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Sample records for mediated hypersensitivity reaction

  1. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  2. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  3. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  4. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  5. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction with mango.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to the fruit mango is extremely rare and can exhibit either as immediate or delayed reactions. Since 1939, only 22 patients (10 with immediate type I reactions and 12 with delayed) have been documented with allergy to mango. History of atopy and geographical region may influence the type of reaction. Immediate reactions occurred most often in patients with history of atopy, while delayed reactions developed in non-atopic individuals. Clustering of delayed hypersensitivity reports from Australia and immediate reactions from Europe has been documented. We report a 50-year-old man with immediate type I hypersensitivity to mango, who developed cough, wheezing dyspnoea, generalised itching and abdominal discomfort after ingestion of mango. Life threatening event can also happen making it imperative to diagnose on time, so as to prevent significant morbidity and potential mortality. PMID:25133813

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Guéant-Rodriguez, Rosa-Maria; Romano, Antonino; Barbaud, Annick; Brockow, Knut; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Adverse reactions after iodinate contrast media (ICM) administration have been observed, which can be classified as immediate (i.e., occurring within one hour after administration) and delayed or non-immediate (i.e., occurring more than one hour after administration). Even though the incidence of ICM adverse reactions has been significantly reduced by the introduction of non-ionic compounds, immediate reactions still occur in about 3% of administrations. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been suggested for ICM reactions, including immunologic ones. Basophils and mast cells participate in immediate reactions through the release of mediators like histamine and tryptase, whereas a T-cell-mediated pathogenic mechanism is involved in most non-immediate reactions, particularly maculopapular rashes. Skin tests and specific IgE assays are carried out to diagnose immediate hypersensitivity reactions, while both delayed-reading intradermal tests and patch tests are usually performed to evaluate non-immediate reactions. However, in vitro specific IgE assays are not commercially available. As far as in vitro tests are concerned, a response involving ICM-related T-cell activity may be assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. Allergologic evaluation appears to be indicated in hypersensitivity reactions to ICM, although the sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of allergologic tests have not yet been established. This paper summarizes the current state of the art and addresses the research that is still needed on the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis, and prevention of ICM-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

  7. Chapter 28: Classification of hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Uzzaman, Ashraf; Cho, Seong H

    2012-01-01

    The original Gell and Coomb's classification categorizes hypersensitivity reactions into four subtypes according to the type of immune response and the effector mechanism responsible for cell and tissue injury: type I, immediate or IgE mediated; type II, cytotoxic or IgG/IgM mediated; type III, IgG/IgM immune complex mediated; and type IV, delayed-type hypersensitivity or T-cell mediated. The classification has been improved so that type IIa is the former type II and type IIb is antibody-mediated cell stimulating (Graves Disease and the "autoimmune" type of chronic idiopathic urticaria). Type IV has four major categories: type IVa is CD4(+)Th1 lymphocyte mediated with activation of macrophages (granuloma formation and type I diabetes mellitus); type IVb is CD4(+)Th2 lymphocyte mediated with eosinophilic involvement (persistent asthma and allergic rhinitis); type IVc is cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocyte with involvement of perforin-granzme B in apoptosis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis); type IVd is T-lymphocyte-driven neutrophilic inflammation (pustular psoriasis and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis). Some diseases have multiple types of immunologic hypersensitivity.

  8. Severe hypersensitivity reaction to minocycline.

    PubMed

    de Paz, S; Pérez, A; Gómez, M; Trampal, A; Domínguez Lázaro, A

    1999-01-01

    Minocycline is a tetracycline derivative mainly used in the treatment of acne vulgaris in young persons. Adverse events have been reported with minocycline, although it can be considered a safe drug. We report a case of severe hypersensitivity reaction to minocycline in a young patient. Laboratory examinations, chest X-ray, skin test and skin biopsy were performed. Oral challenge test with minocycline was not carried out as it can be hazardous. A case of severe reaction to minocycline is described in this article. The clinical and laboratory findings may be helpful in diagnosing similar reactions for which the immunological mechanisms are unknown. Moreover, this type of reaction must be recognized early due to the potential fatal outcome.

  9. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions - new concepts.

    PubMed

    Posadas, S J; Pichler, W J

    2007-07-01

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds such as drugs can cause a variety of diseases mainly involving skin, but also liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. In addition to the well-known immediate, IgE-mediated reactions to drugs, many drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed. Recent data have shown that in these delayed reactions drug-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognize drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR) in an MHC-dependent way. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthems revealed that distinct T cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T cell reactions, which by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions. Drugs are not only immunogenic because of their chemical reactivity, but also because they may bind in a labile way to available TCRs and possibly MHC-molecules. This seems to be sufficient to stimulate certain, probably preactivated T cells. The drug seems to bind first to the fitting TCR, which already exerts some activation. For full activation, an additional interaction of the TCR with the MHC molecules is needed. The drug binding to the receptor structures is reminiscent of a pharmacological interaction between a drug and its (immune) receptor and was thus termed the p-i concept. In some patients with drug hypersensitivity, such a response occurs within hours even upon the first exposure to the drug. The T cell reaction to the drug might thus not be due to a classical, primary response, but is due to peptide-specific T cells which happen to be stimulated by a drug. This new concept has major implications

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to vaccine components.

    PubMed

    Heidary, Noushin; Cohen, David E

    2005-09-01

    Vaccines are responsible for the control of many infectious diseases that were once common in the United States, including polio, measles, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), rubella (German measles), mumps, tetanus, and Haemophilus influenzae type b. National efforts to generate collaboration between federal, state, and local governments and public and private health care providers have resulted in record high levels of vaccination coverage in the United States. The high rate of US vaccinations is paralleled by growing concerns about the safety of their delivery. The variety of substances used in vaccines sometimes causes the development of cutaneous reactions in susceptible adults and children. This article will review adverse cutaneous events consistent with hypersensitivity reactions to the following ingredients in vaccines: aluminum, thimerosal, 2-phenoxyethanol, formaldehyde, and neomycin.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to synthetic haemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Villanueva, Rafael J; González, Elena; Quirce, Santiago; Díaz, Raquel; Alvarez, Laura; Menéndez, David; Rodríguez-Gayo, Lucía; Bajo, M Auxiliadora; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Undergoing a haemodialysis (HD) session poses a certain risk of hypersensitivity adverse reactions as large quantities of blood are in contact with various synthetic materials. Hypersensitivity reactions to ethylene oxide and non-biocompatible membranes, such as cuprophane, have been described in HD. Cases of hypersensitivity with biocompatible membranes, such as polysulfone, and even polysulfone-polyvinylpyrrolidone, have also been reported. In this article we describe six cases of mostly early-stage hypersensitivity reactions to HD occurring in our department, characterised by malaise, desaturation, bronchospasm and arterial hypotension, with good response to the session’s temporary suspension and with reappearance in subsequent sessions that used a synthetic dialyser. No hypersensitivity reactions reappeared in successive observations when the sessions were carried out using a cellulose membrane.

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  13. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  14. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2006-09-01

    The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) is approximately 12%, with 1 - 2% of patients developing grade 3 or 4 in severity. However, the recent rising incidence of HSR to oxaliplatin observed is the result of increasing clinical use. HSR to oxaliplatin may manifest as facial flushing, rash/hives, tachycardia, dyspnoea, erythema, pruritus, fever, tongue swelling, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness and oedema. Anaphylactic shock is rare but serious, and must be considered in the event of hypotension. No definitive approaches to prevent and treat HSR associated with oxaliplatin are available; however, few successful strategies have been reported. Such strategies include: slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of type 1 and 2 histamine receptors, and desensitisation. Successful implementation of oxaliplatin desensitisation protocols based on other platinum-containing compounds have been reported, which could enable a small number of patients who experience severe HSR to further receive an effective therapy for CRC. However, reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitisation strategies are still missing. Recently, subcutaneous adrenaline has also been utilised as an alternative approach to manage HSR to oxaliplatin. Knowledge of this rare but real toxicity of oxaliplatin is paramount because the use of this drug continues to increase not only for the treatment of patients with stage II-IV CRC, but also other solid malignancies. In this article, the author discusses the incidence, clinical presentation, pathogenesis, risk factors and current strategies of management of HSR associated with oxaliplatin. PMID:16907658

  15. IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Gotua, M; Lomidze, N; Dolidze, N; Gotua, T

    2008-04-01

    Food allergy has become a serious health concern especially in developed countries in the past two decades. In general population approximately 4-6% of children and 1-3% of adults experience food allergy. The article reviews IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders. Epidemiology, Mechanism, Clinical manifestations, Genetically modified crops (GMOs), Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies are discussed. The investigations show that over 90% of IgE-mediated food allergies in childhood are caused by: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. Also the causes of food allergy are food additives, genetically modified crops. Risk factors for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis include asthma and previous allergic reactions to the causative food. Food allergy is one of the most common causes of systematic anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, with an annual incidence of four cases per million populations and estimated 500 deaths annually. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, individuals may experience urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, oral syndrome, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, hypotension, shock and cardiac arrhythmias, caused by the massive release of mediators from mast cells and basophiles. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on history, detailed dietary analysis, skin testing, measuring specific IgE in blood serum and challenge tests. Treatment and prevention includes: avoidance diet, application of auto-injectable epinephrine, H1 and H2 antihistamines, corticosteroids, antileukotrienes, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, cromolyn sodium, etc.

  16. The chemical mediation of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions. I. Purification of a macrophage-chemotactic factor from bovien gamma-globulin-induced skin reactions in guinea pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, T.; Ueda, K.; Maeda, S.

    1977-01-01

    A macrophage-chemotactic factor (MCFS) was extracted in the pseudoglobulin fraction from delayed hypersensitivity skin lesions induced by bovine gamma-globulin in guinea pigs. Its chemotactic activity was estimated by a modification of Boyden's method using Nuclepore filter. After chromatography of the protein fraction using Sephadex G-50 and DEAE-cellulose, in that order, two chemotactic fractions were obtained. The chemotactic factor with stronger activity (MCFS-1) was further highly purified (488-fold) by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. This factor migrated in a single band on acrylamide disc gel electrophoresis and was found to be a protein that was free of nucleic acid. Gel filtration showed that its molecular weight was similar to that of IgG. Its chemotactic activity was heat labile. Intradermal injection of this factor into normal guinea pigs induced a pronounced mononuclear cell emigration from venules. These findings are pertinent to understanding macrophage reaction in the delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Am J Pathol 87:359-374, 1977). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:66878

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin in children.

    PubMed

    Lazzareschi, Ilaria; Ruggiero, Antonio; Riccardi, Riccardo; Attinà, Giorgio; Colosimo, Cesare; Lasorella, Anna

    2002-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin are rare but sometimes life-threatening events may occur requiring discontinuation of treatment. In our study, we describe clinical features and diagnostic procedures of carboplatin-associated reactions in children affected by low-grade astrocytoma and treated with multiple courses of carboplatin. In 6 out of 29 children, we reported allergic events. We also report a desensitization protocol for carboplatin administration, which allowed the patients to receive effective treatment without adverse reactions.

  18. Immediate-type hypersensitivity drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Wiese, Michael D; Heddle, Robert J; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported for nearly all classes of therapeutic reagents and these reactions can occur within minutes to hours of exposure. These reactions are unpredictable, not directly related to dose or the pharmacological action of the drug and have a relatively high mortality risk. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, immune mechanisms, diagnosis and prevention of the most serious form of immediate onset drug hypersensitivity reaction, anaphylaxis. The incidence of drug-induced anaphylaxis deaths appears to be increasing and our understanding of the multiple and complex reasons for the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis to drugs is also expanding. This review highlights the importance of enhancing our understanding of the biology of the patient (i.e. immune response, genetics) as well as the pharmacology and chemistry of the drug when investigating, diagnosing and treating drug hypersensitivity. Misdiagnosis of drug hypersensitivity leads to substantial patient risk and cost. Although oral provocation is often considered the gold standard of diagnosis, it can pose a potential risk to the patient. There is an urgent need to improve and standardize diagnostic testing and desensitization protocols as other diagnostic tests currently available for assessment of immediate drug allergy are not highly predictive. PMID:24286446

  19. Pharmacogenetic determinants of immediate and delayed reactions of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guéant, J L; Guéant-Rodriguez, R M; Gastin, I Aimone; Cornejo-García, J A; Viola, M; Barbaud, A; Mertes, P M; Blanca, M; Romano, A

    2008-01-01

    Drug allergy refers to a hypersensitivity reaction for which either an IgE or T-cell-mediated mechanism is demonstrated. The recognition of the drug by B and T cells is influenced by variants of HLA genes. The genetic factors involved in IgE-mediated mechanisms have been studied mainly in beta-lactam reactions, and they appear to be related to human leukocyte antigen presentation (HLA A2 and DRw52), TNFA -308G>A, class switching to IgE by B cells (variants of IL-13 and of IL-4RA), and expression of IgE receptors on target cells (variant of the FcepsilonRIbeta gene). Delayed T-cell-mediated reactions are also associated with HLA alleles. Studies have reported an association of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-B*5801 in patients with the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis provoked by carbamazepine, as well as of HLA-B*5701 with abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*5701 seems to be a strong predictor in whites, but not in Hispanics or Africans. Carbamazepine hypersensitivity is also influenced by gene variants of cytochrome P450 enzymes on the generation of reactive metabolites, while CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms influence the bioactivation of sulfamethoxazole in prohapten. Pharmacogenetic studies on aspirin hypersensitivity have identified distinct types of predictors, such as HLA genotypes, a polymorphism in the promoter of the FcepsilonRIalpha gene, and variants in genes of enzymes from the arachidonic acid pathway. In the future, identification of genetic predictors will benefit from genomewide association studies that also take ethnic differences into account. Ideally, predictors will help to prevent adverse reactions, as suggested by a recent study on the effectiveness of prospective HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir in HIV patients. PMID:18991696

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medications used widely to treat allergic inflammation. Although the endocrine and gastrointestinal side effects of corticosteroids have been described, the occurrence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and delayed contact dermatitis due to corticosteroids remains under-recognized. Hypersensitivity reactions can occur to a corticosteroid itself, or to the additives and vehicles in corticosteroid preparations. Skin testing and oral graded challenge can help confirm the suspected culprit agent in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and help identify an alternative tolerated corticosteroid. Patch testing can help identify the culprit agents in delayed hypersensitivity contact dermatitis. Cross-reactivity patterns have not been observed for immediate hypersensitivity reactions as they have been for delayed contact dermatitis. Sensitization in contact dermatitis exhibits cross-reactivity patterns based on corticosteroid structure. We review the current understanding regarding the clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

  2. The Genetics of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-García, J A; Jurado-Escobar, R; Doña, I; Perkins, J R; Agúndez, J A; García-Martín, E; Viguera, E; Blanca-López, N; Canto, G; Blanca, M

    2016-01-01

    DHRs are induced by various mechanisms and encompass a heterogeneous set of potentially life-threatening clinical entities. In addition to environmental effects, individual factors play a key role in this intricate puzzle. However, despite commendable efforts in recent years to identify individual predisposing factors, our knowledge of the genetic basis of these reactions remains incomplete. In this manuscript, we summarize current research on the genetics of DHRs, focusing on specific immune-mediated reactions (immediate and nonimmediate) and on pharmacologically mediated reactions (cross-intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). We also provide some thoughts on potential technological approaches that would help us to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying DHRs. We believe this manuscript will be of interest not only for allergists and basic researchers in the field, but also for clinicians from various areas of expertise who manage these reactions in their clinical practice.

  3. The Genetics of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Cornejo-García, J A; Jurado-Escobar, R; Doña, I; Perkins, J R; Agúndez, J A; García-Martín, E; Viguera, E; Blanca-López, N; Canto, G; Blanca, M

    2016-01-01

    DHRs are induced by various mechanisms and encompass a heterogeneous set of potentially life-threatening clinical entities. In addition to environmental effects, individual factors play a key role in this intricate puzzle. However, despite commendable efforts in recent years to identify individual predisposing factors, our knowledge of the genetic basis of these reactions remains incomplete. In this manuscript, we summarize current research on the genetics of DHRs, focusing on specific immune-mediated reactions (immediate and nonimmediate) and on pharmacologically mediated reactions (cross-intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). We also provide some thoughts on potential technological approaches that would help us to decipher the molecular mechanisms underlying DHRs. We believe this manuscript will be of interest not only for allergists and basic researchers in the field, but also for clinicians from various areas of expertise who manage these reactions in their clinical practice. PMID:27375032

  4. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions. PMID:27619816

  5. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions. PMID:27619816

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media: the role of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Janos

    2004-01-01

    Although intravenous use of radiocontrast media (RCM) for a variety of radiographic procedures is generally safe, clinically significant acute hypersensitivity reactions still occur in a significant percentage of patients. The mechanism of these anaphylactoid, or "pseudoallergic," reactions is complex, involving complement activation, direct degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and modulation of enzymes and proteolytic cascades in plasma. In this review, basic information on different RCMs and their reactogenicity is summarized and updated, and the prevalence, pathomechanism, prediction, prevention, treatment, and economic impact of hypersensitivity reactions are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting complement activation as an underlying cause of RCM reactions.

  7. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments.

  8. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments. PMID:26708389

  9. An unexpected positive hypersensitive reaction to eugenol.

    PubMed

    Tammannavar, Praveen; Pushpalatha, C; Jain, Shrenik; Sowmya, S V

    2013-09-18

    Eugenol is an active, principal aromatic liquid responsible for several pharmacological activities. It is widely used in dental practice to relieve pain arising from various sources, such as pulpitis and dentinal hypersensitivity. As a primary irritant and sensitiser, it is known to cause contact urticaria as well as chronic urticaria. However, eugenol causes allergic contact dermatitis, possibly because it can react directly with proteins to form conjugate and reactive haptens. It is found that eugenol in various dental preparations-especially in the case of some zinc oxide-contains preparations such as periodontal dressings and root canal cements. This can cause hypersensitivity when it comes in contact with gingiva or teeth. This article presents a case of immediate allergic contact urticaria to eugenol during dental treatment.

  10. An unexpected positive hypersensitive reaction to eugenol

    PubMed Central

    Tammannavar, Praveen; C, Pushpalatha; Jain, Shrenik; SV, Sowmya

    2013-01-01

    Eugenol is an active, principal aromatic liquid responsible for several pharmacological activities. It is widely used in dental practice to relieve pain arising from various sources, such as pulpitis and dentinal hypersensitivity. As a primary irritant and sensitiser, it is known to cause contact urticaria as well as chronic urticaria. However, eugenol causes allergic contact dermatitis, possibly because it can react directly with proteins to form conjugate and reactive haptens. It is found that eugenol in various dental preparations-especially in the case of some zinc oxide–contains preparations such as periodontal dressings and root canal cements. This can cause hypersensitivity when it comes in contact with gingiva or teeth. This article presents a case of immediate allergic contact urticaria to eugenol during dental treatment. PMID:24049087

  11. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to anti-D immunoglobulin preparations.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, K; Nasser, S M

    2014-11-01

    RhD immunoglobulin G (anti-D) administered to pregnant Rh(-) women prevents Rh isoimmunization. Its use has significantly reduced the incidence of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn previously responsible for one death in every 2200 births. In pregnancy, acute drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis can have serious deleterious effects on the mother and foetus/neonate. Women can be erroneously labelled as drug allergic as the investigation of hypersensitivity reactions in pregnancy is complex and drug challenges are usually contraindicated. We present three cases of suspected anti-D hypersensitivity clinically presenting as anaphylaxis and delayed transfusion-related reaction. We also propose a new algorithm for the investigations of such reaction. It relies on detailed history, cautious interpretation of skin tests, foetal Rh genotyping from maternal blood and, in some cases, anti-D challenges. This is not to deprive women of anti-D which might put their future pregnancies at risk. PMID:25066207

  12. Re-visiting Hypersensitivity Reactions to Taxanes: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Castells, Mariana C

    2015-10-01

    Taxanes (a class of chemotherapeutic agents) are an important cause of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in cancer patients. During the last decade, the development of rapid drug desensitization has been key to allow patients with HSRs to taxanes to be safely re-treated although the mechanisms of these HSRs are not fully understood. Earlier studies suggested that solvents, such as Cremophor EL used to solubilize paclitaxel, were responsible for HSRs through complement activation, but recent findings have raised the possibility that some of these HSRs are IgE-mediated. Taxane skin testing, which identifies patients with an IgE-mediated sensitivity, appears as a promising diagnostic and risk stratification tool in the management of patients with HSRs to taxanes. The management of patients following a HSR involves risk stratification and re-exposure could be performed either through rapid drug desensitization or graded challenge based on the severity of the initial HSR and the skin test result. Rapid drug desensitization has been shown to be an effective and safe method to re-introduce taxanes in hundreds of patients, including those with life-threatening HSRs. Patients with non-severe delayed skin HSRs may benefit from rapid drug desensitization since they may be at increased risk for an immediate HSR upon re-exposure. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and novel mechanisms of immediate HSRs to taxanes. A new management strategy for HSRs to taxanes based on skin testing and rapid drug desensitization is proposed.

  13. Anaesthesia-associated hypersensitivity reactions: seven years' data from a British bi-specialty clinic.

    PubMed

    Low, A E; McEwan, J C; Karanam, S; North, J; Kong, K-L

    2016-01-01

    Our bi-specialty clinic was established to systematically investigate patients with suspected peri-operative hypersensitivity reactions. Four hundred and ten patients were studied; 316 following an intra-operative reaction ('postoperative' group) and 94 with a previous history of reaction, referred before undergoing anaesthesia ('pre-operative' group). In the postoperative group, 173 (54.7%) were diagnosed with IgE-mediated reactions: 65 (37.6%) to neuromuscular blocking drugs; 54 (31.2%) antibiotics; 15 (8.7%) chlorhexidine and 12 (6.9%) patent blue dye. Reactions were severe in 114 patients (65.9%). All reactions to patent blue dye were severe. We identified IgE sensitisation in 22 (13.2%) cases with isolated mucocutaneous reactions. Only 173 (54.7%) patients had serum tryptase samples taken. Referrers' suspected causal agent was confirmed in only 37.2% of patients. Of 94 patients reviewed 'pre-operatively', 29 (30.8%) were diagnosed with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, reinforcing the importance of investigating this group of patients. Knowledge of the range of causative agents identified in our study should guide the investigation of suspected peri-operative hypersensitivity reactions.

  14. Pragmatism and the evaluation of metal hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Evaluating patients with potential metal hypersensitivity reactions is challenging. Clear evidence-based guidelines based on randomized studies are lacking. A pragmatic approach to evaluation of these patients is useful due to this lack of evidence. Patch testing remains the gold standard for evaluating type IV reactions on the skin and is also likely the best test for metal reactions to implanted devices until more hard data is available.

  15. Hemolysate-mediated renal vasoconstriction and hypersensitization.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Falk, S; Conger, J D; Voelkel, N F

    1999-01-01

    The present studies measured vessel diameter, before and after addition of hemolysate, in isolated afferent arterioles (AA) and efferent arterioles (EA) obtained from the rat kidney. Human red blood cells (RBC) were hemolyzed in distilled water and membranes were discarded after centrifugation. Hemolysate added to the bath solution caused vigorous AA and EA contraction and, after washout, hypersensitized the AA and EA to doses of angiotensin II (AII) which would normally only elicit 50% contraction (EC50). Neither the contraction nor the hypersensitization were mimicked by pure human hemoglobin. The vasoconstrictive responses in the AA and EA were accompanied by increased cytosolic-free calcium concentration. Further purification (desalting) of the hemolysate to remove substance of < or = 1000 Da (which include ATP) did not eliminate the vasoconstrictive component from the hemolysate. Finally, cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells also demonstrated a rapid increase in (Ca2+i) when exposed to hemolysate. This increase in (Ca2+i) was, in part, dependent on Ca2+ influx since it could be attenuated with diltiazem (10(-5) M). In conclusion, hemolysate contains a factor which induces contractions of the isolated rat kidney AA and EA and rapid elevations in (Ca2+i). This factor, from hemolyzed RBC, is not hemoglobin itself. PMID:10048115

  16. Pharmacogenetics and Predictive Testing of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions adverse drug reaction (ADR) occur in approximately 17% of patients. Avoiding ADR is thus mandatory from both an ethical and an economic point of view. Whereas, pharmacogenetics changes of the pharmacokinetics may contribute to the explanation of some type A reactions, strong relationships of genetic markers has also been shown for drug hypersensitivity belonging to type B reactions. We present the classifications of ADR, discuss genetic influences and focus on delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions, i.e., drug-induced liver injury, drug-induced agranulocytosis, and severe cutaneous ADR. A guidance how to read and interpret the contingency table is provided as well as an algorithm whether and how a test for a pharmacogenetic biomarker should be conducted.

  17. Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Saff, Rebecca R; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Because of widespread use, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most common cause of all adverse drug reactions, with hypersensitivity reported in ∼1% of the population. NSAID hypersensitivity can be categorized into five types by the underlying disease, symptoms of reaction, and timing of reaction. These include rhinitis and asthma induced by NSAIDs (also known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (NECD), urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, single NSAID-induced reactions, and delayed NSAID reactions. NECD occurs in one-third of patients with chronic urticaria who develop an exacerbation of their urticaria, sometimes with angioedema, typically beginning 30-90 minutes after ingestion of NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. In urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, patients without underlying disease develop urticaria or angioedema 30-90 minutes after ingestion of COX-1-inhibiting NSAIDs including aspirin. Single NSAID-induced reactions are immediate and specific to a single NSAID and are thought to occur because of an IgE-mediated reaction against a specific epitope of the NSAID. Delayed NSAID reactions occur days to weeks after initiating an NSAID. These are T-cell mediated and not amenable to desensitization or rechallenge. Classifying the type of NSAID hypersensitivity is important because many patients with a prior history of urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs will often tolerate aspirin test dose. This would allow the use of an aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease despite a presumed history of NSAID hypersensitivity.

  18. Atopic dermatitis: clinical relevance of food hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Burks, A W; Mallory, S B; Williams, L W; Shirrell, M A

    1988-09-01

    Forty-six patients with atopic dermatitis ranging from mild to severe were evaluated for food hypersensitivity with double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. Twenty-eight (61%) patients had a positive prick skin reaction to one of the foods tested. Sixty-five food challenges were performed; 27 (42%) were interpreted as positive in 15 (33%) patients. Egg, milk, and peanut accounted for 78% of the positive reactions. As in previous studies, patients developed skin (96%), respiratory (52%), or gastrointestinal (30%) symptoms during the challenge. These studies indicate that children who have atopic dermatitis unresponsive to routine therapy or who continue to need daily treatment after several months would benefit from evaluation for food hypersensitivity.

  19. Studies of the quenching phenomenon in delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D A; Allenby, C F

    1991-09-01

    Studies in guinea pig and man have shown that eugenol can quench non-specifically contact urticarial responses, whereas limonene seems largely ineffective. In a comprehensive series of studies, there was little evidence of quenching of delayed contact hypersensitivity reactions to cinnamic aldehyde or citral, including in 'pre-quenched' material supplied by a perfume/flavour company, and in a similar mixture prepared in this laboratory, in the guinea pig model. In addition, there was no evidence of the quenching by eugenol of allergic reactions to cinnamic aldehyde in a panel of human subjects with a proven history of cinnamic-aldehyde-induced allergic contact dermatitis. Overall, the results lend little credibility to earlier literature reports of quenching phenomena in delayed contact hypersensitivity responses.

  20. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of delayed-type drug hypersensitivity reactions, from bedside to bench and back.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, Rik; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) have been present since the advent of drugs. In particular T-cell mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions represent a heterogeneous clinical entity with a diverse pathogenesis and result in a considerable burden of morbidity and mortality not only driven by the reactions themselves but also by the use of alternatives which are sometimes less effective or even more dangerous. Diagnostic procedures rely on clinical history, skin testing and potential provocation testing, whereas validated in vitro diagnostic procedures are still lacking for most of them. Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics combined with basic scientific research has provided insights in the pathogenesis of abacavir and carbamazepine hypersensitivities linked with certain human leucocyte antigen risk alleles. Nevertheless, important scientific questions on how other DHR arise and how host-drug interactions occur, remain unanswered. Recent work indicates an intricate relation between host, drug and pathogens in severe cutaneous and systemic reactions and provides more insights in the role of regulatory T-cells and viral reactivation in these reactions. In this review we focus on type IV delayed-type DHR, and address recent advances in the pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics, and diagnosis of these reactions with an emphasis on the understandings arising from basic research.

  1. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yun, James; Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B(*)57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B(*)57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  2. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  3. Hypersensitivity reaction to components of parenteral nutrition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carlos Ruiz; Ponce, Esperanza Castejón; Busquets, Ferran Bossacoma; Hernández, Diana Sánchez; Oliva, Silvia Meavilla; Santacruz, Enrique Llerena; Pérez, Naymar; De Los Santos Pelegrini, Mariela; Flaque, Miquel Villaronga

    2016-01-01

    Very rare cases of hypersensitivity reactions to various constituents of parenteral nutrition (PN) have been reported in children. Adverse effects associated with PN administration have centered on metabolic, infectious, and mechanical complications. Here we describe three cases of hypersensitivity to components of PN. Case 1 is a 1-mo-old breastfed baby with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis associated with an infection with cytomegalovirus. On the second day of PN, 60 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient had an allergic reaction with an overall diffused rash. On day 4 of PN, the multivitamin solution and the trace element mix were excluded, showing a good tolerance. Case 2 is a 4-y-old girl with a background of stage III neuroblastoma. On day 3 of PN, 15 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed sudden facial edema. On day 5, suspecting the amino acid solution to be the etiology of her reaction, PN was infused with another amino acid preparation, and the patient showed good tolerance. Case 3 is a 10-y-old boy with a diagnosis of an acute peritonitis. Two h after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed a general wheal rash. He referred a background of fish allergy. Considering that the lipid emulsion used had components from fish oil (SMOF Lipid), a new PN was infused on day 2. The new PN contained a lipid emulsion containing vegetable oil (ClinOleic). The patient showed good tolerance. In conclusion, we consider that, although the hypersensitivity to PN components is infrequent, there is an increase in reports of pediatric cases describing this allergic pathology.

  4. Skin Testing in the Evaluation and Management of Carboplatin-Related Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lax, Timothy; Long, Aidan; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) are a frequent occurrence in patients being retreated for malignancy. The most common and severe reactions are thought to be IgE mediated. Currently, skin testing is the only method used clinically to identify individuals sensitized to carboplatin. Despite almost 20 years of clinical use, a standardized approach to skin testing and its use in the management of carboplatin HSRs has not been well established. We review the utility of carboplatin skin testing and discuss factors that influence the interpretation of skin testing results. A risk stratification strategy using skin testing and desensitization to manage patients with carboplatin HSRs is proposed.

  5. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. PMID:27144408

  6. [The reactions of hypersensitivity: the mechanisms of development, clinical manifestations, principles of diagnostic (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Tukavkina, S Yu; Kharseyeva, G G

    2014-05-01

    The article considers the principles of modern classification of hypersensitivity, pathogenic mechanisms of formation of its various types resulting in development of typical clinical symptoms and syndromes. The knowledge and comprehension of these issues is important for physicians of different specializations since it permits to properly make out and formulate diagnosis and timely send patient for examination and treatment to such specialist as allergist-immunologist. The particular attention was paid to description of pathogenesis of diseases and syndromes underlaid by IgE-mediated type of hypersensitivity since their share is highest and clinical manifestations frequently require emergency medical care. The diagnostic of allergic diseases is to be implemented sequentially (step-by-step) and include common clinical and special (specific) methods. In case of choosing of extent of specialized allergological examination the diagnostic significance of techniques and their safety is to be taken into account concerning condition of patient. The diagnosis is objectively formulated only by complex of examination results. It is worth to remember about possibility of development of syndromes similar to IgE-mediated allergy by their clinical manifestations but belonging to non-allergic type of hypersensitivity. It is important to know main causes, mechanisms and ways of formation of such reactions previously named as anaphylactoid ones.

  7. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  8. Hypersensitivity Reaction to High-Dose Methotrexate and Successful Rechallenge in a Pediatric Patient with Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jeffrey R.; Ward, Deborah A.; Crews, Kristine R.; Panetta, John C.; Navid, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to methotrexate are rare, but have been reported. Methotrexate has shown activity against many malignancies, and omission of methotrexate therapy may increase the risk of cancer-related death in some patients. Therefore, rechallenging patients with methotrexate following hypersensitivity may be beneficial. We report a case of a child with metastatic osteosarcoma who experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to high-dose methotrexate and was successfully rechallenged with methotrexate using a 6-hour infusion. Using this regimen, adequate peak methotrexate plasma concentrations were achieved and no further hypersensitivity reactions were noted. PMID:23955991

  9. Hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin and other antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Syrigou, Ekaterini; Syrigos, Kostas; Saif, M Wasif

    2008-03-01

    Although the reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to antineoplastic agents is considered to be uncommon, it is difficult to evaluate their exact prevalence, mainly because their definition is vast and pathogenic mechanisms are vague. HSR include facial flushing, erythema, pruritus, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, steroids, and type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists. Desensitization could allow the small number of patients who experience severe HSR to receive effective therapy for their cancer. Reintroductions have only been reported as single case studies or small cohorts. Large-scale validation on desensitization strategies is still missing. With regard to oxaliplatin, knowledge of its rare but eminent toxicity is paramount, because this drug is widely used in treating colorectal cancer, the second-highest cause of cancer mortality in the United States. PMID:18377776

  10. Hypersensitivity reaction to pine nuts (pinon nuts--pignolia).

    PubMed

    Fine, A J

    1987-09-01

    This report describes two patients with allergic reactions due to the ingestion of pine nuts. Skin testing to the aqueous allergen revealed immediate positive prick test reactions suggesting an IgE-mediated response. No reported cases have been found previously in a review of the medical literature.

  11. Successful desensitization protocol for hypersensitivity reaction probably caused by dabrafenib in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Abu-Amna, Mahmoud; Hadad, Salim; Haim, Nissim; Shahar, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are both orally bioavailable small molecule agents that block mitogen activated protein kinase signalling in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation. Generalized hypersensitivity reactions to vemurafenib or dabrafenib have not been described. Continuing vemurafenib or dabrafenib therapy despite hypersensitivity reaction is especially important in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation, in whom this mutation plays a critical role in tumour growth. Desensitization protocols to overcome hypersensitivity reactions by gradual reintroduction of small amounts of the offending drug up to full therapeutic doses are available for many anti-cancer agents, including vemurafenib but, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported for dabrafenib. We describe a patient with metastatic melanoma who developed Type I hypersensitivity reaction to vemurafenib and to subsequent treatment with dabrafenib, and who was successfully treated by drug desensitization which allowed safe prolonged continuation of dabrafenib. The development of hypersensitivity reactions for both dabrafenib and vemurafinib in the current case could be because these drugs have a similar chemical structure and cause a cross-reactivity. However, hypersensitivity reaction to a non-medicinal ingredient shared by the two drugs is also possible. Oral desensitization appears to be an option for patients with hypersensitivity Type I to dabrafenib. This approach may permit clinicians to safely administer dabrafenib to patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions to this life-prolonging medication.

  12. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan. PMID:27221832

  13. Clinical Features of Oxaliplatin Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bano, Nusrat; Najam, Rahila; Qazi, Faaiza; Mateen, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Oxaliplatin, a third generation novel platinum compound is the most effective first line chemotherapeutic agent for colorectal cancer (CRC) in combination with 5FU and leucovorin. It is indicated for pancreatic, gastric and testicular cancers combined with bevacuzimab, capecitabine, irinotecan and other cytotoxic agents. However, moderate to severe hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) during or after oxaliplatin infusion usually require cessation of chemotherapy or substitution of the key therapeutic drug which largely interferes with improved patient prognosis. This mini- review showcases recent and accepted opinions/approaches in oxaliplatin induced HSR management. Physicians and oncologists have varying attitudes regarding the decision to rechallenge the patient after an HSR experience, efficacy of desensitization protocols, effectiveness and selection of drugs for premedication and possibilities of cross sensitivity to other platinum agents (e.g. carboplatin). A brief insight into underlying molecular mechanisms and clinical manifestations of oxaliplatin induced HSR is offered. We have also discussed the management of oxaliplatin induced HSR and risk stratification for a successful and complete chemotherapeutic plan.

  14. [Etiology of hypersensitivity reactions following Chinese or Indonesian meals].

    PubMed

    de Maat-Bleeker, F

    1992-02-01

    Various authors have criticised or confirmed the relation between adverse reactions to Chinese food ('The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome') and the use of monosodium glutamate (Vetsin). In our experience the occurrence of urticaria, angioedema or anaphylaxis after meals in Chinese or Indonesian restaurants is more often due to IgE-mediated Type I food allergy, caused by consumption of shrimp, peanut or spices, in particular those of the parsley family (e.g. coriander). A detailed description of four such cases is presented.

  15. Genetic factors in the predisposition to drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-02-03

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions can occur with most drugs, although the frequency, severity, and clinical manifestations vary. Case reports have suggested that there may be familial clustering of drug hypersensitivity suggesting a genetic predisposition. As with most other forms of drug response, predisposition to drug hypersensitivity reactions is likely to be multifactorial and multigenic. Given the immune pathogenesis of these reactions, it is perhaps not surprising that the most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex for drugs such as abacavir, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. For abacavir, it has been suggested that preprescription genotyping for HLA-B*5701 in whites may reduce the incidence of hypersensitivity. It is likely that as our knowledge of variation in the human genome improves, coupled with improvements in technology, many more significant genetic predisposing factors for drug hypersensitivity are likely to be identified in the next decade. However, as we search for these genetic factors, it is important that we do not forget environmental predisposition, and to bear in mind that a genetic marker for drug hypersensitivity in one population may not necessarily be relevant for another population. Notwithstanding the advances in genetic technologies, the ultimate determinant of success in this area of research will be the identification and careful phenotyping of patients with drug hypersensitivity reactions. As we progress to whole genome scanning, in order to satisfy the requirements for adequate statistical power, the identification of large numbers of carefully phenotyped patients will be feasible only through international collaborations.

  16. Low incidence of abacavir hypersensitivity reaction among African children initiating antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Nahirya-Ntege, Patricia; Musiime, Victor; Naidoo, Bethany; Bakeera-Kitaka, Sabrina; Nathoo, Kusum; Munderi, Paula; Mugyenyi, Peter; Kekitiinwa, Adeodata; Bwakura-Dangarembizi, Mutsa F; Crawley, Jane

    2011-06-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are reported in approximately 5% of adults receiving abacavir, but there are few published data in children. Among 1150 African children receiving antiretroviral therapy in a randomized trial, suspected hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir were rare (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.01-0.9). Patients were managed successfully through the provision of clear guidelines and education of clinical staff, children, and their caregivers.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to vaccine constituents: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Berger, Emily M; Brauer, Jeremy A; Cohen, David E

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines are composed of immunogens, preservatives, adjuvants, antibiotics, and manufacturing by-products. Components of vaccines may rarely elicit adverse reactions in susceptible individuals, thus raising concerns regarding vaccine safety. In this report, we add to the medical literature 3 cases of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity to the vaccine preservative aluminum. We provide a review of major constituents in vaccines that have elicited immediate-type or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and describe their clinical manifestations. We include a table of the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines, which lists the quantities of major components including ovalbumin (egg protein), gelatin, aluminum, neomycin, 2-phenoxyethanol, thimerosal, and formaldehyde. Our goals were to inform physicians on the variety of hypersensitivity reactions to common vaccines and to provide information on the choice of vaccines in patients with suspected hypersensitivity.

  18. Basophil Reactivity as Biomarker in Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions-Potential and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Markus; Harrer, Andrea; Himly, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) resemble typical immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated symptoms. Clinical manifestations range from local skin reactions, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory symptoms to severe systemic involvement with potential fatal outcome. Depending on the substance group of the eliciting drug the correct diagnosis is a major challenge. Skin testing and in vitro diagnostics are often unreliable and not reproducible. The involvement of drug-specific IgE is questionable in many cases. The culprit substance (parent drug or metabolite) and potential cross-reacting compounds are difficult to identify, patient history and drug provocation testing often remain the only means for diagnosis. Hence, several groups proposed basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of immediate DHRs as basophils are well-known effector cells in allergic reactions. However, the usefulness of BAT in immediate DHRs is highly variable and dependent on the drug itself plus its capacity to spontaneously conjugate to serum proteins. Stimulation with pure solutions of the parent drug or metabolites thereof vs. drug-protein conjugates may influence sensitivity and specificity of the test. We thus, reviewed the available literature about the use of BAT for diagnosing immediate DHRs against drug classes such as antibiotics, radio contrast media, neuromuscular blocking agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and biologicals. Influencing factors like the selection of stimulants or of the identification and activation markers, the stimulation protocol, gating strategies, and cut-off definition are addressed in this overview on BAT performance. The overall aim is to evaluate the suitability of BAT as biomarker for the diagnosis of immediate drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:27378928

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Rosado Ingelmo, A; Doña Diaz, I; Cabañas Moreno, R; Moya Quesada, M C; García-Avilés, C; García Nuñez, I; Martínez Tadeo, J I; Mielgo Ballesteros, R; Ortega-Rodríguez, N; Padial Vilchez, M A; Sánchez-Morillas, L; Vila Albelda, C; Moreno Rodilla, E; Torres Jaén, M J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of these guidelines is to ensure efficient and effective clinical practice. The panel of experts who produced this consensus document developed a research protocol based on a review of the literature. The prevalence of allergic reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is estimated to be 1:170 000, that is, 0.05%-0.1% of patients undergoing radiologic studies with ICM (more than 75 million examinations per year worldwide). Hypersensitivity reactions can appear within the first hour after administration (immediate reactions) or from more than 1 hour to several days after administration (nonimmediate or delayed reactions). The risk factors for immediate reactions include poorly controlled bronchial asthma, concomitant medication (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, ß-blockers, and proton-pump inhibitors), rapid administration of the ICM, mastocytosis, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections. The most common symptoms of immediate reactions are erythema and urticaria with or without angioedema, which appear in more than 70% of patients. Maculopapular rash is the most common skin feature of nonimmediate reactions (30%-90%). Skin and in vitro tests should be performed for diagnosis of both immediate and nonimmediate reactions. The ICM to be administered will therefore be chosen depending on the results of these tests, the ICM that induced the reaction (when known), the severity of the reaction, the availability of alternative ICM, and the information available on potential ICM cross-reactivity. Another type of contrast media, gadolinium derivatives, is used used for magnetic resonance imaging. Although rare, IgE-mediated reactions to gadolinium derivatives have been reported. PMID:27326981

  20. Objective clinical and laboratory studies of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to foods in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    May, C D

    1976-10-01

    Clinical and laboratory observations were made with 38 children afflicted with chronic severe asthma (reversible obstructive airway disease) in which hypersensitivity to food was incriminated in the histories. Symptoms were evoked in double-blind food challenges in only 11/38 children and 14/70 challenges, and were characteristic of immediate-type hypersensitivity and were chiefly gastrointestinal, even though asthma was the common presenting complaint. There were no delayed reactions. Peanut was responsible for 8 reactions, egg for 5, and cow's milk for 1. The feature that most successfully identified those having positive reactions in challenges was a significant wheal reaction in a skin test by puncture technique using a verified extract of 1:20 W/V concentration. No subject with clinically significant, symptomatic hypersensitivity to food had a negative puncture test, and puncture tests were positive in only 10/56 instances of negative reactions in food challenges. Laboratory observations included release of histamine and enzymes from leukocytes and the levels of neutrophil enzymes in serum before and after food provocation tests. While these determinations were of interest with respect to the immunochemical basis of reactions to foods, they did not prove useful for practical clinical diagnosis. The outstanding laboratory findings was the occurrence of "spontaneous" release of 25% to 100% of the histamine from leukocytes in all cases proved clinically hypersensitive by food challenges, which suggests that this may be an indicator of immediate-type hypersensitivity to food. From the findings in the study, a general approach to food hypersensitivity was developed in which the immunologic components coupled with quantitative concentration-response relationships serve to render comprehensible the distinction between asymptomatic (immunologic) hypersensitivity and symptomatic (clinical) hypersensitivity.

  1. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters. PMID:26808300

  2. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-01

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  3. Hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants - diagnostic algorithm and suggested patch test series for clinical use.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne D; Taylor, James S; Maibach, Howard I; Lidén, Carola; Bruze, Magnus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous and systemic hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metals are challenging to evaluate and treat. Although they are uncommon, they do exist, and require appropriate and complete evaluation. This review summarizes the evidence regarding evaluation tools, especially patch and lymphocyte transformation tests, for hypersensitivity reactions to implanted metal devices. Patch test evaluation is the gold standard for metal hypersensitivity, although the results may be subjective. Regarding pre-implant testing, those patients with a reported history of metal dermatitis should be evaluated by patch testing. Those without a history of dermatitis should not be tested unless considerable concern exists. Regarding post-implant testing, a subset of patients with metal hypersensitivity may develop cutaneous or systemic reactions to implanted metals following implant. For symptomatic patients, a diagnostic algorithm to guide the selection of screening allergen series for patch testing is provided. At a minimum, an extended baseline screening series and metal screening is necessary. Static and dynamic orthopaedic implants, intravascular stent devices, implanted defibrillators and dental and gynaecological devices are considered. Basic management suggestions are provided. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive reference for use by those evaluating suspected cutaneous and systemic metal hypersensitivity reactions.

  4. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction following liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome) infusion.

    PubMed

    Nath, Proggananda; Basher, Ariful; Harada, Michiyo; Sarkar, Santana; Selim, Shahjada; Maude, Richard J; Noiri, Eisei; Faiz, Abul

    2014-10-01

    Liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome) is now becoming first choice for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) patients due to high efficacy and less toxicity. The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions to liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome), especially during therapy, is very rare. We report two patients with kala-azar: one developed breathing difficulties and hypotension followed by shock and the other had facial angioedema with chest tightness during treatment. Both patients were managed with immediate action of injection: adrenaline, diphenhydramine and hydrocortisone. In our experience, AmBisome can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions that warrant proper support and close supervision.

  5. Hypersensitivity reaction studies of a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Cheng, Guang; Du, Yuan; Ye, Liang; Chen, Wenzhong; Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Tian; Tian, Jingwei; Fu, Fenghua

    2013-03-01

    The commercial drug paclitaxel (Taxol) may introduce hypersensitivity reactions associated with the polyethoxylated castor oil-ethanol solvent. To overcome these problems, we developed a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation, known as Lipusu. In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to compare the safety profiles of Lipusu and Taxol, with special regard to hypersensitivity reactions. First, Swiss mice were used to determine the lethal dosages, and then to evaluate hypersensitivity reactions, followed by histopathological examination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) of serum SC5b-9 and lung histamine. Additionally, healthy human serum was used to analyze in vitro complement activation. Finally, an MTT assay was used to determine the in vitro anti-proliferation activity. Our data clearly showed that Lipusu displayed a much higher safety margin and did not induce hypersensitivity or hypersensitivity-related lung lesions, which may be associated with the fact that Lipusu did not activate complement or increase histamine release in vivo. Moreover, Lipusu did not promote complement activation in healthy human serum in vitro, and demonstrated anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cells, similar to that of Taxol. Therefore, the improved formulation of paclitaxel, which exhibited a much better safety profile and comparable cytotoxic activity to Taxol, may bring a number of benefits to cancer patients.

  6. HLA-A★3101 and Carbamazepine-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Mark; Alfirevic, Ana; Bourgeois, Stephane; Farrell, John J.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Carrington, Mary; Sills, Graeme J.; Marson, Tony; Jia, Xiaoming; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Molokhia, Mariam; Johnson, Michael R.; O’Connor, Gerard D.; Chaila, Elijah; Alhusaini, Saud; Shianna, Kevin V.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Walley, Nicole; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pichler, Werner; Park, B. Kevin; Depondt, Chantal; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.; Deloukas, Panos; Delanty, Norman; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B★1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS–TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. METHODS We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. RESULTS The HLA-A★3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P = 3.5×10−8). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A★3101 allele (P = 1.1×10−6). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS–TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). CONCLUSIONS The presence of the HLA-A★3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.) PMID:21428769

  7. Studies of hypersensitivity reactions to foods in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Bock, S A; Lee, W Y; Remigio, L K; May, C D

    1978-12-01

    In order to extend previous investigations of adverse reactions to foods performed at this institution, 68 children, aged 5 mo to 15 yr, were studied. All subjects reported a history of adverse reaction to ingestion of one or more of the 14 foods under study. Sixteen of 43 subjects, 3 yr of age or older, had 22 adverse reactions during 94 food challenges with one or more of the 14 foods. All reactions confirmed were to peanut or other nuts, milk, egg, and soy. Skin testing with 1:20 weight/volume concentrations of food extracts applied by the puncture technique produced a net wheal reaction 3 mm or greater in all subjects 3 yr of age or older in whom double-blind food challenges confirmed the history of adverse reaction. Thirteen of 25 children less than 3 yr of age manifested adverse reactions during 49 food challenges. Skin testing by puncture technique produced a net wheal 3 mm or greater in 9 children less than 3 yr of age in whom food challenge elicited a clinical response within 2 hr. One of 4 subjects less than 3 yr of age in whom the adverse reaction occurred more than 4 hr after food challenge exhibited a wheal to puncture skin test of 3 mm or greater. These studies suggest that at present double-blind food challenge is an indispensible tool for the unequivocal evaluation of adverse reactions to foods.

  8. Immediate food hypersensitivity reactions on the first known exposure to the food.

    PubMed

    van Asperen, P P; Kemp, A S; Mellis, C M

    1983-04-01

    We report 8 infants with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to foods (milk, egg, or peanut), occurring at the first-known exposure. Each developed symptoms within the first hour, but these generally settled within 2 hours. Sensitisation to the food concerned was demonstrated by positive immediate allergen skin prick tests in every case. Symptoms experienced included irritability, erythematous rash, urticaria, angio-oedema, vomiting, rhinorrhoea, and cough. Five infants were being followed prospectively and 4 were clinically tolerant of the food by age 16 months. The most likely route of sensitisation was via breast milk. None of the infants experienced similar reactions while being breast fed, suggesting that the reaction was dose dependent. As 5 out of a group of 80 infants being followed prospectively developed an immediate reaction at their first known exposure to a food, this appeared to be a not uncommon presentation of food hypersensitivity in infancy.

  9. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease.

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified.

  11. Systemic Immediate Hypersensitive Reactions after Treatment with Sweet Bee Venom: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: A previous study showed that bee venom (BV) could cause anaphylaxis or other hypersensitivity reactions. Although hypersensitivity reactions due to sweet bee venom (SBV) have been reported, SBV has been reported to be associated with significantly reduced sensitization compared to BV. Although no systemic immediate hypersensitive response accompanied by abnormal vital signs has been reported with respect to SBV, we report a systemic immediate hypersensitive response that we experienced while trying to use SBV clinically. Methods: The patient had undergone BV treatment several times at other Oriental medicine clinics and had experienced no adverse reactions. She came to acupuncture & moxibustion department at Semyung university hospital of Oriental medicine (Je-cheon, Korea) complaining of facial hypoesthesia and was treated using SBV injections, her first SBV treatment. SBV, 0.05 cc, was injected at each of 8 acupoints, for a total of 0.40 cc: Jichang (ST4), Daeyeong (ST5), Hyeopgeo (ST6), Hagwan (ST7), Yepung (TE17), Imun (TE21), Cheonghoe (GB2), and Gwallyeo (SI18). Results: The patient showed systemic immediate hypersensitive reactions. The main symptoms were abdominal pain, nausea and perspiration, but common symptoms associated with hypersensitivity, such as edema, were mild. Abdominal pain was the most long-lasting symptom and was accompanied by nausea. Her body temperature decreased due to sweating. Her diastolic blood pressure could not be measured on three occasions. She remained alert, though the symptoms persisted. The following treatments were conducted in sequence; intramuscular epinephrine, 1 mg/mL, injection, intramuscular dexamethasone, 5 mg/mL, injection, intramuscular buscopan, 20 mg/mL, injection, oxygen (O2) inhalation therapy, 1 L/minutes, via a nasal prong, and intravascular injection of normal saline, 1 L. After 12 hours of treatment, the symptoms had completely disappeared. Conclusion: This case shows that the use of SBV does not

  12. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction after cervical disc replacement: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lagier, M; Briere, M; Giorgi, H; Fuentes, S; Blondel, B; Tropiano, P

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of allergic reaction after total cervical disc arthroplasty. A 52-year old woman was operated on for right C6 cervicobrachial neuralgia secondary to C5-C6 disc disease with foraminal stenosis. A cobalt-chromium-molybdenum total disc prosthesis had been implanted two years earlier. The patient was referred to our institution for recurrence of axial neck pain associated with abdominal patches of erythematous itching rash and swallowing disorder. Allergy tests confirmed type-4 allergic reaction to chromium. Symptoms decreased after removal of the prosthesis with secondary fusion. Delayed allergic reaction is uncommon in spine surgery, but should be considered in case of recurrence of initial symptomatology associated with non-spinal signs.

