Science.gov

Sample records for mediated hypersensitivity reaction

  1. Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Hypersensitivity Reaction to Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, John; Nicholls, Katherine; Jones, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is a commonly used analgesic agent in the management of both acute and chronic pain. While dose-dependent side effects are well described, allergy to ketamine is extremely rare. A 41-year-old woman with chronic pelvic pain and previous ketamine exposure developed a widespread urticarial rash and mild perioral edema following the initiation of a ketamine infusion. The infusion was ceased and the patient was treated with oral antihistamine, with rapid resolution of symptoms. Serum tryptase levels were elevated at 2 and 6 hours after the infusion was ceased, and subsequent intradermal skin testing supported the diagnosis of type I hypersensitivity reaction to ketamine. This case represents a likely immunoglobulin E-mediated type I hypersensitivity reaction to ketamine, supported by elevated tryptase levels and positive intradermal skin testing. The interpretation of these results and likely mechanism of the hypersensitivity reaction are described. The patient and treating team were advised against subsequent use of ketamine, due to the risk of serious adverse systemic reaction with repeat exposure. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  2. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  3. Hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Fields, C L; Robinson, J W; Roy, T M; Ossorio, M A; Byrd, R P

    1998-05-01

    Adverse drug reactions can vary from a simple rash to anaphylactic shock. While certain medications including the penicillins are well known to cause such reactions, other drugs are not as commonly recognized. Azathioprine hypersensitivity reactions tend to be benign and self-limiting with cessation of drug ingestion. We report a patient who had a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine, which manifested as distributive shock that mimicked sepsis. We also reviewed the English language literature for risk factors for a hypersensitivity reaction to azathioprine and its possible mechanism.

  4. Pharmacogenetics of hypersensitivity drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Negrini, Simone; Becquemont, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and represent a major burden on the healthcare system. Some of those reactions are immunologically mediated (hypersensitivity reactions) and can be clinically subdivided into two categories: immediate reactions (IgE-related) and delayed reactions (T-cell-mediated). Delayed hypersensitivity reactions include both systemic syndromes and organ-specific toxicities and can be triggered by a wide range of chemically diverse drugs. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between human leukocyte antigen alleles and susceptibility to delayed drug hypersensitivity. Most notable examples include human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*57:01 allele and abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome or HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-B*58:01 alleles related to severe cutaneous reactions induced by carbamazepine and allopurinol, respectively. This review aims to explore our current understanding in the field of pharmacogenomics of HLA-associated drug hypersensitivities and its translation into clinical practice for predicting adverse drug reactions. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. [Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin].

    PubMed

    Becerril-Ángeles, Martín; Moctezuma-Trejo, Cristina; Espinosa-Larrañaga, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin are infrequent, yet of clinical importance. The mechanisms of hypersensitivity involved can be of three types: I, III and IV. To describe the pathophysiology of hypersensitivity to insulin, its clinical features and diagnostic and therapeutic approach, that help identify the cases of allergy to insulin and begin a treatment, or if necessary, to refer patients to a specialists or appropriate medical attention. An electronic search of papers related to insulin hypersensitivity was performed in PubMed and the articles selected were those considered the most relevant for this review. Thirty eight papers about pathophysiology, mechanisms of injury and the different types of insulin involved in hypersensitivity reactions were included. Likewise, information for the diagnosis of insulin hypersensitivity and some options of treatment for first contact physicians or the referral of patients to specialists in endocrinology and allergy were included. Insulin hypersensitivity has a low prevalence and diverse clinical manifestations. The different types of insulin suitable allow the majority of cases of hypersensitivity to continue the treatment in a efficient and flexible manner.

  6. Tolerability of cefazolin after immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to nafcillin in the outpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Youngster, Ilan; Shenoy, Erica S; Banerji, Aleena; Nelson, Sandra B

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the safety and tolerability of cefazolin therapy among patients with methicillin-sensitive Gram-positive bacterial infections who develop non-IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to nafcillin. In this retrospective cohort analysis of the Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy program at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 2007 through 2013, we identified patients switched from nafcillin to cefazolin after an immune-mediated HSR. We reviewed patient demographics, details about the original HSR, and outcomes after the switch to cefazolin therapy. HSRs were classified by reaction type and likely mechanism. There were 467 patients treated with nafcillin, of which 60 (12.8%) were switched to cefazolin during their prescribed course. Of the 60 patients who transitioned to cefazolin, 17 (28.3%) were switched because of non-IgE-mediated HSRs. HSRs included maculopapular rash (n = 10), immune-mediated nephritis (n = 3), isolated eosinophilia (n = 2), immune-mediated hepatitis (n = 1), and a serum sickness-like reaction (n = 1). All but one patient (94.1%) who switched to cefazolin tolerated the drug with resolution of the HSR and completed their therapy with cefazolin. No patient experienced worsening of their rash or progressive organ dysfunction. With appropriate monitoring, therapy with cefazolin after non-IgE-mediated HSRs to nafcillin appears to be safe. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Drug hypersensitivity reactions involving skin.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Oliver; Schnyder, Benno; Pichler, Werner J

    2010-01-01

    Immune reactions to drugs can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, lungs, and other organs. Beside immediate, IgE-mediated reactions of varying degrees (urticaria to anaphylactic shock), many drug hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed, namely hours to days after starting drug treatment, showing a variety of clinical manifestations from solely skin involvement to fulminant systemic diseases which may be fatal. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-specific T cells in patients with delayed reactions confirmed a predominant role for T cells in the onset and maintenance of immune-mediated delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions (type IV reactions). In these reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells are stimulated by drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR). Drugs can stimulate T cells in two ways: they can act as haptens and bind covalently to larger protein structures (hapten-carrier model), inducing a specific immune response. In addition, they may accidentally bind in a labile, noncovalent way to a particular TCR of the whole TCR repertoire and possibly also major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-molecules - similar to their pharmacologic action. This seems to be sufficient to reactivate certain, probably in vivo preactivated T cells, if an additional interaction of the drug-stimulated TCR with MHC molecules occurs. The mechanism was named pharmacological interaction of a drug with (immune) receptor and thus termed the p-i concept. This new concept may explain the frequent skin symptoms in drug hypersensitivity to oral or parenteral drugs. Furthermore, the various clinical manifestations of T cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity may be explained by distinct T cell functions leading to different clinical phenotypes. These data allowed a subclassification of the delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) into T cell reactions which, by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines, preferentially activate and recruit

  8. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  9. Intestinal B cell-activating factor: an indicator of non-IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to food?

    PubMed

    Lied, G Arslan; Lillestøl, K; Valeur, J; Berstad, A

    2010-07-01

    Medically confirmed hypersensitivity reactions to food are usually IgE-mediated. Non-IgE-mediated reactions are not only seldom recognized but also more difficult to diagnose. To examine B cell-activating factor (BAFF) in serum and gut lavage fluid of patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity, and to study its relationship to atopic disease. Gut lavage fluid was obtained from 60 and serum from another 17 patients with self-reported food hypersensitivity. Twenty healthy volunteers served as controls, gut lavage fluid was obtained in all, serum from 11 of 20. The patients were divided into atopic and non-atopic subgroups. BAFF was measured by ELISA in both serum and gut lavage fluid. B cell-activating factor levels in serum and gut lavage fluid were significantly higher in patients than in controls (P < 0.03 and P < 0.002 respectively). Non-atopic patients had significantly higher levels of BAFF in serum than both atopic patients (P < 0.05) and controls (P < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between serum levels of BAFF and IgE. The results suggest that BAFF might be a new mediating mechanism in food hypersensitivity reactions. Significantly higher levels in non-atopic compared with atopic patients, and no correlation between BAFF and IgE, suggest that BAFF might be involved particularly in non-IgE-mediated reactions.

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Butani, Lavjay; Calogiuri, Gianfranco

    2017-06-01

    To describe hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. PubMed search of articles published during the past 30 years with an emphasis on publications in the past decade. Case reports and review articles describing hypersensitivity reactions in the context of hemodialysis. Pharmacologic agents are the most common identifiable cause of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving hemodialysis. These include iron, erythropoietin, and heparin, which can cause anaphylactic or pseudoallergic reactions, and topical antibiotics and anesthetics, which lead to delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Many hypersensitivity reactions are triggered by complement activation and increased bradykinin resulting from contact system activation, especially in the context of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use. Several alternative pharmacologic preparations and dialyzer membranes are available, such that once an etiology for the reaction is established, recurrences can be prevented without affecting the quality of care provided to patients. Although hypersensitivity reactions are uncommon in patients receiving hemodialysis, they can be life-threatening. Moreover, considering the large prevalence of the end-stage renal disease population, the implications of such reactions are enormous. Most reactions are pseudoallergic and not mediated by immunoglobulin E. The multiplicity of potential exposures and the complexity of the environment to which patients on dialysis are exposed make it challenging to identify the precise cause of these reactions. Great diligence is needed to investigate hypersensitivity reactions to avoid recurrence in this high-risk population. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Kathrin; Bircher, Andreas J

    2005-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics cause immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions, and may also affect internal organs and circulating blood cells. The underlying pathomechanisms are only partly understood. The extent of cross-reactivity among different quinolones depends on the type of clinical manifestation and its underlying mechanism. Despite recent advances, reliable diagnostic tests are still lacking. Recent studies have shown quinolone-specific IgE in vitro in more than 50% of patients with immediate-type reactions and a considerable cross-reactivity with related compounds. In maculopapular drug exanthems from ciprofloxacin, specific T-cell clones were identified, and cross-reactivity to related compounds was detected in approximately 50% of the clones. From re-exposure studies in patients with exanthems, cross-reactivity appears to be lower. Cellular tests such as lymphocyte transformation tests are currently not very useful. For prick and intradermal skin tests, widely divergent nonirritant test concentrations have been recommended. Desensitization may be possible in selected patients.

  12. Oral Hypersensitivity Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... of substances. The most common causes are food, food additives, drugs, oral hygiene products, and dental materials. Q: Are there any specific foods that are more commonly implicated in intraoral hypersensitivity ...

  13. Chapter 28: Classification of hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Uzzaman, Ashraf; Cho, Seong H

    2012-01-01

    The original Gell and Coomb's classification categorizes hypersensitivity reactions into four subtypes according to the type of immune response and the effector mechanism responsible for cell and tissue injury: type I, immediate or IgE mediated; type II, cytotoxic or IgG/IgM mediated; type III, IgG/IgM immune complex mediated; and type IV, delayed-type hypersensitivity or T-cell mediated. The classification has been improved so that type IIa is the former type II and type IIb is antibody-mediated cell stimulating (Graves Disease and the "autoimmune" type of chronic idiopathic urticaria). Type IV has four major categories: type IVa is CD4(+)Th1 lymphocyte mediated with activation of macrophages (granuloma formation and type I diabetes mellitus); type IVb is CD4(+)Th2 lymphocyte mediated with eosinophilic involvement (persistent asthma and allergic rhinitis); type IVc is cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocyte with involvement of perforin-granzme B in apoptosis (Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis); type IVd is T-lymphocyte-driven neutrophilic inflammation (pustular psoriasis and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis). Some diseases have multiple types of immunologic hypersensitivity.

  14. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions - new concepts.

    PubMed

    Posadas, S J; Pichler, W J

    2007-07-01

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds such as drugs can cause a variety of diseases mainly involving skin, but also liver, kidney, lungs and other organs. In addition to the well-known immediate, IgE-mediated reactions to drugs, many drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions appear delayed. Recent data have shown that in these delayed reactions drug-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognize drugs through their T cell receptors (TCR) in an MHC-dependent way. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthems revealed that distinct T cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T cell reactions, which by releasing certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions. Drugs are not only immunogenic because of their chemical reactivity, but also because they may bind in a labile way to available TCRs and possibly MHC-molecules. This seems to be sufficient to stimulate certain, probably preactivated T cells. The drug seems to bind first to the fitting TCR, which already exerts some activation. For full activation, an additional interaction of the TCR with the MHC molecules is needed. The drug binding to the receptor structures is reminiscent of a pharmacological interaction between a drug and its (immune) receptor and was thus termed the p-i concept. In some patients with drug hypersensitivity, such a response occurs within hours even upon the first exposure to the drug. The T cell reaction to the drug might thus not be due to a classical, primary response, but is due to peptide-specific T cells which happen to be stimulated by a drug. This new concept has major implications

  15. Selective immediate hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs.

    PubMed

    Canto, Maria Gabriela; Andreu, Isabel; Fernandez, Javier; Blanca, Miguel

    2009-08-01

    Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs imply that patients develop a urticarial/anaphylactic response to a single drug with good tolerance to other compounds. No systematic review of these reactions has yet been made. With the increase in consumption of NSAIDs, these have become one of the most common drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. Although cross-intolerance reactions are the most common, a significant proportion is selective responses. As specific IgE antibodies are not always found, there is only indirect evidence supporting an IgE-mediated mechanism in selective NSAID reactors. Selective immediate reactions to NSAIDs must be considered when a patient develops urticaria or anaphylaxis after intake of one drug with good tolerance to drugs from other groups or even a drug from the same group with a slightly different chemical structure. Further research is required to identify the antigenic determinant structures recognized.

  16. Allergic or Hypersensitivity Reactions to Orthopaedic Implants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Haines, Colin M; Uhl, Richard L

    2017-10-01

    Allergic or hypersensitivity reactions to orthopaedic implants can pose diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Although 10% to 15% of the population exhibits cutaneous sensitivity to metals, deep-tissue reactions to metal implants are comparatively rare. Nevertheless, the link between cutaneous sensitivity and clinically relevant deep-tissue reactions is unclear. Most reactions to orthopaedic devices are type IV, or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. The most commonly implicated allergens are nickel, cobalt, and chromium; however, reactions to nonmetal compounds, such as polymethyl methacrylate, antibiotic spacers, and suture materials, have also been reported. Symptoms of hypersensitivity to implants are nonspecific and include pain, swelling, stiffness, and localized skin reactions. Following arthroplasty, internal fixation, or implantation of similarly allergenic devices, the persistence or early reappearance of inflammatory symptoms should raise suspicions for hypersensitivity. However, hypersensitivity is a diagnosis of exclusion. Infection, as well as aseptic loosening, particulate synovitis, instability, and other causes of failure must first be eliminated.

  17. Antibiotic hypersensitivity reactions and approaches to desensitization.

    PubMed

    Legendre, Davey P; Muzny, Christina A; Marshall, Gailen D; Swiatlo, Edwin

    2014-04-01

    Before initiating antibiotic therapy, drug hypersensitivity is an important consideration, and a common strategy is to avoid giving patients medications when a high likelihood of severe reactions exists. With an increase in antibiotic resistance and a decrease in novel antibiotics, there is greater pressure to consider antibiotics in patients with a history of adverse reactions. The major concerns include IgE-mediated, or type I, reactions, anaphylaxis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. Some antibiotics with similar characteristics, such as cephalosporins and penicillins, may be given safely to patients with a certain allergy profile. There is still greater concern when considering antibiotics for patients with reported allergy. Desensitization is a strategy to safely induce drug tolerance to a specific drug to limit the possibility of a type I reaction.

  18. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with endovascular devices.

    PubMed

    Honari, Golara; Ellis, Stephen G; Wilkoff, Bruce L; Aronica, Mark A; Svensson, Lars G; Taylor, James S

    2008-07-01

    Allergic reactions to endoprostheses are uncommon and reported in association with orthopaedic, dental, endovascular and other implanted devices. Hypersensitivity reactions to the biomaterials used in endovascular prostheses are among the infrequent reactions that may lead to local or systemic complications following cardiovascular therapeutic interventions. This article reviews potential immunotoxic effects of commonly used biomaterials. Reports of putative hypersensitivity reactions to endovascular devices, including coronary stents, perforated foramen occluders, pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators are also reviewed.

  19. Chemotherapy and biotherapy-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Van Gerpen, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Nearly all chemotherapy and biotherapy drugs used in cancer treatment today can cause hypersensitivity reactions. Certain groups of drugs frequently associated with these reactions include the asparaginases, taxanes, platinum compounds, epipodophyllotoxins, and the monoclonal antibodies. Recognizing and managing hypersensitivity reactions are critical when caring for patients receiving these drugs because the reactions are potentially life-threatening. A thorough understanding of the drugs is necessary to assist the nurse in prevention, early recognition, and timely management.

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions to synthetic haemodialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Villanueva, Rafael J; González, Elena; Quirce, Santiago; Díaz, Raquel; Alvarez, Laura; Menéndez, David; Rodríguez-Gayo, Lucía; Bajo, M Auxiliadora; Selgas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Undergoing a haemodialysis (HD) session poses a certain risk of hypersensitivity adverse reactions as large quantities of blood are in contact with various synthetic materials. Hypersensitivity reactions to ethylene oxide and non-biocompatible membranes, such as cuprophane, have been described in HD. Cases of hypersensitivity with biocompatible membranes, such as polysulfone, and even polysulfone-polyvinylpyrrolidone, have also been reported. In this article we describe six cases of mostly early-stage hypersensitivity reactions to HD occurring in our department, characterised by malaise, desaturation, bronchospasm and arterial hypotension, with good response to the session’s temporary suspension and with reappearance in subsequent sessions that used a synthetic dialyser. No hypersensitivity reactions reappeared in successive observations when the sessions were carried out using a cellulose membrane.

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  2. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  3. Benign hypersensitivity reactions to smallpox vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bessinger, G Todd; Smith, Sidney B; Olivere, Joseph W; James, Bruce L

    2007-05-01

    With the reinstitution of smallpox vaccinations, physicians are seeing significant numbers of adverse events for the first time since the 1980s. The most common adverse events seen in our large military population are benign. We observed a clinically and histopathologically distinct reaction pattern that has not been fully characterized previously. All smallpox-vaccinated patients at Fort Hood, Texas with adverse cutaneous reactions were referred to the dermatology clinic at Darnall Army Community Hospital. Patients were evaluated by a staff dermatologist who performed a skin biopsy and took clinical photographs. If the patients had intact vesicles or pustules, direct fluorescent antibody testing, viral and bacterial cultures, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were also performed. Three hypersensitivity reaction patterns were seen: exanthematous, erythema multiforme-like (EM-like), and urticarial. The patterns had distinct clinical and histopathologic findings. Of the 11,058 vaccinees, six had the exanthematous reaction pattern, two had the urticarial reaction pattern, and one had the EM-like pattern. We describe a new exanthematous type of hypersensitivity reaction to the smallpox vaccine. Hypersensitivity reactions occur at a rate higher than previously reported. In a carefully screened military population, these three hypersensitivity reactions are much more common than life-threatening or serious reactions. Although the reactions have distinct clinical and pathologic features, they are all characterized by mild or absent systemic symptoms and a benign outcome.

  4. IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Gotua, M; Lomidze, N; Dolidze, N; Gotua, T

    2008-04-01

    Food allergy has become a serious health concern especially in developed countries in the past two decades. In general population approximately 4-6% of children and 1-3% of adults experience food allergy. The article reviews IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders. Epidemiology, Mechanism, Clinical manifestations, Genetically modified crops (GMOs), Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies are discussed. The investigations show that over 90% of IgE-mediated food allergies in childhood are caused by: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. Also the causes of food allergy are food additives, genetically modified crops. Risk factors for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis include asthma and previous allergic reactions to the causative food. Food allergy is one of the most common causes of systematic anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, with an annual incidence of four cases per million populations and estimated 500 deaths annually. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, individuals may experience urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, oral syndrome, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, hypotension, shock and cardiac arrhythmias, caused by the massive release of mediators from mast cells and basophiles. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on history, detailed dietary analysis, skin testing, measuring specific IgE in blood serum and challenge tests. Treatment and prevention includes: avoidance diet, application of auto-injectable epinephrine, H1 and H2 antihistamines, corticosteroids, antileukotrienes, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, cromolyn sodium, etc.

  5. Hypersensitivity reactions to dapsone: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Maria; Wozel, Gottfried; Schmitt, Jochen

    2012-03-01

    Dapsone is widely used in the treatment of leprosy and several chronic inflammatory dermatological conditions. Hypersensitivity reactions to dapsone are potentially fatal adverse drug reactions with unknown prevalence and risk factors. We performed a systematic review covering all reported cases of hypersensitivity reactions, in order to systematically summarize the published evidence on prevalence, clinical course and fatality rate. Articles were identified through standardized search strategies. Included studies were reviewed for hypersensitivity characteristics and odds ratios were calculated in univariate and multivariate regression models to assess the risk factors for fatal outcome. A total of 114 articles (17 epidemiological studies, 97 case reports) totalling 336 patients with hypersensitivity reactions were included for analysis. From the epidemiological studies a total hypersensitivity reaction prevalence rate of 1.4% (95% confidence interval 1.2–1.7%) was determined. Mucosal involvement, hepatitis, higher age and disease occurrence in non-affluent countries were associated with higher risk of fatal outcome. Overall, the fatality rate was 9.9%.

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions to Cephalosporins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Hye

    2014-01-01

    Cephalosporins can cause a range of hypersensitivity reactions, including IgE-mediated, immediate reactions. Cephalosporin allergy has been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other β-lactam antibiotics. Unlike penicillins, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood and thus, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available. Nevertheless, skin testing with diluted solutions of cephalosporins can be valuable in confirming IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. In vitro tests are in development using recent technological advances and can be used as complementary tests. However, they are not commonly used because of their reduced sensitivity and limited availability. In selected cases of inconclusive results in both skin tests and IgE assays, a graded challenge or induction of drug tolerance with the implicated cephalosporin should be performed. PMID:25374747

  7. Effect of pollen-mediated oxidative stress on immediate hypersensitivity reactions and late-phase inflammation in allergic conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Choudhury, Barun K.; Sur, Sanjiv; Boldogh, Istvan

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic eye diseases are complex inflammatory conditions of the conjunctiva that are becoming increasingly prevalent and present an increasing economic burden because of direct and indirect health expenditures. Objective We sought to identify factors that may synergize with antigen-induced allergic inflammation and lead to allergic conjunctivitis. We used a murine model of allergic conjunctivitis to test the effect of oxidative stress generated by pollen oxidases using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced) or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NAD[P]H) as an electron donor present in pollen grains. Methods Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by hydrated Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen (short ragweed pollen; RWP) grains was determined by using 2′-7′-dihydro-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, nitroblue tetrazolium reduction, and Amplex Red assay. The RWP-induced changes in intracellular ROS levels were examined in A549 cells, human primary bronchial epithelial cells, and murine conjunctiva. Results Ragweed pollen grains contain NAD(P)H oxidase activity, which is diphenyleneiodonium-sensitive and quinacrine-sensitive and sodium azide-resistant. These NAD(P)H oxidases generate a superoxide anion that can be converted to H2O2 by pollen grain–associated superoxide dismutase. These diffusible oxygen radicals from pollen grains increase intracellular ROS levels in cultured epithelial cells and murine conjunctiva. Similar phenomena were observed in sensitized and naive mice, indicating that the RWP-induced oxidative stress in conjunctival epithelium is independent of adaptive immunity. Inactivation of NAD(P)H oxidase activity in RWP decreases the immediate-type hypersensitivity and inflammatory cell infiltration into the conjunctiva. Conclusion Our data suggest that ROS generated by NAD(P)H oxidases in pollen grains intensify immediate allergic reactions and recruitment of inflammatory cells in murine conjunctiva. PMID:16210058

  8. [Rare, severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide].

    PubMed

    Korsholm, Anne Sofie; Ebbehøj, Eva; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-07-07

    The literature reports a large variety of adverse reactions to potassium iodide. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide in a 51-year-old woman with Graves' thyrotoxicosis is described. Following administration the patient developed sialadenitis, conjunctivitis, stomatitis and acneiform iododerma that responded dramatically to withdrawal of the potassium iodide and administration with corticosteroids. Awareness of these adverse reactions may prevent prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary tests and treatments.

  9. Immediate-type hypersensitivity drug reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Shelley F; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Wiese, Michael D; Heddle, Robert J; Brown, Simon G A

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis have been reported for nearly all classes of therapeutic reagents and these reactions can occur within minutes to hours of exposure. These reactions are unpredictable, not directly related to dose or the pharmacological action of the drug and have a relatively high mortality risk. This review will focus on the clinical presentation, immune mechanisms, diagnosis and prevention of the most serious form of immediate onset drug hypersensitivity reaction, anaphylaxis. The incidence of drug-induced anaphylaxis deaths appears to be increasing and our understanding of the multiple and complex reasons for the unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis to drugs is also expanding. This review highlights the importance of enhancing our understanding of the biology of the patient (i.e. immune response, genetics) as well as the pharmacology and chemistry of the drug when investigating, diagnosing and treating drug hypersensitivity. Misdiagnosis of drug hypersensitivity leads to substantial patient risk and cost. Although oral provocation is often considered the gold standard of diagnosis, it can pose a potential risk to the patient. There is an urgent need to improve and standardize diagnostic testing and desensitization protocols as other diagnostic tests currently available for assessment of immediate drug allergy are not highly predictive. PMID:24286446

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to food additives.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Shahid; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-06-01

    To provide an updated concise review on food additives adverse reactions, diagnosis, and management. Despite the common use of food additives, their adverse reactions seem to be very rare in the general population (0.01-0.23%) but higher in atopic individuals (2-7%). Probably because of the difficulty in diagnosis, most of the available information is based on case reports or small series. Reported reactions are mostly mild and may affect the skin, the gastrointestinal tract, or the airways, and rarely anaphylaxis. Food additives should be suspected as the culprit in patients who report a history of reactions to a number of unrelated foods or to a certain food when commercially prepared but not when prepared at home. The major problem in dealing with reactions to additives is the identification of the offending agent(s). Apart from a careful history taking, allergy skin testing or in-vitro testing are rarely useful. Trials of elimination and reintroduction may be more helpful. If the anticipated reaction is severe, a well designed challenge testing should be carried out. Once the offending additive(s) is confirmed, treatment is avoidance. Because accidental exposure often happens, patients with a history of severe reactions should have self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert (Turlock, California, USA) identification.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to biologic agents.

    PubMed

    Vultaggio, Alessandra; Castells, Mariana C

    2014-08-01

    Biologic agents (BAs) are important therapeutic tools; their use has rapidly expanded and they are used in oncology, immunology, and inflammatory diseases. Their use may be limited, however, by adverse drug reactions. This article reviews the current literature on clinical presentation and pathogenic mechanisms of both acute and delayed reactions. In addition, procedures for management of BA-induced reactions, including preventive and diagnostic work-up, are provided. Lastly, this article summarizes the current knowledge of desensitization to several widely used monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Type IV hypersensitivity reactions following Dermabond adhesive utilization in knee surgery: A Report of Three Cases.

    PubMed

    Yagnatovsky, Michelle; Pham, Hien; Rokito, Andrew; Jazrawi, Laith; Strauss, Eric

    2017-01-25

    ​We retrospectively reviewed the records of 3 patients (3 knees) with a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction following Dermabond exposure after an orthopaedic knee procedure. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions are mediated by CD4+ helper T cells. The use of skin adhesives in place of traditional sutures is increasing in popularity given Dermabond's potential benefits of decreased wound infection rate and better wound approximation. However, hypersensitivity reactions to the cyanoacrylate material in Dermabond have been described. Differentiating hypersensitivity reactions from post-operative infections is important as septic arthritis is a potentially devastating complication. This case series presents the challenge of properly diagnosing and managing hypersensitivity reactions. Consultation with allergists and dermatologists may be appropriate for ascertaining the nature of the surgical site complication and proper management. The recommended management of hypersensitivity-type reactions is a course of topical steroids and infection work up if needed.

  13. Management of nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.

    PubMed

    Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Haddad, Cynthia; Paulmann, Maren; Mockenhaupt, Maja

    2014-08-01

    Nonimmediate hypersensitivity to drugs has a huge diversity of clinical presentations affecting exclusively or predominantly a single organ (most often the skin) or multiple organs. The latter is the rule with drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, and with drug-induced vasculitis. The management includes a dozen successive steps. Finally, the patient should be provided clear information on the suspected cause of the reaction, recommendations for follow-up after severe reactions associated with a risk of sequelae, and clear recommendations for future use of medications. Pharmacovigilance networks should be informed.

  14. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins and other betalactams.

    PubMed

    Antúnez, C; Martín, E; Cornejo-García, J A; Blanca-Lopez, N; R-Pena, R; Mayorga, C; Torres, M J; Blanca, M

    2006-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams are IgE mediated and constitute the most frequent allergic reactions mediated by specific immunological mechanisms. IgE responses to benzyl penicillin (BP), the first antibiotic producing the benzyl penicilloyl structure (BPO), are characterized by a quick release of inflammatory mediators, resulting in anaphylactic shock, urticaria and angioedema. With the progressive appearance of other structures, comprising cephalosporins, carbapenems, monobactams and clavulanic acid, IgE selective responses and cross-reactivity reactions were observed. The diagnosis of betalactam hypersensitivity, classically based on skin testing with major and minor determinants of benzyl penicillin or in vitro IgE antibodies to BP, has been modified by the inclusion of different determinants generated from these compounds, for which amoxicillin (AX) is the most relevant, followed by cephalosporins. Some subjects develop positive responses to several betalactams, mostly within the same family, but others develop a selective response. These are relevant for the appropriate selection of antimicrobial drugs in patients who have immediate hypersensitivity to betalactams.

  15. Type I hypersensitivity reaction as a complication of lepa

    PubMed Central

    Janthli, Deepa Manjunath; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Somashekar, Shruthi; Lohith, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse drug reaction is defined as response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses normally used in man for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological functions. Type I hypersensitivity reaction is known as anaphylactic reaction which is due to immediate immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction. It is characterized by symptoms such as fever nausea, back pain, angiodema, rash, flushing, etc. Lepa generally refers to the application of pastes formed by mixing powder of herbs with water, milk, etc., and liquids. Complementary and alternative medicines are frequently used by the general population. Many people consider them to be without side effects. Ayurvedic treatment involves Shodhana (biopurification), Shaman (pacification), Bahya (external therapy), and Abhyantara karma's (internal therapy) for treating different diseases. One such bahya karma or external therapy is lepa. Even though lepa is said as “Aadhya Upakrama,” undue hypersensitivity is observed in many patients. A 60-year-old woman had an adverse reaction to lepa after being administered as an external medication. The observations were erythema, eruptions, and itching. Such case of hypersensitivity is discussed in the present study. PMID:26792959

  16. Type I hypersensitivity reaction as a complication of lepa.

    PubMed

    Janthli, Deepa Manjunath; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Somashekar, Shruthi; Lohith, B A

    2015-12-01

    Adverse drug reaction is defined as response to a drug which is noxious and unintended, and which occurs at doses normally used in man for the prophylaxis, diagnosis or therapy of disease, or for the modification of physiological functions. Type I hypersensitivity reaction is known as anaphylactic reaction which is due to immediate immunoglobulin E-mediated reaction. It is characterized by symptoms such as fever nausea, back pain, angiodema, rash, flushing, etc. Lepa generally refers to the application of pastes formed by mixing powder of herbs with water, milk, etc., and liquids. Complementary and alternative medicines are frequently used by the general population. Many people consider them to be without side effects. Ayurvedic treatment involves Shodhana (biopurification), Shaman (pacification), Bahya (external therapy), and Abhyantara karma's (internal therapy) for treating different diseases. One such bahya karma or external therapy is lepa. Even though lepa is said as "Aadhya Upakrama," undue hypersensitivity is observed in many patients. A 60-year-old woman had an adverse reaction to lepa after being administered as an external medication. The observations were erythema, eruptions, and itching. Such case of hypersensitivity is discussed in the present study.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: analysis of the factors involved.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Ariza, A; Doña, I; Mayorga, C; Montañez, M I; Garcia-Campos, J; Gomez, F; Rondón, C; Blanca, M; Torres, M J

    2013-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones seem to be on the increase, especially immediate type reactions. The aim of this study was to determine whether several conditions, including gender, age, type of reaction, time interval between the reaction and the study, type of symptoms, the specific fluoroquinolone involved in the reaction and previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams or to other drugs were factors contributing to the development of hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. We analysed retrospectively all patients attending our allergy department between January 2005 and December 2010 because of a reaction associated with fluoroquinolone administration. The diagnosis was confirmed by basophil activation test or drug provocation tests. In accordance with the results, patients were then classified as having hypersensitivity or non-hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones. A group of 218 patients was evaluated; 69 were confirmed as having hypersensitivity, 146 as non-hypersensitivity and 3 were excluded. Comparisons between groups showed that the allergic patients more often had a previous confirmed hypersensitivity to betalactams (P = 0.029), immediate reactions (P = 0.001) and anaphylaxis (P = 0.000), and moxifloxacin was the fluoroquinolone most frequently involved (P = 0.027). The logistic regression analysis showed three factors associated with the diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions to fluoroquinolones: previous hypersensitivity to betalactams (OR: 4.571; 95% CI: 0.987-21.171; adjusted OR: 23.654; 95% CI: 1.529-365.853), immediate reactions (OR: 17.333; 95% CI: 4.374-68.691; adjusted OR: 52.493; 95% CI: 6.621-416.200) and reactions induced by moxifloxacin (OR: 3.091; 95% CI: 1.160-8.239; adjusted OR: 13.610; 95% CI: 2.419-76.565). In patients who develop reactions to fluoroquinolones, hypersensitivity is more often confirmed in those with immediate reactions and when moxifloxacin is involved. Moreover, patients with hypersensitivity to

  18. Ethanol as a cause of hypersensitivity reactions to alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, I; Hipler, U-C; Zuberbier, T; Worm, M

    2002-08-01

    Adverse reactions after ingestion of alcoholic beverages are common. Metabolic differences in individuals and also the histamine content in alcoholic beverages have been implicated. By contrast pure ethanol has rarely been reported as a cause of hypersensitivity reactions and its mechanism has not been clarified yet. To determine whether ethanol itself accounts for alcohol hypersensitivity in patients with anaphylactic reactions after alcohol intake. In search of possible pathomechanisms all patients were analysed by skin prick testing and sulfidoleukotriene production of peripheral leucocytes using ethanol and its metabolites. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges with a cumulated amount of 30 mL ethanol were performed in 12 adult patients with a positive history of adverse reactions after consumption of different alcoholic beverages. Skin prick tests and measurement of sulfidoleukotriene production were performed using different concentrations of ethanol and acetaldehyde from 50 to 1000 mm. Oral challenges with pure ethanol were positive in six out of eleven patients. All challenge-positive patients, but also four out of five challenge-negative patients, showed an increased sulfidoleukotriene production in-vitro compared with healthy controls. Skin prick tests using alcoholic beverages, ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid were negative in all patients (12/12). Our study shows that ethanol itself is a common causative factor in hypersensitivity reactions to alcoholic beverages. These reactions occur dose-dependent and a non-IgE-mediated pathomechanism is likely, because skin prick tests were negative in all cases. Increased sulfidoleukotriene production was determined in some patients, but is no reliable predictor. Therefore oral provocation tests remain indispensable in making the diagnosis of ethanol hypersensitivity.