  13. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  14. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to a stainless steel crown: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Ozdemir, C E; Yilmaz, Y

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steel crowns are commonly used to restore primary or permanent teeth in pediatric restorative dentistry. Here, we describe a case of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which manifested itself as perioral skin eruptions, after restoring the decayed first permanent molar tooth of a 13-year-old Caucasian girl with a preformed stainless steel crown. The eruptions completely healed within one week after removal of the stainless steel crown. The decayed tooth was then restored with a bis-acryl crown and bridge. Since no perioral skin eruptions occurred during the six-month follow-up, we presume that the cause of the perioral skin eruptions was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which was triggered by the nickel in the stainless steel crown.

  15. An immediate (type I) hypersensitivity reaction during placement of a dental rubber dam.

    PubMed

    Field, E A; Longman, L P; al-Sharkawi, M; King, C M

    1997-06-01

    A dental student developed swelling of the lips and peri-oral urticaria, immediately after placement of a dental rubber dam during a chairside demonstration of clinical dentistry. A provisional diagnosis of a Type I hypersensitivity reaction to natural rubber latex was made and an appointment organised for specialist investigations. The student reported an atopic history and allergy to peanuts. A Radioallergosorbent Test (RAST), to measure Ig-E antibodies to latex, was positive. The dental student was given advice concerning the avoidance of natural rubber latex. Dental staff must be aware of potentially serious reactions to natural rubber latex in the dental surgery.

  16. [Hypersensitive reaction after application of heparin with activation heparin induced trombocytopenia in initiation of intermittent haemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Masopust, Jan; Charvát, Jiří; Mokrá, Dana; Hloch, Ondřej; Háša, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Our report describes the case of patient with hypersensitive reaction regularly arising early after initiation of haemodialysis. This characteristic reaction with pletoric face coloration, bronchospasm, increase of blood pressure, anxiety and decrease of blood oxygen saturation at the consequence and central cyanosis was regularly present without dependence on type of dialysis membrane, drug premedication or prophylactic flushing haemodialysis system by isotonic natrium chloride solution. Low platelet value and trouble-free haemodialysis realized without heparin showed real cause of patients problem. Resolution of this state was regional citrate anticoagulation during intermitent haemodialysis. PMID:25873123

  17. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  18. [An autopsy case of malignant histiocytosis-like disorder following hypersensitive reaction to mosquito bite].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S; Baba, K; Koide, O; Nakayama, K

    1989-03-01

    An autopsy case of an 18-year-old Japanese girl with a malignant histiocytosis-like disorder that developed during the course of a hypersensitive reaction to mosquito bite is reported. Episodes of hypersensitive reactions to mosquito bite had been repeated since she was 12 years old and at the age of 18 years she died of acute respiratory failure only 11 days after a mosquito bite. On autopsy, the dermal reaction to the last mosquito bite had already calmed down, and 'poorly differentiated histiocytes', which were presumed from their histochemical characteristics, had remarkably infiltrated into multiple organs, appearing like leukemic infiltration. Only a small number of them were noted in the lymph nodes and the bone marrow. The results of histochemical examination of 'poorly differentiated histiocytes' was as follows: (1) Neither markers for granulocytes (peroxidase and naphthyl AS-D Cl esterase) nor markers for lymphocytes and plasma cells (leukocyte common antigen and immunoglobulins) were detected. (2) Some markers for histiocytes (peanut lectin agglutinin and lysozyme) were positive in some of the proliferated cells. (3) A marker for T-zone histiocyte (s-100 protein) was negative. These results suggested that the proliferated cells included cells of the monocyte-macrophage system. These cells morphologically showed no phagocytic activity and were suggested to be immature histiocytes. Jurco et al. reported (poorly differentiated) malignant histiocytosis consisting of immature histiocytes without phagocytic activity, by using histochemical methods.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect stings.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2004-07-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insect venom that were reported primarily in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology from 2002 through 2003. Among the topics highlighted are new insights into the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis and potential strategies for more effective treatment of the atopic march. Patients should remain supine with raised legs during anaphylactic shock because upper body elevation could result in sudden death from loss of venous return to the heart. A major advance in food allergy was that humanized, monoclonal anti-IgE antibody showed protection against peanut-induced anaphylaxis. In addition to studies elucidating mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity, a clinical study showed patients with a history of prior penicillin allergy with negative penicillin allergy test results are unlikely to experience reactions or resensitization on subsequent oral courses of penicillin. Lastly, there are new recommendations for patients with convincing insect sting reaction histories but negative skin test responses to venom.

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.

    PubMed

    Kuyucu, Semanur; Mori, Francesca; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Gomes, Eva; Brockow, Knut

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to β-lactam antibiotics in children, studies about HSR to non-β-lactam antibiotics (NBLAs) such as sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones, and antituberculosis agents are scarce, and information is generally limited to case reports. The aim of this extensive review was to summarize our present knowledge on clinical characteristics, evaluation, and management of HSR to NBLAs in children based on the literature published between 1980 and 2013. NBLAs have been reported to induce a wide spectrum of HSRs from mild eruptions to severe, and sometimes fatal, systemic drug reactions, especially in some high-risk groups. The diagnosis relied upon history and remained unconfirmed by allergological tests in most of the cases. Obtaining a detailed history is valuable in the diagnosis of suspected reactions to NBLAs. Diagnostic in vivo and in vitro tests for NBLAs lack validation, which makes the diagnosis challenging. The definitive diagnosis of NBLA hypersensitivity frequently depends upon drug provocation tests. Studies including children showed that only 7.8 to 36% of suspected immediate and delayed HSRs to NBLAs could be confirmed by skin and/or provocation tests. Therefore, a standardized diagnostic approach and management strategy should be developed and employed for pediatric patients in the evaluation of suspected HSRs to NBLAs, some of which may be critical and unreplaceable in certain clinical situations. PMID:25201401

  1. Drug-reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2014-02-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a rare, severe cutaneous adverse reaction characterised by fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia and/or other leukocyte abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and often has a relapsing-remitting course despite withdrawal of the drug. The drugs that are most implicated include aromatic anticonvulsants, allopurinol, sulphonamides, antiretrovirals (abacavir and nevirapine), and minocycline. The pathogenesis of DRESS/DIHS is far from clear but probably involves a combination of impaired pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of drug metabolites, the sequential reactivation of the herpesvirus family and genetic susceptibility conferred by the association with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The strong association between abacavir and HLA-B*5701 has enabled pharmacogenetics screening to be employed successfully to minimise the occurrence of hypersensitivity. A prolonged course of oral corticosteroids is required to treat DRESS/DIHS, given the relapsing-remitting nature of the condition with i.v. immunoglobulin and valgangciclovir reserved for refractory or life-threatening cases.

  2. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  3. The Validity of Claims-Based Algorithms to Identify Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions and Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicole C; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Arora, Tarun; Smith, Wilson K; Kilgore, Meredith L; Saag, Kenneth G; Safford, Monika M; Delzell, Elizabeth S

    2015-01-01

    Validation of claims-based algorithms to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions and osteonecrosis of the jaw has not been performed in large osteoporosis populations. The objective of this project is to estimate the positive predictive value of the claims-based algorithms in older women with osteoporosis enrolled in Medicare. Using the 2006-2008 Medicare 5% sample data, we identified potential hypersensitivity and osteonecrosis of the jaw cases based on ICD-9 diagnosis codes. Potential hypersensitivity cases had a 995.0, 995.2, or 995.3 diagnosis code on emergency department or inpatient claims. Potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases had ≥1 inpatient or outpatient physician claim with a 522.7, 526.4, 526.5, or 733.45 diagnosis code or ≥2 claims of any type with a 526.9 diagnosis code. All retrieved records were redacted and reviewed by experts to determine case status: confirmed, not confirmed, or insufficient information. We calculated the positive predictive value as the number of confirmed cases divided by the total number of retrieved records with sufficient information. We requested 412 potential hypersensitivity and 304 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw records and received 174 (42%) and 84 (28%) records respectively. Of 84 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases, 6 were confirmed, resulting in a positive predictive value (95% CI) of 7.1% (2.7, 14.9). Of 174 retrieved potential hypersensitivity records, 95 were confirmed. After exclusion of 25 records with insufficient information for case determination, the overall positive predictive value (95% CI) for hypersensitivity reactions was 76.0% (67.5, 83.2). In a random sample of Medicare data, a claim-based algorithm to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions performed well. An algorithm for osteonecrosis of the jaw did not, partly due to the inclusion of diagnosis codes that are not specific for osteoporosis of the jaw.

  4. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2010.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2011-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2010. Key epidemiologic observations include an apparent increase in peanut allergy, with more than 1% of children affected, and increasing evidence that early food allergen exposure, rather than avoidance, might improve allergy outcomes. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include improved insights into prognosis and estimation of severity through component-resolved diagnostics and characterization of IgE binding to specific epitopes. Regarding treatment, oral and epicutaneous immunotherapy show promise. Studies of drug allergies show insights into pathophysiology, and studies on insect hypersensitivity reveal improved diagnostic methods. Genetic and functional studies have revealed the important role of epidermal differentiation products in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Cross-talk between the atopic immune response with the innate immune response have also been found to predispose to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. New therapeutic approaches to control chronic urticaria have also been identified during the past year.

  5. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.

  6. Case Report About Fatal or Near-Fatal Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cetuximab: Anticetuximab IgE as a Valuable Screening Test.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Benoît; Mariotte, Delphine; Moldovan, Cristian; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Vergnaud, Marie-Claude; Laroche, Dominique; Gervais, Radj

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are a classic side effect of cetuximab. We report the cases of three patients who developed life-threatening hypersensitivity to cetuximab, which could have been predicted by assessing the concentration of serum anticetuximab immunoglobulin (Ig)E. The anticetuximab IgE concentration could be an interesting test to predict which patients are at risk of experiencing severe hypersensitivity reactions to cetuximab.

  7. Case Report About Fatal or Near-Fatal Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cetuximab: Anticetuximab IgE as a Valuable Screening Test

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, Benoît; Mariotte, Delphine; Moldovan, Cristian; Grellard, Jean-Michel; Vergnaud, Marie-Claude; Laroche, Dominique; Gervais, Radj

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are a classic side effect of cetuximab. We report the cases of three patients who developed life-threatening hypersensitivity to cetuximab, which could have been predicted by assessing the concentration of serum anticetuximab immunoglobulin (Ig)E. The anticetuximab IgE concentration could be an interesting test to predict which patients are at risk of experiencing severe hypersensitivity reactions to cetuximab. PMID:25089092

  8. Diagnostic procedure after an immediate hypersensitivity reaction in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Tacquard, Charles; Laroche, Dominique; Stenger, Rodolphe; Mariotte, Delphine; Uring-Lambert, Béatrice; De Blay, Frédéric; Malinovsky, Jean-Marc; Mertes, Paul Michel

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of a perioperative allergic reaction is based on clinical features associated with a suggestive timeline, the exclusion of other diagnoses, elevated concentrations of degranulation markers (histamine, tryptase), and positive allergy assessments (skin tests, specific IgE). After initiating appropriate treatment, the anesthesiologist should take blood samples to measure histamine and tryptase concentrations just after the reaction and repeat them 1-2hours later to validate the diagnosis of immediate hypersensitivity. A delayed measurement of basal tryptase is useful to rule out mastocytosis and to interpret moderate tryptase levels. The anesthesiologist must inform the patient of the reaction to obtain adhesion and consent to subsequent investigations and must record the timing of the reaction and of the blood sampling, the possible causal agents, and the treatment administered. These data must be shared with the laboratory and the allergist. An adverse drug reaction report must be filed. The gold standard for allergy assessment is skin testing. These tests should be done in an appropriate facility, with experienced staff and in compliance with current guidelines. Specific IgE assays and cellular assays can help when clinical features and skin tests are discordant. Provocation tests are sometimes required. After allergy assessment, the safest protocol for subsequent anesthesia is determined in collaboration with the anesthesiologist. The patient must be informed and carry an allergy alert card. PMID:27374263

  9. Systems biology approaches to enhance our understanding of drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J R; Barrionuevo, E; Ranea, J A; Blanca, M; Cornejo-Garcia, J A

    2014-12-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) encompass a wide spectrum of unpredictable clinical entities. They represent an important health problem, affecting people of all ages, and lead to a large strain on the public health system. Here, we summarize experiments that use high-throughput genomics technologies to investigate HDRs. We also introduce the field of systems biology as a relatively recent discipline concerned with the integration and analysis of high-throughput data sets such as DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing data. We describe previous studies that have applied systems biology techniques to related fields such as allergy and asthma. Finally, we present a number of potential applications of systems biology to the study of HDRs, in order to make the reader aware of the types of analyses that can be performed and the insights that can be gained through their application.

  10. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2008.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2009-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects and in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2008. Key epidemiologic observations include a rise in anaphylaxis in a population-based study and lower rates of peanut allergy in Israel, where infants consume peanut early compared with the United Kingdom, where dietary introduction is generally delayed. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include IgE epitope mapping that discloses the likelihood and severity of allergy; studies correlating likelihood of clinical reactivity on the basis of food-specific IgE to sesame, peanut, milk, and tree nuts; and an observation that a low baseline angiotensin-converting enzyme level may be associated with having pharyngeal edema during a reaction. Molecular, immunologic, and genetic studies are discerning pathways that are key in development of food allergy, identifying new modalities to interrupt mast cell degranulation, and elucidating risks associated with penicillin allergy. Regarding treatment, clinical studies show a majority of children with milk and egg allergy tolerate these proteins in modest amounts when they are extensively heated in baked goods, and studies show promise for oral immunotherapy to treat milk allergy and sublingual immunotherapy for honey bee venom hypersensitivity. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has continued to be highlighted in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis (AD). Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to develop viral and bacterial infection. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported including use of probiotics, biologics, vitamin D, and skin barrier creams.

  11. In vitro evidence of delayed-type hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; English, J S; Mattey, D L

    1993-11-01

    Hypersensitivity to topical hydrocortisone is becoming increasingly recognized. We present further evidence that this is mediated via a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction. A hydrocortisone: albumin complex was able to induce a proliferative response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients allergic to hydrocortisone. Protein binding of hydrocortisone or a degradation product may be important in the development of corticosteroid allergy.

  12. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5% of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses.

  13. [Food hypersensitivity in children].

    PubMed

    Kolacek, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity affects children and adults with an increasing prevalence, and is therefore an important public health problem in the majority of developed countries. Moreover, self-reported reactions to food are of several times higher prevalence, compared to hypersensitivity diagnosed following well established evidence-based diagnostic guidelines. In children, allergic food reactions are more common compared to non-allergic food hypersensitivity reactions, and 90% of them are caused with only 8 food allergens: cow's milk, soya, egg, fish, shellfish, peanut, tree-nuts and gluten. Diagnosis should be based on challenge tests with the potentially offending food allergens. Concerning other, more conservative diagnostic procedures, negative serology and negative skin-prick tests can exclude IgE-mediated food allergy, but positive tests, due to high rate of false positive reactions are not sufficient for diagnosis. Strict dietary avoidance of incriminated allergens is the only well established management strategy. However, this should be applied only if food allergy is well documented - following the exposition tests. Introducing elimination diet in a paediatric population, particularly with the elimination of multiple foods, could cause inappropriate growth and disturb organ maturation. Concerning allergy prevention, avoidance of allergens is not efficacious either during pregnancy and lactation or weaning period, and is therefore, not recommended neither as a population preventive measure, nor in children at risk.

  14. Carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction: role of IgE-dependent basophil activation and FcεRI.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takuya; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Nozomi; Kobayashi, Natsuki; Sugimoto, Hiroko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Okuda, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Basophil activation was observed in patients with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction (HR). However, the precise mechanism by which carboplatin induces basophil activation and the associated surrogate markers remains to be elucidated. To investigate whether IgE-dependent mechanisms, including the overexpression of FcεRI, participate in carboplatin-induced basophil activation, 13 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled: 5 with a history of carboplatin-induced severe hypersensitivity reaction within the past 2 years, and 8 with no such history. The expression levels of FcεRI, IgE, and CD203c on basophils were measured using a flow cytometer. Immunoglobulin E-dependent basophil activation was evaluated by testing for IgE passive sensitization using lactic acid, and by testing for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibition, using wortmannin. In three patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity, pretreatment with wortmannin almost completely inhibited carboplatin-induced basophil activation (P < 0.05). In a healthy control subject, whose own IgE showed no response to carboplatin, acquired reactivity to carboplatin when exposed to plasma from patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. This did not occur when the same experiment was carried out using plasma from the patients negative for carboplatin hypersensitivity. Moreover, pretreatment with omalizumab, a monoclonal anti-IgE antibody, almost completely blocked carboplatin-induced basophil activation in the plasma of patients positive for carboplatin hypersensitivity. On further investigation, the HR-positive group had significantly higher levels of FcεRI compared with the negative group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, an IgE-dependent mechanism incorporating FcεRI overexpression participates in carboplatin-induced severe HR. These results establish the relevance of monitoring the pharmacodynamic changes of basophils to prevent carboplatin-induced severe HR.

  15. The Major Soybean Allergen Gly m Bd 28K Induces Hypersensitivity Reactions in Mice Sensitized to Cow's Milk Proteins.

    PubMed

    Candreva, Ángela María; Smaldini, Paola Lorena; Curciarello, Renata; Fossati, Carlos Alberto; Docena, Guillermo Horacio; Petruccelli, Silvana

    2016-02-24

    Reactions to soy have been reported in a proportion of patients with IgE-mediated cow's milk allergy (CMA). In this work, we analyzed if Gly m Bd 28K/P28, one of the major soybean allergens, is a cross-reactive allergen with cow milk proteins (CMP). We showed that P28 was recognized by IgE sera from CMA patients and activated human peripheral basophils degranulation. Moreover, IgE sera of mice exclusively sensitized to CMP recognized P28. Splenocytes from sensitized animals secreted IL-5 and IL-13 when incubated with CMP or soy proteins, but only IL-13 when treated with P28. In addition, a skin test was strongly positive for CMP and weakly positive for P28. Remarkably, milk-sensitized mice showed hypersensitivity symptoms following sublingual challenge with P28 or CMP. With the use of bioinformatics' tools seven putative cross-reactive epitopes were identified. In conclusion, using in vitro and in vivo tests we demonstrated that P28 is a novel cross-reactive allergen with CMP.

  16. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD.

  17. Cell-mediated immune reactions to clinical neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Okabe, I; Kurosu, Y; Morita, K

    1985-09-01

    Immunotherapy may be an effective treatment for neuroblastoma. It is of importance to delineate changes in various parameters of tumor immunity over an extended period, before and during the course of treatment, in any given case. In our patients with neuroblastoma, tumor-associated cell-mediated immune-reaction showed a good responsiveness before treatment. However, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions were shown to be negative in many cases, particularly in those with advanced tumor, and T gamma cells were enormously increased in some cases. During the course of therapy, the tumor-associated cellular immune responsiveness showed a tendency to become negative when the patient was tumor free or was in remission, but showed a tendency to become positive on regrowth, recurrence or metastasis of tumor. The T gamma cells showed much the same fluctuations as did the tumor-associated cellular immune responsiveness.

  18. Allergy/hypersensitivity reactions as a predisposing factor to complex regional pain syndrome I in orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Kenter, Keith; Newman, Ashley; O'Brien, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Several predisposing conditions have been associated with complex regional pain syndrome I (CRPS I). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between a history of allergy/hypersensitivity reactions and CRPS I in orthopedic patients. Orthopedic patients with CRPS I (n=115) who experienced pain relief after a successful sympathetic nerve blockade were identified for study inclusion; a control group (n=115) matched to the CRPS I group by age, sex, and location of injury was also included. All patients in the study had an average age of 42 years. In the CRPS I group, all participants were Caucasian and the majority (80.8%) were women. The skin of patients with CRPS I was described as fair (57.7%), mottled (57.7%), or sensitive (80.8%). Of the patients with CRPS I, 78 (67.8%) reported a statistically significant history of allergies compared with the 39 (33.9%) patients in the control group (P<.0001). Patients with CRPS I who experienced complete pain relief for at least 1 month following a single sympathetic nerve block were asked to answer a questionnaire (n=35), and some then underwent immediate hypersensitivity testing using a skin puncture technique (n=26). Skin hypersensitivity testing yielded an 83.3% positive predictive value with an accuracy of 76.9%. Based on these results, a positive history for allergy/hypersensitivity reactions is a predisposing condition for CRPS I in this subset of orthopedic patients. These hypersensitivity reactions may prove important in gaining a better understanding in the pathophysiology of CRPS I as a regional pain syndrome.

  19. Oxaliplatin Is a Safe Alternative Option for Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic Cancers After Hypersensitivity Reaction to Carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna V.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Miller, Austin; Riebandt, Grazyna C.; Blum, Bonnie L.; Odunsi, Kunle O.; Frederick, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the tolerability and efficacy of oxaliplatin in patientswith recurrent gynecologic malignancies after carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions in comparison with conventionally used cisplatin. Methods Forty-six patients were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy from 2006 to 2011 and developed hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin. Oxaliplatin was administered to 27 patients; 19 patients received cisplatin. Clinicopathologic variables, toxicity, and time-to-failure were analyzed retrospectively using descriptive statistics, Fisher exact, and independent sample permutation t tests. Results The median number of carboplatin cycles and cumulative dose before reaction were similar in the oxaliplatin and cisplatin groups, respectively (6 vs 7.5 cycles, P = 0.93; 980 [662] mg vs 686 [579.6] mg, P = 0.49). Non–life-threatening hypersensitivity reaction to oxaliplatin developed in 2 of 27 patients. No reactions to cisplatin occurred. The median number of oxaliplatin/cisplatin cycles was 6 in both groups. Complete response to therapy was 34.6% (oxaliplatin) and 31.6% (cisplatin); stable disease was seen in 50.0% and 36.8% of oxaliplatin- and cisplatin-treated patients, respectively (P = 0.46). Exposure to oxaliplatin resulted in less neurotoxicity than cisplatin (25.9% vs 68.4%, P = 0.01). The median number of prior chemotherapy lines in both groups was 2. The median time-to-failure was 10.8 months in oxaliplatin group and 9.8 months in cisplatin group (P = 0.86). Conclusions Salvage therapy with oxaliplatin after hypersensitivity reaction to carboplatin is associated with excellent tolerability and time-to-failure comparable to cisplatin. When further administration of carboplatin is precluded, oxaliplatin represents a safe and effective treatment strategy in the platinum-sensitive relapse setting. The significantly lower neurotoxicity profile makes it an attractive alternative to cisplatin. PMID:25356535

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways.

  1. Intraoperative Ephedrine Allergy in a Patient Who Received Chemotherapy and Perioperative Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hakimoğlu, Sedat; Tuzcu, Kasım; Davarcı, Işıl; Karcıoğlu, Murat; Kurt, Raziye; Dikey, İsmail

    2015-01-01

    Anaesthesia represents a specific set-up in respect to pharmacology, and during this time, early hypersensitivity reactions or anaphylaxis may occur in patients who are exposed to a great number of foreign substances. Intravenous ephedrine (5 mg) was applied to a 37-year-old patient due to the development of intraoperative hypotension in a total abdominal hysterectomy operation. After application, hyperaemia was seen in the track of the intravenous catheter of that extremity. Approximately 15 minutes later, urticarial plaques were observed extensively in the abdomen and in both extremities. Methylprednisolone (100 mg+100 mg) and pheniramine (45.5 mg) were given with an increasing infusion rate of intravenous crystalloid. The patient was extubated without any problem and removed to the recovery unit for observation. After the total disappearance of lesions at postoperative 60 minutes and because of the stability of vital signs, the patient was removed to the service. In the follow-up of surgery, no complication developed, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. PMID:27366482

  2. Mediating chemical reactions using polysaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Lauren E.

    We have studied the NaBH4-mediated hydrogenation of select alkenes catalyzed by polysaccharide-stabilized nanoparticles. We compared the catalytic properties of Ni-based nanoparticles or Au/Co-based nanoparticles on the hydrogenation of cinnamic acid, cinnamide, cinnamyl alcohol, and ethyl cinnamate. We evaluated the possibility that the type of stabilizing polysaccharide surrounding the nanoparticle may affect the selectivity towards the alkene compounds that undergo the hydrogenation reaction. We found that the hydrogenation of cinnamide or ethyl cinnamate proceeded readily to 100% completion independent of the type of polysaccharide stabilizing the nanoparticle. However, the extent of the hydrogenation of cinnamyl alcohol and cinnamic acid varied greatly depending on the type of polysaccharide stabilizing the nanoparticle. In the course of these studies, we observed that some polysaccharides by themselves promoted the hydrolysis of ethyl cinnamate. Thus, we have raised the hypothesis that some polysaccharides may act as "esterases" and explored the interaction between select polysaccharides and a variety of ester compounds.

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Pseudomonas Strains Exhibiting Differential Hypersensitivity Reactions on Tobacco and Corn Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Tchagang, Caetanie Fometeu; Xu, Renlin; Mehrtash, Shima; Rahimi, Shabnam; Sidibé, Aïssata; Li, Xiang; Bromfield, Eden S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Two novel Pseudomonas strains (S1E40 and S3E12) isolated from corn roots are antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani and exhibit differential hypersensitivity reactions on tobacco and corn seedlings. We report here the draft genome sequences of strains S1E40 and S3E12, consisting of 6.98 and 7.06 Mb with 6,150 and 6,129 predicted protein-coding sequences, respectively. PMID:27795242

  4. Quantitative analysis of eosinophils in acute graft-versus-host disease compared with drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Joshua; Bergfeld, Wilma F

    2010-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), if not detected and treated early, is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs), the most frequent clinical and histopathological mimickers of early aGVHD, are often still distinguished from aGVHD by the presence of eosinophils within the inflammatory infiltrate on skin biopsy. Distinguishing these entities is important because the delay of appropriate treatment of aGVHD may lead to advanced stages of the disease process with a poor prognosis. To determine whether the existence or amount of eosinophilic infiltrate could be used to differentiate these entities, we employed a quantitative method of analyzing eosinophils in skin biopsies of rashes from patients with aGVHD and DHR. Eosinophils were counted in 50 high-power fields (HPFs) in skin biopsies of patients with clinical grade >or=2 aGVHD (+aGVHD), with clinical grade <2 aGVHD (-aGVHD), and those with clinical DHR (+DHR). The average number of eosinophils per 10 HPFs (ave. eos/10 HPFs) increased throughout each group. The ave. eos/10 HPFs in +DHR was significantly different from both aGVHD groups (P < 0.001). The specificity to completely rule out aGVHD did not reach 100% until 16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs was observed. There is a significant difference between the numbers of eosinophils found in differentiating DHR from aGVHD, but a very high number (>16.0 ave. eos/10 HPFs) is necessary to rule out aGVHD completely. Therefore, a quantitative analysis of eosinophils in all biopsies to rule out aGVHD would be of limited value and should only be considered in those biopsies with significant eosinophilia.

  5. Is cancer a severe delayed hypersensitivity reaction and histamine a blueprint?

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Longevity and accumulation of multiple context-dependent signaling pathways of long-standing inflammation (antigen-load or oxidative stress) are the results of decreased/altered regulation of immunity and loss of control switch mechanisms that we defined as Yin and Yang of acute inflammation or immune surveillance. Chronic inflammation is initiated by immune disruptors-induced progressive changes in physiology and function of susceptible host tissues that lead to increased immune suppression and multistep disease processes including carcinogenesis. The interrelated multiple hypotheses that are presented for the first time in this article are extension of author's earlier series of 'accidental' discoveries on the role of inflammation in developmental stages of immune dysfunction toward tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Detailed analyses of data on chronic diseases suggest that nearly all age-associated illnesses, generally categorized as 'mild' (e.g., increased allergies), 'moderate' (e.g., hypertension, colitis, gastritis, pancreatitis, emphysema) or 'severe' (e.g., accelerated neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases or site-specific cancers and metastasis) are variations of hypersensitivity responses of tissues that are manifested as different diseases in immune-responsive or immune-privileged tissues. Continuous release/presence of low level histamine (subclinical) in circulation could contribute to sustained oxidative stress and induction of 'mild' or 'moderate' or 'severe' (immune tsunami) immune disorders in susceptible tissues. Site-specific cancers are proposed to be 'severe' (irreversible) forms of cumulative delayed hypersensitivity responses that would induce immunological chaos in favor of tissue growth in target tissues. Shared or special features of growth from fetus development into adulthood and aging processes and carcinogenesis are briefly compared with regard to energy requirements of highly complex function of Yin and Yang. Features of Yang

  6. Is cancer a severe delayed hypersensitivity reaction and histamine a blueprint?

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Longevity and accumulation of multiple context-dependent signaling pathways of long-standing inflammation (antigen-load or oxidative stress) are the results of decreased/altered regulation of immunity and loss of control switch mechanisms that we defined as Yin and Yang of acute inflammation or immune surveillance. Chronic inflammation is initiated by immune disruptors-induced progressive changes in physiology and function of susceptible host tissues that lead to increased immune suppression and multistep disease processes including carcinogenesis. The interrelated multiple hypotheses that are presented for the first time in this article are extension of author's earlier series of 'accidental' discoveries on the role of inflammation in developmental stages of immune dysfunction toward tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Detailed analyses of data on chronic diseases suggest that nearly all age-associated illnesses, generally categorized as 'mild' (e.g., increased allergies), 'moderate' (e.g., hypertension, colitis, gastritis, pancreatitis, emphysema) or 'severe' (e.g., accelerated neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases or site-specific cancers and metastasis) are variations of hypersensitivity responses of tissues that are manifested as different diseases in immune-responsive or immune-privileged tissues. Continuous release/presence of low level histamine (subclinical) in circulation could contribute to sustained oxidative stress and induction of 'mild' or 'moderate' or 'severe' (immune tsunami) immune disorders in susceptible tissues. Site-specific cancers are proposed to be 'severe' (irreversible) forms of cumulative delayed hypersensitivity responses that would induce immunological chaos in favor of tissue growth in target tissues. Shared or special features of growth from fetus development into adulthood and aging processes and carcinogenesis are briefly compared with regard to energy requirements of highly complex function of Yin and Yang. Features of Yang

  7. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  8. Role of the potassium chloride cotransporter isoform 2-mediated spinal chloride homeostasis in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Qian, Ai-Hua; Song, Dan-Dan; Ben, Qi-Wen; Yao, Wei-Yan; Sun, Jing; Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2015-05-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity represents an important hallmark in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), of which the mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to examine whether cation-chloride cotransporter (CCC)-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis of the spinal cord is involved in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Chronic visceral hypersensitivity was induced by exposing male Wistar rats to water avoidance stress (WAS). RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of CCCs in the spinal cord. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on adult spinal cord slices to evaluate Cl(-) homeostasis and Cl(-) extrusion capacity of lamina I neurons. Visceral sensitivity was estimated by measuring the abdominal withdrawal reflex in response to colorectal distension (CRD). After 10 days of WAS exposure, levels of both total protein and the oligomeric form of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2 (KCC2), but not Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the lumbosacral spinal cord. The downregulation of KCC2 resulted in a depolarizing shifted equilibrium potential of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic current and impaired Cl(-) extrusion capacity in lamina I neurons of the lumbosacral spinal cord from WAS rats. Acute noxious CRD disrupted spinal KCC2 expression and function 2 h after the final distention in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. Pharmacological blockade of KCC2 activity by intrathecal injection of a KCC2 inhibitor [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid enhanced visceral nociceptive sensitivity in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. These results suggest that KCC2 downregulation-mediated impairment of spinal cord Cl(-) homeostasis may play an important role in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:25792562

  9. Testing for Drug Hypersensitivity Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Rive, Craig M; Bourke, Jack; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Type B drug reactions comprise only 20% of all drug reactions but they tend to be primarily immunologically mediated and less dependent on the drug’s pharmacological action and dose. Common Type B reactions seen in clinical practice are those of the immediate, IgE, Gell-Coombs Type I reactions, and the delayed, T-cell mediated, Type IV reactions. Management of these types of reactions, once they have occurred, requires careful consideration and recognition of the utility of routine diagnostic tests followed by ancillary specialised diagnostic testing. For Type I, IgE mediated reactions this includes prick/intradermal skin testing and oral provocation. For Type IV, T-cell mediated reactions this includes a variety of in vivo (patch testing) and ex vivo tests, many of which are currently mainly used in highly specialised research laboratories. The recent association of many serious delayed (Type IV) hypersensitivity reactions to specific drugs with HLA class I and II alleles has created the opportunity for HLA screening to exclude high risk populations from exposure to the implicated drug and hence prevent clinical reactions. For example, the 100% negative predictive value of HLA-B*5701 for true immunologically mediated abacavir hypersensitivity and the development of feasible, inexpensive DNA-based molecular tests has led to incorporation of HLA-B*5701 screening in routine HIV clinical practice. The mechanism by which drugs specifically interact with HLA has been recently characterised and promises to lead to strategies for pre-clinical screening to inform drug development and design. PMID:23592889

  10. Phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase-mediated signalling is required for benzothiadiazole-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death in rice suspension-cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Song, Fengming; Zheng, Zhong

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of phospholipase C/diacylglycerol kinase (PLC/DGK)-mediated signalling in oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death was studied in rice suspension-cultured cells treated with benzothiadiazole (BTH) and infected by Xanthomonas oryza pv. oryza (Xoo), the causal agent of rice leaf blight disease. Treatment of rice suspension cells with BTH resulted in a significant oxidative burst, as indicated by accumulation of superoxide anion and H(2)O(2), and hypersensitive cell death, as determined by Evans blue staining. A peak in oxidative burst was detected 3-4 h after BTH treatment and hypersensitive cell death was observed 8 h after treatment. In addition, significant oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death were detected in BTH-treated suspension cells, but not in untreated control cells, after Xoo infection. Scavengers and antioxidants of active oxygen species, e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, N-acetylcysteine, and flavone, reduced significantly the BTH-induced oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death, indicating that oxidative burst is required for BTH-induced hypersensitive cell death. Expression of the PLC/DGK pathway genes, a diacylglycerol kinase gene, OsDAGK1, and a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, and a defence-related EREBP transcriptional factor gene, OsBIERF3, was activated in rice cells after BTH treatment and in the BTH-treated cells after Xoo infection. Treatment of rice cells with phosphatidic acid, a phospholipid signalling molecule, resulted in the production of oxidative burst and hypersensitive cell death. However, neomycin, a PLC inhibitor, inhibited partially but not completely the production of oxidative burst, hypersensitive cell death, and expression of OsBIERF3 and OsDAGK1 induced by BTH in rice cells. These results suggest that PLC/DGK-mediated signalling plays an important role in BTH-induced oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, and activation of defence response in rice.

  11. Cyclic AMP and the mechanism of leucocyte lysosomal enzyme release during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D A

    1977-11-01

    The pleural cavity of rats was used to study the effect of altering leucocyte cyclic AMP content on the release of B-glucuronidase activity during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. The effect on intravenous colchicine was also studied. Despite an increase of 135 to 235% in leucocyte cyclic AMP content no decrease in B-glucuronidase release was observed. Similarly, colchicine had no effect on enzyme release. It was concluded that the cyclic nucleotides and leucocyte microtubules may have no significant role to play in the release of lysosomal enzymes during acute inflammation in vivo. PMID:201738

  12. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  13. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide.

  14. Rds and Rih mediate hypersensitive cell death independent of gene-for-gene resistance to the oat crown rust pathogen Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae.

    PubMed

    Yu, G X; Braun, E; Wise, R P

    2001-12-01

    The Pca crown rust resistance cluster in the diploid Avena genus confers gene-for-gene specificity to numerous isolates of Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae. Recombination breakpoint analysis indicates that specificities conferred by the Pca cluster are controlled by at least five distinct genes, designated Pc81, Pc82, Pc83, Pc84, and Pc85. Avena plants with the appropriate genotype frequently respond to P. coronata by undergoing hypersensitive cell death at the sites of fungal infection. Autofluorescence of host cells in response to P. coronata occurs in plants that develop visible necrotic lesions but not in plants that lack this phenotype. Two newly described, non-Pc loci were shown to control hypersensitive cell death. Rds (resistance-dependent suppressor of cell death) suppresses the hypersensitive response (HR), but not the resistance, mediated by the Pc82 resistance gene. In contrast, Rih (resistance-independent hypersensitive cell death) confers HR in both resistant and susceptible plants. Linkage analysis indicates that Rds is unlinked to the Pca cluster, whereas Rih is tightly linked to it. These results indicate that multiple synchronous pathways affect the development of hypersensitive cell death and that HR is not essential for resistance to crown rust. Further characterization of these genes will clarify the relationship between plant disease resistance and localized hypersensitive cell death.

  15. Repeated PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibody administration induces fatal xenogeneic hypersensitivity reactions in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Christine; Sckisel, Gail D.; Proia, David A.; Mirsoian, Annie; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Chen, Mingyi; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Kelly, Karen; Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting coinhibitory molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 are increasingly used as targets of therapeutic intervention against cancer. While these targets have led to a critical paradigm shift in treatments for cancer, these approaches are also plagued with limitations owing to cancer immune evasion mechanisms and adverse toxicities associated with continuous treatment. It has been difficult to reproduce and develop interventions to these limitations preclinically due to poor reagent efficacy and reagent xenogenecity not seen in human trials. In this study, we investigated adverse effects of repeated administration of PD-1 and PD-L1 mAbs in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We observed rapid and fatal hypersensitivity reactions in tumor bearing mice within 30–60 min after 4–5 administrations of PD-L1 or PD-1 mAb but not CTLA-4 antibody treatment. These events occurred only in mice bearing the highly inflammatory 4T1 tumor and did not occur in mice bearing non-inflammatory tumors. We observed that mortality was associated with systemic accumulation of IgG1 antibodies, antibodies specific to the PD-1 mAb, and accumulation of Gr-1high neutrophils in lungs which have been implicated in the IgG mediated pathway of anaphylaxis. Anti-PD-1 associated toxicities were alleviated when PD-1 blockade was combined with the therapeutic HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, which impaired immune responses toward the xenogeneic PD-1 mAb. This study highlights a previously uncharacterized fatal hypersensitivity exacerbated by the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in the broadly used 4T1 tumor model as well as an interesting relationship between this particular class of checkpoint blockade and tumor-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:27057446

  16. Humoral measurement of type-1 hypersensitivity reactions to a commercial Malassezia allergen.

    PubMed

    Farver, K; Morris, D O; Shofer, F; Esch, B

    2005-08-01

    Malassezia pachydermatis is considered to be a contributing factor to canine atopic dermatitis (AD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the humoral response to a commercially produced M. pachydermatis extract. Fifteen atopic dogs with Malassezia overgrowth on the skin (MD), 16 atopic dogs without MD, three atopic dogs with overgrowth of Malassezia in the ears only (MO), and 12 normal dogs were intradermally tested with M. pachydermatis extract at 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 PNU mL(-1). All dogs were evaluated cytologically by cutaneous tape strip and bilateral ear exudate sampling to determine presence of MD or MO. Each had serum evaluated for anti-Malassezia IgE using three Malassezia extracts with an ELISA assay. The irritant threshold concentration at which healthy nonatopic dogs ceased to react was 1000 PNU mL(-1). There was a significant difference in intradermal test reactivity between the atopic groups. At this dilution, 93% (14/15) of the atopic MD group, 31% (5/16) of the atopic group without MD or MO, and 100% (3/3) of the atopic MO only group reacted. There were no significant differences in the serum IgE levels as measured by the Greer ELISA assay, between any groups using any of the three extracts. These results support that Greer's M. pachydermatis extract is useful for intradermal testing of dogs with an allergic phenotype, and that atopics with MD are more likely to have a type-1 Malassezia hypersensitivity than those without. The ELISA assay may require further development in order to be useful for the diagnosis of Malassezia hypersensitivity. PMID:16101797

  17. Multicolor fluorescence imaging for early detection of the hypersensitive reaction to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Chaerle, Laury; Lenk, Sándor; Hagenbeek, Dik; Buschmann, Claus; Van Der Straeten, Dominique

    2007-03-01

    The physiological status of plants can nowadays be promptly monitored with non-invasive methods. This opens the possibility to continuously follow-up plant performance and permits to detect stress-induced deviations presymptomatically. Upon stress, plants may synthesize specific compounds, depending on the causal agent. Such compounds may alter the absorption of the light impinging on plant leaves, hence the spectrum of reflected, re-emitted, and transmitted light changes. UV-excited fluorescence imaging specifically allows visualization of the accumulation of phenolic compounds, e.g. those associated with the hypersensitive response to pathogens. By using imaging at regular intervals (time-lapse series) of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection in resistant tobacco we aimed at the description and quantification of the kinetics of blue-green fluorescence compared to the visual development of the disease. Presymptomatic responses to TMV infection were observed with a multicolor fluorescence and reflectance imaging setup. The onset of increases in blue-green and chlorophyll fluorescence were comparable in timing, although further symptom development was strikingly different. Compounds known to accumulate during the hypersensitive response and displaying blue-green fluorescence revealed different dynamics of fluorescence evolution in time. The multichannel imaging system permitted to discern the key components salicylic acid and scopoletin. In contrast, for the compatible interaction between TMV and non-resistant tobacco, no presymptomatic responses were detected on inoculated leaves. This work proves the potential of multispectral imaging to unveil stress-associated signatures, and the power of blue-green fluorescence imaging to monitor accumulation of secondary compounds.

  18. Optimization of the THP-1 activation assay to detect pharmaceuticals with potential to cause immune mediated drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Corti, Daniele; Galbiati, Valentina; Gatti, Nicolò; Marinovich, Marina; Galli, Corrado L; Corsini, Emanuela

    2015-10-01

    Despite important impacts of systemic hypersensitivity induced by pharmaceuticals, for such endpoint no reliable preclinical approaches are available. We previously established an in vitro test to identify contact and respiratory allergens based on interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in THP-1 cells. Here, we challenged it for identification of pharmaceuticals associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions, with the idea that drug sensitizers share common mechanisms of cell activation. Cells were exposed to drugs associated with systemic hypersensitivity reactions (streptozotocin, sulfamethoxazole, neomycin, probenecid, clonidine, procainamide, ofloxacin, methyl salicylate), while metformin was used as negative drug. Differently to chemicals, drugs tested were well tolerated, except clonidine and probenecid, with no signs of cytotoxicity up to 1-2mg/ml. THP-1 activation assay was adjusted, and conditions, that allow identification of all sensitizing drugs tested, were established. Next, using streptozotocin and selective inhibitors of PKC-β and p38 MAPK, two pathways involved in chemical allergen-induced cell activation, we tested the hypothesis that similar pathways were also involved in drug-induced IL-8 production and CD86 upregulation. Results indicated that drugs and chemical allergens share similar activation pathways. Finally, we made a structure-activity hypothesis related to hypersensitivity reactions, trying to individuate structural requisite that can be involved in immune mediated adverse reactions. PMID:26028146

  19. A single gene, AIN, in Medicago truncatula mediates a hypersensitive response to both bluegreen aphid and pea aphid, but confers resistance only to bluegreen aphid.

    PubMed

    Klingler, John P; Nair, Ramakrishnan M; Edwards, Owain R; Singh, Karam B

    2009-01-01

    Biotic stress in plants frequently induces a hypersensitive response (HR). This distinctive reaction has been studied intensively in several pathosystems and has shed light on the biology of defence signalling. Compared with microbial pathogens, relatively little is known about the role of the HR in defence against insects. Reference genotype A17 of Medicago truncatula Gaertn., a model legume, responds to aphids of the genus Acyrthosiphon with necrotic lesions resembling a HR. In this study, the biochemical nature of this response, its mode of inheritance, and its relationship with defence against aphids were investigated. The necrotic lesion phenotype and resistance to the bluegreen aphid (BGA, Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji) and the pea aphid (PA, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) were analysed using reference genotypes A17 and A20, their F(2) progeny and recombinant inbred lines. BGA-induced necrotic lesions co-localized with the production of H(2)O(2), consistent with an oxidative burst widely associated with hypersensitivity. This HR correlated with stronger resistance to BGA in A17 than in A20; these phenotypes cosegregated as a semi-dominant gene, AIN (Acyrthosiphon-induced necrosis). In contrast to BGA, stronger resistance to PA in A17, compared with A20, did not cosegregate with a PA-induced HR. The AIN locus resides in a cluster of sequences predicted to encode the CC-NBS-LRR subfamily of resistance proteins. AIN-mediated resistance presents a novel opportunity to use a model plant and model aphid to study the role of the HR in defence responses to phloem-feeding insects. PMID:19690018

  20. Artificial light at night alters delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in response to acute stress in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Kaugars, Katherine E; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Several physiological and behavioral processes rely on precisely timed light information derived from the natural solar cycle. Using this information, traits have adapted to allow individuals within specific niches to optimize survival and reproduction, but urbanization by humans has significantly altered natural habitats. Nighttime light exposure alters immune function in several species, which could lead to decreased fitness or survival, particularly in the face of an environmental challenge. We exposed male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to five lux of light at night for four weeks, and then administered six hours of acute restraint stress. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was assessed immediately following stress. Acute restraint increased the DTH reaction in dark nights, but exposure to nighttime light prevented this response. Exposure to light at night prolonged the DTH response in non-stressed control hamsters. These results suggest that light pollution may significantly alter physiological responses in Siberian hamsters, particularly in response to a salient environmental challenge such as stress.

  1. [Evaluation of short-time premedication with d-chlorpheniramine maleate injection for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitivity reaction].

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomohiko; Doi, Masakazu; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Akase, Tomohide

    2008-08-01

    Paclitaxel(referred to hereinafter as PTX )is used in ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, gastric cancer, and endometrial cancer with positive treatment result reports. However, severe allergic reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with relatively high frequency. For the prevention of such allergic reactions, administration of a premedication composed of the three components, dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablet, and ranitidine hydrochloride injection solution(or injectable famodine), is advised in the appended documentation. Administration is difficult because, among these three components, only diphenhydramine hydrochloride is administered orally and thus must be provided through the internal medicine department. Particularly when this combined dosage is administered as outpatient chemotherapy, the doctor must prescribe diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the patient must not forget to bring them on the day in which chemotherapy is administered. Also, checks by the medical staff such as pharmacists and nurses are required, complicating the administration of this therapy further. Taking this situation into consideration, our hospital uses a short-time premedication method wherein d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate injections are substituted for diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the time required for premedication is reduced to 15 minutes. This study investigated the allergic reaction ratio to consider the safety and usefulness of the short-time premedication method used at our hospital. The chemotherapy regimens conducted for the subject patients were 9 cases of PTX+CBDCA, 6 cases of biweekly- PTX, and 5 cases of weekly-PTX. A total of 67 PTX injections were given, 15 of them being first-time administrations. The ratio of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions was 10.0%(2 cases in 20). The short-time premedication method using d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate

  2. Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 contribute to peroxynitrite-mediated inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ndengele, Michael M; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Esposito, Emanuela; Mazzon, Emanuela; Di Paola, Rosanna; Matuschak, George M; Salvemini, Daniela

    2008-09-01

    Peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), the reaction product of the interaction between superoxide (O(2)(*-)) and nitric oxide (*NO), is a potent proinflammatory and cytotoxic nitrooxidative species. Its role as a mediator of hyperalgesia (clinically defined as an augmented sensitivity to painful stimuli) is not known. In light of the known proinflammatory properties of ONOO(-), our study addressed its potential involvement in the development of hyperalgesia associated with tissue damage and inflammation. Intraplantar injection in rats of the ONOO(-) precursor O(2)(*-) (1 microM) led to the development of thermal hyperalgesia associated with a profound localized inflammatory response. Both events were blocked by L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, 3-30 mg/kg), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, or by FeTM-4-PyP(5+) [Fe(III)5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin, 3-30 mg/kg], an ONOO(-) decomposition catalyst. These results suggested that locally synthesized ONOO(-) produced in situ by O(2)(*-) and *NO is key in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. The direct link between ONOO(-) and hyperalgesia was further supported by demonstrating that intraplantar injection of soluble ONOO(-) itself (1 microM) similarly led to inflammatory hyperalgesia. ONOO(-) generated by the interaction between exogenous administration of O(2)(*-) and endogenous *NO, or provided by direct injection of ONOO(-), activated the transcription factor NF-kappaB in paw tissues, enhancing expression of the inducible but not the constitutive cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2 and COX-1, respectively). ONOO(-)-mediated hyperalgesia was blocked in a dose-dependent manner by intraperitoneal injections of indomethacin (10 mg/kg), a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, or NS398 [N-(2-cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl)methanesulfonamide; 10 mg/kg] a selective COX-2 inhibitor, as well as by an anti-prostaglandin (PG) E(2) antibody (200 microg). In another established model of inflammation

  3. New approaches for predicting T cell–mediated drug reactions: A role for inducible and potentially preventable autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Aaron W.; Ostrov, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are commonplace and occur when a drug binds to its intended pharmacological target (Type A ADR) or an unintended target (Type B ADR). Immunologically mediated Type B ADRs, such as drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (SJS/TEN), can be severe and result in a diverse set of clinical manifestations that include fever and rash as well as multiple organ failure (liver, kidney, lungs, and/or heart) in the case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There is increasing evidence that specific HLA alleles influence the risk of drug reactions. Several features of T cell–mediated ADRs are strikingly similar to those displayed by autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, such as strong HLA association, organ-specific adaptive immune responses, viral involvement, and activation of innate immunity. There is a need to better predict patient populations at risk for developing immunologically mediated Type B ADRs. Since methods to predict type 1 diabetes using genetic and immunological biomarkers have been developed to a high level of accuracy (predicting 100% of individuals likely to progress), new research strategies based on these methods may also improve the ability to predict drug hypersensitivity. PMID:26254052

  4. New approaches for predicting T cell-mediated drug reactions: A role for inducible and potentially preventable autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Ostrov, David A

    2015-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are commonplace and occur when a drug binds to its intended pharmacologic target (type A ADR) or an unintended target (type B ADR). Immunologically mediated type B ADRs, such as drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, can be severe and result in a diverse set of clinical manifestations that include fever and rash, as well as multiple organ failure (liver, kidney, lungs, and/or heart) in the case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There is increasing evidence that specific HLA alleles influence the risk of drug reactions. Several features of T cell-mediated ADRs are strikingly similar to those displayed by patients with autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, such as strong HLA association, organ-specific adaptive immune responses, viral involvement, and activation of innate immunity. There is a need to better predict patient populations at risk for immunologically mediated type B ADRs. Because methods to predict type 1 diabetes by using genetic and immunologic biomarkers have been developed to a high level of accuracy (predicting 100% of subjects likely to progress), new research strategies based on these methods might also improve the ability to predict drug hypersensitivity. PMID:26254052

  5. A combined single-blind, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to determine the reproducibility of hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame.

    PubMed

    Garriga, M M; Berkebile, C; Metcalfe, D D

    1991-04-01

    Aspartame is an O-methyl ester composed of phenylalanine and aspartic acid. After its final approval as a sweetener in 1981, a number of reports of adverse reactions to aspartame appeared in the literature. To explore the pathogenesis of such reactions, we initiated a study in July 1986 to identify subjects with hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame with blinded challenge procedures. The study was closed after 32 months. During that time, we advertised in local newspapers and worked closely with the local community of allergists and dermatologists in an attempt to recruit subjects with hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame. A total of 61 self-referrals and physician referrals were screened, with 20 referrals evaluated in clinic. After this evaluation, 12 patients underwent single- and double-blind challenge with up to 2000 mg of aspartame. No subject with a clearly reproducible adverse reaction to aspartame was identified. In summary, we found that it is difficult to recruit study subjects with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to aspartame and that subjects who believed themselves allergic to aspartame did not have reproducible reactions.

  6. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47(phox) subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  7. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47phox subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  8. Hypersensitive reactions to local dental anesthetics and patient information: critical review of a drug leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the case of a patient who experienced adverse reactions to a local anesthetic. It reviews symptoms of adverse reactions, possible causes, patient management, and alternative anesthesia modes. The second part of the paper discusses the product leaflet information and the associated legal issues. PMID:22915891

  9. Involvement of the outer wall layer of Cladosporium cladosporioides in an IgG-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bergen, M S; Yang, T J; Collins, R P

    1988-01-01

    The serum of an individual hypersensitive to the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides reacted with the outer wall layer of germinating spores, immature hyphae, and, to a lesser extent, mature mycelium, as detected by the indirect immunofluorescence assay when goat anti-human IgG, but not goat anti-human IgE, was employed. The outer wall layer of ungerminated spores, however, did not react with the patient's serum and the anti-human IgG probe. When ungerminated spores were vortexed in physiological saline for 1 min, approximately 8 pg of protein/spore was released; this rapid release of protein may have been the cause of the loss of antigenic activity from the outer wall layer of ungerminated spores during the immunoassay process. Immunoblotting revealed the presence of a high molecular weight antigen in all the extracts of the fungus at various stages of the life cycle, including ungerminated and germinating spores, hyphae in the logarithmic phase, mature mycelium, and a culture filtrate of C. cladosporioides.

  10. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  11. Expression and inheritance of hypersensitive resistance to rice hoja blanca virus mediated by the viral nucleocapsid protein gene in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Z; Lozano, I; Tabares, E; Fory, L; Domínguez, J; Cuervo, M; Calvert, L

    2003-04-01

    Rice hoja blanca virus (RHBV) is a major virus disease of economic importance affecting rice in northern South America, Central America and the Caribbean. This is the first report of transgenic resistance to RHBV and the transformation of an indica rice variety from Latin America. Rice transformed with the RHBV nucleocapsid protein ( N) gene had a significant reduction in disease development. Several reactions were observed that ranged from susceptible to completely resistant plants (immunity). The resistant reactions were characterized by the production of local lesions like a hypersensitive reaction or a recovery phenotype with the emergence of symptom-less new leaves. These transgenic RHBV-resistant rice lines expressed the N gene RNA at low levels that were below the detection limit by Northern blots and only resolved by RT-PCR. The nucleocapsid protein could not be detected in any of the transgenic plants either by Western or ELISA tests. These results suggest that the resistance encoded by the N gene in these plants appears to be mediated by RNA. When challenged with RHBV, the resistant transgenic lines showed a significant increased performance for important agronomic traits including the number of tillers, the number of grains per plant and the yield as compared to the susceptible control. Furthermore, upon inoculation some of the most-resistant transgenic lines showed agronomic traits similar to the uninoculated non-transgenic Cica 8 control. Using both agronomic traits and disease severity as criteria, several of the most-resistant lines were followed through the R(4) generation and demonstrated that the N gene and RHBV resistance was inherited in a stable manner. These transgenic rice lines could become a new genetic resource in developing RHBV-resistant cultivars. PMID:12671749

  12. Lymphoid tissue phospholipase A2 group IID resolves contact hypersensitivity by driving antiinflammatory lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shimo, Kanako; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kabashima, Kenji; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Lambeau, Gérard; Bollinger, James M.; Hara, Shuntaro; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is mediated in part by antiinflammatory lipid mediators. Although phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes have been implicated in the promotion of inflammation through mobilizing lipid mediators, the molecular entity of PLA2 subtypes acting upstream of antiinflammatory lipid mediators remains unknown. Herein, we show that secreted PLA2 group IID (PLA2G2D) is preferentially expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and displays a pro-resolving function. In hapten-induced contact dermatitis, resolution, not propagation, of inflammation was compromised in skin and LNs of PLA2G2D-deficient mice (Pla2g2d−/−), in which the immune balance was shifted toward a proinflammatory state over an antiinflammatory state. Bone marrow-derived DCs from Pla2g2d−/− mice were hyperactivated and elicited skin inflammation after intravenous transfer into mice. Lipidomics analysis revealed that PLA2G2D in the LNs contributed to mobilization of a pool of polyunsaturated fatty acids that could serve as precursors for antiinflammatory/pro-resolving lipid mediators such as resolvin D1 and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, which reduced Th1 cytokine production and surface MHC class II expression in LN cells or DCs. Altogether, our results highlight PLA2G2D as a “resolving sPLA2” that ameliorates inflammation through mobilizing pro-resolving lipid mediators and points to a potential use of this enzyme for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:23690440

  13. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-01-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment. PMID:9061952

  14. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus. PMID:27072852

  15. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    Introducing aryl- and heteroaryl moieties into molecular scaffolds are often key steps in the syntheses of natural products, drugs, or functional materials. A variety of cross-coupling methods have been well established, mainly using transition metal mediated reactions between prefunctionalized substrates and arenes or C-H arylations with functionalization in only one coupling partner. Although highly developed, one drawback of the established sp2-sp2 arylations is the required transition metal catalyst, often in combination with specific ligands and additives. Therefore, photoredox mediated arylation methods have been developed as alternative over the past decade. We begin our survey with visible light photo-Meerwein arylation reactions, which allow C-H arylation of heteroarenes, enones, alkenes, and alkynes with organic dyes, such as eosin Y, as the photocatalyst. A good number of examples from different groups illustrate the broad application of the reaction in synthetic transformations. While initially only photo-Meerwein arylation-elimination processes were reported, the reaction was later extended to photo-Meerwein arylation-addition reactions giving access to the photoinduced three component synthesis of amides and esters from alkenes, aryl diazonium salts, nitriles or formamides, respectively. Other substrates with redox-active leaving groups have been explored in photocatalyzed arylation reactions, such as diaryliodonium and triarylsulfonium salts, and arylsulfonyl chlorides. We discus some examples with their scope and limitations. The scope of arylation reagents for photoredox reactions was extended to aryl halides. The challenge here is the extremely negative reduction potential of aryl halides in the initial electron transfer step compared to, e.g., aryl diazonium or diaryliodonium salts. In order to reach reduction potentials over -2.0 V vs SCE two consecutive photoinduced electron transfer steps were used. The intermediary formed colored radical

  16. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    Introducing aryl- and heteroaryl moieties into molecular scaffolds are often key steps in the syntheses of natural products, drugs, or functional materials. A variety of cross-coupling methods have been well established, mainly using transition metal mediated reactions between prefunctionalized substrates and arenes or C-H arylations with functionalization in only one coupling partner. Although highly developed, one drawback of the established sp2-sp2 arylations is the required transition metal catalyst, often in combination with specific ligands and additives. Therefore, photoredox mediated arylation methods have been developed as alternative over the past decade. We begin our survey with visible light photo-Meerwein arylation reactions, which allow C-H arylation of heteroarenes, enones, alkenes, and alkynes with organic dyes, such as eosin Y, as the photocatalyst. A good number of examples from different groups illustrate the broad application of the reaction in synthetic transformations. While initially only photo-Meerwein arylation-elimination processes were reported, the reaction was later extended to photo-Meerwein arylation-addition reactions giving access to the photoinduced three component synthesis of amides and esters from alkenes, aryl diazonium salts, nitriles or formamides, respectively. Other substrates with redox-active leaving groups have been explored in photocatalyzed arylation reactions, such as diaryliodonium and triarylsulfonium salts, and arylsulfonyl chlorides. We discus some examples with their scope and limitations. The scope of arylation reagents for photoredox reactions was extended to aryl halides. The challenge here is the extremely negative reduction potential of aryl halides in the initial electron transfer step compared to, e.g., aryl diazonium or diaryliodonium salts. In order to reach reduction potentials over -2.0 V vs SCE two consecutive photoinduced electron transfer steps were used. The intermediary formed colored radical

  17. Inhibition of immediate type hypersensitivity reaction by combined irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light.

    PubMed

    Koreck, Andrea; Csoma, Zsanett; Boros-Gyevi, Marta; Ignacz, Ferenc; Bodai, Laszlo; Dobozy, Attila; Kemeny, Lajos

    2004-12-01

    Recently we found that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation in erythematous doses significantly inhibited the immediate type hypersensibility reaction in the skin. In the present study we investigated the effects of different wavelengths on the skin prick test reaction (SPT). The forearm of ragweed allergic patients was irradiated with increasing doses of ultraviolet A (UVA), visible light (VIS) or combined UVB, UVA and VIS light, referred to as mUV/VIS. SPTs were performed 24 h after irradiation both on irradiated and non-irradiated control skin areas using ragweed extract. UVA and VIS irradiation led to a slight, not significant inhibition of allergen-induced wheal formation. Mixed irradiation with mUV/VIS light resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of the allergen-induced wheal formation. The inhibition was significant already at suberythematous doses. As there is a good correlation between SPT and the nasal symptoms in patients with hay fever these data suggest that phototherapy with mUV/VIS light might be an effective and safe treatment modality for immediate type hypersensibility reactions in the skin and nasal mucosa. PMID:15542366

  18. Spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 channel induces mechanical hypersensitivity, increases cutaneous blood flow, and mediates the pronociceptive action of dynorphin A.

    PubMed

    Wei, H; Saarnilehto, M; Falck, L; Viisanen, H; Lasierra, M; Koivisto, A; Pertovaara, A

    2013-06-01

    We characterized pain behavior and cutaneous blood flow response induced by activation of the spinal transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel using intrathecal drug administrations in the rat. Additionally, we assessed whether the pronociceptive actions induced by intrathecally administered dynorphin A, cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α) are mediated by the spinal TRPA1 channel. Cinnamaldehyde, a TRPA1 agonist, produced a dose-related (3-10 μg) cutaneous blood flow increase and mechanical hypersensitivity effect. These effects at the currently used doses were of short duration and attenuated, although not completely, by pretreatment with A-967079, a TRPA1 antagonist. The cinnamaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity was also reduced by pretreatment with minocycline (an inhibitor of microglial activation), but not by carbenoxolone (a gap junction decoupler). In vitro study, however, indicated that minocycline only poorly blocks the TRPA1 channel. The mechanical hypersensitivity effect induced by dynorphin A, but not that by cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α), was attenuated by a TRPA1 antagonist Chembridge-5861528 as well as A-967079. The cinnamaldehyde-induced cutaneous blood flow increase was not suppressed by MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, or bicuculline, a GABA(A) receptor antagonist. The results indicate that spinal TRPA1 channels promote mechanical pain hypersensitivity and due to antidromic activation of nociceptive nerve fibers increase cutaneous blood flow. The attenuation of the cinnamaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity effect by minocycline may be explained by action other than block of the TRPA1 channel. Moreover, the spinal TRPA1 channel is involved in mediating the pronociceptive action of dynorphin A, but not that of the spinal cholecystokinin or prostaglandin F(2α).

  19. Phytohemagglutinin induces major short-term protease-sensitive lymphocyte traffic involving high endothelium venule-like blood vessels in acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in skin and other tissues.

    PubMed

    Binns, R M; Licence, S T; Wooding, F B

    1990-05-01

    Injection of phytohemagglutinin induces dose-dependent acute delayed-type hypersensitivity-like reactions in young pig skin which attract large numbers of labeled peripheral blood lymphocytes and lymphoblasts but not red cells. Similar reactions are induced in the gut wall, joints, and draining lymph nodes, and also in the skin of sheep and cattle, and by concanavalin A. Labeled peripheral blood lymphocyte entry starts within 2 h, is maximal at 6-18 h and is effectively over by 48 h and, both early and late, is markedly inhibited in a selective way by trypsinization, like high endothelium venule-mediated entry to lymphoid tissues. Electron microscopy showed development of high endothelium venule-like blood vessels with intramural lymphoid cells in mononuclear infiltrates. Inductive processes in this model short-term peripheral defense mechanism are being investigated.

  20. Asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen.

    PubMed

    Somerville, P; Wray, R C

    1993-05-01

    We report a unique patient with true asymmetrical hypersensitivity to bovine collagen. Hypersensitivity is the development of an inflammatory response at a treatment site after a negative skin test. She developed an inflammatory response in only one of two simultaneously injected sites. About 1.5% of patients with a negative skin test have a hypersensitivity reaction consisting of firmness, erythema, and swelling. The signs and symptoms generally resolve spontaneously in a few months.

  1. Allergic hypersensitivity to neomycin. Relationship between patch test reactions and 'use' tests.

    PubMed

    Prystowsky, S D; Nonomura, J H; Smith, R W; Allen, A M

    1979-06-01

    The prevalence of neomycin patch test sensitivity in the general population is approximately 1%. We describe the relationship between positive neomycin patch tests and clinical "use tests" with two antibiotic combinations (Neosporin G cream and Neosporin ointment). The neomycin use test was positive in seven of eight subjects with a strongly positive patch test, and in two of four subjects with a weakly positive patch test. A positive use test usually occurred earlier and was always more intense with the cream base. The use test reactions were usually mild even with continued application of the antigen. Use tests with commercial products may be helpful in evaluating the clinical relevance of positive patch tests.

  2. Flavohaemoglobin HmpX from Erwinia chrysanthemi confers nitrosative stress tolerance and affects the plant hypersensitive reaction by intercepting nitric oxide produced by the host.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Martine; Mills, Catherine E; Zeier, Jürgen; Anzi, Chiara; Lamb, Chris; Poole, Robert K; Delledonne, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Host cells respond to infection by generating nitric oxide (NO) as a cytotoxic weapon to facilitate killing of invading microbes. Bacterial flavohaemoglobins are well-known scavengers of NO and play a crucial role in protecting animal pathogens from nitrosative stress during infection. Erwinia chrysanthemi, which causes macerating diseases in a wide variety of plants, possesses a flavohaemoglobin (HmpX) whose function in plant pathogens has remained unclear. Here we show that HmpX consumes NO and prevents inhibition by NO of cell respiration, indicating a role in protection from nitrosative stress. Furthermore, infection of Saintpaulia ionantha plants with an HmpX-deficient mutant of E. chrysanthemi revealed that the lack of NO scavenging activity causes the accumulation of unusually high levels of NO in host tissue and triggers hypersensitive cell death. Introduction of the wild-type hmpX gene in an incompatible strain of Pseudomonas syringae had a dramatic effect on the hypersensitive cell death in soya bean cell suspensions, and markedly reduced the development of macroscopic symptoms in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These observations indicate that HmpX not only protects against nitrosative stress but also attenuates host hypersensitive reaction during infection by intercepting NO produced by the plant for the execution of the hypersensitive cell death programme. PMID:15998309

  3. Ten weeks of infection with a tissue-invasive helminth protects against local immune complex-mediated inflammation, but not cutaneous type I hypersensitivity, in previously sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E.; Mitre, Blima K.; Morris, C. Paul; Kim, So-Young; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect chronic helminth infection has on allergic disease in mice previously sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). 10 weeks of infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis reduced immunological markers of type I hypersensitivity, including OVA-specific IgE, basophil activation, and mast cell degranulation. Despite these reductions, there was no protection against immediate clinical hypersensitivity following intradermal OVA challenge. However, late phase ear swelling, due to type III hypersensitivity, was significantly reduced in chronically infected animals. Levels of total IgG2a, OVA-specific IgG2a, and OVA-specific IgG1 were reduced in the setting of infection. These reductions were likely due to increased antibody catabolism as ELISPOT assays demonstrated that infected animals do not have suppressed antibody production. Ear histology 24 hours after challenge showed infected animals have reduced cellular infiltration in the ear, with significant decreases in numbers of neutrophils and macrophages. Consistent with this, infected animals had less neutrophil-specific chemokines CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 in the ear following challenge. Additionally, in vitro stimulation with immune-complexes resulted in significantly less CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 production by eosinophils from chronically infected mice. Expression of FcγRI was also significantly reduced on eosinophils from infected animals. These data indicate that chronic filarial infection suppresses eosinophilic responses to antibody-mediated activation and has the potential to be used as a therapeutic for pre-existing hypersensitivity diseases. PMID:26324775

  4. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  5. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis.

  6. Localized Changes in Peroxidase Activity Accompany Hydrogen Peroxide Generation during the Development of a Nonhost Hypersensitive Reaction in Lettuce1

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Charles S.; Brown, Ian R.; Mansfield, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxidase activity was characterized in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) leaf tissue. Changes in the activity and distribution of the enzyme were examined during the development of a nonhost hypersensitive reaction (HR) induced by Pseudomonas syringae (P. s.) pv phaseolicola and in response to an hrp mutant of the bacterium. Assays of activity in tissue extracts revealed pH optima of 4.5, 6.0, 5.5 to 6.0, and 6.0 to 6.5 for the substrates tetramethylbenzidine, guaiacol, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid, respectively. Inoculation with water or with wild-type or hrp mutant strains of P. s. pv phaseolicola caused an initial decline in total peroxidase activity; subsequent increases depended on the hydrogen donor used in the assay. Guaiacol peroxidase recovered more rapidly in tissues undergoing the HR, whereas changes in tetramethylbenzidine peroxidase were generally similar in the two interactions. In contrast, increases in chlorogenic acid peroxidase were significantly higher in tissues inoculated with the hrp mutant. During the HR, increased levels of Mn2+/2,4-dichlorophenol-stimulated NADH and NADPH oxidase activities, characteristic of certain peroxidases, were found in intercellular fluids and closely matched the accumulation of H2O2 in the apoplast. Histochemical analysis of peroxidase distribution by electron microscopy revealed a striking, highly localized increase in activity within the endomembrane system and cell wall at the sites of bacterial attachment. However, no clear differences in peroxidase location were observed in tissue challenged by the wild-type strain or the hrp mutant. Our results highlight the significance of the subcellular control of oxidative reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell wall alterations, and the HR. PMID:9808752

  7. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS): symptoms of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to foods.

    PubMed

    Amlot, P L; Kemeny, D M; Zachary, C; Parkes, P; Lessof, M H

    1987-01-01

    Eighty highly atopic patients were selected for study because they had either atopic eczema (fifty cases) or atopic reactivity to foods, as judged by a positive skin-prick test (thirty cases). In all, sixty-five out of eighty subjects (81%) described symptoms of some kind provoked by foods, but correspondingly positive skin tests were found in only half of these, thirty-three out of eighty (41%). The symptoms experienced by thirty-one of the thirty-three patients with positive skin tests were immediate in onset (within 1 hr) and were at first confined to the upper gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent symptoms being oral irritation and throat tightness. In a proportion of these patients, further symptoms such as urticaria, asthma or anaphylaxis developed following the initial oral symptoms, which suggested the term 'oral allergy syndrome'. In the absence of the oral allergy, symptoms such as asthma, urticaria, migraine or eczema starting later than 1 hr after food were seldom associated with positive skin tests. In the oral allergy syndrome, the characteristic symptoms (strong association with positive skin tests and RAST, time of onset and sites at which symptoms are expressed) suggest a causative relationship between exposure to food antigens and specific IgE-induced release of mediators. In cases of food intolerance that lack a characteristic symptom pattern and a positive skin test or radio-allergo-sorbent test, it seems appropriate to consider non-IgE-mediated causes. PMID:3829369

  8. Detection of a hypersensitive reaction in the chestnut hybrid 'Bouche de Bétizac' infested by Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu.

    PubMed

    Dini, Francesca; Sartor, Chiara; Botta, Roberto

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the study was the identification of the mechanisms of resistance to Dryocosmus kuriphilus Yasumatsu in the hybrid-resistant cultivar 'Bouche de Bétizac' (Castanea sativa × Castanea crenata). Larvae and eggs of the insect are found in the buds of this cultivar at the end of winter, but there is no gall development after budburst. The hypothesis of the presence of a hypersensitive reaction (HR) in the buds was tested using diaminobenzidine (DAB) to detect H(2)O(2) and by Real Time PCR (RT-PCR) to evaluate the expression of a germin-like protein gene. HR in plants is elicited by the production of reactive oxygen compounds, such as H(2)O(2), and results in the programmed cell death. The DAB test was applied to buds of 'Bouche de Bétizac' and of the susceptible cultivar 'Madonna' (C. sativa) at different stages of budburst. The DAB staining produced brown areas in the swelling buds of 'Bouche de Bétizac', indicating the presence of H(2)O(2). On the contrary, all uninfested buds, as well as the infested buds of 'Madonna', appeared whitish. Papers report that germin and germin-like proteins (GLP) with oxalate oxidase activity are discrete markers of stress-responsive gene products. A strong expression of the chestnut GLP gene was detected by RT-PCR at bud swelling in infested 'Bouche de Bétizac' buds but not in 'Madonna' ones. The results support the hypothesis of the occurrence of an HR in 'Bouche de Bétizac' as response to the cynipid infestation, resulting in cell and larvae death.

  9. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  10. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and ... May 27, 2016 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National ...

  11. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Executive Committee Board of Trustees Governance Past Presidents Staff/Contact History Awards Our Partners Membership Membership Categories Renew Your Membership Login Fellowship Academic Fellowship Affiliate Fellowship (AFAOM) Application Process Fellowship Study ...

  12. Targeting a Cross-Reactive Gly m 5 Soy Peptide as Responsible for Hypersensitivity Reactions in a Milk Allergy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L.; Candreva, Angela M.; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Methods Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Results Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Conclusions Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide. PMID:24416141

  13. Molecular characterization and expression of the Erwinia carotovora hrpNEcc gene, which encodes an elicitor of the hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Cui, Y; Liu, Y; Chatterjee, A K

    1997-05-01

    The nucleotide sequence of hrpNEcc DNA, cloned from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora strain Ecc71, reveals a coding region of 1,068 bp which matches the size of hrpNEcc transcripts. hrpNEcc is predicted to encode a glycine-rich protein of approximately 36 kDa. Like the elicitors of the hypersensitive reaction (HR) produced by E. chrysanthemi (HarpinEch) and E. amylovora (HarpinEa), the deduced 36-kDa protein does not possess a typical signal sequence, but it contains a putative membrane-spanning domain. In Escherichia coli strains overexpressing hrpNEcc, the 36-kDa protein has been identified as the hrpNEcc product by Western blot analysis using anti-HarpinEch antibodies. The 36-kDa protein fractionated from E. coli elicits the HR in tobacco leaves. Moreover, a HrpN- and RsmA- double mutant (RsmA = regulator of secondary metabolites) does not produce this 36-kDa protein or elicit the HR, although this strain, like the RsmA- and HrpN+ bacteria, overproduces extracellular enzymes and macerates celery petioles. These observations demonstrate that hrpNEcc encodes the elicitor of the HR, designated HarpinEcc. The levels of hrpNEcc transcripts are affected in both RsmA+ and RsmA- strains by media composition and carbon sources, although the mRNA levels are substantially higher in the RsmA- strains. The expression of hrpNEcc in Ecc71 is cell density dependent and is activated by the quorum-sensing signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHL). By contrast, hrpNEcc expression in an RsmA- strain is independent of cell density, and substantial expression occurs in the absence of OHL. The effects of cultural conditions and the occurrence of putative cis-acting sequences, such as consensus sigma 54 promoters and an hrp promoter upstream of the transcriptional start site, indicate that the production of HarpinEcc in wild-type RsmA+ E. carotovora subsp. carotovora is tightly regulated. These observations, taken along with the finding that the HR is caused by Rsm

  14. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  15. Hypersensitivity syndrome caused by amitriptyline administration

    PubMed Central

    Milionis, H.; Skopelitou, A.; Elisaf, M.

    2000-01-01

    Adverse cutaneous manifestations are among the most common side effects associated with psychotropic drugs. Skin reactions due to amitriptyline (a tricyclic antidepressant agent) include rashes and hypersensitivity reactions (for example, urticaria and photosensitivity) as well as hyperpigmentation. Hypersensitivity syndrome is a specific severe idiosyncratic reaction causing skin, liver, joint, and haematological abnormalities, which usually resolve after the discontinuation of the implicated drug. A case of a 24 year old woman who experienced hypersensitivity syndrome three weeks after the initiation of amitriptyline is reported.


Keywords: tricyclic antidepressant drugs; amitriptyline; adverse cutaneous reactions; hypersensitivity syndrome PMID:10824052

  16. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  17. Presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated reactions in periprosthetic tissue after aseptic loosening of total hip replacements with metal bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huber, Monika; Reinisch, Georg; Trettenhahn, Günter; Zweymüller, Karl; Lintner, Felix

    2009-01-01

    Aseptic loosening of articular implants is frequently associated with tissue reactions to wear particles. Some patients, who had received metal-on-metal articulations, present early symptoms including persistent pain and implant failure. These symptoms raise the suspicion about the development of an immunological response. Furthermore, the generation of rare corrosion products in association with metallic implants has been observed. Corrosion products are known to enhance third-body wear and contribute to the loss of the implant. The purpose of this study was to investigate periprosthetic tissue containing solid corrosion products after aseptic loosening of second-generation metal-on-metal total hip replacements made of low-carbon cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy for the presence of immunologically determined tissue changes. Periprosthetic tissue of 11 cases containing uncommon solid deposits was investigated by light microscopy. In order to confirm the presence of corrosion products, additional methods including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were used. All investigated cases revealed solid chromium orthophosphate corrosion products as well as metallic wear particles to a various extent. Moreover, various intense tissue reactions characteristic of immune response were observed in all cases. The simultaneous presence of corrosion products and hypersensitivity-associated tissue reaction indicates that a relationship between corrosion development and implant-related hypersensitivity may exist. PMID:18725188

  18. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. PMID:27067273

  19. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk.

  20. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  1. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  2. Dentine hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    West, Nicola; Seong, Joon; Davies, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity is a common oral pain condition affecting many individuals. The aetiology is multifactorial; however, over recent years the importance of erosion has become more evident. For dentine hypersensitivity to occur, the lesion must first be localised on the tooth surface and then initiated to exposed dentine tubules which are patent to the pulp. The short, sharp pain symptom is thought to be derived from the hydrodynamic pain theory and, although transient, is arresting, affecting quality of life. This episodic pain condition is likely to become a more frequent dental complaint in the future due to the increase in longevity of the dentition and the rise in tooth wear, particularly amongst young adults. Many efficacious treatment regimens are now available, in particular a number of over-the-counter home use products. The basic principles of treatment are altering fluid flow in the dentinal tubules with tubule occlusion or modifying or chemically blocking the pulpal nerve. PMID:24993261

  3. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:22576054

  4. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions.

  5. [Dentinal hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Steinkeller-Dekel, M; Smidt, A; Pilo, R

    2010-01-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is defined as short and transient painful response of exposed dentin, usually cervical, to different stimuli, such as thermal, mechanical osmotic or chemical. The etiology of dentinal hypersensitivity is open tubules (because of enamel loss or gingival recession), allowing painful stimulus to reach the pulp. The hydrodynamic theory explains the mechanism through which pain is aroused. When treating dentinal hypersensitivity, dentists always have to rule out other pathologies, such as carries, leakage, postoperative sensitivity, cracked tooth etc., and only then assess pain intensity and treat the tooth. Treatment always starts with prevention of both stimulus and exposure of dentin, and reducing predisposing factors. The treatment options include OTC products, such as fluoride and/or potassium enriched mouth washes and dentifrices, or in-office treatments, such as high content fluoride varnishes and gels, potassium oxalate chelating agents, Glutaraldehyde containing tissue fixating agents, bonding materials, low viscosity glass ionomers and even non-conservative treatments such as root canal therapy or mucogingival surgical interventions. PMID:20597258

  6. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  7. Normative Mediation of Reactions to Crowding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin, Robert A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This study manipulated norms governing interaction levels in crowded groups of women. Results indicated norms influenced reactions to crowding as predicted. Women reacted most positively when interaction levels were high and most negatively when interaction levels were low. (Author)

  8. Sensitization of P2X3 receptors by cystathionine β-synthetase mediates persistent pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhu, Hongyan; Zou, Kang; Yuan, Bo; Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Xinghong; Yan, Jun; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-03-20

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a major cause of discogenic low back pain and sciatica, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is becoming recognized for its involvement in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. The present study was designed to investigate the roles of the H2S signaling pathway in the regulation of expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2XRs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats with LDH. LDH was induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP), harvested from rat tail, in lumbar 5 and 6 spinal nerve roots. Implantation of autologous NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, which was partially reversed by an intrathecal injection of A317491, a potent inhibitor of P2X3Rs and P2X2/3Rs. The NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity was associated with the increased expression of P2X3Rs, but not P2X1Rs and P2X2Rs, receptors in L5-6 DRGs. NP implantation also produced a 2-fold increase in ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons when compared to those of controls (P < 0.05). Interestingly, NP implantation significantly enhanced expression of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme, cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS). Systematic administration of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of CBS, suppressed the upregulation of P2X3R expression and the potentiation of ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons (P < 0.05). Intrathecal injection of AOAA markedly attenuated NP induced- persistent pain hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that sensitization of P2X3Rs, which is likely mediated by CBS-H2S signaling in primary sensory neurons, contributes to discogenic pain. Targeting CBS/H2S-P2X3R signaling may represent a potential treatment for neuropathic pain caused by LDH.

  9. Quantum reaction boundary to mediate reactions in laser fields.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2011-01-14

    Dynamics of passage over a saddle is investigated for a quantum system under the effect of time-dependent external field (laser pulse). We utilize the recently developed theories of nonlinear dynamics in the saddle region, and extend them to incorporate both time-dependence of the external field and quantum mechanical effects of the system. Anharmonic couplings and laser fields with any functional form of time dependence are explicitly taken into account. As the theory is based on the Weyl expression of quantum mechanics, interpretation is facilitated by the classical phase space picture, while no "classical approximation" is involved. We introduce a quantum reactivity operator to extract the reactive part of the system. In a model system with an optimally controlled laser field for the reaction, it is found that the boundary of the reaction in the phase space, extracted by the reactivity operator, is modulated with time by the effect of the laser field, to "catch" the system excited in the reactant region, and then to "release" it into the product region. This method provides new insights in understanding the origin of optimal control of chemical reactions by laser fields.

  10. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  11. The effects of anticoagulants and other drugs on cellular and cutaneous reactions to antigen in guinea-pigs with delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D. S.

    1965-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity to tuberculin was induced in guinea-pigs by vaccination with BCG. The effects of several drugs on the responses of peritoneal exudate cells to tuberculin (PPD) and on delayed skin reactions to PPD were investigated. In untreated animals intraperitoneal injections of PPD were followed by the virtually complete loss of macrophages from the exudates (the macrophage disappearance reaction), the partial loss of lymphocytes and a marked increase in the number of polymorphs in the exudates. The macrophage disappearance reaction was markedly or completely inhibited in animals treated with the anticoagulant drugs heparin or sodium warfarin, very slightly inhibited in animals treated with cortisone acetate or promethazine and not inhibited in animals treated with reserpine. The other peritoneal cellular responses were variably but only slightly affected by these drugs. Delayed skin reactions to PPD were partly inhibited in animals treated with heparin, sodium warfarin or cortisone acetate and more strongly inhibited in animals treated with a combination of sodium warfarin and cortisone acetate. Histological examination of the skin test sites of untreated animals and of animals treated with sodium warfarin and/or cortisone acetate showed that the accumulation of macrophages was more markedly inhibited in animals treated with sodium warfarin than in animals treated with cortisone alone. No correlation could be established between the effect of treatment with sodium warfarin on the macrophage disappearance reaction, on blood coagulation and on serum complement levels. ImagesFIGS. 2-5 PMID:5838197

  12. A redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and application in immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ru-Jia; Ma, Wei; Peng, Mao-Pan; Bai, Zhi-Shan; Long, Yi-Tao

    2016-08-31

    A novel redox-mediated chromogenic reaction was demonstrated based on the reaction between HAuCl4 and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), which generate various color responses from red to green in the resulting solutions. Various redox substance could be used to mediate the reaction and trigger a distinct color response. We established a sensitive hydrogen peroxide colorimetric sensor based on the redox-mediated chromogenic reaction and depicted the application both in detection of enzyme and in an immunoassay. Combining the traditional chromogenic reagent with gold nanoparticles, our assay has the advantage in short response time (within three minutes), high sensitivity (10(-12) g mL(-1) for HBsAg) and stability. PMID:27506364

  13. Transplant-mediated enhancement of spinal cord GABAergic inhibition reverses paclitaxel-induced mechanical and heat hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bráz, João M; Wang, Xidao; Guan, Zhonghui; Rubenstein, John L; Basbaum, Allan I

    2015-06-01

    Decreased spinal cord GABAergic inhibition is a major contributor to the persistent neuropathic pain that can follow peripheral nerve injury. Recently, we reported that restoring spinal cord GABAergic signaling by intraspinal transplantation of cortical precursors of GABAergic interneurons from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse the mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia) that characterizes a neuropathic pain model in the mouse. We show that MGE cell transplants are also effective against both the mechanical allodynia and the heat hyperalgesia produced in a paclitaxel-induced chemotherapy model of neuropathic pain. To test the necessity of GABA release by the transplants, we also studied the utility of transplanting MGE cells from mice with a deletion of VGAT, the vesicular GABA transporter. Transplants from these mice, in which GABA is synthesized but cannot be stored or released, had no effect on mechanical hypersensitivity or heat hyperalgesia in the paclitaxel model. Taken together, these results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of GABAergic precursor cell transplantation in diverse neuropathic pain models and support our contention that restoration of inhibitory controls through release of GABA from the transplants is their mode of action. PMID:25760475

  14. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R.J.; Tse, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents. Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects. For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test. It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs. PMID:445303

  15. Detection of delayed hypersensitivity reaction in rats by radioisotopic footpad assay with sodium deoxycholate extract and mitomycin-C-treated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Mizushima, Y; Hosokawa, M; Kobayashi, H

    1978-08-01

    Immune response in WKA rats immunized with methylcholanthrene-induced KMT-17 tumor was measured by radioisotopic footpad assay. The assay was specific, quantitative, and objective compared with the ordinary method of measuring the thickness of footpads. The strongest footpad reaction was observed 24 hr after injection of the antigens. The reaction was transferred by lymphoid cells but not by serum. These results indicate that the footpad assay manifests delayed-type hypersensitivity to tumor antigens. In order to obtain more reliable antigen preparation for the footpad assay, antigens prepared by several methods were compared. Solubilized antigen extracted with sodium deoxycholate (DOC) showed the strongest reaction in the immunized host and weak reaction in the control non-immunized host. This marked difference between the immunized and control groups indicates that DOC-extracted antigen was better antigen than tumor cells treated with mitomycin-C (40 microgram/ml), formaldehyde solution (0.2%, 0.01%), X-irradiation (3,500, 10,000 rad), non-treated whole-cell antigen, crude membrane, cell homogenates, or antigens extracted by hypotonic sonication and 3M KCl method. The DOC-extracted antigen was well preserved at -20 degrees for 1 month. PMID:81787

  16. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in patients with type B acute and chronic hepatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Nagafuchi, S; Kashiwagi, S; Hayashi, S; Inoue, T; Imayama, S; Takeshita, M; Kikuchi, M

    1985-01-01

    Skin reactivity to HBsAg was studied in patients with type B acute and chronic hepatitis and in healthy controls. HBsAg preparations containing 50 micrograms/ml of antigen both with and without alum elicited positive skin reactions in all seven anti-HBs+ persons. Histological examination of skin tissue from the reactive area using monoclonal antibodies to the cell surface of lymphocytes revealed accumulation of Leu-3a positive lymphocytes, showing that the inflammation was a typical delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Irrespective of the presence of HBeAg and anti-HBe, patients with chronic type B hepatitis responded clearly to PPD and SK/SD antigens, whereas they did not exhibit DTH skin reactivity to HBsAg. In contrast, although patients with acute type B hepatitis did not exhibit specific DTH a reaction to HBsAg in the acute period, they began to develop DTH skin reactivity to HBsAg in the convalescent phase of the disease preceding the appearance of anti-HBs antibody. It is suggested that DTH reaction to HBsAg might play an important role in the pathogenesis of type B viral hepatitis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:4075587

  17. Practical Management of Patients with a History of Immediate Hypersensitivity to Common non-Beta-Lactam Drugs.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to medications are among the most feared adverse drug reactions, because of their close association with anaphylaxis. This review discusses a practical management approach for patients with a history of an immediate hypersensitivity to a non-beta-lactam medication, where reexposure to the implicated, or similar, medication is clinically necessary. Mechanisms associated with severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions include IgE-mediated mast cell activation, complement-mediated mast cell activation, and direct mast cell activation. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions may also be mediated by vasodilators, other pharmacologic mechanisms, or be secondary to underlying patient-specific biochemical abnormalities such as endocrine tumors or chronic spontaneous urticaria. The key features in the reaction history and the biochemistry of the implicated medication are discussed. Most individuals with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to a medication, who require reuse of that drug, can be safely retreated with a therapeutic course of the implicated drug after a full-dose challenge, graded challenge, or desensitization, with or without premedication and/or any preliminary diagnostic testing, depending on the specific situation.

  18. [Hypersensitivity to mosquito bite manifested as Skeeter síndrome].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; García-Calderín, Diego; Ibarra, Jesús Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The reactions to mosquito bites are immunological reactions with involvement of IgE, IgG and T cells mediated hypersensitivity. These reactions are common and range from small local reactions, large local reactions to systemic allergic reactions. Skeeter syndrome is defined as a large local induced inflammatory reaction to mosquito bite and sometimes accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and vomiting. Diagnosis is based on clinical history and physical examination, supported by the identification of specific IgE by skin testing. Treatment includes prevention, antihistamines and steroids in some cases. Specific immunotherapy still requires further study. This paper reports two cases of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to mosquito bites, which were evaluated in our center presenting positive skin tests.

  19. The Absence of CYP3A5*3 Is a Protective Factor to Anticonvulsants Hypersensitivity Reactions: A Case-Control Study in Brazilian Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Kerr, Daniel Shikanai; dos Santos, Bernardo; Talib, Leda Leme; Yamaguti, Célia; Rodrigues, Helcio; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Although aromatic anticonvulsants are usually well tolerated, they can cause cutaneous adverse drug reactions in up to 10% of patients. The clinical manifestations of the antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions (AHR) vary from mild skin rashes to severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions which are related to high mortality and significant morbidity. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes are associated with altered enzymatic activity and may contribute to the risk of AHR. Here we present a case-control study in which we genotyped SNPs of CYP2C19, 2C9 and 3A5 of 55 individuals with varying severities of AHR, 83 tolerant, and 366 healthy control subjects from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical characterization was based on standardized scoring systems and drug patch test. All in vivo investigation followed the ENDA (European Network of Drug Allergy) recommendations. Genotype was determined by real time PCR using peripheral blood DNA as a template. Of all 504 subjects, 65% were females, 45% self-identified as Afro-American, 38% as Caucasian and 17% as having non-African mixed ascendancy. Amongst 55 subjects with AHR, 44 had severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions. Of the 46 drug patch tests performed, 29 (63%) were positive. We found a strong association between the absence of CYP3A5*3 and tolerant subjects when compared to AHR (p = 0.0002, OR = 5.28 [CI95% 2.09-14.84]). None of our groups presented positive association with CYP2C19 and 2C9 polymorphisms, however, both SNPs contributed to separation of cases and tolerants in a Classification and Regression Tree. Our findings indicate that drug metabolism genes can contribute in the tolerability of antiepileptics. CYP3A5*3 is the most prevalent CYP3A5 allele associated with reduced enzymatic function. The current study provides evidence that normal CYP3A5 activity might be a protective factor to aromatic antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Brazilian subjects. PMID:26291084

  20. Wheat hypersensitive-induced reaction genes TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 are involved in response to stripe rust fungus infection and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yinghui; Guo, Jun; Shi, Xuexia; Guan, Xiangnan; Liu, Furong; Bai, Pengfei; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2013-02-01

    KEY MESSAGE : TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 play positive roles in resistance to the stripe rust fungus via inducing HR and regulating defense-related genes, but are negatively regulated by various abiotic stimuli. Plant hypersensitive-induced reaction (HIR) genes are known to be associated with the hypersensitive response and disease defense. In wheat, two HIR genes, TaHIR1 and TaHIR3, have been identified and found to be up-regulated after infection with the stripe rust fungus. Here, we further determined their roles in defense against abiotic stresses and the stripe rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 proteins were localized in the plasma membrane of tobacco cells. The expression of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 was reduced by the environmental stimuli, including low temperature, drought, and high salinity stresses. In addition, the expression of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 was down-regulated by exogenously applied ethrel and abscisic acid, whereas expression was not affected by treatments with salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. Furthermore, barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing of TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 reduced resistance in wheat cultivar Suwon11 against an avirulent stripe rust pathotype CYR23 and area of necrotic cells neighboring the infection sites, and altered the expression levels of defense-related genes. These results suggest that TaHIR1 and TaHIR3 function positively in the incompatible interaction of wheat-stripe rust fungus, but exhibit negative transcriptional response to abiotic stresses.

  1. Phospholipase D-mediated hypersensitivity at central synapses is associated with abnormal behaviours and pain sensitivity in rats exposed to prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liting; Gooding, Hayley L; Brunton, Paula J; Russell, John A; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue

    2013-11-01

    Adverse events at critical stages of development can lead to lasting dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS). To seek potential underlying changes in synaptic function, we used a newly developed protocol to measure alterations in receptor-mediated Ca(2+) fluorescence responses of synaptoneurosomes, freshly isolated from selected regions of the CNS concerned with emotionality and pain processing. We compared adult male controls and offspring of rats exposed to social stress in late pregnancy (prenatal stress, PS), which showed programmed behavioural changes indicating anxiety, anhedonia and pain hypersensitivity. We found corresponding increases, in PS rats compared with normal controls, in responsiveness of synaptoneurosomes from frontal cortex to a glutamate receptor (GluR) agonist, and from spinal cord to activators of nociceptive afferents. Through a combined pharmacological and biochemical strategy, we found evidence for a role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1)-mediated signalling, that may involve 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) activation, at both levels of the nervous system. These changes might participate in underpinning the enduring alterations in behaviour induced by PS. PMID:23932932

  2. Avocado hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Blanco, C; Carrillo, T; Castillo, R; Quiralte, J; Cuevas, M

    1994-07-01

    The avocado (Av) is a fruit that belongs to the Lauraceae family. We report 17 patients with immediate hypersensitivity to avocado. Clinical manifestations in relation to avocado ingestion were as follows: systemic anaphylaxis in seven patients, angioedema/urticaria in six, vomiting in two, bronchial asthma in one, and rhinoconjunctivitis in one. Skin prick test (SPT) with fresh avocado was positive in all patients with the Strong avocado variety (SAv) and in 14 patients with the Hass avocado variety (HAv). Our patient-associated sensitizations were as follows: 10 to latex, eight to chestnut, eight to banana, four to kiwi, and four to walnut. Avocado-sensitized patients with latex allergy were typically middle-aged women, professionally exposed to latex, who also exhibited frequent associated sensitizations to chestnut, banana, and other fruits. Specific IgE against avocado was demonstrated in 11 of our patients, by both commercial CAP and RAST with avocado extract coupled to nitrocellulose disks. Despite its lower protein content, SAv seems to be more allergenic than HAv, both in vivo and in vitro. On incubating a pool of sera from our patients with avocado, latex, chestnut, and banana extracts, a progressive RAST inhibition was obtained, with SAv- and chestnut-marked disks. This suggests the existence of common antigenic determinants among these allergens.

  3. Rpi-blb2-Mediated Hypersensitive Cell Death Caused by Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 Requires SGT1, but not EDS1, NDR1, Salicylic Acid-, Jasmonic Acid-, or Ethylene-Mediated Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang-Keun; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Choi, Doil

    2014-09-01

    Potato Rpi-blb2 encodes a protein with a coiled-coil-nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (CC-NBS-LRR) motif that recognizes the Phytophthora infestans AVRblb2 effector and triggers hypersensitive cell death (HCD). To better understand the components required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in plants, we used virus-induced gene silencing to repress candidate genes in Rpi-blb2-transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants and assayed the plants for AVRblb2 effector. Rpi-blb2 triggers HCD through NbSGT1-mediated pathways, but not NbEDS1- or NbNDR1-mediated pathways. In addition, the role of salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET) in Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD were analyzed by monitoring of the responses of NbICS1-, NbCOI1-, or NbEIN2-silenced or Rpi-blb2::NahG-transgenic plants. Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2 was not associated with SA accumulation. Thus, SA affects Rpi-blb2-mediated resistance against P. infestans, but not Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2. Additionally, JA and ET signaling were not required for Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in N. benthamiana. Taken together, these findings suggest that NbSGT1 is a unique positive regulator of Rpi-blb2-mediated HCD in response to AVRblb2, but EDS1, NDR1, SA, JA, and ET are not required.

  4. Cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reactions of cattle vaccinated with mutant strains of Brucella abortus, using brucellins prepared from various brucellar strains.

    PubMed

    Cheville, N F; Jensen, A E; Morfitt, D C; Stabel, T J

    1994-09-01

    Cutaneous reactivity to brucellin was evaluated in 10-month-old heifers vaccinated with low-virulence mutant strains of Brucella abortus and was compared with brucellin reactions in postparturient cows with active brucellosis. In the cows, the cutaneous lesion was characterized microscopically as severe, acute, serofibrinous vasculitis; dermal lesions at 6, 12, 25, and 48 hours after brucellin injection consisted of endothelial activation and perivascular exudation that led to progressive accumulation of fibrin, monocytes, macrophages, and lymphocytes. In vaccinated heifers, cutaneous tests were done, using standard brucellin, brucellin prepared from strain RB51, and the purified brucellar proteins-31K and superoxide dismutase. Negative-control cattle given saline solution, did not have cutaneous reactions. Standard brucellin induced the most marked reactions in vaccinated heifers. Brucellin from rough strain RB51 caused positive reactions in heifers vaccinated with strain 19, but reactions were variable in other groups. Skin lesions induced by purified superoxide dismutase and 31-kd proteins in vaccinated cattle were not acceptable for diagnosis. Marked variability of test responses in vaccinated cattle precludes field use of this test to determine vaccination status.

  5. Anandamide Attenuates Th-17 Cell-Mediated Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Response by Triggering IL-10 Production and Consequent microRNA Induction

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Austin R.; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous cannabinoids [endocannabinoids] are lipid signaling molecules that have been shown to modulate immune functions. However, their role in the regulation of Th17 cells has not been studied previously. In the current study, we used methylated Bovine Serum Albumin [mBSA]-induced delayed type hypersensitivity [DTH] response in C57BL/6 mice, mediated by Th17 cells, as a model to test the anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids. Administration of anandamide [AEA], a member of the endocannabinoid family, into mice resulted in significant mitigation of mBSA-induced inflammation, including foot pad swelling, cell infiltration, and cell proliferation in the draining lymph nodes [LN]. AEA treatment significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production, as well as decreased RORγt expression while causing significant induction of IL-10 in the draining LNs. IL-10 was critical for the AEA-induced mitigation of DTH response inasmuch as neutralization of IL-10 reversed the effects of AEA. We next analyzed miRNA from the LN cells and found that 100 out of 609 miRNA species were differentially regulated in AEA-treated mice when compared to controls. Several of these miRNAs targeted proinflammatory mediators. Interestingly, many of these miRNA were also upregulated upon in vitro treatment of LN cells with IL-10. Together, the current study demonstrates that AEA may suppress Th-17 cell–mediated DTH response by inducing IL-10 which in turn triggers miRNA that target proinflammatory pathways. PMID:24699635

  6. Ectopically expressed sweet pepper ferredoxin PFLP enhances disease resistance to Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum affected by harpin and protease-mediated hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ger, Mang-Jye; Louh, Guan-Yu; Lin, Yi-Hsien; Feng, Teng-Yung; Huang, Hsiang-En

    2014-12-01

    Plant ferredoxin-like protein (PFLP) is a photosynthesis-type ferredoxin (Fd) found in sweet pepper. It contains an iron-sulphur cluster that receives and delivers electrons between enzymes involved in many fundamental metabolic processes. It has been demonstrated that transgenic plants overexpressing PFLP show a high resistance to many bacterial pathogens, although the mechanism remains unclear. In this investigation, the PFLP gene was transferred into Arabidopsis and its defective derivatives, such as npr1 (nonexpresser of pathogenesis-related gene 1) and eds1 (enhanced disease susceptibility 1) mutants and NAHG-transgenic plants. These transgenic plants were then infected with the soft-rot bacterial pathogen Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora, ECC) to investigate the mechanism behind PFLP-mediated resistance. The results revealed that, instead of showing soft-rot symptoms, ECC activated hypersensitive response (HR)-associated events, such as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ), electrical conductivity leakage and expression of the HR marker genes (ATHSR2 and ATHSR3) in PFLP-transgenic Arabidopsis. This PFLP-mediated resistance could be abolished by inhibitors, such as diphenylene iodonium (DPI), 1-l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)-butane (E64) and benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (z-VAD-fmk), but not by myriocin and fumonisin. The PFLP-transgenic plants were resistant to ECC, but not to its harpin mutant strain ECCAC5082. In the npr1 mutant and NAHG-transgenic Arabidopsis, but not in the eds1 mutant, overexpression of the PFLP gene increased resistance to ECC. Based on these results, we suggest that transgenic Arabidopsis contains high levels of ectopic PFLP; this may lead to the recognition of the harpin and to the activation of the HR and other resistance mechanisms, and is dependent on the protease-mediated pathway.

  7. Antigenic specificities of delayed hypersensitivity in mice to dinitrophenylated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yonemasu, K.; Crowle, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    that control over development of delayed hypersensitivities and cell-mediated immunologic reactions may be easier than hitherto anticipated, because humoral antibodies to only a portion of an antigen molecule will suffice to control sensitization to the entire molecule. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:4127727

  8. A physiologic differentiation between delayed and immediate hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Michael A.; Allen, James C.

    1969-01-01

    Studies have been made of movement of various macromolecules into and out of the pleural space of guinea pigs during the course of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD), and a passively transferred immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ovalbumin. While the immediate hypersensitivity reaction transiently alters vascular permeability as shown by increased movement of macromolecules into the chest, the delayed hypersensitivity reaction is marked by a decreased capacity to resorb macromolecules from the pleural space. The data suggest that the two hypersensitivity reactions may be distinguished by these physiologic differences. Additional data from studies of a chemically induced pleural effusion in these animals suggest that some type of outflow obstruction is necessary for the development of effusion, but that the outflow defect caused by the irritating chemical is based on a different mechanism than that seen during the delayed hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:4179171

  9. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins.

  10. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  11. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E.; Montañez, María I.; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier. PMID:27731424

  12. Immunization against an IL-6 peptide induces anti-IL-6 antibodies and modulates the Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity reaction in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Desallais, Lucille; Bouchez, Caroline; Mouhsine, Hadley; Moreau, Gabriel; Ratsimandresy, Rojo; Montes, Matthieu; Do, Hervé; Quintin-Colonna, Françoise; Zagury, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) overproduction has been involved in the pathogenesis of several chronic inflammatory diseases and the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody has been proven clinically efficient to treat them. However, the drawbacks of monoclonal antibodies have led our group to develop an innovative anti-IL-6 strategy using a peptide-based active immunization. This approach has previously shown its efficacy in a mouse model of systemic sclerosis. Here the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of this strategy was assessed in non human primates. No unscheduled death and clinical signs of toxicity was observed during the study. Furthermore, the cynomolgus monkeys immunized against the IL-6 peptide produced high levels of anti-IL-6 antibodies as well as neutralizing antibodies compared to control groups. They also showed an important decrease of the cumulative inflammatory score following a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced by the Tetanus vaccine compared to control groups (minus 57,9%, P = 0.014). These findings are highly significant because the immunizing IL-6 peptide used in this study is identical in humans and in monkeys and this novel anti-IL-6 strategy could thus represent a promising alternative to monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26782790

  13. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs. PMID:15361145

  14. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs.

  15. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs. PMID:25123018

  16. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs.

  17. ABA-HYPERSENSITIVE BTB/POZ PROTEIN 1 functions as a negative regulator in ABA-mediated inhibition of germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hani; Kim, Soon-Hee; Seo, Dong Hye; Chung, Sunglan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the contribution of CRL3-ABA-mediated responses, we attempted to find CRL3 substrate receptors involved in ABA signaling. One gene named ABA-HYPERSENSITIVE BTB/POZ PROTEIN 1 (AHT1) was upregulated more than 2.5 times by ABA, and its coding region possessed a BTB/POZ domain, which is the common feature of CRL3 substrate receptors. Loss of AHT1 led to retardation of the germination process, not inhibition of root growth. AHT1 transcripts also increased in response to mannitol, NaCl and drought treatments at the seedling stage and in dry seeds. High expression of AHT1 in dry seeds was inhibited by the defect of ABA signaling components such as ABI1, ABI3 and SRKs indicating that the expression of AHT1 is dependent on ABA signaling. Among bZIP transcription factors participating in ABA signaling, the losses of ABI5/DPBF1, AREB1/ABF2, EEL/DPBF4 and DPBF2/bZIP67 resulted in reduced AHT1 expression, showing that these transcription factors play a positive role in ABA-induced AHT1 expression. While loss of AHT1 did not affect the expression pattern of NCED3, ABI2, SRKs and AREB/ABF genes, it led to hyperinduction of ABI5/DPBF genes such as ABI5/DPBF1, EEL/DPBF4 and AREB3/DPBF3, which are mainly involved in seed development and germination, as well as ABA-inducible genes transactivated by ABI5. Overall, these findings indicate that AHT1 negatively regulates ABA-mediated inhibition of germination, possibly by repressing the expression of a subset of ABI5/DPBF subfamily genes, and that AHT1 may be regulated by a negative feedback process through its linkage with a part of ABI5/DPBF proteins. PMID:26667153

  18. How to manage asparaginase hypersensitivity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved significantly in recent decades, primarily due to dose-intensified, multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, of which asparaginase has played a prominent role. Despite this success, hypersensitivity remains a significant problem, often requiring the termination of asparaginase. Failure to complete the entire asparaginase therapy course due to clinical hypersensitivity, subclinical hypersensitivity (i.e., silent inactivation), or other treatment-related toxicity is associated with poor ALL outcomes. Thus, it is critical to rapidly identify patients who develop clinical/subclinical hypersensitivity and switch these patients to an alternate asparaginase formulation. This article provides an overview of asparaginase hypersensitivity, identification and management of hypersensitivity and subclinical hypersensitivity, and issues related to switching patients to asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi following hypersensitivity reaction.