  19. Hypersensitivity and immunologic reactions to biologics: opportunities for the allergist.

    PubMed

    Khan, David A

    2016-08-01

    There has been a great expanse in the use of biological agents during the past decade. However, there are significant differences between biologics and typical pharmaceutical drugs. This review focuses on 3 separate types of adverse reactions to biologics, namely high cytokine reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, and secondary immunodeficiency. A PubMed literature search restricted to the previous 10 years using combinations of search terms, including omalizumab, rituximab, TGN1412, biologic agent, anaphylaxis, hypogammaglobulinemia, desensitization, and cytokine storm, was performed. The results were manually filtered to identify relevant articles with additional references identified from bibliographies. Reports were selected for TGN1412 cytokine storm, omalizumab anaphylaxis and desensitization, rituximab-induced hypogammaglobulinemia, rituximab anaphylaxis and serum sickness, and monoclonal antibody desensitization. A phase 1 clinical trial using a humanized anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (TGN1412) caused severe cytokine storm reactions in all 6 subjects, resulting in multiorgan failure. Omalizumab has been reported to cause anaphylaxis in fewer than 0.1% of patients, many with delayed reactions. The mechanism for this anaphylactic reaction is unclear. Rituximab has been associated with hypogammaglobulinemia, serum sickness-like reactions, and anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitizations to monoclonal antibodies, including rituximab, suspected of causing immunoglobulin E-mediated reactions have been found to be generally safe and effective. Hypersensitivity reactions and immune dysregulation from biologic agents are not rare. The allergist and immunologist should be involved in managing these patients for optimal care. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity reaction].

    PubMed

    Servonnet, A; Leclercq, E; Delacour, H; Ceppa, F

    2010-12-01

    A potentially life-threatening hypersensitive reaction occurs in association with initiation of HIV nucleoside analogue abacavir therapy in 4 to 8% of patients. Preliminary studies appear to confirm the role of the immune system in abacavir hypersensitivity. The reaction is possibly the result of presentation of drug peptides onto HLA, that may induce a pathogenic T-cell response. Hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir is strongly associated with the presence of the HLA-B*5701 allele and prospective HLA-B*5701 genetic screening has now been instituted in clinical practice to reduce the risk of hypersensitivity reaction. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Corticosteroids: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    Corticosteroids are anti-inflammatory medications used widely to treat allergic inflammation. Although the endocrine and gastrointestinal side effects of corticosteroids have been described, the occurrence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions and delayed contact dermatitis due to corticosteroids remains under-recognized. Hypersensitivity reactions can occur to a corticosteroid itself, or to the additives and vehicles in corticosteroid preparations. Skin testing and oral graded challenge can help confirm the suspected culprit agent in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and help identify an alternative tolerated corticosteroid. Patch testing can help identify the culprit agents in delayed hypersensitivity contact dermatitis. Cross-reactivity patterns have not been observed for immediate hypersensitivity reactions as they have been for delayed contact dermatitis. Sensitization in contact dermatitis exhibits cross-reactivity patterns based on corticosteroid structure. We review the current understanding regarding the clinical presentation, evaluation, and management of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

  2. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yawalkar, N

    2009-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity represents an immune-mediated reaction to a drug. Although several drug hypersensitivity reactions are confined to the skin and rather mild, some may be life threatening and also involve further organs such as liver, kidney and bone marrow. The exact pathogenesis of many drug hypersensitivity reactions is still obscure. In this review the concepts on how small molecular drugs can activate the immune system are discussed and the hapten, prohapten and p-i concept are explained. Furthermore, the classification of drug hypersensitivity reactions and some common and severe clinical manifestations of drug-induced T cell mediated reactions are presented.

  3. [Hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media: diagnosis, prevention and treatment].

    PubMed

    Mahlab-Guri, Keren; Herskovitz, Pearl; Sthoeger, Zev

    2012-07-01

    More than 70 million radiographic examinations with radio contrast media are performed worldwide each year. The incidence of adverse reactions to radio contrast media is 5-13%. Adverse reactions include hypersensitivity reactions, chemotoxic reactions and renal toxicity. Hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media range from mild pruritus to life-threatening emergency. The differential diagnosis between hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media and chemotoxic reaction is challenging. The incidence of chemotoxic reactions is mainly affected by the chemical structure of the radio contrast media and the rate of infusion. The incidence of hypersensitivity radio contrast media reaction is affected by age and by the presence of asthma and other atopic diseases. The diagnosis of hypersensitivity reaction to radio contrast media is based on clinical manifestations. The additional value of laboratory tests is limited and questionable. In case of hypersensitivity radio contrast reaction, the infusion should be stopped immediately, airways should be protected and fluids, oxygen and drugs should be given. Prophylactic treatment before its administration may prevent hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.

  4. Allergic and hypersensitivity reactions in the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Salmaan; Chant, Clarence

    2010-06-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are defined as immunologically based adverse reactions to chemicals or medicinal agents. These reactions are common in the intensive care unit and can present as a simple, mildly symptomatic rash or as life-threatening anaphylactic reactions. Hypersensitivity reactions have traditionally been classified as types I to IV reactions based on the underlying immune mechanisms, although the clinical relevance of the classification is unclear, and new subtypes to this system have been recently proposed. Given the immunologic and often unpredictable nature of these reactions, avoidance or prevention is not a feasible option. Therefore, management has primarily consisted of withdrawal of potential offending agents, supportive therapy, symptomatic management, and, in some specific examples, targeted pharmacotherapy. This article outlines the background and types of hypersensitivity reactions and provides descriptions and management strategies when applicable to common types of hypersensitivity reactions encountered in the intensive care unit.

  5. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: infection or hypersensitivity reaction?

    PubMed

    Dreesman, Alexandra; Hoorens, Anne; Hachimi-Idrissi, Said

    2010-08-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is a potentially life-threatening delayed hypersensitivity reaction characterized by the triad of fever, rash and multiorgan involvement, which usually occurs within the first weeks of introduction of an antiepileptic drug. It mimics several life-threatening diseases, which makes it potentially difficult to recognize. We describe the case of a 6-year-old boy admitted with anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome after the association of lamotrigine treatment with sodium valproic acid for reluctant epilepsy.

  6. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction to gadolinium-based MR contrast media.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Min-Hye; Lee, Whal; Min, Kyung-Up; Han, Moon-Hee; Cho, Sang-Heon

    2012-08-01

    To determine the incidence and risk factors of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to gadolinium-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents. Institutional review board approval and a waiver of informed consent were obtained. A retrospective study of patients who had been given gadolinium-based MR contrast media between August 2004 and July 2010 was performed by reviewing their electronic medical records. In addition to data on immediate hypersensitivity reaction, the kinds of MR contrast media and demographic data including age, sex, and comorbidity were collected. To compare the groups, the χ(2) test, Fisher exact test, χ(2) test for trend, Student t test, analysis of variance test, and multiple logistic regression test were performed. A total of 112 immediate hypersensitivity reactions (0.079% of 141 623 total doses) were identified in 102 patients (0.121% of 84 367 total patients). Among the six evaluated MR contrast media, gadodiamide had the lowest rate (0.013%) of immediate hypersensitivity reactions, while gadobenate dimeglumine had the highest rate (0.22%). The rate for immediate hypersensitivity reactions was significantly higher in female patients (odds ratio = 1.687; 95% confidence interval: 1.143, 2.491) and in patients with allergies and asthma (odds ratio = 2.829; 95% confidence interval: 1.427, 5.610). Patients with a previous history of immediate hypersensitivity reactions had a higher rate of recurrence after reexposure to MR contrast media (30%) compared with the incidence rate in total patients (P < .0001). The incidence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions increased depending on the number of times patients were exposed to MR contrast media (P for trend = .036). The most common symptom was urticaria (91.1%), and anaphylaxis occurred in 11 cases (9.8%). The mortality rate was 0.0007% because of one fatality. The incidence of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to MR contrast media was 0.079%, and the recurrence rate of hypersensitivity

  7. Outpatient desensitization in selected patients with platinum hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, David M; Vetter, Monica Hagan; Cohn, David E; Khan, Ambar; Hays, John L

    2017-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies are a standard treatment for both initial and recurrent gynecologic cancers. Given this widespread use, it is important to be aware of the features of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the subsequent treatment of these reactions. There is also increasing interest in the development of desensitization protocols to allow patients with a history of platinum hypersensitivity to receive further platinum based therapy. In this review, we describe the management of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the desensitization protocols utilized at our institution. We also describe the clinical categorizations utilized to triage patients to appropriate desensitization protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Type III Hypersensitivity Reaction in Mushroom Growers

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byoung-Whui; Min, Kyung-Up; Kim, You-Young; Moon, Hee-Bom; Chang, Suk-II; Kang, Seock-Young; Kim, Sang-Jae; Kim, Sin-Ok

    1991-01-01

    Some respiratory symptoms in mushroom growers such as mushroom worker’s lung develop by inhalation of certain agents arising from the environment of mushroom cultivation. Recently we observed mushroom workers who had respiratory symptoms which might be type III hypersensitivity reaction to the antigen of Pleurotus floridae. We gave questionaires to all the mushroom growers at one of the biggest cultivation areas of mushrooms, Pleurotus floridae in Pocheon, Kyunggi Province. Those with respiratory symptoms were subjects for the study. CBC, chest X-ray, pulmonary function test, skin test with Pleurotus floridae extract, and precipitin antibody test to Pleurotus floridae were performed in the study subjects. Out of a total 308 mushroom workers, 23 workers (14 males, 9 females) had respiratory symptoms. Their mean age was 45 years, and their mean duration of engagement was 3.4 years. Their main symptoms were cough (100%), sputum (82.6%), dyspnea (43.5%), and fever with chills (13.0%). Two cases showed increased interstitial lung markings on chest X-ray films. Sixteen cases (73.9%) showed precipitin antibodies against P. floridae extract by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Antibodies against Micropolyspora faeni and Thermoactinomyces vulgaris were not detected in any subject. PMID:1742253

  9. Clinical value of radiocontrast media skin tests as a prescreening and diagnostic tool in hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae-Hoon; Jo, Eun-Jung; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kim, Min-Hye; Yang, Min-Suk; Song, Woo-Jung; Choi, Sang-Il; Kim, Jae-Hyoung; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2013-04-01

    Some radiocontrast media (RCM) hypersensitivity reactions may have underlying IgE- or T-cell-mediated mechanisms. RCM skin testing may be useful for predicting future reactions. To investigate the clinical value of RCM skin testing before computed tomography and after RCM hypersensitivity reactions. Patients who underwent RCM skin testing were a prospective sample of convenience at a single medical center and were tested just before their pending nonionic RCM-enhanced computed tomogram. In addition, skin test data of patients who were referred to the allergy clinic because of their previous RCM hypersensitivity reactions were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 1048 patients enrolled in the study prospectively. Of these, 672 (64.1%) had never been exposed to RCM. Of the 376 previously exposed to RCM, 61 (16.2%) had a history of at least one mild RCM-associated reaction, 56 (91.8%) had immediate reactions, and 5 had no-immediate reactions. There was only 1 positive immediate hypersensitivity RCM skin test result (0.09%). There were 51 mild immediate reactions (4.9%), 1 moderate immediate reaction (0.09%), 8 mild nonimmediate reactions (0.76%), and 1 moderate nonimmediate reaction (0.09%). There was only 1 positive delayed hypersensitivity skin test result (0.09%), retrospectively determined, in 1 (11.1%) of the nonimmediate RCM-associated reactions. Sensitivity of RCM skin testing was significantly higher with severe immediate reactions (57.1%) than mild reactions (12.9%) and moderate reactions (25.0%) in the retrospective review of diagnostic skin test data (P = .03). RCM skin testing for screening is of no clinical utility in predicting hypersensitivity reactions. RCM skin testing may have modest utility in retrospectively evaluating severe adverse reactions. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Implanted Metal Devices: Facts and Fictions.

    PubMed

    Teo Wendy, Z W; Schalock, P C

    The use of metals in the medical field has become increasingly prevalent over the past few decades. Patients find themselves being exposed to metals in a variety of ways, ranging from external exposure to instruments such as the stainless steel in surgical blades to internal exposure via medical devices being implanted in their bodies. There has been growing interest in the possibility of developing hypersensitivity reactions to constituent metals in medical implant devices, both in cutaneous and systemic forms. Hypersensitivity reactions to metals are uncommon, but they are reported and require appropriate evaluation and management, particularly if they are symptomatic. In view of the lack of consensus in the field on the appropriate steps to evaluate and manage patients with suspected metal hypersensitivity reactions, this review aims to analyze current evidence on hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants in orthopedic surgery, endovascular surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and dental surgery.

  11. Type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to cyanocobalamin but not hydroxycobalamin.

    PubMed

    Moloney, F J; Hughes, R; O'Shea, D; Kirby, B

    2008-07-01

    We report a case of a 42-year-old woman with a background of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome, who developed a type I immediate hypersensitivity reaction to intramuscular cyanocobalamin. Intradermal testing showed a positive reaction to cyanocobalamin. The patient was subsequently treated with intramuscular hydroxycobalamin after negative intradermal testing to this alternative B(12) compound. A review of previously described cases of hypersensitivity to either compound provides a rationale for the management of this rare but serious side-effect.

  12. Drug hypersensitivity reactions targeting the skin in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Voie, K L; Campbell, K L; Lavergne, S N

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) can be dose dependent or idiosyncratic. Most idiosyncratic reactions are believed to be immune-mediated; such drug hypersensitivities and allergies are unpredictable. Cutaneous reactions are the most common presentation of drug allergies. In veterinary medicine it can be difficult to assess the true prevalence of adverse drug reactions, although reports available suggest that they occur quite commonly. There are multiple theories that attempt to explain how drug allergies occur, because the pathogenesis is not yet well understood. These include the (pro)-hapten hypothesis, the Danger Theory, the pi concept, and the viral reactivation theory. Cutaneous drug allergies in veterinary medicine can have a variety of clinical manifestations, ranging from pruritus to often fatal toxic epidermal necrolysis. Diagnosis can be challenging, as the reactions are highly pleomorphic and may be mistaken for other dermatologic diseases. One must rely heavily on history and physical examination to rule out other possibilities. Dechallenge of the drug, histopathology, and other diagnostic tests can help to confirm the diagnosis. New diagnostic tools are beginning to be used, such as antibody or cellular testing, and may be used more in the future. There is much yet to learn about drug allergies, which makes future research vitally important. Treatment of drug allergies involves supportive care, and additional treatments, such as immunosuppressive medications, depend on the manifestation of the disease. Of utmost importance is to avoid the use of the incriminating drug in future treatment of the patient, as subsequent reactions can be worse, and ultimately can prove fatal.

  13. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-09-13

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions.

  14. Involvement of Histamine and RhoA/ROCK in Penicillin Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jiayin; Yi, Yan; Li, Chunying; Zhang, Yushi; Wang, Lianmei; Zhao, Yong; Pan, Chen; Liang, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions has not been completely elucidated. These reactions are generally considered to be mediated by IgE, but penicillin-specific IgE could not be detected in most cases. This study demonstrated that penicillin was able to cause vascular hyperpermeability in a mouse model mimicking clinical symptoms of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions. The first exposure to penicillin also induced immediate edema and exudative reactions in ears and lungs of mice in a dose-dependent manner. Vasodilation was noted in microvessels in ears. These reactions were unlikely to be immune-mediated reactions, because no penicillin-specific IgE was produced. Furthermore, penicillin treatment directly elicited rapid histamine release. Penicillin also led to F-actin reorganization in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and increased the permeability of the endothelial monolayer. Activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was observed in ears and lungs of mice and in endothelial cells after treatment with penicillin. Both an anti-histamine agent and a ROCK inhibitor attenuated penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mice. This study presents a novel mechanism of penicillin immediate hypersensitivity reactions and suggests a potential preventive approach against these reactions. PMID:27619816

  15. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments.

  16. An unexpected positive hypersensitive reaction to eugenol.

    PubMed

    Tammannavar, Praveen; Pushpalatha, C; Jain, Shrenik; Sowmya, S V

    2013-09-18

    Eugenol is an active, principal aromatic liquid responsible for several pharmacological activities. It is widely used in dental practice to relieve pain arising from various sources, such as pulpitis and dentinal hypersensitivity. As a primary irritant and sensitiser, it is known to cause contact urticaria as well as chronic urticaria. However, eugenol causes allergic contact dermatitis, possibly because it can react directly with proteins to form conjugate and reactive haptens. It is found that eugenol in various dental preparations-especially in the case of some zinc oxide-contains preparations such as periodontal dressings and root canal cements. This can cause hypersensitivity when it comes in contact with gingiva or teeth. This article presents a case of immediate allergic contact urticaria to eugenol during dental treatment.

  17. Hypersensitivity Reactions Associated with Platinum Antineoplastic Agents: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Makrilia, Nektaria; Syrigou, Ekaterini; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Manolopoulos, Leonidas; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-containing chemotherapy agents (cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin) have been approved in the first-line setting of numerous malignancies, such as ovarian, bladder, head and neck, colorectal, and lung cancer. Their extensive use over the last decade has led to a significant increase in the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions, which are defined as unforeseen reactions whose signs and symptoms cannot be explained by the known toxicity of these drugs. Skin rash, flushing, abdominal cramping, itchy palms, and back pain are common symptoms. Cardiovascular and respiratory complications can prove fatal. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms have been suggested. Hypersensitivity usually appears after multiple infusions, suggesting type I allergic reactions; however, other types of hypersensitivity also seem to be implicated. Several management options are available to treating physicians: discontinuation of chemotherapy, premedication, prolonging of infusion duration, desensitization protocols, and replacement with a different platinum compound after performing skin tests that rule out cross-reactions among platinum agents. PMID:20886011

  18. Delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to anthrax vaccine.

    PubMed

    Greidanus, Thomas G; Honl, Beth A

    2002-01-01

    The Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program is a Department of Defense initiative to protect military personnel against the threat of anthrax. Surveillance for adverse events associated with anthrax vaccination has shown that mild local reactions are not uncommon while systemic reactions are extremely rare. We present a case of 26-year-old male with delayed-type hypersensitivity after two doses of anthrax vaccine.

  19. Diagnosis and management of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Scott D; Salazar, Kimberly C

    2013-08-01

    Cephalosporins are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of antibiotics. Immediate IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions have been reported with use of a specific cephalosporin, as a cross-reaction between different cephalosporins or as a cross-reaction to other β-lactam antibiotics, namely, penicillin. Historically, frequent reports of anaphylaxis following administration of first- and second-generation cephalosporins to patients with a history of penicillin allergy led to the belief of a high degree of allergic cross-reactivity. More recent evidence reveals a significantly lower risk of cross-reactivity between penicillins and the newer-generation cephalosporins. The current thought is that a shared side chain, rather than the β-lactam ring structure, is the determining factor in immunologic cross-reactivity. Understanding the chemical structure of these agents has allowed us to identify the allergenic determinants for penicillin; however, the exact allergenic determinants of cephalosporins are less well understood. For this reason, standardized diagnostic skin testing is not available for cephalosporins as it is for penicillin. Nevertheless, skin testing to the cephalosporin in question, using a nonirritating concentration, provides additional information, which can further guide the work-up of a patient suspected of having an allergy to that drug. Together, the history and the skin test results can assist the allergist in the decision to recommend continued drug avoidance or to perform a graded challenge versus an induction of tolerance procedure.

  20. Stable form of galectin-9, a Tim-3 ligand, inhibits contact hypersensitivity and psoriatic reactions: a potent therapeutic tool for Th1- and/or Th17-mediated skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Haruna; Satoh, Takahiro; Matsushima, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuki; Saeki, Kazumi; Niki, Toshiro; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2009-08-01

    Tim-3 is a cell surface molecule preferentially expressed in Th1 and Th17 cells. Galectin-9 is a ligand for Tim-3 and the binding of galectin-9 to Tim-3 induces apoptosis. We recently developed a stable form of galectin-9 (sGal-9) by partial deletion of the linker peptide. In this study, we characterized the therapeutic effects of sGal-9 on inflammatory reactions in contact hypersensitivity and IL-23-induced psoriatic mouse models. In contact hypersensitivity in mice, the ear swelling response was suppressed by sGal-9. In vitro treatment with sGal-9 resulted in cell apoptosis of CD4, CD8, and hepatic NK cells. sGal-9-treated mice had decreased IFN-gamma- and IL-17-producing T cells. Similarly, sGal-9 reduced epidermal thickness and dermal cellular infiltrate levels in IL-23-induced psoriasis-like skin inflammation. This was accompanied by decreased skin lesion levels of IL-17 and IL-22. sGal-9 may be a unique and useful therapeutic tool for the treatment of Th1- and/or Th17-mediated skin inflammation.

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions to aprotinin re-exposure in paediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Siehr, Stephanie; Stuth, Eckehard; Tweddell, James; Hoffman, George; Troshynski, Todd; Jones, Deborah; Mitchell, Michael; Ghanayem, Nancy

    2010-02-01

    Hypersensitivity to aprotinin is low (1-3%) but more likely with re-exposure. The manufacturer issued a black box warning which lists aprotinin re-exposure within 1 year of prior exposure as a contraindication. We investigated the temporal relationship between re-exposure interval and hypersensitivity in children. With Human Research Review Board approval, charts of all patients exposed to aprotinin during cardiac surgery were reviewed. We extracted data for re-exposure interval and hypersensitivity to skin tests, intravenous test dosing or infusion of the loading dose. We defined systemic hypersensitivity as haemodynamic instability, respiratory symptoms or diffuse skin reaction temporally related to exposure. From March 1994 to June 2007, there were a total of 2333 aprotinin exposures in 1824 patients. A total of 509 re-exposures occurred in 381 patients: 280 in 244 patients with early (within 1 year) re-exposure and 229 in 222 patients with late (after 1 year) re-exposure. Thirteen systemic hypersensitivity reactions occurred in the 509 re-exposures (2.6%): two during skin testing and 11 during the loading dose. Although the incidence of local hypersensitivity was increased with early re-exposure (6/280 or 2.1% vs 0/229, p=0.019), the incidence of the systemic reaction was not different between early and late re-exposures (6/280 or 2.1% (CI 0.8-4.6%) vs 7/229 or 3.1% (CI 1.2-6.2%), p=0.6). Six patients with a previous hypersensitivity reaction had an additional re-exposure to aprotinin; one of these patients had a systemic reaction during the third exposure. The incidence and type of hypersensitivity to aprotinin re-exposure in our cohort is consistent with previous reports. Repeat exposure within 1 year did not increase the risk of systemic hypersensitivity. Copyright 2009 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Re-visiting Hypersensitivity Reactions to Taxanes: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Castells, Mariana C

    2015-10-01

    Taxanes (a class of chemotherapeutic agents) are an important cause of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in cancer patients. During the last decade, the development of rapid drug desensitization has been key to allow patients with HSRs to taxanes to be safely re-treated although the mechanisms of these HSRs are not fully understood. Earlier studies suggested that solvents, such as Cremophor EL used to solubilize paclitaxel, were responsible for HSRs through complement activation, but recent findings have raised the possibility that some of these HSRs are IgE-mediated. Taxane skin testing, which identifies patients with an IgE-mediated sensitivity, appears as a promising diagnostic and risk stratification tool in the management of patients with HSRs to taxanes. The management of patients following a HSR involves risk stratification and re-exposure could be performed either through rapid drug desensitization or graded challenge based on the severity of the initial HSR and the skin test result. Rapid drug desensitization has been shown to be an effective and safe method to re-introduce taxanes in hundreds of patients, including those with life-threatening HSRs. Patients with non-severe delayed skin HSRs may benefit from rapid drug desensitization since they may be at increased risk for an immediate HSR upon re-exposure. This review focuses on the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and novel mechanisms of immediate HSRs to taxanes. A new management strategy for HSRs to taxanes based on skin testing and rapid drug desensitization is proposed.

  3. Anaesthesia-associated hypersensitivity reactions: seven years' data from a British bi-specialty clinic.

    PubMed

    Low, A E; McEwan, J C; Karanam, S; North, J; Kong, K-L

    2016-01-01

    Our bi-specialty clinic was established to systematically investigate patients with suspected peri-operative hypersensitivity reactions. Four hundred and ten patients were studied; 316 following an intra-operative reaction ('postoperative' group) and 94 with a previous history of reaction, referred before undergoing anaesthesia ('pre-operative' group). In the postoperative group, 173 (54.7%) were diagnosed with IgE-mediated reactions: 65 (37.6%) to neuromuscular blocking drugs; 54 (31.2%) antibiotics; 15 (8.7%) chlorhexidine and 12 (6.9%) patent blue dye. Reactions were severe in 114 patients (65.9%). All reactions to patent blue dye were severe. We identified IgE sensitisation in 22 (13.2%) cases with isolated mucocutaneous reactions. Only 173 (54.7%) patients had serum tryptase samples taken. Referrers' suspected causal agent was confirmed in only 37.2% of patients. Of 94 patients reviewed 'pre-operatively', 29 (30.8%) were diagnosed with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, reinforcing the importance of investigating this group of patients. Knowledge of the range of causative agents identified in our study should guide the investigation of suspected peri-operative hypersensitivity reactions. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. Pharmacogenetics and Predictive Testing of Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Ruwen; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions adverse drug reaction (ADR) occur in approximately 17% of patients. Avoiding ADR is thus mandatory from both an ethical and an economic point of view. Whereas, pharmacogenetics changes of the pharmacokinetics may contribute to the explanation of some type A reactions, strong relationships of genetic markers has also been shown for drug hypersensitivity belonging to type B reactions. We present the classifications of ADR, discuss genetic influences and focus on delayed-onset hypersensitivity reactions, i.e., drug-induced liver injury, drug-induced agranulocytosis, and severe cutaneous ADR. A guidance how to read and interpret the contingency table is provided as well as an algorithm whether and how a test for a pharmacogenetic biomarker should be conducted. PMID:27818635

  5. Delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against Nexplanon®.

    PubMed

    Serati, Maurizio; Bogani, Giorgio; Kumar, Sanjeev; Cromi, Antonella; Ghezzi, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Nexplanon® is an etonogestrel implant with a long-acting contraceptive effect. Although several studies underlined its safety profile, its implant can rarely lead to moderate or severe adverse event. Here, we presented a case of delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction against Nexplanon® that resolved after its removal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Analysis and differentiation of cytergic immune reactions: tuberculine type and cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Günther, O

    1975-07-01

    The classic delayed tuberculine reaction represents a T-cell mediated immune reaction, detectable already before the formation of antibodies in the course of proteine sensitization. Myocobacteria stimulate and enhance this reaction. The skin test reaction needs the whole antigen for induction. The reaction starts 6 to 8 hours later, shows maximal development 24 to 28 (-72) hours later and is characterized by inflammation, induration, sometimes with hemorrhagies, necroses and ulceration, a macrophage infiltration is typical in the histological picture. During the reaction between antigen and sensitized T-cells mediators are set free which act by the way of unspecific stimulation on T-, B-lymphocytes and macrophages, otherwise they may inhibit macrophage migration. The delayed reaction is active in many infectious diseases and in the rejection of transplants and tumours. The cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity (Jones-Mote) is a T-cell mediated immune reaction, detectable even before the classic delayed reaction after sensitization with tiny up to large doses of proteines. The skin reaction needs the whole antigen for induction, is visible 2 to 4 hours later in form of an inflammation with slight swelling and reaches maximal development 12 to 24 hours later without hemorrhagies or necroses. The infiltration consists mainly of basophilic leucocytes. There exists a weaker avidity of the T-cells of the cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity compared to the T-cells of the delayed reaction or to the amount of antibodies. Therefore this reaction is easily suppressed by other immune reactions. In contactdermatitis and vaccine virus infections of the guinea pig the cutaneous basophilic hypersensitivity consists for weeks and months because under these circumstances other immune reactions do not compete. The differentiation of the two reactions shall develop to a routine laboratory procedure due to their therapeutic consequences in the immune diagnostic field.

  7. Rapid desensitization of hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapy agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana

    2006-08-01

    All chemotherapy agents can cause hypersensitivity reactions, which have limited the used of critical drugs in very sick patients for fear of inducing a more severe reaction and possibly death. The choice of an alternative chemotherapy regimen is often limited by tumor sensitivity and, because of the increasing number of cancer survivors, exposure to multiple courses of the same or similar chemotherapy agents. Increased exposures lead to sensitization and to hypersensitivity reactions in an increasing patient population. The need to offer first line therapy after cancer recurrence has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations, which allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented hypersensitivity reactions. Desensitization protocols are available to treat hypersensitivity reactions to most chemotherapy agents including taxenes, platinums, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies and others, by gradual re-introduction of small amounts of drug antigens up to full therapeutic doses. Candidate patients include those who present mild to severe type I hypersensitivity, mast cell/IgE dependent, reactions during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Symptoms include pruritus, flushing, urticaria, angioedema, respiratory and gastrointestinal distress, changes in blood pressure including hypotension, and shock with anaphylaxis. Associated musculoskeletal symptoms and pain can be present in patients reacting to taxenes as in anaphylactoid reactions, in which mast cell/IgE mechanisms cannot be demonstrated. There is now strong evidence that anaphylactoid reactions are amendable to treatment with the same rapid desensitization protocols as for type I hypersensitivity reactions. Initial rapid desensitizations should only be performed in settings with one on one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Temporary tolerization is achieved in a few hours. After the first desensitization

  8. Type IV hypersensitivity reaction to a temporary tattoo

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy developed a skin eruption 10 days after application of a temporary tattoo advertised as a “natural black henna tattoo.” The eruption was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the tattoo ink. The textile dye paraphenylenediamine (PPD) is a common industrial allergen and can be found in some temporary tattoo inks. This case describes the reaction and reviews the international literature pertaining to PPD and temporary tattoos. PMID:17256041

  9. Management of patients with nonaspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease aspirin hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Saff, Rebecca R; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Because of widespread use, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the second most common cause of all adverse drug reactions, with hypersensitivity reported in ∼1% of the population. NSAID hypersensitivity can be categorized into five types by the underlying disease, symptoms of reaction, and timing of reaction. These include rhinitis and asthma induced by NSAIDs (also known as aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (NECD), urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, single NSAID-induced reactions, and delayed NSAID reactions. NECD occurs in one-third of patients with chronic urticaria who develop an exacerbation of their urticaria, sometimes with angioedema, typically beginning 30-90 minutes after ingestion of NSAIDs that inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. In urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs, patients without underlying disease develop urticaria or angioedema 30-90 minutes after ingestion of COX-1-inhibiting NSAIDs including aspirin. Single NSAID-induced reactions are immediate and specific to a single NSAID and are thought to occur because of an IgE-mediated reaction against a specific epitope of the NSAID. Delayed NSAID reactions occur days to weeks after initiating an NSAID. These are T-cell mediated and not amenable to desensitization or rechallenge. Classifying the type of NSAID hypersensitivity is important because many patients with a prior history of urticaria or angioedema induced by multiple NSAIDs will often tolerate aspirin test dose. This would allow the use of an aspirin for primary or secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease despite a presumed history of NSAID hypersensitivity.