  19. Statistical properties of multistep enzyme-mediated reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; De Ronde, Wiet H; Daniels, Bryan C; Mugler, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated reactions may proceed through multiple intermediate conformational states before creating a final product molecule, and one often wishes to identify such intermediate structures from observations of the product creation. In this paper, we address this problem by solving the chemical master equations for various enzymatic reactions. We devise a perturbation theory analogous to that used in quantum mechanics that allows us to determine the first () and the second (variance) cumulants of the distribution of created product molecules as a function of the substrate concentration and the kinetic rates of the intermediate processes. The mean product flux V=d/dt (or 'dose-response' curve) and the Fano factor F=variance/ are both realistically measurable quantities, and while the mean flux can often appear the same for different reaction types, the Fano factor can be quite different. This suggests both qualitative and quantitative ways to discriminate between different reaction schemes, and we explore this possibility in the context of four sample multistep enzymatic reactions. We argue that measuring both the mean flux and the Fano factor can not only discriminate between reaction types, but can also provide some detailed information about the internal, unobserved kinetic rates, and this can be done without measuring single-molecule transition events.

  20. Insect-sting challenge in 324 subjects with a previous anaphylactic reaction: current criteria for insect-venom hypersensitivity do not predict the occurrence and the severity of anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, P W; Hack, C E; Struyvenberg, A; van der Zwan, J K

    1994-08-01

    Three hundred twenty-four patients with a history of yellow jacket- (n = 272) or honeybee- (n = 52) sting anaphylaxis were prospectively subjected to an in-hospital sting challenge. Plasma levels of specific IgE and IgG4, skin venom tests, severity of previous reaction, sex, age, atopic constitution, histamine skin test results, location and number of previous stings, time interval between previous anaphylactic reaction and sting challenge, and time interval between sting challenge and onset of anaphylaxis were studied in relation to the clinical severity of a reaction after sting challenge. A recurrent anaphylactic reaction after sting challenge was observed in 25% of yellow jacket- and in 52% of honeybee-sensitive persons. The severity of this reaction correlated significantly with age and the time interval between sting challenge and onset of anaphylaxis only: older persons with faster reactions had more severe symptoms after sting challenge. None of the current criteria for insect-sting hypersensitivity (IgE, IgG4, skin test) significantly related on an individual basis or in combinations to the reaction after sting challenge. We conclude that the current criteria to assess insect-venom hypersensitivity do not relate to the occurrence and severity of anaphylactic symptoms after an insect-sting challenge.

  1. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species. PMID:25738554

  2. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species.

  3. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  4. α-Regioselective Barbier Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds and Allyl Halides Mediated by Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Wu, San; Li, Ying; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    The first utility of praseodymium as a mediating metal in the Barbier reaction of carbonyl compounds with allyl halides was reported in this paper. In contrast to the traditional metal-mediated or catalyzed Barbier reactions, exclusive α-adducts were obtained in this one-pot reaction with a broad scope of substrates and feasible reaction conditions.

  5. α-Regioselective Barbier Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds and Allyl Halides Mediated by Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Wu, San; Li, Ying; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    The first utility of praseodymium as a mediating metal in the Barbier reaction of carbonyl compounds with allyl halides was reported in this paper. In contrast to the traditional metal-mediated or catalyzed Barbier reactions, exclusive α-adducts were obtained in this one-pot reaction with a broad scope of substrates and feasible reaction conditions. PMID:27490708

  6. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  7. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  8. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ("allergic") and non-immune-mediated ("pseudo allergic") reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  9. Antibody-mediated depletion of lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3(+) )-activated T lymphocytes prevents delayed-type hypersensitivity in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Poirier, N; Haudebourg, T; Brignone, C; Dilek, N; Hervouet, J; Minault, D; Coulon, F; de Silly, R V; Triebel, F; Blancho, G; Vanhove, B

    2011-05-01

    Lymphocyte-activation gene-3 (LAG-3, CD223) is a marker for recently activated effector T cells. Activated T lymphocytes are of major importance in many autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection. Therefore, specifically depleting LAG-3(+) T cells might lead to targeted immunosuppression that would spare resting T cells while eliminating pathogenic activated T cells. We have shown previously that anti-LAG-3 antibodies sharing depleting as well as modulating activities inhibit heart allograft rejection in rats. Here, we have developed and characterized a cytotoxic LAG-3 chimeric antibody (chimeric A9H12), and evaluated its potential as a selective therapeutic depleting agent in a non-human primate model of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). Chimeric A9H12 showed a high affinity to its antigen and depleted both cytomegalovirus (CMV)-activated CD4(+) and CD8(+) human T lymphocytes in vitro. In vivo, a single intravenous injection at either 1 or 0·1 mg/kg was sufficient to deplete LAG-3(+) -activated T cells in lymph nodes and to prevent the T helper type 1 (Th1)-driven skin inflammation in a tuberculin-induced DTH model in baboons. T lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration into the skin was also reduced. The in vivo effect was long-lasting, as several weeks to months were required after injection to restore a positive reaction after antigen challenge. Our data confirm that LAG-3 is a promising therapeutic target for depleting antibodies that might lead to higher therapeutic indexes compared to traditional immunosuppressive agents in autoimmune diseases and transplantation. PMID:21352204

  10. Lyn is essential for fcgamma receptor III-mediated systemic anaphylaxis but not for the Arthus reaction.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, T; Ono, M; Watanabe, T; Takai, T

    2001-03-01

    The Src family kinase Lyn initiates intracellular signal transduction by associating with a variety of immune receptors such as antigen receptor on B cells and high-affinity Fc receptor (FcR) for immunoglobulin Ig(E) (FcepsilonRI) on mast cells. Involvement of Lyn in the IgE-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity is well documented, but the physiological significance of Lyn in IgG-dependent, type III low-affinity FcR for IgG (FcgammaRIII)-mediated responses is largely unknown. In this study, we generated a double-mutant mouse strain deficient in both type II FcR for IgG (FcgammaRIIB) and Lyn to exclude any involvement of inhibitory signaling by FcgammaRIIB, which otherwise downregulates FcgammaRIII-mediated cellular responses. FcgammaRIIB-deficient but Lyn-sufficient mice served as controls. The Lyn deficiency attenuated IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis in vivo, and significantly reduced calcium mobilization and degranulation responses of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in vitro. However, we found that either interleukin 4 or tumor necrosis factor alpha release by BMMCs was comparable to that from Lyn-deficient and control mice, and the reverse-passive Arthus reaction was equally induced in both mutant mice, indicating that Lyn is not involved in the onset of the IgG-mediated, FcgammaRIII-dependent late phase responses of mast cells. These findings provide us with insight into distinct signaling mechanisms in mast cells underlying the development of diverse pathologies as well as a therapeutic potential for selective treatment of allergic disorders. PMID:11238587

  11. STUDIES ON HYPERSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Gell, P. G. H.; Benacerraf, B.

    1961-01-01

    In earlier observations with the picryl system, it was concluded that contact sensitivity was a form of delayed (cellular) hypersensitivity to conjugates of sensitizer with autologous proteins indistinguishable in its immunological mechanism from other classical forms of delayed hypersensitivity to proteins. This conclusion has been confirmed and extended with the picryl and chlorbenzoyl chloride systems. 1. It is shown that to induce a state of contact sensitivity, the minimal necessary amounts of hapten are of the same order of magnitude, whether this hapten is conjugated with protein or the free reactive chemical itself. From this, it is evident that contamination of conjugates with small amounts of unreacted sensitizer plays no part in the induction of contact reactivity by the conjugate. With the dinitrophenyl system, no contact sensitivity could be induced by the conjugates used; possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. 2. Animals sensitized to contact by homologous conjugate can be completely desensitized by injections of such a conjugate in large amount; a similar injection schedule has no effect on the contact sensitivity of animals sensitized with the free reactive sensitizer. 3. The capacity of heterologous (ovalbumin) conjugates to evoke anti-hapten antibodies is shown to be greater than that of homologous (guinea pig seralbumin) conjugates: the reverse is true of their capacity to induce delayed reactivity. 4. Evidence is brought forward to suggest that in animals sensitized with homologous albumin conjugates, the specificity of the delayed reaction involves more than the hapten alone, even though the carrier protein is non-antigenic on its own. The contrast with the apparent lesser specificity of the antibodies later produced is discussed. PMID:13704282

  12. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  13. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca(2+)-NOS pathway.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca(2+) in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca(2+)-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  14. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  15. The structural basis of cell-mediated immunological reactions of collagen

    PubMed Central

    Adelmann, B. C.

    1972-01-01

    Denatured calf and rat skin collagen and α1- and α2-chains from these collagens were tested for their capacity to sensitize guinea-pigs for the cutaneous delayed hypersensitivity reaction and to elicit this reaction in sensitized animals. Alpha-chains from neutral salt extracted and from urea extracted collagen were also compared. All preparations were fully active as sensitizers as well as elicitors of the skin reaction. In spite of extensive cross-reactions, significant differences between α1- and α2-chains of a given species as well as between corresponding chains of different species could be detected. Differences between chains from neutral salt extracted collagen and from urea extracted collagen were also revealed. PMID:4636288

  16. [Delayed hypersensitivity to protamine and immediate hypersensitivity to insulin].

    PubMed

    Köllner, A; Senff, H; Engelmann, L; Kalveram, K J; Velcovsky, H G; Haneke, E

    1991-08-16

    A 63-year-old female, with type II diabetes mellitus, diagnosed in 1967, was started on combination therapy with sulphonylureas and human depot insulin in May 1989, because of inadequate blood sugar control with sulphonylureas alone. Within 3 months she began to develop nodular skin reactions at the site of injection, 12-24 hours after insulin injections. Intradermal testing demonstrated delayed (Gell and Coombs type IV) hypersensitivity to protamine. No specific IgE or IgG antibodies were demonstrable. She was changed to protamine-free human delayed action insulin. After an initial reaction-free period, red urticarial lesions, attributable to immediate (Gell and Coombs type I) hypersensitivity to human insulin, appeared at the injection sites. There were no other complications with continued insulin therapy, and after about 6 weeks no further local reactions were detectable. When an allergic reaction to an insulin preparation is suspected, careful immunological investigation should be performed, to ensure adequate treatment without risk to the patient.

  17. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  18. Titanium hypersensitivity. A hidden threat for dental implant patients?

    PubMed

    Bilhan, Hakan; Bural, Canan; Geckili, Onur

    2013-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys have been widely used for dental prosthetic devices because of their superior mechanical properties and biocompatibility. However, the incidence of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy is still unknown and the discussion about its existence is ongoing. Unexplained implant failures have also forced dental clinicians to investigate the possibility of titanium hypersensitivity or allergy. This review focuses on the potential of dental implant-related titanium hypersensitivity or allergic reactions. It includes an examination of the existing scientific literature and current knowledge. Evidence-based data and studies related to titanium hypersensitivity in dental implant patients are also discussed.

  19. Sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Trimmer, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The study of sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reactions (AR) has been undertaken. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated reacting with a number of sperm surface antigens. These mAbs have been used in functional assays to attempt to infer the roles of these proteins in the induction of the AR. These mAbs have also been used to isolate protein for biochemical characterization and reconstitution studies. mAbs reacting with a 210 kD protein of the sea urchin sperm plasma membrane have been used to identify this protein as playing a role in the regulation of ion fluxes during the induction of the AR. mAbs reacting with certain extracellular regions inhibit the induction of: the AR, the long duration {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into the mitochondrion, and H{sup +} efflux. Addition of these same mAbs, however, induces an increase in sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} to levels much higher than those induced by FSG, as monitored by the fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators fura 2 and indo 1. This (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} increase occurs without an increase in pH{sub i}, and thus allows for the first time the analysis of the effects of increasing sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} ion the absence of increased pH{sub i}.

  20. Pathophysiology of neutrophil-mediated extracellular redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Jaganjac, Morana; Cipak, Ana; Schaur, Rudolf Joerg; Zarkovic, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil granulocyte leukocytes (neutrophils) play fundamental role in the innate immune response. In the presence of adequate stimuli, neutrophils release excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may induce cell and tissue injury. Oxidative burst of neutrophils acts as a double-edged sword. It may contribute to the pathology of atherosclerosis and brain injury but is also necessary in resolving infections. Moreover, neutrophil-derived ROS may also have both a tumor promoting and tumor suppressing role. ROS have a specific activities and diffusion distance, which is related to their short lifetime. Therefore, the manner in which ROS will act depends on the cells targeted and the intra- and extracellular levels of individual ROS, which can further cause production of reactive aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) that act as a second messengers of ROS. In this review we discuss the influence of neutrophil mediated extracellular redox reactions in ischemia reperfusion injury, transplant rejection and chronic diseases (atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases and cancer). At the end a brief overview of cellular mechanisms to maintain ROS homeostasis is given.

  1. Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D; Oquendo, Anabella

    2011-07-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is exemplified by brief, sharp, well-localized pain in response to thermal, evaporative, tactile, osmotic, or chemical stimuli that cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Pulpal pain is usually more prolonged, dull, aching, and poorly localized and lasts longer than the applied stimulus. Up to 30% of adults have dentinal hypersensitivity at some time. Current techniques for treatment may be only transient in nature and results are not always predictable. Two methods of treatment of dentin hypersensitivity are tubular occlusion and blockage of nerve activity. A differential diagnosis needs to be accomplished before any treatment. PMID:21726693

  2. Redox-mediated reactions of vinylferrocene: toward redox auxiliaries.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Alan A; Zhang, Xiaolu; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Long, De-Liang; Macgregor, Stuart A; Cooke, Graeme

    2016-05-01

    Chemical redox reactions have been exploited to transform unreactive vinylferrocene into a powerful dienophile for the Diels-Alder reaction and reactive substrate for thiol addition reactions upon conversion to its ferrocenium state. We have further investigated the ability of these reactions to facilitate redox-auxiliary-like reactivity by further hydrogenolyisis of the Diels-Alder adduct to the corresponding cyclopentane derivative.

  3. Removal of triclosan via peroxidases-mediated reactions in water: Reaction kinetics, products and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianhua; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhang, Ya; Ji, Yuefei; Shi, Huanhuan; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated and compared reaction kinetics, product characterization, and toxicity variation of triclosan (TCS) removal mediated by soybean peroxidase (SBP), a recognized potential peroxidase for removing phenolic pollutants, and the commonly used horseradish peroxidase (HRP) with the goal of assessing the technical feasibility of SBP-catalyzed removal of TCS. Reaction conditions such as pH, H2O2 concentration and enzyme dosage were found to have a strong influence on the removal efficiency of TCS. SBP can retain its catalytic ability to remove TCS over broad ranges of pH and H2O2 concentration, while the optimal pH and H2O2 concentration were 7.0 and 8μM, respectively. 98% TCS was removed with only 0.1UmL(-1) SBP in 30min reaction time, while an HRP dose of 0.3UmL(-1) was required to achieve the similar conversion. The catalytic performance of SBP towards TCS was more efficient than that of HRP, which can be explained by catalytic rate constant (KCAT) and catalytic efficiency (KCAT/KM) for the two enzymes. MS analysis in combination with quantum chemistry computation showed that the polymerization products were generated via CC and CO coupling pathways. The polymers were proved to be nontoxic through growth inhibition of green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus). Taking into consideration of the enzymatic treatment cost, SBP may be a better alternative to HRP upon the removal and detoxification of TCS in water/wastewater treatment. PMID:26921508

  4. Carmine hypersensitivity masquerading as azithromycin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; McMorris, Marc; Baldwin, James

    2009-01-01

    Macrolide hypersensitivity is a rarely reported event. However, carmine dye has become increasingly important as a provocative agent. We present a case of a woman with documented carmine hypersensitivity, who reported anaphylaxis 90 minutes after ingestion of a generic azithromycin. Our investigations revealed that this was an allergy to the carmine dye in the tablet's coating rather than to the antibiotic. Seven extracts were prepared including carmine dye, crushed dried female cochineal insects, crushed tablets of Zithromax (Pfizer Inc.) and generic azithromycin (Teva Pharmaceuticals), and the crushed colored coatings from both tablets. These were suspended in preservative-free normal saline, and then applied as a skin-prick test and read at 30 minutes. The skin-prick skin test results were 4+ to histamine and carmine dye, but negative to cochineal insect extract, Pfizer crushed tablets, and negative control. The patient was 1+ to the Teva crushed tablet, but was 4+ to the Teva brand coating and negative to the Pfizer brand coating, which did not contain carmine. The patient subsequently ingested Pfizer Zithromax without any sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of carmine anaphylaxis attributed to carmine-containing medication. Careful history and skin-prick testing to the appropriate agents allowed elucidation of the subtlety of the true offending agent without unnecessary avoidance of the medication class. Patients with a carmine hypersensitivity should actively check with their pharmacy or prescribing physician to verify their medications are free of this offending agent. PMID:19331724

  5. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  6. Studies on Lewis acid-mediated intramolecular cyclization reactions of allene-ene systems.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, K; Watanabe, T; Tsukui, A

    2000-03-01

    The Lewis acid-mediated reactions of allene-ene compounds, derived from 3-methylcitronellal or dimethyl malonate, were carried out using various Lewis acids such as ethylaluminum dichloride, diethylaluminum chloride, titanium chloride, zinc chloride etherate, or boron trifluoride etherate, affording unexpectedly intramolecular [2+2]cycloaddition products under some particular reaction conditions without any formation of intramolecular ene reaction products.

  7. Assessment of DFT methods for computing activation energies of Mo/W-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lianrui; Chen, Hui

    2015-10-13

    Using high level ab initio coupled cluster calculations as reference, the performances of 15 commonly used density functionals (DFs) on activation energy calculations for typical Mo/W-mediated reactions have been systematically assessed for the first time in this work. The selected representative Mo/W-mediated reactions cover a wide range from enzymatic reactions to organometallic reactions, which include Mo-catalyzed aldehyde oxidation (aldehyde oxidoreductase), Mo-catalyzed dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reduction (DMSO reductase), W-catalyzed acetylene hydration (acetylene hydratase), Mo/W-mediated olefin metathesis, Mo/W-mediated olefin epoxidation, W-mediated alkyne metathesis, and W-mediated C-H bond activation. Covering both Mo- and W-mediated reactions, four DFs of B2GP-PLYP, M06, B2-PLYP, and B3LYP are uniformly recommended with and without DFT empirical dispersion correction. Among these four DFs, B3LYP is notably improved in performance by DFT empirical dispersion correction. In addition to the absolute value of calculation error, if the trend of DFT results is also a consideration, B2GP-PLYP, B2-PLYP, and M06 keep better performance than other functionals tested and constitute our final recommendation of DFs for both Mo- and W-mediated reactions. PMID:26574251

  8. The role of the gastrointestinal tract in the development of respiratory hypersensitivities.

    PubMed

    Björkstén, B

    1996-08-01

    Adverse reactions to foods may sometimes cause symptoms from the respiratory tract, including bronchial obstruction and rhinitis. The true prevalence is not known. In adults, it has been estimated to be about 1% of asthmatic patients or less. This would correspond to a prevalence of about 2-4 in 10,000 of the general population. The prevalence in children is higher, as IgE mediated food allergy is more common in this age group than in adults. The most common foods causing immunologically mediated reactions include milk, egg, fish, crustaceans, nuts, wheat, soy, peanut, peas and other legumes. In addition certain food additives, e.g. sulphites, may rarely be incriminated in respiratory hypersensitivity via adverse reactions with unknown mechanisms. A double-blind placebo controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) is the only way to conclusively confirm a relationship between the ingestion of a certain food item and a reaction in the respiratory tract.

  9. Late-onset Anticonvulsant Hypersensitivity Syndrome Mimicking Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Geduk, Ayfer; Birtas Atesoglu, Elif; Mehtap, Ozgur; Terzi Demirsoy, Esra; Can, Burak; Tarkun, Pinar; Hacihanefioglu, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is a fatal, idiosyncratic drug reaction that is caused by aromatic antiepileptic drugs. This cutaneous drug reaction is also called pseudolymphoma because of its clinical and histological similarities with malignant lymphoma. The primary clinical findings are fever, skin rashes, enlarged lymph nodes, single or multiple internal organ involvement and hematological abnormalities. Typically, anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome occurs 1-8 weeks after drug administration. We herein present the case of a patient who had been on anticonvulsant therapy for five years and died from late-onset anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome. PMID:26666613

  10. Biomaterial hypersensitivity: is it real? Supportive evidence and approach considerations for metal allergic patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchelson, Andrew J; Wilson, Craig J; Mihalko, William M; Grupp, Thomas M; Manning, Blaine T; Dennis, Douglas A; Goodman, Stuart B; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected.

  11. Manganese-Mediated Coupling Reaction of Vinylarenes and Aliphatic Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Nai-Xing; Bai, Cui-Bing; Wang, Yan-Jing; Lan, Xing-Wang; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He; Wen, Jia-Long

    2015-01-01

    Alcohols and alkenes are the most abundant and commonly used organic building blocks in the large-scale chemical synthesis. Herein, this is the first time to report a novel and operationally simple coupling reaction of vinylarenes and aliphatic alcohols catalyzed by manganese in the presence of TBHP (tert-butyl hydroperoxide). This coupling reaction provides the oxyalkylated products of vinylarenes with good regioselectivity and accomplishes with the principles of step-economies. A possible reaction mechanism has also been proposed. PMID:26470633

  12. Manganese-Mediated Coupling Reaction of Vinylarenes and Aliphatic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Nai-Xing; Bai, Cui-Bing; Wang, Yan-Jing; Lan, Xing-Wang; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He; Wen, Jia-Long

    2015-01-01

    Alcohols and alkenes are the most abundant and commonly used organic building blocks in the large-scale chemical synthesis. Herein, this is the first time to report a novel and operationally simple coupling reaction of vinylarenes and aliphatic alcohols catalyzed by manganese in the presence of TBHP (tert-butyl hydroperoxide). This coupling reaction provides the oxyalkylated products of vinylarenes with good regioselectivity and accomplishes with the principles of step-economies. A possible reaction mechanism has also been proposed. PMID:26470633

  13. Manganese-Mediated Coupling Reaction of Vinylarenes and Aliphatic Alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Nai-Xing; Bai, Cui-Bing; Wang, Yan-Jing; Lan, Xing-Wang; Xing, Yalan; Li, Yi-He; Wen, Jia-Long

    2015-10-01

    Alcohols and alkenes are the most abundant and commonly used organic building blocks in the large-scale chemical synthesis. Herein, this is the first time to report a novel and operationally simple coupling reaction of vinylarenes and aliphatic alcohols catalyzed by manganese in the presence of TBHP (tert-butyl hydroperoxide). This coupling reaction provides the oxyalkylated products of vinylarenes with good regioselectivity and accomplishes with the principles of step-economies. A possible reaction mechanism has also been proposed.

  14. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act via FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Oliver T.; Logsdon, Stephanie L.; Zhou, Joseph S.; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Rivas, Magali Noval; Koleoglou, Kyle J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some individuals with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. Objective To test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis, and whether this occurs via the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Methods Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) exposed to allergen, or to passively transfer allergy to naïve hosts. In parallel experiments, sera obtained from peanut allergic patients before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay using basophils from non-allergic donors. Results Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMC for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG-mediated and FcγRIIb-dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT, but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Conclusion Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. PMID:25042981

  15. Bioorthogonal tetrazine-mediated transfer reactions facilitate reaction turnover in nucleic acid-templated detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoxing; Cisneros, Brandon T; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2014-12-31

    Tetrazine ligations have proven to be a powerful bioorthogonal technique for the detection of many labeled biomolecules, but the ligating nature of these reactions can limit reaction turnover in templated chemistry. We have developed a transfer reaction between 7-azabenzonorbornadiene derivatives and fluorogenic tetrazines that facilitates turnover amplification of the fluorogenic response in nucleic acid-templated reactions. Fluorogenic tetrazine-mediated transfer (TMT) reaction probes can be used to detect DNA and microRNA (miRNA) templates to 0.5 and 5 pM concentrations, respectively. The endogenous oncogenic miRNA target mir-21 could be detected in crude cell lysates and detected by imaging in live cells. Remarkably, the technique is also able to differentiate between miRNA templates bearing a single mismatch with high signal to background. We imagine that TMT reactions could find wide application for amplified fluorescent detection of clinically relevant nucleic acid templates.

  16. Delayed hypersensitivity to a corticosteroid suspension containing methylprednisolone. Two cases of conjunctival inflammation after retrobulbar injection.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C G; Robertson, D B

    1985-02-01

    Two patients with chronic iridocyclitis had a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, characterized by severe conjunctival inflammation, after retrobulbar injections with a commercial suspension of methylprednisolone acetate. Although patch test reactions to methylprednisolone at enhanced concentrations were negative, delayed hypersensitivity could be easily demonstrated by intradermal testing with this corticosteroid. Both patients also had concomitant delayed hypersensitivity to a proprietary preservative (myristyl gamma-picolinium chloride) in the commercial corticosteroid suspension, which was confirmed by intradermal testing. These observations (negative patch test reactions, positive intradermal test reactions) suggest that the route of administration may be an important determinant of antigenic hapten-protein complex formation and subsequent delayed hypersensitivity responses involving cutaneous or mucocutaneous tissue.

  17. Structural basis of chronic beryllium disease: linking allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W

    2014-07-01

    T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. Here, we show that the T cell ligand is created when a Be(2+) cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be(2+) itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be(2+) and an accompanying Na(+) cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of preexisting self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

  18. Benzoxazinone-Mediated Triazine Degradation: A Proposed Reaction Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Willett, C D; Lerch, R N; Lin, C-H; Goyne, K W; Leigh, N D; Roberts, C A

    2016-06-22

    The role of benzoxazinones (Bx, 2-hydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one) in triazine resistance in plants has been studied for over half a century. In this research, fundamental parameters of the reaction between DIBOA-Glc (2-β-d-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one) and atrazine (ATR, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N'-(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) were examined. Through a series of experiments employing a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques, the DIBOA-Glc/ATR reaction was characterized in terms of reactant and product kinetics, stoichiometry, identification of a reaction intermediate, and reaction products formed. Results of these experiments demonstrated that the reaction mechanism proceeds via nucleophilic attack of the hydroxamic acid moiety of DIBOA-Glc at the C-2 position of the triazine ring to form hydroxyatrazine (HA, 2-hydroxy-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), with associated degradation of DIBOA-Glc. Degradation of reactants followed first-order kinetics with a noncatalytic role of DIBOA-Glc. A reaction intermediate was identified as a DIBOA-Glc-HA conjugate, indicating a 1:1 DIBOA-Glc:ATR stoichiometry. Reaction products included HA and Cl(-), but definitive identification of DIBOA-Glc reaction product(s) was not attained. With these reaction parameters elucidated, DIBOA-Glc can be evaluated in terms of its potential for a myriad of applications, including its use to address the problem of widespread ATR contamination of soil and water resources.

  19. Anaphylaxis and Anaphylactoid Reactions: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Luskin, Allan T.; Luskin, Susan S.

    1996-07-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute fatal or potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction. Anaphylaxis represent a clinical diagnosis based on history and physical examination and includes symptoms of airway obstruction, generalized skin reactions, particularly flushing, itching, urticaria, angioedema cardiovascular symptoms including hypotension and gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms result from the action of mast cell mediators, especially histamine and lipid mediators such as leukotrienes and platelet activating factor on shock tissue. The shock tissue includes blood vessels, mucous glands, smooth muscle, and nerve endings. Anaphylaxis follows the typical immediate hypersensitivity time course, with a reaction beginning within minutes of antigen exposure. A late-phase reaction hours after the initial reaction may occur. Mast cell mediator release can be triggered by both IgE and non--IgE-mediated factors. Therefore, anaphylaxis may be termed anaphylaxis (IgE mediated) or anaphylactoid (non--IgE mediated). The most common IgE-mediated triggers are drugs, typically penicillin or other beta-lactam antibiotics, foods, most commonly nuts, peanuts, fish and shellfish, or hymenoptera stings. Non-IgE-mediated causes include factors causing marked complement activation such as plasma proteins or compounds which act directly on the mast cell membrane, such as vancomycin, quinolone antibiotics, or radiographic contrast media. The pathophysiology of some trigger factors, such as aspirin, remains unclear. Therapy of anaphylaxis revolves around patient education, avoidance, desensitization or pharmacologic pretreatment when agents causing anaphylaxis need to be readministered, and early recognition and prompt therapy of reactions should they occur.

  20. Systemic cell-mediated reactions in vivo. Effect of the interaction of circulating antigen with sensitized lymphocytes on glomeruli and pulmonary alveoli.

    PubMed Central

    Bhan, A. K.; Schneeberger, E. E.; Collins, A. B.; McCluskey, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of systemic cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions on glomeruli and lungs were investigated in rats. The animals were given an intravenous injection of antigen 7 days after sensitization or were given an intravenous injection of lymph node cells from sensitized syngeneic donors 1 day after antigen injection. Control animals were given an irrelevant antigen or saline. All animals received three injections of 3H-thymidine during the course of the experiments. The animals were sacrificed 2 or 3 days after antigen injection. Autoradiographs of renal and pulmonary tissue showed significantly more labeled mononuclear cells in glomeruli and pulmonary alveolar walls in the experimental groups than in the control groups. Immunofluorescence studies did not reveal antigen, rat IgG, or C3 in glomeruli. The results indicate that systemic cell-mediated reactions can lead to an accumulation of mononuclear cells in glomeruli and lungs, an effect that may contribute to tissue injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6611090

  1. [A patient with paclitaxel hypersensitivity treated with nab-paclitaxel].

    PubMed

    Ouchi, Akira; Ouchi, Akira; Asano, Masahiko; Aono, Keiya; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Kato, Takehiro

    2014-07-01

    A 63-year-old man with multiple liver metastases from gastric cancer was treated with S-1 plus cisplatin; however, the number of multiple liver metastases increased. The patient received paclitaxel(PTX)treatment, but a hypersensitivity reaction occurred after administering the second dose; therefore, he received docetaxel treatment. A hypersensitivity reaction occurred after administering the first dose of docetaxel; therefore, he received irinotecan treatment. However, irinotecan administration was stopped because of severe diarrhea and weight reduction. Subsequently, at the patient's request, nab-PTX treatment was initiated by administering a premedication regimen of dexamethasone(8mg)and chlorpheniramine(10mg); no hypersensitivity reactions were reported thereafter. Nab-PTX is a contraindication; however, it might be possible to use nab-PTX for treating patients with PTX hypersensitivity.

  2. Organoaluminum-mediated direct cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hiroki; Saito, Tatsuo; Wang, Chao; Uchiyama, Masanobu

    2015-04-01

    We present a direct cross-coupling reaction between arylaluminum compounds (ArAlMe2 ⋅LiCl) and organic halides RX (R=aryl, alkenyl, alkynyl; X=I, Br, and Cl) without any external catalyst. The reaction takes place smoothly, simply upon heating, thereby enabling the efficient and chemo-/stereoselective formation of biaryl, alkene, and alkyne coupling products with broad functional group compatibility.

  3. Electrosensibility and electromagnetic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Norbert; Schröttner, Jörg

    2003-09-01

    Electromagnetic sensibility, the ability to perceive electric and electromagnetic exposure, and electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS), developing health symptoms due to exposure to environmental electromagnetic fields, need to be distinguished. Increased electrosensibility is a necessary, however, not a sufficient condition for electromagnetic hypersensitivity. At an extended sample of the general population of 708 adults, including 349 men and 359 women aged between 17 and 60 years, electrosensibility was investigated and characterized by perception threshold and its standard deviation. By analyzing the probability distributions of the perception threshold of electric 50 Hz currents, evidence could be found for the existence of a subgroup of people with significantly increased electrosensibility (hypersensibility) who as a group could be differentiated from the general population. The presented data show that the variation of the electrosensibility among the general population is significantly larger than has yet been estimated by nonionizing radiation protection bodies, but much smaller than claimed by hypersensitivity self-aid groups. These quantitative results should contribute to a less emotional discussion of this problem. The investigation method presented, is capable of exclusion diagnostics for persons suffering from the hypersensitivity syndrome. PMID:12929157

  4. Inflammatory Mediators of Leprosy Reactional Episodes and Dental Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cortela, D. C. B.; de Souza Junior, A. L.; Virmond, M. C. L.; Ignotti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Reactional episodes in leprosy are a result of complex interactions between the immune system, Mycobacterium leprae, and predisposing factors, including dental infections. To determine the main inflammatory mediators in the immunopathological process of dental infections and leprosy reactions, we conducted a systematic review of primary literature published between 1996 and 2013. A three-stage literature search was performed (Stage I, “leprosy reactions” and “inflammatory mediators”; Stage II, “dental infections” and “inflammatory mediators”; and Stage III, “leprosy reactions,” “dental infections,” and “inflammatory mediators”). Of the 911 eligible publications, 10 were selected in Stage I, 68 in Stage II, and 1 in Stage III. Of the 27 studied inflammatory mediators, the main proinflammatory mediators were IL-6, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-17; the main anti-inflammatory mediators were IL-10 and IL-4. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were significant during periodontal and reactional lesion evolution; IFN-γ and IL-1β were associated with types 1 and 2 reactions and chronic periodontal disease. The proinflammatory mediators in dental infections and leprosy reactions, especially IL-6 and TNF-α, were similar across studies, regardless of the laboratory technique and sample type. IFN-γ and IL-1β were significant for leprosy reactions and periodontal diseases. This pattern was maintained in serum. PMID:26339136

  5. Teenagers' experiences of living with food hypersensitivity: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Heather; Roberts, Graham; van Laar, Darren; Dean, Taraneh

    2010-06-01

    Teenagers are a high-risk group for food-hypersensitivity fatalities, engage in risk-taking behaviours and may experience impaired quality of life. Understanding their experience is important to inform their care. This study aimed to describe the lived experiences of teenagers with food hypersensitivity. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 teenagers (13-18 yr) with food hypersensitivity to a variety of foods and analysed using a phenomenological approach. Teenagers described living with (or coming to know) food hypersensitivity (FHS) as a way of life but still found living with food hypersensitivity to be burdensome. A necessary part of living with food hypersensitivity was coping with associated burden; a variety of coping strategies were employed to this effect. Teenagers described ways in which the burden of living with food hypersensitivity was alleviated or exacerbated by others. Management of food hypersensitivity was based on an assessment of acceptable risk resulting in varying levels of precaution taking. Teenagers' understanding of their FHS and ability to cope with it needs to be regularly assessed. Educational support may be required to ensure they take an appropriate level of precautions to minimize the chance of future reactions while not over compromising their quality of life. Psychological support may be required to help them to utilize healthy adaptive strategies to cope with the stresses of living with FHS. This approach is also likely to facilitate the smooth handover of responsibility from parent to teenager.

  6. Visible-light-mediated chan-lam coupling reactions of aryl boronic acids and aniline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Woo-Jin; Tsukamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-05-26

    The copper(II)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction between aryl boronic acids and aniline derivatives was found to be improved significantly under visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis. The substrate scope of this oxidative Chan-Lam reaction was thus expanded to include electron-deficient aryl boronic acids as viable starting materials.

  7. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  8. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Novacek, Johanna; Roiser, Lukas; Zielke, Katharina; Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-08-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions.

  9. Towards a General Understanding of Carbonyl-Stabilised Ammonium Ylide-Mediated Epoxidation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Robiette, Raphaël; Waser, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The key factors for carbonyl-stabilised ammonium ylide-mediated epoxidation reactions were systematically investigated by experimental and computational means and the hereby obtained energy profiles provide explanations for the observed experimental results. In addition, we were able to identify the first tertiary amine-based chiral auxiliary that allows for high enantioselectivities and high yields for such epoxidation reactions. PMID:27381752

  10. Synthesis of multisubstituted pyrroles from doubly activated cyclopropanes using an iron-mediated oxidation domino reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Wei; Li, Junlong; Liu, Qingfeng; Liu, Tongxin; Zhang, Guisheng

    2014-11-21

    An alternative route has been developed for the construction of multisubstituted pyrrole derivatives from readily available, doubly activated cyclopropanes and anilines using an iron-mediated oxidation domino reaction (i.e., sequential ring-opening, cyclization, and dehydrogenation reactions). This reaction uses readily available reactants and is tolerant of a broad range of substrates, with the desired products being formed in good to excellent yields. PMID:25330125

  11. Sequential Multicomponent Reactions and a Cu-Mediated Rearrangement: Diastereoselective Synthesis of Tricyclic Ketones.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Denis; Franz, Max; Schmidtmann, Marc; Martens, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    A novel Cu-mediated rearrangement reaction based on bisamides containing a thiazolidine substructure opens the possibility for diastereoselective synthesis toward a tricyclic annulated and bridged heterocyclic system. The required precursors are easily synthesizable by a two-step synthetic pathway using the concept of sequential multicomponent reactions, i.e. the Asinger and Ugi reactions. Due to this synthesis strategy, a number of unique tricyclic heterocycles, characterized by high diversity, are synthesized in an effective manner. PMID:26571048

  12. Benzoxazinone-mediated triazine degradation: A proposed reaction mechanism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of benzoxazinones (Bx, 2-hydroxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one)) in triazine degradation and resistance has been studied for over half a century. In this research, the fundamental parameters of the reaction between DIBOA-Glc (2-ß-D-glucopyranosyloxy-4-hydroxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one) and atrazin...

  13. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates proneural wave propagation when combined with EGF-mediated reaction diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Minami, Yoshiaki; Miura, Takashi; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-08-30

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates binary cell fate choice, resulting in salt and pepper patterns during various developmental processes. However, how Notch signaling behaves in combination with other signaling systems remains elusive. The wave of differentiation in the Drosophila visual center or "proneural wave" accompanies Notch activity that is propagated without the formation of a salt and pepper pattern, implying that Notch does not form a feedback loop of lateral inhibition during this process. However, mathematical modeling and genetic analysis clearly showed that Notch-mediated lateral inhibition is implemented within the proneural wave. Because partial reduction in EGF signaling causes the formation of the salt and pepper pattern, it is most likely that EGF diffusion cancels salt and pepper pattern formation in silico and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and EGF-mediated reaction diffusion enables a function of Notch signaling that regulates propagation of the wave of differentiation. PMID:27535937

  14. Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates proneural wave propagation when combined with EGF-mediated reaction diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Makoto; Yasugi, Tetsuo; Minami, Yoshiaki; Miura, Takashi; Nagayama, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Notch-mediated lateral inhibition regulates binary cell fate choice, resulting in salt and pepper patterns during various developmental processes. However, how Notch signaling behaves in combination with other signaling systems remains elusive. The wave of differentiation in the Drosophila visual center or “proneural wave” accompanies Notch activity that is propagated without the formation of a salt and pepper pattern, implying that Notch does not form a feedback loop of lateral inhibition during this process. However, mathematical modeling and genetic analysis clearly showed that Notch-mediated lateral inhibition is implemented within the proneural wave. Because partial reduction in EGF signaling causes the formation of the salt and pepper pattern, it is most likely that EGF diffusion cancels salt and pepper pattern formation in silico and in vivo. Moreover, the combination of Notch-mediated lateral inhibition and EGF-mediated reaction diffusion enables a function of Notch signaling that regulates propagation of the wave of differentiation. PMID:27535937

  15. Engaging unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides in visible-light-mediated free radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, John D; D'Amato, Erica M; Narayanam, Jagan M R; Stephenson, Corey R J

    2012-10-01

    Radical reactions are a powerful class of chemical transformations. However, the formation of radical species to initiate these reactions has often required the use of stoichiometric amounts of toxic reagents, such as tributyltin hydride. Recently, the use of visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis to generate radical species has become popular, but the scope of these radical precursors has been limited. Here, we describe the identification of reaction conditions under which photocatalysts such as fac-Ir(ppy)3 can be utilized to form radicals from unactivated alkyl, alkenyl and aryl iodides. The generated radicals undergo reduction via hydrogen atom abstraction or reductive cyclization. The reaction protocol utilizes only inexpensive reagents, occurs under mild reaction conditions, and shows exceptional functional group tolerance. Reaction efficiency is maintained upon scale-up and decreased catalyst loading, and the reaction time can be significantly shortened when the reaction is performed in a flow reactor.

  16. [Electromagnetic fields hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Sobiczewska, Elzbieta; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2009-01-01

    The development of industry, particularly of new technologies in communication systems, gives rise to the number and diversty of electromagnetic field (EMF) sources in the environment. These sources, including power-frequent, radiofrequent and microwaves, make human life richer, safer and easier. But at the same time, there is growing concern about possible health risks connected with EMF exposure. An increasing number of persons have recently reported on a variety of health problems induced, in their opinion, by exposure to EMF. It is important to note that EMF levels to which these individuals are exposed are generally well below the recommended exposure limits and are certainly far below those known to produce any adverse effects. These persons call themselves "electromagnetic hypersensitivity individuals" And complain about experiencing various types of non-specific symptoms, including dermatological, neurological and vegetative. In the present paper, the problem of electromagnetic hypersensitivity phenomenon is discussed based on the recently published literature.

  17. Hypersensitivity vasculitis associated with leuprolide (Lupron).

    PubMed

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2010-09-01

    Leuprolide (Lupron) is a synthetic analog of naturally occurring gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Leuprolide is used as a hormonal antagonist in the treatment of advanced prostatic cancer, and as hormonal therapy in the treatment of endometriosis. Off-label, it is also used in premenopausal or perimenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer for the purpose of ovarian ablation. Ever since its FDA approval in 1985, many adverse reactions have been reported in association with leuprolide ranging from local skin irritation to severe anaphylactoid reactions. In this case report, we present a case of hypersensitivity vasculitis (serum sickness) in a patient who received leuprolide for his prostate cancer. Serum sickness has never been reported as a side-effect of leuprolide. Our case is the first case of serum sickness associated with leuprolide. We emphasize that physicians using leuprolide should be wary of signs and symptoms of hypersensitivity vasculitis or serum sickness.

  18. Systemic reaction to papain in a nonoccupational setting.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, L E; Bowers, C H

    1983-04-01

    A patient experienced a severe systemic allergic reaction after ingesting meat tenderizer. Evaluation revealed that the reaction was mediated by IgE antibody to papain, an ingredient of the tenderizer. Papain hypersensitivity has been reported among pharmacists and factory workers exposed to the agent, but few nonoccupational cases have been described. The present case may be the first in which the sensitization appears to have occurred via the gastrointestinal route. Papain-containing products are commonly used throughout our society and papain hypersensitivity may represent an unrecognized cause of allergic symptoms. PMID:6601123

  19. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  20. The methylthiolation reaction mediated by the Radical-SAM enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Mohamed; Arragain, Simon; Fontecave, Marc; Mulliez, Etienne; Hunt, John F.; Luff, Jon D.; Forouhar, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanistic enzymology of the Radical-SAM enzymes. It is now clear that these enzymes appear to be involved in a remarkably wide range of chemically challenging reactions. This review article highlights mechanistic and structural aspects of the methylthiotransferases (MTTases) sub-class of the Radical-SAM enzymes. The mechanism of methylthio insertion, now observed to be performed by three different enzymes is an exciting unsolved problem. PMID:22178611

  1. AAPH-mediated antioxidant reactions of secoisolariciresinol and SDG.

    PubMed

    Hosseinian, Farah S; Muir, Alister D; Westcott, Neil D; Krol, Ed S

    2007-02-21

    Secoisolariciresinol (SECO ) is the major lignan found in flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) and is present in a polymer that contains secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG ). SECO, SDG and the polymer are known to have a number of health benefits, including reduction of serum cholesterol levels, delay in the onset of type II diabetes and decreased formation of breast, prostate and colon cancers. The health benefits of SECO and SDG may be partially attributed to their antioxidant properties. To better understand their antioxidant properties, SECO and SDG were oxidized using 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane), an in vitro model of radical scavenging. The major lignan radical-scavenging oxidation products and their formation over time were determined. SDG was converted to four major products, which were the result of a phenoxyl radical intermediate. One of these products, a dimer of SDG, decomposed under the reaction conditions to form two of the other major products, and . SECO was converted to five major products, two of which were also the result of a phenoxyl radical intermediate. The remaining products were the result of an unexpected alkoxyl radical intermediate. The phenol oxidation products were stable under the reaction conditions, whereas two of the alcohol oxidation products decomposed. In general, only one phenol group on the lignans was oxidized, suggesting that the number of phenols per molecule may not predict radical scavenging antioxidant ability of lignans. Finally, SECO is a superior antioxidant to SDG, and it may be that the additional alcohol oxidation pathway contributes to its greater antioxidant ability.

  2. Mediating millisecond reaction time around particles and cells.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Go, Derek E; Gossett, Daniel R; Tan, Andrew P; Di Carlo, Dino

    2014-02-01

    Precise spatiotemporal control of how particles and cells interact with reagents is critical for numerous laboratory and industrial processes. Novel tools for exerting this control at shorter time scales will enable development of new chemical processes and biomedical assays. Previously, we have developed a generalized approach to manipulate cells and particles across fluid streams termed rapid inertial solution exchange (RInSE), which utilizes inertial lift forces at finite Reynolds number and high Peclet number to transfer particles from an initial solution to another within a millisecond. Here, we apply these principles toward developing a continuous flow microfluidic platform that enables transient chemical treatments of cells and particles (on the order of 1 ms). We also demonstrate how the reactant stream can be employed as a diffusion barrier, preventing adverse reactions between coflowing solutions. In order to demonstrate the utility of the method, we applied it to various operations in molecular biology and automated cell staining including cell permeabilization, fluorescent staining, and molecular delivery to viable cells. We expect this method will enable previously unexplored studies of the dynamics of molecular events, improve uniformity of reactions carried on the surface of beads, and increase uniformity in cell-based assays through automation.

  3. Immune responses to ectoparasites of horses, with a focus on insect bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D

    2014-11-01

    Horses are affected by a wide variety of arthropod ectoparasites, ranging from lice which spend their entire life on the host, through ticks which feed over a period of days, to numerous biting insects that only transiently visit the host to feed. The presence of ectoparasites elicits a number of host responses including innate inflammatory responses, adaptive immune reactions and altered behaviour; all of which can reduce the severity of the parasite burden. All of these different responses are linked through immune mechanisms mediated by mast cells and IgE antibodies which have an important role in host resistance to ectoparasites, yet immune responses also cause severe pathological reactions. One of the best described examples of such pathological sequelae is insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) of horses; an IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity to the salivary proteins of Culicoides spp. associated with T-helper-2 production of IL4 and IL13. Importantly, all horses exposed to Culicoides have an expanded population of Culicoides antigen-specific T cells with this pattern of cytokine production, but in those which remain healthy, the inflammatory reaction is tempered by the presence of FoxP3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells that express IL10 and TGF-beta, which suppresses the IL4 production by Culicoides antigen-activated T cells.

  4. Drug Hypersensitivity: Pharmacogenetics and Clinical Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J.; Chung, Wen-Hung; Mockenhaupt, Maja; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Mallal, Simon A.

    2011-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) include syndromes such as drug reaction, eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN). An important advance has been the discovery of associations between HLA alleles and many of these syndromes including abacavir hypersensitivity reaction, allopurinol DRESS/DIHS and SJS/TEN and SJS/TEN associated with aromatic amine anticonvulsants. These HLA associations have created the promise for prevention through screening and have additionally shed further light on the immunopathogenesis of SCARs. The roll-out of HLA-B*5701 into routine clinical practice as a genetic screening test to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity provides a translational roadmap for other drugs. Numerous hurdles exist in the widespread translation of several other drugs such as carbamazepine where the positive predictive value of HLA-B*1502 is low and the negative predictive value of HLA-B*1502 for SJS/TEN may not be 100% in all ethnic groups. International collaborative consortia have been formed with the goal of developing phenotype standardization and undertaking HLA and genome-wide analyses in diverse populations with these syndromes. PMID:21354501

  5. Hypersensitivity associated with sugammadex administration: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Kalansky, A

    2014-11-01

    Sugammadex is a drug used to reverse neuromuscular blockade induced by rocuronium or vecuronium. It has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the USA due to concerns regarding hypersensitivity. The objective of this review was to identify similarities in the presentation of hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. A comprehensive search was performed in PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science for cases reporting hypersensitivity reactions to sugammadex. In addition, we contacted regulatory agencies and the company marketing the drug for unpublished reports. Reports were included if they were in English, primary investigations, lacked an alternative probable explanation for the reaction and included a comprehensive description of the hypersensitivity. We identified 15 cases of hypersensitivity following sugammadex administration. All cases that reported exact timing (14/15) occurred in 4 min or less. Most of the patients (11/15; 73%) met World Anaphylaxis Organization criteria for anaphylaxis. Awareness must be raised for the possibility of drug-induced hypersensitivity during the critical 5-min period immediately following sugammadex administration.

  6. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  7. Alkali metal mediated C–C bond coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C–C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz){sub 2}, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz){sub 2}, the structure of [Li(Bz){sub 2}]{sup −} was drastically changed: Bz–Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C–C single bond was formed in the C{sub 1}–C{sub 1}′ position of Bz–Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz–Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C–C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  8. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli. PMID:25140103

  9. Relationship between Sympathetic Skin Responses and Auditory Hypersensitivity to Different Auditory Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Kato, Fumi; Iwanaga, Ryoichiro; Chono, Mami; Fujihara, Saori; Tokunaga, Akiko; Murata, Jun; Tanaka, Koji; Nakane, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Goro

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] Auditory hypersensitivity has been widely reported in patients with autism spectrum disorders. However, the neurological background of auditory hypersensitivity is currently not clear. The present study examined the relationship between sympathetic nervous system responses and auditory hypersensitivity induced by different types of auditory stimuli. [Methods] We exposed 20 healthy young adults to six different types of auditory stimuli. The amounts of palmar sweating resulting from the auditory stimuli were compared between groups with (hypersensitive) and without (non-hypersensitive) auditory hypersensitivity. [Results] Although no group × type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was observed for the extent of reaction, significant type of stimulus × first stimulus interaction was noted for the extent of reaction. For an 80 dB-6,000 Hz stimulus, the trends for palmar sweating differed between the groups. For the first stimulus, the variance became larger in the hypersensitive group than in the non-hypersensitive group. [Conclusion] Subjects who regularly felt excessive reactions to auditory stimuli tended to have excessive sympathetic responses to repeated loud noises compared with subjects who did not feel excessive reactions. People with auditory hypersensitivity may be classified into several subtypes depending on their reaction patterns to auditory stimuli.

  10. [Nonallergic hypersensitivity to environmental factors].

    PubMed

    Rakhmanin, Iu A; Fedoseeva, V N; Makovetskaia, A K; Fedoskova, T G

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of manifestations of non-allergic hypersensitivity to chemical environmental factors pose the question about the need to study the mechanisms of its formation in population. It should be borne in mind that, in the absence of immunological mechanisms of formation of the mentioned state, the term "chemical sensitization" must be replaced by the term "non-allergic hypersensitivity." The investigation of this problem should permit to reduce the risk of formation of different types of hypersensitivity in population.

  11. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field.

  12. Advances in the electrochemical simulation of oxidation reactions mediated by cytochrome p450.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Ugo; Boujtita, Mohammed

    2014-10-20

    Combining electrochemistry with mass spectrometry constitutes an increasingly useful approach for simulating reactions catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP450). In this review, we discuss the ability of the electrochemical cell to act as a reliable tool to mimic CYP450. The electrochemical oxidation process and CYP450-catalyzed reactions are compared in terms of mechanistic pathways, chemical structures of reactive intermediate metabolites, and final chemical structures of oxidation products. The oxidation reactions mediated by CYP450 are known to occur by either a single electron transfer (SET) or a hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism. The similarities between the reactions mediated electrochemically or by CYP450 are discussed in terms of SET and HAT mechanisms.

  13. Food hypersensitivity among Caucasian and non-Caucasian children.

    PubMed

    Dias, Renuka P; Summerfield, Alison; Khakoo, G A

    2008-02-01

    There are little data regarding the frequency of different foods that cause hypersensitivity in the UK. Furthermore, there are no data regarding food hypersensitivity related to ethnic variations. This prospective study involved 76 children with IgE-mediated food allergy presenting consecutively over 18 months to a Paediatric Allergy Clinic serving a well-defined population that is 21% non-Caucasian. A total of 52.6% of the paediatric allergy clinic population was non-Caucasian compared with 35.9% in General Paediatric Clinics giving a mean difference in percentage of 16.7 (5.6, 27.8), p < 0.01. The average number of food allergens per child in the non-Caucasian group was 2.05 vs. 1.22 in the Caucasian group, mean difference 0.83, which is significant (t = 4.15, d.f. = 74, p < 0.01). Analysis of other allergic conditions revealed no significant increase in the non-Caucasian group. The mean age of first reaction to any food was 2.6 yr (range 0.3-12 yr) in Caucasian, and 1.7 yr (range 0.3-8 yr) in non-Caucasian, children (p < 0.05). There were 125 reactions in the study population, with egg, peanut, tree nut, cow milk and cod being the commonest food allergens. Some novel foods, such as kiwi, lentil and sesame, were also represented in the top 10 food allergies, particularly in the non-Caucasian population. Ethnic minorities are over-represented in terms of the number of children with food allergy and number of food allergies per child, present at an earlier age with food allergy, and possibly have a greater variety of food allergies compared with Caucasians. This is important in terms of health education. Our findings need confirmation by a more detailed population based study, ideally using food challenges in addition to history and skin prick testing.

  14. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Morkunas, A R; Miller, M B

    1997-10-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect that can occur from exposure to phenytoin, carbamazepine, or phenobarbital. It has diverse clinical features and a variable presentation which results in a delay in making the diagnosis. The syndrome commonly begins within 3 weeks after initiation of an anticonvulsant. Patients typically present with a constellation of fever, usually followed by the development of a rash of variable severity and type, and lymphadenopathy. In patients presenting with these features, the clinician should have a high index of suspicion for AHS. PMID:9330838

  15. Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos AC; Gimenez, Andréa; Kuranishi, Lilian; Storrer, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HSP) is a common interstitial lung disease resulting from inhalation of a large variety of antigens by susceptible individuals. The disease is best classified as acute and chronic. Chronic HSP can be fibrosing or not. Fibrotic HSP has a large differential diagnosis and has a worse prognosis. The most common etiologies for HSP are reviewed. Diagnostic criteria are proposed for both chronic forms based on exposure, lung auscultation, lung function tests, HRCT findings, bronchoalveolar lavage, and biopsies. Treatment options are limited, but lung transplantation results in greater survival in comparison to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Randomized trials with new antifibrotic agents are necessary. PMID:27703382

  16. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe; Xu, Qiang

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  17. Frequencies of immune hypersensitivity reaction-associated HLA class I alleles in healthy South African Indian and mixed ancestry populations determined by a novel real-time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Loubser, S; Paximadis, M; Gentle, N; Puren, A; Gray, C M; Tiemessen, C T

    2014-10-01

    We have determined the frequencies of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01, HLA-B*35:05, HLA-C*04 and HLA-C*08 in healthy individuals of South African Indian (SAI) ethnicity (n = 50) and South African mixed (SAM) ancestry (n = 50) using real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) assay. HLA-B*57:01 associates with immune hypersensitivity reaction (IHR) in individuals exposed to abacavir (ABC), while nevirapine (NVP) IHR associates with HLA-B*35:05, HLA-C*04 and HLA-C*08. Real-time AS-PCR assays typically use less DNA, are more cost-effective and rapid compared with conventional genotyping methods, such as sequence-based typing (SBT). The assay was developed using samples of known HLA class I genotype and subsequently applied to the SAI and SAM samples. HLA-B*57:01 was detected in SAM and SAI populations at frequencies of 8.0% and 12.0%, respectively, while HLA-B*35:05 was not found in SAI individuals, but was present in 6.0% of SAM individuals. HLA-C*04 was detected in 22.0% and 24.0% of SAM and SAI individuals, respectively, while 10.0% and 8.0% of SAM and SAI individuals, respectively, were HLA-C*08 positive. This study reports the development of a novel real-time AS-PCR assay to identify HLA class I alleles associated with ABC and NVP IHR and has established the frequencies of these alleles present in healthy SAI and SAM populations. Using South African demographic data, our hypothetical analysis suggests that a substantial number of individuals would benefit from the assay.

  18. Hypersensitivity of prediabetic JCR:LA-cp rats to fine airborne combustion particle-induced direct and noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Spencer D; Dreher, Kevin L; Kelly, Sandra E; Russell, James C

    2006-04-01

    Particulate matter with mean aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm (PM(2.5)), from diesel exhaust, coal or residual oil burning, and from industrial plants, is a significant component of airborne pollution. Type 2 diabetes is associated with enhanced risk of adverse cardiovascular events following exposure to PM(2.5). Particle properties, sources, and pathophysiological mechanisms responsible are unknown. We studied effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) from a large U.S. powerplant on vascular function in a prediabetic, hyperinsulinemic model, the JCR:LA-cp rat. Residual oil fly ash leachate (ROFA-L) was studied using aortic rings from young-adult, obese, insulin-resistant rats and lean normal rats in vitro. Contractile response to phenylephrine and relaxant response to acetylcholine were determined in the presence and absence of L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In a separate series of studies, the direct contractile effects of ROFA-L on repeated exposure were determined. ROFA-L (12.5 microg ml(-1)) increased phenylephrine-mediated contraction in obese (p < 0.05), but not in lean rat aortae, with the effect being exacerbated by L-NAME, and it reduced acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of both obese and lean aortae (p < 0.0001). Initial exposure of aortae to ROFA-L caused a small contractile response (<0.05 g), which was markedly greater on second exposure in the obese (approximately 0.6 g, p < 0.0001) aortae but marginal in lean (approximately 0.1 g) aortae. Our data demonstrate that bioavailable constituents of oil combustion particles enhance noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction, impair endothelium-mediated relaxation, and induce direct vasocontraction in prediabetic rats. These observations provide the first direct evidence of the causal properties of PM(2.5) and identify the pathophysiological role of the early prediabetic state in susceptibility to environmentally induced cardiovascular disease. These are important implications for public

  19. Case of immediate hypersensitivity to beer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Tomoko; Yagami, Akiko; Shimojo, Naoshi; Hara, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Masashi; Matsunaga, Kayoko

    2016-06-01

    We report here a case of immediate hypersensitivity to beer, in which a female patient developed angioedema of the eyelids shortly after consuming beer. In skin prick tests, the patient showed positive reactions to the base ingredients of beer, particularly malt and barley. The specific serum immunoglobulin E antibodies against barley and malt displayed weakly positive reactivity. To identify the immunoreactive antigens, malt and barley proteins were separated by 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoreacted with the patient's serum. The results of mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the main antigen was a protein with similarity to protein z-type serpin. Notably, the identified antigen had a molecular weight of 20-25 kDa, which is markedly smaller than that previously reported for protein Z4 (44 kDa). Taken together, these analyses indicate that a possible new antigen which belongs to the protein Z family elicits immediate hypersensitivity to beer. PMID:26661797

  20. Bromine radical-mediated sequential radical rearrangement and addition reaction of alkylidenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Kippo, Takashi; Hamaoka, Kanako; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2013-01-16

    Bromine radical-mediated cyclopropylcarbinyl-homoallyl rearrangement of alkylidenecyclopropanes was effectively accomplished by C-C bond formation with allylic bromides, which led to the syntheses of 2-bromo-1,6-dienes. A three-component coupling reaction comprising alkylidenecyclopropanes, allylic bromides, and carbon monoxide also proceeded well to give 2-bromo-1,7-dien-5-ones in good yield.

  1. [Cell-mediated immunity and delayed hypersensitivity study in splenectomy patients: a comparative evaluation between IFN-gamma and skin tests].

    PubMed

    Miniello, S; Jirillo, E; Urgesi, G; D'Abbicco, D; Tomasicchio, N; Bonomo, G M

    1999-01-01

    The authors of this paper attempt to indicate a feasible, easy-to-use and inexpensive instrument for daily assessing and monitoring of splenectomized subjects to see if they are immunocompromised. Skin tests which are considered easy and inexpensive, may be useful for immunological investigation if their effectiveness is considered equal to that of more difficult and expensive methods. They have also assessed the effectiveness of ST in the study of specific cell-mediated immunity in general and also in cases of delayed hypersensibility, comparatively to serum IFN gamma dosage. The latter is produced by Th1 lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells and is considered a reasonable indicator of cell-mediated immunity and Th1-related delayed hypersensibility. The results of this study confirm that ST is effective in 100% of all splenectomized patients compared to positivity of 60% for the compromise of the immunocompetent system revealed by serum IFN gamma dosage in the same sample of patients. In addition, the fundamental role of other cytokines was confirmed. These include IL-2 which is produced by Th1 lymphocytes and whose lack of results in splenectomized patients are immunocompromised. This is revealed not only by IFN gamma dosage but also by ST. PMID:10633837

  2. Proper use of skin tests with food extracts in diagnosis of hypersensitivity to food in children.

    PubMed

    Bock, S A; Buckley, J; Holst, A; May, C D

    1977-07-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the proper use of skin tests with food extracts in diagnosis of hypersensitivity to food in children. Cutaneous reactions evoked by graded amounts of food extracts were compared with results of double-blind food challenge and in vitro release of histamine from leucocytes. A 3 mm or greater weal reaction in skin tests by puncture technique using food extracts of 1:20 w/v concentration was found to indicate the degree of hypersensitivity likely to be associated with clinically significant hypersensitivity reactions to food. Proper use of this simple technique will facilitate accurate diagnosis of food hypersensitivity in children by identifying the group among whom all positive reactions to food challenges will be found. Nevertheless, double-blind food challenge is essential to establish a diagnosis of symptomatic hypersensitivity to food.

  3. Suicide Disclosure in Suicide Attempt Survivors: Does Family Reaction Moderate or Mediate Disclosure's Effect on Depression?

    PubMed

    Frey, Laura M; Hans, Jason D; Cerel, Julie

    2016-02-01

    Existing literature has found a link between disclosure of a stigmatized identity and improved mental health; however, research on the impact of suicide disclosure to family members is scarce. Suicide attempt survivors (n = 74) in the United States were examined to assess whether family reaction moderates or mediates the relationship between suicide disclosure and subsequent depression symptoms. Family reaction did not moderate but did mediate the relationship between disclosure and depression symptoms while controlling for time since most recent attempt. Higher rates of disclosure predicted more positive family reactions, which in turn predicted less severe depression symptoms. Findings indicate that family members can play an essential role in the recovery process after an attempt occurs, which has important implications for both researchers and clinicians who seek to decrease stigma for attempt survivors while simultaneously decreasing the likelihood of future attempts.

  4. Alpha-adrenergic receptors mediate imipramine/alarm substance-induced reaction in rats.

    PubMed

    Abel, E L

    1994-08-01

    The mechanism of adverse imipramine-induced reactions (jitteriness, convulsions) was investigated by precipitating such reactions in rats with three injections (IP) of imipramine (5-40 mg/kg) at 24, 5, and 1 h before testing, and comparing their occurrence with comparable treatments using specific noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake inhibitors [nortriptyline (10 or 30 mg/kg, IP), citalopram (0.5-5.0 mg/kg, IP)]. This initial study indicated that these reactions were mediated by imipramine's noradrenergic effects. Subsequent combinations of imipramine and an alpha 2 agonist (clonidine, 5 mg/kg) and antagonist (yohimbine, 2 mg/kg), and a beta-adrenergic antagonist (propranolol, 2 or 5 mg/kg) (all administered IP 0.5 h after the last injection of imipramine) suggested imipramine's adverse effects were mediated by alpha 2 receptors. The possible involvement of the locus ceruleus in these effects was considered.

  5. [Corneal ulcerative lesions in type-I immediate hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Giuri, S

    1998-01-01

    The vernal keratoconjunctivitis (KCV) is included within the category of the hypersensitiveness diseases, the immunopathological mechanism which causes the disease being represented by a type-I hypersensibility reaction. The mechanism which determines the appearance of the corneal lesions isn't entirely cleared up, but there are however some pathogenic links which have been already deciphered. The type I hypersensibility reaction is taking place within two stages: stage I the stage of the sensitizing contact and stage II the stage of the unleashing contact. During the first stage, the Langerhans cells take over and process the allergen, exhibiting on their surface only the antigenic part. The Langerhans cells interact with the T helper native cells (Tho), cells from which there will result the predominantly differentiated Th2 subtype. The Thz cells will activate, by means of the interleukines, the B cells (which produce the IgE), the mast cells and the eosinophilic cells. During the second stage, the allergen is coming into contact with the IgE specific antibodies, which are fastened on the mast cells membrane, generating the opening of their granules. The result of this evolution is represented by the unleash of vasoactive mediators, own enzymes, chemical mediators (among which there is also the eosinophilic chemotactic factor ECFA). The latter contributes to the infiltration of the epithelial and of the subepithelial tissue with eosinophilic cells. The major basic protein (PBM), one of the proteins released from the eosinophilic cells' big granules, plays a major pathogenic role in the production of the corneal ulcer, by means of its direct cytotoxic effect and also by means of inhibiting the migration of the epithelial corneal cells. The role of the mast cells and also the role of the neutrophile cells within the framework of the pathogenesis of the ulcer is disputable, because some specific enzymes tryptase, respectively elastase--have been found within the

  6. [Corneal ulcerative lesions in type-I immediate hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Giuri, S

    1998-01-01

    The vernal keratoconjunctivitis (KCV) is included within the category of the hypersensitiveness diseases, the immunopathological mechanism which causes the disease being represented by a type-I hypersensibility reaction. The mechanism which determines the appearance of the corneal lesions isn't entirely cleared up, but there are however some pathogenic links which have been already deciphered. The type I hypersensibility reaction is taking place within two stages: stage I the stage of the sensitizing contact and stage II the stage of the unleashing contact. During the first stage, the Langerhans cells take over and process the allergen, exhibiting on their surface only the antigenic part. The Langerhans cells interact with the T helper native cells (Tho), cells from which there will result the predominantly differentiated Th2 subtype. The Thz cells will activate, by means of the interleukines, the B cells (which produce the IgE), the mast cells and the eosinophilic cells. During the second stage, the allergen is coming into contact with the IgE specific antibodies, which are fastened on the mast cells membrane, generating the opening of their granules. The result of this evolution is represented by the unleash of vasoactive mediators, own enzymes, chemical mediators (among which there is also the eosinophilic chemotactic factor ECFA). The latter contributes to the infiltration of the epithelial and of the subepithelial tissue with eosinophilic cells. The major basic protein (PBM), one of the proteins released from the eosinophilic cells' big granules, plays a major pathogenic role in the production of the corneal ulcer, by means of its direct cytotoxic effect and also by means of inhibiting the migration of the epithelial corneal cells. The role of the mast cells and also the role of the neutrophile cells within the framework of the pathogenesis of the ulcer is disputable, because some specific enzymes tryptase, respectively elastase--have been found within the

  7. Application of hypersensitivity skin testing in chemotherapy-induced pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, James C; Hawkins, Carolyn A

    2015-01-01

    Skin testing has been utilised to determine the culprit allergenic agent in drug reactions. Its application in the setting of hypersensitivity reaction relating to combination chemotherapeutic regimens may help identify the causative drug, allowing drug that is safe to be continued and avoiding limiting treatment options for patients. We report what we believe to be the first published case of hypersensitivity skin testing for gemcitabine-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic leiomyosarcoma and another case of docetaxel-induced pneumonitis in a patient with metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:26539407

  8. Immediate-type hypersensitivity to polyethylene glycols: a review.

    PubMed

    Wenande, E; Garvey, L H

    2016-07-01

    Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) or macrogols are polyether compounds widely used in medical and household products. Although generally considered biologically inert, cases of mild to life-threatening immediate-type PEG hypersensitivity are reported with increasing frequency. Nevertheless, awareness of PEG's allergenic potential remains low, due to a general lack of suspicion towards excipients and insufficient product labelling. Information on immediate-type reactions to PEG is limited to anecdotal reports, and the potential for PEG sensitization and cross-sensitization to PEGylated drugs and structurally related derivatives is likely underestimated. Most healthcare professionals have no knowledge of PEG and thus do not suspect PEG's as culprit agents in hypersensitivity reactions. In consequence, patients are at risk of misdiagnosis and commonly present with a history of repeated, severe reactions to a range of unrelated products in hospital and at home. Increased awareness of PEG prevalence, PEG hypersensitivity, and improved access to PEG allergy testing, should facilitate earlier diagnosis and reduce the risk of inadvertent re-exposure. This first comprehensive review provides practical information for allergists and other healthcare professionals by describing the clinical picture of 37 reported cases of PEG hypersensitivity since 1977, summarizing instances where PEG hypersensitivity should be considered and proposing an algorithm for diagnostic management. PMID:27196817

  9. Stent hypersensitivity and infection in sinus cavities

    PubMed Central

    Soufras, George D.; Hahalis, George

    2013-01-01

    Persistent mucosal inflammation, granulation tissue formation, hypersensitivity, and multifactorial infection are newly described complications of retained drug-eluting stents from endoscopic sinus surgery for refractory rhinosinusitis. In an important report published in Allergy and Rhinology, a 45-year-old male patient suffering from recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery and was found, for the first time, to have steroid-eluting catheters that were inadvertently left in the ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The retained catheters had caused persistent mucosal inflammation and formation of granulation tissue denoting hypersensitivity reaction. These consequences had induced perpetuation of symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis. Meticulous removal of the retained stents with the nitinol wings from inflamed tissues of the frontal, ethmoidal, and sphenoethmoidal recesses in which they were completely imbedded was successfully performed without polypoid regrowth. Cultures of specimens taken from both left and right stents showed heavy growth of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and moderate growth of Klebsiella oxytoca, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus. Fungal infection was not detected. The current knowledge and experience regarding stent hypersensitivity and infection in relation with the use of stents in sinus cavities is reviewed. PMID:24498522

  10. Recent advances in hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Lacasse, Yves; Girard, Mélissa; Cormier, Yvon

    2012-07-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a pulmonary disease with symptoms of dyspnea and cough resulting from the inhalation of an allergen to which the subject has been previously sensitized. The diagnosis of HP most often relies on an array of nonspecific clinical symptoms and signs developed in an appropriate setting, with the demonstration of interstitial markings on chest radiographs, serum precipitating antibodies against offending antigens, a lymphocytic alveolitis on BAL, and/or a granulomatous reaction on lung biopsies. The current classification of HP in acute, subacute, and chronic phases is now challenged, and a set of clinical predictors has been proposed. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, usual interstitial pneumonia, and bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia may be the sole histologic expression of the disease. Presumably, like in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic HP may occur without further exposure to the offending antigen. New offending antigens, such as mycobacteria causing hot tub lung and metalworking fluid HP, have recently been identified and have stimulated further research in HP. PMID:22796841

  11. Substrate-mediated proton relay mechanism for the religation reaction in topoisomerase II.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Kyohei; Shoji, Mitsuo; Kondo, Daiki; Sato, Akimasa; Yang, Moon Young; Kamiya, Katsumasa; Shiraishi, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    The DNA religation reaction of yeast type II topoisomerase (topo II) was investigated to elucidate its metal-dependent general acid/base catalysis. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations were performed for the topo II religation reaction, and the proton transfer pathway was examined. We found a substrate-mediated proton transfer of the topo II religation reaction, which involves the 3' OH nucleophile, the reactive phosphate, water, Arg781, and Tyr782. Metal A stabilizes the transition states, which is consistent with a two-metal mechanism in topo II. This pathway may be required for the cleavage/religation reaction of topo IA and II and will provide a general explanation for the catalytic mechanism in the topo IA and II.

  12. An assessment of the reaction energetics for cytochrome P450-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Higgins, L; Korzekwa, K R; Rao, S; Shou, M; Jones, J P

    2001-01-01

    Regioselectivity is used to determine the absolute energetic differences for four different reactions catalyzed by P450. Abstraction of a hydrogen from a benzylic carbon containing a chlorine has a 1.0 kcal/mol lower barrier than abstraction from a simple benzylic carbon, which in turn is 0.4 to 0.9 kcal/mol lower than abstraction from the methyl group of an aromatic ether and 0.1 to 0.6 kcal/mol easier than aromatic hydroxylation. Isotope effects are used to determine if the enzyme-substrate complexes leading to each product, from a given substrate, are in rapid equilibrium. For all enzymes isotopically sensitive branching is observed from the benzylic carbon upon deuterium incorporation at that position to each of the other positions, indicating that each product arises from the same active oxygen species. The energetic differences determined experimentally are accurately reproduced by theoretical hydrogen atom abstractions at both the AM1 semiempirical and DFT levels of theory.

  13. Lewis base mediated β-elimination and Lewis acid mediated insertion reactions of disilazido zirconium compounds.

    PubMed

    Yan, KaKing; Duchimaza Heredia, Juan J; Ellern, Arkady; Gordon, Mark S; Sadow, Aaron D

    2013-10-01

    The reactivity of a series of disilazido zirconocene complexes is dominated by the migration of anionic groups (hydrogen, alkyl, halide, OTf) between the zirconium and silicon centers. The direction of these migrations is controlled by the addition of two-electron donors (Lewis bases) or two-electron acceptors (Lewis acids). The cationic nonclassical [Cp2ZrN(SiHMe2)2](+) ([2](+)) is prepared from Cp2Zr{N(SiHMe2)2}H (1) and B(C6F5)3 or [Ph3C][B(C6F5)4], while reactions of B(C6F5)3 and Cp2Zr{N(SiHMe2)2}R (R = Me (3), Et (5), n-C3H7 (7), CH═CHSiMe3 (9)) provide a mixture of [2](+) and [Cp2ZrN(SiHMe2)(SiRMe2)](+). The latter products are formed through B(C6F5)3 abstraction of a β-H and R group migration from Zr to the β-Si center. Related β-hydrogen abstraction and X group migration reactions are observed for Cp2Zr{N(SiHMe2)2}X (X = OTf (11), Cl (13), OMe (15), O-i-C3H7 (16)). Alternatively, addition of DMAP (DMAP = 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine) to [2](+) results in coordination to a Si center and hydrogen migration to zirconium, giving the cationic complex [Cp2Zr{N(SiHMe2)(SiMe2DMAP)}H](+) ([19](+)). Related hydrogen migration occurs from [Cp2ZrN(SiHMe2)(SiMe2OCHMe2)](+) ([18](+)) to give [Cp2Zr{N(SiMe2DMAP)(SiMe2OCHMe2)}H](+) ([22](+)), whereas X group migration is observed upon addition of DMAP to [Cp2ZrN(SiHMe2)(SiMe2X)](+) (X = OTf ([12](+)), Cl ([14](+))) to give [Cp2Zr{N(SiHMe2)(SiMe2DMAP)}X](+) (X = OTf ([26](+)), Cl ([20](+))). The species involved in these transformations are described by resonance structures that suggest β-elimination. Notably, such pathways are previously unknown in early metal amide chemistry. Finally, these migrations facilitate direct Si-H addition to carbonyls, which is proposed to occur through a pathway that previously had been reserved for later transition metal compounds.

  14. [In vitro immunologic diagnosis of hypersensitivity to vegetables].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Díaz, T; Cuevas Agustín, M; Luz Díez Gómez, M; Losada Cosme, E; Moneo Goiri, I

    1986-01-01

    Acute reaction to food allergens is a fairly common problem that is often seen in the allergist's office, its incidence being specially high in childhood. Milk and eggs are the most common sensitizing foods, but usually the type of food allergens responsible for these reactions varies according to food habits in different countries. Legumes occupy an important role in the Spanish diet, being responsible for a large number of allergic reactions. It has been shown that legumes occupy the fourth place in importance among the food allergens, inducing hypersensitivity reactions in Spanish children. This article describes five patients with clinical features suggestive of being mediated by IgE antibodies specific for different legumes. In all the cases, disorders appeared immediately after the ingestion or even the inhalation of vapours from cooked legumes (lentil, bean or chick-pea). Clinical features consisted of: urticaria, angioedema, abdominal symptoms and rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma. The five patients required hospital emergency care on several occasions. Two patients suffered also from seasonal pollinosis with rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. All the patients complained of these type of disorders with any legume, but lentil was found to induce the most severe reactions and it was therefore selected for this study. The presence of specific IgE antibodies was demonstrated in vivo in all the patients by means of skin prick-test. It was performed using a lentil extract prepared in our laboratory. Negative controls were also included. A reverse enzymeimmunoassay (REIA) revealed the presence of specific IgE antibodies in the sera of the five subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Horseradish Peroxidase-Mediated, Iodide-Catalyzed Cascade Reaction for Plasmonic Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Xianyu, Yunlei; Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    This report outlines an enzymatic cascade reaction for signal transduction and amplification for plasmonic immunoassays by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). HRP-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and iodide-catalyzed oxidation of cysteine is employed to modulate the plasmonic signals of AuNPs. It agrees well with the current immunoassay platforms and allows naked-eye readout with enhanced sensitivity, which holds great promise for applications in resource-constrained settings. PMID:26460152

  16. Horseradish Peroxidase-Mediated, Iodide-Catalyzed Cascade Reaction for Plasmonic Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Xianyu, Yunlei; Chen, Yiping; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-11-01

    This report outlines an enzymatic cascade reaction for signal transduction and amplification for plasmonic immunoassays by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mediated aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). HRP-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and iodide-catalyzed oxidation of cysteine is employed to modulate the plasmonic signals of AuNPs. It agrees well with the current immunoassay platforms and allows naked-eye readout with enhanced sensitivity, which holds great promise for applications in resource-constrained settings.

  17. Hypersensitivity and nanoparticles: update and research trends

    PubMed Central

    MOCAN, TEODORA; MATEA, CRISTIAN T.; IANCU, CORNEL; AGOSTON-COLDEA, LUCIA; MOCAN, LUCIAN; ORASAN, REMUS

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology holds a great promise for a wide range of medical-intent applications (diagnostic, treatment and prophylaxis of various diseases). Their advantages are due to their size, versatility and potential for multiple simultaneous applications. However, concerns have been formulated by scientific world due to insufficient data on toxicity of nanomaterials. One area of interest is represented by the interactions between nanoparticles and the components of the immune system. We review herein reported data on hypersensitivity reactions. The role exerted by nanoparticles in both immunostimulation and immunosuppression in allergen-driven mechanisms was studied, as well as future trends in worldwide research. PMID:27152071

  18. Anti-allergic effects of nilotinib on mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis like reactions.

    PubMed

    El-Agamy, Dina S

    2012-04-01

    Nilotinib is a new orally bioavailable potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is used for the treatment of BCR-ABL-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia. However, its effect on mast cell-mediated anaphylactic reaction is still not known. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of nilotinib on the anaphylactic allergic reaction and study its possible mechanism(s) of action. Nilotinib administration prevented systemic anaphylaxis in mice, mediated by compound 48/80, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Also, nilotinib significantly inhibited (P<0.05) allergic paw edema in rats. Furthermore, nilotinib significantly decreased (P<0.05) the IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in a dose dependent manner. In addition, nilotinib dose-dependently reduced histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells activated either by compound 48/80 or by ovalbumin. Moreover, nilotinib attenuated the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α expression in the rat peritoneal mast cells. These findings provide evidence that nilotinib inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and so it could be a candidate as an anti-allergic agent.

  19. ERK1/2 mediates sperm acrosome reaction through elevation of intracellular calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Jaldety, Yael; Breitbart, Haim

    2015-10-01

    Mammalian sperm acquire fertilization capacity after residing in the female reproductive tract for a few hours in a process called capacitation. Only capacitated sperm can bind the zona pellucida (ZP) of the egg and undergo the acrosome reaction, a process that allows penetration and fertilization. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mediates signalling in many cell types, however its role in sperm function is largely unknown. Here we show that ERK1/2 is highly phosphorylated/activated after a short incubation of mouse sperm under capacitation conditions and that this phosphorylation is reduced after longer incubation. Further phosphorylation was observed upon addition of crude extract of egg ZP or epidermal growth factor (EGF). The mitogen-activated ERK-kinase (MEK) inhibitor U0126 abolished ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in vitro fertilization rate and the acrosome reaction induced by ZP or EGF but not by the Ca2+-ionophore A23187. Moreover, inhibition of ERK1/2 along the capacitation process diminished almost completely the sperm's ability to go through the acrosome reaction, while inhibition at the end of capacitation attenuated the acrosome reaction rate by only 45%. The fact that the acrosome reaction, induced by the Ca2+ -ionophore A23187, was not inhibited by U0126 suggests that ERK1/2 mediates the acrosome reaction by activating Ca2+ transport into the cell. Direct determination of intracellular [Ca2+] revealed that Ca2+ influx induced by EGF or ZP was completely blocked by U0126. Thus, it has been established that the increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation/activation in response to ZP or by activation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by EGF, is a key event for intracellular Ca2+ elevation and the subsequent occurrence of the acrosome reaction.

  20. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice elicited by cytoplasmic fractions of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, R J; Reiss, E

    1978-01-01

    Four subcellular fractions of Cryptococcus neoformans prepared by differential centrifugation of disrupted whole yeast and a 3-day culture filtrate were examined for their ability to elicit delayed-type hypersensitivity in sensitized animals. The methods used to detect sensitization were (i) the footpad swelling test and inhibition of peritoneal macrophage migration in mice and (ii) skin testing in guinea pigs. Two entities, the post-mitochondrial supernatant and the culture filtrate, showed considerable activity in the footpad test, with 26- and 30-microliter 24-h swellings, respectively, at 6 weeks after infection. With the latter there was interference from a strong antibody-mediated 4-h skin reaction. The post-mitochondrial supernatant produced strong delayed-type hypersensitivity in guinea pigs at a dose of 69 microgram, and there was no demonstrable cross-reactivity in animals sensitized with heterologous fungi. The footpad swelling in mice correlated well with the macrophage migration inhibition test, with 71% inhibition in mice infected subcutaneously with C. neoformans at 6 weeks. However, mice infected intravenously developed poorer cell-mediated immunity than the subcutaneously infected mice. The post-mitochondrial supernatant was found to contain detectable amounts of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide. Images PMID:365751

  1. Performance of Density Functionals for Activation Energies of Zr-Mediated Reactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hui

    2013-11-12

    Coupled cluster CCSD(T) calculations with core-valence correlation and complete basis set (CBS) limit extrapolation are used to benchmark the performance of commonly used density functionals in computing energy barriers for Zr-mediated reactions involving zirconocene species. These reactions include (a) insertions of the Zr-H bond of Cp2Zr(H)Cl into C═C, C≡C, and C═O bonds and (b) C-H activations by Zr═N bond in Cp2Zr═NH. The best performing functionals are M06-L, M06, and M06-2X in the M06 series, all having mean unsigned deviations (MUD) less than 2 kcal/mol. The worst performing functional is OLYP, with a distinctly large MUD of more than 10 kcal/mol. Considering also the trends in barrier heights and the systematic barrier height deviation, our best recommended functional is M06-2X. In this work, DFT empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D3) is found to improve the performance of barrier height values for most functionals (especially of OLYP and B3LYP). With DFT empirical dispersion correction, we also recommend M06-2X for reaction barrier calculations of Zr-mediated reactions.

  2. Lung Transplantation for Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Koth, Laura; Mooney, Joshua; Golden, Jeff; Hays, Steven; Greenland, John; Wolters, Paul; Ghio, Emily; Jones, Kirk D.; Leard, Lorriana; Kukreja, Jasleen; Blanc, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inhaled antigen-mediated interstitial lung disease (ILD). Advanced disease may necessitate the need for lung transplantation. There are no published studies addressing lung transplant outcomes in HP. We characterized HP outcomes compared with referents undergoing lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). METHODS: To identify HP cases, we reviewed records for all ILD lung transplantation cases at our institution from 2000 to 2013. We compared clinical characteristics, survival, and acute and chronic rejection for lung transplant recipients with HP to referents with IPF. We also reviewed diagnoses of HP discovered only by explant pathology and looked for evidence of recurrent HP after transplant. Survival was compared using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard modeling. RESULTS: We analyzed 31 subjects with HP and 91 with IPF among 183 cases undergoing lung transplantation for ILD. Survival at 1, 3, and 5 years after lung transplant in HP compared with IPF was 96%, 89%, and 89% vs 86%, 67%, and 49%, respectively. Subjects with HP manifested a reduced adjusted risk for death compared with subjects with IPF (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.08-0.74; P = .013). Of the 31 cases, the diagnosis of HP was unexpectedly made at explant in five (16%). Two subjects developed recurrent HP in their allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, subjects with HP have excellent medium-term survival after lung transplantation and, relative to IPF, a reduced risk for death. HP may be initially discovered only by review of the explant pathology. Notably, HP may recur in the allograft. PMID:25412059

  3. Single Photon Initiated Decomposition Rearrangement Reactions (spidrr) of Organic Molecules Mediated by the Ni+ Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellert, Darrin; Mansell, Adam; Theis, Zachary; Gutierrez, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The Bellert group at Baylor University has developed a novel method for performing single photon initiated decomposition rearrangement reactions (SPIDRR) of organic molecules mediated by a transition metal cation. The advantage that SPIDRR affords is the direct measurement of first order microcanonical rate constants, k(E), determined at resolved internal energies. Furthermore, the SPIDRR technique measures kinetic details of exothermic reactions where product production is limited only by submerged activation barriers (kinetic barriers that are at energies below the separated reactant limit). Thus, such reactions approach unit efficiency, are thermodynamically driven, and are of greater relevance to catalytic research. Direct measurements of k(E) values extend to isotopically labelled species that provide direct measurement of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE), furnishing unique insight into the mechanistic details of a reaction. This talk presents results from the visible photon initiated, Ni+ induced decarbonylation reaction of propionaldehyde. Here a rather unique energy dependent behavior of the measured rate constants was observed and attributed to a dynamic competition between parallel reaction coordinates available to the photo-excited precursor. RRKM calculations in concert with high level DFT is used to support and further experimental results.

  4. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yubin; Guo, Na; Dou, Deqiang; Ran, Xiaoku; Ma, Xiande; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR) accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative), coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb), coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways.

  5. Proteomics Study on Nonallergic Hypersensitivity Induced by Compound 4880 and Ovalbumin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yubin; Guo, Na; Dou, Deqiang; Ran, Xiaoku; Ma, Xiande; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Nonallergic hypersensitivity reaction (NHR) accounts for more than 77% of all immune-mediated immediate hypersensitivity reactions and has become a serious threat to public health. Here, proteomics was used to study the NHR mechanism of two typical substances, the compound 4880 and ovalbumin. Twelve different proteins were suggested as potential biomarkers for examining the NHR mechanism, and our results revealed that the mechanism mainly encompassed 2 processes, i.e., generation and effect processes. The generation process could be classified as direct stimulation, complement (classical and alternative), coagulation, kallikrein-kinin, and integrated pathways. Thus glutathione peroxidase 1, terminal complement complex (complement factor 4d and Bb), coagulation 13, kininogen-1, and IgE could be used as candidate biomarkers for the indication of the corresponding pathways respectively, the proteins were further confirmed by ELISA. And the effect process was mainly composed of histamine as well as proteins such as DCD and MYLPF, which could be used as important indices for the symptoms of NHR. Our study differs from previous studies in that C4880 was found to not only be involved in the direct stimulation pathway, but also in the activated complement and kallikrein-kinin pathways through the coagulation pathway. We also report for the first time that ovalbumin-induced NHR could be a combination of the coagulation, classical complement, and integrated pathways. PMID:26829397

  6. Immediate-type latex hypersensitivity in a hairdresser.

    PubMed

    Sajjachareonpong, Praneet; Lee, Adriene; Nixon, Rosemary

    2002-05-01

    Hairdressers commonly develop contact dermatitis caused by either skin irritants or allergens to which they are exposed. Those using latex gloves are also at risk of developing immediate hypersensitivity reactions to latex. We present a hairdresser with hand dermatitis, primarily as a result of immediate-type hypersensitivity to latex causing contact urticaria, diagnosed with radioallergosorbent testing. Only three previous studies have reported latex allergy in hairdressers. This condition needs to be considered as a differential diagnosis in hairdressers presenting with hand dermatitis and a history of wearing either rubber or disposable latex gloves. PMID:11982576

  7. Peanut-induced anaphylactic reactions.

    PubMed

    Burks, W; Bannon, G A; Sicherer, S; Sampson, H A

    1999-07-01

    Food allergies, particularly to peanuts, are a common cause of anaphylaxis. Approximately 125 people die each year in the USA secondary to food-induced anaphylaxis. Clinical anaphylaxis is a syndrome of diverse etiology and dramatic presentation of symptoms associated with the classic features of type I, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity [1]. Typically the term anaphylaxis connotes an immunologically-mediated event that occurs after exposure to certain foreign substances. This reaction results from the generation and release of a variety of potent biologically active mediators and their concerted effects on various target organs. Anaphylaxis is recognized by cutaneous, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal signs and symptoms occurring singly or in combination. This article focuses on allergic reactions to peanuts that manifest as signs and symptoms involving multiple target organs or the cardiovascular system alone.

  8. Fast and Sequence-Specific Palladium-Mediated Cross-Coupling Reaction Identified from Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo—a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the “microenvironment” of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2 = 13 000 ± 2000 M–1 s–1) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium–alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  9. Fast and sequence-specific palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction identified from phage display.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Li, Nan; Ramil, Carlo P; Lin, Qing

    2014-09-19

    Fast and specific bioorthogonal reactions are highly desirable because they provide efficient tracking of biomolecules that are present in low abundance and/or involved in fast dynamic process in living systems. Toward this end, classic strategy involves the optimization of substrate structures and reaction conditions in test tubes, testing their compatibility with biological systems, devising synthetic biology schemes to introduce the modified substrates into living cells or organisms, and finally validating the superior kinetics for enhanced capacity in tracking biomolecules in vivo--a lengthy process often mired by unexpected results. Here, we report a streamlined approach in which the "microenvironment" of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter is exploited directly in biological systems via phage-assisted interrogation of reactivity (PAIR) to optimize not only reaction kinetics but also specificity. Using the PAIR strategy, we identified a short alkyne-containing peptide sequence showing fast kinetics (k2=13,000±2000 M(-1) s(-1)) in a palladium-mediated cross-coupling reaction. Site-directed mutagenesis studies suggested that the residues surrounding the alkyne moiety facilitate the assembly of a key palladium-alkyne intermediate along the reaction pathway. When this peptide sequence was inserted into the extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), this reactive sequence directed the specific labeling of EGFR in live mammalian cells. PMID:25025771

  10. Exciton Primer-mediated SNP detection in SmartAmp2 reactions.

    PubMed

    Lezhava, Alexander; Ishidao, Takefumi; Ishizu, Yuri; Naito, Kana; Hanami, Takeshi; Katayama, Atsuko; Kogo, Yasushi; Soma, Takahiro; Ikeda, Shuji; Murakami, Kayoko; Nogawa, Chihiro; Itoh, Masayoshi; Mitani, Yasumasa; Harbers, Matthias; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2010-02-01

    Most commonly used intercalating fluorescent dyes in DNA detection are lacking any sequence specificity, whereas so-called Exciton Primers can overcome this limitation by functioning as "sequence-specific dyes." After hybridization to complementary sequences, the fluorescence of Exciton Primers provides sequence-specific signals for real-time monitoring of amplification reactions. Applied to the SmartAmp2 mutation detection process, Exciton Primers show high signal strength with low background leading to a superior specificity and sensitivity compared to SYBR Green I. Signal strength can be further enhanced using multiple dyes within one Exciton Primer or use of multiple Exciton Primers in the same amplification reaction. Here we demonstrate the use of Exciton Primers for genotyping a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the VKORC1 locus (-1639G>A) relevant for Warfarin dosing as an example for Exciton Primers mediated genotyping by SmartAmp2. The genotyping assay can use only one labeled Exciton Primer for endpoint detection, or simultaneously by real-time monitoring detect wild-type and mutant alleles in a one-tube reaction using two Exciton Primers having different dyes. Working directly from blood samples, Exciton Primer mediated genotyping by SmartAmp2 offers superior solutions for rapid point-of-care testing.

  11. Environmental chemicals relevant for respiratory hypersensitivity: the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Becher, R; Hongslo, J K; Jantunen, M J; Dybing, E

    1996-08-01

    The allergenic constituents of non-industrial indoor environments are predominantly found in the biologic fraction. Several reports have related biological particles such as mites and their excreta, dander from pets and other furred animals, fungi and bacteria to allergic manifestations including respiratory hypersensitivity among the occupants of buildings. Also, bacterial cell-wall components and the spores of toxin-producing moulds may contribute to the induction of hypersensitivity, but the relevance for human health is not yet determined. The knowledge regarding hypersensitivity and asthmatic reactions after exposure to chemical agents is primarily based on data from occupational settings with much higher exposure levels than usually found in non-industrial indoor environments. However, there is evidence that indoor exposure to tobacco smoke, some volatile organic compounds (VOC) and various combustion products (either by using unvented stoves or from outdoor sources) can be related to asthmatic symptoms. In some susceptible individuals, the development of respiratory hypersensitivity or elicitation of asthmatic symptoms may also be related to the indiscriminate use of different household products followed by exposure to compounds such as diisocyanates, organic acid anhydrides, formaldehyde, styrene and hydroquinone. At present, the contribution of the indoor environment both to the development of respiratory hypersensitivity and for triggering asthmatic symptoms is far from elucidated.

  12. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  13. Biomaterial Hypersensitivity: Is It Real? Supportive Evidence and Approach Considerations for Metal Allergic Patients following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mihalko, William M.; Grupp, Thomas M.; Manning, Blaine T.; Dennis, Douglas A.; Goodman, Stuart B.; Saleh, Khaled J.

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  14. Biomaterial hypersensitivity: is it real? Supportive evidence and approach considerations for metal allergic patients following total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mitchelson, Andrew J; Wilson, Craig J; Mihalko, William M; Grupp, Thomas M; Manning, Blaine T; Dennis, Douglas A; Goodman, Stuart B; Tzeng, Tony H; Vasdev, Sonia; Saleh, Khaled J

    2015-01-01

    The prospect of biomaterial hypersensitivity developing in response to joint implant materials was first presented more than 30 years ago. Many studies have established probable causation between first-generation metal-on-metal hip implants and hypersensitivity reactions. In a limited patient population, implant failure may ultimately be related to metal hypersensitivity. The examination of hypersensitivity reactions in current-generation metal-on-metal knee implants is comparatively limited. The purpose of this study is to summarize all available literature regarding biomaterial hypersensitivity after total knee arthroplasty, elucidate overall trends about this topic in the current literature, and provide a foundation for clinical approach considerations when biomaterial hypersensitivity is suspected. PMID:25883940

  15. Zn-Mediated Reduction of Oxalyl Chloride Forming CO and Its Application in Carbonylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Markovič, Martin; Lopatka, Pavol; Koóš, Peter; Gracza, Tibor

    2015-11-20

    An efficient protocol for the generation of carbon monoxide by Zn-mediated reduction of oxalyl chloride has been developed. Oxalyl chloride was applied as an extremely effective substitute for toxic gaseous CO in the palladium-catalyzed alkoxy-/amino-/hydrogen-/hydroxycarbonylation processes providing industrially interesting esters, amides, aldehydes, and carboxylic acids in good to excellent yields. This new procedure can be applied to various carbonylation reactions in the presence of a transition metal catalyst under mild conditions and with a stoichiometric amount of CO source. PMID:26555577

  16. Ligand-Promoted, Boron-Mediated Chemoselective Carboxylic Acid Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hideoki; Morita, Yuya; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-05-01

    The first carboxylic acid selective aldol reaction mediated by boron compounds and a mild organic base (DBU) was developed. Inclusion of electron-withdrawing groups in the amino acid derivative ligands reacted with BH3·SMe2 forms a boron promoter with increased Lewis acidity at the boron atom and facilitated the carboxylic acid selective enolate formation, even in the presence of other carbonyl groups such as amides, esters, ketones, or aliphatic aldehydes. The remarkable ligand effect led to the broad substrate scope including biologically relevant compounds. PMID:27104352

  17. Dentin hypersensitivity and its management.

    PubMed

    Chu, C H; Lam, Anty; Lo, Edward C M

    2011-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity is a common patient complaint that is more prevalent than the profession realizes. It is important for dentists to diagnose dentin hypersensitivity by exclusion and provide appropriate treatment recommendations for patients. Various treatment methods have been proposed but no universally accepted desensitizing agent or treatment has been identified. When a patient has symptoms that can be attributed to dentin hypersensitivity, a thorough clinical examination should be carried out to rule out other likely causes prior to diagnosis and treatment. Depending on the identified cause, a combination of individualized instructions on proper oral health behaviors, use of at-home products, and professional treatment may be required to manage the problem. PMID:21903521

  18. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, A; Hamza, E; Janda, J; Crameri, R; Marti, E; Rhyner, C

    2012-06-30

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of the horse caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides and is currently the best characterized allergic disease of horses. This article reviews knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBH, with a particular focus on the causative allergens. Whereas so far hardly any research has been done on the role of antigen presenting cells in the pathogenesis of IBH, recent studies suggest that IBH is characterized by an imbalance between a T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T cell (T(reg)) immune response, as shown both locally in the skin and with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Various studies have shown IBH to be associated with IgE-mediated reactions against salivary antigens from Culicoides spp. However, until recently, the causative allergens had not been characterized at the molecular level. A major advance has now been made, as 11 Culicoides salivary gland proteins have been identified as relevant allergens for IBH. Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment of IBH. Characterization of the main allergens for IBH and understanding what mechanisms induce a healthy or allergic immune response towards these allergens may help to develop new treatment strategies, such as immunotherapy.

  19. Suspected acute hemolytic transfusion reaction mediated by anti-Di(a).

    PubMed

    Bennett, Ashwini; Boyapati, Ray K; Hong, Frank S

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Di(a) can mediate hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, but it is unclear if it can cause hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs). To date, there has only been one report of a possible immediate HTR attributed to anti-Di(a). Our case report details an immediate HTR due to anti-Di(a) in a patient with pre-existing liver failure. This reaction triggered multi-organ failure, and the patient subsequently died. This case also highlights the importance of considering HTRs even when routine antibody screening has been unremarkable, particularly when electronic crossmatch is used, because of the potential for an alloantibody against a low-prevalence antigen. PMID:27187197

  20. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, protons (H(+)) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H(+) channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H(+) currents and H(+) concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H(+) between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an "enzymatic flip-flop" circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH. PMID:27052724

  1. Dearomatization Reactions of N-Heterocycles Mediated by Group 3 Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Kevin L; Williams, Bryan N; Benitez, Diego; Carver, Colin T; Ogilby, Kevin R; Tkatchouk, Ekaterina; Goddard, William A; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2010-01-13

    Group 3 (Sc, Y, Lu, La) benzyl complexes supported by a ferrocene diamide ligand are reactive toward aromatic N-heterocycles by mediating their coupling and, in a few cases, the cleavage of their C-N bonds. When these complexes reacted with 2,2'-bipyridine or isoquinoline, they facilitated the alkyl migration of the benzyl ligand onto the pyridine ring, a process accompanied by the dearomatization of the N-heterocycle. The products of the alkyl-transfer reactions act as hydrogen donors in the presence of aromatic N-heterocycles, ketones, and azobenzene. Experimental and computational studies suggest that the hydrogen transfer takes place through a concerted mechanism. An interesting disproportionation reaction of the dearomatized, alkyl-substituted isoquinoline complexes is also reported.

  2. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.

  3. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenasemore » and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  4. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase. The transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH. PMID:27052724

  5. Catalytic conversion reactions mediated by single-file diffusion in linear nanopores: hydrodynamic versus stochastic behavior.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, David M; Wang, Jing; Wendel, Joseph H; Liu, Da-Jiang; Pruski, Marek; Evans, James W

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. Diffusion within the pores is subject to a strict single-file (no passing) constraint. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice-gas model for this reaction-diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction-diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction-diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion in this multispecies system. The h-RDE successfully describe nontrivial aspects of transient behavior, in contrast to the mf-RDE, and also correctly capture unreactive steady-state behavior in the pore interior. However, steady-state reactivity, which is localized near the pore ends when those regions are catalytic, is controlled by fluctuations not incorporated into the hydrodynamic treatment. The mf-RDE partly capture these fluctuation effects, but cannot describe scaling behavior of the reactivity.

  6. Food Hypersensitivity in Patients Over 14 Years of Age Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Čelakovská, Jarmila; Ettler, K; Ettlerová, K; Vaněčková, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients suffering from atopic dermatitis often describe food hypersensitivity. Rising prevalence of food hypersensitivity and severe allergic reactions to foods have been reported, but the data are scarce. Aims and Objectives: Evaluation of food hypersensitivity reactions in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Materials and Methods: The dermatological examination was performed in patients of age 14 years and above and the detailed history was taken concerning the food hypersensitivity. Results: A total of 228 patients were examined-72 men, 156 women, average age 26.2 (SD 9.5) years. The food hypersensitivity reactions were recorded in 196 patients from 228 (86%), no reactions were recorded in 32 patients (24%). Foods with the most often recorded reactions are: Nuts (in 35% of patients), tomatoes (in 20%), and kiwi (in 17, 5%), apples and spices (in 16%), tangerines and oranges (in 15%), capsicum (in 13%), fishes (in 12%), celery (in 9%), and chocolate (in 7%). Conclusion: Food hypersensitivity reactions are recorded in 86% of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Nuts, tomatoes, and pollen–associated foods play a role in the majority of patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. PMID:24891679

  7. INCIDENCE OF APNEA ATTACK AS ALLERGIC REACTION AFTER ORAL FOOD CHALLENGE IN PATIENT WITH IgE-MEDIATED WHEAT ALLERGY.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and might cause death. Although wheezes, dyspnea or loss of consciousness are known to occur with severe allergic reactions with IgE-mediated food allergy, reports of apnea attack associated with IgE-mediated food allergy are rare. In this case, 9-year-old boy with IgE-mediated wheat allergy experienced apnea attack with strong desaturation after an immediate allergic reaction including erythema, abdominal pain, vomiting, and anaphylactic shock. The patient had asphyxia and cyanosis confirmed by medical staff when his oxygen saturation decreased to the 60% level, and he had occasional asphyxia over 10 seconds with no thoracic motion after a desaturation episode. Central apnea attack might be occurred in patient with IgE-mediated food allergy. However, the exact mechanism responsible remains unknown and further research is needed. PMID:27616176

  8. [Utility of challenge test in immediate hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone sodium succinate].

    PubMed

    Amaya-Mejía, Adela Sisy; Galindo-Pacheco, Lucy Vania; O'Farrill-Romanillos, Patricia María; Rodríguez-Mireles, Karen Alicia; Campos-Romero, Freya Helena; del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroid hypersensitivity is a complex phenomenon in which many factors interact, such as idiosyncrasy, intolerance or allergic reactions. The prevalence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids is 0.2%-0.5%. Corticosteroids have major therapeutic implications; thus, when hypersensitivity is suspected, in-vitro and/or in-vivo testing can be performed to confirm diagnosis, being the drug challenge the gold standard. After definitive diagnosis, cross-reactivity among the different corticosteroid groups should be considered, to choose wisely if corticosteroid therapy is still required. In Coopman classification, steroids belonging to groups A, B and D2 have high cross-reactivity, however, more studies are needed to determine the degree of cross-reaction among these drugs. This paper presents the case of a woman, in who hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone succinate was confirmed by drug challenge test.

  9. Catalytic reactions with bulk-mediated excursions: Mixing fails to restore chemical equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppey, M.; Bénichou, O.; Klafter, J.; Moreau, M.; Oshanin, G.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the effect of the bulk-mediated excursions (BME) of reactive species on the long-time behavior of the catalytic Langmuir-Hinshelwood-like A+B→0 reactions in systems in which a catalytic plane (CP) is in contact with a liquid phase, containing concentrations of reactive particles. Such BME result from repeated particles desorption from the CP, subsequent diffusion in the liquid phase, and eventual readsorption on the CP away from the initial detachment point. This process leads to an effective superdiffusive transport along the CP. We consider both “batch” reactions, in which all particles of reactive species were initially adsorbed onto the CP, and reactions followed by a steady inflow of particles onto the CP. We show that for batch reactions the BME provide an effective mixing channel and here the mean-field-type behavior emerges. On the contrary, for reaction followed by a steady inflow of particles, we observe essential departures from the mean-field behavior and find that the mixing effect of the BME is insufficient to restore chemical equilibrium. We show that a steady state is established as t→∞, in which the limiting value of the mean coverage of the CP depends on the particles’ diffusion coefficient in the bulk liquid phase, and that the spatial distributions of adsorbed particles are strongly correlated. Moreover, we show that the relaxation to such a steady state is a power-law function of time, in contrast to the exponential time dependence describing the approach to equilibrium in perfectly stirred systems.