  10. Linezolid desensitization for a patient with multiple medication hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Bagwell, Autumn D; Stollings, Joanna L; White, Katie D; Fadugba, Olajumoke O; Choi, Jane J

    2013-01-01

    To describe a case in which a linezolid desensitization protocol was successfully used for a polymicrobial surgical wound infection in a patient with multiple drug hypersensitivity reactions. A 24-year-old woman with vocal cord dysfunction requiring tracheostomy was admitted for a surgical wound infection following a tracheostomy fistula closure procedure. The patient reported multiple antibiotic allergies including penicillins (rash), sulfonamides (rash), vancomycin (anaphylaxis), azithromycin (rash), cephalosporins (anaphylaxis), levofloxacin (unspecified), clindamycin (unspecified), and carbapenems (unspecified). Gram stain of the purulent wound drainage demonstrated mixed gram-negative and gram-positive flora, and bacterial cultures were overgrown with Proteus mirabilis, which precluded identification of other pathogens. Following failed test doses of linezolid, tigecycline, and daptomycin, all of which resulted in hypersensitivity reactions, a 16-step linezolid desensitization protocol was developed and successfully implemented without adverse reactions. The patient completed a 2-week course of antibiotic therapy that included linezolid upon finishing the desensitization protocol. Linezolid is useful in treating complicated and uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections caused by gram-positive bacteria. With precautions, including premedication, a monitored nursing unit, and immediate availability of an emergency anaphylaxis kit, drug desensitization allows patients the ability to safely use medications to which they may have an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. Minimal data exist on linezolid desensitization protocols. Linezolid desensitization can be a viable option in patients requiring antimicrobial therapy for complicated gram-positive skin infections.

  11. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir following re-challenge.

    PubMed

    Todd, Sej; Emerson, C R

    2017-03-01

    We report this case to highlight the possibility of a severe hypersensitivity reaction as an important potential consequence of couples, living with HIV, sharing anti-retroviral treatment. An HIV-1 positive and carrier of HLA-B*57:01 allele, treatment experienced man was commenced one pill Regimen Stribild (tenofovir, emtricitabine, elvitegravir and cobicistat) in July 2015. On running short of medication, he admitted to sharing his partner's treatment (Triumeq; abacavir, lamivudine and dolutegravir). On the second occasion, re-introduction resulted in whole body rash 4 h post dose and was associated with fever, respiratory symptoms, headache and vomiting. On examination, he was pyrexic, tachyponeic, tachycardiac and hypotensive. Hypersensitivity to abacavir can cause significant morbidity. Re-challenge can result in a more rapid, severe and potentially life-threatening reaction. This potentially could become an increasing problem with more couples, living with HIV, sharing medication.

  12. Hypersensitive reaction to praziquantel in a clonorchiasis patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Min; Lim, Hyun-Sul; Hong, Sung-Tae

    2011-09-01

    Praziquantel is the drug of choice for clonorchiasis. Since clonorchiasis is endemic in most river basins, praziquantel has been widely used for 30 years in Korea. A 54-year-old Korean woman suffered from hypersensitive reactions, such as nausea, dyspnea, rash, and urticaria after taking the first dose of praziquantel to treat clonorchiasis. She ingested one dose again and the same symptoms appeared, and she was treated at a clinic with anti-histamines. She tried one more dose with anti-histamines but found the same symptoms. Later, she was found to pass eggs of Clonorchis sinensis and medicated with flubendazole. The hypersensitive reaction to praziquantel is rare but occurs. This is the 5th case report in the world.

  13. [Castleman's disease: Rapid desensitization for hypersensitivity reaction to rituximab].

    PubMed

    Boin, C; Lambert, S; Thomann, P; Aujoulat, O; Kieffer, P

    2016-06-01

    Rapid desensitization allows secure administration of a drug and is indicated when there is no therapeutic alternative. We report a 49-year-old patient who presented with a hypersensitivity reaction following an infusion of rituximab (375mg/m(2)) in the context of a Castleman's syndrome. After a clinical flare (splenomegaly, adenopathies) despite treatment with tocilizumab, anakinra and valganciclovir, the reintroduction of rituximab was decided, according to the rapid desensitization protocol. Four full dose desensitizations were successfully performed allowing immediate clinical improvement (apyrexia, loss of sweating and lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly partial regression) and biological (negativation of HHV8 viral load, and disappearance of neutropenia, anemia and thrombocytopenia). Rapid desensitization is a promising method for the pursuit of rituximab therapy after a hypersensitivity reaction and should be considered in patients with no acceptable therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2015 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Allopurinol hypersensitivity reactions: desensitization strategies and new therapeutic alternative molecules.

    PubMed

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Nettis, Eustachio; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Foti, Caterina; Ferrannini, Antonio; Butani, Lavjay

    2013-02-01

    Allopurinol, an analog of hypoxanthine has been worldwide used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout for over 40 years. Unfortunately some patients assuming this medication have developed hypersensitivity reactions ranging from mild cutaneous eruption to more severe clinical manifestations such as allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome or Steven-Johnson syndrome and lethal toxic epidermal necrolysis. Various strategies of slow desensitization have been elaborated to reintroduce allopurinol in a part of these patients, mainly patients affected by mild skin reactions as fixed drug eruption or exanthema. However, several new uricosuric therapies have been recently introduced. Actually drugs as recombinant urate oxidase and febuxostat are under post-marketing surveillance to control potential adverse effects related to their immunogenicity even.

  15. The role of iodine in hypersensitivity reactions to radio contrast media.

    PubMed

    Scherer, K; Harr, T; Bach, S; Bircher, A J

    2010-03-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated radio contrast media (RCM) are either immediate-type (IT) or delayed reactions (DT). In IT, the pathomechanism is unclear. In DT, delayed positive patch (PT) and intradermal tests (IDT) and RCM-specific T cells suggest a T cell-mediated mechanism. In both, the role of iodine has not been clarified; however, patients are often labelled as 'iodine allergic'. Occasionally, positive skin tests to iodine-containing drugs are observed. We investigated the presence of hypersensitivity to iodine in patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. Nineteen patients with a history of IT (n=9) or DT (n=10) to RCM were investigated. Skin prick tests, IDT and PT with several RCM and iodine formulations were carried out. All underwent oral provocation with Lugol's solution (LS). Two patients each with iodine mumps, contact dermatitis to iodized antiseptics and chronic idiopathic urticaria served as control or proof of concept. In the IT group, skin tests were positive in three out of nine patients to one RCM. One patient with negative skin tests reacted twice to oral iodine with urticaria. In the DT group, sensitization to one or several RCM was identified in 10 out of 10 patients. In seven out of 10 patients, additional sensitizations to the iodine formulations were found. Two patients developed a mild exanthema after oral provocation with LS. We have previously demonstrated in patients with iodine mumps that an oral challenge with LS is a valid means to elicit hypersensitivity reactions to iodine. In 19 patients, we showed that iodine is rarely the eliciting agent in hypersensitivity reactions to RCM. Only one patient with a late urticaria to an RCM with a late urticaria to LS and two patients with DT and broad sensitization to all RCM tested reacted to LS with an exanthema. In most cases, more likely the RCM molecules and not iodine are the eliciting compounds.

  16. Persistent Skin Reactions and Aluminium Hypersensitivity Induced by Childhood Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Salik, Elaha; Løvik, Ida; Andersen, Klaus E; Bygum, Anette

    2016-11-02

    There is increasing awareness of reactions to vaccination that include persistent skin reactions. We present here a retrospective investigation of long-lasting skin reactions and aluminium hypersensitivity in children, based on medical records and questionnaires sent to the parents. In the 10-year period 2003 to 2013 we identified 47 children with persistent skin reactions caused by childhood vaccinations. Most patients had a typical presentation of persisting pruritic subcutaneous nodules. Five children had a complex diagnostic process involving paediatricians, orthopaedics and plastic surgeons. Two patients had skin biopsies performed from their skin lesions, and 2 patients had the nodules surgically removed. Forty-two children had a patch-test performed with 2% aluminium chloride hexahydrate in petrolatum and 39 of them (92%) had a positive reaction. The persistent skin reactions were treated with potent topical corticosteroids and disappeared slowly. Although we advised families to continue vaccination of their children, one-third of parents omitted or postponed further vaccinations.

  17. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of delayed-type drug hypersensitivity reactions, from bedside to bench and back.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, Rik; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) have been present since the advent of drugs. In particular T-cell mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions represent a heterogeneous clinical entity with a diverse pathogenesis and result in a considerable burden of morbidity and mortality not only driven by the reactions themselves but also by the use of alternatives which are sometimes less effective or even more dangerous. Diagnostic procedures rely on clinical history, skin testing and potential provocation testing, whereas validated in vitro diagnostic procedures are still lacking for most of them. Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics combined with basic scientific research has provided insights in the pathogenesis of abacavir and carbamazepine hypersensitivities linked with certain human leucocyte antigen risk alleles. Nevertheless, important scientific questions on how other DHR arise and how host-drug interactions occur, remain unanswered. Recent work indicates an intricate relation between host, drug and pathogens in severe cutaneous and systemic reactions and provides more insights in the role of regulatory T-cells and viral reactivation in these reactions. In this review we focus on type IV delayed-type DHR, and address recent advances in the pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics, and diagnosis of these reactions with an emphasis on the understandings arising from basic research.

  18. Hypersensitive Reaction to Tattoos: A Growing Menace in Rural India.

    PubMed

    Shashikumar, B M; Harish, M R; Shwetha, B; Kavya, M; Deepadarshan, K; Phani, H N

    2017-01-01

    Increased enthusiasm toward newer fashion trends among rural India along with the lack of government regulation has led to increased tattoo reactions. The objective of this study is to describe various clinical manifestations of hypersensitive reactions to tattoo ink reported at a tertiary care hospital in Mandya district. An observational study was carried out over a period of 1 year from June 2014 to May 2015 at Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences, Mandya. All the patients reporting with allergic reaction due to tattooing were included in the present study after obtaining informed consent. Transient acute inflammatory reaction, infections, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area were excluded from this study. A detailed history regarding the onset, duration and color used for tattooing were collected. Cutaneous examination and biopsy was to done to know the type of reaction. Fifty cutaneous allergic reactions were diagnosed among 39 patients. Mean age of subjects was 22 years and mean duration before the appearance of lesion was 7 months. Common colors associated with reactions were red (53.9%), black (33.3%), green (5.1%), and multicolor (7.7%). Itching was the predominant symptom. Skin lesions mainly consisted of lichenoid papules and plaques, eczematous lesions, and verrucous lesions. Lichenoid histopathology reaction was the most common tissue allergic reaction. Increasing popularity of tattooing among young people has predisposed to parallel increase in adverse reactions. Red pigment is most common cause of allergic reaction in the present study, and lichenoid reaction is the most common reaction.

  19. Multinational experience with hypersensitivity drug reactions in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Jares, Edgardo José; Sánchez-Borges, Mario; Cardona-Villa, Ricardo; Ensina, Luis Felipe; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Gómez, Maximiliano; Barayazarra, Susana; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Serrano, Carlos D; Cuello, Mabel Noemi; Morfin-Maciel, Blanca María; De Falco, Alicia; Cherrez-Ojeda, Iván

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic drug allergy data from Latin America are scarce, and there are no studies on specific procedures focusing on this topic in Latin America. To assess the clinical characteristics and management of hypersensitivity drug reactions in different Latin American countries. An European Network of Drug Allergy questionnaire survey was implemented in 22 allergy units in 11 Latin American countries to report on consecutive patients who presented with a suspected hypersensitivity drug reaction. Each unit used its own protocols to investigate patients. Included were 868 hypersensitivity drug reactions in 862 patients (71% of adults and elderly patients were women and 51% of children were girls, P = .0001). Children presented with less severe reactions than adults and elderly patients (P < .0001). Urticaria and angioedema accounted for the most frequent clinical presentations (71%), whereas anaphylaxis was present in 27.3% of cases. There were no deaths reported. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (52.3%), β-lactam antibiotics (13.8%), and other antibiotics (10.1%) were the drugs used most frequently. Skin prick tests (16.7%) and provocation tests (34.2%) were the study procedures most commonly used. A large proportion of patients were treated in the emergency department (62%) with antihistamines (68%) and/or corticosteroids (53%). Only 22.8% of patients presenting with anaphylaxis received epinephrine. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics were the drugs used in at least 75% of patients. More than half the reactions were treated in the emergency department, whereas epinephrine was administered in fewer than 25% of patients with anaphylaxis. Dissemination of guidelines for anaphylaxis among primary and emergency department physicians should be encouraged. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro diagnosis of immediate IgE-mediated drug hypersensitivity: warnings and (unmet) needs.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Astrid P; Sabato, Vito; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-08-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) constitute an important health condition, with serious consequences of inadequate diagnosis. In this article, some of the most important issues related to in vitro diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergies are discussed. In vitro diagnostics will benefit from expanded and novel insights and understandings in drug chemical reactivity, protein binding, biotransformation, degradation, identification of (cross-reactive) drug antigenic determinants, and deeper understanding of sensitization routes. Collective efforts should be undertaken to activate fundamental and clinical investigations.

  1. Ethanol metabolite acetic acid as causative agent for type-1 hypersensitivity-like reactions to alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W H; Gall, H

    1996-09-01

    Adverse reactions to alcoholic beverages are common and more frequently mediated by immunological mechanisms than previously thought. To elucidate relevant allergens in this context we studied patients with an informative medical history. This report describes a comprehensive allergological approach in a patient exhibiting type-I hypersensitivity-like reactions towards beverages and medication containing alcohol, and salad dressings with acetic acid. The ethanol metabolite acetic acid was found to yield positive prick test results in concentrations not eliciting reactions in healthy and atopic controls. Among other ethanol metabolites, acetic acid is a potential allergen in the context of hypersensitivity towards alcoholic beverages.

  2. Allotype specific interactions of drugs and HLA molecules in hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Illing, Patricia T; Mifsud, Nicole A; Purcell, Anthony W

    2016-10-01

    It is hypothesised that associations between adverse drug reactions and specific alleles of the human leukocyte antigens arise due to specific interactions between the human leukocyte antigen molecules and the causative drug that stimulate immune responses targeting drug exposed tissues. To date this has only been definitively demonstrated for abacavir, an antiretroviral that causes a systemic adverse drug reaction, abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome, solely in HLA-B*57:01(+) individuals. Whilst this has informed the modification of abacavir to remove immunogenicity, there remains an imperative to define other interactions between drugs and specific HLA in order to understand the scope of interactions that can drive T cell mediated drug hypersensitivity. Here we review the current state of understanding of these interactions.

  3. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  4. Hypersensitivity reaction to components of parenteral nutrition in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Carlos Ruiz; Ponce, Esperanza Castejón; Busquets, Ferran Bossacoma; Hernández, Diana Sánchez; Oliva, Silvia Meavilla; Santacruz, Enrique Llerena; Pérez, Naymar; De Los Santos Pelegrini, Mariela; Flaque, Miquel Villaronga

    2016-01-01

    Very rare cases of hypersensitivity reactions to various constituents of parenteral nutrition (PN) have been reported in children. Adverse effects associated with PN administration have centered on metabolic, infectious, and mechanical complications. Here we describe three cases of hypersensitivity to components of PN. Case 1 is a 1-mo-old breastfed baby with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis associated with an infection with cytomegalovirus. On the second day of PN, 60 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient had an allergic reaction with an overall diffused rash. On day 4 of PN, the multivitamin solution and the trace element mix were excluded, showing a good tolerance. Case 2 is a 4-y-old girl with a background of stage III neuroblastoma. On day 3 of PN, 15 min after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed sudden facial edema. On day 5, suspecting the amino acid solution to be the etiology of her reaction, PN was infused with another amino acid preparation, and the patient showed good tolerance. Case 3 is a 10-y-old boy with a diagnosis of an acute peritonitis. Two h after the initiation of the infusion, the patient showed a general wheal rash. He referred a background of fish allergy. Considering that the lipid emulsion used had components from fish oil (SMOF Lipid), a new PN was infused on day 2. The new PN contained a lipid emulsion containing vegetable oil (ClinOleic). The patient showed good tolerance. In conclusion, we consider that, although the hypersensitivity to PN components is infrequent, there is an increase in reports of pediatric cases describing this allergic pathology.

  5. Biophoton distress flares signal the onset of the hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, John W

    2005-07-01

    Detection of biophoton emission, a natural bioluminescence, has emerged as a non-destructive method to mark the onset of the hypersensitive resistance reaction in Arabidopsis, bean and tomato. Rapid biophoton emission in Arabidopsis requires an intact R-gene signalling network and increased levels of cytosolic calcium and nitric oxide. The burst of biophotons precedes macroscopic symptoms by several hours and its timing is characteristic for specific gene-for-gene interactions. The ability to monitor biophoton emission from whole plants in real time should allow detailed dissection of plant defence responses.

  6. Skin Testing in the Evaluation and Management of Carboplatin-Related Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lax, Timothy; Long, Aidan; Banerji, Aleena

    2015-01-01

    Carboplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) are a frequent occurrence in patients being retreated for malignancy. The most common and severe reactions are thought to be IgE mediated. Currently, skin testing is the only method used clinically to identify individuals sensitized to carboplatin. Despite almost 20 years of clinical use, a standardized approach to skin testing and its use in the management of carboplatin HSRs has not been well established. We review the utility of carboplatin skin testing and discuss factors that influence the interpretation of skin testing results. A risk stratification strategy using skin testing and desensitization to manage patients with carboplatin HSRs is proposed.

  7. Mechanisms of drug hypersensitivity reactions and the skin.

    PubMed

    Kuljanac, Ilko

    2008-01-01

    The skin is an organ most often affected by adverse drug reactions. Because of limited reactivity of the skin, different drugs may induce the same reactions on the skin, even if the same drug may induce different adverse drug reactions. Many of these adverse drug reactions do not include immunological mechanisms, most of them are non-immunological processes. Adverse drug reactions which involve an immune system, may appear different times after drug administration. The severity of reactions is not dependent on the time at which adverse drug reaction appeared, even if some life threatening adverse drug reactions appear immediately after a drug administration. Four types of immunological reactions, (according to Cooms and Gell), may be involved in a drug adverse reaction. The first type of reaction (anaphylactic reaction) begins early after drug administration and different severities of the reactions could exist. The second type, known as cytotoxic hypersensitivity, begins after some minutes to a few hours after a drug administration. Third and fourth types of immunological reactions begin usually hours to days after drug administration. Some types of immunological reactions may begin days to weeks after drug administration. Sensitization to the drugs must be happen early, since re-exposition to the drug leads to the adverse drug reactions. The way of sensitization sometimes determines which immune mechanism will be involved and which clinical reaction will appear. Tests in vivo and in vitro can be used in the diagnosis of adverse drug reactions. All these tests are more or less limited to a false positive or false negative reaction and possibilities of serious reactions in tests. Provocations tests give the most satisfactory results but they may be dangerous and life threatening. We must carefully choose the skin tests and apply them according to the suspected pathomechanism of adverse drug reaction geneses and estimate the usefulness and the risks of the tests

  8. Hypersensitive Reaction to Tattoos: A Growing Menace in Rural India

    PubMed Central

    Shashikumar, B M; Harish, M R; Shwetha, B; Kavya, M; Deepadarshan, K; Phani, H N

    2017-01-01

    Background: Increased enthusiasm toward newer fashion trends among rural India along with the lack of government regulation has led to increased tattoo reactions. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe various clinical manifestations of hypersensitive reactions to tattoo ink reported at a tertiary care hospital in Mandya district. Materials and Methods: An observational study was carried out over a period of 1 year from June 2014 to May 2015 at Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences, Mandya. All the patients reporting with allergic reaction due to tattooing were included in the present study after obtaining informed consent. Transient acute inflammatory reaction, infections, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area were excluded from this study. A detailed history regarding the onset, duration and color used for tattooing were collected. Cutaneous examination and biopsy was to done to know the type of reaction. Results: Fifty cutaneous allergic reactions were diagnosed among 39 patients. Mean age of subjects was 22 years and mean duration before the appearance of lesion was 7 months. Common colors associated with reactions were red (53.9%), black (33.3%), green (5.1%), and multicolor (7.7%). Itching was the predominant symptom. Skin lesions mainly consisted of lichenoid papules and plaques, eczematous lesions, and verrucous lesions. Lichenoid histopathology reaction was the most common tissue allergic reaction. Conclusion: Increasing popularity of tattooing among young people has predisposed to parallel increase in adverse reactions. Red pigment is most common cause of allergic reaction in the present study, and lichenoid reaction is the most common reaction. PMID:28584372

  9. Basophil activation test for investigation of IgE-mediated mechanisms in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Markus; Harrer, Andrea; Lang, Roland; Schneider, Michael; Ferreira, Tima; Hawranek, Thomas; Himly, Martin

    2011-09-16

    Hypersensitivity reactions against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like propyphenazone (PP) and diclofenac (DF) can manifest as Type I-like allergic reactions (1). In clinical practice, diagnosis of drug hypersensitivity is mainly performed by patient history, as skin testing is not reliable and oral provocation testing bears life-threatening risks for the patient (2). Hence, evidence for an underlying IgE-mediated pathomechanism is hard to obtain. Here, we present an in vitro method based on the use of human basophils derived from drug-hypersensitive patients that mimics the allergic effector reaction in vivo. As basophils of drug-allergic patients carry IgE molecules specific for the culprit drug, they become activated upon IgE receptor crosslinking and release allergic effector molecules. The activation of basophils can be monitored by the determination of the upregulation of CD63 surface expression using flow cytometry (3). In the case of low molecular weight drugs, conjugates are designed to enable IgE receptor crosslinking on basophils. As depicted in Figure 1, two representatives of NSAIDs, PP and DF, are covalently bound to human serum albumin (HSA) via a carboxyl group reacting with the primary amino group of lysine residues. DF carries an intrinsic carboxyl group and, thus, can be used directly (4), whereas a carboxyl group-containing derivative of PP had to be organochemically synthesized prior to the study (1). The coupling degree of the low molecular weight compounds on the protein carrier molecule and their spatial distribution is important to guarantee crosslinking of two IgE receptor molecules. The here described protocol applies high performance-size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) equipped with a sequential refractive index (RI) and ultra violet (UV) detection system for determination of the coupling degree. As the described methodology may be applied for other drugs, the basophil activation test (BAT) bears the potential to be

  10. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to ibuprofen and other arylpropionic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Blanca-López, N; Pérez-Alzate, D; Andreu, I; Doña, I; Agúndez, J A; García-Martín, E; Salas, M; Miranda, M Á; Torres, M J; Cornejo-García, J A; Blanca, M; Canto, G

    2016-07-01

    Although ibuprofen and other arylpropionic acid derivatives (APs) are the most common medicines involved in hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) to NSAIDs, no patient series studies have been performed regarding immediate selective reactions (SRs) to these drugs. To characterize patients with immediate selective HDRs to ibuprofen and other APs through clinical history and challenge. Subjects who developed an HDR to APs less than 1 h after drug intake were included. Tolerance to aspirin was assessed and challenge was performed with ibuprofen in all cases, and additionally with the culprit drug (if different) in those patients that tolerated ibuprofen. Serum tryptase levels and tryptase immunohistochemical staining in skin biopsies were also assessed in some patients with a positive DPT to ibuprofen. From a total of 245 patients with a confirmed history of HDRs to APs, 17% were classified as selective immediate hypersensitivity reactors by both clinical history and challenge. A selective response to naproxen and dexketoprofen with tolerance to ibuprofen was found in 16 of 20 cases. Significant differences in serum tryptase levels were observed between 2 and 24 h in the 11 cases that were studied further. Within the group of patients with HDRs to NSAIDs, APs can induce immediate SRs. Within this group, selective responses to a single drug or responders to several APs may exist, suggesting potential immunological cross-reactivity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a review. New applications in hypersensitivity reactions of cattle and horses.

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N; Eyre, P

    1977-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit the biosynthesis of kinins and prostaglandins and stabilize leukocyte lysosomal membranes. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs also weakly block the biosynthesis of histamine and serotonin, and pharmacologically antagonize kinins, prostaglandins and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs effectively control both cardiovascular and respiratory manifestations of hypersensitivity in cattle and horses. This, coupled with the contrasting lack of effectiveness of "antiamine" drugs, suggests that bio-amines such as histamine and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) may be less important than kinins, postaglandins and slow-reacting substance in the mediation of the hypersensitivity/inflammatory reaction, at least in cardiopulmonary systems of these species. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs justify more prominence in the clinical control of acute respiratory disease in domestic herbivores. PMID:332290

  12. Incidence of intraoperative hypersensitivity reactions: a registry analysis: a registry analysis.

    PubMed

    Saager, Leif; Turan, Alparslan; Egan, Cameron; Mascha, Edward J; Kurz, Andrea; Bauer, Maria; Besson, Hervé; Sessler, Daniel I; Hesler, Brian D

    2015-03-01

    Previously reported incidences for intraoperative hypersensitivity reactions vary more than 15-fold. The goal was to determine the incidence of intraoperative hypersensitivity events at a U.S. surgical center. With institutional review board (Cleveland, Ohio) approval and waiver of written/informed consent, the anesthesia records of adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 2005 to 2011 at the Cleveland Clinic were queried using a novel electronic search protocol developed to identify potential hypersensitivity reactions: cardiovascular collapse defined as systolic arterial blood pressure less than 50 mmHg; administration of epinephrine; administration of diphenhydramine; physician comments in the anesthesia record suggestive of hypersensitivity reactions; laboratory tests for histamine, tryptase, or immunoglobulin-E within 24 h of surgery; and International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes suggestive of hypersensitivity reactions. Each electronically identified candidate chart was evaluated by an adjudication committee. Hypersensitivity reactions were graded on a 5-point severity scale. From these data, the authors determined the proportion of operations having adjudicated hypersensitivity reactions, and calculated the 95% exact binomial CI. Among 178,746 records, 4,008 charts were identified by the search strategies. After adjudication, 264 hypersensitivity cases were identified. The overall incidence of hypersensitivity reactions was 1:677 surgeries, corresponding to 15 (95% CI, 13 to 17) cases per 10,000 operations. The incidence of severe hypersensitivity reactions (grades 3 to 5) was 1:4,583, corresponding to 2 (95% CI, 2 to 3) cases per 10,000 operations. The incidence of severe hypersensitivity reactions was similar to previous reports. However, the overall incidence of hypersensitivity reactions was much greater than reported elsewhere, possibly because of a comprehensive search strategy.

  13. [The reactions of hypersensitivity: the mechanisms of development, clinical manifestations, principles of diagnostic (a lecture)].

    PubMed

    Tukavkina, S Yu; Kharseyeva, G G

    2014-05-01

    The article considers the principles of modern classification of hypersensitivity, pathogenic mechanisms of formation of its various types resulting in development of typical clinical symptoms and syndromes. The knowledge and comprehension of these issues is important for physicians of different specializations since it permits to properly make out and formulate diagnosis and timely send patient for examination and treatment to such specialist as allergist-immunologist. The particular attention was paid to description of pathogenesis of diseases and syndromes underlaid by IgE-mediated type of hypersensitivity since their share is highest and clinical manifestations frequently require emergency medical care. The diagnostic of allergic diseases is to be implemented sequentially (step-by-step) and include common clinical and special (specific) methods. In case of choosing of extent of specialized allergological examination the diagnostic significance of techniques and their safety is to be taken into account concerning condition of patient. The diagnosis is objectively formulated only by complex of examination results. It is worth to remember about possibility of development of syndromes similar to IgE-mediated allergy by their clinical manifestations but belonging to non-allergic type of hypersensitivity. It is important to know main causes, mechanisms and ways of formation of such reactions previously named as anaphylactoid ones.

  14. Hypersensitivity reactions to intravenous iron: guidance for risk minimization and management

    PubMed Central

    Rampton, David; Folkersen, Joergen; Fishbane, Steven; Hedenus, Michael; Howaldt, Stefanie; Locatelli, Francesco; Patni, Shalini; Szebeni, Janos; Weiss, Guenter

    2014-01-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia when oral iron is inappropriate, ineffective or poorly tolerated. Acute hypersensitivity reactions during iron infusions are very rare but can be life-threatening. This paper reviews their frequency, pathogenesis and risk factors, and provides recommendations about their management and prevention. Complement activation-related pseudo-allergy triggered by iron nanoparticles is probably a more frequent pathogenetic mechanism in acute reactions to current formulations of intravenous iron than is an immunological IgE-mediated response. Major risk factors for hypersensitivity reactions include a previous reaction to an iron infusion, a fast iron infusion rate, multiple drug allergies, severe atopy, and possibly systemic inflammatory diseases. Early pregnancy is a contraindication to iron infusions, while old age and serious co-morbidity may worsen the impact of acute reactions if they occur. Management of iron infusions requires meticulous observation, and, in the event of an adverse reaction, prompt recognition and severity-related interventions by well-trained medical and nursing staff. PMID:25420283

  15. Immediate systemic hypersensitivity reaction associated with topical application of Australian tea tree oil.

    PubMed

    Mozelsio, Nancy B; Harris, Kathleen E; McGrath, Kris G; Grammer, Leslie C

    2003-01-01

    Australian tea tree oil has been used as a veterinary antiseptic for many years and, more recently, has been extended into human use. There have been many reports of allergic contact dermatitis and toxicity reactions, but it has never been implicated in immediate systemic hypersensitivity reactions. A 38-year-old man experienced immediate flushing, pruritus, throat constriction, and lightheadedness after topical application of tea tree oil. Our purpose was to determine whether this represented an immunoglobulin E (IgE)--mediated reaction. Skin-prick and intradermal testing was performed, as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for specific IgG and IgE against tea tree oil. The patient had a positive wheal and flare reaction on intradermal testing with tea tree oil. All five patient controls were negative on skin testing. No specific IgG or IgE was detected. We present the first reported case of an immediate systemic hypersensitivity reaction occurring after topical application of Australian tea tree oil, confirmed by positive wheal and flare reaction on skin testing.

  16. Ovariectomy aggravates hypersensitivity reactions to paclitaxel in rats.

    PubMed

    Goromaru, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshinori; Sendo, Toshiaki; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yano, Takahisa; Ikesue, Hiroaki; Oishi, Ryozo

    2005-02-01

    The incidence of hypersensitivity reactions is still a matter of serious concern during chemotherapy with paclitaxel, particularly in patients with ovarian cancer. We recently reported that intravenous injection of paclitaxel causes acute lung injury characterized by vascular hyperpermeability, edema and respiratory dysfunction in rats. In the present study, we investigated the influence of ovariectomy on the paclitaxel-induced acute lung injury in rats. Ovariectomy worsened paclitaxel-induced acute lung injury, which was reversed by 17beta-estradiol. The mRNA expression for endothelial nitric oxide synthase was reduced in lungs of ovariectomized rats. To determine the role for nitric oxide, we examined the effects of several agents that modulate nitric oxide concentration on the pulmonary response to paclitaxel. In ovary-intact rats, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester exaggerated paclitaxel-induced acute lung injury, while nitric oxide donors such as sodium nitroprusside and isosorbide dinitrate attenuated the lung injury. Sodium nitroprusside was also effective in alleviating the paclitaxel-induced acute lung injury in ovariectomized rats. These findings suggest that ovariectomy enhances the susceptibility to paclitaxel hypersensitivity, in which decrease in estrogen and subsequent reduction in nitric oxide synthesis may be involved.

  17. Hypersensitive radical probe studies of chloroperoxidase-catalyzed hydroxylation reactions.

    PubMed

    Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Hager, L P

    1998-07-01

    The oxidation of hypersensitive radical probes by chloroperoxidase from Caldariomyces fumago (CPO) was studied in an attempt to "time" a putative radical intermediate. Oxidation of (trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)methane, previously studied by Zaks and Dodds [Zaks, A., and Dodds, D. R. (1995) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115, 10419-10424] was reinvestigated. Unrearranged oxidation products were found as previously reported, and control experiments demonstrated that the cyclic alcohol from oxidation at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position, while subject to further oxidation, survives CPO oxidation as detectable species. However, in contrast to the report by Zaks and Dodds, the rearranged alcohol product expected from ring opening of a cyclopropylcarbinyl radical intermediate was shown to be unstable toward the enzyme oxidation reaction. Because of this instability, two new hypersensitive radical probes, (trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)ethane and 2-(trans-2-phenylcyclopropyl)propane, and their potential cyclic and acyclic products from oxidation at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position were synthesized and tested. Oxidation of both of these probes at the cyclopropylcarbinyl position by CPO gave unrearranged alcohol products only, but control experiments again demonstrated that the rearranged alcohol products were unstable toward CPO oxidation conditions. From the combination of the probe and control studies, the lifetime of a putative radical intermediate must be less than 3 ps. Whereas the results are consistent with an insertion mechanism for production of alcohol product, they do not exclude a very short-lived intermediate.

  18. Hypersensitivity Reaction to High-Dose Methotrexate and Successful Rechallenge in a Pediatric Patient with Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Jeffrey R.; Ward, Deborah A.; Crews, Kristine R.; Panetta, John C.; Navid, Fariba

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to methotrexate are rare, but have been reported. Methotrexate has shown activity against many malignancies, and omission of methotrexate therapy may increase the risk of cancer-related death in some patients. Therefore, rechallenging patients with methotrexate following hypersensitivity may be beneficial. We report a case of a child with metastatic osteosarcoma who experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to high-dose methotrexate and was successfully rechallenged with methotrexate using a 6-hour infusion. Using this regimen, adequate peak methotrexate plasma concentrations were achieved and no further hypersensitivity reactions were noted. PMID:23955991

  19. Hypersensitivity reaction to high-dose methotrexate and successful rechallenge in a pediatric patient with osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey R; Ward, Deborah A; Crews, Kristine R; Panetta, John C; Navid, Fariba

    2014-02-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to methotrexate are rare, but have been reported. Methotrexate has shown activity against many malignancies, and omission of methotrexate therapy may increase the risk of cancer-related death in some patients. Therefore, rechallenging patients with methotrexate following hypersensitivity may be beneficial. We report a case of a child with metastatic osteosarcoma who experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to high-dose methotrexate and was successfully rechallenged with methotrexate using a 6-hour infusion. Using this regimen, adequate peak methotrexate plasma concentrations were achieved and no further hypersensitivity reactions were noted.