  10. Basophil Reactivity as Biomarker in Immediate Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions—Potential and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Markus; Harrer, Andrea; Himly, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) resemble typical immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated symptoms. Clinical manifestations range from local skin reactions, gastrointestinal and/or respiratory symptoms to severe systemic involvement with potential fatal outcome. Depending on the substance group of the eliciting drug the correct diagnosis is a major challenge. Skin testing and in vitro diagnostics are often unreliable and not reproducible. The involvement of drug-specific IgE is questionable in many cases. The culprit substance (parent drug or metabolite) and potential cross-reacting compounds are difficult to identify, patient history and drug provocation testing often remain the only means for diagnosis. Hence, several groups proposed basophil activation test (BAT) for the diagnosis of immediate DHRs as basophils are well-known effector cells in allergic reactions. However, the usefulness of BAT in immediate DHRs is highly variable and dependent on the drug itself plus its capacity to spontaneously conjugate to serum proteins. Stimulation with pure solutions of the parent drug or metabolites thereof vs. drug-protein conjugates may influence sensitivity and specificity of the test. We thus, reviewed the available literature about the use of BAT for diagnosing immediate DHRs against drug classes such as antibiotics, radio contrast media, neuromuscular blocking agents, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and biologicals. Influencing factors like the selection of stimulants or of the identification and activation markers, the stimulation protocol, gating strategies, and cut-off definition are addressed in this overview on BAT performance. The overall aim is to evaluate the suitability of BAT as biomarker for the diagnosis of immediate drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:27378928

  11. Hypersensitivity to preservatives.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Denis

    2004-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to cosmetics, topical medicaments, consumer goods, foods, and industrial products to protect them against microbial spoilage and to protect the consumer against infection. The ideal preservative, both effective and devoid of irritant or sensitizing potential, is still to be discovered. The present paper reviews the most important classes of preservatives, namely parabens, formaldehyde-releasers, and isothiazolinones. The author also discusses newer agents such as Euxyl K 400 and isopropynyl butylcarbamate. Each preservative is described in terms of chemical and physical characteristics, antimicrobial efficacy, exposure, cutaneous adverse reactions, patch testing concentrations, patterns of cross-reactions, and reported rates of sensitization. The history of preservatives goes back to the 1930s, and ironically, the parabens, which the industry has sought to replace with "safer" alternatives, are still the most frequently used biocides in cosmetics and appear to be far less sensitizing than most of the newer agents.

  12. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a high school teacher.

    PubMed

    Moniodis, A; Hamilton, T; Racila, E; Cockrill, B; McCunney, R

    2015-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease mediated by an immunological response to an inhaled antigen. Outbreaks of HP have been reported in industrial settings where manufacturing workers are exposed to water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Water-based MWFs promote growth of microorganisms and can be easily aerosolized and are thus potential aetiological agents of HP. We present a case of HP caused by exposure to water-based MWF in a vocational high school teacher. Culture of MWF used at his school grew Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. This is the first known report of MWF-induced HP outside an industrial setting. The growth of Pseudomonas spp in this case recalls the earliest reports of the microbiology of MWF-induced HP and suggests that routine bacterial culture may be useful in the diagnosis of HP in workplaces without standard cleaning and biocide regulations. PMID:26136595

  13. Hypersensitivity to Parietaria officinalis pollen in newcomers to the area with the plant.

    PubMed

    Cvitanović, S; Marusić, M; Juricić, M; Vrdoljak, E; Petrovecki, M; Rozga, A; Stavljenić-Rukavina, A

    1993-11-01

    Hypersensitivity to Parietaria officinalis (wall pellitory) pollen and other environmental allergens was studied in pollinosis patients allergic to P. officinalis pollen who were born in areas without P. officinalis and later moved to the city of Split, where P. officinalis is responsible for some 65% of pollinosis cases. Highly significant positive correlations were found for both the intensity of skin test reaction and concentration of specific serum IgE with the length of residence in the area. In contrast, the respective data on subjects hypersensitive to P. officinalis pollen allergen, but born and living in the area of Split, revealed a tendency to negative correlation between age and intensity of hypersensitivity to P. officinalis. A number of patients from both groups were tested for presence of serum IgE antibodies specific for 14 common environmental allergens. Hypersensitivity to P. officinalis pollen was associated with hypersensitivity to olive, mugwort, and birch pollen in newcomers; hypersensitivity to birch and, to some extent, olive pollen was significantly more frequent in newcomers than in autochthonous patients who were allergic to P. officinalis pollen. Regardless of whether the patients were autochthons or newcomers to the area with P. officinalis, hypersensitivity to P. officinalis mostly excluded hypersensitivity to Dermatophagoides farinae and D. pteronyssinus, and vice versa.

  14. Target-specific variants of Flp recombinase mediate genome engineering reactions in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Riddhi; Li, Feng; Voziyanova, Eugenia; Voziyanov, Yuri

    2015-09-01

    Genome engineering relies on DNA-modifying enzymes that are able to locate a DNA sequence of interest and initiate a desired genome rearrangement. Currently, the field predominantly utilizes site-specific DNA nucleases that depend on the host DNA repair machinery to complete a genome modification task. We show here that genome engineering approaches that employ target-specific variants of the self-sufficient, versatile site-specific DNA recombinase Flp can be developed into promising alternatives. We demonstrate that the Flp variant evolved to recombine an FRT-like sequence, FL-IL10A, which is located upstream of the human interleukin-10 gene, and can target this sequence in the model setting of Chinese hamster ovary and human embryonic kidney 293 cells. This target-specific Flp variant is able to perform the integration reaction and, when paired with another recombinase, the dual recombinase-mediated cassette exchange reaction. The efficiency of the integration reaction in human cells can be enhanced by 'humanizing' the Flp variant gene and by adding the nuclear localization sequence to the recombinase.

  15. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  16. Coupling Solar Energy into Reactions: Materials Design for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Li, Yu; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-08-26

    Enabled by surface plasmons, noble metal nanostructures can interact with and harvest incident light. As such, they may serve as unique media to generate heat, supply energetic electrons, and provide strong local electromagnetic fields for chemical reactions through different mechanisms. This solar-to-chemical pathway provides a new approach to solar energy utilization, alternative to conventional semiconductor-based photocatalysis. To provide readers with a clear picture of this newly recognized process, this review presents coupling solar energy into chemical reactions through plasmonic nanostructures. It starts with a brief introduction of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures, followed by a demonstration of tuning plasmonic features by tailoring their physical parameters. Owing to their tunable plasmonic properties, metallic materials offer a platform to trigger and drive chemical reactions at the nanoscale, as systematically overviewed in this article. The design rules for plasmonic materials for catalytic applications are further outlined based on existing examples. At the end of this article, the challenges and opportunities for further development of plasmonic-mediated catalysis toward energy and environmental applications are discussed.

  17. Carbon dioxide released from subduction zones by fluid-mediated reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ague, Jay J.; Nicolescu, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The balance between the subduction of carbonate mineral-bearing rocks into Earth's mantle and the return of CO2 to the atmosphere by volcanic and metamorphic degassing is critical to the carbon cycle. Carbon is thought to be released from subducted rocks mostly by simple devolatilization reactions. However, these reactions will also retain large amounts of carbon within the subducting slab and have difficulty in accounting for the mass of CO2 emitted from volcanic arcs. Carbon release may therefore occur via fluid-induced dissolution of calcium carbonate. Here we use carbonate δ18O and δ13C systematics, combined with analyses of rock and fluid inclusion mineralogy and geochemistry, to investigate the alteration of the exhumed Eocene Cycladic subduction complex on the Syros and Tinos islands, Greece. We find that in marble rocks adjacent to two fluid conduits that were active during subduction, the abundance of calcium carbonate drastically decreases approaching the conduits, whereas silicate minerals increase. Up to 60-90% of the CO2 was released from the rocks--far greater than expected via simple devolatilization reactions. The δ18O of the carbonate minerals is 5-10 lighter than is typical for metamorphosed carbonate rocks, implying that isotopically light oxygen was transported by fluid infiltration from the surroundings. We suggest that fluid-mediated carbonate mineral removal, accompanied by silicate mineral precipitation, provides a mechanism for the release of enormous amounts of CO2 from subduction zones.

  18. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A G; Pajares, María A; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  19. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  20. What Controls the "Off/On Switch" in the Toehold-Mediated Strand Displacement Reaction on DNA Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles?

    PubMed

    Yao, Dongbao; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Shiyan; Song, Tingjie; Huang, Fujian; Liang, Haojun

    2015-06-30

    In DNA dynamic nanotechnology, a toehold-mediated DNA strand-displacement reaction has demonstrated its capability in building complex autonomous system. In most cases, the reaction is performed in pure DNA solution that is essentially a one-phase system. In the present work, we systematically investigated the reaction in a heterogeneous media, in which the strand that implements a displacing action is conjugated on gold nanoparticles. By monitoring the kinetics of spherical nucleic acid (SNA) assembly driven by toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction, we observed significant differences, i.e., the abrupt jump in behavior of an "off/on switch", in the reaction rate when the invading toehold was extended to eight bases from seven bases. These phenomena are attributed to the effect of steric hindrance arising from the high density of invading strand conjugated to AuNPs. Based on these studies, an INHIBIT logic gate presenting good selectivity was developed.

  1. Nickel hypersensitivity in patients with inferior vena cava filters: case report and literature and MAUDE database review.

    PubMed

    Morshedi, Maud M; Kinney, Thomas B

    2014-08-01

    Placement of a prophylactic retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter was requested in a 73-year-old woman with nickel hypersensitivity resulting in a clinical dilemma. Given that all retrievable filters contain nickel, the published literature and the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database were reviewed; no documented case of IVC filter placement in a patient with nickel hypersensitivity or reported hypersensitivity reaction in a patient after IVC filter placement could be identified. This article presents the uneventful course of the case described and a review of the literature and recommendations on use of nickel-containing devices in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  2. Zirconium granuloma resulting from an aluminum zirconium complex: a previously unrecognized agent in the development of hypersensitivity granulomas.

    PubMed

    Skelton, H G; Smith, K J; Johnson, F B; Cooper, C R; Tyler, W F; Lupton, G P

    1993-05-01

    Zirconium compounds have been associated with the development of hypersensitivity granulomas. However, aluminum zirconium complexes have not previously been shown to induce sensitization. We present the clinical and histologic findings of a case in which a patient developed an acute hypersensitivity reaction to an aluminum zirconium complex. PMID:8491884

  3. Adverse reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Simon, R A

    1986-01-01

    There are thousands of agents that are intentionally added to the food that we consume. These include preservatives, stabilizers, conditioners, thickeners, colorings, flavorings, sweeteners, antioxidants, etc. etc. Yet only a surprisingly small number have been associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Amongst all the additives, FD&C dyes have been most frequently associated with adverse reactions. Tartrazine is the most notorious of them all; however, critical review of the medical literature and current Scripps Clinic studies would indicate that tartrazine has been confirmed to be at best only occasionally associated with flares of urticaria or asthma. There is no convincing evidence in the literature of reactivity to the other azo or nonazo dyes. This can also be said of BHA/BHT, nitrites/nitrates and sorbates. Parabens have been shown to elicit IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions when used as pharmaceutical preservatives; however, as with the other additives noted above, ingested parabens have only occasionally been associated with adverse reactions. MSG, the cause of the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' has only been linked to asthma in one report. Sulfiting agents used primarily as food fresheners and to control microbial growth in fermented beverages have been established as the cause of any where from mild to severe and even fatal reactions in at least 5% of the asthmatic population. Other reactions reported to follow sulfite ingestion include anaphylaxis, gastro intestinal complaints and dermatological eruptions. The prevalence of these non asthmatic reactions is unknown. The mechanism of sulfite sensitive asthma is also unknown but most likely involves hyperreactivity to inhale SO2 in the great majority of cases; however, there are reports of IgE mediated reactions and other sulfite sensitive asthmatics have been found with low levels of sulfite oxidase; necessary to oxidize endogenous sulfite to sulfate.

  4. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome with significant gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Ling; Teo, Lynn; Wang, Yi-Shi; Liu, Tsun-Tsien

    2012-11-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an idiosyncratic systemic reaction to a drug. The clinical presentation of this syndrome comprises a diverse spectrum, ranging from mild to fulminating organ failure. Nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms are common in DHS, but severe morbidities and mortalities attributed to gut disease in DHS are rarely described. We present a case of DHS with significant gastrointestinal symptoms of prolonged profuse watery diarrhoea and persistent hypokalaemia requiring judicious intravenous water and electrolyte replacement. The symptoms resolved only after the introduction of intravenous hydrocortisone. It is important to consider intravenous corticosteroids if the gastrointestinal system is involved, as accelerated gut motility and mucosal damage would affect absorption of oral medications. Supportive treatment with the monitoring of fluid and electrolytes status and judicious replacement remains fundamental in the management of DHS patients with gut involvement.

  5. NMR measurement of hydrodynamic dispersion in porous media subject to biofilm mediated precipitation reactions.

    PubMed

    Fridjonsson, Einar O; Seymour, Joseph D; Schultz, Logan N; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B; Codd, Sarah L

    2011-03-01

    Noninvasive measurements of hydrodynamic dispersion by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) are made in a model porous system before and after a biologically mediated precipitation reaction. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was unable to detect the small scale changes in pore structure visualized during light microscopy analysis after destructive sampling of the porous medium. However, pulse gradient spin echo nuclear magnetic resonance (PGSE NMR) measurements clearly indicated a change in hydrodynamics including increased pore scale mixing. These changes were detected through time-dependent measurement of the propagator by PGSE NMR. The dynamics indicate an increased pore scale mixing which alters the preasymptotic approach to asymptotic Gaussian dynamics governed by the advection diffusion equation. The methods described here can be used in the future to directly measure the transport of solutes in biomineral-affected porous media and contribute towards reactive transport models, which take into account the influence of pore scale changes in hydrodynamics.

  6. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-24

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag(+)-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  7. Detection of DNA damage based on metal-mediated molecular beacon and DNA strands displacement reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yanxiang; Wei, Min; Wei, Wei; Yin, Lihong; Pu, Yuepu; Liu, Songqin

    2014-01-01

    DNA hairpin structure probes are usually designed by forming intra-molecular duplex based on Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds. In this paper, a molecular beacon based on silver ions-mediated cytosine-Ag+-cytosine base pairs was used to detect DNA. The inherent characteristic of the metal ligation facilitated the design of functional probe and the adjustment of its binding strength compared to traditional DNA hairpin structure probes, which make it be used to detect DNA in a simple, rapid and easy way with the help of DNA strands displacement reaction. The method was sensitive and also possesses the good specificity to differentiate the single base mismatched DNA from the complementary DNA. It was also successfully applied to study the damage effect of classic genotoxicity chemicals such as styrene oxide and sodium arsenite on DNA, which was significant in food science, environmental science and pharmaceutical science.

  8. Water mediated hydrogen abstraction mechanism in the radical reaction between HOSO and NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesar, Antonija; Tušar, Simona

    2016-05-01

    The effect of water molecules on the direct hydrogen abstraction from HOSO by NO2 was investigated for the first time. Stationary points were located at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2pd) and CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ levels of theory whereas energetics was further improved by CBS-QB3 and G4 composite methods. The fractions of hydrated radical complexes were estimated in order to assess atmospheric relevance of the title reaction. The energy barrier of the water mediated process becomes negligible. The formations of post-reactive complexes from pre-reactive complexes are energetically very favorable and the processes are spontaneous suggesting that they should be very feasible under atmospheric conditions.

  9. Dual Islet Transplantation Modeling of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Martin, BM; Samy, KP; Lowe, MC; Thompson, PW; Cano, J; Farris, AB; Song, M; Dove, CR; Leopardi, FV; Strobert, EA; Jenkins, JB; Collins, BH; Larsen, CP; Kirk, AD

    2015-01-01

    Islet xenotransplantation is a potential treatment for diabetes without the limitations of tissue availability. Although successful experimentally, early islet loss remains substantial and attributed to an instant blood mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR). This syndrome of islet destruction has been incompletely defined and characterization in pig-to-primate models has been hampered by logistical and statistical limitations of large animal studies. To further investigate IBMIR, we developed a novel in vivo dual islet transplant model to precisely characterize IBMIR as proof-of-concept that this model can serve to properly control experiments comparing modified xenoislet preparations. Wild-type (WT) and α1,3-galactosyltransferase knockout (GTKO) neonatal porcine islets (NPIs) were studied in non-immunosuppressed rhesus macaques. Inert polyethylene microspheres served as a control for the effects of portal embolization. Digital analysis of immunohistochemistry targeting IBMIR mediators was performed at one and 24 hours after intraportal islet infusion. Early findings observed in transplanted islets include complement and antibody deposition, and infiltration by neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets. Insulin, complement, antibody, neutrophils, macrophages, and platelets were similar between GTKO and WT islets, with increasing macrophage infiltration at 24 hours in both phenotypes. This model provides an objective and internally controlled study of distinct islet preparations and documents the temporal histology of IBMIR. PMID:25702898

  10. Sulfa hypersensitivity in patients with HIV infection: onset, treatment, critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C; Madalon, M; Wortham, D W; Graziano, F M

    1998-05-01

    Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole is the most effective medication used in both the treatment and prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in patients with HIV/AIDS. Its use, however, is accompanied by a high incidence of adverse reactions, especially fever, myalgia and rash (sulfa hypersensitivity). In a group of our patients, we have examined the clinical parameters at the time of onset of sulfa hypersensitivity, and the success of a desensitization protocol for this adverse event. We also have performed a comprehensive review of the literature on sulfa hypersensitivity and have compared our results to those previously reported in the literature. Our findings indicate that the sulfa hypersensitivity reaction is more likely to develop in patients with advanced disease and that desensitization can restore tolerability to the drug in approximately two thirds of those who attempt it.

  11. Evaluation of a spontaneous canine model of immunoglobulin E-mediated food hypersensitivity: dynamic changes in serum and fecal allergen-specific immunoglobulin E values relative to dietary change.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hilary A; Hammerberg, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of the pilot study reported here was to evaluate serum and fecal total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses to dietary change in five Maltese x beagle dogs with suspected food hypersensitivity, compared with those of five clinically normal dogs. Clinical parameters (pruritus, otitis, and diarrhea) improved in the Maltese x beagle dogs during feeding of a novel diet, and signs were exacerbated by oral allergen provocation. Relative concentrations of serum and fecal wheat-, corn-, and milk-specific IgE were determined by use of an ELISA. The onset of clinical signs of disease was accompanied by an increase in serum allergen-specific IgE concentrations. In contrast, changes in clinical signs of disease or allergen-specific IgE values were not seen in the control group undergoing the same regimen. Total serum IgE concentration was measured by use of the ELISA, and comparison with known quantities of a monoclonal IgE allowed absolute values to be reported. Values were high in the Maltese x beagle colony (7 to 34 microg/ml), compared with those in the control dogs (0.7 to 6 microg/ml). Total serum and total fecal IgE concentrations did not change in either group during the study. Although allergen-specific IgE was detected in the feces of both groups, significant interassay variability made interpretation of the results difficult. The authors concluded that these Maltese x beagle dogs satisfied the currently recognized clinical criteria for the diagnosis of canine food hypersensitivity. Furthermore, the clinical and serologic responses seen in these dogs in response to oral allergen provocation suggest that this may be a useful model for the study of spontaneous food hypersensitivity.

  12. Severe type IV hypersensitivity to 'black henna' tattoo.

    PubMed

    Vasilakis, Vasileios; Knight, Bernice; Lidder, Satnam; Frankton, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old Bangladeshi girl presented with a 9-day history of an extensive pruritic, erythematous, papulovesicular skin eruption to both forearms. Appearance was 5 days following application of a home-made henna preparation. Examination revealed ulceration and scabbing along the whole henna pattern and early keloid formation. A diagnosis of type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction superimposed by infection was initially made. As in this case, home-made henna preparations commonly combine commercial henna with black hair dye, paraphenylenediamine (PPD). PPD, widely known as 'black henna', darkens the pigment and precipitates the drying process. PPD is a potent contact allergen associated with a high incidence of hypersensitivity reactions. Despite treatment the patient was left with extensive keloid scarring in the pattern of the henna tattoo. PMID:22778139

  13. Effects of light energy and reducing agents on C60-mediated photosensitizing reactions.

    PubMed

    Quinones, Michael; Zhang, Yazhou; Riascos, Penelope; Hwang, Huey-Min; Aker, Winfred G; He, Xiaojia; Gao, Ruomei

    2014-01-01

    Many biomolecules contain photoactive reducing agents, such as reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and 6-thioguanine (6-TG) incorporated into DNA through drug metabolism. These reducing agents may produce reactive oxygen species under UVA irradiation or act as electron donors in various media. The interactions of C60 fullerenes with biological reductants and light energy, especially via the Type-I electron-transfer mechanism, are not fully understood although these factors are often involved in toxicity assessments. The two reductants employed in this work were NADH for aqueous solutions and 6-TG for organic solvents. Using steady-state photolysis and electrochemical techniques, we showed that under visible light irradiation, the presence of reducing agents enhanced C60 -mediated Type-I reactions that generate superoxide anion (O2(.-)) at the expense of singlet oxygen ((1)O2) production. The quantum yield of O2(.-) production upon visible light irradiation of C60 is estimated below 0.2 in dipolar aprotic media, indicating that the majority of triplet C60 deactivate via Type-II pathway. Upon UVA irradiation, however, both C60 and NADH undergo photochemical reactions to produce O2(.-), which could lead to a possible synergistic toxicity effects. C60 photosensitization via Type-I pathway is not observed in the absence of reducing agents.

  14. Inhibitory effects of mast cell-mediated allergic reactions by cell cultured Siberian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Koo, H N; Myung, N I; Shin, M K; Kim, J W; Kim, D K; Kim, K S; Kim, H M; Lee, Y M

    2001-02-01

    The crude drug "Siberian Ginseng (SG)" has long been used in empirical Oriental medicine for the nonspecific enhancement of resistance in humans and animals. In this study, we investigated the effect of cell cultured SG by oral administration in mast cell-mediated allergic reactions. SG dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic allergy with doses of 10(-2) to 1 g/kg 1 h before oral administration. Of special note, SG inhibited systemic allergy with the dose of 1 g/kg by 25%. SG (1 g/kg) also inhibited passive cutaneous allergic reaction by 51%. SG dose-dependently inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. When SG (0.01 mg/ml) was added, the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 in antidinitrophenyl (DNP) IgE antibody-stimulated mast cells was inhibited 39.5% and 23.3%, respectively. In addition, SG inhibited anti-DNP IgE antibody-stimulated TNF-alpha protein expression in mast cells. Our studies provide evidence that SG may be beneficial in the treatment of various types of allergic diseases.

  15. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Jonathan D.; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NOy onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO2 or N2O5 on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO2 in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist. PMID:19620710

  16. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    PubMed

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  17. Food hypersensitivity in a cat.

    PubMed

    Medleau, L; Latimer, K S; Duncan, J R

    1986-09-15

    Food hypersensitivity was diagnosed in a 4-year-old Siamese cat. Clinical signs included intense erythema, with alopecia, excoriations, erosions, and crusts involving the ventral portion of the abdomen, inguinal region, medial aspect of each thigh, and cranial and lateral aspects of all 4 limbs. The cat was intensely pruritic. Histologically, there was cutaneous mast cell hyperplasia and diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the dermis. Blood eosinophilia also was found. Clinical signs resolved after exclusive feeding of a hypoallergenic diet.

  18. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis during minocycline treatment.

    PubMed

    Kloppenburg, M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C

    1994-06-01

    A patient is reported who developed dyspnoea, fever, pleuritic chest pain and a non-productive cough following treatment with minocycline for 9 days. The chest radiograph showed an interstitial pattern and there was a peripheral eosinophilia. A diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis attributable to minocycline was made. The disease responded quickly to withdrawal of the drug. This observation shows that minocycline, despite its mild toxicity profile, can give rise to serious adverse effects.

  19. Angioneurotic edema: a rare case of hypersensitivity to metoclopramide

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Aleksander; Matuszewski, Tomasz; Kruszewski, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    The case of a 30-year-old woman who had already experienced two incidents of angioneurotic edema and urticaria caused by drugs during the acute gastroenteritis. The allergological workup revealed hypersensitivity to metoclopramide. This case documents that metoclopramide, a drug commonly used to inhibit the vomiting, may cause not only bronchospastic reaction in an asthmatic patient but also angioneurotic edema of the tongue and larynx as well as urticaria. No similar cases in the literature were found. PMID:24278059

  20. Estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity following stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Karpowicz, Jane M; Furman, Andrew J; da Silva, Joyce Teixeira; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    We used functional MRI and a longitudinal design to investigate the brain mechanisms in a previously reported estrogen-dependent visceral hypersensitivity model. We hypothesized that noxious visceral stimulation would be associated with activation of the insula, anterior cingulate cortex, and amygdala, and that estrogen-dependent, stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity would both enhance activation of these regions and recruit activation of other brain areas mediating affect and reward processing. Ovariectomized rats were treated with estrogen (17 β-estradiol, E2) or vehicle (n = 5 per group) and scanned in a 7T MRI at three different time points: pre-stress (baseline), 2 days post-stress, and 18 days post-stress. Stress was induced via a forced-swim paradigm. In a separate group of ovariectomized rats, E2 treatment induced visceral hypersensitivity at the 2 days post-stress time point, and this hypersensitivity returned to baseline at the 18 days post-stress time point. Vehicle-treated rats show no hypersensitivity following stress. During the MRI scans, rats were exposed to noxious colorectal distention. Across groups and time points, noxious visceral stimulation led to activations in the insula, anterior cingulate, and left amygdala, parabrachial nuclei, and cerebellum. A group-by-time interaction was seen in the right amygdala, ventral striatum-pallidum, cerebellum, hippocampus, mediodorsal thalamus, and pontine nuclei. Closer inspection of the data revealed that vehicle-treated rats showed consistent activations and deactivations across time, whereas estrogen-treated animals showed minimal deactivation with noxious visceral stimulation. This unexpected finding suggests that E2 may dramatically alter visceral nociceptive processing in the brain following an acute stressor. This study is the first to examine estrogen-stress dependent interactions in response to noxious visceral stimulation using functional MRI. Future studies that include other control

  1. Cracking the egg: An insight into egg hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Dhanapala, Pathum; De Silva, Chamika; Doran, Tim; Suphioglu, Cenk

    2015-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to the chicken egg is a widespread disorder mainly affecting 1-2% of children worldwide. It is the second most common food allergy in children, next to cow's milk allergy. Egg allergy is mainly caused by hypersensitivity to four allergens found in the egg white; ovomucoid, ovalbumin, ovotransferrin and lysozyme. However, some research suggests the involvement of allergens exclusively found in the egg yolk such as chicken serum albumin and YGP42, which may play a crucial role in the overall reaction. In egg allergic individuals, these allergens cause conditions such as itching, atopic dermatitis, bronchial asthma, vomiting, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, laryngeal oedema and chronic urticaria, and anaphylaxis. Currently there is no permanent cure for egg allergy. Upon positive diagnosis for egg allergy, strict dietary avoidance of eggs and products containing traces of eggs is the most effective way of avoiding future hypersensitivity reactions. However, it is difficult to fully avoid eggs since they are found in a range of processed food products. An understanding of the mechanisms of allergic reactions, egg allergens and their prevalence, egg allergy diagnosis and current treatment strategies are important for future studies. This review addresses these topics and discusses both egg white and egg yolk allergy as a whole.

  2. DELAYED HYPERSENSITIVITY TO HAPTEN-PROTEIN CONJUGATES

    PubMed Central

    Cell, P. G. H.; Silverstein, Arthur M.

    1962-01-01

    Further data have been presented showing that the specificity of the delayed hypersensitivity reaction in the guinea pig to hapten-protein conjugates involves to a considerable degree a contribution by the protein carrier. The carrier contribution is such that sensitization to guinea pig albumin-m-azobenzenesulfonate, for example, does not result in cross-reaction with conjugates of the same hapten with unrelated proteins such as ovalbumin or human gamma globulin, nor were cross-reactions observed between conjugates prepared with the same hapten, coupled to the same protein, but by two different chemical routes, such that the point of attachment of the hapten to the protein differed. It thus appears that in this system both hapten and carrier protein are necessary, but that neither alone is in general sufficient to stimulate the delayed sensitive cell. Desensitization experiments with cross-reacting hapten-protein conjugates have suggested the presence of a multiplicity of antigenic determinants participating in the elicitation of the delayed lesion, and of a concomitant development of a heterogeneity of specificities in the population of delayed sensitive cells in the sensitized animal. The data are discussed in terms of the apparent requirement of the delayed sensitivity mechanism for a larger functional antigenic determinant than that required for interaction with circulating antibodies. Some possible explanations for this difference, and some of its consequences, are discussed. PMID:13897619

  3. Visible-Light-Mediated Generation of Nitrogen-Centered Radicals: Metal-Free Hydroimination and Iminohydroxylation Cyclization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Jacob; Booth, Samuel G; Essafi, Stephanie; Dryfe, Robert A W; Leonori, Daniele

    2015-11-16

    The formation and use of iminyl radicals in novel and divergent hydroimination and iminohydroxylation cyclization reactions has been accomplished through the design of a new class of reactive O-aryl oximes. Owing to their low reduction potentials, the inexpensive organic dye eosin Y could be used as the photocatalyst of the organocatalytic hydroimination reaction. Furthermore, reaction conditions for a unique iminohydroxylation were identified; visible-light-mediated electron transfer from novel electron donor-acceptor complexes of the oximes and Et3N was proposed as a key step of this process.

  4. UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lewei; Huang, Hongli; Yang, Chao; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-02-20

    UV light-mediated difunctionalization of alkenes through an aroyl radical addition/1,4-/1,2-aryl shift has been described. The resulted aroyl radical from a photocleavage reaction added to acrylamide compounds followed by cyclization led to the formation of oxindoles, whereas the addition to cinnamic amides aroused a unique 1,4-aryl shift reaction. Furthermore, the difunctionalization of alkenes of prop-2-en-1-ols was also achieved through aroyl radical addition and a sequential 1,2-aryl shift cascade reaction.

  5. Kinetics of microbially mediated reactions: dissimilatory sulfate reduction in saltmarsh sediments (Sapelo Island, Georgia, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, Alakendra N.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Kostka, Joel E.; Viollier, Eric

    2003-04-01

    A sediment disk reactor was tested in once flow-through mode to retrieve kinetic parameters for the Monod rate law that describes sulfate reduction. The experimental method was compared with a previously described procedure by the authors where a sediment plug-flow reactor was operated in a recirculation mode. In recirculation mode, accumulation of metabolic byproducts in certain cases may result in negative feedback, thus preventing accurate determination of kinetic information. The method described in this article provides an alternative to the recirculation sediment plug-flow-through reactor technique for retrieving kinetic parameters of microbially mediated reactions in aquatic sediments. For sulfate reduction in a saltmarsh site, a maximum estimate of the half-saturation concentration, Ks, of 204±26 μM and a maximum reaction rate, Rm, of 2846±129 nmol cm( wet sediment ) 3 d-1 was determined. The Ks value obtained was consistent with the one estimated previously (K s=240±20 μM) from a different site within the same saltmarsh mud flat using a recirculating reactor. From the Rm value and reduction rates determined using 35SO 42- incubation experiments, we infer that sulfate reduction is limited in the field. Substrate availability is not the main contributor for the limitation, however. Competition from other microbes, such as iron reducers affects the activity of sulfate reducers in the suboxic to anoxic zones, whereas aerobes compete in the oxic zone. High sulfide concentration in the pore water may also have acted as a toxin to the sulfate reducers in the field.

  6. Contribution of afferent pathways to nerve injury-induced spontaneous pain and evoked hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    King, Tamara; Qu, Chaoling; Okun, Alec; Mercado, Ramon; Ren, Jiyang; Brion, Triza; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank

    2011-09-01

    A predominant complaint in patients with neuropathic pain is spontaneous pain, often described as burning. Recent studies have demonstrated that negative reinforcement can be used to unmask spontaneous neuropathic pain, allowing for mechanistic investigations. Here, ascending pathways that might contribute to evoked and spontaneous components of an experimental neuropathic pain model were explored. Desensitization of TRPV1-positive fibers with systemic resiniferatoxin (RTX) abolished spinal nerve ligation (SNL) injury-induced thermal hypersensitivity and spontaneous pain, but had no effect on tactile hypersensitivity. Ablation of spinal NK-1 receptor-expressing neurons blocked SNL-induced thermal and tactile hypersensitivity as well as spontaneous pain. After nerve injury, upregulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) is observed almost exclusively in large-diameter fibers, and inactivation of the brainstem target of these fibers in the nucleus gracilis prevents tactile but not thermal hypersensitivity. Blockade of NPY signaling within the nucleus gracilis failed to block SNL-induced spontaneous pain or thermal hyperalgesia while fully reversing tactile hypersensitivity. Moreover, microinjection of NPY into nucleus gracilis produced robust tactile hypersensitivity, but failed to induce conditioned place aversion. These data suggest that spontaneous neuropathic pain and thermal hyperalgesia are mediated by TRPV1-positive fibers and spinal NK-1-positive ascending projections. In contrast, the large-diameter dorsal column projection can mediate nerve injury-induced tactile hypersensitivity, but does not contribute to spontaneous pain. Because inhibition of tactile hypersensitivity can be achieved either by spinal manipulations or by inactivation of signaling within the nucleus gracilis, the enhanced paw withdrawal response evoked by tactile stimulation does not necessarily reflect allodynia.

  7. Antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF: drug-induced life-threatening hemolytic anemia in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Chavez, Alma; Mian, Amir; Scurlock, Amy M; Blackall, Douglas; Com, Gulnur

    2010-12-01

    Adverse reactions to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are a growing concern. We report the case of a pediatric patient with CF with multiple comorbidities and a history of drug reactions, who developed life-threatening piperacillin-induced immune hemolytic anemia. We review drug-induced hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) in particular, and antibiotic hypersensitivity in CF in general, including the frequency, pathogenesis, and risk factors. Finally, we discuss the treatment options and propose an algorithm for the management of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with CF. PMID:20833594

  8. Contact Hypersensitivity to Oxazolone Provokes Vulvar Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martinov, Tijana; Glenn-Finer, Rose; Burley, Sarah; Tonc, Elena; Balsells, Evelyn; Ashbaugh, Alyssa; Swanson, Linnea; Daughters, Randy S.; Chatterjea, Devavani

    2013-01-01

    The interplay among pain, allergy and dysregulated inflammation promises to yield significant conceptual advances in immunology and chronic pain. Hapten-mediated contact hypersensitivity reactions are used to model skin allergies in rodents but have not been utilized to study associated changes in pain perception in the affected skin. Here we characterized changes in mechanical hyperalgesia in oxazolone-sensitized female mice challenged with single and repeated labiar skin exposure to oxazolone. Female mice were sensitized with topical oxazolone on their flanks and challenged 1-3 times on the labia. We then measured mechanical sensitivity of the vulvar region with an electronic pressure meter and evaluated expression of inflammatory genes, leukocyte influx and levels of innervation in the labiar tissue. Oxazolone-sensitized mice developed vulvar mechanical hyperalgesia after a single labiar oxazolone challenge. Hyperalgesia lasted up to 24 hours along with local influx of neutrophils, upregulation of inflammatory cytokine gene expression, and increased density of cutaneous labiar nerve fibers. Three daily oxazolone challenges produced vulvar mechanical hyperalgesic responses and increases in nerve density that were detectable up to 5 days post-challenge even after overt inflammation resolved. This persistent vulvar hyperalgesia is resonant with vulvodynia, an understudied chronic pain condition that is remarkably prevalent in 18-60 year-old women. An elevated risk for vulvodynia has been associated with a history of environmental allergies. Our pre-clinical model can be readily adapted to regimens of chronic exposures and long-term assessment of vulvar pain with and without concurrent inflammation to improve our understanding of mechanisms underlying subsets of vulvodynia and to develop new therapeutics for this condition. PMID:24205293

  9. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to Rhipicephalus tick larval antigens in pre-sensitized cattle.

    PubMed

    Marufu, M C; Chimonyo, M; Mans, B J; Dzama, K

    2013-06-01

    Nguni cattle are known to be more resistant to ticks than Bonsmara cattle, even if the immunological mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not fully understood. Cutaneous hypersensitivity responses to unfed larval extracts (ULE) of the ticks Rhipicephalus decoloratus and Rhipicephalus microplus were investigated in Nguni and Bonsmara cattle to improve knowledge on the immunity to ticks. Hypersensitivity reactions were induced by intradermal inoculation of 0.1ml of ULE of R. decoloratus and R. microplus ticks (50μg protein) in the right and left ear, respectively, of 8-9-month-old Nguni (n=11) and Bonsmara (n=9) heifers. Ear thickness was measured using callipers before and 0.5, 1, 6, 24, 48, and 72h post inoculation (PI). Bonsmara cattle showed a more intense immediate reaction with maximum response at 1h PI and no delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Nguni heifers, conversely, presented a less intense immediate reaction with maximum response at 1h PI, and a delayed hypersensitivity reaction at 72h PI. Reactions to R. decoloratus ULE produced a more intense skin response than to R. microplus in both breeds at all time intervals. Nguni cattle showed lower tick infestation indicating higher tick resistance than Bonsmara cattle. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction could be associated with superior tick resistance in the Nguni breed, while immediate hypersensitivity reaction could be associated with increased tick susceptibility in the Bonsmara breed. This study indicates the need for further investigations on the correlation of tick resistance and cellular immune responses to tick infestation in Nguni cattle. PMID:23453577

  10. Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2004-01-01

    Mold-induced hypersensitivity pneumonitis results from macrophage- and lymphocyte-driven inflammation, which may be attributable to contaminated humidifiers or heating-ventilation systems or sources in homes, schools, or workplaces. A case may be suspected when there is water intrusion or inadequate drainage. Some fungal causes include species of Alternaria, Aspergillus, Cryptostroma, Penicillium, Pullularia, Rhodotorula, and Trichosporon. The differential diagnosis includes mold-induced asthma, sick building syndrome, mass psychogenic illness (epidemic hysteria), unjustified fears of "toxic" molds, and conditions causing recurrent pneumonitis. PMID:15510579

  11. Ion-Mediated Polymerase Chain Reactions Performed with an Electronically Driven Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Qian; Guo, Linjie; Huang, Qing; Shi, Jiye; Yang, Yang; Liu, Dongsheng; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-09-26

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method for exponentially amplifying very low amounts of target DNA from genetic, clinical, and forensic samples. However, the heating and cooling steps in PCR largely hamper the miniaturization of thermocyclers for on-site detection of pathogens and point-of-care tests. Herein, we devise an ion-mediated PCR (IM-PCR) strategy by exploiting ion-induced DNA denaturation/renaturation cycles. DNA duplexes are effectively denatured in alkaline solutions; whereas, the denatured single-stranded DNA strands readily reform duplexes at neutral pH. By using an integrated microchip that can programmably control the solution pH simply switching the potential in a range of several hundred millivolts, we can trigger IM-PCR at a constant temperature. Analogously to thermal cycling, 30 cycles of pH-induced denaturation/renaturation were used to amplify protein DNA fragments as confirmed by DNA sequencing. We anticipate that this portable, low-cost, and scalable IM-PCR holds great promise for widespread biological, clinical, and environmental applications. PMID:27611873

  12. Redox reactions induced by nitrosative stress mediate protein misfolding and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zezong; Nakamura, Tomohiro; Lipton, Stuart A

    2010-06-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through beta-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  13. Redox Reactions Induced by Nitrosative Stress Mediate Protein Misfolding and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    Overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors accounts, at least in part, for excitotoxic neuronal damage, potentially contributing to a wide range of acute and chronic neurologic diseases. Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD), manifest deposits of misfolded or aggregated proteins, and result from synaptic injury and neuronal death. Recent studies have suggested that nitrosative stress due to generation of excessive nitric oxide (NO) can mediate excitotoxicity in part by triggering protein misfolding and aggregation, and mitochondrial fragmentation in the absence of genetic predisposition. S-Nitrosylation, or covalent reaction of NO with specific protein thiol groups, represents a convergent signal pathway contributing to NO-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, compromised dynamics of mitochondrial fission-fusion process, thus leading to neurotoxicity. Here, we review the effect of S-nitrosylation on protein function under excitotoxic conditions, and present evidence suggesting that NO contributes to protein misfolding and aggregation via S-nitrosylating protein-disulfide isomerase or the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin, and mitochondrial fragmentation through β-amyloid-related S-nitrosylation of dynamin-related protein-1. Moreover, we also discuss that inhibition of excessive NMDA receptor activity by memantine, an uncompetitive/fast off-rate (UFO) drug can ameliorate excessive production of NO, protein misfolding and aggregation, mitochondrial fragmentation, and neurodegeneration. PMID:20333559

  14. Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Hepatocyte Transplantation: Current Status and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charlotte A; Dhawan, Anil; Smith, Richard A; Mitry, Ragai R; Fitzpatrick, Emer

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HT) is emerging as a promising alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients with certain liver-based metabolic disease and acute liver failure. Hepatocytes are generally infused into the portal venous system, from which they migrate into the liver cell plates of the native organ. One of the major hurdles to the sustained success of this therapy is early cell loss, with up to 70% of hepatocytes lost immediately following infusion. This is largely thought to be due to the instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), resulting in the activation of complement and coagulation pathways. Transplanted hepatocytes produce and release tissue factor (TF), which activates the coagulation pathway, leading to the formation of thrombin and fibrin clots. Thrombin can further activate a number of complement proteins, leading to the activation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and subsequent hepatocyte cell death. Inflammatory cells including granulocytes, monocytes, Kupffer cells, and natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to cluster around transplanted hepatocytes, leading to their rapid clearance shortly after transplantation. Current research aims to improve cell engraftment and prevent early cell loss. This has been proven successful in vitro using pharmacological interventions such as melagatran, low-molecular-weight dextran sulphate, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Effective inhibition of IBMIR would significantly improve hepatocyte engraftment, proliferation, and function, providing successful treatment for patients with liver-based metabolic diseases. PMID:26996786

  15. Cervical dentin hypersensitivity: a cross-sectional investigation in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Rahiotis, C; Polychronopoulou, A; Tsiklakis, K; Kakaboura, A

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in a cross-sectional investigation of Greek adults. Seven hundred and sixty-seven subjects were examined. Participants were patients processed for first examination in the Clinic of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Athens. The evaluation of hypersensitivity was performed using two methods: for each tooth, the response to a) tactile stimulus and b) air-blast stimulus was measured. Additional factors such as smoking habits, oral health behaviour, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush, daily use of fluoride solution and of desensitising toothpaste, gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions were recorded and evaluated as causative factors. Descriptive statistics on the demographics of the study sample, of oral health behaviour characteristics and of oral examination findings were performed. Comparisons of these characteristics in the presence or absence of hypersensitivity were conducted with the chi-square test. Data were further analysed using multiple logistic regression modelling. Among study participants, 21·3% had at least one cervical dentin hypersensitivity reaction to the tactile stimulus, and 38·6%, to the air-blast stimulus. Multivariate analysis detected association of the hypersensitivity in tactile or air-blast stimulus with the non-carious lesions and with the gingival recessions. Additionally, a relation between hypersensitivity and air-blast stimulus with gender (female) was found. There was no association between the hypersensitivity in both of the stimuli and the level of education, smoking, consumption of acidic foods, type of toothbrush and daily use of fluoride solution or desensitising toothpaste. The overall prevalence of cervical dentin hypersensitivity in the adult population in Athens ranged from 21·3% to 38·6% depending on the type of stimuli. Cervical non-carious lesions and gingival

  16. Hypersensitivity Responses in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Khorooshi, Reza; Asgari, Nasrin; Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Berg, Carsten Tue; Owens, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated tissue damage or hypersensitivity can be mediated by autospecific IgG antibodies. Pathology results from activation of complement, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, mediated by inflammatory effector leukocytes include macrophages, natural killer cells, and granulocytes. Antibodies and complement have been associated to demyelinating pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, where macrophages predominate among infiltrating myeloid cells. Serum-derived autoantibodies with predominant specificity for the astrocyte water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are implicated as inducers of pathology in neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disease where activated neutrophils infiltrate, unlike in MS. The most widely used model for MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is an autoantigen-immunized disease that can be transferred to naive animals with CD4+ T cells, but not with antibodies. By contrast, NMO-like astrocyte and myelin pathology can be transferred to mice with AQP4–IgG from NMO patients. This is dependent on complement, and does not require T cells. Consistent with clinical observations that interferon-beta is ineffective as a therapy for NMO, NMO-like pathology is significantly reduced in mice lacking the Type I IFN receptor. In MS, there is evidence for intrathecal synthesis of antibodies as well as blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, whereas in NMO, IgG accesses the CNS from blood. Transfer models involve either direct injection of antibody and complement to the CNS, or experimental manipulations to induce BBB breakdown. We here review studies in MS and NMO that elucidate roles for IgG and complement in the induction of BBB breakdown, astrocytopathy, and demyelinating pathology. These studies point to significance of T-independent effector mechanisms in neuroinflammation. PMID:26500654

  17. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets. PMID:26113584

  18. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets.

  19. Management of dentinal hypersensitivity: a review.

    PubMed

    Parolia, Abhishek; Kundabala, M; Mohan, Mandakini

    2011-03-01

    Dentinal hypersensitivity is a very common clinical finding that can cause considerable concern for the patient. Clinicians must understand the various etiological factors, their complexities, and numerous treatment options available. This article reviews the etiology, management, and prevention of dentinal hypersensitivity. PMID:21563596

  20. PERSISTENT SUPPRESSION OF CONTACT HYPERSENSITIVITY, AND ALTERED T-CELL PARAMETERS IN F344 RATS EXPOSED PERINATALLY TO 2,3,7,8-TETRACHLORODIBENZO-P-DIOXIN (TCDD)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    The outcome of perinatal low-level TCDD exposure on the T cell-mediated contact hypersensitivity response (CHS) in adult F344 rats was investigated. Suppression of the 2,4- dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB)-specific contact hypersensitivity reponse occurred in mature off...

  1. Pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain: prevalence and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Müller, Monika; Ashraf, Aroosiah; Neziri, Alban Y; Streitberger, Konrad; Andersen, Ole K; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Hypersensitivity of pain pathways is considered a relevant determinant of symptoms in chronic pain patients, but data on its prevalence are very limited. To our knowledge, no data on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity are available. We studied the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in 961 consecutive patients with various chronic pain conditions. Pain threshold and nociceptive withdrawal reflex threshold to electrical stimulation were used to assess pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity, respectively. Using 10th percentile cutoff of previously determined reference values, the prevalence of pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity (95% confidence interval) was 71.2 (68.3-74.0) and 80.0 (77.0-82.6), respectively. As a secondary aim, we analyzed demographic, psychosocial, and clinical characteristics as factors potentially associated with pain hypersensitivity and spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity using logistic regression models. Both hypersensitivity parameters were unaffected by most factors analyzed. Depression, catastrophizing, pain-related sleep interference, and average pain intensity were significantly associated with hypersensitivity. However, none of them was significant for both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Furthermore, the odds ratios were very low, indicating modest quantitative impact. To our knowledge, this is the largest prevalence study on central hypersensitivity and the first one on the prevalence of spinal nociceptive hypersensitivity in chronic pain patients. The results revealed an impressively high prevalence, supporting a high clinical relevance of this phenomenon. Electrical pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex explore aspects of pain processing that are mostly independent of sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical pain-related characteristics.

  2. Absence of cross-reactivity to carbapenems in patients with delayed hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Romano, A; Gaeta, F; Valluzzi, R L; Alonzi, C; Maggioletti, M; Zaffiro, A; Caruso, C; Quaratino, D

    2013-12-01

    Studies performed on subjects with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have demonstrated a 1% rate of cross-reactivity between penicillins and both imipenem and meropenem, while a single study found a 5.5% rate of cross-reactivity with imipenem/cilastatin in subjects with T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to β-lactams, mostly penicillins. We studied 204 consecutive subjects with a well-demonstrated T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to assess the cross-reactivity with carbapenems and the tolerability of such alternative β-lactams. All 204 subjects underwent skin tests with imipenem/cilastatin and meropenem; 130 of them were skin-tested also with ertapenem. Subjects with negative test results were challenged with these carbapenems. All subjects displayed negative skin tests to carbapenems and tolerated challenges. These data demonstrate the absence of clinically significant T-cell-mediated cross-reactivity between penicillins and carbapenems. Negative delayed-reading skin testing with carbapenems in individuals with documented T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins correlates well with subsequent clinical tolerance of therapeutic doses of carbapenems.

  3. Mediating and Moderating Effects in Ageism and Depression among the Korean Elderly: The Roles of Emotional Reactions and Coping Reponses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Ho; Noh, Samuel; Chun, Heeran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the relationship between ageism and depression, exploring the stress-mediating and stress-moderating roles of emotional reactions and coping behaviors. Methods Data were from the 2013 Ageism and Health Study (n = 816), a cross-sectional survey of urban and rural community-dwelling seniors aged 60–89 years in South Korea. Participants with at least one experience of ageism reported on their emotional reactions and coping responses. The measure yielded two types of coping: problem-focused (taking formal action, confrontation, seeking social support) and emotion-focused (passive acceptance, emotional discharge). Results Although ageism was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (B = 0.27, p < 0.0001), the association was entirely mediated by emotional reactions such as anger, sadness, and powerlessness. Problem-focused coping, especially confrontation and social support, seemingly reduced the impact of emotional reactions on depression, whereas emotion-focused coping exacerbated the adverse effects. Conclusion These findings support the cultural characterization explanation of ageism and related coping processes among Korean elderly and suggest that regulating emotional reactions may determine the efficacy of coping with ageism. PMID:26981336

  4. Hypersensitivity to the local anesthetic articaine hydrochloride.

    PubMed Central

    Malanin, K.; Kalimo, K.

    1995-01-01

    A patient developed skin erythema and wheals within 1 h after local dental anesthesia with articaine hydrochloride. Pretreatment with oral terfenadine or topical betamethasone dipropionate prevented her reaction to articaine. In contrast, neither pretreatment with oral aspirin nor topical capsaicin affected her reaction to articaine. The results of radioallergosorbent tests (RAST) to articaine and a passive transfer test were negative. The reaction was probably caused by a complement-mediated mechanism leading to the degranulation of mast cells. The patient tolerated local anesthesia with lidocaine. PMID:8934983

  5. Boron-mediated sequential alkyne insertion and C-C coupling reactions affording extended π-conjugated molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Naoki; Muranaka, Sho; Shigeno, Naoki; Sugiyama, Haruka; Takenouchi, Kumiko; Hajjaj, Fatin; Fukushima, Takanori

    2016-09-01

    C-C bond coupling reactions illustrate the wealth of organic transformations, which are usually mediated by organotransition metal complexes. Here, we show that a borafluorene with a B-Cl moiety can mediate sequential alkyne insertion (1,2-carboboration) and deborylation/Csp2-Csp2 coupling reactions, leading to aromatic molecules. The first step, which affords a borepin derivative, proceeds very efficiently between the borafluorene and various alkynes by simply mixing these two components. The second step is triggered by a one-electron oxidation of the borepin derivative, which results in the formation of a phenanthrene framework. When an excess amount of oxidant is used in the second step, the phenanthrene derivatives can be further transformed in situ to afford dibenzo[g,p]chrysene derivatives. The results presented herein will substantially expand the understanding of main group chemistry and provide a powerful synthetic tool for the construction of a wide variety of extended π-conjugated systems.

  6. Classification and practical approach to the diagnosis and management of hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, M L; Asero, R; Bavbek, S; Blanca, M; Blanca-Lopez, N; Bochenek, G; Brockow, K; Campo, P; Celik, G; Cernadas, J; Cortellini, G; Gomes, E; Niżankowska-Mogilnicka, E; Romano, A; Szczeklik, A; Testi, S; Torres, M J; Wöhrl, S; Makowska, J

    2013-10-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) constitute only a subset of all adverse reactions to these drugs, but due to their severity pose a significant burden to patients and are a challenge to the allergist. In susceptible individuals, NSAIDs induce a wide spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions with various timing, organ manifestations, and severity, involving either immunological (allergic) or nonimmunological mechanisms. Proper classification of reactions based on clinical manifestations and suspected mechanism is a prerequisite for the implementation of rational diagnostic procedures and adequate patient management. This document, prepared by a panel of experts from the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Task Force on NSAIDs Hypersensitivity, aims at reviewing the current knowledge in the field and proposes uniform definitions and clinically useful classification of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs. The document proposes also practical algorithms for the diagnosis of specific types of NSAIDs hypersensitivity (which include drug provocations, skin testing and in vitro testing) and provides, when data are available, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypersensitive patients, including drug avoidance and drug desensitization.

  7. Cracking the shell on egg-hypersensitive patients and egg-containing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chernin, Leah R; Swender, David; Hostoffer, Robert W

    2011-10-01

    Hens' eggs are a common food in the American diet. They are consumed as a primary food source and added as an ingredient to other foods. In individuals who are hypersensitive to eggs, egg-containing foods can cause mild to severe allergic reactions if ingested. These individuals may also have adverse reactions to vaccines produced on egg media. Vaccines that are created on egg media include those for measles, mumps, and rubella; rabies; yellow fever; and influenza. The authors discuss recent developments in the use of egg-containing vaccines in hypersensitive patients.

  8. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine

    PubMed Central

    Belhekar, Mahesh N.; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  9. A case of hypersensitivity to soluble and isophane insulins but not to insulin glargine.