  20. Diagnoses and Management of Drug Hypersensitivity and Anaphylaxis in Cancer and Chronic Inflammatory Diseases: Reactions to Taxanes and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi-Santos, Rafael; Castells, Mariana

    2016-06-08

    Due to the increase in utilization of chemotherapies and antibodies, drug hypersensitivity reactions have increased dramatically worldwide, preventing the use of first-line therapies and impacting patients' survival and quality of life. Some of the more frequently used medications in cancer include taxanes for ovarian, lung, breast, and prostate cancers. Monoclonal antibodies are used in the treatment of neoplastic, autoimmune, and inflammatory diseases, and their clinical applications are becoming broader. Monoclonal antibody targets include CD20, HER-2, EGFR, IL-6 receptor, TNF-α, CD30, VEGF-A, IgE, and more, and examples of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases that respond to monoclonal antibodies include rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, and asthma. Neoplastic diseases include non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and colorectal, breast, gastric, and lung cancer. The clinical presentation of drug hypersensitivity reactions ranges from mild cutaneous reactions to life-threatening symptoms including anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) has become a groundbreaking approach to the management of immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions IgE and non-IgE mediated. It is the only effective procedure that enables sensitized patients to receive the full treatment dose safely, thus representing an important advance in the patients' treatment and prognosis. The aim of this review is to provide an update on hypersensitivity reactions to commonly used monoclonal and taxanes, their clinical presentations, diagnosis, and the use of RDD for their management.

  1. Delayed Cutaneous Hypersensitivity Reactions in Patients With Kaposi's Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J. F.; Ziegler, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Defects in cellular immunocompetence have been sought in 25 patients with Kaposi's sarcoma. Skin tests with recall antigens, and PHA lymphocyte stimulation in vitro showed that efferent delayed hypersensitivity responses are intact in the majority. However, attempted sensitization and subsequent challenge with DNCB demonstrated that the afferent limb of the responses was impaired in some patients. This did not appear to be related to the morphology of the tumour or to prognosis. Tumour specific reactions were demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro and these correlated significantly with the morphology and histology. The interpretation of the results for an individual is confounded by the multiplicity of factors influencing the outcome in a particular patient. PMID:4447775

  2. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction related to the use of pegfilgrastim.

    PubMed

    Dadla, Aliakbar; Tannenbaum, Susan; Yates, Breton; Holle, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    Filgrastim and pegfilgrastim are granulocyte colony-stimulating factor products, which have been part of the supportive treatment of cancer patients for years to increase the white blood cell count and absolute neutrophil count with the objective of preventing neutropenic fever in patients at risk because of chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is a glycosylated form of filgrastim with a prolonged duration of effect, a reduced renal clearance, and relatively fewer side effects. We present a patient with early breast cancer who developed a rash more than a week after the use of pegfilgrastim. Clinicians must be aware of the possibility of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction as the application of this drug is increasing and an adverse event can result in delay of chemotherapy treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ(2) test for trend, p < 0.05) with occurrence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.

  4. Successful desensitization protocol for hypersensitivity reaction probably caused by dabrafenib in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Abu-Amna, Mahmoud; Hadad, Salim; Haim, Nissim; Shahar, Eduardo

    2015-09-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib are both orally bioavailable small molecule agents that block mitogen activated protein kinase signalling in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation. Generalized hypersensitivity reactions to vemurafenib or dabrafenib have not been described. Continuing vemurafenib or dabrafenib therapy despite hypersensitivity reaction is especially important in patients with melanoma and BRAF(V600E) mutation, in whom this mutation plays a critical role in tumour growth. Desensitization protocols to overcome hypersensitivity reactions by gradual reintroduction of small amounts of the offending drug up to full therapeutic doses are available for many anti-cancer agents, including vemurafenib but, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported for dabrafenib. We describe a patient with metastatic melanoma who developed Type I hypersensitivity reaction to vemurafenib and to subsequent treatment with dabrafenib, and who was successfully treated by drug desensitization which allowed safe prolonged continuation of dabrafenib. The development of hypersensitivity reactions for both dabrafenib and vemurafinib in the current case could be because these drugs have a similar chemical structure and cause a cross-reactivity. However, hypersensitivity reaction to a non-medicinal ingredient shared by the two drugs is also possible. Oral desensitization appears to be an option for patients with hypersensitivity Type I to dabrafenib. This approach may permit clinicians to safely administer dabrafenib to patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions to this life-prolonging medication. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. In vitro methods for diagnosing nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions to drugs.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Sanz, M L; Gamboa, P; Garcia-Aviles, M C; Fernandez, J; Torres, M J

    2013-01-01

    Nonimmediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are difficult to manage in daily clinical practice, mainly owing to their heterogeneous clinical manifestations and the lack of selective biological markers. In vitro methods are necessaryto establish a diagnosis, especially given the low sensitivity of skin tests and the inherent risks of drug provocation testing. In vitro evaluation of nonimmediate DHRs must include approaches that can be applied during the different phases of the reaction. During the acute phase, monitoring markers in both skin and peripheral blood helps to discriminate between immediate and nonimmediate DHRs with cutaneous responses and to distinguish between reactions that, although they present similar clinical symptoms, are produced by different immunological mechanisms and therefore have a different treatment and prognosis. During the resolution phase, in vitro testing is used to detect the response of T cells to drug stimulation; however, this approach has certain limitations, such as the lack of validated studies assessing sensitivity. Moreover, in vitro tests indicate an immune response that is not always related to a DHR. In this review, members of the Immunology and Drug Allergy Committee of the Spanish Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEAIC) provide an overview of the most widely used in vitro tests for evaluating nonimmediate DHRs.

  6. Immunologic mechanisms in hypersensitivity reactions to metal ions: an overview.

    PubMed

    Büdinger, L; Hertl, M

    2000-02-01

    Metal ions such as Ni2+, Co2+, Cu2+, or Cr3+ are haptens with a high immunogenic potential, as contact dermatitis caused by ionic metals occurs in about 10-15% of the human population. Since alloys containing Ni2+, Co2+, and Cr3+ are components of implants in replacement surgery, dentures, orthodontic wires, and various other devices, adverse reactions to metal ions create serious problems in practical medicine as incompatibility reactions to metal-containing biomaterials. On the other hand, contact dermatitis to metal ions such as Ni2+ is a well-established model for studying the molecular mechanisms involved in the recognition of haptens by the immune system. Although many investigations have been performed to elucidate the molecular interactions causing contact hypersensitivity in man, many aspects remain to be clarified. This review will focus on the experimental data accumulated so far on the immunologic mechanisms responsible for the recognition of metal ions by T cells and eliciting adverse immune reactions causing contact dermatitis.

  7. Low rate of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in Northeast Tennessee: An Appalachian effect?

    PubMed

    Adams, C Brooke; Street, D Sierra; Crass, Melanie; Bossaer, John B

    2016-12-01

    Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody with a known risk of hypersensitivity reactions. Early studies showed hypersensitivity reaction rates of 3%, but there appears to be a higher incidence in the southeastern United States. To confirm the findings from nearby institutions that cetuximab-associated hypersensitivity reactions occur in approximately 20% of patients in the southeastern United States. A retrospective chart review was conducted at Johnson City Medical Center in Johnson City, Tennessee. Each patient's first infusion was analyzed for hypersensitivity reaction, as well as for demographic information such as allergy and smoking history, pre-medications, and malignancy type. Data from the first infusion of cetuximab were collected for a total of 71 patients with various malignancies. The overall rate of grade 3 or higher hypersensitivity reaction was 1.4%, and total rate of hypersensitivity reaction was 8.5%. These findings more closely correlate to the early clinical trials and package insert. Both severe (p = 0.001) and any-grade (p = 0.002) hypersensitivity reaction occurred less frequently in one Southeastern Appalachian medical center compared to academic medical centers directly to the east and west. Patients in southern Appalachia may be less likely to develop cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions compared to surrounding areas in the Southeastern U.S. These results lend support to the theory that exposure to lonestar ticks (Amblyomma americanum) may be responsible for the development of IgE antibodies to cetuximab that cause hypersensitivity reactions. The development of quick and reliable bedside predictors of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions may aid clinicians considering the use of cetuximab. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Incidence and predictors of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in a North Carolina academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nicole L; Chandiramani, Divya V; Morse, Michael A; Wei, David; Hedrick, Nancy E; Hansen, Richard A

    2011-06-01

    Previous research has indicated a high incidence of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in the southern US. This study documents the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions in North Carolina, and explores whether factors such as patient demographics, allergy history, premedications, and cancer type are potential predictors for cetuximab reactions. This retrospective chart review consisted of 72 consecutively treated patients from Duke University's Morris Oncology treatment center between September 2005 and August 2007. Data regarding stage of malignancy, premedications, and hypersensitivity reactions were collected from electronic databases. The number and type of reactions were characterized. Patients with and without hypersensitivity reactions were compared using bivariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression. Of the 72 patients, 21 (29%) experienced hypersensitivity reactions. The majority of reactions (62%) were grades III or IV. Of the 21 patients having a reaction, 9 (43%) were sent to the emergency room and 5 (24%) had an overnight hospitalization. Three hospitalized patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. Both male gender (p = 0.039) and head/neck cancer (p = 0.014) were related to an increased likelihood of hypersensitivity reaction in bivariate analyses. In multivariate analyses, controlling for demographics, allergy history, premedications, and cancer type/stage, only type of cancer was predictive of hypersensitivity reaction (colon vs head/neck OR = 0.177; 95% CI 0.036-0.858). This study confirms a high rate of cetuximab hypersensitivity reactions in a southern region of the US. Patients with head/neck cancers were significantly more likely to have hypersensitivity reactions than patients with colon cancers.

  9. Clinical Abacavir Hypersensitivity Reaction among Children in India.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Sharma, Saurabh; Johri, Anuradha; Chourasia, Ankita; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-08-01

    Abacavir is currently recommended as a part of first line regimen by National AIDS Control Organization. The objective of this study was to observe the incidence of clinically diagnosed abacavir Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) among children on abacavir based therapy in the National program. In this observational study, all children started on abacavir were included and HSR reaction was diagnosed clinically as per National guidelines. HLA- B*5701 testing was done in children diagnosed with clinical abacavir HSR. Among 101 children started on abacavir during the study period, 8 [7.9 % (95 % CI 3.5-15.0 %)] children developed clinically diagnosed abacavir HSR. All children with concomitant illness (4/8) were HLA-B*5701 negative. Only 2 (25 %, 2/8) carried HLA-B*5701 allele. Fever with abdominal symptoms as compared to respiratory symptoms were more common in HLA-B*5701 positive cases. Overdiagnosis of clinically diagnosed abacavir HSR is common and could be decreased by treating concomitant illness before starting abacavir.

  10. Gender difference, sex hormones, and immediate type hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Mempel, M; Schober, W; Behrendt, H; Ring, J

    2008-11-01

    Gender differences in the development and prevalence of human diseases have long been recognized. Immense interest grows in the understanding of the role of sex hormones in the homeostasis of immunity. Asthma predominates in boys before puberty and this gender preference reverses after puberty and in adulthood, when adult women tend to have a more severe disease, often recalcitrant to treatment. Atopic eczema in preschool children shows insignificant gender difference or male preponderance in different studies, with more adult females suffering from atopic eczema. The limited data on the prevalence of immediate hypersensitivity to hymenoptera venom show controversial results. Discrepancy exists regarding the gender difference in food allergy, with females reporting significantly more allergic reactions in questionnaire studies. In general, adverse reactions to nonionic iodinated radiocontrast media are more commonly observed in females. The course of allergic diseases varies unpredictably during pregnancy, whereas hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women usually has a favorable influence on the course of asthma. Experiments in rodents confirm an effect of estrogens on mast cell activation and allergic sensitization, while progesterone is shown to suppress histamine release but potentiate IgE induction. Dehydroepiandrosterone may antagonize the production of Th2 cytokines but the effect of testosterone and the other androgens remains less defined. Actual data from human studies are lacking.

  11. Safety and efficacy of substituting nedaplatin after carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions in gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Michikami, Hiroo; Minaguchi, Takeo; Ochi, Hiroyuki; Onuki, Mamiko; Okada, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Koji; Satoh, Toyomi; Oki, Akinori; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Repeated treatment with carboplatin increases the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions. Current managements for carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions involve premedication, desensitization, and replacing agents. However, preventive effects for recurrent reactions by the former two methods are still limited, and substituting non-platinum agent can attenuate efficacy against platinum-sensitive diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of substituting nedaplatin, another platinum compound, as a strategy to deal with carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions in gynecologic cancers. Patients who experienced carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions and subsequently switched to nedaplatin between 2001 and 2009 were identified through our database. The incidence and severity of nedaplatin hypersensitivity were examined. Response to nedaplatin therapy was evaluated according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and serum CA-125 levels.   Forty-six of 570 patients (8.1%) experienced carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions, and the increased cycle numbers of carboplatin-based regimens correlated with the high incidence of hypersensitivity (≤6, 0.9% vs ≥7, 19.2%). Of these 46 patients, 38 subsequently switched to nedaplatin-based regimens (ovarian, tubal or peritoneal carcinoma, 30; endometrial carcinoma, 6; cervical carcinoma, 2). Three of the 38 patients (7.9%) eventually developed hypersensitivity against nedaplatin, and all their reactions were grade 2. The response rate to nedaplatin therapy among 32 evaluable patients was 31.3%. Replacing carboplatin with nedaplatin provided a safe and efficacious approach to manage carboplatin hypersensitivity. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to indicate the usefulness of nedaplatin after carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions. Further evaluations are warranted to confirm our finding. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan

  12. Hypersensitivity reaction caused by folinic acid administration: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Florit-Sureda, Marta; Conde-Estévez, David; Vidal, Joana; Montagut, Clara

    2016-12-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is combined with folinic acid (FA) for enhancing its cytotoxic effects in the colon cancer chemotherapy treatment. Folinic acid has rarely been involved in hypersensitivity reactions. Here, we report a case of FA hypersensitivity in an adult patient initially attributed to oxaliplatin administered concurrently. A 56-year-old male patient diagnosed with colon cancer received twelve cycles of FOLFOX4, one cycle of FOLFIRI plus cetuximab and nine cycles of FOLFOX6 uneventful. At the tenth cycle of FOLFOX6 chemotherapy, after 15 minutes of starting the infusion of oxaliplatin and FA, the patient reported flushing, pruritus and abdominal pain and erythema and oedema developed over the face and thorax. After progression, FOLFIRI plus aflibercept was scheduled and another reaction occurred. At this time, FA was discontinued and the patient received another cycle consisted on irinotecan plus 5-FU without incidences. This episode of hypersensitivity reaction following FA infusion with no oxaliplatin empirically confirmed that the hypersensitivity reaction was secondary to FA. Clinicians should be aware of hypersensitivity reaction with FA, especially when FA is administered concomitantly with oxaliplatin, despite its lower risk to cause hypersensitivity reactions. Furthermore, the similar signs and symptoms associated to the hypersensitivity reactions of each agent, highlight the importance of having a specialised allergist team for to make a prompt diagnose of the causative agent in order to prevent patient harm and proceed properly without unnecessary delays in the scheduled chemotherapy treatments.

  13. Drug hypersensitivity reactions during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J; Scherer Hofmeier, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Drugs may elicit a considerable variety of clinical signs, often affecting the skin and the mucous membranes. The most common are maculopapular exanthema, urticaria and angioedema. More rarely pustular, vesiculobullous, vasculitic and lichenoid lesions may be observed. Apart from the morphology, also the chronology of the occurrence and the evolution of the single skin lesions and the exanthema are paramount in the clinical diagnosis. Often, the skin is the only affected organ; however, it may herald a systemic involvement of internal organs, such as in severe drug-induced hypersensitivity syndromes or anaphylaxis. Cutaneous manifestations, particularly maculopapular exanthemas have a high incidence among patients treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In many cases, a virus- or drug-induced origin or a combination of both is responsible. However, the transplantation itself may also induce similar skin changes. These exanthemas include most often graft-versus-host disease, and rarely engraftment syndrome or eruption of lymphocyte recovery. The elucidation of the underlying cause of the exanthemas occurring in immune compromised patients and the determination of the correct diagnosis remain challenging. An extensive differential diagnosis has to be put forward. This includes several groups of disorders with sometimes very similar cutaneous manifestations. Manifestations form the underlying disease, complications from therapy, infections and drug reactions are the most common differential diagnoses.

  14. US-Based Emergency Department Visits for Fluoroquinolone-Associated Hypersensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S. Christopher; Budnitz, Dan; Sorbello, Alfred; Mehta, Hina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate the rate of hypersensitivity reactions per 100,000 prescription dispensings of fluoroquinolones based on care rendered in a nationally-representative sample of US hospital emergency departments (ED). Methods We analyzed the frequency of fluoroquinolone-associated hypersensitivity reactions using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance system (2004–2010) in conjunction with US retail outpatient prescription data from IMS Health (2004–2010). We further categorized reaction severity into three subgroups (mild, moderate, severe). Results Based on 1,422 cases of fluoroquinolone-associated hypersensitivity reactions and national drug utilization projections, we estimated risk of hypersensitivity reactions for moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The absolute risk of a fluoroquinolone-related hypersensitivity reaction of any severity was low (44.0 (95% CI 34.8–53.3) ED visits/100,000 prescriptions; however, we identified a statistically significant difference in the relative risk (rate ratios) of seeking care in an ED attributed to moxifloxacin hypersensitivity compared to either levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin. For all reaction severities, the estimated ED visits/100,000 prescriptions were 141.3 (95% CI 99.9–182.7) for moxifloxacin, 40.8 (95% CI 31.5–50.0) for levofloxacin, and 26.3 (95% CI 20.8–31.9) for ciprofloxacin. When the rates were stratified by reaction severity category (mild or moderate-severe), moxifloxacin continued to be implicated in more ED visits per 100,000 prescriptions dispensed than either levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Fluoroquinolones may cause hypersensitivity reactions requiring care in an ED, and relative to use, the rate of moxifloxacin-related hypersensitivity reactions is higher than comparator fluoroquinolones. PMID:23963962

  15. US-based emergency department visits for fluoroquinolone-associated hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, S Christopher; Budnitz, Daniel S; Sorbello, Alfred; Mehta, Hina

    2013-10-01

    To estimate the rate of hypersensitivity reactions per 100,000 prescription dispensings of fluoroquinolones based on care rendered in a nationally representative sample of US hospital emergency departments (ED). We analyzed the frequency of fluoroquinolone-associated hypersensitivity reactions using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-Cooperative Adverse Drug Event Surveillance system (2004-2010) in conjunction with US retail outpatient prescription data from IMS Health (2004-2010). We further categorized reaction severity into three subgroups (mild, moderate, and severe). Based on 1422 cases of fluoroquinolone-associated hypersensitivity reactions and national drug utilization projections, we estimated risk of hypersensitivity reactions for moxifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The absolute risk of a fluoroquinolone-related hypersensitivity reaction of any severity was low (44.0 (95% CI 34.8-53.3) ED visits/100,000 prescriptions); however, we identified a statistically significant difference in the relative risk (rate ratios) of seeking care in an ED attributed to moxifloxacin hypersensitivity compared to either levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin. For all reaction severities, the estimated ED visits/100,000 prescriptions were 141.3 (95% CI 99.9-182.7) for moxifloxacin, 40.8 (95% CI 31.5-50.0) for levofloxacin, and 26.3 (95% CI 20.8-31.9) for ciprofloxacin. When the rates were stratified by reaction severity category (mild or moderate-severe), moxifloxacin continued to be implicated in more ED visits per 100,000 prescriptions dispensed than either levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin. Fluoroquinolones may cause hypersensitivity reactions requiring care in an ED, and relative to use, the rate of moxifloxacin-related hypersensitivity reactions is higher compared to levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. The usefulness of plasma histamine and different tryptase cut-off points in the diagnosis of peranaesthetic hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Berroa, F; Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Ferrer, M; Moncada, R; Goikoetxea, M J; Urbain, C M; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2014-02-01

    Anaesthetic hypersensitivity reactions can be IgE- or not IgE-mediated and are a challenge to find the causal agent. Histamine and tryptase determination are classically considered useful in the diagnosis of these reactions. The aim of our study was to assess the diagnostic usefulness of plasma histamine and different cut-off points of serum tryptase. Patients suffering a reaction suggestive of hypersensitivity during general anaesthesia in Clínica Universidad de Navarra (2008-2012) were included. Serum tryptase and plasma histamine were measured at the time of the reaction and 2 h later. Baseline tryptase was also determined. Four to eight weeks after the reaction an allergological study was performed to all the drugs or products involved in the reaction. Sixty-five patients suffered an immediate hypersensitivity reaction during the period of the study. Thirty-seven patients (20 male) with median age 48 years (12-79) were included because they completed allergological study, and histamine and tryptase were correctly obtained. Elevated plasma histamine was observed in 34 cases (92%). Tryptase exceeded twice the basal values in 10 patients (31%). Using different cut-off points of tryptase, the number of patients with elevated tryptase would be 15 patients (41%) for a cut-off point of 5 μg/L; 12 patients (32%) for a cut-off point of 8.23 μg/L; nine patients (24%) for 10.5 μg/L; and eight patients (22%) for 11.4 μg/L. The median tryptase level for the IgE-mediated reactions was 9.0 μg/L (2-70 μg/L) and 4.0 μg/L (3-13 μg/L) in non-IgE-mediated reactions (P < 0.01). Median tryptase levels were higher in more severe reactions (grade 2 or 3) in comparison with grade 1. The best ratio for serum-tryptase-during-reaction/basal-serum-tryptase to discriminate between IgE and non-IgE reactions was 2.0. The best criterion for discriminating IgE- and non IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in anaesthesia was a tryptase value exceeding twice the basal one

  17. Role of CCL7 in Type I Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Experimental Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chuan-Hui; Collins, Andrea M.; Boettner, Douglas R.; Yang, YanFen

    2017-01-01

    Molecules that are necessary for ocular hypersensitivity reactions include the receptors CCR1 and CCR3; CCL7 is a ligand for these receptors. Therefore, we explored the role of CCL7 in mast cell activity and motility in vitro and investigated the requirement for CCL7 in a murine model of IgE-mediated allergic conjunctivitis. For mast cells treated with IgE and Ag, the presence of CCL7 synergistically enhanced degranulation and calcium influx. CCL7 also induced chemotaxis in mast cells. CCL7-deficient bone marrow–derived mast cells showed decreased degranulation following IgE and Ag treatment compared with wild-type bone marrow–derived mast cells, but there was no difference in degranulation when cells were activated via an IgE-independent pathway. In vivo, CCL7 was upregulated in conjunctival tissue during an OVA-induced allergic response. Notably, the early-phase clinical symptoms in the conjunctiva after OVA challenge were significantly higher in OVA-sensitized wild-type mice than in control challenged wild-type mice; the increase was suppressed in CCL7-deficient mice. In the OVA-induced allergic response, the numbers of conjunctival mast cells were lower in CCL7-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. Our results demonstrate that CCL7 is required for maximal OVA-induced ocular anaphylaxis, mast cell recruitment in vivo, and maximal FcεRI-mediated mast cell activation in vitro. A better understanding of the role of CCL7 in mediating ocular hypersensitivity reactions will provide insights into mast cell function and novel treatments for allergic ocular diseases. PMID:27956527

  18. [Hypersensitivity reactions to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and tolerance to alternative drugs].

    PubMed

    Calvo Campoverde, K; Giner-Muñoz, M T; Martínez Valdez, L; Rojas Volquez, M; Lozano Blasco, J; Machinena, A; Plaza, A M

    2016-03-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most common reactions to drugs. The prevalence varies from 0.6 to 5.7% in general population, but there are no data available in children. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of patients diagnosed with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs, and describe their clinical characteristics, type of hypersensitivity, and tolerance to alternative drugs. Retrospective study was conducted on children with suspected hypersensitivity to NSAIDs from January 2012 to December 2013. The diagnosis was confirmed by oral drug provocation test (DPT) to the drug involved in the group with a history of one episode, while in the group with a history of more than one episode with the same drug the diagnosis was based on clinical data. Subsequently, a DPT with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) was done in order to classify hypersensitivity into selective or multiple. In those cases with a positive result, a DPT was performed with alternative drugs. Out of a total of 93 children studied, 26 were diagnosed with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs: 7 confirmed by oral DPT, and 19 based on clinical data. Multiple hypersensitivity was diagnosed in 50% of patients. Ibuprofen was involved in all reactions. The most common clinical manifestation was angioedema (44%). Acetaminophen was the best tolerated alternative drug. More than one quarter (28%) of the population studied was diagnosed with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs, and 50% had multiple hypersensitivity. Acetaminophen is a safe alternative in children with hypersensitivity to NSAIDs. Meloxicam may be an alternative in cases that do not tolerate acetaminophen. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypersensitivity reactions to transcatheter chemoembolization with cisplatin and Lipiodol suspension for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Aikata, Hiroshi; Katamura, Yoshio; Takaki, Shintaro; Waki, Koji; Hiramatsu, Akira; Takahashi, Shoichi; Hieda, Masashi; Kakizawa, Hideaki; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-08-01

    To assess the predictors of hypersensitivity reaction to chemoembolization procedures with cisplatin and Lipiodol suspension for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Between February 2005 and December 2008, 434 patients with HCC were treated with chemoembolization with a cisplatin and Lipiodol suspension. This retrospective cohort study analyzed the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions as an adverse effect and their predictors by multivariate logistic regression analyses. In total, 847 chemoembolization procedures were carried out in 434 patients. The median number of procedures per patient was 2 (range, 1-12). Mean dose of cisplatin per chemoembolization session was 27 mg (range, 15.0-80.0 mg), and the median total dose of cisplatin per patient was 55 mg (range, 5.0-560.0 mg). Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in 14 patients (1.7%). The median number of chemoembolization procedures in these patients was 7 (range, 3-10). Mean dose of cisplatin per session was 22 mg (range, 9.2-35.7 mg), and the median total dose of cisplatin was 134 mg (range, 37-286 mg). On multivariate analysis, the only parameter that showed an independent association with hypersensitivity reactions was the performance of 3 or more than three chemoembolization procedures. Performance of more than three chemoembolization procedures with a cisplatin and Lipiodol suspension was found to be independently associated with hypersensitivity reactions. Patients undergoing repeated chemoembolization procedures with cisplatin and Lipiodol suspension may experience hypersensitivity reactions as an adverse effect. Copyright (c) 2010 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Multi-Scale Optical Imaging of the Delayed Type Hypersensitivity Reaction Attenuated by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Qiao, Sha; Liu, Zheng; Fu, Ling; Shen, Guanxin; Luo, Qingming

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages (MMs) play important roles in the development of cell-mediated delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH). However, the dynamics of neutrophils and MMs during the DTH reaction and how the immunosuppressant rapamycin modulates their behavior in vivo are rarely reported. Here, we take advantage of multi-scale optical imaging techniques and a footpad DTH reaction model to non-invasively investigate the dynamic behavior and properties of immune cells from the whole field of the footpad to the cellular level. During the classic elicitation phase of the DTH reaction, both neutrophils and MMs obviously accumulated at inflammatory foci at 24 h post-challenge. Rapamycin treatment resulted in advanced neutrophil recruitment and vascular hyperpermeability at an early stage (4 h), the reduced accumulation of neutrophils (> 50% inhibition ratio) at 48 h, and the delayed involvement of MMs in inflammatory foci. The motility parameters of immune cells in the rapamycin-treated reaction at 4 h post-challenge displayed similar mean velocities, arrest durations, mean displacements, and confinements as the classic DTH reaction at 24 h. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment shortened the initial preparation stage of the DTH reaction and attenuated its intensity, which may be due to the involvement of T helper type 2 cells or regulatory T cells. PMID:24465276

  1. Hypersensitivity reactions to vaccine constituents: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Berger, Emily M; Brauer, Jeremy A; Cohen, David E

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines are composed of immunogens, preservatives, adjuvants, antibiotics, and manufacturing by-products. Components of vaccines may rarely elicit adverse reactions in susceptible individuals, thus raising concerns regarding vaccine safety. In this report, we add to the medical literature 3 cases of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity to the vaccine preservative aluminum. We provide a review of major constituents in vaccines that have elicited immediate-type or delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and describe their clinical manifestations. We include a table of the Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines, which lists the quantities of major components including ovalbumin (egg protein), gelatin, aluminum, neomycin, 2-phenoxyethanol, thimerosal, and formaldehyde. Our goals were to inform physicians on the variety of hypersensitivity reactions to common vaccines and to provide information on the choice of vaccines in patients with suspected hypersensitivity.

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Diagnosis and Management of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Contrast Media.

    PubMed

    Rosado Ingelmo, A; Doña Diaz, I; Cabañas Moreno, R; Moya Quesada, M C; García-Avilés, C; García Nuñez, I; Martínez Tadeo, J I; Mielgo Ballesteros, R; Ortega-Rodríguez, N; Padial Vilchez, M A; Sánchez-Morillas, L; Vila Albelda, C; Moreno Rodilla, E; Torres Jaén, M J

    2016-01-01

    The objective of these guidelines is to ensure efficient and effective clinical practice. The panel of experts who produced this consensus document developed a research protocol based on a review of the literature. The prevalence of allergic reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) is estimated to be 1:170 000, that is, 0.05%-0.1% of patients undergoing radiologic studies with ICM (more than 75 million examinations per year worldwide). Hypersensitivity reactions can appear within the first hour after administration (immediate reactions) or from more than 1 hour to several days after administration (nonimmediate or delayed reactions). The risk factors for immediate reactions include poorly controlled bronchial asthma, concomitant medication (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, ß-blockers, and proton-pump inhibitors), rapid administration of the ICM, mastocytosis, autoimmune diseases, and viral infections. The most common symptoms of immediate reactions are erythema and urticaria with or without angioedema, which appear in more than 70% of patients. Maculopapular rash is the most common skin feature of nonimmediate reactions (30%-90%). Skin and in vitro tests should be performed for diagnosis of both immediate and nonimmediate reactions. The ICM to be administered will therefore be chosen depending on the results of these tests, the ICM that induced the reaction (when known), the severity of the reaction, the availability of alternative ICM, and the information available on potential ICM cross-reactivity. Another type of contrast media, gadolinium derivatives, is used used for magnetic resonance imaging. Although rare, IgE-mediated reactions to gadolinium derivatives have been reported.

  3. Tolerability of aztreonam and carbapenems in patients with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Gaeta, Francesco; Valluzzi, Rocco Luigi; Alonzi, Cristiana; Maggioletti, Michela; Caruso, Cristiano; Romano, Antonino

    2015-04-01

    Studies performed on samples larger than 100 subjects with a documented IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have demonstrated a cross-reactivity rate of approximately 1% between penicillins and both imipenem and meropenem, whereas a single study found a cross-reactivity rate of 6.2% with aztreonam in 16 such subjects. To assess the cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and 3 carbapenems (imipenem-cilastatin, meropenem, and ertapenem) in patients with documented IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins. A total of 212 consecutive subjects with immediate reactions to penicillins and positive results on skin tests to at least 1 penicillin reagent underwent skin tests with aztreonam and carbapenems; subjects with negative results were challenged with escalating doses of aztreonam and carbapenems. All subjects displayed negative skin test results to both aztreonam and carbapenems; 211 accepted challenges and tolerated them. Challenges were not followed by full therapeutic courses. These data indicate the tolerability of both aztreonam and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic subjects. In those who especially require these alternative β-lactams, however, we recommend pretreatment skin tests, both because rare cases of cross-reactivity have been reported and because negative results indicate tolerability. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs according to the latest classification.

    PubMed

    Demir, S; Olgac, M; Unal, D; Gelincik, A; Colakoglu, B; Buyukozturk, S

    2015-11-01

    The consensus document for hypersensitivity reactions to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) proposed by the European Network for Drug Allergy (ENDA) interest group (2011) was revised in 2013. We aimed to evaluate the usability of the latest NSAID hypersensitivity classification of ENDA. A total of 370 patients with a history of hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs among the 1250 outpatients referred for suspected drug allergy between July 2013 and June 2014 were evaluated, and 308 patients who were confirmed as having NSAID hypersensitivity were included in this study. After confirming the diagnosis, a single-blind placebo-controlled drug provocation test was performed with aspirin or diclofenac to categorize the patients according to the ENDA classification. The reactions not meeting the ENDA classification criteria were grouped as blended reactions. Among the 308 patients (224 female, mean age 42.12 ± 13.24), the leading cause of hypersensitivity reactions was metamizol (30.5%) followed by aspirin (30.2%). The most common NSAID hypersensitivity subgroup was SNIUAA (46.4%) and the least common type was SNIDR (1.6%). Cross-reactivity was identified in 50.3% of the patients. In five patients (1.6%), the hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs did not meet the ENDA classification: Three patients experienced anaphylaxis with different NSAIDs, one patient encountered anaphylaxis with one NSAID and urticaria with other NSAIDs, and the last patient had angioedema with different NSAIDs. The latest ENDA classification for NSAID hypersensitivity is generally a practical and useful instrument for clinicians. We only point out that anaphylaxis with different NSAIDs can be seen in a small group of patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  6. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity.

  7. Best practices in multiple sclerosis: infusion reactions versus hypersensitivity associated with biologic therapies.

    PubMed

    Namey, Marie; Halper, June; O'leary, Shirley; Beavin, Jill; Bishop, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Infusion nurses are uniquely positioned to play a vital role in the early identification and management of infusion and hypersensitivity reactions during the administration of biologic therapies. This article reviews the current evidence regarding reactions related to the administration of monoclonal antibodies, namely, natalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against the cellular adhesion molecule alpha4-integrin, in patients with multiple sclerosis. In addition to differentiating between infusion and hypersensitivity reactions, the article presents general guidelines for the management of these reactions and provides case studies to better illustrate the use of appropriate interventions.

  8. Copper mediated carbometalation reactions.

    PubMed

    Müller, D S; Marek, I

    2016-08-08

    Since the first discovery of carbocupration of alkynes in the 1970s a tremendous amount of research has been carried out in this field. The exceptionally high selectivities obtained attribute to the great synthetic value of carbocupration reactions. This tutorial review will present the most important features of carbocupration of alkynes and highlight the most relevant reviews. Then a comprehensive review of copper mediated carbometalation of cyclopropenes will follow. The latter method has received much attention over the last decade as it allows the highly selective construction of poly-substituted cyclopropanes which can be transformed into acyclic derivatives bearing one or multiple tertiary or quaternary carbon stereocenters.

  9. Pharmacogenomics of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions: challenges, opportunities and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Puangpetch, Apichaya; Medhasi, Sadeep; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra

    2014-06-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions affect many patients leading to a variety of clinical manifestations, mainly the cutaneous adverse reactions ranging from milder skin reactions to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Hypersensitivity reactions are unpredictable and are thought to have an underlying genetic etiology, as suggested by case reports. With the scientific knowledge of pharmacogenomics and the evidence based on the genomic testing, it is possible to identify genetic predisposing factors for these serious adverse reactions and personalize drug therapy. The most significant genetic associations have been identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encoded for human leukocyte antigens (HLA) alleles. Drugs associated with hypersensitivity reactions with strong genetic predisposing factors include abacavir, nevirapine, carbamazepine, and allopurinol. In this review, strong genetic associations of drug-induced SCARs are highlighted so as to improve drug safety and help to select optimal drugs for individual patients. Further investigation, however, is essential for the characterization of other genes involved in the hypersensitivity reactions with the use of several genetic strategies and technologies.

  10. Desensitization in delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions -- an EAACI position paper of the Drug Allergy Interest Group.

    PubMed

    Scherer, K; Brockow, K; Aberer, W; Gooi, J H C; Demoly, P; Romano, A; Schnyder, B; Whitaker, P; Cernadas, J S R; Bircher, A J

    2013-07-01

    Drug hypersensitivity may deprive patients of drug therapy, and occasionally no effective alternative treatment is available. Successful desensitization has been well documented in delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions. In certain situations, such as sulfonamide hypersensitivity in HIV-positive patients or hypersensitivity to antibiotics in patients with cystic fibrosis, published success rates reach 80%, and this procedure appears helpful for the patient management. A state of clinical tolerance may be achieved by the administration of increasing doses of the previously offending drug. However, in most cases, a pre-existent sensitization has not been proven by positive skin tests. Successful re-administration may have occurred in nonsensitized patients. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of desensitization is needed. Currently, desensitization in delayed hypersensitivity reactions is restricted to mild, uncomplicated exanthems and fixed drug eruptions. The published success rates vary depending on clinical manifestations, drugs, and applied protocols. Slower protocols tend to be more effective than rush protocols; however, underreporting of unsuccessful procedures is very probable. The decision to desensitize a patient must always be made on an individual basis, balancing risks and benefits. This paper reviews the literature and presents the expert experience of the Drug Hypersensitivity Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

  11. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with subcutaneous glargine insulin therapy in a cat.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Lisa A; Zuendt, Greg F; Nakamura, Reid K; Gambardella, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A 14-year-old, domestic shorthair cat was treated for transient diabetes mellitus for 3 months with glargine insulin, which was discontinued when the diabetes mellitus resolved. Approximately 36 months later the diabetes mellitus recurred and glargine insulin was restarted. Within 2-3 mins of the first injection the cat collapsed, developed profuse vomiting and diarrhea, as well as facial swelling and diffuse erythema. A hypersensitivity reaction was suspected and the cat was treated with antihistamines, aggressive fluid therapy and gastrointestinal support. The cat made a full recovery and was discharged 3 days later. Six months later the cat re-presented for relapse of its diabetes mellitus and an intradermal skin challenge with 1:20 diluted insulin was performed confirming a hypersensitivity to glargine. The cat continues to be well regulated on porcine zinc insulin without any hypersensitivity reactions noted. Hypersensitivity reactions to insulin administration are rarely described in human medicine. This is the first reported case of a hypersensitivity reaction secondary to glargine insulin in a cat. Clinicians should be aware of this potential complication, particularly in animals with a previous history of insulin administration and the potential to utilize intradermal testing with insulin.

  12. Carboplatin Hypersensitivity Reactions in Pediatric Low Grade Glioma Are Protocol Specific and Desensitization Shows Poor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Dodgshun, Andrew J; Hansford, Jordan R; Cole, Theresa; Choo, Sharon; Sullivan, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The use of carboplatin for the treatment of pediatric low grade gliomas (PLGG) is often limited by the development of carboplatin hypersensitivity. Reported rates of carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions vary between 6% and 32% in these patients. Here we report the frequency of carboplatin hypersensitivity reactions depending on the treatment regimen used, and outcomes of carboplatin desensitization. The records of all patients in a single institution who were treated with carboplatin for PLGG were accessed and all patients receiving more than one dose of carboplatin are reported. Thirty four patients with PLGG were treated with carboplatin according to one of the two different regimens. Carboplatin hypersensitivity was documented in 47% of patients, but the frequency differed by treatment protocol. Those patients treated with 4-weekly single agent carboplatin had carboplatin allergy in 8% of cases whereas 68% of those treated with combined carboplatin and vincristine (every three weeks, according to the SIOP 2004 low grade glioma protocol) had carboplatin reactions (OR 23.6, P < 0.01). Desensitization was only successful in two out of 10 patients in whom it was attempted. Hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin are more common in this cohort than previously reported and rates are protocol-dependent. Desensitization showed limited effectiveness in this cohort. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Serious carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions associated with the HSP70 gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Alfirevic, Ana; Mills, Tracy; Harrington, Pauline; Pinel, Tracy; Sherwood, James; Jawaid, Ansar; Smith, John C; March, Ruth E; Barratt, Bryan J; Chadwick, David W; Kevin Park, B; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2006-04-01

    The use of carbamazepine (CBZ), the most commonly prescribed antiepileptic drug, is hampered by the occurrence of severe, potentially lethal hypersensitivity reactions. The pathogenesis of hypersensitivity is not yet known, but immune mechanisms are involved. Predisposition to CBZ hypersensitivity is likely to be genetically determined, and genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have been implicated. The heat shock protein (HSP70) gene cluster is located in the MHC class III region. Using a case-control study design, we compared 61 patients with CBZ hypersensitivity (22 with a severe reaction) to 44 patients on CBZ with no signs of hypersensitivity and 172 healthy controls. The genotyping strategy involved identification of common and rare single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the HSP70 gene cluster by sequencing, estimation of linkage disequilibrium (LD) and haplotype structure, and thereafter, analysis of SNP/haplotype frequencies in the cases and controls. Population substructure was evaluated by genotyping of 34 microsatellites. Twenty-five SNPs were detected across the three HSP70 genes. Analyses revealed that alleles G, T and C at the SNPs HSPA1A +1911 C/G, HSPA1A +438 C/T and HSPA1L +2437 T/C, respectively, were associated with protection from serious hypersensitivity reactions to CBZ, with the associated alleles falling on a common haplotype. We were unable to detect the presence of population stratification in our patients and controls. Our data show that HSP70 gene variants are associated with serious CBZ hypersensitivity reactions, but whether this is causal or reflects LD with another gene within the MHC requires further study.

  14. Common allergies do not influence the prevalence of cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Bosak, Magdalena; Porębski, Grzegorz; Słowik, Agnieszka; Turaj, Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to establish whether the presence of common allergies increases the risk of drug-related hypersensitivity reactions among patients with epilepsy treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). We studied 753 patients with epilepsy seen in tertiary outpatient epilepsy clinic. We obtained data related to epilepsy type, past and ongoing treatment with AEDs, occurrence of maculopapular exanthema or more serious cutaneous adverse reactions (Stevens-Johnson syndrome - SJS) and their characteristics. We noted an occurrence of allergic reactions unrelated to treatment with AED, including rash unrelated to AED, bronchial asthma, persistent or seasonal allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, rash after specific food and other allergic reactions. There were 61 cases of AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction (including 3 cases of SJS) noted in association with 2319 exposures to AEDs (2.63%) among 55 out of 753 patients (7.3%). Cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction to AED was most commonly noted after lamotrigine (12.1%), carbamazepine (5.4%) and oxcarbazepine (4.1%). Prevalence of allergic reactions unrelated to AED was similar between patients with and without AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction (rash unrelated to AED: 16.4% vs. 10.2%; bronchial asthma: 1.8% vs. 0.1%; persistent allergic rhinitis: 7.3% vs. 10.2%; seasonal allergic rhinitis: 7.3% vs. 11.7%; atopic dermatitis: 0 vs. 0.7%; rash after specific food: 5.4% vs. 6.4%; other allergic reactions: 5.4% vs. 5.2%, respectively; P>0.1 for each difference). Presence of common allergies is not a significant risk factor for AED-related cutaneous hypersensitivity reaction among patients with epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Immediate hypersensitivity reaction following liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome) infusion.

    PubMed

    Nath, Proggananda; Basher, Ariful; Harada, Michiyo; Sarkar, Santana; Selim, Shahjada; Maude, Richard J; Noiri, Eisei; Faiz, Abul

    2014-10-01

    Liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome) is now becoming first choice for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar) patients due to high efficacy and less toxicity. The reported incidence of hypersensitivity reactions to liposomal amphotericin-B (AmBisome), especially during therapy, is very rare. We report two patients with kala-azar: one developed breathing difficulties and hypotension followed by shock and the other had facial angioedema with chest tightness during treatment. Both patients were managed with immediate action of injection: adrenaline, diphenhydramine and hydrocortisone. In our experience, AmBisome can cause severe hypersensitivity reactions that warrant proper support and close supervision.

  16. Immunological Mechanisms of Drug Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoli; Ariza, Adriana; Waddington, James; Park, Kevin; Naisbitt, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are adverse drug reactions that may be divided into several categories; namely pharmacologic intolerance, idiosyncratic reactions, pseudo-allergic reactions and allergic reactions. Drug allergic reactions are those DHRs that are mediated by either antibodies or drug-specific T cells. They vary in terms of severity, time-to-onset of clinical manifestations and target organ. Skin is most commonly implicated in drug hypersensitivity reactions; however, it is now apparent that reactions targeting internal organs fall under the definition of drug hypersensitivity. Multiple hypotheses have been proposed to explain the diverse immune mechanisms involved and the heterogeneous clinical presentation. The discovery of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) risk alleles for some DHRs has provided insights in the pathogenesis of these reactions. In this review we summarize immune cells involved in DHRs, discuss the possible immunological mechanisms of DHRs, with an emphasis on the IgE-mediated immediate reactions and T cell-dependent delayed type reactions.

  17. Hypersensitivity reaction studies of a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongbo; Cheng, Guang; Du, Yuan; Ye, Liang; Chen, Wenzhong; Zhang, Leiming; Wang, Tian; Tian, Jingwei; Fu, Fenghua

    2013-03-01

    The commercial drug paclitaxel (Taxol) may introduce hypersensitivity reactions associated with the polyethoxylated castor oil-ethanol solvent. To overcome these problems, we developed a polyethoxylated castor oil-free, liposome-based alternative paclitaxel formulation, known as Lipusu. In this study, we performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to compare the safety profiles of Lipusu and Taxol, with special regard to hypersensitivity reactions. First, Swiss mice were used to determine the lethal dosages, and then to evaluate hypersensitivity reactions, followed by histopathological examination and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) of serum SC5b-9 and lung histamine. Additionally, healthy human serum was used to analyze in vitro complement activation. Finally, an MTT assay was used to determine the in vitro anti-proliferation activity. Our data clearly showed that Lipusu displayed a much higher safety margin and did not induce hypersensitivity or hypersensitivity-related lung lesions, which may be associated with the fact that Lipusu did not activate complement or increase histamine release in vivo. Moreover, Lipusu did not promote complement activation in healthy human serum in vitro, and demonstrated anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cells, similar to that of Taxol. Therefore, the improved formulation of paclitaxel, which exhibited a much better safety profile and comparable cytotoxic activity to Taxol, may bring a number of benefits to cancer patients.

  18. An algorithm for treatment of patients with hypersensitivity reactions after vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wood, Robert A; Berger, Melvin; Dreskin, Stephen C; Setse, Rosanna; Engler, Renata J M; Dekker, Cornelia L; Halsey, Neal A

    2008-09-01

    Concerns about possible allergic reactions to immunizations are raised frequently by both patients/parents and primary care providers. Estimates of true allergic, or immediate hypersensitivity, reactions to routine vaccines range from 1 per 50000 doses for diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis to approximately 1 per 500000 to 1000000 doses for most other vaccines. In a large study from New Zealand, data were collected during a 5-year period on 15 marketed vaccines and revealed an estimated rate of 1 immediate hypersensitivity reaction per 450000 doses of vaccine administered. Another large study, conducted within the Vaccine Safety Datalink, described a range of reaction rates to >7.5 million doses. Depending on the study design and the time after the immunization event, reaction rates varied from 0.65 cases per million doses to 1.53 cases per million doses when additional allergy codes were included. For some vaccines, particularly when allergens such as gelatin are part of the formulation (eg, Japanese encephalitis), higher rates of serious allergic reactions may occur. Although these per-dose estimates suggest that true hypersensitivity reactions are quite rare, the large number of doses that are administered, especially for the commonly used vaccines, makes this a relatively common clinical problem. In this review, we present background information on vaccine hypersensitivity, followed by a detailed algorithm that provides a rational and organized approach for the evaluation and treatment of patients with suspected hypersensitivity. We then include 3 cases of suspected allergic reactions to vaccines that have been referred to the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment network to demonstrate the practical application of the algorithm.

  19. Leukemoid reaction secondary to hypersensitivity syndrome to phenobarbital: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qinghai; Wu, Yuanqiang; Zhan, Yi; Tang, Ling; Zhou, Yangmei; Yin, Jun; Fan, Fan; Zhang, Guiying; Lu, Qianjin; Xiao, Rong

    2013-01-01

    The most important adverse effects of phenobarbital, an anticonvulsant drug, are behavior and cognitive alterations. Hypersensitivity syndrome caused by phenobarbital presenting with a leukemoid reaction is a rare side effect, which is rarely ever reported and needs to be known. We report on a 27-year-old Chinese woman who experienced hypersensitivity syndrome three weeks after the initiation of phenobarbital. The patient developed fever, skin rash, face swelling, lymphadenopathy, myalgia, hepatitis, eosinophilia, atypical lymphocytes and leukocytosis. Along with the pathological progress of the disease, the patient noticed a gradual exacerbation of her symptoms. And the highest leukocyte count was up to 127.2 x 10(9)/L. After discontinuing of phenobarbital and administration of methylprednisolone combined with the intravenous immunoglobulin shock therapy, all initial symptoms improved and the leukocyte count normalized. This case is reported because of its rarity of the leukemoid reaction secondary to hypersensitivity syndrome to phenobarbital.

  20. HLA-A★3101 and Carbamazepine-Induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Europeans

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Mark; Alfirevic, Ana; Bourgeois, Stephane; Farrell, John J.; Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Carrington, Mary; Sills, Graeme J.; Marson, Tony; Jia, Xiaoming; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Molokhia, Mariam; Johnson, Michael R.; O’Connor, Gerard D.; Chaila, Elijah; Alhusaini, Saud; Shianna, Kevin V.; Radtke, Rodney A.; Heinzen, Erin L.; Walley, Nicole; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pichler, Werner; Park, B. Kevin; Depondt, Chantal; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Goldstein, David B.; Deloukas, Panos; Delanty, Norman; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Carbamazepine causes various forms of hypersensitivity reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe blistering reactions. The HLA-B★1502 allele has been shown to be strongly correlated with carbamazepine-induced Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS–TEN) in the Han Chinese and other Asian populations but not in European populations. METHODS We performed a genomewide association study of samples obtained from 22 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, 43 subjects with carbamazepine-induced maculopapular exanthema, and 3987 control subjects, all of European descent. We tested for an association between disease and HLA alleles through proxy single-nucleotide polymorphisms and imputation, confirming associations by high-resolution sequence-based HLA typing. We replicated the associations in samples from 145 subjects with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions. RESULTS The HLA-A★3101 allele, which has a prevalence of 2 to 5% in Northern European populations, was significantly associated with the hypersensitivity syndrome (P = 3.5×10−8). An independent genomewide association study of samples from subjects with maculopapular exanthema also showed an association with the HLA-A★3101 allele (P = 1.1×10−6). Follow-up genotyping confirmed the variant as a risk factor for the hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 12.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.27 to 121.03), maculopapular exanthema (odds ratio, 8.33; 95% CI, 3.59 to 19.36), and SJS–TEN (odds ratio, 25.93; 95% CI, 4.93 to 116.18). CONCLUSIONS The presence of the HLA-A★3101 allele was associated with carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions among subjects of Northern European ancestry. The presence of the allele increased the risk from 5.0% to 26.0%, whereas its absence reduced the risk from 5.0% to 3.8%. (Funded by the U.K. Department of Health and others.) PMID:21428769

  1. Risk factors contributing to the development of carboplatin-related delayed hypersensitivity reactions in Japanese patients with gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Hiroko; Iwamoto, Takuya; Murashima, Yukiko; Tabata, Tsutomu; Sagawa, Norimasa; Okuda, Masahiro

    2011-02-01

    The rate of hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving carboplatin (CBDCA) has been reported to increase after multiple doses of the agent. However, risk factors for these onsets have not been well described. In this study, we investigated the contribution of the reported risk factors to the onset of CBDCA-related delayed hypersensitivity reactions. We reviewed the records of gynecologic cancer patients receiving CBDCA of more than 7 cycles in Mie University Hospital from March 2006 to July 2009. The patients were divided into two groups on the basis of whether hypersensitivity reactions developed (13 patients) or not (43 patients). Thereafter, the potential influences of the patients' characteristics on the development of CBDCA-related delayed hypersensitivity reactions were explored using logistic regression analyses. The median CBDCA-free interval (10 months) in patients with hypersensitivity reactions was significantly higher than that (3 months) in patients without hypersensitivity reactions. Logistic regression analyses revealed a CBDCA-free interval >13 months (odds ratio 22.2, 95% confidence interval 2.57-192, p < 0.01) and a maximum dose of CBDCA > 650 mg (odds ratio 9.52, 95% confidence interval 1.04-93.9; p < 0.05) were significantly correlated with the incidence of CBDCA-related delayed hypersensitivity reactions. Careful attention should be paid to the onset of delayed hypersensitivity reactions for recurrent gynecologic cancer patients receiving CBDCA > 650 mg after an interval of more than 13 months from the previous CBDCA administration.

  2. Drug desensitization in the management of hypersensitivity reactions to monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mezzano, Veronica; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Picard, Matthieu; Caiado, Joana; Castells, Mariana

    2014-04-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, which may vary in severity from mild to life-threatening, can lead to their discontinuation and replacement by alternative agents that are often less effective, more toxic, and/or more expensive. Drug desensitization has emerged as the best treatment modality capable of allowing re-introduction of the hypersensitivity reaction-inducing medication in highly sensitized patients in need of first line therapies. In recent years, the availability of new anti-neoplastic drugs and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies has increased, as has the potential for hypersensitivity reactions. Development of desensitization protocols for these new medications requires a careful assessment of the potential risks and benefits. The purposes of this review are to provide an overview of the presentation of hypersensitivity reactions amenable to desensitization and to increase awareness of the indications for and outcomes of desensitization protocols. Rapid drug desensitization has proven to be a safe and effective way of administering first line therapy to patients with hypersensitivity reactions, providing an extremely powerful treatment modality for patients for whom alternative drugs are deemed unacceptable. Rapid drug desensitization protocols should be administered only by highly trained allergists and nurses who have experience in determining which reactions are amenable to desensitization, and can identify high risk patients and provide them with appropriate care. Efforts should be made to increase awareness of the remarkable safety and efficacy of rapid drug desensitization among non-allergists, especially in the fields of oncology and rheumatology, so as to favor its universal application. Development of desensitization units to provide state-of-the-art care is possible only through coordinated teamwork.

  3. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis-like reaction among workers exposed to diphenylmethane [correction to piphenylmethane] diisocyanate (MDI).

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, O; Malo, J L; Dugas, M; Cartier, A; Desjardins, A; Lévesque, J; Shaughnessy, M A; Grammer, L C

    1993-02-01

    Isocyanates are well documented as a cause of occupational asthma. A hypersensitivity pneumonitis type of reaction has also been reported but only in a few isolated cases. We investigated nine subjects who complained of respiratory and general symptoms related to workplace exposure. All the subjects had worked in a plant where a resin based on diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) is used in the manufacture of woodchip boards. They underwent inhalation challenges using the MDI resin for progressively increasing periods of time on separate days. In eight subjects, exposure to subirritant amounts of MDI induced a pattern of reaction consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, i.e., significant falls in both FEV1 and FVC associated with a rise in body temperature (> 38 degrees C) and an increase in blood neutrophils (> +2,500/mm3). Bronchoalveolar lavage, performed in two subjects 24 h after the end of challenge exposure, revealed an increase in lymphocytes and neutrophils. Specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgE antibodies to MDI human serum albumin (HSA) conjugates were present in all subjects. We conclude that the MDI resin caused an hypersensitivity pneumonitis type of reaction in at least eight (4.7%) of the 167 potentially exposed workers employed in the plant. These findings indicate that in some workplaces, a hypersensitivity pneumonitis type of reaction may be a more frequent consequence of isocyanate exposure than is usually thought.

  4. Evaluation of drug-related hypersensitivity reactions in children.

    PubMed

    Martín-Muñoz, F; Moreno-Ancillo, A; Domínguez-Noche, C; Díaz-Pena, J M; García-Ara, C; Boyano, T; Ojeda, J A

    1999-01-01

    Patients with drug reactions are often referred to allergists for "allergy". Skin testing and clinical history seem to have a good negative predictive value, however, although drug challenge could be dangerous, it is the only way to confirm the diagnosis. We aimed to demonstrate that most children with a history of non-life-threatening drug reactions do not have a true drug allergy and examined the use of drug challenge in childhood. Patients with reactions were referred to our clinic by pediatricians. In 1 year, 354 reactions were studied in 239 children. Patients were classified according to their positive or negative history of drug allergy. Skin prick testing was done in all cases. Exclusion criteria for challenge included drug anaphylaxis, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, systemic reactions with severe concomitant illness, beta-inhibitor drug therapy or positive skin test to the implicated drug with a positive history. It was found that the beta-lactam antibiotics were involved in 50% of suspected reactions, aspirin in 10% and sulfonamides in 9%. Histories were considered positive only in 25%. Drug challenges confirmed only 4% of all reactions. It was concluded that drug challenge may be the gold standard for most childhood reactions that are considered to be allergic, non-life-threatening and drug-related. Only 4% of these suspected reactions were exclusively caused by drug allergy.

  5. Studies of hypersensitivity reactions to foods in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Bock, S A; Lee, W Y; Remigio, L K; May, C D

    1978-12-01

    In order to extend previous investigations of adverse reactions to foods performed at this institution, 68 children, aged 5 mo to 15 yr, were studied. All subjects reported a history of adverse reaction to ingestion of one or more of the 14 foods under study. Sixteen of 43 subjects, 3 yr of age or older, had 22 adverse reactions during 94 food challenges with one or more of the 14 foods. All reactions confirmed were to peanut or other nuts, milk, egg, and soy. Skin testing with 1:20 weight/volume concentrations of food extracts applied by the puncture technique produced a net wheal reaction 3 mm or greater in all subjects 3 yr of age or older in whom double-blind food challenges confirmed the history of adverse reaction. Thirteen of 25 children less than 3 yr of age manifested adverse reactions during 49 food challenges. Skin testing by puncture technique produced a net wheal 3 mm or greater in 9 children less than 3 yr of age in whom food challenge elicited a clinical response within 2 hr. One of 4 subjects less than 3 yr of age in whom the adverse reaction occurred more than 4 hr after food challenge exhibited a wheal to puncture skin test of 3 mm or greater. These studies suggest that at present double-blind food challenge is an indispensible tool for the unequivocal evaluation of adverse reactions to foods.

  6. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media -- an update.

    PubMed

    Bumbăcea, Roxana Silvia; Petruţescu, Brînduşa; Bumbăcea, Dragoş; Strâmbu, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Used since 1929 in medical practice, nowadays four chemical varieties of intravascular iodine based radiocontrast media (I-RCM) are available: ionic monomers with high osmolarity, ionic dimers with low osmolarity, non-ionic monomers with low osmolarity and non-ionic iso-osmolar dimers. Increasing prescription of l-RCMs augments the number of reported hypersensitivity reactions. I-RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions can be dclasified in two types: immediate hypersensitivity reactions (IHRs - occurring within the first hour) and delayed hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs - occurring between 1 hour and 7 days). IHRs usually present as urticaria and angioedema but may associate severe respiratory and cardiovascular symptoms. Risk factors for an IHRs include a prior immediate reaction, personal history of atopic diseases (mainly asthma) and treatment with beta blocking agents. Diagnostic tests for IHRs include blood tests (serum tryptase) and skin tests (prick and intradermal) performed 2 to 6 months after IHR. High osmolarity of the I-RCM is the factor most strongly associated with IHRs. Primary prevention of IHRs involves the use of non-ionic low-osmolar or iso-osmolar agents for all intravascular procedures. DHRs are usually mild to moderate in severity, transient and self-limiting, presenting as maculopapular rash in more than 50% of cases. As with IHRs, the most important risk factor for DHRs is a previous reaction to I-RCM. Assessment of DHRs includes skin prick tests, intradermal and patch tests. Due to extensive cross-reactivity between I-RCM, a change of product is no guarantee against a repeated reaction. Current premedication procedures in patients with previous severe reactions can reduce symptoms, but may not prevent recurrent reactions.

  7. Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and pharmacogenomics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Alfirevic, Ana; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2010-04-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions represent a major concern for clinicians, patients, regulators and drug developers. Severe hypersensitivity is associated with high morbidity and mortality, it cannot be predicted from the known pharmacology of the drug and it is usually detected post-marketing when a large number of patients have been exposed to a particular drug. Recent success in developing clinically useful genetic tests that have allowed us to predict the risk of abacavir-induced hypersensitivity has helped to pave the path for a pharmacogenetic approach. However, the loop from identifying a genetic association to improving clinical outcome is still lacking for many drugs. In this commentary, we discuss the progress of hypersensitivity pharmacogenomics over the last decade and point out what remains to be done in the future. The current efforts of the international community are focused on the development of consortia, which aim to standardize disease phenotypes, but also to collect larger numbers of well-phenotyped patients and to pool biological samples through these collaborations. In addition, it is necessary to advance our knowledge of hypersensitivity mechanisms through functional studies, which will lead to the development of predictive and diagnostic tests.

  8. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2013.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2014-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2013. Studies on food allergy suggest that (1) 7.6% of the US population is affected, (2) a "healthy" early diet might prevent food allergy, (3) the skin might be an important route of sensitization, (4) allergen component testing might aid diagnosis, (5) the prognosis of milk allergy might be predictable through early testing, (6) oral or sublingual immunotherapy show promise but also have caveats, and (7) preclinical studies show promising alternative modes of immunotherapy and desensitization. Studies on eosinophilic esophagitis show a relationship to connective tissue disorders and that dietary management is an effective treatment for adults. Markers of anaphylaxis severity have been determined and might inform potential diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Insights on serum tests for drug and insect sting allergy might result in improved diagnostics. Genetic and immune-mediated defects in skin epithelial differentiation contribute to the severity of atopic dermatitis. Novel management approaches to treatment of chronic urticaria, including use of omalizumab, are being identified. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hypersensitivity reactions to human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Liew Woei; Crawford, Nigel; Tang, Mimi L K; Buttery, Jim; Royle, Jenny; Gold, Michael; Ziegler, Christine; Quinn, Patrick; Elia, Sonja

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe the outcomes of clinical evaluation, skin testing, and vaccine challenge in adolescent schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine introduced in Australian schools in 2007. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Two tertiary paediatric allergy centres in Victoria and South Australia, Australia. Participants 35 schoolgirls aged 12 to 18.9 years with suspected hypersensitivity reactions to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine. Main outcome measures Clinical review and skin prick and intradermal testing with the quadrivalent vaccine and subsequent challenge with the vaccine. Results 35 schoolgirls with suspected hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine were notified to the specialised immunisation services in 2007, after more than 380 000 doses had been administered in schools. Of these 35 schoolgirls, 25 agreed to further evaluation. Twenty three (92%) experienced reactions after the first dose. Thirteen (52%) experienced urticaria or angio-oedema, and of these, two experienced anaphylaxis. Thirteen had generalised rash, one with angio-oedema. The median time to reaction was 90 minutes. Nineteen (76%) underwent skin testing with the quadrivalent vaccine: all were skin prick test negative and one was intradermal test positive. Eighteen (72%) were subsequently challenged with the quadrivalent vaccine and three (12%) elected to receive the bivalent vaccine. Seventeen tolerated the challenge and one reported limited urticaria four hours after the vaccine had been administered. Only three of the 25 schoolgirls were found to have probable hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent vaccine. Conclusion True hypersensitivity to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in Australian schoolgirls was uncommon and most tolerated subsequent doses. PMID:19050332

  10. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-11-14

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  11. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction resulting in maculopapular-type eruption due to entecavir in the treatment of chronic hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Jeong, Hye Won; Choi, Ki Hwa; Yoon, Tae Young; Sung, Nohyun; Choi, Young Ki; Kim, Eun Ha; Chae, Hee Bok

    2014-01-01

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated the potent antiviral efficacy of entecavir (ETV), and this relatively new nucleoside analogue drug has rapidly become a frequently prescribed therapy for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) worldwide. While the studies have also shown a good overall safety profile for ETV, adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients with advanced cirrhosis have been reported and represent a broad spectrum of drug-induced injuries, including lactic acidosis, myalgia, neuropathy, azotemia, hypophosphatemia, muscular weakness, and pancreatitis, as well as immune-mediated responses (i.e., allergic reactions). Cutaneous ADRs associated with ETV are very rare, with only two case reports in the publicly available literature; both of these cases were classified as unspecified hypersensitivity allergic (type I) ADR, but neither were reported as pathologically proven or as evaluated by cytokine release analysis. Here, we report the case of a 45-year-old woman who presented with a generalized maculopapular rash after one week of ETV treatment for lamivudine-resistant CHB. The patient reported having experienced a similar skin eruption during a previous three-month regimen of ETV, for which she had self-discontinued the medication. Histopathological analysis of a skin biopsy showed acanthotic epidermis with focal parakeratosis and a perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate admixed with interstitial eosinophils in the papillary and reticular dermis, consistent with a diagnosis of drug sensitivity. A lymphocyte stimulation test showed significantly enhanced IL-4, indicating a classification of type IVb delayed hypersensitivity. The patient was switched to an adefovir-lamivudine combination regimen and the skin eruption resolved two weeks after the ETV withdrawal. This case represents the first pathologically and immunologically evidenced ETV-induced delayed type hypersensitivity skin reaction reported to date. Physicians should be aware of the potential, although rare

  12. Genetic variants associated with drugs-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions: a PRISMA-compliant systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oussalah, A; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M; Barbaud, A; Nakonechna, A; Cernadas, J; Gotua, M; Brockow, K; Caubet, J-C; Bircher, A; Atanaskovic, M; Demoly, P; K Tanno, L; Terreehorst, I; Laguna, J J; Romano, A; Guéant, J-L

    2016-04-01

    Drug hypersensitivity includes allergic (AR) and nonallergic reactions (NARs) influenced by genetic predisposition. We performed a systematic review of genetic predictors of IgE-mediated AR and NAR with MEDLINE and PubMed search engine between January 1966 and December 2014. Among 3110 citations, the search selected 53 studies, 42 of which remained eligible. These eligible studies have evaluated genetic determinants of immediate reactions (IR) to beta-lactams (n = 19), NAR against aspirin (n = 12) and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n = 8), and IR to biologics (n = 3). We reported two genomewide association studies and four case-control studies on candidate genes validated by replication. Genes involved in IR to beta-lactams belonged to HLA type 2 antigen processing, IgE production, atopy, and inflammation, including 4 genes validated by replications, HLA-DRA, ILR4, NOD2, and LGALS3. Genes involved in NAR to aspirin belonged to arachidonic acid pathway, membrane-spanning 4A gene family, histamine production pathway, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while those involved in NAR to all NSAIDs belonged to arachidonic acid pathway and HLA antigen processing pathway. ALOX5 was a common predictor of studies on NAR to both aspirin and NSAIDs. Although these first conclusions could be drawn, this review highlights also the lack of reliable data and the need for replicating studies in contrasted populations, taking into account worldwide allele frequencies, gene-gene interactions, and contrasted situations of environmental exposure.