    PubMed

    Belhekar, Mahesh N; Pai, Sarayu; Tayade, Parimal; Dalwadi, Pradip; Munshi, Renuka; Varthakavi, Prema

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is an important agent for the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). Allergic reactions to insulin therapy, although rare, have been evident since animal insulin became available for the treatment of DM in 1922. Hypersensitivity to insulin has considerably been reduced with the introduction of human insulin produced by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Here, we present a case of Type 2 DM who demonstrated immediate (Type 1) hypersensitivity reaction on the sites of subcutaneous injection of soluble and isophane insulin but insulin glargine was tolerated well and provided good glycemic control. PMID:25878390

  10. IgE-Mediated Reaction to Metamizole: Evaluation of a Patient with Severe Anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Sevket; Ucar, Ramazan; Caliskaner, Ahmet Zafer

    2016-06-01

    Metamizole, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with weak anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic effects, is used as an analgesic and antipyretic agent. Many adverse reactions to metamizole, such as early or late-onset systemic reactions and bone marrow suppression, have been identified. In this report, we present a case of systemic reaction after the application of parenteral metamizole (Novalgin(®) ampoule; Sanofi Aventis, İstanbul, Turkey) and discuss the mechanism underlying the reaction. PMID:27551180

  11. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  12. Periaqueductal Grey EP3 Receptors Facilitate Spinal Nociception in Arthritic Secondary Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Drake, R.A.R.; Leith, J.L.; Almahasneh, F.; Martindale, J.; Wilson, A.W.; Lumb, B.

    2016-01-01

    hypersensitivity). This is found in many painful conditions, particularly arthritis. The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is an important center that controls spinal nociceptive processing, on which secondary hypersensitivity depends. Prostaglandins (PGs) are mediators of inflammation with pronociceptive actions within the PAG under normal conditions. We find that secondary hindpaw hypersensitivity in arthritic rats results from spinal sensitization to peripheral A-nociceptor inputs. In the PAG of arthritic, but not naive, rats, there is enhanced control of spinal A-nociceptor processing through PG EP3 receptors. The descending facilitatory actions of intra-PAG PGs play a direct and central role in the maintenance of inflammatory secondary hypersensitivity, particularly relating to the processing of A-fiber nociceptive information. PMID:27581447

  13. Food hypersensitivity among adult patients: epidemiological and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R; Delgado, J; Quiralte, J; Blanco, C; Carrillo, T

    1996-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity (FH) is lesser frequent among adult patients than in childhood. Foods implicated in hypersensitivity reactions vary with sociocultural and diet habits from a geographic place to other. We studied 142 adult patients sensitized to foods, among 7698 patients visited at our Outpatient Clinic. Hundred and twenty patients referred clinical symptoms after consumption of one or more foods consistently. From the latest, 107 patients (89.2%) were atopics (92 of them sensitizes to dust mites) and 54 (45%) referred atopic familiar background. Most frequent recorded symptoms were: urticaria/angioedema 84 cases (70%), oral syndrome 65 (54%), asthma 48 (37%) and anaphylaxis 33 patients (27.5%). Shellfish sensitization occurred in 50 patients, fresh fruits in 33 and nuts in 29 cases. Shrimp (48 patients), squid (33), kiwi (14), papaya (14), avocado (13) and banana (12 cases) were the most frequent causes of FH. Significant statistical association between foods and inhalants was observed for fresh fruits and latex (p < 0.001), fresh fruits and pollens (p < 0.01), and shellfish and Blatta germanica (p < 0.001). Prevalence of FH among patients at our Area is around 1.6%. Tropical fruits, as other kind of fruits, seem to share common IgE-epitopes to pollens. High prevalence of shellfish and cockroach hypersensitivity could be more easily developed by previous domestic mites sensitization.

  14. [Radiographic contrast media hypersensitivity. New understanding of pathophysiology with implications for patient management].

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Ring, J

    2005-01-01

    There has been a remarkable progress in our understanding of the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity to contrast media (CM). Immediate reactions develop within one hour after application of CM under the clinical picture of anaphylaxis. Pruritic exanthems appearing several days afterwards account for the majority of non-immediate reactions. Current evidence indicates an allergic basis of severe immediate as well as of non-immediate reactions involving CM-reactive IgE-antibodies and T-lymphocytes, respectively. Skin tests are helpful to establish the diagnosis of these reactions. The use of skin tests to predict tolerability of CM in patients with previous hypersensitivity reaction to CM is controversial. The value of cellular in-vitro tests is unknown. In patients with previous hypersensitivity to CM, premedication with antihistamins and/or corticosteroids is recommended, but current premedication protocols do not suppress all repeat reactions. European multicenter studies addressing sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of test procedures as well as prophylaxis and risk factors of CM hypersensitivity are currently ongoing.

  15. Cross-allergenicity in the legume botanical family in children with food hypersensitivity. II. Laboratory correlates.

    PubMed

    Bernhisel-Broadbent, J; Taylor, S; Sampson, H A

    1989-11-01

    Only two of 41 legume-allergic patients diagnosed by double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenge or "convincing history" of anaphylaxis had an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to more than one member of the legume family. However, extensive immunologic cross-reactivity was demonstrated among legume antigens on Immunoblot and Immunodot-blot analyses and prick skin tests. The proteins of six legumes (peanut, soybean, lima bean, pea, garbanzo bean, and green beans) were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose, and probed with sera from six legume-allergic patients. Multiple IgE-binding bands were identified in each legume lane by the sera from each of these legume-allergic patients. In vitro cross-reactivity did not correlate with clinical hypersensitivity. All the legumes studied (except green bean) had a prominent band at 20 kd. Numerous proteins and protein subunits can be identified in each of the legumes (16 peanut, 21 soybean, 23 lima bean, 25 pea, 22 garbanzo bean, and 11 green bean protein bands) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and it appears that legume-allergic patients' sera may recognize multiple similar fractions from each legume. A second in vitro test was performed in which the six legume extracts were bound directly onto nitrocellulose paper. These "legume" Immunodot blots were probed for specific IgE-binding activity with sera from 62 patients with positive legume prick skin tests. The legume Immunodot blots again demonstrated extensive clinically irrelevant cross-reactivity. However, this test may prove useful as a simple technique for screening food-specific IgE with minimal quantities of sera.

  16. Site-specific Protein Bioconjugation via a Pyridoxal 5′-Phosphate-Mediated N-Terminal Transamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Witus, LS; Francis, M.

    2015-01-01

    The covalent attachment of chemical groups to proteins is a critically important tool for the study of protein function and the creation of protein-based materials. Methods of site-specific protein modification are necessary for the generation of well-defined bioconjugates possessing a new functional group in a single position in the amino acid sequence. This paper describes a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) mediated transamination reaction that is specific for the N-terminus of a protein. The reaction oxidizes the N-terminal amine to a ketone or an aldehyde, which can form a stable oxime linkage with an alkoxyamine reagent of choice. Screening studies have identified the most reactive N-terminal residues, facilitating the use of site-directed mutagenesis to achieve high levels of conversion. Additionally, this reaction has been shown to work on a number of targets that are not easily accessed through heterologous expression, such as monoclonal antibodies. PMID:23836553

  17. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis and exposure to zirconium silicate in a young ceramic tile worker.

    PubMed

    Liippo, K K; Anttila, S L; Taikina-Aho, O; Ruokonen, E L; Toivonen, S T; Tuomi, T

    1993-10-01

    We describe a nonsmoking ceramic tile worker 25 yr of age who developed a worsening dry cough and dyspnea after 3.5 yr as a sorter and glazer of tiles. Open lung biopsy revealed an intense granulomatous interstitial pneumonia with mild fibrosis, compatible with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and numerous very small birefringent crystals around the terminal airways and occasionally in granulomas. Pulmonary particle analysis revealed an inhaled dust burden nearly 100-fold the normal background level, mainly consisting of clay minerals and zirconium silicate. The patient had no history or clinical or laboratory findings suggesting any organic etiologic agent. A sarcoid granulomatosis type of chronic pulmonary hypersensitivity reaction is known after long-term exposure to zirconium, but this case demonstrates that zirconium can also cause an acute and fulminant allergic alveolitislike hypersensitivity reaction.

  18. An unusual case of delayed-type hypersensitivity to ceftriaxone and meropenem.

    PubMed

    Dias de Castro, E; Leblanc, A; Sarmento, A; Cernadas, J R

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a low cross-reactivity between β-lactam antibiotics and carbapenems in IgE-mediated reactions. There are no studies on cross-reactivity of meropenem in patients with non-immediate hypersensitivity to cephalosporins. We describe a case of a 13-year-old male, admitted in Neurosurgery with a severe extradural empyema complicating frontal sinusitis, submitted to an emergent bifrontal craniotomy. A generalized maculopapular exanthema, fever and malaise, appeared by the 7th day of meningeal doses of ceftriaxone, clindamycin and vancomycin. Those were replaced by meropenem, with posterior worsening of the reaction and mucosal involvement. A new scheme with amikacin, metronidazole and linezolid was done with improvement. Skin prick, intradermal and patch tests to penicillins, ceftriaxone and meropenem were negative. Lymphocyte transformation test was positive to ceftriaxone and negative to meropenem.Non-immediate T cell mechanism seems to be involved. Diagnosis work-up couldn't exclude cross-reactivity between ceftriaxone and meropenem.

  19. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  20. TEMPO-Mediated Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Synthesis of Tetrahydropyridazines Using Ketohydrazones and Olefins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Long; Peng, Xie-Xue; Chen, Fei; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    A novel, facile, and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyridazines by a one-pot tandem reaction of easily accessible ketohydrazones and olefins in the presence of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) has been successfully developed. The reaction involves the initial generation of azoalkenes from direct oxidative dehydrogenation of ketohydrazones using TEMPO as the commercially available oxidant, followed by a subsequent aza-Diels-Alder reaction with olefins.

  1. Borohydride-mediated radical addition reactions of organic iodides to electron-deficient alkenes.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Takuji; Uehara, Shohei; Hirao, Hidefumi; Fukuyama, Takahide; Matsubara, Hiroshi; Ryu, Ilhyong

    2014-05-01

    Cyanoborohydrides are efficient reagents in the reductive addition reactions of alkyl iodides and electron-deficient olefins. In contrast to using tin reagents, the reaction took place chemoselectively at the carbon-iodine bond but not at the carbon-bromine or carbon-chlorine bond. The reaction system was successfully applied to three-component reactions, including radical carbonylation. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction of a primary alkyl radical from tetrabutylammonium cyanoborohydride was estimated to be <1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C by a kinetic competition method. This value is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of tributyltin hydride.

  2. Sympathoinhibition and hypotension in carotid sinus hypersensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity is a known cause of syncope in humans. The condition is characterized by cardioinhibition and vasodepression, each to varying degrees. The extent and importance of sympathoinhibition has not been determined in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity. This study reports on the extent of sympathoinhibition measured directly directly during carotid massage with and without atrioventricular sequential pacing, in a patient with symptomatic carotid sinus reflex hypersensitivity. Carotid massage elicited asystole, hypotension and complete inhibition of muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Carotid massage during atrioventricular pacing produced similar sympathoinhibition, but with minimal hypotension. Therefore, sympathoinhibition did not contribute importantly to the hypotension during carotid massage in the supine position in this patient. Further investigations are required to elucidate the relation of sympathoinhibition to hypotension in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity in the upright position.

  3. Food hypersensitivity to lamb in a cat.

    PubMed

    Reedy, L M

    1994-04-01

    Severe facial pruritus in a cat was caused by food hypersensitivity to lamb. The cat had been fed an exclusive diet of lamb for 2 years after it had been diagnosed to have food hypersensitivity to fish. Signs, including erythema, alopecia, and excoriations of the head and neck, were poorly responsive to corticosteroid administration, but resolved within a few weeks after removal of the suspected allergen.

  4. Drug-Hypersensitivity Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Rose L.

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is a systemic autoimmune disorder that results in mucocutaneous symptoms ranging in severity from mild pruritus to life-threatening skin and mucosal loss, with different nomenclature depending on the severity of the symptoms. The purpose of this article is to review the recent advances in understanding the pathology of drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, as well as current recommendations for both medical and wound management. PMID:24527369

  5. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation.

  6. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  7. EXPRESS: Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane M; Traub, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stressinduced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  8. Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  9. Visual detection of formaldehyde by highly selective fluorophore labeling via gold(III) complex-mediated three-component coupling reaction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kong-Fan; Deng, Jie-Ren; Wei, Xiao-Qun; Shao, Shi-Ping; Xiang, Da-Peng; Wong, Man-Kin

    2015-07-21

    A novel method for visual detection of formaldehyde with excellent selectivity via a gold(iii) complex-mediated three-component coupling reaction of resin-linked sterically bulky amines and fluorescent alkynes has been developed.

  10. Real-time electrochemical monitoring of the polymerase chain reaction by mediated redox catalysis.

    PubMed

    Deféver, Thibaut; Druet, Michel; Rochelet-Dequaire, Murielle; Joannes, Martine; Grossiord, Céline; Limoges, Benoit; Marchal, Damien

    2009-08-19

    We described the proof-of-principle of a nonoptical real-time PCR that uses cyclic voltammetry for indirectly monitoring the amplified DNA product generated in the PCR reaction solution after each PCR cycle. To enable indirect measurement of the amplicon produced throughout PCR, we monitor electrochemically the progressive consumption (i.e., the decrease of concentration) of free electroactive deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) used for DNA synthesis. This is accomplished by exploiting the fast catalytic oxidation of native deoxyguanosine triphosphate (dGTP) or its unnatural analogue 7-deaza-dGTP by the one-electron redox catalysts Ru(bpy)(3)(3+) (with bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) or Os(bpy)(3)(3+) generated at an electrode. To demonstrate the feasibility of the method, a disposable array of eight miniaturized self-contained electrochemical cells (working volume of 50 microL) has been developed and implemented in a classical programmable thermal cycler and then tested with the PCR amplification of two illustrated examples of real-world biological target DNA sequences (i.e., a relatively long 2300-bp sequence from the bacterial genome of multidrug-resistant Achromobacter xylosoxidans and a shorter 283-bp target from the human cytomegalovirus). Although the method works with both mediator/base couples, the catalytic peak current responses recorded with the Ru(bpy)(3)(3+)/dGTP couple under real-time PCR conditions are significantly affected by a continuous current drift and interference with the background solvent discharge, thus leading to poorly reproducible data. Much more reproducible and reliable results are finally obtained with the Os(bpy)(3)(3+)/7-deaza-dGTP, a result that is attributed to the much lower anodic potential at which the catalytic oxidation of 7-deaza-dGTP by Os(bpy)(3)(3+) is detected. Under these conditions, an exponential decrease of the catalytic signal as a function of the number of PCR cycles is obtained, allowing definition of a cycle

  11. Pyrovanadolysis, a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate, Mn2+, and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7*

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Kulczyk, Arkadiusz W.; Akabayov, Sabine R.; Theile, Christopher; McLaughlin, Larry W.; Beauchamp, Benjamin; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3′–5′-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PPi). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5′-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry of the oxygen connecting the two phosphorus atoms of PPi, a variety of compounds was examined for their ability to carry out a reaction similar to pyrophosphorolysis. We describe a manganese-mediated pyrophosphorolysis-like activity using pyrovanadate (VV) catalyzed by the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. We designate this reaction pyrovanadolysis. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a shorter Mn-V distance of the polymerase-VV complex than the Mn-P distance of the polymerase-PPi complex. This structural arrangement at the active site accounts for the enzymatic activation by Mn-VV. We propose that the Mn2+, larger than Mg2+, fits the polymerase active site to mediate binding of VV into the active site of the polymerase. Our results may be the first documentation that vanadium can substitute for phosphorus in biological processes. PMID:21697085

  12. Pyrovanadolysis: a Pyrophosphorolysis-like Reaction Mediated by Pyrovanadate MN2plus and DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; A Kulczyk; S Akabayov; C Thiele; L McLaughlin; B Beauchamp; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    DNA polymerases catalyze the 3'-5'-pyrophosphorolysis of a DNA primer annealed to a DNA template in the presence of pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}). In this reversal of the polymerization reaction, deoxynucleotides in DNA are converted to deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates. Based on the charge, size, and geometry of the oxygen connecting the two phosphorus atoms of PP{sub i}, a variety of compounds was examined for their ability to carry out a reaction similar to pyrophosphorolysis. We describe a manganese-mediated pyrophosphorolysis-like activity using pyrovanadate (VV) catalyzed by the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. We designate this reaction pyrovanadolysis. X-ray absorption spectroscopy reveals a shorter Mn-V distance of the polymerase-VV complex than the Mn-P distance of the polymerase-PP{sub i} complex. This structural arrangement at the active site accounts for the enzymatic activation by Mn-VV. We propose that the Mn{sup 2+}, larger than Mg{sup 2+}, fits the polymerase active site to mediate binding of VV into the active site of the polymerase. Our results may be the first documentation that vanadium can substitute for phosphorus in biological processes.

  13. Virus Infections Incite Pain Hypersensitivity by Inducing Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Ou, Rong; Rabelo de Souza, Guilherme; Cunha, Thiago M.; Lemos, Henrique; Mohamed, Eslam; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Randall, Janice; Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a comorbidity associated with many clinical diseases, though the underlying causes are poorly understood. Recently, chronic pain hypersensitivity in rodents treated to induce chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues was linked to enhanced tryptophan catabolism in brain mediated by indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Here we show that acute influenza A virus (IAV) and chronic murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) infections, which stimulate robust IDO expression in lungs and lymphoid tissues, induced acute or chronic pain hypersensitivity, respectively. In contrast, virus-induced pain hypersensitivity did not manifest in mice lacking intact IDO1 genes. Spleen IDO activity increased markedly as MuLV infections progressed, while IDO1 expression was not elevated significantly in brain or spinal cord (CNS) tissues. Moreover, kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan catabolite made by cells expressing IDO, incited pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient mice and Kyn potentiated pain hypersensitivity due to MuLV infection. MuLV infection stimulated selective IDO expression by a discreet population of spleen cells expressing both B cell (CD19) and dendritic cell (CD11c) markers (CD19+ DCs). CD19+ DCs were more susceptible to MuLV infection than B cells or conventional (CD19neg) DCs, proliferated faster than B cells from early stages of MuLV infection and exhibited mature antigen presenting cell (APC) phenotypes, unlike conventional (CD19neg) DCs. Moreover, interactions with CD4 T cells were necessary to sustain functional IDO expression by CD19+ DCs in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes from MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice induced pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient recipient mice, while selective in vivo depletion of DCs alleviated pain hypersensitivity in MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice and led to rapid reduction in splenomegaly, a hallmark of MuLV immune pathogenesis. These findings reveal critical roles for CD19+ DCs

  14. Voltammetric and electrochemical ESR studies of oxidation reactions mediated by tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Wain, Andrew J; Streeter, Ian; Thompson, Mary; Fietkau, Nicole; Drouin, Ludovic; Fairbanks, Antony J; Compton, Richard G

    2006-02-16

    The electrochemical oxidation of tris(4-bromophenyl)amine in the presence of 2,6-lutidine is examined in acetonitrile. Voltammetric and spectroscopic investigations suggest that the electrogenerated triaryl aminium radical cation oxidizes 2,6-lutidine in an EC' mechanism, and an equilibrium constant for this homogeneous electron transfer is estimated. The mediated oxidation of a protected phenyl selenoglycoside by this reaction mixture is studied by the use of electrochemical ESR, employing a tubular flow cell, and signal intensity data is found to be consistent with the proposed mechanism, allowing the determination of kinetic parameters by computational simulation. Products of the mediated glycoside oxidation are determined by proton NMR and mass spectrometry. PMID:16471872

  15. Binaphthyl-based chiral bifunctional organocatalysts for water mediated asymmetric List-Lerner-Barbas aldol reactions.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Veeramanoharan; Chithiraikumar, Chinnadurai; Siva, Ayyanar

    2016-10-14

    Novel binaphthyl-based chiral bifunctional organocatalysts were designed, synthesized and successfully applied to the asymmetric List-Lerner-Barbas aldol reaction in the presence of water. These organocatalysts were found to be effective catalysts for the reactions of symmetrical, unsymmetrical and cyclic ketones with different aldehydes to give the corresponding aldol products with higher yields (up to 98%) and very good ee's up to 99%. The catalytic system leads to higher yields and selectivities than the previously reported well-known proline based organocatalysts. In addition to the effect of solvent, additives, catalyst concentration, temperature and the substrate scope of the reactions were also investigated. PMID:27604169

  16. [Reflections about allergic and crossed reactions to sulphonamides and drugs with radical-sulphonamide].

    PubMed

    Montes Montes, José; Alfonso Barrón, Enrique; Cruz Leyva, Jazmín del Alva; Flores Flores, José

    2004-01-01

    In the daily pharmacological therapy, some compounds may cause eventually allergic hypersensitivity reactions generating adverse effects. The objective of this study and its reflections has been to recommend caution, being prudent when expressing an opinion on risks and benefits of drugs themselves or some of their radicals that may contain because this attitude might produce a unsuitable concern. Drugs hypersensitivity (an unexpected pharmacological effect) may resemble a true allergic reaction but without the implication of IgE immunoglobulin. Such reactions are result of effector systems drug activation, leading to direct proallergic or proinflammatory chemical mediators release from mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. Sulphonamides are an illustrative example because they possess a chemical core resembling that from other kind of drugs -furosemide, some COXIB and others- besides its haptenic capability (even though they have different chemical structure). Selective COX 2 inhibitors are considered an accepted symptomatic therapy in rheumatic diseases as well as some other conditions where pain and inflammation are present; based on its generalized use in such conditions, authors decided to perform this investigation in the allergy clinics of Hospital General de México and Hospital Español de México, looking for cases of true allergic, crossed or hypersensitivity reactions related to one COXIB that includes a sulphamidic radical in its chemical structure. No clinical significance was found concerning the above mentioned reactions and the antiinflammatory-analgesic compound (celecoxib).

  17. GaCl3 -Mediated Reactions of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes with Aromatic Aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Denis D; Novikov, Roman A; Tomilov, Yury V

    2016-09-26

    A new strategy for cascade assembly of substituted indenes and polycyclic lactones based on reactions of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes and styrylmalonates with aromatic aldehydes in the presence of GaCl3 has been developed. The use of GaCl3 makes it possible to principally change the direction of the reaction known in this series of substrates and to perform the process in a multicomponent version. Generation of formal 1,2-zwitterionic intermediates owing to complexation of dicarboxylate groups with GaCl3 is the driving force of the reactions discovered. This method makes it possible to assemble indenylmalonates or indano[1',2':2,3]indano[2,1-b]furan-2-ones in one synthetic stage from readily available starting compounds with high regio- and diastereoselectivity. A mechanism of the reactions has been suggested using the (18) O label in benzaldehyde. PMID:27573178

  18. Controlled Light-Mediated Preparation of Gold Nanoparticles by a Norrish Type I Reaction of Photoactive Polymers.

    PubMed

    Mäsing, Florian; Mardyukov, Artur; Doerenkamp, Carsten; Eckert, Hellmut; Malkus, Ursula; Nüsse, Harald; Klingauf, Jürgen; Studer, Armido

    2015-10-19

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are subjects of broad interest in scientific community due to their promising physicochemical properties. Herein we report the facile and controlled light-mediated preparation of gold nanoparticles through a Norrish type I reaction of photoactive polymers. These carefully designed polymers act as reagents for the photochemical reduction of gold ions, as well as stabilizers for the in situ generated AuNPs. Manipulating the length and composition of the photoactive polymers allows for control of AuNP size. Nanoparticle diameter can be controlled from 1.5 nm to 9.6 nm.

  19. DNase I hypersensitive sites within the inducible qa gene cluster of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, J A; Giles, N H

    1986-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive regions were mapped within the 17.3-kilobase qa (quinic acid) gene cluster of Neurospora crassa. The 5'-flanking regions of the five qa structural genes and the two qa regulatory genes each contain DNase I hypersensitive sites under noninducing conditions and generally exhibit increases in DNase I cleavage upon induction of transcription with quinic acid. The two large intergenic regions of the qa gene cluster appear to be similarly organized with respect to the positions of constitutive and inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites. Inducible hypersensitive sites on the 5' side of one qa gene, qa-x, appear to be differentially regulated. Employing these and previously published data, we have identified a conserved sequence element that may mediate the activator function of the qa-1F regulatory gene. Variants of the 16-base-pair consensus sequence are consistently found within DNase I-protected regions adjacent to inducible DNase I hypersensitive sites within the gene cluster. Images PMID:2944110

  20. INDIUM MEDIATED REACTIONS IN WATER: SYNTHESIS OF BETA-HYDROXYL ESTERS. (R822668)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A variety of small beta, Greek-hydroxyl esters were synthesized efficiently through indium mediated carbon-carbon bond formation in water followed by ozonolysis.

  1. Links between Adolescents' Expected Parental Reactions and Prosocial Behavioral Tendencies: The Mediating Role of Prosocial Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Sam A.; Carlo, Gustavo; Roesch, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine relations between adolescents' social cognitions regarding parenting practices and adolescents' prosocial behavioral tendencies. A mediation model was tested whereby the degree to which adolescents perceived their parents as responding appropriately to their prosocial and antisocial behaviors was…

  2. Anxiety sensitivity and post-traumatic stress reactions: Evidence for intrusions and physiological arousal as mediating and moderating mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Fan, Qianqian

    2015-08-01

    A growing body of research has implicated anxiety sensitivity (AS) and its dimensions in the development of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the mechanism(s) that may account for the association between AS and PTSD remains unclear. Using the "trauma film paradigm," which provides a prospective experimental tool for investigating analog intrusion development, the present study examines the extent to which intrusions mediate the association between AS and the development of posttraumatic stress reactions. After completing a measure of AS and state mood, unselected participants (n = 45) viewed a 10 min film of graphic scenes of fatal traffic accidents and then completed a second assessment of state mood. Participants then kept a daily diary to record intrusions about the film for a one-week period. Post-traumatic stress reactions about the film were then assessed after the one-week period. The results showed that general AS and physical and cognitive concerns AS predicted greater post-traumatic stress reactions about the film a week later. Furthermore, the number of intrusions the day after viewing the traumatic film, but not fear and disgust in response to the trauma film, mediated the association between general AS (and AS specifically for physical and cognitive concerns) and post-traumatic stress reactions a week later. Subsequent analysis also showed that physiological arousal during initial exposure to the traumatic film moderated the association between general AS and the number of intrusions reported the day after viewing the film. The implications of these analog findings for conceptualizing the mechanism(s) that may interact to explain the role of AS in the development of PTSD and its effective treatment are discussed. PMID:26121496

  3. Preparation of ultrathin, robust protein microcapsules through template-mediated interfacial reaction between amine and catechol groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Zhongyi; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Wenyan; Song, Xiaokai; Ai, Qinghong; Wu, Hong

    2013-11-11

    A novel approach to the synthesis of protein microcapsules is developed through template-mediated interfacial reaction. Protein-doped CaCO3 templates are first synthetized via coprecipitation and then coated with a catechol-containing alginate (AlgDA) layer. Afterward, the templates are exposed to ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium (EDTA) solution to dissolve CaCO3. During CaCO3 dissolution, the generated CO2 gas pushes protein molecules moving to the AlgDA layer, and thereby Michael addition and Schiff base reactions proceed, forming the shell of protein microcapsules. Three kinds of proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin, catalase, and protamine sulfate, are utilized. The shell thickness of microcapsule varies from 25 to 82 nm as the doping amount of protein increased from 2 to 6 mg per 66 mg CaCO3. The protein microcapsules have a robust but flexible shell and can be reversibly deformed upon exposure to osmotic pressure. The bioactivity of protein microcapsules is demonstrated through enzymatic catalysis experiments. The protein microcapsules remain about 80% enzymatic activity of the equivalent free protein. Hopefully, our approach could be extended to many other applications such as drug/gene delivery, tissue scaffolds, and catalysis due to the universality of Michael reaction and Schiff base reactions.

  4. CYSTIC FIBROSIS AND ANTIBIOTIC HYPERSENSITIVITY: PRESENT KNOWLEDGE AND PRACTICAL APPROACH.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, D; Chiron, R; Tremblay, F; Caimmi, S; Ricci, A; Licari, A; Marseglia, G L

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common fatal genetic diseases (1 in 2500 births). The defect causing the disease is localized on the 7q31 gene, which codifies for the CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator) transmembrane protein. CFTR is a chloride channel localized on the epithelial cells of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, pancreatic ducts, biliary tree, intestine, vas deferens and sweat glands. More than 2000 different mutations are currently known; some are prominent or relatively frequent, ranging from one population to another. The most frequent complications of cystic fibrosis are those affecting the bronchial tree. Patients suffer from recurrent lung infections, which involve a progressive loss of lung function. The pulmonary infections are frequent or chronic and limit the quality of life of patients. In addition to being enormously exposed to antibiotics, they have many more opportunities to develop hypersensitivity reactions to these molecules. Only a complete allergy work-up with a detailed analysis of the clinical history, skin tests and provocation test can show if the patient has actually experienced an allergic hypersensitivity reaction. Desensitization is to be considered as a treatment that may help patients benefit from antibiotic treatment in those cases in which they have a proven allergy to a certain molecule. PMID:26634585

  5. Nonbonded, attractive cation-pi interactions in azide-mediated asymmetric ring expansion reactions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Christopher E; Ribelin, Timothy; Withrow, Donna; Basseri, Yashar; Manukyan, Anna K; Bermudez, Amy; Nuera, Christian G; Day, Victor W; Powell, Douglas R; Poutsma, Jennifer L; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2008-05-01

    The influence of attractive, nonbonded interactions on the reactions of 1,2- and 1,3-hydroxyalkyl azides with ketones has been investigated through experimental and computational means. A series of 1,3-hydroxyalkyl azides bearing electronically tuned aromatic groups at the 2 position were prepared and reacted along with several derivatives designed to conformationally restrict the rotational orientation of the aromatic substituent. These studies showed that a cation-pi interaction between an aryl moiety and an N2(+) leaving group plays a role in determining the stereoselectivity of these reactions. A series of ab initio calculations supported this hypothesis. A computational and experimental analysis suggested a primarily steric model for the analogous reactions of substituted 2-azido-1-ethanol analogues. PMID:18396910

  6. Expression of IL-17A concentration and effector functions of peripheral blood neutrophils in food allergy hypersensitivity patients.

    PubMed

    Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Pałgan, Krzysztof; Gawrońska-Ukleja, Ewa; Kuźmiński, Andrzej; Przybyszewski, Michał; Socha, Ewa; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2016-03-01

    Lymphocytes Th17 and other types of immune system cells produce IL17. By induction of cytokines and chemokines, the IL17 cytokine is involved in mechanisms of allergic reaction with participation of neutrophil granulocytes. It affects activation, recruitment, and migration of neutrophils to the tissues, regulating inflammatory reaction intensity. Excited neutrophils secrete inter alia elastase and reactive oxygen species (ROS)--significant mediators of inflammation process responsible for tissues damage.The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentrations of serum interleukin 17A, serum neutrophil elastase, and ROS production by neutrophils in patients with food allergy.The study included 30 patients with food allergy diagnosed based on interview, clinical symptoms, positive SPT, placebo controlled double-blind oral provocation trial, and the presence of asIgE in blood serum against selected food allergens using fluoro-immuno-enzymatic method FEIA UNICap 100. The control group consisted of 10 healthy volunteers. The concentrations of IL17A were determined in all patients using ELISA method with eBioscience kits, and elastase using BenderMed Systems kits. Chemiluminescence of non-stimulated neutrophils was evaluated using luminol-dependent kinetic method for 40 min on Luminoskan (Labsystems luminometer).The results of serum IL-17A concentrations and the values of chemiluminescence obtained by non-activated neutrophils, as well as elastase concentrations, were higher in patients with food allergic hypersensitivity compared to healthy volunteers.This study demonstrates a significance of IL-17A and activated neutrophil granulocytes in the course of diseases with food allergic hypersensitivity. PMID:26684636

  7. Hypersensitivity to hypercapnia: definition/(s).

    PubMed

    Vickers, Kristin

    2012-05-15

    Empirical evidence indicates that panic disorder (PD) patients experience hypersensitivity to hypercapnia, a condition in which the blood level of carbon dioxide exceeds the normal value. The importance of this research line is substantial and indeed, hypercapnic hypersensitivity has been advanced as a possible endophenotype of panic. Definitions of "hypersensitivity," however, have varied. The purpose of this brief review is to delineate and critique different definitions of hypercapnic hypersensitivity. Several definitions - panic attack rate, panic symptoms including dyspnea, subjective anxiety, and respiratory disturbance - are explored. The review concludes that although no ideal definition has emerged, marked anxiety post-hypercapnia has substantial support as a putative trait marker of PD. The term "subjective hypersensitivity" (Coryell et al., 2001) is re-introduced to denote pronounced anxiety post-hypercapnia and recommended for use along with its previous definition: increased self-reported anxiety measured on a continuous visual analog scale, already widely in use. Due to the well-established link between panic and respiration, definitional candidates focusing on aberrant respiratory response - less investigated as trait markers of PD in high risk studies - warrant scrutiny as well. Several reasons why definitional clarity might be beneficial are presented, along with ideas for future research.

  8. Power toothbrushes, gender, and dentin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hefti, A F; Stone, C

    2000-06-01

    Power toothbrushes require less force for plaque removal than manual brushes. In addition, in vitro studies have indicated that brushing with low force could occlude patent dentin tubules by formation of a smear layer. Hence, lessening the force necessary to remove plaque may reduce dentin hypersensitivity. However, it was recently suggested that the use of an oscillating/rotating power toothbrush could decrease tooth sensitivity as compared to a sonic power toothbrush. Therefore, the objective of the present research was to compare the effect on dentin hypersensitivity of two different types of power brushes, the Optiva Sonicare and the Braun Oral B Ultra Plaque Remover. The null hypothesis was tested in an 8-week, randomized, parallel group, examiner-blind clinical trial. Fifty-nine subjects with a history of dentin hypersensitivity participated. Dentin hypersensitivity-associated pain was elicited using tactile and evaporative stimuli and assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS) instrument. Clinical examinations were carried out at screening and baseline and repeated after 8 weeks of twice daily use of the power brushes. Data analysis was performed on VAS scores obtained at the final visit following adjustment for group differences at baseline. A 35% to 40% reduction in pain as compared to baseline was observed in both treatment groups. Treatment-related differences were not statistically significant. A gender-related effect on dentin hypersensitivity was observed using the tactile stimulus and may merit further investigation.

  9. Unimolecular diffusion-mediated reactions with a nonrandom time-modulated absorbing barrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashford, D.; Weaver, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    A diffusion-reaction model with time-dependent reactivity is formulated and applied to unimolecular reactions. The model is solved exactly numerically and approximately analytically for the unreacted fraction as a function of time. It is shown that the approximate analytical solution is valid even when the system is far from equilibrium, and when the reactivity probability is more complicated than a square-wave function of time. A discussion is also given of an approach to problems of this type using a stochastically fluctuating reactivity, and the first-passage time for a particular example is derived.

  10. Boron-mediated sequential alkyne insertion and C-C coupling reactions affording extended π-conjugated molecules.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Naoki; Muranaka, Sho; Shigeno, Naoki; Sugiyama, Haruka; Takenouchi, Kumiko; Hajjaj, Fatin; Fukushima, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    C-C bond coupling reactions illustrate the wealth of organic transformations, which are usually mediated by organotransition metal complexes. Here, we show that a borafluorene with a B-Cl moiety can mediate sequential alkyne insertion (1,2-carboboration) and deborylation/Csp(2)-Csp(2) coupling reactions, leading to aromatic molecules. The first step, which affords a borepin derivative, proceeds very efficiently between the borafluorene and various alkynes by simply mixing these two components. The second step is triggered by a one-electron oxidation of the borepin derivative, which results in the formation of a phenanthrene framework. When an excess amount of oxidant is used in the second step, the phenanthrene derivatives can be further transformed in situ to afford dibenzo[g,p]chrysene derivatives. The results presented herein will substantially expand the understanding of main group chemistry and provide a powerful synthetic tool for the construction of a wide variety of extended π-conjugated systems. PMID:27581519

  11. Ex Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Selected Medicinal Plants against Fenton Reaction-Mediated Oxidation of Biological Lipid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha; Urooj, Asna

    2015-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidation is often linked to various degenerative diseases. Biological substrates with lipids as major components are susceptible to oxygen-derived lipid peroxidation due to their composition. Lipid peroxide products act as biomarkers in evaluating the antioxidant potential of various plants and functional foods. The study focused on evaluation of the antioxidant potential of two extracts (methanol and 80% methanol) of four medicinal plants, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, against Fenton reaction-mediated oxidation of three biological lipid substrates; cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain homogenate. The antioxidant activity of the extracts was measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method. Also, the correlation between the polyphenol, flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity in biological substrates was analyzed. Results indicated highest antioxidant potential by 80% methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (97.55%), methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata (72.15%), and methanol extract of Canthium parviflorum (49.55%) in cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, and brain, respectively. The polyphenol and flavonoid contents of methanol extract of Andrographis paniculata in cholesterol (r = 0.816) and low-density lipoprotein (r = 0.948) and Costus speciosus in brain (r = 0.977, polyphenols, and r = 0.949, flavonoids) correlated well with the antioxidant activity. The findings prove the antioxidant potential of the selected medicinal plants against Fenton reaction in biological lipid substrates. PMID:26933511

  12. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  13. Boron-mediated sequential alkyne insertion and C–C coupling reactions affording extended π-conjugated molecules

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Naoki; Muranaka, Sho; Shigeno, Naoki; Sugiyama, Haruka; Takenouchi, Kumiko; Hajjaj, Fatin; Fukushima, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    C–C bond coupling reactions illustrate the wealth of organic transformations, which are usually mediated by organotransition metal complexes. Here, we show that a borafluorene with a B–Cl moiety can mediate sequential alkyne insertion (1,2-carboboration) and deborylation/Csp2–Csp2 coupling reactions, leading to aromatic molecules. The first step, which affords a borepin derivative, proceeds very efficiently between the borafluorene and various alkynes by simply mixing these two components. The second step is triggered by a one-electron oxidation of the borepin derivative, which results in the formation of a phenanthrene framework. When an excess amount of oxidant is used in the second step, the phenanthrene derivatives can be further transformed in situ to afford dibenzo[g,p]chrysene derivatives. The results presented herein will substantially expand the understanding of main group chemistry and provide a powerful synthetic tool for the construction of a wide variety of extended π-conjugated systems. PMID:27581519

  14. Nickel hypersensitivity and orthodontic treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Gölz, Lina; Papageorgiou, Spyridon N; Jäger, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Nickel-containing alloys are widely used in orthodontic appliances, even though nickel is by far the most common contact allergen. However, the scientific evidence concerning allergic reactions to nickel in orthodontic patients has not been evaluated systematically. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the prevalence of nickel hypersensitivity is affected by orthodontic treatment. Unrestricted electronic and manual searches were performed until July 2013 for human clinical studies assessing orthodontic treatment and nickel hypersensitivity. Methodological limitations were evaluated with the Downs and Black tool. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from random-effects meta-analyses, followed by subgroup and sensitivity analyses. Thirty studies were included in the review, and 24 datasets with 10 184 patients in the meta-analyses. Orthodontic treatment had no significant effect on nickel hypersensitivity (n = 11; crude OR 0.99; 95%CI: 0.78-1.25; p = 0.914). However, when confounding from factors such as sex and piercings was taken into account, orthodontic treatment was associated with a lower risk of hypersensitivity (n = 1; adjusted OR 0.60; 95%CI: 0.40-0.80; p < 0.001). This was even more pronounced when orthodontic treatment was performed prior to piercing (n = 7; crude OR 0.35; 95%CI: 0.24-0.50; p < 0.001). Orthodontic treatment seems to have a protective role against nickel hypersensitivity, especially when it precedes piercings.

  15. A case of chlorpheniramine maleate-induced hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Sang-Min; Lee, So-Hee; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Antihistamines are commonly used to treat allergic disease, such as allergic rhinitis, urticaria, and angioedema. Although several previous reports describe hypersensitivity to antihistamines such as cetirizine and hydroxyzine, documented cases of chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity are extremely rare. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old Korean woman who presented with urticaria after ingesting a cold medication. Over the previous 5 years, she had also experienced a food allergy to crab and shrimp, allergic rhinitis, and repeated urticaria after ingesting cold medication. Provocation with aspirin elicited generalized urticaria. Intravenous chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone was injected for symptom control, but in fact appeared to aggravate urticaria. A second round of skin and provocation tests for chlorpheniramine and methylprednisolone showed positive results only for chlorpheniramine. She was diagnosed with aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine hypersensitivity, and was instructed to avoid these drugs. To date, this is the second of only two cases of chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity with aspirin intolerance. Although the relationship between aspirin intolerance and chlorpheniramine-induced type I hypersensitivity is unclear, physicians should be aware of the possibility of urticaria or other allergic reactions in response to antihistamines.

  16. Mosla punctulata Inhibits Mast Cell-mediated Allergic Reactions Through the Inhibition of Histamine Release and Inflammatory Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Je, I. G.; Shin, T. Y.; Kim, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic inflammatory diseases such as food allergy, asthma, sinusitis and atopic dermatitis are increasing worldwide. This study examined the effects of aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic and immunoglobulin E-mediated local anaphylaxis and it also reduced intracellular calcium level and down-streamed histamine release from mast cells. In addition, aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata decreased gene expression and secretion of tumour necrosis factor alpha, an important proinflammatory cytokine, in mast cells. The inhibitory effect on tumour necrosis factor alpha expression was nuclear factor kappa B dependent. The results indicate that aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata inhibited mast cell-mediated allergic inflammatory reaction by suppressing histamine release and expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha, and involvement of calcium and nuclear factor kappa B in these effects. Hence it can be concluded that, the aqueous extract of Mosla punctulata might be a possible therapeutic candidate for allergic inflammatory disorders. PMID:24591741

  17. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented.

  18. Hypersensitivity and vaccines: an update.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Deschildre, Antoine; Waton, Julie; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Tréchot, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Allergic reactions to vaccines can be classified as sensitivity to one of the vaccine components, pseudo-allergic reactions, often after hyperimmunization, and exacerbation of atopic symptoms or vasculitis. Pseudo-allergic reactions, some possibly due to hyperimmunization, are probably more common than true allergies. Atopic reactions should not be confused with the "flash" phenomenon, defined as an exacerbation of an allergic reaction due to a reduction in the allergic reactivity threshold following the vaccine injection. BCGitis occurs frequently, and for this reason, guidelines for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) have been modified. The vaccine is now reserved for people at risk of exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review provides an update on the vaccination modalities for people allergic to eggs, on the assessment that should be performed when a reaction occurs due to tetanus vaccination, on the urticaria after hepatitis vaccination, on an aluminum granuloma, which is more and more frequent in young children, and vasculitis after flu vaccination and BCGitis. The side effects associated with new, recently released vaccines, such as anti-influenza A H1N1 or anti-human papilloma virus (HPV) will also be presented. PMID:23238161

  19. Isolation, identification, and characterization of clones encoding antigens responsible for peanut hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burks, A W; Cockrell, G; Stanley, J S; Helm, R M; Bannon, G A

    1995-01-01

    Peanut allergy is a significant health problem because of the frequency, the potential severity, and the chronicity of the allergic sensitivity. Serum IgE from patients with documented peanut hypersensitivity reactions and a peanut cDNA expression library were used to identify clones that encode peanut allergens. One of the major peanut allergens, Ara h I, was selected from these clones using Ara h I-specific oligonucleotides and polymerase chain reaction technology. The Ara h I clone identified a 2.3-kb mRNA species on a Northern blot containing peanut poly A+RNA. DNA sequence analysis of the cloned inserts revealed that the Ara h I allergen has significant homology with the vicilin seed storage protein family found in most higher plants. The isolation of the Ara h I clones allowed the synthesis of this protein in Escherichia coli cells and subsequent recognition of this recombinant protein in immunoblot analysis using serum IgE from patients with peanut hypersensitivity. With the production of the recombinant peanut protein it will now be possible to address the pathophysiologic and immunologic mechanisms regarding peanut hypersensitivity reactions specifically and food hypersensitivity in general.

  20. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides.

  1. Total Synthesis of the Antimicrotubule Agent (+)-Discodermolide Using Boron-Mediated Aldol Reactions of Chiral Ketones.

    PubMed

    Paterson; Florence; Gerlach; Scott

    2000-01-01

    With a similar mechanism of action to taxol, the title compound 1 is a particularly promising candidate for development in cancer chemotherapy. This efficient synthesis, based on stereocontrolled aldol reactions, should help to overcome the scarce natural supply of 1 from the rare sponge source.

  2. Glucocorticoid hypersensitivity syndrome--a case report.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Okopien, B

    2012-11-01

    Glucocorticoid hypersensitivity syndrome has been reported to date only in several patients. This article describes a unique case of this syndrome in a 24-year old female admitted to hospital because of arterial hypertension and obesity. Although her clinical picture suggested Cushing's syndrome, she had low adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels with a poor response to corticotrophin-releasing hormone and Synacthen. In turn, an overnight dexamethasone suppression test with 0.25 mg of dexamethasone led to a dramatic decrease in morning cortisol. A diagnosis of glucocorticoid hypersensitivity was made and the patient started treatment with ketoconazole and cabergoline, which resulted in some clinical improvement. This case illustrates the need for clinical awareness of glucocorticoid hypersensitivity in patients suspected of Cushing's syndrome.

  3. CD8+ T cell migration to the skin requires CD4+ help in a murine model of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in contact hypersensitivity responses have not been fully solved, and remain an important question. Using an adoptive transfer model, we investigated the role of the respective T cell subset. Magnetic bead separated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from oxazolone sensitized C57BL/6 mice were transferred into RAG-/- mice, followed by hapten challenge and analysis of inflammatory parameters at 24 hours post exposure. The CD4+ T cell recipient mice developed partial contact hypersensitivity responses to oxazolone. CD8+ T cells caused significant amplification of the response in recipients of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells including ear swelling, type 1 inflammatory mediators, and cell killing. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were not sufficient to mediate contact hypersensitivity, although abundantly present in the lymph nodes in the CD8+ T cell reconstituted mice. There were no signs of inflammation at the site of hapten exposure, indicating impaired recruitment of CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells. These data show that CD4+ T cells mediate contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone, but CD8+ T cells contribute with the most potent effector mechanisms. Moreover, our results suggest that CD4+ T cell function is required for the mobilization of CD8+ effector T cells to the site of hapten exposure. The results shed new light on the relative importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the effector phase of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:22916101

  4. The involvement of immune reactions in cardiac damage during acute myocardial infarction: role of cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, M; Vasiljevic, Z; Vuckovic-Dekic, L; Spasic, S

    1997-06-01

    This study was undertaken with the aim of investigating humoral and cell-mediated immune response in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as possible mechanisms involved in the infarction enlargement. Twenty three patients with first AMI and 15 healthy volunteers were examined. Of the AMI patients, 14 had extensive infarction (group A), while 9 patients had small infarction (group B). Immunologic analyses were performed at admission, and repeated after 3, 7, 14 and 21 days of the acute event. Following parameters were tested: number of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD20+ cells; serum IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels; polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, metabolic activity); leukocyte migration in vitro in the presence of water-soluble homologous heart extract. It was demonstrated that the number of B cells, serum IgG, C3, immune complex and anticardiac antibody levels were elevated from 7th-14th days after AMI. Concerning these parameters, however, no significant differences were obtained between group A and group B of AMI patients. Chemotaxis and metabolic activity of peripheral blood PMN, but not phagocytosis, were enhanced during AMI, again changes of PMN did not correlate with the extension of infarction. In contrast, leukocyte migration inhibition in vitro revealed that only patients with extensive AMI have developed positive reaction during the first 14 days after the onset of the disease, while leukocyte inhibition reaction appeared in patients with nonextensive AMI not earlier than the 21st day after the infarction. These findings demonstrate generation of immune reactivity during AMI and indicate that humoral immune response seems more likely to be an epiphenomenon related to tissue necrosis, while cell-mediated immune reactions could influence the extensiveness of cardiac damage.

  5. Inhibitory effects of BiRyuChe-bang on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Moon, Phil-Dong; Choi, Il Sang; Go, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Byong-Joo; Kang, Sang Woo; Yoon, Sunhee; Han, Seung-Jun; Nam, Sun-Young; Oh, Hyun-A; Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Young-Sick; Kim, Ju-Sung; Kim, Myong-Jo; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2013-01-01

    BiRyuChe-bang (BRC) is a Korean prescription medicine, which has been used to treat allergic rhinitis at Kyung Hee Medical Center. In this work, we investigated the effects of BRC on mast cell-mediated allergic reactions and inflammatory cytokines production, and identified the active component of BRC. Histamine release was measured from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). Ear swelling and passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) were examined in mouse models. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used for the expressions of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was analyzed by Western blotting. BRC significantly inhibited the compound 48/80-induced ear swelling response, histamine release from RPMCs, PCA activated by anti-dinitrophenyl IgE, and PMA plus A23187-induced inflammatory cytokines production (p < 0.05). In addition, BRC dose-dependently inhibited the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 as well as the activation of NF-κB in a human mast cell line, HMC-1 cells. BRC inhibited the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in mice induced with PCA. Several components of BRC, such as 1,8-Cineole, Linalool, Linalyl acetate, α-Pinene, and α-Terpineol, significantly inhibited the release of histamine from RPMCs (p < 0.05). Among these components, Linalyl acetate was the most effective for inhibiting histamine release. These results indicate that BRC has a potential regulatory effect on allergic and inflammatory reactions mediated by mast cells.

  6. Clinical food hypersensitivity: the relevance of duodenal immunoglobulin E-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, C; Romanini, E; Caruana, P; Street, M E; de' Angelis, G

    1998-10-01

    Owing to poor reliability of laboratory tests, diagnosis of food allergy is based on clinical response to double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of duodenal IgE-positive cells in the diagnosis of food allergy. Thirty-one children with a history of possible food allergy underwent duodenal biopsies, skin prick tests, and measurement of serum IgE antibodies, and were put on an elimination diet followed by food challenge. Open food challenges were performed in patients under 12 mo of age, and double-blind placebo-controlled challenges were for suspected foods. On the basis of clinical food hypersensitivity, patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 13 children with food allergy. Thirteen of 20 positive provocations elicited reactions within 12 h from the end of the challenge, seven later. Group 2 was the control group and included 18 patients with negative food challenges. The number of IgE-positive cells in biopsy specimens was significantly more elevated in group 1 with respect to group 2 (153.24 +/- 83.13 versus 18.4 +/- 18.9; p < 0.01). Total serum IgE levels were elevated compared with that of the control group (p < 0.01) and correlated with the number of IgE-positive cells (p < 0.001, r = 0.62). Enhanced IgE-containing cells were found in all delayed reactors, but about one-third had negative skin prick tests or specific serum IgE antibodies to the offending foods. Our results showed that systemic reactions to foods are associated with an IgE-mediated response in the duodenal mucosa. Larger studies would be required to assess the predictive value of an increased number of IgE-positive cells in the diagnosis of allergy to food, especially in children with delayed reactions.

  7. Basophil activation by mosquito extracts in patients with hypersensitivity to mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Yasuhisa; Wada, Taizo; Muraoka, Masahiro; Matsuda, Yusuke; Toma, Tomoko; Yachie, Akihiro

    2015-08-01

    Hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB) is a cutaneous disorder belonging to the group of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated T/natural killer (NK)-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, and is primarily mediated by EBV-infected NK cells. It is characterized by intense local skin reactions accompanied by general symptoms after mosquito bites, and infiltration of EBV-infected NK cells into the bite sites. However, the mechanisms underlying these reactions have not been fully examined. We recently described the activation of circulating basophils by mosquito extracts in vitro in a patient with HMB. To further investigate this finding, we studied four additional patients with HMB. All patients showed typical clinical features of HMB after mosquito bites and they had NK lymphocytosis and high peripheral blood EBV DNA loads. We found evidence of EBV infection in NK cells through in situ hybridization that detected EBV-encoded small RNA-1, and flow cytometry showed HLA-DR expression on almost all NK cells. Basophil activation tests with the extracts of epidemic mosquitoes Culex pipiens pallens and Aedes albopictus showed positive responses to one or both extracts in all samples from patients with HMB, suggesting the presence of mosquito antigen-specific IgE and its binding to basophils. In particular, the extract of Aedes albopictus was able to activate basophils in all available patient samples. These results indicate that basophils and/or mast cells activated by mosquito bites may be involved in initiation and development of severe skin reactions to mosquito bites in HMB.

  8. Sexual reactions in Mortierellales are mediated by the trisporic acid system.

    PubMed

    Schimek, Christine; Kleppe, Kathrin; Saleem, Abdel-Rahman; Voigt, Kerstin; Burmester, Anke; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2003-06-01

    Several species of Mortierella (Mortierellales, Zygomycota) were examined for substances regulating their sexual reactions. Compounds isolated from both mated and single growing Mortierella strains were purified by thin layer chromatography. Some of these compounds showed UV absorbance-characteristics similar to those of trisporoids, a group of compounds involved in sexual regulation in Mucorales. A compound with a 4-dihydromethyltrisporate-like absorbance spectrum was detected. To test for the interspecific sexual responses typically induced by trisporoids, the compounds extracted from Mortierella spp. were tested against the Mucorales Mucor mucedo and Phycomyces blakesleeanus and were found to induce sexual reactions in both tester strains. A gene encoding 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase was identified in several Mortierella species and the activity of the gene product was shown using a histochemical assay. We suggest that the regulation of sexual processes by trisporoids is common to both Mucorales and Mortierellales and may be more widespread within the Zygomycota.