  13. Desensitization to ceftaroline in a patient with multiple medication hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Justin M; Richter, Lisa M; Alonto, Augusto; Leedahl, David D

    2015-02-01

    The case of a patient with multiple medication hypersensitivity reactions and a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection who underwent desensitization to ceftaroline is reported. A 32-year-old Caucasian woman with asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease, heart murmur, and major depression was admitted for MRSA cellulitis with a subcutaneous abscess along the left sternomanubrial joint and clavicular osteomyelitis secondary to port placement after gastric bypass surgery. The patient had an extensive history of hypersensitivity reactions. Pertinent documented allergies were as follows: penicillin (anaphylaxis), daptomycin (anaphylaxis), vancomycin (hives), linezolid (hives), ertapenem (rash), ciprofloxacin (rash), and tigecycline (rash). The patient also reported previous reactions to aztreonam (unknown) and gentamicin (hives). The pharmacy was consulted to develop a desensitization protocol for ceftaroline. The desensitization protocol used three serial dilutions of ceftaroline to make 14 sequential infusions with escalating doses. Intramuscular epinephrine, i.v. diphenhydramine, and i.v. methylprednisolone were ordered as needed for the development of immediate hypersensitivity reactions during or after administration of ceftaroline. The cumulative dose (574.94 mg) was administered intravenously over 225 minutes with no breakthrough symptoms reported during or after the desensitization protocol. Ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg i.v. every 12 hours was continued for six weeks. Desensitization to ceftaroline was conducted for a patient with extensive history of hypersensitivity reactions to other drugs, including penicillin-induced anaphylaxis. Desensitization and subsequent treatment with full doses of ceftaroline were accomplished without apparent adverse effects. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Discrepancies in the diagnosis and classification of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity reactions in children.

    PubMed

    Arikoglu, Tuğba; Aslan, Gulen; Yildirim, Didem Derici; Batmaz, Sehra Birgul; Kuyucu, Semanur

    2017-07-01

    Hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently encountered in daily clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the confirmation rates, risk factors of NSAID hypersensitivity in children and to try to classify them with a standardized diagnostic protocol. All patients with a suspicion of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity were evaluated with European Network for drug Allergy (ENDA) recommendations. The children were classified as selective responders (SRs) or cross-intolerant (CI) depending on the drug provocation test (DPT) results. We evaluated 106 children with a suspicion of NSAID hypersensitivity. NSAID hypersensitivity was confirmed with tests in 31 patients; 4 (12.9%) were diagnosed by skin tests and 27 (87.1%) by DPTs and two patients with a history of anaphylaxis by medical records. Eleven patients (33.3%) were classified as SRs, whereas twenty-two (66.6%) children as CIs. SRs and CIs were further classified as NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema (n = 8), NSAID-exacerbated cutaneous disease (n = 6) and NSAID-exacerbated respiratory disease (n = 1) and single NSAID-induced urticaria/angioedema and/or anaphylaxis (n = 11). Eight (24.2%) patients could not be categorized according to ENDA/GA(2)LEN classification; one CI patient could not be classified based on pathomechanisms, seven CIs could not be categorized based on the underlying disease and clinical manifestations. A reaction within an hour of drug intake (aOR:3.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.18-7.67, p = 0.021), a history with multiple NSAIDs hypersensitivity (aOR:2.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.16-7.60, p = 0.022), and family history of atopy (aOR:4.0, 95% confidence interval: 1.50-10.82, p = 0.006) were found as the independent risk factors related to confirmed NSAID hypersensitivity. This study suggests the presence of different phenotypes which do not fit into the current classifications in children with NSAID hypersensitivity. Copyright

  15. A perspective of nanotechnology in hypersensitivity reactions including drug allergy.

    PubMed

    Montañez, Maria Isabel; Ruiz-Sanchez, Antonio J; Perez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel

    2010-08-01

    We provide an overview of the application of the concepts of nanoscience and nanotechnology as a novel scientific approach to the area of nanomedicine related to the domain of the immune system. Particular emphasis will be paid to studies on drug allergy reactions. Several well defined chemical structures arranged in the dimension of the nanoscale are currently being studied for biomedical purposes. By interacting with the immune system, some of these show promising applications as vaccines, diagnostic tools and activators/effectors of the immune response. Even a brief listing of some key applications of nanostructured materials shows how broad and intense this area of nanomedicine is. As a result of the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology applied to medicine, new approaches can be envisioned for problems related to the modulation of the immune response, as well as in immunodiagnosis, and to design new tools to solve related medical challenges. Nanoparticles offer unique advantages with which to exploit new properties and for materials to play a major role in new diagnostic techniques and therapies. Fullerene-C60 and multivalent functionalized gold nanoparticles of various sizes have led to new tools and opened up new ways to study and interact with the immune system. Some of the most versatile nanostructures are dendrimers. In their interaction with the immune system they can naturally occurring macromolecules, taking advantage of the fact that dendrimers can be synthesized into nanosized structures. Their multivalence can be successfully exploited in vaccines and diagnostic tests for allergic reactions.

  16. A delayed hypersensitivity reaction to a stainless steel crown: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Ozdemir, C E; Yilmaz, Y

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steel crowns are commonly used to restore primary or permanent teeth in pediatric restorative dentistry. Here, we describe a case of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which manifested itself as perioral skin eruptions, after restoring the decayed first permanent molar tooth of a 13-year-old Caucasian girl with a preformed stainless steel crown. The eruptions completely healed within one week after removal of the stainless steel crown. The decayed tooth was then restored with a bis-acryl crown and bridge. Since no perioral skin eruptions occurred during the six-month follow-up, we presume that the cause of the perioral skin eruptions was a delayed hypersensitivity reaction, which was triggered by the nickel in the stainless steel crown.

  17. Patch testers' opinions regarding diagnostic criteria for metal hypersensitivity reactions to metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity reactions to implanted devices remain a challenging and controversial topic. Diagnostic criteria and methods are not well delineated. Diagnostic criteria for hypersensitivity reactions after metallic device implantation are evaluated in this study by a multinational group of patch testers using Thyssen's previously published criteria. A total of 119 dermatologists at the 2012 European Contact Dermatitis Society and 2013 American Contact Dermatitis Society meetings answered a survey regarding their opinions on topics relating to metal hypersensitivity. Four major and 5 minor diagnostic criteria emerged. Approximately 80% of respondents found the following criteria useful (major criteria): chronic dermatitis beginning weeks to months after metallic implantation, eruption overlying the metal implant, positive patch test to a metal component of the implant, and complete clearing after removal of the potentially allergenic implant. Minor criteria (<61% of respondents) were as follows: systemic allergic dermatitis reaction, therapy-resistant dermatitis, morphology consistent with dermatitis, histology consistent with allergic contact dermatitis, and a positive in vitro test to metals (eg, lymphocyte transformation test). In the challenging situation such as a symptomatic or failing orthopedic device, applying these 4 major criteria and the 5 supportive minor criteria may be useful for guiding decision making.

  18. Dietary hypersensitivity in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Mandigers, Paul; German, Alexander J

    2010-10-01

    Adverse reactions to food or dietary hypersensitivity are frequently seen problems in companion animal medicine and may be difficult to differentiate from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Dietary hypersensitivity can be divided into two subgroups: immunological and nonimmunological problems. Non-immunological problems can be subdivided into food intolerance, food poisoning, and dietary indiscretion. The immunological group can be subdivided into true food allergy (IgE mediated) and anaphylaxis (non-IgE mediated). This article gives an outline of what dietary hypersensitivity is, and more specifically food allergy and how to deal with patients with possible dietary hypersensitivity.

  19. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2012.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2012. Studies support an increase in peanut allergy prevalence in children and exposure to the antibacterial agent triclosan and having filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations as risk factors for food sensitization. The role of specific foods in causing eosinophilic esophagitis is elucidated by several studies, and microRNA analysis is identified as a possible noninvasive disease biomarker. Studies on food allergy diagnosis emphasize the utility of component testing and the possibility of improved diagnosis through stepped approaches, epitope-binding analysis, and bioinformatics. Treatment studies of food allergy show promise for oral immunotherapy, but tolerance induction remains elusive, and additional therapies are under study. Studies on anaphylaxis suggest an important role for platelet-activating factor and its relationship to the need for prompt treatment with epinephrine. Insights on the pathophysiology and diagnosis of non-IgE-mediated drug allergy are offered, with novel data regarding the interaction of drugs with HLA molecules. Numerous studies support influenza vaccination of persons with egg allergy using modest precautions. Evidence continues to mount that there is cross-talk between skin barrier defects and immune responses in patients with atopic dermatitis. Augmentation of the skin barrier with reduction in skin inflammatory responses will likely lead to the most effective intervention in patients with this common skin disease. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IL-21 reduces immediate hypersensitivity reactions in mouse skin by suppressing mast cell activation or IgE production.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa-Mineoka, Risa; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Katoh, Norito

    2011-07-01

    IL-21 regulates activation, proliferation, and differentiation of various immune cells. We have previously shown that exogenous IL-21 administration reduces allergic reactions in mouse models of anaphylaxis and allergic rhinitis. However, the effects of IL-21 in allergic cutaneous reactions remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of IL-21 in a mouse model of the IgE-mediated cutaneous immediate hypersensitivity reaction (IHR). We also investigated the mechanism of IL-21-induced regulation of allergic cutaneous reactions. Mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal ovalbumin (OVA) injection and challenged by injecting OVA intradermally into the ears, with intraperitoneal administration of recombinant murine (rm)IL-21 during the sensitization period or after completion of sensitization. After challenge, IL-21-untreated allergic mice developed biphasic responses characterized by early-phase and late-phase reactions. The biphasic reactions were significantly reduced by rmIL-21 treatment during sensitization or after completion of sensitization. Administration of rmIL-21 during sensitization reduced the cutaneous IHR by suppressing allergen-specific IgE production. In contrast, administration of rmIL-21 after completion of sensitization did not decrease serum levels of allergen-specific IgE, but significantly suppressed mast cell degranulation in skin. These results suggest that the regulatory effects of IL-21 on the cutaneous IHR involve suppression of allergen-specific IgE production or mast cell degranulation.

  1. Safe administration of iron sucrose in a patient with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Sane, Radhika; Baribeault, David; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2007-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia required parenteral iron therapy and was treated with intravenous ferric gluconate. She tolerated the first dose, but after the second dose, she developed a tingling feeling all over her body, along with swelling in her hands and feet, and a rash with hives over most of her body. It was thought that she had likely experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate. The decision was made to continue therapy; however, two modifications were made. The patient was given dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen 1 hour before administering the third dose, and the infusion time was prolonged by 1 hour. Approximately 45 minutes after the infusion was completed, the patient developed hives on her arms and legs. At the patient's next clinic visit, it was decided that continuation of parenteral iron repletion was necessary, and the decision was made to attempt a challenge with iron sucrose. The patient was given dexamethasone 8 mg to be taken the night before and the morning of treatment. She successfully completed the iron repletion therapy with iron sucrose. Three parenteral iron products are available in the United States: iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate complex, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, the oldest of these products, carries the highest risk for hypersensitivity reactions. Available data suggest that either iron sucrose or ferric gluconate can be safely administered to patients with known hypersensitivity to iron dextran. Our patient's experience implies that it may be possible to safely administer iron sucrose to a patient with hypersensitivity to ferric gluconate. This finding has clinical implications and warrants confirmation in a larger population.

  2. Cross-reactivity and tolerability of aztreonam and cephalosporins in subjects with a T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins.

    PubMed

    Romano, Antonino; Gaeta, Francesco; Valluzzi, Rocco Luigi; Maggioletti, Michela; Caruso, Cristiano; Quaratino, Donato

    2016-07-01

    The few studies performed in adults with T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins have found a rate of cross-reactivity with cephalosporins ranging from 2.8% to 31.2% and an absence of cross-reactivity with aztreonam. We sought to evaluate the possibility of using cephalosporins and aztreonam in subjects with documented delayed hypersensitivity to penicillins who especially require them. We conducted a prospective study of 214 consecutive subjects who had 307 nonimmediate reactions to penicillins (almost exclusively aminopenicillins) and had positive patch test and/or delayed-reading skin test responses to at least 1 penicillin reagent. To assess cross-reactivity with cephalosporins and aztreonam and the tolerability of such alternative β-lactams, all subjects underwent skin tests with cephalexin, cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. Subjects with negative responses were challenged with the alternative β-lactams concerned. All subjects had negative skin test results to cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam and tolerated challenges. Forty (18.7%) of the 214 subjects had positive skin test responses to at least 1 aminocephalosporin. Of the 174 subjects with negative responses, 170 underwent challenges; 1 reacted to cefaclor. These data demonstrate a rate of cross-reactivity between aminopenicillins and aminocephalosporins (ie, cephalexin, cefaclor, and cefadroxil) of around 20%, as well as the absence of cross-reactivity between penicillins and cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam in all subjects with T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to penicillins, almost exclusively aminopenicillins. Therefore these subjects could be treated with cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, and aztreonam. In those who especially require cephalosporin or aztreonam treatment, however, we recommend pretreatment skin tests because negative responses indicate tolerability. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc

  3. Skin testing in patients with hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media - a European multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Brockow, K; Romano, A; Aberer, W; Bircher, A J; Barbaud, A; Bonadonna, P; Faria, E; Kanny, G; Lerch, M; Pichler, W J; Ring, J; Rodrigues Cernadas, J; Tomaz, E; Demoly, P; Christiansen, C

    2009-02-01

    Iodinated contrast media cause both immediate and nonimmediate hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of skin tests in patients who have experienced such reactions. Skin prick, intradermal and patch tests with a series of contrast media were conducted in 220 patients with either immediate or nonimmediate reaction. Positive skin tests were defined according to internationally accepted guidelines. Seventy-one never-exposed subjects and 11 subjects who had tolerated contrast medium exposure, served as negative controls. Skin test specificity was 96-100%. For tests conducted within the time period from 2 to 6 months after the reaction, up to 50% of immediate reactors and up to 47% of nonimmediate reactors were skin test positive. For immediate reactors, the intradermal tests were the most sensitive, whereas delayed intradermal tests in combination with patch tests were needed for optimal sensitivity in nonimmediate reactors. Contrast medium cross-reactivity was more common in the nonimmediate than in the immediate group. Interestingly, 49% of immediate and 52% of nonimmediate symptoms occurred in previously unexposed patients. Many of these patients were skin test positive, indicating that they were already sensitized at the time of first contrast medium exposure. These data suggest that at least 50% of hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media are caused by an immunological mechanism. Skin testing appears to be a useful tool for diagnosis of contrast medium allergy and may play an important role in selection of a safe product in previous reactors.

  4. Chronic otitis media and immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity in adults: is it a contributor of cholesteatoma?

    PubMed

    Hong, Sang Duk; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho; Chung, Kyu-Whan

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between chronic otitis media (COM) and immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated hypersensitivity in adults. A prospective comparative study. One hundred seventeen patients with COM from July 2005 to April 2007 were enrolled. All subjects had a questionnaire on allergic rhinitis symptoms and performed allergy tests that included a total IgE and the multiple radioallergosorbent chemiluminescence assay to check the presence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis were 22.2% and 7.7% in patients with COM, respectively. The mean total IgE was 157.2 ranging from 3 to 1833. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity was similar with regard to the recurrence or bilaterality. However, patients with cholesteatoma had a higher prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity than patients without that condition. The prevalence of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity and allergic rhinitis in adults with COM appeared to be higher than in the general population. Allergy might contribute to COM especially in cases with a cholesteatoma.

  5. Oxazolone-induced delayed type hypersensitivity reaction in the adult yucatan pigs. A useful model for drug development and validation.

    PubMed

    Nuhaily, Samer; Damaj, Bassam B; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a model of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in the ear skin of large animals such as adult Yucatan pigs, which may aid in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic modalities of newly developed anti-inflammatory drugs. The pigs were sensitized with oxazolone, re-challenged with the same irritant six days later, and dosed with either vehicle or with cyclosporine A (CsA) before and after challenge. CsA reduced the redness, inhibited the accumulation of ear fluid and inflammatory cells, as well as the release of the inflammatory mediators. Further, CsA inhibited the proliferation of T cells collected from the spleens or PBMCs of CsA-treated pigs when these cells were stimulated in vitro with PMA plus Ionomycin. These results indicate that pig skin can be used to evaluate modalities for the purpose of developing drugs that may be used to treat DTH in humans.

  6. Type III hypersensitivity reactions to a B cell epitope antigen are abrogated using a depot forming vaccine platform.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Lisa D; MacKay, Alecia; Kaliaperumal, Valarmathy; Weir, Genevieve; Penwell, Andrea; Rajagopalan, Rajkannan; Langley, Joanne; Halperin, Scott; Mansour, Marc; Stanford, Marianne M

    2017-09-21

    Peptide antigens are combined with an adjuvant in order to increase immunogenicity in vivo. The immunogenicity and safety of a RSV vaccine formulated in a novel oil-based platform, DepoVax™ (DPX), was compared to an alum formulation. A peptide B cell epitope derived from RSV small hydrophobic ectodomain (SHe) served as the antigen. Both vaccines induced SHe-specific antibodies after immunization of mice. A single dose of the DPX-based formulation resulted in anti-SHe titres for up to 20 weeks. Boosting with Alum-SHe, but not with DPX-SHe, led to unexpected clinical signs such as decreased activity, cyanosis and drop in body temperature in mice but not in rabbits. The severity of adverse reactions correlated with magnitude of SHe-specific IgG immune responses and decreased complement component 3 plasma levels, indicating a type III hypersensitivity reaction. By RP-HPLC analysis, we found that only 8-20% of the antigen was found to be adsorbed to alum in vitro, indicating that this antigen is likely released systemically upon injection in vivo. Clinical signs were not observed in rabbits, indicating the response correlates with peptide dose relative to size of animal. These results suggest that peptide antigens targeted to produce B cell mediated response may result in increased incidence of type III hypersensitivity reactions when delivered in non-depot forming vaccines. The DPX formulation induced strong antibody titres to the antigen without causing adverse events, likely due to the strength of the depot in vivo, and demonstrates the potential safety and immunogenicity of this platform for B cell peptide antigens.

  7. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  8. Hypersensitivity reactions to non-betalactam antibiotics in children: an extensive review.

    PubMed

    Kuyucu, Semanur; Mori, Francesca; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina; Caubet, Jean-Christoph; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Gomes, Eva; Brockow, Knut

    2014-10-01

    In contrast to hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to β-lactam antibiotics in children, studies about HSR to non-β-lactam antibiotics (NBLAs) such as sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones, and antituberculosis agents are scarce, and information is generally limited to case reports. The aim of this extensive review was to summarize our present knowledge on clinical characteristics, evaluation, and management of HSR to NBLAs in children based on the literature published between 1980 and 2013. NBLAs have been reported to induce a wide spectrum of HSRs from mild eruptions to severe, and sometimes fatal, systemic drug reactions, especially in some high-risk groups. The diagnosis relied upon history and remained unconfirmed by allergological tests in most of the cases. Obtaining a detailed history is valuable in the diagnosis of suspected reactions to NBLAs. Diagnostic in vivo and in vitro tests for NBLAs lack validation, which makes the diagnosis challenging. The definitive diagnosis of NBLA hypersensitivity frequently depends upon drug provocation tests. Studies including children showed that only 7.8 to 36% of suspected immediate and delayed HSRs to NBLAs could be confirmed by skin and/or provocation tests. Therefore, a standardized diagnostic approach and management strategy should be developed and employed for pediatric patients in the evaluation of suspected HSRs to NBLAs, some of which may be critical and unreplaceable in certain clinical situations.

  9. Metal hypersensitivity reactions to implants: opinions and practices of patch testing dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous metal hypersensitivity reactions (MHR) are common but rare with implanted devices. This study aimed to characterize the opinions of dermatologists who are actively evaluating/advising patients with MHR. A questionnaire was distributed to all individuals who attended the European Society of Contact Dermatitis (ESCD) 2012 and the American Contact Dermatitis Society 2013 meetings. A total of 119 individuals responded with a participation rates of 10% (ESCD) and 32% (American Contact Dermatitis Society). Ninety-six percent of the respondents evaluate MHR and 91% were attending physicians. Orthopedic and dental devices were common problems compared with cardiovascular devices. Patch testing is the top choice for evaluating MHR. Lymphocyte transformation and intradermal tests are rarely used. Eighty-two percent of the respondents evaluate plastic/glue components in symptomatic patients postimplant. Most dermatologists use a tray specifically for joint allergy or a history-based custom array of allergens. Those patients with a strong clinical history of metal allergy should be evaluated before metal implantation (54%), whereas others forgo evaluation and recommend a titanium implant based on history alone (38%). Diagnostic criteria for postimplant reactions were evaluated. Eight percent of the respondents felt that no evaluation was necessary, with ESCD respondents being significantly more likely to not recommend evaluation (P = 0.001). Metal hypersensitivity reactions consultation requests are common for preimplant and postimplant issues. Patch testing is currently the best test for MHR.

  10. A practical and successful desensitization protocol for immediate hypersensitivity reactions to iron salts.

    PubMed

    Demir, Semra; Olgac, Muge; Unal, Derya; Gelincik, Asli; Colakoglu, Bahauddin; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2014-01-01

    Orally administered iron salts (OAS) are widely used in the management of iron deficiency anemia and hypersensitivity reactions to OAS are not common. If an offending drug is the sole option or is significantly more effective than its alternatives, it can be readministered by desensitization. The oral desensitization protocols for iron published so far concern either desensitization that was completed only over a long period or did not attain the recommended therapeutic dose. We aimed to develop a more effective protocol. We report here on 2 patients who experienced hypersensitivity reactions to OAS. After confirming the diagnosis, both patients were desensitized to oral ferrous (II) glycine sulfate complex according to a 2-day desensitization protocol. A commercial suspension of oral ferrous glycine sulfate, which contains 4 mg of elemental iron in 1 ml, was preferred. We started with a dose as low as 0.1 ml from a 1/100 dilution (0.004 mg elemental iron) of the original suspension and reached the maximum effective dose in 2 days. Both patients were successfully desensitized and they went on to complete the 6-month iron treatment without any adverse effects. Although hypersensitvity reactions to iron are not common, there is no alternative for iron administration. Therefore, desensitization has to be the choice. This easy desensitization protocol seems to be a promising option. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. STUDIES ON THE TUBERCULIN REACTION AND ON SPECIFIC HYPERSENSITIVENESS IN BACTERIAL INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Zinsser, H

    1921-10-31

    The work reported in the preceding sections justifies, we think, a number of definite conclusions. In addition to this, some of the experiments indicate a line of thought which may lead to considerable alteration in our conceptions, both of phenomena of bacterial hypersensitiveness and of infection. 1. In guinea pigs two fundamentally different types of intradermal reactions may be observed. One of these is the immediate, transitory reaction which develops in animals sensitized against proteins (horse serum, etc.) and may be regarded as one of the manifestations of general protein hypersensitiveness, or anaphylaxis; the other is the tuberculin type of skin reaction which develops more slowly, leads to a more profound injury of the tissues and is independent of anaphylaxis as ordinarily conceived. 2. The tuberculin type of hypersensitiveness (as well as probably the typhoidin, mallein, abortin reactions, etc.) does not develop at all in guinea pigs sensitized with proteins, like horse serum, etc. While this form of hypersensitiveness may eventually be induced with materials not bacterial in origin, it has been observed up to date only as a reaction of bacterial infection. 3. Methods of treatment with protein material from bacterial cultures which sensitize guinea pigs to anaphylactic reactions with the bacterial extracts, do not sensitize them to the tuberculin type of reaction. Such sensitization is easily accomplished only by infecting the animals with living organisms. No reliable method of sensitizing guinea pigs to such reactions with dead bacterial material has as yet been worked out, though a few hopeful experiments have been obtained with massive injections of large amounts of the acid-precipitable substances (nucleoproteins?) from bacterial extracts. 4. In animals made hypersensitive to the tuberculin type of reaction by infection with living bacteria, the reaction may be elicited by intradermal injections of bacterial extracts from which all coagulable

  12. Changes in delayed hypersensitivity reaction in mice exposed to O/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, H.; Shiraishi, F.; Ashikawa, T.; Murakami, M.

    1987-06-01

    BALB/c mice were continuously exposed to 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ for 1, 3, 7, and 14 days. Ozone exposure suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity (DH) reaction to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The maximum effect was seen after 7 days of exposure. To estimate the suppression of the DH reaction by O/sub 3/ exposure, the numbers of lymphocytes in thymus and blood of exposed mice were compared with those of control mice. A decrease in the numbers of lymphocytes in both thymus and blood was observed in O/sub 3/-exposed mice. The percentage of T and B lymphocytes in blood of exposed mice was the same as that in blood of control mice. These results suggest that 0.8 ppm O/sub 3/ exposure affects the T lymphocytes required for DH reactions.

  13. Increased 5-hydroxytryptamine mediates post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity via the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Dong; Sung, Tae-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Ju; La, Jun-Ho; Kim, Tae-Wan; Yang, Il-Suk

    2008-11-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity often develops after intestinal inflammation, but the pathogenic mechanism has not been clearly elucidated. We investigated whether this post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity is mediated by 5-hydroxytryptamine through activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor. In male Sprague-Dawley rats recovered from acetic acid-induced colitis, we monitored visceral nociceptive response by scoring the abdominal withdrawal reflex and simultaneously measuring the changes in arterial pulse rate. Seven days after induction of colitis, 52% of the rats showed an increased abdominal withdrawal reflex score and arterial pulse rate changes to colorectal distension, indicating that they had post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. The 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists, alosetron (20 mg/kg, p.o.) and granisetron (10 microg/kg, s.c.), inhibited post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity. Administration of a 5-hydroxytryptamine precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan; 10 mg/kg, s.c.), induced visceral hypersensitivity in naïve rats, which was antagonized by granisetron. Increase in 5-hydroxytryptamine immunoreactive cells in colonic mucosal layer was found both in the rats with post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity and in the 5-hydroxytryptophan-treated rats. These results suggest that increased 5-hydroxytryptamine in colonic mucosa mediates post-inflammatory visceral hypersensitivity through activation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor.

  14. Hypersensitivity reactions to penicillins: studies in a group of patients with negative benzylpenicillin G skin test.

    PubMed

    Qiao, H-L; Li, Z; Yang, J; Tian, X; Gao, N; Jia, L-J

    2009-06-01

    Although skin tests are usually employed to evaluate current penicillin allergy status, a negative result does not exclude hypersensitivity. There is a need for accurate in vitro tests to exclude hypersensitivity. A radioallergosorbent test (RAST) is a potentially good supplementary approach, but there is little information on the suitability of this method to diagnose penicillin hypersensitivity in subjects with a negative skin test to benzylpenicillin. A total of 133 patients with a negative skin test to benzylpenicillin G (PG) and all of whom developed allergic reactions to PG were studied. RAST was used to detect eight kinds of specific IgE antibodies to penicillins in serum, which included four kinds of major and minor antigenic determinants to four penicillin drugs. The combination sites for the specific IgE antibodies were studied by RAST inhibition test. The rate of positive reactions for the specific IgE antibodies was 59.40% (79/133). Of the eight kinds of antigenic determinants, the positive rates for specific IgE against the major and minor determinants were 39.10% (52) and 42.86% (57) respectively. Of the four drugs, positive cases only to PG were 10 (7.5%), were significantly fewer than the cross-reacting positive cases (36) to PG (P < 0.01). In the RAST inhibition studies all drugs exhibited good inhibitory potencies, and in some instances the side-chain of the penicillins could induce specific responses with a variable degree of cross-reactivity among the different penicillins. Radioallergosorbent test is a good complementary test in persons who are skin-test negative with PG, and the sensitivity of RAST increases with increasing specificity of IgE antibodies to be detected. 6-APA and the groups, making part of the different side-chains on penicillins, all contributed to the cross-reactivity.

  15. Adrenergic Stimulation Mediates Visceral Hypersensitivity to Colorectal Distension following Heterotypic Chronic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Winston, John H.; Xu, Guang-Yin; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Chronic stress exacerbates or causes relapse of symptoms such as abdominal pain and cramping in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We investigated whether chronic stress increases plasma norepinephrine and sensitizes colon-specific dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by increasing the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the colon wall. Methods Heterotypic chronic stress (HeCS) was induced in male Wistar rats and neurologic and molecular responses were analyzed. Tissues were analyzed for NGF expression. Results HeCS significantly increased the visceromoter response to colorectal distension; expression of NGF increased in colonic muscularis externa and mucosa/submucosa. Rheobase decreased, resting membrane potential was depolarized, and electrogenesis of action potentials increased in colon-specific thoracolumbar DRG neurons. Luminal administration of resiniferatoxin in distal colon, systemic administration of anti-NGF antibody, or inhibition of the NGF receptor TrkA by k252A or antisense oligonucleotides in thoracolumbar DRG blocked the chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. Blockade of α1/α2- and β1/β2-adrenergic receptors prevented the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity and increased expression of NGF in the colon wall. HeCS did not induce any inflammatory response in the colon wall. Conclusion The peripheral stress mediator norepinephrine induces visceral hypersensitivity to colorectal distension in response to HeCS by increasing the expression of NGF in the colon wall, which sensitizes primary afferents in the absence of an inflammatory response. PMID:19800336

  16. Drug-reaction eosinophilia and systemic symptoms and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Suran L

    2014-02-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), also known as drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), is a rare, severe cutaneous adverse reaction characterised by fever, rash, lymphadenopathy, eosinophilia and/or other leukocyte abnormalities, and internal organ involvement and often has a relapsing-remitting course despite withdrawal of the drug. The drugs that are most implicated include aromatic anticonvulsants, allopurinol, sulphonamides, antiretrovirals (abacavir and nevirapine), and minocycline. The pathogenesis of DRESS/DIHS is far from clear but probably involves a combination of impaired pharmacokinetics and the accumulation of drug metabolites, the sequential reactivation of the herpesvirus family and genetic susceptibility conferred by the association with certain human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. The strong association between abacavir and HLA-B*5701 has enabled pharmacogenetics screening to be employed successfully to minimise the occurrence of hypersensitivity. A prolonged course of oral corticosteroids is required to treat DRESS/DIHS, given the relapsing-remitting nature of the condition with i.v. immunoglobulin and valgangciclovir reserved for refractory or life-threatening cases. © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions to food colours with special reference to the natural colour annatto extract (butter colour).

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, H; Larsen, J C; Tarding, F

    1978-01-01

    It is well known that synthetic food colours especially some azo dyes can provoke hypersensitivity reactions such as urticaria, angioneurotic oedema, and astma (Michaëlsson and Juhlin, 1973, Granholt and Thune, 1975). Natural food colours are scarcely investigated with respect to potential allergic properties. Annatto extract, a commonly used food colour in edible fats e.g. butter, has been tested in patients. Among 61 consecutive patients suffereing from chornic urticaria and/or angioneurotic oedema 56 patients were orally provoked by annatto extract during elimination diet. Challenge was performed with a dose equivalent to the amount used in 25 grammes of butter. Twentysix per cent of the patients reacted to this colour 4 hours (SD: 2,6) after intake. Similar challenges with synthetic dyes showed the following results: Tartrazine 11%, Sunset Yellow FCF 17%, Food Red 17 16%, Amaranth 9%, Ponceau 4 R 15%, Erythrosine 12% and Brillant Blue FCF 14%. The present study indicates that natural food colours may induce hypersensitivity reactions as frequent as synthetic dyes.

  18. Rapid drug desensitization for hypersensitivity reactions to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Castells Guitart, M C

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to drugs has risen in the last 10 years owing to increased exposure to better and more allergenic medications including monoclonal antibodies. HSRs prevent patients from using their first-line therapy, leading to decreased quality of life and life expectancy. Although premedication with antihistamines, leukotriene blockers, and corticosteroids can protect against mild-to-moderate HSR, none of these medications has provided protection against anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization is a treatment option for patients with HSR to their first-line medication that protects against anaphylaxis.Although the mechanisms of drug desensitization are not completely understood, in vitro mast cell models of IgE antigen desensitization have led to the design of safe and effective in vivo protocols aimed at protecting highly sensitized patients from hypersensitivity reactions and anaphylaxis. This review provides an insight into the mechanisms of IgE/mast cell desensitization, the principles and practice of drug desensitization, and an overview of the different desensitization protocols and their safety and efficacy profiles. Drug desensitization should only be performed by allergists, trained nurses, and experienced pharmacists, since this high-risk procedure involves reintroducing allergenic medication to highly sensitized patients, with the consequent potential for severe or fatal HSRs.

  19. THE USE OF SPECIFIC "LYMPHOCYTE" ANTISERA TO INHIBIT HYPERSENSITIVE REACTIONS OF THE "DELAYED" TYPE

    PubMed Central

    Waksman, Byron H.; Arbouys, Simone; Arnason, Barry G.

    1961-01-01

    Rabbit antisera against normal guinea pig lymph node, when injected into guinea pigs, produced transient depression of the level of blood lymphocytes. It had no effect on other circulating cellular elements. Repeated injection over several days produced lymphopenia, which became progressively less marked with continued treatment, and clear-cut depletion of small lymphocytes in lymph nodes, whether draining an inoculation site or remote. In guinea pigs treated with lymphocyte antiserum, there was marked suppression of the tuberculin and contact allergic reactions and the "delayed" skin reaction to purified diphtheria toxoid, and a relative suppression of allergic encephalomyelitis and the rejection of first set skin homografts. There was a slight effect on second set graft rejection and no effect on PCA or the reversed passive Arthus reaction. Non-specific reactions to intradermal turpentine or to concentrated dinitrochlorobenzene placed on the skin were moderately reduced. The suppression of these reactions (except allergic encephalomyelitis) was closely correlated with the degree of lymphopenia. Lymphocyte antiserum absorbed with normal blood white cells lost both its lymphopenic effect and its ability to suppress the tuberculin reaction. It is tentatively concluded that a circulating mononuclear cell, probably the small lymphocyte, is the primary reactant in the various types of delayed hypersensitive reactions. PMID:14004486

  20. A single-arm Phase II validation study of preventing oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions by dexamethasone: the AVOID trial

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoichiro; Hirata, Keiji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Kotaka, Masahito; Fujita, Hideto; Aisu, Naoya; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Kosaka, Takeo; Maeda, Kotaro; Kiyomi, Fumiaki; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with colorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin are at risk of hypersensitivity reactions, with the incidence estimated to be 12%–20%. Coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin could potentially reduce the incidence of these reactions, but oxaliplatin is reported to be incompatible with alkaline compounds in solution. However, in a previous retrospective study we found that the pH of a solution of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin was less than 7.4, and that hypersensitivity to oxaliplatin could have been prevented by coinfusion of dexamethasone. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin to prevent oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Patients and methods The AVOID trial was a prospective, multicenter, open-label, single-arm Phase II trial conducted from January to September 2013. The study included 73 patients who received capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) or XELOX plus bevacizumab therapy for colorectal cancer. In all patients, oxaliplatin was administered in combination with dexamethasone. The primary outcome measure was the presence of hypersensitivity reactions. Results Hypersensitivity reactions occurred in three patients (4.1%); all three experienced a cutaneous reaction (grade 1 erythema). None of the 73 patients developed respiratory symptoms, ocular symptoms, or anaphylaxis. Grade 3 or higher hemotoxicity occurred in 13.7% of the patients and grade 3 or higher nonhematological toxicity occurred in 13.7%. The response rate to treatment was 64.4%. Conclusion The coinfusion of dexamethasone and oxaliplatin effectively reduced oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with colorectal cancer. This approach should be considered for all patients treated with oxaliplatin, allowing treatment to be completed as planned. PMID:26648694

  1. Self-reported prevalence of hypersensitivity reactions against drugs among medical students: does awareness cause any difference?

    PubMed

    Bavbek, Sevim; Erkekol, Ferda Öner; Celik, Gülfem Elif; Gönüllü, Ipek; Misirligil, Zeynep

    2011-02-01

    True epidemiologic data on hypersensitivity reactions to drugs are scarce. More accurate data may be obtained in more specific clinical settings. Considering their educational background, medical students may be an appropriate target audience for evaluating prevalence of drug hypersensitivity. This study is designed to determine the prevalence of self-reported drug hypersensitivity alongside related factors among young adults. A structured questionnaire was administered to the students. A total of 1267 students (mean age: 21.71+1.90 years, F/M: 648/619) from all grades responded to the survey. The mean prevalence of self-reported drug hypersensitivity was 4.7% (60/1267). The most frequently involved drugs were beta-lactam antibiotics (55%) followed by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (28%). The most commonly reported clinical presentations were cutaneous (43.3%), followed by systemic (36.8%), cardiovascular (8.3%) and respiratory (8.3%) symptoms. Factors related with reported reactions were higher grades (p=0.015, OR: 2.09), female gender (p=0.006, OR: 2.13), personal history of allergic diseases (p=0.001, OR: 2.64), and family history of drug hypersensitivity (p<0.001, OR: 5.78). Half of the students sought medical help during the acute stage of their reaction. Only 3.2% of the cases have been referred to an allergist for further evaluation. This study, the first of its kind in Turkey, with medical students showed that self-reported hypersensitivity reactions to drugs is highly prevalent and its prevalence seems to be affected by awareness of the individuals in addition to previously reported risk factors. The education of both patients and physicians on the management of drug hypersensitivity seems to be necessary. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Skin test protocol for the prevention of hypersensitivity reactions to oxaliplatin.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Mauro; Bonadonna, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Several hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to oxaliplatin have been reported. Presently, there is no reliable way to predict the development of this adverse reaction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of skin tests in the detection of patients at risk of developing HSRs to oxaliplatin. Patients under treatment with oxaliplatin underwent the prick test at a concentration of 1 mg/ml and, if negative, intradermal injection at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml, one hour before each course of oxaliplatin, starting from the second administration. A group of 101 patients were submitted to skin tests: two were positive, whereas five developed HSR despite negative tests (false-negative rate: 5.05%). These patients underwent desensitization, which permitted to conclude the planned schedule in five cases. A negative skin test to oxaliplatin has a good reliability in predicting HSRs. We suggest performing tests only in patients that have received at least five courses of oxaliplatin.

  3. Orbital inflammation secondary to a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to sub-Tenon's hyaluronidase.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo; Lim, Lik Thai

    2014-03-01

    We report a rare case of a delayed orbital inflammation with raised intraocular pressure as a result of hyluronidase allergy following sub-Tenon's anaesthesia. Here, we have shown evidence to prove the orbital inflammation to be an allergic response to hyluronidase with a skin patch test. This is the first case to our knowledge of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to sub-Tenon's hyluronidase comprising of an initial exposure to hyluronidase in the fellow eye with no subsequent allergic response, but with a subsequent delayed reaction to hyluronidase during a second eye cataract surgery. This case demonstrates hyaluronidase allergy should be considered as a differential diagnosis among patients presenting with acute post-operative orbital inflammation, even if there is a history of previous exposure to hyaluronidase in the fellow eye with no subsequent allergic response.

  4. Fever as the only manifestation of hypersensitivity reactions associated with oxaliplatin in a patient with colorectal cancer Oxaliplatin-induced hypersensitivity reaction

    PubMed Central

    Saif, M Wasif; Roy, Shailja; Ledbetter, Leslie; Madison, Jennifer; Syrigos, Kostas

    2007-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to oxaliplatin in patients with colorectal cancer include facial flushing, erythema, pruritis, fever, tachycardia, dyspnea, tongue swelling, rash/hives, headache, chills, weakness, vomiting, burning sensations, dizziness, and edema. We report a patient with fever as the sole manifestation of initial HSR, review the literature and discuss the management of HSR. A 57-year-old female with T3N2M0 rectal adenocarcinoma received modified FOLFOX-6. She tolerated the first 8 cycles without any toxicities except grade 1 peripheral neuropathy and nausea. During 9th and 10th infusions, she developed fever to a maximum of 38.3°C with stable hemodynamic status despite medications. During 11th infusion, she developed grade 3 HSR consisting of symptomatic bronchospasm, hypotension, nausea, vomiting, cough, and fever. On examination, she was pale, cyanotic, with a temperature of 38.8°C, BP dropped to 95/43 mm Hg, pulse of 116/min and O2 saturation of 88%-91%. She was hospitalized for management and recovered in 24 h. Fever alone is not a usual symptom of oxaliplatin HSR. It may be indicative that the patient may develop serious reactions subsequently, as did our patient who developed hypotension with the third challenge. Treatment and prevention consists of slowing the infusion rate, use of steroids and antagonists of Type 1 and 2 histamine receptor antagonists, whereas desensitization could help to provide the small number of patients who experience severe HSR with the ability to further receive an effective therapy for their colorectal cancer. PMID:17876901

  5. The Validity of Claims-Based Algorithms to Identify Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions and Osteonecrosis of the Jaw

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Nicole C.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Arora, Tarun; Smith, Wilson K.; Kilgore, Meredith L.; Saag, Kenneth G.; Safford, Monika M.; Delzell, Elizabeth S.

    2015-01-01

    Validation of claims-based algorithms to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions and osteonecrosis of the jaw has not been performed in large osteoporosis populations. The objective of this project is to estimate the positive predictive value of the claims-based algorithms in older women with osteoporosis enrolled in Medicare. Using the 2006-2008 Medicare 5% sample data, we identified potential hypersensitivity and osteonecrosis of the jaw cases based on ICD-9 diagnosis codes. Potential hypersensitivity cases had a 995.0, 995.2, or 995.3 diagnosis code on emergency department or inpatient claims. Potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases had ≥1 inpatient or outpatient physician claim with a 522.7, 526.4, 526.5, or 733.45 diagnosis code or ≥2 claims of any type with a 526.9 diagnosis code. All retrieved records were redacted and reviewed by experts to determine case status: confirmed, not confirmed, or insufficient information. We calculated the positive predictive value as the number of confirmed cases divided by the total number of retrieved records with sufficient information. We requested 412 potential hypersensitivity and 304 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw records and received 174 (42%) and 84 (28%) records respectively. Of 84 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases, 6 were confirmed, resulting in a positive predictive value (95% CI) of 7.1% (2.7, 14.9). Of 174 retrieved potential hypersensitivity records, 95 were confirmed. After exclusion of 25 records with insufficient information for case determination, the overall positive predictive value (95% CI) for hypersensitivity reactions was 76.0% (67.5, 83.2). In a random sample of Medicare data, a claim-based algorithm to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions performed well. An algorithm for osteonecrosis of the jaw did not, partly due to the inclusion of diagnosis codes that are not specific for osteoporosis of the jaw. PMID:26161858

  6. The Validity of Claims-Based Algorithms to Identify Serious Hypersensitivity Reactions and Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicole C; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Arora, Tarun; Smith, Wilson K; Kilgore, Meredith L; Saag, Kenneth G; Safford, Monika M; Delzell, Elizabeth S

    2015-01-01

    Validation of claims-based algorithms to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions and osteonecrosis of the jaw has not been performed in large osteoporosis populations. The objective of this project is to estimate the positive predictive value of the claims-based algorithms in older women with osteoporosis enrolled in Medicare. Using the 2006-2008 Medicare 5% sample data, we identified potential hypersensitivity and osteonecrosis of the jaw cases based on ICD-9 diagnosis codes. Potential hypersensitivity cases had a 995.0, 995.2, or 995.3 diagnosis code on emergency department or inpatient claims. Potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases had ≥1 inpatient or outpatient physician claim with a 522.7, 526.4, 526.5, or 733.45 diagnosis code or ≥2 claims of any type with a 526.9 diagnosis code. All retrieved records were redacted and reviewed by experts to determine case status: confirmed, not confirmed, or insufficient information. We calculated the positive predictive value as the number of confirmed cases divided by the total number of retrieved records with sufficient information. We requested 412 potential hypersensitivity and 304 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw records and received 174 (42%) and 84 (28%) records respectively. Of 84 potential osteonecrosis of the jaw cases, 6 were confirmed, resulting in a positive predictive value (95% CI) of 7.1% (2.7, 14.9). Of 174 retrieved potential hypersensitivity records, 95 were confirmed. After exclusion of 25 records with insufficient information for case determination, the overall positive predictive value (95% CI) for hypersensitivity reactions was 76.0% (67.5, 83.2). In a random sample of Medicare data, a claim-based algorithm to identify serious hypersensitivity reactions performed well. An algorithm for osteonecrosis of the jaw did not, partly due to the inclusion of diagnosis codes that are not specific for osteoporosis of the jaw.

  7. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2011.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2010.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2011-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2010. Key epidemiologic observations include an apparent increase in peanut allergy, with more than 1% of children affected, and increasing evidence that early food allergen exposure, rather than avoidance, might improve allergy outcomes. Advances in food allergy diagnosis include improved insights into prognosis and estimation of severity through component-resolved diagnostics and characterization of IgE binding to specific epitopes. Regarding treatment, oral and epicutaneous immunotherapy show promise. Studies of drug allergies show insights into pathophysiology, and studies on insect hypersensitivity reveal improved diagnostic methods. Genetic and functional studies have revealed the important role of epidermal differentiation products in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. Cross-talk between the atopic immune response with the innate immune response have also been found to predispose to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis. New therapeutic approaches to control chronic urticaria have also been identified during the past year. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Incidence of hypersensitivity skin reactions in patients on full-dose low-molecular-weight heparins during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schultinge, L; Knol, H M; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Erwich, J J H M; Meijer, K

    2013-12-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are the most commonly used anticoagulants for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in pregnancy. Hypersensitivity skin reactions associated with the use of LMWH are frequently seen, but are probably underreported. To evaluate the incidence of hypersensitivity skin reactions due to the use of LMWH in pregnancy, and the subsequent management of anticoagulation. From 1999 to 2009, we followed consecutive women who used therapeutic anticoagulation for venous indications. Women visited a combined obstetric/coagulation clinic and were seen by a thrombosis specialist every two months until six weeks postpartum. All women were started on nadroparin. We included 135 pregnancies in 88 women. Overall, in 52 of 135 pregnancies (39%), women switched at least once to another anticoagulant because of the development of hypersensitivity skin reactions. Switching to another preparation of LMWH was effective in 77% of the cases. In 23% of the cases skin reactions recurred and another switch had to be made. In almost half of the pregnancies, women had to switch at least once to another anticoagulant preparation due to the development of hypersensitivity skin reactions on LMWH. In most cases, skin reactions did not recur on the second preparation of LMWH used.

  10. Delayed hypersensitivity reaction to acellular dermal matrix in breast reconstruction: the red breast syndrome?

    PubMed

    Ganske, Ingrid; Hoyler, Marguerite; Fox, Sharon E; Morris, Donald J; Lin, Samuel J; Slavin, Sumner A

    2014-12-01

    Acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has become a valuable tool in reconstructive breast surgery, in part because it has been considered to be a non-reactive and non-immunogenic entity. However, some patients who undergo breast reconstruction with ADMs develop postoperative erythema overlying their ADM grafts. The etiology of this phenomenon is poorly understood. In this article, we summarize clinical cases in which patients developed localized breast erythema following reconstruction with ADMs. We review what is known about postoperative breast erythema after ADM-based breast reconstructions and the possible antigenicity of biologic mesh implants. We report 4 implant-based breast reconstruction patients who developed erythematous reactions overlying the region where ADM was placed: one demonstrated a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction on punch biopsy of the affected skin, leading to removal of the biologic product; 2 others had a similar clinical presentation that responded to corticosteroids without removal of the biologic material, with 1 patient experiencing recrudescence of erythema that responded fully to a second course of corticosteroids; and a fourth showed erythema that was only moderately responsive to antibiotic therapy but which improved consistently after the patient initiated chemotherapy. We propose that the etiology of erythema overlying ADM grafts, and the so-called red breast syndrome, may in some patients be a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction to the ADM product. Affected patients may benefit from treatment with corticosteroids or similar medications, and that such treatment may, in some cases, enable patients to retain the ADM grafts and enable salvage of the reconstructed breast.

  11. Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Skin Reactions in Congenital Afibrinogenemia Lack Fibrin Deposition and Induration

    PubMed Central

    Colvin, Robert B.; Mosesson, Michael W.; Dvorak, Harold F.

    1979-01-01

    Induration is a characteristic feature of delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reactions and is the usual measure of their intensity. The precise basis of induration has not been established, although activation of the clotting system with consequent fibrin deposition has been clearly implicated. In this study, two subjects with congenital afibrinogenemia, a genetic defect in fibrinogen synthesis, were skin tested with standard microbial antigens: streptokinase-streptodornase, monilia, mumps, and tuberculin purified protein derivative. One positive delayed reaction from each subject was biopsied at 40-48 h and compared with 23 biopsies of similar skin tests in normal volunteers. The eight skin tests in the afibrinogenic subjects lacked induration, although the erythema was similar in size (10-34 mm in diameter), intensity, and time-course to those in normals. Biopsies from the two strongest reactions from the afibrinogenemic subjects showed a typical perivascular mononuclear infiltrate. No more than traces of fibrin/fibrinogen were detected by immunofluorescence, in striking contrast to the abundant fibrin/fibrinogen deposition in 23 positive, indurated reactions in normal subjects. These findings indicate that fibrinogen itself is essential for the development of induration in delayed-type skin reactions in man. As judged by 1-μm sections and fluorescence, this is probably a result of the formation of an extravascular fibrin gel. Images PMID:447844

  12. Evaluation of Lymphocyte Transformation Test Results in Patients with Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions following the Use of Anticonvulsant Drugs.

    PubMed

    Karami, Zahra; Mesdaghi, Mehrnaz; Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Mansouri, Mahboubeh; Taghdiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Kayhanidoost, Zarrintaj; Jebelli, Bita; Shekarriz Foumani, Reza; Babaie, Delara; Chavoshzadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Administration of the anticonvulsant drugs phenobarbital, phenytoin, carbamazepine and lamotrigine can be associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. The lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) is a method to determine which drug has caused the hypersensitivity reaction. This study was done to evaluate the results of LTT in patients with delayed hypersensitivity reactions following the administration of anticonvulsants. Twenty-four patients with hypersensitivity reactions, e.g. drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug rash and eosinophilia with systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrosis (TEN), following the administration of anticonvulsant drugs, and 24 patients who had used anticonvulsant drugs but did not have hypersensitivity reactions (the control group) were included in this study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated. The cells were stimulated with the drugs, phytohemagglutinin as a mitogen and Candida as an antigen (positive controls). Lymphocyte proliferation was measured using the BrdU proliferation assay kit (Roche, Germany). The stimulation index was calculated as the mean ratio of the OD of stimulated cells divided by the OD of unstimulated cells. The results in the case and control groups were compared. Of 24 patients in the test group, 14 (58.3%) had positive LTT results and 10 (41.7%) had negative results. Among patients in the control group, 1 (4.2%) had a positive LTT result and 23 (95.8%) had negative results. Among the patients who had received carbamazepine and phenytoin, there was a significant difference between the results of LTT in the case and control groups (p = 0.002 and p = 0.028, respectively). Although patients receiving lamotrigine and phenobarbital had more positive LTT results in the case group than in the control group, these differences were not statistically significant. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of LTT

  13. Systems biology approaches to enhance our understanding of drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J R; Barrionuevo, E; Ranea, J A; Blanca, M; Cornejo-Garcia, J A

    2014-12-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) encompass a wide spectrum of unpredictable clinical entities. They represent an important health problem, affecting people of all ages, and lead to a large strain on the public health system. Here, we summarize experiments that use high-throughput genomics technologies to investigate HDRs. We also introduce the field of systems biology as a relatively recent discipline concerned with the integration and analysis of high-throughput data sets such as DNA microarrays and next-generation sequencing data. We describe previous studies that have applied systems biology techniques to related fields such as allergy and asthma. Finally, we present a number of potential applications of systems biology to the study of HDRs, in order to make the reader aware of the types of analyses that can be performed and the insights that can be gained through their application. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Histopathologic spectrum of hypersensitivity reactions associated with anti-CD52 therapy (alemtuzumab).

    PubMed

    Clark, Stacie L; Tse, Julie Y; Fisher, David C; LeBeouf, Nicole R; Murphy, George F; Kupper, Thomas S; Clark, Rachael A; Lian, Christine G

    2016-11-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD52, a cell surface antigen on B and T lymphocytes, and used to treat B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Skin rash is a common adverse reaction following treatment with alemtuzumab. However, the clinicopathologic features and immunologic basis for the reaction have not been previously reported. Our hospital's electronic pathology database was searched for cases with documentation of 'alemtuzumab' or 'anti-CD52' in the clinical history provided by either the ordering physician or the pathologist. Clinical and histopathologic review of the cases was performed. Five patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were treated with alemtuzumab, and developed pruritic, erythematous papules and plaques. Histopathology of the skin lesions revealed subacute spongiotic dermatitis with multifocal parakeratosis, endothelial activation and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate. Eosinophils were not a prominent feature. We describe the clinicopathologic features of a novel hypersensitivity reaction to alemtuzumb, and hypothesize it may be due to an immunologic response precipitated by the persistence of resident memory T-cells (TRM ) in the skin. Our findings raise awareness for a novel reaction pattern and guide the histopathologic interpretation of lesions which may clinically mimic residual or recurrent cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Utility of opium seed extract tests in preventing hypersensitivity reactions during surgery.

    PubMed

    Armentia, A; Pineda, F; Palacios, R; Martín-Gil, F-J; Miguel, A S; Arenal, J J; Tejedor, J; Tef, B M

    2014-01-01

    Anaphylaxis during anaesthesia is fatal in 3-9% of patients and analgesics, including opioids, and is the second most common medicament-related cause, although the prevalence is underestimated. We recently found that patients may generate IgE antibodies to opium seeds. To determine the diagnostic accuracy of specific antibodies to morphine, codeine, rocuronium and oil body and aqueous fractions of Papaver somniferum seeds in the diagnosis and prevention of allergy to opioids. Patients with hypersensitivity reactions during surgery, and severe clinical allergy (pollen, tobacco), and illicit heroin users were selected. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of in vivo and in vitro diagnostic techniques including oil body and aqueous fractions of P. somniferum seeds were measured. We studied 203 patients, with mean age 35.1±17.1 and 200 healthy controls. Patients sensitised to heroin or with hypersensitivity reactions during surgery responded to P. somniferum seed tests. Of patients not known to be sensitised to opioids, the highest positivity was in patients sensitised to tobacco (p<0.001). Opium seed skin tests and IgE, especially the oil body fraction, were more sensitive (64.2%) and specific (98.4%) than morphine, codeine and rocuronium tests for opioid sensitivity. Pollen allergy was not a risk factor for sensitisation to morphine. Sensitivity to opioids and intraoperative anaphylaxis can be diagnosed by routine tests. IgE and skin tests for the oil body fraction of P. somniferum had the highest sensitivity for sensitisation to opioids. Copyright © 2012 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of two hypersensitive induced reaction genes from wheat infected by stripe rust pathogen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel gene induced during hypersensitive reaction (HIR) in wheat was identified using in silico cloning and designated as TaHIR2. The TaHIR2 gene was deduced to encode a 284-amino acid protein, whose molecular mass and isoelectric point (pI) were 31.05 kD and 5.18, respectively. Amino acid sequenc...

  17. [Administration of premedication with fexofenadine for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitive reactions in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Komatsubara, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Kyoko; Kogure, Yuuki; Matsuhisa, Tetsuaki; Eguchi, Hisae

    2010-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most important breast cancer treatment drugs. However, severe hypersensitivity reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with high frequency. For the prevention of such hypersensitivity reactions, administration of a premedication composed of three components, diphenhydramine, ranitidine (or famotidine), and dexamethasone, has been advised in package insert information of medicine. Administration of diphenhydramine is difficult in breast cancer patients complicated with closed-angle glaucoma, because diphenhydramine has a weak anticholinergic adverse effect which can induce mydriasis and glaucoma attack. We studied the prevention of severe hypersensitivity reactions and of glaucoma attack in 2 breast cancer patients complicated with closed angle glaucoma at our hospital from April 2007 to March 2008. We switched from diphenhydramine to fexofenadine as the medicine to prevent hypersensitivity reactions. Hypersensitivity reactions were not observed throughout all courses in both patients, and no glaucoma attack was observed.

  18. Impact of drug formulation and free platinum/cisplatin ratio on hypersensitivity reactions to cisplatin: formulation matters.

    PubMed

    Pincinato, E C; Visacri, M B; de Souza, C M; Tuan, B T; Ferrari, G B; de Oliveira, D N; Barbosa, C R; Rodrigues, R F; Granja, S; Ambrósio, R F L; Catharino, R R; Rosa, P C P; Lima, C S P; Mazzola, P G; Moriel, P

    2015-02-01

    Use of cisplatin can induce type I hypersensitivity reactions that may also be linked to the quality of the drug utilized. We observed cases of hypersensitivity that appeared to be associated with the brand of cisplatin used. The aim of this study was to compare two different brands of cisplatin in relation to type I hypersensitivity reactions. Brand A was used in a tertiary care teaching hospital until 2012, and use of brand B started from January 2013, when the first hypersensitivity cases were observed. Patients were categorized based on symptom. Cisplatin of both brands was analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-(+)-MS) and characterized according to US Pharmacopeia. There were no cases of hypersensitivity associated with the use of cisplatin brand A, whereas four of 127 outpatients that used cisplatin brand B were affected. The two brands were in accordance with the US Pharmacopeia parameters, and there was no significant difference in the total platinum levels between the two brands when analysed by HPLC. However, high-resolution ESI-(+)-MS analyses show that brand B contains approximately 2.7 times more hydrolysed cisplatin than brand A. The increase in the hydrolysed form of cisplatin found in brand B may be the cause of the hypersensitivity reaction observed in a subset of patients. We present the first study of the quality of drugs by high-resolution ESI-(+)-MS. Drug regulatory agencies and manufacturers should consider including measurement of hydrolysed cisplatin as a quality criterion for cisplatin formulations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Fibronectin deposition in delayed-type hypersensitivity. Reactions of normals and a patient with afibrinogenemia.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R A; Horsburgh, C R; Hoffman, A A; Dvorak, H F; Mosesson, M W; Colvin, R B

    1984-01-01

    During development of delayed hypersensitivity (DH) skin reactions, fibronectin accumulates in two distinct sites: (a) the dermal interstitium in a pattern similar to fibrin and with a time course similar to that of fibrin deposition and mononuclear cell infiltration, and (b) blood vessel walls in a pattern suggestive of basement membrane staining and with a time course similar to that of endothelial cell proliferation. In vitro fibronectin can bind to monocytes or endothelial cells and simultaneously bind to fibrin or collagen matrices; by such interaction in vivo it may affect cell migration or proliferation. Thus, fibronectin deposition in DH reactions may facilitate cell-matrix interactions; however, the possibility exists that extravascular fibronectin accumulation may be only secondary to interstitial fibrin clot formation, and that blood vessel-associated fibronectin may be only a function of adsorption onto basement membrane (type IV) collagen. To address these possibilities, we investigated the association of fibronectin with fibrin, type IV collagen, and mononuclear cell infiltrates in DH reactions. Skin sites of DH reactions in normal volunteers were biopsied at 24, 48, and 72 h after intradermal challenge and examined by immunofluorescence technique. At all time points most of the interstitial fibronectin coincided with fibrin; however, some interstitial fibronectin was coincident with mononuclear cells positive for HLA-DR or monocyte-specific antigen. The coincidence of fibronectin with mononuclear cells was more apparent in a 48-h DH reaction from a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia. Vessel wall fibronectin was increased by 48 h after challenge and appeared as a fine linear band on the luminal side of a much thicker band of type IV collagen. Thus, the coincidence of extravascular fibronectin with mononuclear cells, its appearance without fibrin in the site from a patient with afibrinogenemia, and incomplete correspondence of vessel wall

  20. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2009.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects, as well as advances in allergic skin disease that were reported in the Journal in 2009. Among key epidemiologic observations, several westernized countries report that more than 1% of children have peanut allergy, and there is some evidence that environmental exposure to peanut is a risk factor. The role of regulatory T cells, complement, platelet-activating factor, and effector cells in the development and expression of food allergy were explored in several murine models and human studies. Delayed anaphylaxis to mammalian meats appears to be related to IgE binding to the carbohydrate moiety galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose, which also has implications for hypersensitivity to murine mAb therapeutics containing this oligosaccharide. Oral immunotherapy studies continue to show promise for the treatment of food allergy, but determining whether the treatment causes tolerance (cure) or temporary desensitization remains to be explored. Increased baseline serum tryptase levels might inform the risk of venom anaphylaxis and might indicate a risk for mast cell disorders in persons who have experienced such episodes. Reduced structural and immune barrier function contribute to local and systemic allergen sensitization in patients with atopic dermatitis, as well as increased propensity of skin infections in these patients. The use of increased doses of nonsedating antihistamines and potential usefulness of omalizumab for chronic urticaria was highlighted. These exciting advances reported in the Journal can improve patient care today and provide insights on how we can improve the diagnosis and treatment of these allergic diseases in the future. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Immunological mechanisms underlying delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to glatiramer acetate.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, Cristobalina; Blazquez, Ana B; Doña, Inmaculada; Gomez, Francisca; Chaves, Patricia; Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J; Blanca-López, Natalia; Melendez, Lidia; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, Maria Jose

    2012-07-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity to glatiramer acetate is rare, and the underlying immunological mechanisms are not completely understood. To study the immunologic response in 2 patients with multiple sclerosis who developed maculopapular exanthema related with the administration of glatiramer acetate. The allergologic study included general blood tests, viral serologic tests, and skin tests (patch and intradermal tests). The immunologic study was performed in skin biopsy specimens by immunohistochemistry and in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry and the lymphocyte transformation test. Skin test results were negative in both patients, and the diagnosis was confirmed by a drug provocation test. The evaluation of the acute phase showed an increase in the percentage of CD8 T lymphocytes (>50%) and the percentage of cells expressing skin-homing receptor (cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen) (>70%) and chemokine receptors (CCR4 and CXCR3) at T1. A positive proliferative response was observed in T lymphocytes (stimulation index [SI] = 3.5 in patient 1 and 3.59 in patient 2), especially the CD8(+) subpopulation (SI = 5.5 and 4.6 in patients 1 and 2, respectively), and NK lymphocytes (SI = 3.9 and 8.5 in patients 1 and 2, respectively) after glatiramer acetate stimulation. This study demonstrates the important role of T(H)1 cells expressing skin-homing receptors in delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to glatiramer acetate. A lymphocyte transformation test revealed a specific glatiramer acetate recognition by T lymphocytes and NK lymphocytes. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5% of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses.

  3. Iron oxide nanoparticles suppressed T helper 1 cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chien-Chang; Liang, Hong-Jen; Wang, Chia-Chi; Liao, Mei-Hsiu; Jan, Tong-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Background It was recently reported that iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated antigen-specific humoral responses and T cell cytokine expression in ovalbumin-sensitized mice. It is presently unclear whether iron oxide nanoparticles influence T helper 1 cell-mediated immunity. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), whose pathophysiology requires the participation of T helper 1 cells and macrophages. Methods DTH was elicited by a subcutaneous challenge with ovalbumin to the footpads of mice sensitized with ovalbumin. Iron oxide nanoparticles (0.2–10 mg iron/kg) were administered intravenously 1 hour prior to ovalbumin sensitization. Local inflammatory responses were examined by footpad swelling and histological analysis. The expression of cytokines by splenocytes was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Administration of iron oxide nanoparticles, in a dose-dependent fashion, significantly attenuated inflammatory reactions associated with DTH, including the footpad swelling, the infiltration of T cells and macrophages, and the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the inflammatory site. Iron oxide nanoparticles also demonstrated a suppressive effect on ovalbumin-stimulated production of interferon-γ by splenocytes and the phagocytic activity of splenic CD11b+ cells. Conclusion These results demonstrated that a single dose of iron oxide nanoparticles attenuated DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and functional activity of T helper 1 cells and macrophages in response to antigen stimulation. PMID:22701318

  4. Immediate Reactions to More Than 1 NSAID Must Not Be Considered Cross-Hypersensitivity Unless Tolerance to ASA Is Verified.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Alzate, D; Cornejo-García, J A; Pérez-Sánchez, N; Andreu, I; García-Moral, A; Agúndez, J A; Bartra, J; Doña, I; Torres, M J; Blanca, M; Blanca-López, N; Canto, G

    Individuals who develop drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) to chemically unrelated nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are considered cross-hypersensitive. The hallmark for this classification is that the patient presents a reaction after intake of or challenge with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). Whether patients react to 2 or more NSAIDs while tolerating ASA remains to be studied (selective reactions, SRs). Objective: To identify patients with SRs to 2 or more NSAIDs including strong COX-1 inhibitors. Patients who attended the Allergy Service of Hospital Infanta Leonor, Madrid, Spain with DHRs to NSAIDs between January 2011 and December 2014 were evaluated. Those with 2 or more immediate reactions occurring in less than 1 hour after intake were included. After confirming tolerance to ASA, the selectivity of the response to 2 or more NSAIDs was demonstrated by in vivo and/or in vitro testing or by controlled administration. From a total of 203 patients with immediate DHRs to NSAIDs, 16 (7.9%) met the inclusion criteria. The patients presented a total of 68 anaphylactic or cutaneous reactions (mean [SD], 4.2 [2.1]). Most reactions were to ibuprofen and other arylpropionic acid derivatives and to metamizole. Two different NSAIDs were involved in 11 patients and 3 in 5 patients. Patients with NSAID-induced anaphylaxis or urticaria/angioedema should not be considered cross-hypersensitive unless tolerance to ASA is verified.

  5. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2014.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2015-02-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2014. Studies on food allergy suggest worrisomely high rates of peanut allergy and food-induced anaphylaxis-related hospitalizations. Evidence is mounting to support the theory that environmental exposure to peanut, such as in house dust, especially with an impaired skin barrier attributed to atopic dermatitis (AD) and loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene, is a risk factor for sensitization and allergy. Diagnostic tests are improving, with early studies suggesting the possibility of developing novel cellular tests with increased diagnostic utility. Treatment trials continue to show the promise and limitations of oral immunotherapy, and mechanistic studies are elucidating pathways that might define the degree of efficacy of this treatment. Studies have also provided insights into the prevalence and characteristics of anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy, such as suggesting that baseline platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activity levels are related to the severity of reactions. Advances in drug allergy include identification of HLA associations for penicillin allergy and a microRNA biomarker/mechanism for toxic epidermal necrolysis. Research identifying critical events leading to skin barrier dysfunction and the polarized immune pathways that drive AD have led to new therapeutic approaches in the prevention and management of AD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Are metals involved in tattoo-related hypersensitivity reactions? A case report.