  9. Promotion of a Ti-Mediated Mannich Reaction by a Proton Source.

    PubMed

    Limanto, John; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Reamer, Robert A; Tan, Lushi; Brunskill, Andrew; Reibarkh, Mikhail

    2016-01-15

    Low temperature NMR studies revealed that a diastereoselective Mannich reaction between a phenyl oxazolidone-derived titanium enolate and an aromatic aldimine was found to occur only after introduction of a proton source. While various protic additives could be used to promote the transformation, the best results were obtained using AcOH to afford the corresponding Mannich products in high diastereoselectivities and yields. PMID:26656787

  10. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides. PMID:22423599

  11. Oxidative degradation of nalidixic acid by nano-magnetite via Fe2+/O2-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Ardo, Sandy G; Nélieu, Sylvie; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Delarue, Ghislaine; Brest, Jessica; Pironin, Elsa; Morin, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    Organic pollution has become a critical issue worldwide due to the increasing input and persistence of organic compounds in the environment. Iron minerals are potentially able to degrade efficiently organic pollutants sorbed to their surfaces via oxidative or reductive transformation processes. Here, we explored the oxidative capacity of nano-magnetite (Fe3O4) having ∼ 12 nm particle size, to promote heterogeneous Fenton-like reactions for the removal of nalidixic acid (NAL), a recalcitrant quinolone antibacterial agent. Results show that NAL was adsorbed at the surface of magnetite and was efficiently degraded under oxic conditions. Nearly 60% of this organic contaminant was eliminated after 30 min exposure to air bubbling in solution in the presence of an excess of nano-magnetite. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed a partial oxidation of magnetite to maghemite during the reaction, and four byproducts of NAL were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (UHPLC-MS/MS). We also provide evidence that hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) were involved in the oxidative degradation of NAL, as indicated by the quenching of the degradation reaction in the presence of ethanol. This study points out the promising potentialities of mixed valence iron oxides for the treatment of soils and wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  12. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S; McMurray, Timothy P; Gebhart, G F

    2012-10-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15-60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14-28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14-28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs.

  13. Altered colorectal afferent function associated with TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice

    PubMed Central

    La, Jun-Ho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Schwartz, Erica S.; McMurray, Timothy P.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation of the distal bowel is often associated with abdominal pain and hypersensitivity, but whether and which colorectal afferents contribute to the hypersensitivity is unknown. Using a mouse model of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, we investigated colorectal hypersensitivity following intracolonic TNBS and associated changes in colorectum and afferent functions. C57BL/6 mice were treated intracolonically with TNBS or saline. Visceromotor responses to colorectal distension (15–60 mmHg) were recorded over 8 wk in TNBS- and saline-treated (control) mice. In other mice treated with TNBS or saline, colorectal inflammation was assessed by myeloperoxidase assay and immunohistological staining. In vitro single-fiber recordings were conducted on both TNBS and saline-treated mice to assess colorectal afferent function. Mice exhibited significant colorectal hypersensitivity through day 14 after TNBS treatment that resolved by day 28 with no resensitization through day 56. TNBS induced a neutrophil- and macrophage-based colorectal inflammation as well as loss of nerve fibers, all of which resolved by days 14–28. Single-fiber recordings revealed a net increase in afferent drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents at day 14 post-TNBS and reduced proportions of mechanically insensitive afferents (MIAs) at days 14–28. Intracolonic TNBS-induced colorectal inflammation was associated with the development and recovery of hypersensitivity in mice, which correlated with a transient increase and recovery of sensitization of stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and MIAs. These results indicate that the development and maintenance of colorectal hypersensitivity following inflammation are mediated by peripheral drive from stretch-sensitive colorectal afferents and a potential contribution from MIAs. PMID:22859364

  14. Metal-mediated reaction modeled on nature: the activation of isothiocyanates initiated by zinc thiolate complexes.

    PubMed

    Eger, Wilhelm A; Presselt, Martin; Jahn, Burkhard O; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Anders, Ernst

    2011-04-18

    On the basis of detailed theoretical studies of the mode of action of carbonic anhydrase (CA) and models resembling only its reactive core, a complete computational pathway analysis of the reaction between several isothiocyanates and methyl mercaptan activated by a thiolate-bearing model complex [Zn(NH(3))(3)SMe](+) was performed at a high level of density functional theory (DFT). Furthermore, model reactions have been studied in the experiment using relatively stable zinc complexes and have been investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy. The model complexes used in the experiment are based upon the well-known azamacrocyclic ligand family ([12]aneN(4), [14]aneN(4), i-[14]aneN(4), and [15]aneN(4)) and are commonly formulated as ([Zn([X]aneN(4))(SBn)]ClO(4). As predicted by our DFT calculations, all of these complexes are capable of insertion into the heterocumulene system. Raman spectroscopic investigations indicate that aryl-substituted isothiocyanates predominantly add to the C═N bond and that the size of the ring-shaped ligands of the zinc complex also has a very significant influence on the selectivity and on the reactivity as well. Unfortunately, the activated isothiocyanate is not able to add to the thiolate-corresponding mercaptan to invoke a CA analogous catalytic cycle. However, more reactive compounds such as methyl iodide can be incorporated. This work gives new insight into the mode of action and reaction path variants derived from the CA principles. Further, aspects of the reliability of DFT calculations concerning the prediction of the selectivity and reactivity are discussed. In addition, the presented synthetic pathways can offer a completely new access to a variety of dithiocarbamates. PMID:21405064

  15. "Click" reaction mediated synthesis of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone derivatives and evaluation of their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Pavan Kumar, Ch; Devi, A; Ashok Yadav, P; Rao Vadaparthi, R; Shankaraiah, G; Sowjanya, P; Jain, Nishant; Suresh Babu, K

    2016-11-01

    As part of pharmacological-phytochemical integrated studies on medicinal plants from Indian flora, costunolide (1) and dehydrocostus lactone (2), were isolated as major phytochemicals from Saussurea lappa, a plant traditionally used in different Asian systems of medicine. A series of 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles conjugates were synthesized through diastereo selective Michael addition followed by regioselective Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions. All these triazolyl derivatives (5a-5j) & (7a-7j) were well characterized using modern spectroscopic techniques and evaluated for their anticancer activity against a panel of five human cancerous celllines. The results indicated that all the analogs displayed moderate cytotoxic activity.

  16. Phase Entrainment of Human Delta Oscillations Can Mediate the Effects of Expectation on Reaction Speed

    PubMed Central

    Stefanics, Gábor; Hangya, Balázs; Hernádi, István; Winkler, István; Lakatos, Péter; Ulbert, István

    2015-01-01

    The more we anticipate a response to a predictable stimulus, the faster we react. This empirical observation has been confirmed and quantified by many investigators suggesting that the processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli is facilitated by probability-based confidence of anticipation. However, the exact neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here we show that performance changes related to different levels of expectancy originate in dynamic modulation of delta oscillation phase. Our results obtained in rhythmic auditory target detection tasks indicated significant entrainment of the EEG delta rhythm to the onset of the target tones with increasing phase synchronization at higher levels of predictability. Reaction times correlated with the phase of the delta band oscillation at target onset. The fastest reactions occurred during the delta phase that most commonly coincided with the target event in the high expectancy conditions. These results suggest that low-frequency oscillations play a functional role in human anticipatory mechanisms, presumably by modulating synchronized rhythmic fluctuations in the excitability of large neuronal populations and by facilitating efficient task-related neuronal communication among brain areas responsible for sensory processing and response execution. PMID:20943899

  17. Structure-Based Mechanism for Early PLP-Mediated Steps of Rabbit Cytosolic Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Di Salvo, Martino L.; Scarsdale, J. Neel; Kazanina, Galina; Contestabile, Roberto; Schirch, Verne; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-01-01

    Serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzes the reversible interconversion of L-serine and glycine with transfer of one-carbon groups to and from tetrahydrofolate. Active site residue Thr254 is known to be involved in the transaldimination reaction, a crucial step in the catalytic mechanism of all pyridoxal 5′-phosphate- (PLP-) dependent enzymes, which determines binding of substrates and release of products. In order to better understand the role of Thr254, we have expressed, characterized, and determined the crystal structures of rabbit cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase T254A and T254C mutant forms, in the absence and presence of substrates. These mutants accumulate a kinetically stable gem-diamine intermediate, and their crystal structures show differences in the active site with respect to wild type. The kinetic and crystallographic data acquired with mutant enzymes permit us to infer that conversion of gem-diamine to external aldimine is significantly slowed because intermediates are trapped into an anomalous position by a misorientation of the PLP ring, and a new energy barrier hampers the transaldimination reaction. This barrier likely arises from the loss of the stabilizing hydrogen bond between the hydroxymethyl group of Thr254 and the ε-amino group of active site Lys257, which stabilizes the external aldimine intermediate in wild type SHMTs. PMID:23956983

  18. Pathogen detection in milk samples by ligation detection reaction-mediated universal array method.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Pisoni, G; Severgnini, M; Consolandi, C; Moroni, P; Raschetti, M; Castiglioni, B

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a new DNA chip, based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array, developed to detect and analyze, directly from milk samples, microbial pathogens known to cause bovine, ovine, and caprine mastitis or to be responsible for foodborne intoxication or infection, or both. Probes were designed for the identification of 15 different bacterial groups: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, nonaureus staphylococci, Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus parauberis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma spp., Salmonella spp., Bacillus spp., Campylobacter spp., and Escherichia coli and related species. These groups were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene. For microarray validation, 22 strains from the American Type Culture Collection or other culture collections and 50 milk samples were tested. The results demonstrated high specificity, with sensitivity as low as 6 fmol. Moreover, the ligation detection reaction-universal array assay allowed for the identification of Mycoplasma spp. in a few hours, avoiding the long incubation times of traditional microbiological identification methods. The universal array described here is a versatile tool able to identify milk pathogens efficiently and rapidly. PMID:19528580

  19. Hypersensitivities to sesame and other common edible seeds.

    PubMed

    Patel, A; Bahna, S L

    2016-10-01

    Several seeds have been increasingly incorporated in various food items, with consequent risk of hypersensitivity reactions that are often severe. Identification of the specific seed as the culprit is often not explored or is difficult to verify. In this article, we reviewed the English literature from January 1930 to March 2016 using PubMed and Google Scholar searching for publications relevant to hypersensitivity to common edible seeds, namely sesame, sunflower seed, poppy seed, pumpkin seed, flaxseed, and mustard seed. Considering the worldwide consumption of those seeds, the number of published articles on the subject was relatively small and was mainly as case reports rather than large series. Allergy to sesame was more reported than to other seeds, with an estimated prevalence of 0.1-0.2%. In this review, we summarize the information relevant to each of the six seeds and their oils regarding the manifestations, routes of exposure, identified major allergens, and cross-reactivity with other seeds or other foods. We also addressed the important role of a thorough history taking in suspecting seed allergy, the limited reliability of routine diagnostic procedures, and the importance of verification by appropriate challenge tests. At present, management is basically dietary avoidance and the use of symptomatic medications that may include epinephrine auto-injectors. We did not encounter any well-designed studies on immunotherapy for seed allergy, but it is hoped that such a gap be filled by the development of safe effective protocols in the near future. PMID:27332789

  20. The efficacy of single premedication with antihistamines for radiocontrast media hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Hee; Park, Heung-Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    Background Single premedication with antihistamines for radiocontrast media (RCM) hypersensitivity is frequently used in real world at the emergent situation although its efficacy is not proven. Objective To evaluate the effect of intravenous antihistamines as a premedication in general population who had experience of mild adverse reactions to iodinated RCM. Methods A retrospective observational study on 14,785 subjects who had RCM-enhanced computed tomography scans between January 2014 and December 2015 in Seoul National University Hospital Gangnam Healthcare Center, Seoul, South Korea. Results Among 453 subjects who had a history of mild RCM-induced hypersensitivity reactions, 273 subjects had a single premedication of intravenous antihistamine. When comparing antihistamine-premedication group and nonpremedication group, there is no protective effect of antihistamines on the incidence rate and severity of hypersensitivity (10.6% vs. 11.7%, p = 0.729). Conclusion The clinical efficacy of a single premedication of antihistamines for mild RCM-induced hypersensitivity was not confirmed. PMID:27489788

  1. Beyond the black box: drug- and device-associated hypersensitivity events

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L; Adegboro, Olatokunbo S; Calhoun, Elizabeth A; Raisch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Background: Drug- and device-associated hypersensitivity reactions are serious toxicities that can result in respiratory failure or acute cardiac ischemic events, or even severe hypersensitivity syndromes such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome. These toxicities are usually poorly described in the “black box” warnings section of the product labels. Methods: Adverse event reports contained in databases maintained by the Project on Medical Research on Adverse Drug Events and Reports (Med-RADAR), product labels, safety advisories disseminated by pharmaceutical manufacturers, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were reviewed. Results: Adverse event reports identified three health care workers who developed nevirapine-associated Stevens–Johnson syndrome following occupational exposure to HIV-infected blood or blood products; four persons with localized hypersensitivity and fatal cardiac events associated with rapamycin- or paclitaxel-coated coronary artery stent placements; and six persons with breast cancer who developed severe or fatal anaphylaxis after receiving adjuvant chemotherapy with Cremophor-EL containing paclitaxel. Safety advisories from the FDA, CDC, and the relevant pharmaceutical manufacturers were ambiguous in their description in “black box” warning sections of package inserts describing these serious and potentially fatal toxicities. Conclusion: Improvements are needed in pharmacovigilance and subsequent dissemination of safety advisories for drug/device-associated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:21701613

  2. Severe Hyperacusis, Photophobia, and Skin Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fioretti, Alessandra Barbara; Varakliotis, Theodoros; Poli, Otello; Cantagallo, Manuela; Eibenstein, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with severe hyperacusis, photophobia, and skin hypersensitivity. The patient was initially treated with sound therapy and medical therapy for 4 months and successfully with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and cognitive behavioral therapy which improved her mood and the tolerance for sounds and light. PMID:26981300

  3. Hydrocodone snorting leading to hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Lakshmi Kant; Vijayaraghavan, Vimala

    2016-07-01

    We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by intranasal abuse of the prescription narcotic hydrocodone. The patient's clinical course was complicated by acute respiratory failure. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral opacities. The patient was treated with noninvasive ventilation, a high dose of intravenous steroids, and bronchodilators, resulting in improvement of symptoms and radiographic appearance. PMID:27365873

  4. Hydrocodone snorting leading to hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Vimala

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by intranasal abuse of the prescription narcotic hydrocodone. The patient's clinical course was complicated by acute respiratory failure. A chest radiograph showed diffuse bilateral opacities. The patient was treated with noninvasive ventilation, a high dose of intravenous steroids, and bronchodilators, resulting in improvement of symptoms and radiographic appearance. PMID:27365873

  5. Transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence induced by gradient effects in a reaction-diffusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Qi; Hu, Bambi; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2003-09-01

    The transition from spiral waves to defect-mediated turbulence was studied in a spatial open reactor using Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The experimental results show a new mechanism of the transition from spirals to spatiotemporal chaos, in which the gradient effects in the three-dimensional system are essential. The transition scenario consists of two stages: first, the effects of gradients in the third dimension cause a splitting of the spiral tip and a deletion of certain wave segments, generating new wave sources; second, the waves sent by the new wave sources undergo a backfire instability, and the back waves are laterally unstable. As a result, defects are automatically generated and fill all over the system. The result of numerical simulation using the FitzHugh-Nagumo model essentially agrees with the experimental observation.

  6. Cell-mediated immune responses in owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) with trachoma to soluble antigens of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, D L; Todd, W J; Macdonald, A B

    1978-01-01

    The first temporal study of the cell-mediated immune responses (CMI) following ocular infections with Chlamydia trachomatis is presented. We examined the CMI of owl monkeys infected with trachoma to soluble antigens of C. trachomatis by leucocyte migration inhibition (LIF) and delayed hypersensitivity skin testing. Delayed hypersensitivity of a systemic nature developed after a local eye infection in owl monkeys; clearance of inclusions from conjunctival cells coincided with the onset of this response. The association of eye secretion and circulating antibodies with recovery from primary infection was not so striking. Both cellular and humoral immune responses persisted for at least 2 months, at which time all test animals were completely resistant to re-infection. The elicitation of cell-mediated immune reactions with solubilized chlamydial antigens may permit the isolation of specific antigens involved in the generation of protective immunity in the owl monkey model. PMID:101327

  7. Radiation-induced lung injury: a hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, P.G.; Bryant, D.H.; Morgan, G.W.; Yeates, M.; Fernandez, V.; Penny, R.; Breit, S.N.

    1988-08-15

    Radiation pneumonitis occurs 6 to 12 weeks after thoracic irradiation, and is thought to be due to direct radiation-induced lung injury. Four patients who developed pneumonitis after unilateral thoracic irradiation for carcinoma of the breast were studied with bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium scan of the lung, and respiratory function tests. On the irradiated side of the chest, all four patients showed an increase in total cells recovered from the lavage fluid and a marked increase in the percentage of lymphocytes. When results for the unirradiated lung were compared with results for the irradiated lung, there was a comparable increase in total cells and percentage of lymphocytes. Gallium scans showed increases for both irradiated and unirradiated lungs. Prompt improvement was seen after corticosteroid therapy in all patients. The fact that abnormal findings occur equally in irradiated and unirradiated lung is inconsistent with simple direct radiation-induced injury and suggests an immunologically mediated mechanism such as a hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

  8. Prevalence of latex hypersensitivity among health care workers in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Shahnaz, M; Azizah, M R; Hasma, H; Mok, K L; Yip, E; Ganesapillai, T; Suraiya, H; Nasuruddin, B A

    1999-03-01

    Health care workers have been reported to constitute one of the few high-risk groups related to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity associated with the use of latex products. This paper describes the first ever study of prevalence carried out in Malaysia among these workers. One hundred and thirty health care personnel from Hospital Kuala Lumpur were skin tested. Extracts used were prepared from seven different brands of natural rubber latex gloves with varying levels of extractable protein (EPRRIM). Out of the 130 volunteers, 4 (3.1%) had positive skin test to latex with extracts with high levels of EPRRIM (> 0.7 mg/g). The prevalence among the Malaysian health care workers can be considered to be low in comparison to that of some consumer countries as the USA which reported a prevalence of as high as 16.9%.

  9. IREN, a novel EF-hand motif-containing nuclease, functions in the degradation of nuclear DNA during the hypersensitive response cell death in rice.

    PubMed

    Ootsubo, Yuka; Hibino, Takanori; Wakazono, Takahito; Mukai, Yukio; Che, Fang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR), a type of programmed cell death that is accompanied by DNA degradation and loss of plasma membrane integrity, is a common feature of plant immune responses. We previously reported that transcription of IREN which encodes a novel EF-hand containing plant nuclease is controlled by OsNAC4, a key positive regulator of HR cell death. Transient overexpression of IREN in rice protoplasts also led to rapid DNA fragmentation, while suppression of IREN using RNA interference showed remarkable decrease of DNA fragmentation during HR cell death. Maximum DNA degradation associated with the recombinant IREN was observed in the presence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) or Ca(2+) and Mn(2+). Interestingly, DNA degradation mediated by the recombinant IREN was completely abolished by Zn(2+), even when Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Mn(2+) were present in the reaction buffer. These data indicate that IREN functions in the degradation of nuclear DNA during HR cell death.

  10. An amperometric biosensor utilizing a ferrocene-mediated horseradish peroxidase reaction for the determination of capsaicin (chili hotness).

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Rosmawani; Ahmad, Musa; Heng, Lee Yook

    2013-08-05

    Chili hotness is very much dependent on the concentration of capsaicin present in the chili fruit. A new biosensor based on a horseradish peroxidase enzyme-capsaicin reaction mediated by ferrocene has been successfully developed for the amperometric determination of chili hotness. The amperometric biosensor is fabricated based on a single-step immobilization of both ferrocene and horseradish peroxidase in a photocurable hydrogel membrane, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate). With mediation by ferrocene, the biosensor could measure capsaicin concentrations at a potential 0.22 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), which prevented potential interference from other electroactive species in the sample. Thus a good selectivity towards capsaicin was demonstrated. The linear response range of the biosensor towards capsaicin was from 2.5-99.0 µM with detection limit of 1.94 µM. A good relative standard deviation (RSD) for reproducibility of 6.4%-9.9% was obtained. The capsaicin biosensor demonstrated long-term stability for up to seven months. The performance of the biosensor has been validated using a standard method for the analysis of capsaicin based on HPLC.

  11. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Employing Heteropolyacids as Redox Mediators for Oxygen Reduction Reactions: Pt-Free Cathode Systems.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiaki; Morikawa, Eri; Nakada, Shintaro; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-07-20

    In this study, the heteropolyacids of H3+xPVxMO12-xO40 (x = 0, 2, and 3) were applied as redox mediators for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, of which the cathode is free from the usage of noble metals such as Pt/C. In this system, the electrochemical reduction of heteropolyacid over the carbon cathode and the subsequent reoxidation of the partially reduced heteropolyacid by exposure to the dissolved oxygen in the regenerator are important processes for continuous power generation. Thus, the redox properties of catholytes containing these heteropolyacids were investigated in detail. The substitution quantity of V in the heteropolyacid affected the onset reduction potential as well as the reduction current density, resulting in a difference in cell performance. The chemical composition of heteropolyacid also had a significant impact on the reoxidation property. Among the three compounds, H6PV3Mo9O40 was the most suitable redox mediator. Furthermore, the pH of the catholyte was found to be the crucial factor in determining the reoxidation rate of partially reduced heteropolyacid as well as cell performance.

  12. Characterizing the Mechanistic Pathways of the Instant Blood-Mediated Inflammatory Reaction in Xenogeneic Neonatal Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liuwantara, David; Chew, Yi Vee; Favaloro, Emmanuel J.; Hawkes, Joanne M.; Burns, Heather L.; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hawthorne, Wayne J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) causes major loss of islets after transplantation and consequently represents the initial barrier to survival of porcine neonatal islet cell clusters (NICC) after xenotransplantation. Methods This study used novel assays designed to characterize the various immunologic components responsible for xenogeneic IBMIR to identify initiators and investigate processes of IBMIR-associated coagulation, complement activation and neutrophil infiltration. The IBMIR was induced in vitro by exposing NICC to platelet-poor or platelet-rich human plasma or isolated neutrophils. Results We found that xenogeneic IBMIR was characterized by rapid, platelet-independent thrombin generation, with addition of platelets both accelerating and exacerbating this response. Platelet-independent complement activation was observed as early as 30 minutes after NICC exposure to plasma. However, membrane attack complex formation was not observed in NICC histopathology sections until after 60 minutes. We demonstrated for the first time that NICC-mediated complement activation was necessary for neutrophil activation in the xenogeneic IBMIR setting. Finally, using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer, we identified substantial loss of islet function (up to 40%) after IBMIR with surviving NICC showing evidence of mitochondrial damage. Conclusions This study used novel assays to describe multiple key pathways by which xenogeneic IBMIR causes islet destruction, allowing further refinement of future interventions aimed at resolving the issue of IBMIR in xenotransplantation. PMID:27500267

  13. Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Employing Heteropolyacids as Redox Mediators for Oxygen Reduction Reactions: Pt-Free Cathode Systems.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiaki; Morikawa, Eri; Nakada, Shintaro; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Eguchi, Koichi

    2016-07-20

    In this study, the heteropolyacids of H3+xPVxMO12-xO40 (x = 0, 2, and 3) were applied as redox mediators for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, of which the cathode is free from the usage of noble metals such as Pt/C. In this system, the electrochemical reduction of heteropolyacid over the carbon cathode and the subsequent reoxidation of the partially reduced heteropolyacid by exposure to the dissolved oxygen in the regenerator are important processes for continuous power generation. Thus, the redox properties of catholytes containing these heteropolyacids were investigated in detail. The substitution quantity of V in the heteropolyacid affected the onset reduction potential as well as the reduction current density, resulting in a difference in cell performance. The chemical composition of heteropolyacid also had a significant impact on the reoxidation property. Among the three compounds, H6PV3Mo9O40 was the most suitable redox mediator. Furthermore, the pH of the catholyte was found to be the crucial factor in determining the reoxidation rate of partially reduced heteropolyacid as well as cell performance. PMID:27348019

  14. Molecular Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus by Non-Protein Coding RNA-Mediated Monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Soo Yean, Cheryl Yeap; Selva Raju, Kishanraj; Xavier, Rathinam; Subramaniam, Sreeramanan; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Chinni, Suresh V.

    2016-01-01

    Non-protein coding RNA (npcRNA) is a functional RNA molecule that is not translated into a protein. Bacterial npcRNAs are structurally diversified molecules, typically 50–200 nucleotides in length. They play a crucial physiological role in cellular networking, including stress responses, replication and bacterial virulence. In this study, by using an identified npcRNA gene (Sau-02) in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), we identified the Gram-positive bacteria S. aureus. A Sau-02-mediated monoplex Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) assay was designed that displayed high sensitivity and specificity. Fourteen different bacteria and 18 S. aureus strains were tested, and the results showed that the Sau-02 gene is specific to S. aureus. The detection limit was tested against genomic DNA from MRSA and was found to be ~10 genome copies. Further, the detection was extended to whole-cell MRSA detection, and we reached the detection limit with two bacteria. The monoplex PCR assay demonstrated in this study is a novel detection method that can replicate other npcRNA-mediated detection assays. PMID:27367909

  15. Single primer-mediated circular polymerase chain reaction for hairpin DNA cloning and plasmid editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Khan, Inamullah; Liu, Rui; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Naishuo

    2016-05-01

    We developed and validated a universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, single primer circular (SPC)-PCR, using single primer to simultaneously insert and amplify a short hairpin sequence into a vector with a high success rate. In this method, the hairpin structure is divided into two parts and fused into a vector by PCR. Then, a single primer is used to cyclize the chimera into a mature short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector. It is not biased by loop length or palindromic structures. Six hairpin DNAs with short 4-nucleotide loops were successfully cloned. Moreover, SPC-PCR was also applied to plasmid editing within 3 h with a success rate higher than 95%.

  16. Single primer-mediated circular polymerase chain reaction for hairpin DNA cloning and plasmid editing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Khan, Inamullah; Liu, Rui; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Naishuo

    2016-05-01

    We developed and validated a universal polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, single primer circular (SPC)-PCR, using single primer to simultaneously insert and amplify a short hairpin sequence into a vector with a high success rate. In this method, the hairpin structure is divided into two parts and fused into a vector by PCR. Then, a single primer is used to cyclize the chimera into a mature short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector. It is not biased by loop length or palindromic structures. Six hairpin DNAs with short 4-nucleotide loops were successfully cloned. Moreover, SPC-PCR was also applied to plasmid editing within 3 h with a success rate higher than 95%. PMID:26792375

  17. Treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Veitz-Keenan, Analia; Barna, Julie Ann; Strober, Brad; Matthews, Abigail G.; Collie, Damon; Vena, Donald; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network conducted a three-armed randomized clinical study to determine the comparative effectiveness of three treatments for hypersensitive noncarious cervical lesions (NCCLs): use of a potassium nitrate dentifrice for treatment of hypersensitivity, placement of a resin-based composite restoration and placement of a sealant. Methods Seventeen trained practitioner-investigators (P-Is) in the PEARL Network enrolled participants (N = 304) with hypersensitive posterior NCCLs who met enrollment criteria. Participants were assigned to treatments randomly. Evaluations were conducted at baseline and at one, three and six months thereafter. Primary outcomes were the reduction or elimination of hypersensitivity as measured clinically and by means of patient-reported outcomes. Results Lesion depth and pretreatment sensitivity (mean, 5.3 on a 0- to 10-point scale) were balanced across treatments, as was sleep bruxism (present in 42.2 percent of participants). The six-month participant recall rate was 99 percent. Treatments significantly reduced mean sensitivity (P < .01), with the sealant and restoration groups displaying a significantly higher reduction (P < .01) than did the dentifrice group. The dentifrice group’s mean (standard deviation) sensitivity at six months was 2.1 (2.1); those of the sealant and restoration groups were 1.0 (1.6) and 0.8 (1.4), respectively. Patient-reported sensitivity (to cold being most pronounced) paralleled clinical measurements at each evaluation. Conclusions Sealing and restoration treatments were effective overall in reducing NCCL hypersensitivity. The potassium nitrate dentifrice reduced sensitivity with increasing effectiveness through six months but not to the degree offered by the other treatments. Practical Implications Sealant or restoration placement is an effective method of immediately reducing NCCL sensitivity. Although a potassium nitrate dentifrice

  18. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  19. Allergic reaction to mint leads to asthma.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M; Barnett, Tisha

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cutaneous adverse reactions to mint can result from several different mechanisms including IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (contact dermatitis), and nonimmunologic histamine release. Reactions to cross-reacting plants of the Labiatae family, such as oregano and thyme, as well as to the chemical turpentine, may clue the clinician in on the diagnosis of mint allergy. Contact dermatitis can result from menthol in peppermint. Contact allergens have been reported in toothpastes, which often are mint-flavored. Allergic asthma from mint is less well-recognized. A case of a 54-year-old woman with dyspnea on exposure to the scent of peppermint is presented in whom mint exposure, as seemingly innocuous as the breath of others who had consumed Tic Tac candies, exacerbated her underlying asthma. This case highlights the importance of testing with multiple alternative measures of specific IgE to mint, including skin testing with mint extract, and skin testing with fresh mint leaves. Additionally, this cases suggests that asthma can result from inhaling the scent of mint and gives consideration to obtaining confirmatory pre- and postexposure pulmonary function data by both impulse oscillometry and spirometry. PMID:22852115

  20. Allergic reaction to mint leads to asthma

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Tisha

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory and cutaneous adverse reactions to mint can result from several different mechanisms including IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, delayed-type hypersensitivity (contact dermatitis), and nonimmunologic histamine release. Reactions to cross-reacting plants of the Labiatae family, such as oregano and thyme, as well as to the chemical turpentine, may clue the clinician in on the diagnosis of mint allergy. Contact dermatitis can result from menthol in peppermint. Contact allergens have been reported in toothpastes, which often are mint-flavored. Allergic asthma from mint is less well-recognized. A case of a 54-year-old woman with dyspnea on exposure to the scent of peppermint is presented in whom mint exposure, as seemingly innocuous as the breath of others who had consumed Tic Tac candies, exacerbated her underlying asthma. This case highlights the importance of testing with multiple alternative measures of specific IgE to mint, including skin testing with mint extract, and skin testing with fresh mint leaves. Additionally, this cases suggests that asthma can result from inhaling the scent of mint and gives consideration to obtaining confirmatory pre- and postexposure pulmonary function data by both impulse oscillometry and spirometry. PMID:22852115

  1. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  2. Mechanochemical solid-state synthesis of 2-aminothiazoles, quinoxalines and benzoylbenzofurans from ketones by one-pot sequential acid- and base-mediated reactions.

    PubMed

    Nagarajaiah, Honnappa; Mishra, Abhaya Kumar; Moorthy, Jarugu Narasimha

    2016-04-26

    α-Chloroketones - obtained by the atom-economical chlorination of ketones with trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) in the presence of p-TSA under ball-milling conditions - were set up for a sequential base-mediated condensation reaction with thiourea/thiosemicarbazides, o-phenylenediamine and salicylaldehyde to afford 2-aminothiazoles, 2-hydrazinylthiazoles, quinoxalines and benzoylbenzofurans, respectively, in respectable yields. The viability of one-pot sequential acid- and base-mediated reactions in the solid state under ball-milling conditions is thus demonstrated.

  3. Oral desensitization for food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Land, Michael H; Kim, Edwin H; Burks, A Wesley

    2011-05-01

    Food allergy has become an increasingly prevalent international health problem. Allergic reactions can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis in a short period of time, so the current standard of care dictates strict avoidance of suspected trigger foods and accessibility to injectable epinephrine. Intervention at the time of exposure is considered a rescue therapy rather than a disease-modifying treatment. Investigators have been studying allergen immunotherapy to promote induction of oral tolerance. This article examines the mechanisms of oral tolerance and the breakdown that leads to food allergy, as well as the history and current state of oral and sublingual immunotherapy development.

  4. A Novel Reaction Mediated by Human Aldehyde Oxidase: Amide Hydrolysis of GDC-0834

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Susan; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Liu, Lichuan; Khojasteh, S. Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E. C. A.; Barr, John T.; Jones, Jeffrey P.; Halladay, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    GDC-0834, a Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor investigated as a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, was previously reported to be extensively metabolized by amide hydrolysis such that no measurable levels of this compound were detected in human circulation after oral administration. In vitro studies in human liver cytosol determined that GDC-0834 (R)-N-(3-(6-(4-(1,4-dimethyl-3-oxopiperazin-2-yl)phenylamino)-4-methyl-5-oxo- 4,5-dihydropyrazin-2-yl)-2-methylphenyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b] thiophene-2-carboxamide) was rapidly hydrolyzed with a CLint of 0.511 ml/min per milligram of protein. Aldehyde oxidase (AO) and carboxylesterase (CES) were putatively identified as the enzymes responsible after cytosolic fractionation and mass spectrometry-proteomics analysis of the enzymatically active fractions. Results were confirmed by a series of kinetic experiments with inhibitors of AO, CES, and xanthine oxidase (XO), which implicated AO and CES, but not XO, as mediating GDC-0834 amide hydrolysis. Further supporting the interaction between GDC-0834 and AO, GDC-0834 was shown to be a potent reversible inhibitor of six known AO substrates with IC50 values ranging from 0.86 to 1.87 μM. Additionally, in silico modeling studies suggest that GDC-0834 is capable of binding in the active site of AO with the amide bond of GDC-0834 near the molybdenum cofactor (MoCo), orientated in such a way to enable potential nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl of the amide bond by the hydroxyl of MoCo. Together, the in vitro and in silico results suggest the involvement of AO in the amide hydrolysis of GDC-0834. PMID:25845827

  5. The Modification of Cellulosic Surface with Fatty Acids via Plasma Mediated Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    Much attention has been paid recently to understand the healing process made by the human body, in order to develop new approaches for promoting healing. The wound healing process includes four main phases, namely, hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferation, and remodeling, which take place successively. The human body can provide all the requirements of the healing process in normal wounds, unless there is a kind of deficiency of the skin function or massive fluid losses of vast wounds. Therefore, wound care of non-healing wounds has recently been the growing concern of many applications. The goal of this work is to explore the development of a new cellulose-based wound dressing composite that contain or release wound healing agents attained via dry textile chemical finishing techniques (thermal curing-plasma treatment). The synthesis of different wound healing agents derived from fatty acids and attached chemically to cellulose or even delivered through cyclodextrine modified cellulose are reported in this work. First, free fatty acids, which are obtained from commercial vegetable oils, were identified as wound healing agents. Many of these free acids are known to bind with and deactivate the proteases associated with inflammation at a wound site. Linoleic acid is extracted from commercial products of safflower seed oil while ricinoleic acid is obtained from castor oil. Conjugated linoleic acid was synthesized. Un-conjugated linoleic acid was used to prepare two derivatives namely linoleic azide and allylic ketone of linoleic acid. Different cellulose derivatives such as cellulose peroxide, iododeoxycellulose and cellulose diazonium salt in different degree of substitutions were synthesized in order to facilitate the free radical reaction with the fatty acid derivatives. New modified cellulosic products were synthesized by reacting the cellulosic and the linoleic acid derivatives via thermal or plasma technique and characterized by FT-IR ATR, the wettability test

  6. The Modification of Cellulosic Surface with Fatty Acids via Plasma Mediated Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nada, Ahmed Ali Ahmed

    Much attention has been paid recently to understand the healing process made by the human body, in order to develop new approaches for promoting healing. The wound healing process includes four main phases, namely, hemostatic, inflammatory, proliferation, and remodeling, which take place successively. The human body can provide all the requirements of the healing process in normal wounds, unless there is a kind of deficiency of the skin function or massive fluid losses of vast wounds. Therefore, wound care of non-healing wounds has recently been the growing concern of many applications. The goal of this work is to explore the development of a new cellulose-based wound dressing composite that contain or release wound healing agents attained via dry textile chemical finishing techniques (thermal curing-plasma treatment). The synthesis of different wound healing agents derived from fatty acids and attached chemically to cellulose or even delivered through cyclodextrine modified cellulose are reported in this work. First, free fatty acids, which are obtained from commercial vegetable oils, were identified as wound healing agents. Many of these free acids are known to bind with and deactivate the proteases associated with inflammation at a wound site. Linoleic acid is extracted from commercial products of safflower seed oil while ricinoleic acid is obtained from castor oil. Conjugated linoleic acid was synthesized. Un-conjugated linoleic acid was used to prepare two derivatives namely linoleic azide and allylic ketone of linoleic acid. Different cellulose derivatives such as cellulose peroxide, iododeoxycellulose and cellulose diazonium salt in different degree of substitutions were synthesized in order to facilitate the free radical reaction with the fatty acid derivatives. New modified cellulosic products were synthesized by reacting the cellulosic and the linoleic acid derivatives via thermal or plasma technique and characterized by FT-IR ATR, the wettability test

  7. Complete amino acid sequence of a human monocyte chemoattractant, a putative mediator of cellular immune reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, E A; Yoshimura, T; Leonard, E J; Tanaka, S; Griffin, P R; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Appella, E

    1989-01-01

    In a study of the structural basis for leukocyte specificity of chemoattractants, we determined the complete amino acid sequence of human glioma-derived monocyte chemotactic factor (GDCF-2), a peptide that attracts human monocytes but not neutrophils. The choice of a tumor cell product for analysis was dictated by its relative abundance and an amino acid composition indistinguishable from that of lymphocyte-derived chemotactic factor (LDCF), the agonist thought to account for monocyte accumulation in cellular immune reactions. By a combination of Edman degradation and mass spectrometry, it was established that GDCF-2 comprises 76 amino acid residues, commencing at the N terminus with pyroglutamic acid. The peptide contains four half-cystines, at positions 11, 12, 36, and 52, which create a pair of loops, clustered at the disulfide bridges. The relative positions of the half-cystines are almost identical to those of monocyte-derived neutrophil chemotactic factor (MDNCF), a peptide of similar mass but with only 24% sequence identity to GDCF. Thus, GDCF and MDNCF have a similar gross secondary structure because of the loops formed by the clustered disulfides, and their different leukocyte specificities are most likely determined by the large differences in primary sequence. PMID:2648385

  8. In situ generation of electron acceptor for photoelectrochemical biosensing via hemin-mediated catalytic reaction.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yang; Lei, Jianping; Zhang, Lei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-12-16

    A novel photoelectrochemical sensing strategy is designed for DNA detection on the basis of in situ generation of an electron acceptor via the catalytic reaction of hemin toward H2O2. The photoelectrochemical platform was established by sequential assembly of near-infrared CdTe quantum dots, capture DNA, and a hemin-labeled DNA probe to form a triple-helix molecular beacon (THMB) structure on an indium tin oxide electrode. According to the highly catalytic capacity of hemin toward H2O2, a photoelectrochemical mechanism was then proposed, in which the electron acceptor of O2 was in situ-generated on the electrode surface, leading to the enhancement of the photocurrent response. The utilization of CdTe QDs can extend the absorption edge to the near-infrared band, resulting in an increase in the light-to-electricity efficiency. After introducing target DNA, the THMB structure is disassembled and releases hemin and, thus, quenches the photocurrent. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor shows high sensitivity with a linear range from 1 to 1000 pM and detection limit of 0.8 pM. Moreover, it exhibits good performance of excellent selectivity, high stability, and acceptable fabrication reproducibility. This present strategy opens an alternative avenue for photoelectrochemical signal transduction and expands the applications of hemin-based materials in photoelectrochemical biosensing and clinical diagnosis.

  9. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controling the plant hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mappe...

  10. Dermal exposure to jet fuel suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity: a critical role for aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gerardo; Limon-Flores, Alberto Yairh; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    Dermal exposure to military (JP-8) and/or commercial (Jet-A) jet fuel suppresses cell-mediated immune reactions. Immune regulatory cytokines and biological modifiers, including platelet activating factor (PAF), prostaglandin E(2), and interleukin-10, have been implicated in the pathway of events leading to immune suppression. It is estimated that approximately 260 different hydrocarbons are found in jet fuel, and the exact identity of the active immunotoxic agent(s) is unknown. The recent availability of synthetic jet fuel (S-8), which is refined from natural gas, and is devoid of aromatic hydrocarbons, made it feasible to design experiments to address this problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that the aromatic hydrocarbons present in jet fuel are responsible for immune suppression. We report that applying S-8 to the skin of mice does not upregulate the expression of epidermal cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) nor does it induce immune suppression. Adding back a cocktail of seven of the most prevalent aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, 1,2,4-trimethlybenzene, cyclohexylbenzene, and dimethylnaphthalene) to S-8 upregulated epidermal COX-2 expression and suppressed a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Injecting PAF receptor antagonists, or a selective cycloozygenase-2 inhibitor into mice treated with S-8 supplemented with the aromatic cocktail, blocked suppression of DTH, similar to data previously reported using JP-8. These findings identify the aromatic hydrocarbons found in jet fuel as the agents responsible for suppressing DTH, in part by the upregulation of COX-2, and the production of immune regulatory factors and cytokines.

  11. Positive dermal hypersensitivity and specific antibodies in workers exposed to bio-engineered enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Biagini, R.E.; Henningsen, G.M.; Driscoll, R.; MacKenzie, B.A.; Wilcox, T.; Scinto, J.D.; Bernstein, D.M.; Swanson, M. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty-six employees who produced industrial enzymes from bio-engineered strains of bacteria and fungi were evaluated by skin prick testing and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgE and IgG antibodies. The workers complained of asthma- and flu-like' symptoms which generally lessened away from work. The enzymes evaluated were {alpha}-amylase from A. niger (ind-AAN), B. licheniformis (ind-AAL) and B. subtilis (ind-AAS); purified {alpha}-amylase from B. subtilis (AAS) and A. niger (AAN); alkaline protease from B. licheniformis (ind-APL) and purified alkaline protease (APL); amylase glucosidase from A. niger (ind-AGN) and purified amylase glucosidase (AGN). Significantly positive skin tests were found for APL, AGN and ind-AAN. Significantly elevated specific IgE results were observed for AAN, AGN, and ind-AAN; elevated specific IgGs were observed for AAN, ind-AAN, ind-AAS, ind-AAL and ind-AGN. Radioimmunoassays of air filter samples (using sera with high Ab titers) for 4 of the ind-enzymes showed only ind-AAN at extremely high environmental levels. These results indicate that occupational exposure to some ind-enzymes causes immediate onset dermal hypersensitivity reactions. The results are equivocal as to whether these reactions are IgE mediated, as IgE titers were low. Contrary to this, IgG titers were extremely high and suggest that these biomarkers can be used as indicators of both individual exposure and environmental analyses.

  12. Loss of Central Inhibition: Implications for Behavioral Hypersensitivity after Contusive Spinal Cord Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berrocal, Yerko A.; Almeida, Vania W.; Puentes, Rocio; Knott, Eric P.; Hechtman, Jaclyn F.; Pearse, Damien D.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral hypersensitivity is common following spinal cord injury (SCI), producing significant discomfort and often developing into chronic pain syndromes. While the mechanisms underlying the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after SCI are poorly understood, previous studies of SCI contusion have shown an increase in amino acids, namely, aspartate and glutamate, along with a decrease in GABA and glycine, particularly below the injury. The current study sought to identify alterations in key enzymes and receptors involved in mediating central inhibition via GABA and glycine after a clinically-relevant contusion SCI model. Following thoracic (T8) 25.0 mm NYU contusion SCI in rodents, significant and persistent behavioral hypersensitivity developed as evidenced by cutaneous allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Biochemical analyses confirmed upregulation of glutamate receptor GluR3 with downregulation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme (GAD65/67) and the glycine receptor α3 (GLRA3), notably below the injury. Combined, these changes result in the disinhibition of excitatory impulses and contribute to behavioral hyperexcitability. This study demonstrates a loss of central inhibition and the development of behavioral hypersensitivity in a contusive SCI paradigm. Future use of this model will permit the evaluation of different antinociceptive strategies and help in the elucidation of new targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25180088

  13. Loss of central inhibition: implications for behavioral hypersensitivity after contusive spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Yerko A; Almeida, Vania W; Puentes, Rocio; Knott, Eric P; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Garland, Mary; Pearse, Damien D

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral hypersensitivity is common following spinal cord injury (SCI), producing significant discomfort and often developing into chronic pain syndromes. While the mechanisms underlying the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after SCI are poorly understood, previous studies of SCI contusion have shown an increase in amino acids, namely, aspartate and glutamate, along with a decrease in GABA and glycine, particularly below the injury. The current study sought to identify alterations in key enzymes and receptors involved in mediating central inhibition via GABA and glycine after a clinically-relevant contusion SCI model. Following thoracic (T8) 25.0 mm NYU contusion SCI in rodents, significant and persistent behavioral hypersensitivity developed as evidenced by cutaneous allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Biochemical analyses confirmed upregulation of glutamate receptor GluR3 with downregulation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme (GAD65/67) and the glycine receptor α3 (GLRA3), notably below the injury. Combined, these changes result in the disinhibition of excitatory impulses and contribute to behavioral hyperexcitability. This study demonstrates a loss of central inhibition and the development of behavioral hypersensitivity in a contusive SCI paradigm. Future use of this model will permit the evaluation of different antinociceptive strategies and help in the elucidation of new targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  14. Neurotrophins: peripherally and centrally acting modulators of tactile stimulus-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mannion, R J; Costigan, M; Decosterd, I; Amaya, F; Ma, Q P; Holstege, J C; Ji, R R; Acheson, A; Lindsay, R M; Wilkinson, G A; Woolf, C J

    1999-08-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and transported anterogradely to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord where it is located in dense core vesicles in C-fiber terminals. Peripheral inflammation substantially up-regulates BDNF mRNA and protein in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in a nerve growth factor-dependent fashion and results in novel expression of BDNF by DRG neurons with myelinated axons. C-fiber electrical activity also increases BDNF expression in the DRG, and both inflammation and activity increase full-length TrkB receptor levels in the dorsal horn. Sequestration of endogenous BDNF/neurotrophin 4 by intraspinal TrkB-Fc fusion protein administration does not, in noninflamed animals, change basal pain sensitivity nor the mechanical hypersensitivity induced by peripheral capsaicin administration, a measure of C fiber-mediated central sensitization. TrkB-Fc administration also does not modify basal inflammatory pain hypersensitivity, but does block the progressive hypersensitivity elicited by low-intensity tactile stimulation of inflamed tissue. BDNF, by virtue of its nerve growth factor regulation in sensory neurons including novel expression in A fibers, has a role as a central modulator of tactile stimulus-induced inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

  15. Loss of central inhibition: implications for behavioral hypersensitivity after contusive spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Yerko A; Almeida, Vania W; Puentes, Rocio; Knott, Eric P; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Garland, Mary; Pearse, Damien D

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral hypersensitivity is common following spinal cord injury (SCI), producing significant discomfort and often developing into chronic pain syndromes. While the mechanisms underlying the development of behavioral hypersensitivity after SCI are poorly understood, previous studies of SCI contusion have shown an increase in amino acids, namely, aspartate and glutamate, along with a decrease in GABA and glycine, particularly below the injury. The current study sought to identify alterations in key enzymes and receptors involved in mediating central inhibition via GABA and glycine after a clinically-relevant contusion SCI model. Following thoracic (T8) 25.0 mm NYU contusion SCI in rodents, significant and persistent behavioral hypersensitivity developed as evidenced by cutaneous allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Biochemical analyses confirmed upregulation of glutamate receptor GluR3 with downregulation of the GABA synthesizing enzyme (GAD65/67) and the glycine receptor α3 (GLRA3), notably below the injury. Combined, these changes result in the disinhibition of excitatory impulses and contribute to behavioral hyperexcitability. This study demonstrates a loss of central inhibition and the development of behavioral hypersensitivity in a contusive SCI paradigm. Future use of this model will permit the evaluation of different antinociceptive strategies and help in the elucidation of new targets for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:25180088

  16. Oxygenative and Dehydrogenative [3 + 3] Benzannulation Reactions of α,β-Unsaturated Aldehydes and γ-Phosphonyl Crotonates Mediated by Air: Regioselective Synthesis of 4-Hydroxybiaryl-2-carboxylates.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Prabhakar Ramchandra; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Menon, Rajeev S

    2016-02-19

    Regioselective synthesis of 4-hydroxybiphenyl-2-carboxylates via the base-mediated oxygenative [3 + 3] benzannulation reaction of α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and γ-phosphonyl crotonates is reported. A hydroxyl group is installed in the final product on the originally phosphorus-bound carbon via a novel oxygenative and dehydrogenative transformation. The reaction proceeds rapidly in an open flask, uses atmospheric oxygen as an oxidant, and affords good yields of substituted biaryl phenols. PMID:26859060

  17. Copper-Mediated [3 + 2] Oxidative Cyclization Reaction of N-Tosylhydrazones and β-Ketoesters: Synthesis of 2,3,5-Trisubstituted Furans.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yubing; Li, Xianwei; Yu, Yue; Zhu, Chuanle; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-06-17

    The first attempt at utilizing N-tosylhydrazones as two-carbon synthons has been successfully achieved, which underwent a copper-mediated [3 + 2] oxidative cyclization reaction to afford 2,3,5-trisubstituted furans in moderate to good yields. The features of this method include inexpensive metal catalyst, readily available substrates, high regioselectivity, and convenient operation. The studies provide important approaches for further exploration of the powerful and diverse reaction abilities of N-tosylhydrazones. PMID:27227374

  18. Base-Mediated Cyclocondensation of Salicylaldehydes and 2-Bromoallyl Sulfones for the Synthesis of 3-Sulfonylchromene Derivatives and Their Regioselective Friedel-Crafts Heteroarylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anand; Thadkapally, Srinivas; Menon, Rajeev S

    2015-11-01

    Cesium carbonate-mediated reaction of 2-hydroxybenzaldehydes and 2-bromoallyl sulfones afforded 2H- and 4H-chromenol derivatives endowed with a 3-arylsulfonyl group. 2-Bromoallyl sulfones functioned as synthetic equivalents of allenyl sulfones under these conditions. The 2H- and 4H-chromenol derivatives underwent regioselective Friedel-Crafts reactions with heteroarenes in the presence of p-toluenesulfonic acid to afford 4-heteroaryl-4H-chromene derivatives in excellent yields.

  19. Triblock polymer mediated synthesis of Ir-Sn oxide electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guangfu; Yu, Hongmei; Wang, Xunying; Yang, Donglei; Li, Yongkun; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian

    2014-03-01

    Over the past several decades, tremendous effort has been put into developing cost-effective, highly active and durable electrocatalysts for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in the proton exchange membrane water electrolyzer. This report explores an advanced and effective "soft" material-assistant method to fabricate Ir0.6Sn0.4O2 electrocatalysts with a 0.6/0.4 ratio of Ir/Sn in precursors. Adopting a series of characterization methods, the collective results suggest that the surfactant-material F127 content, as an important factor, can efficiently control the formation of Ir-Sn oxides with varying surface properties and morphologies, such as the grainy and rod-shaped structures. Associating with the half-cell and single electrolyzer, it is affirmed that the optimal ratio of (Ir + Sn)/F127 is 100 for the preparation of S100-Ir0.6Sn0.4O2 with obviously enhanced activity and sufficient durability under the electrolysis circumstances. The lowest cell voltages obtained at 80 °C are 1.631 V at 1000 mA cm-2, and 1.820 V at 2000 mA cm-2, when applying S100-Ir0.6Sn0.4O2 OER catalyst and Ti-material diffusion layer on the anode side and Nafion® 115 membrane. Furthermore, the noble-metal Ir loading in the same cell decreases to 0.77 mg cm-2. These results highlight that Ir-Sn oxide synthesized by the soft-material method is a promising OER electrocatalyst.

  20. [A case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by zinc fume].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Hiroo; Hirata, Takeo; Shimane, Shoko; Morita, Sumihito; Chihara, Koji; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Suda, Takafumi; Chida, Kingo

    2006-12-01

    A 55-year-old man with a 3-year occupational history of welding was admitted for repeated episodes of fever, cough and dyspnea after inhalation of smoke while welding galvanized steel. A computed tomography (CT) showed diffuse centrilobular nodules, panlobular ground-glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields, and he suffered from hypoxemia (PaO2 = 55.3Torr) while breathing room air. Percentage of lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid increased, and lung biopsy specimens at thoracoscopy revealed lymphocytic alveolitis and organization in air spaces. His symptoms and signs disappeared spontaneously only when he ceased welding. Panlobular ground-glass opacity and interlobular septal thickening improved immediately with oral corticosteroids. Patch tests using metal series gave positive reactions to zinc. We diagnosed this case as hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by zinc fumes.