    PubMed

    de Cuyper, Christa; Lodewick, Evelyne; Schreiver, Ines; Hesse, Bernhard; Seim, Christian; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Laux, Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2017-08-09

    Allergic reactions to tattoos are not uncommon. However, identification of the culprit allergen(s) remains challenging. We present a patient with papulo-nodular infiltration of 20-year-old tattoos associated with systemic symptoms that disappeared within a week after surgical removal of metal osteosynthesis implants from his spine. We aimed to explore the causal relationship between the metal implants and the patient's clinical presentation. Metal implants and a skin biopsy of a reactive tattoo were analysed for elemental contents by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Nickel (Ni) and chromium (Cr) as well as high levels of titanium (Ti) and aluminium were detected in both the skin biopsy and the implants. XRF analyses identified Cr(III), with Cr(VI) being absent. Patch testing gave negative results for Ni and Cr. However, patch tests with an extract of the implants and metallic Ti on the tattooed skin evoked flare-up of the symptoms. The patient's hypersensitivity reaction and its spontaneous remission after removal of the implants indicate that Ti, possibly along with some of the other metals detected, could have played a major role in this particular case of tattoo-related allergy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Host Genotype and Hypersensitive Reaction Influence Population Levels of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Bull, Carolee T; Gebben, Samantha J; Goldman, Polly H; Trent, Mark; Hayes, Ryan J

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of population sizes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vitians inoculated onto or into lettuce leaves were monitored on susceptible and resistant cultivars. In general, population growth was greater for susceptible (Clemente, Salinas 88, Vista Verde) than resistant (Batavia Reine des Glaces, Iceberg, Little Gem) cultivars. When spray-inoculated or infiltrated, population levels of X. campestris pv. vitians were consistently significantly lower on Little Gem than on susceptible cultivars, while differences in the other resistant cultivars were not consistently statistically significant. Populations increased at an intermediate rate on cultivars Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. There were significant positive correlations between bacterial concentration applied and disease severity for all cultivars, but bacterial titer had a significantly greater influence on disease severity in the susceptible cultivars than in Little Gem and an intermediate influence in Iceberg and Batavia Reine des Glaces. Infiltration of X. campestris pv. vitians strains into leaves of Little Gem resulted in an incompatible reaction, whereas compatible reactions were observed in all other cultivars. It appears that the differences in the relationship between population dynamics for Little Gem and the other cultivars tested were due to the hypersensitive response in cultivar Little Gem. These findings have implications for disease management and lettuce breeding because X. campestris pv. vitians interacts differently with cultivars that differ for resistance mechanisms.

  8. A systematic review of validated methods for identifying hypersensitivity reactions other than anaphylaxis (fever, rash, and lymphadenopathy), using administrative and claims data.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Gary; Kachroo, Sumesh; Jones, Natalie; Crean, Sheila; Rotella, Philip; Avetisyan, Ruzan; Reynolds, Matthew W

    2012-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration's Mini-Sentinel pilot program aims to conduct active surveillance to refine safety signals that emerge for marketed medical products. A key facet of this surveillance is to develop and understand the validity of algorithms for identifying health outcomes of interest from administrative and claims data. This article summarizes the process and findings of the algorithm review of hypersensitivity reactions. PubMed and Iowa Drug Information Service searches were conducted to identify citations applicable to the hypersensitivity reactions of health outcomes of interest. Level 1 abstract reviews and Level 2 full-text reviews were conducted to find articles using administrative and claims data to identify hypersensitivity reactions and including validation estimates of the coding algorithms. We identified five studies that provided validated hypersensitivity-reaction algorithms. Algorithm positive predictive values (PPVs) for various definitions of hypersensitivity reactions ranged from 3% to 95%. PPVs were high (i.e. 90%-95%) when both exposures and diagnoses were very specific. PPV generally decreased when the definition of hypersensitivity was expanded, except in one study that used data mining methodology for algorithm development. The ability of coding algorithms to identify hypersensitivity reactions varied, with decreasing performance occurring with expanded outcome definitions. This examination of hypersensitivity-reaction coding algorithms provides an example of surveillance bias resulting from outcome definitions that include mild cases. Data mining may provide tools for algorithm development for hypersensitivity and other health outcomes. Research needs to be conducted on designing validation studies to test hypersensitivity-reaction algorithms and estimating their predictive power, sensitivity, and specificity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. [Food hypersensitivity in children].

    PubMed

    Kolacek, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Food hypersensitivity affects children and adults with an increasing prevalence, and is therefore an important public health problem in the majority of developed countries. Moreover, self-reported reactions to food are of several times higher prevalence, compared to hypersensitivity diagnosed following well established evidence-based diagnostic guidelines. In children, allergic food reactions are more common compared to non-allergic food hypersensitivity reactions, and 90% of them are caused with only 8 food allergens: cow's milk, soya, egg, fish, shellfish, peanut, tree-nuts and gluten. Diagnosis should be based on challenge tests with the potentially offending food allergens. Concerning other, more conservative diagnostic procedures, negative serology and negative skin-prick tests can exclude IgE-mediated food allergy, but positive tests, due to high rate of false positive reactions are not sufficient for diagnosis. Strict dietary avoidance of incriminated allergens is the only well established management strategy. However, this should be applied only if food allergy is well documented - following the exposition tests. Introducing elimination diet in a paediatric population, particularly with the elimination of multiple foods, could cause inappropriate growth and disturb organ maturation. Concerning allergy prevention, avoidance of allergens is not efficacious either during pregnancy and lactation or weaning period, and is therefore, not recommended neither as a population preventive measure, nor in children at risk.

  10. Proposal of a skin tests based approach for the prevention of recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media.

    PubMed

    Della-Torre, E; Berti, A; Yacoub, M R; Guglielmi, B; Tombetti, E; Sabbadini, M G; Voltolini, S; Colombo, G

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present work is to evaluate the efficacy of an approach that combines clinical history, skin tests results, and premedication, in preventing recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM). Skin Prick tests, Intradermal tests, and Patch tests were performed in 36 patients with a previous reaction to ICM. All patients underwent a second contrast enhanced radiological procedure with an alternative ICM selected on the basis of the proposed approach. After alternative ICM re-injection, only one patient presented a mild NIR. The proposed algorithm, validated in clinical settings where repeated radiological exams are needed, offers a safe and practical approach for protecting patients from recurrent hypersensitivity reactions to ICM.

  11. Allergy/hypersensitivity reactions as a predisposing factor to complex regional pain syndrome I in orthopedic patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Kenter, Keith; Newman, Ashley; O'Brien, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Several predisposing conditions have been associated with complex regional pain syndrome I (CRPS I). The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between a history of allergy/hypersensitivity reactions and CRPS I in orthopedic patients. Orthopedic patients with CRPS I (n=115) who experienced pain relief after a successful sympathetic nerve blockade were identified for study inclusion; a control group (n=115) matched to the CRPS I group by age, sex, and location of injury was also included. All patients in the study had an average age of 42 years. In the CRPS I group, all participants were Caucasian and the majority (80.8%) were women. The skin of patients with CRPS I was described as fair (57.7%), mottled (57.7%), or sensitive (80.8%). Of the patients with CRPS I, 78 (67.8%) reported a statistically significant history of allergies compared with the 39 (33.9%) patients in the control group (P<.0001). Patients with CRPS I who experienced complete pain relief for at least 1 month following a single sympathetic nerve block were asked to answer a questionnaire (n=35), and some then underwent immediate hypersensitivity testing using a skin puncture technique (n=26). Skin hypersensitivity testing yielded an 83.3% positive predictive value with an accuracy of 76.9%. Based on these results, a positive history for allergy/hypersensitivity reactions is a predisposing condition for CRPS I in this subset of orthopedic patients. These hypersensitivity reactions may prove important in gaining a better understanding in the pathophysiology of CRPS I as a regional pain syndrome. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Inhibition of immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the rat by disodium cromoglycate and nitroindanedione.

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, B A; Ross, J W; Smith, H

    1975-01-01

    A nitroindanedione (BRL 10833) and disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) showed similar activities as inhibitors of IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) and passive peritoneal anaphylaxis (PPA) reactions in the rat. BRL 10833 was more active than DSCG when given parenterally and unlike DSCG it inhibited the PCA reaction in the rat after oral administration. In the PCA test both compounds produced a state of refractoriness both to themselves and to each other. Isoprenaline also inhibited the PCA reaction but its activity was not reduced when the rats were refractory to DSCG. PMID:812623

  13. Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Ring, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Severe Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: Clinical Pattern, Diagnosis, Etiology and Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Paulmann, Maren; Mockenhaupt, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR) are known for a high morbidity and mortality. They may be life-threatening for the affected patient and difficult to accomplish for the patient's family and the treating physician. Such conditions include not only bullous reactions like toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), but also acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Since clinical pattern, etiology, prognosis and treatment differ among these severe skin reactions, a clear diagnosis based on a comprehensive clinical examination, skin biopsy, and specific laboratory tests is necessary. Because most of these reactions are caused by drug intake, a thorough history of medication use has to be obtained. However, there are cases with an infectious or idiopathic cause. In any case it is crucial to identify the most likely cause and rapidly discontinue the inducing agent, if a drug cause is suspected. This is associated with the patient`s prognosis which is often poor for bullous reaction. In addition, patient's age, underlying conditions, and the extent of skin detachment play a major role in terms of prognosis. Severe cutaneous adverse reactions are T-cell-mediated reactions, and certain alleles of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are involved in the activation of T-cells with cytotoxic effect. The therapeutic options depend on the clinical diagnosis. For all reactions a symptomatic and adequate supportive therapy is necessary, in some cases a systemic immunomodulating therapy can be useful.

  15. Bacteriophage Mu as a genetic tool to study Erwinia amylovora pathogenicity and hypersensitive reaction on tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Vanneste, J L; Paulin, J P; Expert, D

    1990-01-01

    Erwinia amylovora 1430 was shown to be sensitive to Mu G(-) particles. Infection resulted either in lytic development or in lysogenic derivatives with insertion of the Mu genome at many sites in the bacterial chromosome. We used the Mu d1Bx::Tn9 (lac Apr Cmr) derivative, called Mu dX, to identify mutants affected in pathogenicity and in their ability to induce a hypersensitive reaction (HR) on tobacco plants. Inoculation of 1,400 lysogenic derivatives on apple root calli led to the identification of 12 mutants in three classes: (i) class 1 mutants were nonpathogenic and unable to induce an HR on tobacco plants; (ii) class 2 mutants were nonpathogenic but retained the ability to induce an HR; and (iii) class 3 mutants showed attenuated virulence. Of the 12 mutants, 8 had a single insertion of the Mu dX prophage. For class 1 and 2 mutants, reversion to pathogenicity was concomitant with the loss of the Mu dX prophage. Furthermore, revertants from the class 1 mutants also recovered the ability to induce an HR on tobacco plants. Five of the six class 3 mutants were impaired in exopolysaccharide production. No changes of the envelope structure (lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane proteins) were correlated with differences in pathogenicity. One class 3 mutant did not produce any functional siderophore, suggesting that iron uptake could be involved in pathogenicity. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 PMID:2137121

  16. Enhancement of the contact hypersensitivity reaction by acute morphine administration at the elicitation phase.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C J; How, T; Lysle, D T

    1999-11-01

    The present study investigated the effects of morphine on the irritant contact sensitivity (ICS) and contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reaction. ICS was induced by croton oil application on the pinnae of naïve rats. Morphine injected prior to croton oil application did not affect the ICS response when assessed by measurements of pinnae thickness. CHS was induced by applying the antigen 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene (DNFB) to the pinnae of rats sensitized to DNFB. Rats received an injection of morphine prior to either initial antigen exposure (sensitization) or antigen reexposure (challenge). Morphine prior to challenge, but not sensitization, resulted in a pronounced enhancement of the CHS response as measured by pinna thickness. Quantitative PCR also showed increased IFN-gamma mRNA levels in the inflamed tissue of morphine-treated rats. Naltrexone blocked the morphine-induced enhancement of the CHS response. The differential effects of morphine suggest that opioids have a more pronounced effect on in vivo immune responses that involve immunological memory. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects in 2007.

    PubMed

    Sicherer, Scott H; Leung, Donald Y M

    2008-06-01

    This review highlights some of the research advances in allergic skin disease, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects that were reported primarily in the Journal in 2007. Advances in diagnosis include possible biomarkers for anaphylaxis, improved understanding of the relevance of food-specific serum IgE tests, identification of possibly discriminatory T-cell responses for drug allergy, and an elucidation of irritant responses for vaccine allergy diagnostic skin tests. Mechanistic studies are discerning T-cell and cytokine responses central to eosinophilic gastroenteropathies and food allergy, including the identification of multiple potential therapeutic targets. Regarding treatment, clinical studies of oral immunotherapy and allergen vaccination strategies show promise, whereas several clinical studies raise questions about whether oral allergen avoidance reduces atopic risks and whether probiotics can prevent or treat atopic disease. The importance of skin barrier dysfunction has been highlighted in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), particularly as it relates to allergen sensitization and eczema severity. Research has also continued to identify immunologic defects that contribute to the propensity of patients with AD to have viral and bacterial infections. New therapeutic approaches to AD, urticaria, and angioedema have been reported, including use of sublingual immunotherapy, anti-IgE, and a kallikrein inhibitor.

  18. Different immune cells mediate mechanical pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Robert E.; Mapplebeck, Josiane C.S.; Rosen, Sarah; Beggs, Simon; Taves, Sarah; Alexander, Jessica K.; Martin, Loren J.; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Sotocinal, Susana G.; Chen, Di; Yang, Mu; Shi, Xiang Qun; Huang, Hao; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Bilan, Philip J.; Tu, Yu Shan; Klip, Amira; Ji, Ru-Rong; Zhang, Ji; Salter, Michael W.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing body of evidence indicates that microglia-neuron signaling is essential for chronic pain hypersensitivity. Here we show using multiple approaches that microglia are not required for mechanical pain hypersensitivity in female mice; female mice achieve similar levels of pain hypersensitivity using adaptive immune cells, likely T-lymphocytes. This sexual dimorphism suggests that male mice cannot be used as proxies for females in pain research. PMID:26120961

  19. Immunomodulatory gene therapy prevents antibody formation and lethal hypersensitivity reactions in murine pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2010-02-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 x 10(10) particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement.

  20. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, and IgE antibodies to GAA in Pompe disease mice, when compared with mock-treated mice (P < 0.05). AAV-LSPhGAApA had the same effect on GAA-antibody production whether it was given prior to, following, or simultaneously with the initial GAA injection. Mice given AAV-LSPhGAApA had significantly less decrease in body temperature (P < 0.001) and lower anaphylactic scores (P < 0.01) following the GAA challenge. Mouse mast cell protease-1 (MMCP-1) followed the pattern associated with hypersensitivity reactions (P < 0.05). Regulatory T cells (Treg) were demonstrated to play a role in the tolerance induced by gene therapy as depletion of Treg led to an increase in GAA-specific IgG (P < 0.001). Treg depleted mice were challenged with GAA and had significantly stronger allergic reactions than mice given gene therapy without subsequent Treg depletion (temperature: P < 0.01; symptoms: P < 0.05). Ubiquitous GAA expression failed to prevent antibody formation. Thus, immunomodulatory gene therapy could provide adjunctive therapy in lysosomal storage disorders treated by enzyme replacement. PMID:19690517

  1. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are consumed during allergic inflammation and affect T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity differently

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, S; Lönnqvist, A; Östman, S; Sandberg, A-S; Wold, A E

    2010-01-01

    Studies have shown that atopic individuals have decreased serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. Indicating these compounds may have a protective effect against allergic reaction and/or are consumed during inflammation. This study investigated whether fish (n-3) or sunflower (n-6) oil supplementation affected T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity in the skin and airways, respectively, and whether the fatty acid serum profile changed during the inflammatory response. Mice were fed regular chow, chow + 10% fish oil or chow + 10% sunflower oil. Mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) resolved in Th1 or Th2 adjuvant. For Th1 hypersensitivity, mice were challenged with OVA in the footpad. Footpad swelling, OVA-induced lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production in the draining lymph node were evaluated. In the airway hypersensitivity model (Th2), mice were challenged intranasally with OVA and the resulting serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and eosinophilic lung infiltration were measured. In the Th1 model, OVA-specific T cells proliferated less and produced less interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 in fish oil-fed mice versus controls. Footpad swelling was reduced marginally. In contrast, mice fed fish oil in the Th2 model produced more OVA-specific IgE and had slightly higher proportions of eosinophils in lung infiltrate. A significant fall in serum levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids accompanied challenge and Th2-mediated inflammation in Th2 model. Fish oil supplementation affects Th1 and Th2 immune responses conversely; significant consumption of n-3 fatty acids occurs during Th2-driven inflammation. The latter observation may explain the association between Th2-mediated inflammation and low serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:20148912

  2. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Novel Pseudomonas Strains Exhibiting Differential Hypersensitivity Reactions on Tobacco and Corn Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tchagang, Caetanie Fometeu; Xu, Renlin; Mehrtash, Shima; Rahimi, Shabnam; Sidibé, Aïssata; Li, Xiang; Bromfield, Eden S P; Tambong, James Tabi

    2016-10-06

    Two novel Pseudomonas strains (S1E40 and S3E12) isolated from corn roots are antagonistic to Rhizoctonia solani and exhibit differential hypersensitivity reactions on tobacco and corn seedlings. We report here the draft genome sequences of strains S1E40 and S3E12, consisting of 6.98 and 7.06 Mb with 6,150 and 6,129 predicted protein-coding sequences, respectively. © Crown copyright 2016.

  3. Histamine Receptor H1-Mediated Sensitization of TRPV1 Mediates Visceral Hypersensitivity and Symptoms in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Mira M; Balemans, Dafne; Van Wanrooy, Sander; Dooley, James; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Valdez-Morales, Eduardo E; Nasser, Yasmin; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Vanbrabant, Winde; Van der Merwe, Schalk; Mols, Raf; Ghesquière, Bart; Cirillo, Carla; Kortekaas, Inge; Carmeliet, Peter; Peetermans, Willy E; Vermeire, Séverine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Augustijns, Patrick; Hellings, Peter W; Belmans, Ann; Vanner, Stephen; Bulmer, David C; Talavera, Karel; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Liston, Adrian; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2016-04-01

    ; this effect could be reproduced by histamine and imidazole acetaldehyde. Compared with subjects given placebo, those given ebastine had reduced visceral hypersensitivity, increased symptom relief (ebastine 46% vs placebo 13%; P = .024), and reduced abdominal pain scores (ebastine 39 ± 23 vs placebo 62 ± 22; P = .0004). In studies of rectal biopsy specimens from patients, we found that HRH1-mediated sensitization of TRPV1 is involved in IBS. Ebastine, an antagonist of HRH1, reduced visceral hypersensitivity, symptoms, and abdominal pain in patients with IBS. Inhibitors of this pathway might be developed as a new treatment approach for IBS. ClinicalTrials.gov no: NCT01144832. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellular Players and Role of Selectin Ligands in Leukocyte Recruitment in a T-Cell-Initiated Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Doebis, Cornelia; Siegmund, Kerstin; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Lowe, John B.; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Hamann, Alf; Huehn, Jochen; Syrbe, Uta

    2008-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions are characterized by a strong cellular infiltrate, including neutrophils, macrophages, and T lymphocytes. In all these cell types, both E- and P-selectin-dependent adhesion pathways play a significant role in recruitment into the inflamed skin. Accordingly, inhibition of selectin-mediated interactions (eg, by antibodies) results in impairment of acute DTH reactions. However, whether inhibition of a specific cell type is responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect or whether all leukocytes are affected remains unclear. To address this question, we used fucosyltransferase-VII knockout mice that lack functional selectin ligands as either donors or recipients in a DTH model elicited by Th1 cell and antigen transfer. We found that selectin-mediated adhesion is required by Th1 effector cells to enter the DTH reaction site and, additionally, to elicit the DTH reaction. On the other hand, elimination of selectin binding in the recipient’s neutrophils and macrophages by use of fucosyltransferase-deficient mice receiving wild-type Th1 effector cells resulted in a strongly reduced infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages but unimpaired footpad swelling. These findings demonstrate a major role for both E- and P-selectin in the recruitment of different leukocyte cell types. However, only the presence of selectin ligands on T cells was critical for the inflammatory reaction. These findings reveal T cells as the predominant targets for selectin blockade that aim to suppress skin inflammation. PMID:18755847

  5. hpaA mutants of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria are affected in pathogenicity but retain the ability to induce host-specific hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Huguet, E; Hahn, K; Wengelnik, K; Bonas, U

    1998-09-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease on pepper and tomato plants. We reported previously that the main hrp (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity) gene cluster in X. c. pv. vesicatoria contains six transcription units, designated hrpA to hrpF. We present here the sequence of the hrpD operon and an analysis of non-polar mutants in each of the six genes. Three genes, hrcQ, hrcR and hrcS, are predicted to encode conserved components of type III protein secretion systems in plant and mammalian pathogenic bacteria. For hrpD5 and hrpD6, homologues have only been found in Ralstonia solanacearum. Interestingly, the hrpD operon contains one gene, hpaA (for hrp-associated), which is specifically required for disease development. hpaA mutants are affected in pathogenicity, but retain in part the ability to induce avirulence gene-mediated, host-specific hypersensitive reaction (HR). In addition, HpaA was found to contain two functional nuclear localization signals, which are important for the interaction with the plant. We propose that HpaA is an effector protein that may be translocated into the host cell via the Hrp secretion pathway.

  6. TRPV1, but not TRPA1, in primary sensory neurons contributes to cutaneous incision-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Barabas, Marie E; Stucky, Cheryl L

    2013-03-04

    Mechanisms underlying postoperative pain remain poorly understood. In rodents, skin-only incisions induce mechanical and heat hypersensitivity similar to levels observed with skin plus deep incisions. Therefore, cutaneous injury might drive the majority of postoperative pain. TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are known to mediate inflammatory and nerve injury pain, making them key targets for pain therapeutics. These channels are also expressed extensively in cutaneous nerve fibers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to mechanical and heat hypersensitivity following skin-only surgical incision. Behavioral responses to mechanical and heat stimulation were compared between skin-incised and uninjured, sham control groups. Elevated mechanical responsiveness occurred 1 day post skin-incision regardless of genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1. To determine whether functional changes in TRPA1 occur at the level of sensory neuron somata, we evaluated cytoplasmic calcium changes in sensory neurons isolated from ipsilateral lumbar 3-5 DRGs of skin-only incised and sham wild type (WT) mice during stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. There were no changes in the percentage of neurons responding to cinnamaldehyde or in their response amplitudes. Likewise, the subpopulation of DRG somata retrogradely labeled specifically from the incised region of the plantar hind paw showed no functional up-regulation of TRPA1 after skin-only incision. Next, we conducted behavior tests for heat sensitivity and found that heat hypersensitivity peaked at day 1 post skin-only incision. Skin incision-induced heat hypersensitivity was significantly decreased in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, we conducted calcium imaging with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. DRG neurons from WT mice exhibited sensitization to TRPV1 activation, as more neurons (66%) from skin-incised mice responded to capsaicin compared to controls (46%), and the sensitization

  7. TRPV1, but not TRPA1, in primary sensory neurons contributes to cutaneous incision-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying postoperative pain remain poorly understood. In rodents, skin-only incisions induce mechanical and heat hypersensitivity similar to levels observed with skin plus deep incisions. Therefore, cutaneous injury might drive the majority of postoperative pain. TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are known to mediate inflammatory and nerve injury pain, making them key targets for pain therapeutics. These channels are also expressed extensively in cutaneous nerve fibers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to mechanical and heat hypersensitivity following skin-only surgical incision. Results Behavioral responses to mechanical and heat stimulation were compared between skin-incised and uninjured, sham control groups. Elevated mechanical responsiveness occurred 1 day post skin-incision regardless of genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1. To determine whether functional changes in TRPA1 occur at the level of sensory neuron somata, we evaluated cytoplasmic calcium changes in sensory neurons isolated from ipsilateral lumbar 3–5 DRGs of skin-only incised and sham wild type (WT) mice during stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. There were no changes in the percentage of neurons responding to cinnamaldehyde or in their response amplitudes. Likewise, the subpopulation of DRG somata retrogradely labeled specifically from the incised region of the plantar hind paw showed no functional up-regulation of TRPA1 after skin-only incision. Next, we conducted behavior tests for heat sensitivity and found that heat hypersensitivity peaked at day 1 post skin-only incision. Skin incision-induced heat hypersensitivity was significantly decreased in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, we conducted calcium imaging with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. DRG neurons from WT mice exhibited sensitization to TRPV1 activation, as more neurons (66%) from skin-incised mice responded to capsaicin compared to controls (46%), and the

  8. Allergen endotoxins induce T-cell-dependent and non-IgE-mediated nasal hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Naruhito; Matsushita, Kazufumi; Fukuoka, Ayumi; Nakahira, Masakiyo; Matsumoto, Makoto; Akasaki, Shoko; Yasuda, Koubun; Shimizu, Takeshi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE on mast cells/basophils is a well-recognized trigger for type 1 allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR). However, allergens may not be the sole trigger for AR, and several allergic-like reactions are induced by non-IgE-mediated mechanisms. We sought to describe a novel non-IgE-mediated, endotoxin-triggered nasal type-1-hypersensitivity-like reaction in mice. To investigate whether endotoxin affects sneezing responses, mice were intraperitoneally immunized with ovalbumin (OVA), then nasally challenged with endotoxin-free or endotoxin-containing OVA. To investigate the role of T cells and mechanisms of the endotoxin-induced response, mice were adoptively transferred with in vitro-differentiated OVA-specific TH2 cells, then nasally challenged with endotoxin-free or endotoxin-containing OVA. Endotoxin-containing, but not endotoxin-free, OVA elicited sneezing responses in mice independent from IgE-mediated signaling. OVA-specific TH2 cell adoptive transfer to mice demonstrated that local activation of antigen-specific TH2 cells was required for the response. The Toll-like receptor 4-myeloid differentiation factor 88 signaling pathway was indispensable for endotoxin-containing OVA-elicited rhinitis. In addition, LPS directly triggered sneezing responses in OVA-specific TH2-transferred and nasally endotoxin-free OVA-primed mice. Although antihistamines suppressed sneezing responses, mast-cell/basophil-depleted mice had normal sneezing responses to endotoxin-containing OVA. Clodronate treatment abrogated endotoxin-containing OVA-elicited rhinitis, suggesting the involvement of monocytes/macrophages in this response. Antigen-specific nasal activation of CD4(+) T cells followed by endotoxin exposure induces mast cell/basophil-independent histamine release in the nose that elicits sneezing responses. Thus, environmental or nasal residential bacteria may exacerbate AR symptoms. In addition, this novel phenomenon might explain

  9. Copper hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fage, Simon W; Faurschou, Annesofie; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2014-10-01

    The world production of copper is steadily increasing. Although humans are widely exposed to copper-containing items on the skin and mucosa, allergic reactions to copper are only infrequently reported. To review the chemistry, biology and accessible data to clarify the implications of copper hypersensitivity, a database search of PubMed was performed with the following terms: copper, dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, contact hypersensitivity, contact sensitization, contact allergy, patch test, dental, IUD, epidemiology, clinical, and experimental. Human exposure to copper is relatively common. As a metal, it possesses many of the same qualities as nickel, which is a known strong sensitizer. Cumulative data on subjects with presumed related symptoms and/or suspected exposure showed that a weighted average of 3.8% had a positive patch test reaction to copper. We conclude that copper is a very weak sensitizer as compared with other metal compounds. However, in a few and selected cases, copper can result in clinically relevant allergic reactions.

  10. Drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bircher, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    Before the arrival of modern pharmacotherapy, drug hypersensitivity reactions were virtually unknown. Toxicity from the many plant-, animal- and inorganic material-derived remedies must have been much more common. One famous example is the intoxications from mercury, which has been used in many ailments, but particularly for the treatment of syphilis. It was only in the 19th century when more and more active principles from e.g. plants were identified, and when the observations of skin reactions became more prevalent. In 1877, Heinrich Köbner used for the first time the term 'drug exanthema' (Arznei-Exanthem). Since then, many different types of exanthemas from the mild macular-papular forms to the severe life-threatening bullous exanthemas such as toxic epidermal necrolysis have been observed from numerous drugs. The systematic investigation of severe drug reactions has only started in the second half of the 20th century, parallel to the increasing knowledge in immunology. Drug hypersensitivity reactions still remain one of the most challenging problems in allergology due to their manifold clinical manifestations and their very diverse pathophysiology. The introduction of new drugs and in turn the emergence of new hypersensitivity reactions will remain a challenge in the future. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Cross-reactivity and Tolerability of Ertapenem in Patients With IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity to β-Lactams.

    PubMed

    Buonomo, A; Pascolini, L; Rizzi, A; Aruanno, A; Pecora, V; Ricci, A G; Mezzacappa, S; Di Rienzo, A; Centrone, M; Nucera, E; Schiavino, D

    2016-01-01

    Administration of carbapenems to β-lactam-allergic patients has always been considered potentially harmful because of a 47.4% rate of cross-reactivity to imipenem reported in a single study. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that the rate of cross-reactivity of imipenem and meropenem with penicillins is lower than 1%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using ertapenem in patients with an established IgE-mediated β-lactam allergy. We studied all participants who came to our allergy unit and had a clinical history of immediate hypersensitivity reactions to β-lactams. The inclusion criteria were a positive skin test result to at least 1 β-lactam molecule and/or positive specific IgE (when available). All participants underwent immediate-type skin tests with several β-lactam molecules including ertapenem. Challenges with intravenous ertapenem were performed on 2 different days in patients with negative skin test results. We examined 49 patients with a clinical history of immediate reactions to β-lactams. All the patients had positive skin tests and/or positive specific IgE to at least 1 β-lactam reagent and negative carbapenem skin tests. Thirty-six patients agreed to undergo the challenges and 35 tolerated the full dose of ertapenem. The practice of avoiding carbapenems in patients with β-lactam allergy should be abandoned considering the very low rate of cross-reactivity. β-Lactam-allergic patients who need ertapenem therapy should undergo skin tests and, if negative, a graded challenge to assess tolerability.

  12. Peripheral Blood Eosinophilia and Hypersensitivity Reactions among Patients Receiving Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G.; Youngster, Ilan; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Parker, Robert A.; Manning, Karen S.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Nelson, Sandra B.

    2015-01-01

    Background While drug-induced peripheral eosinophilia complicates antimicrobial therapy, little is known about its frequency and implications. Objective We aimed to determine the frequency and predictors of antibiotic-induced eosinophilia and subsequent hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs). Methods We evaluated a prospective cohort of former inpatients receiving intravenous antibiotic therapy as outpatients with at least one differential blood count. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, with time-varying antibiotic treatment indicators, to assess the impact of demographic data and antibiotic exposures on eosinophilia and subsequent HSR, including documented rash, renal injury, and liver injury. Possible Drug Rash Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) syndrome cases were identified and manually validated. Results Of 824 patients (60% male, median age 60 years, median therapy duration 41 days), 210 (25%) developed eosinophilia with median peak absolute eosinophil count of 726/mL [IQR: 594–990/mL]. Use of vancomycin, penicillin, rifampin, and linezolid were associated with a higher hazard of developing eosinophilia. There was subsequent HSR in 64/210 (30%) patients with eosinophilia, including rash (N=32), renal injury (N=31), and liver injury (N=13). Patients with eosinophilia were significantly more likely to develop rash (HR = 4.16 [2.54, 6.83]; p<0.0001) and renal injury (HR = 2.13 [1.36, 3.33]; p=0.0009), but not liver injury (HR = 1.75 [0.92, 3.33]; p=0.09). Possible DRESS syndrome occurred in 7/824 (0.8%) patients; 4 (57%) were on vancomycin. Conclusions Drug-induced eosinophilia is common with parenteral antibiotics. While most patients with eosinophilia do not develop an HSR, eosinophilia increases the hazard rate of developing rash and renal injury. DRESS syndrome was more common than previously described. PMID:25981739

  13. Risk stratification and skin testing to guide re-exposure in taxane-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Matthieu; Pur, Leyla; Caiado, Joana; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Galvão, Violeta Regnier; Berlin, Suzanne T; Campos, Susana M; Matulonis, Ursula A; Castells, Mariana C

    2016-04-01

    The optimal approach to patients with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to taxanes has not been established. We sought to assess the safety and efficacy of risk stratification based on the severity of the initial HSR and skin testing for guiding taxane reintroduction in patients with an HSR to these agents. Data on 164 patients treated for a taxane-related HSR from April 2011 to August 2014 at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital were collected retrospectively. Patients were re-exposed to taxanes either through desensitization, challenge, or regular infusion based on the severity of the initial HSR and skin test response. Depending on the initial risk stratification and tolerance to re-exposure, patients were then treated with shorter desensitization protocols, challenge, or both with the aim of resuming regular infusions, except in patients with a severe immediate initial HSR. Of 138 patients desensitized, 29 (21%) had an immediate and 20 (14%) had a delayed HSR with the procedure. Of 49 patients challenged, 2 (4%) had a mild immediate and 1 (2%) had a delayed HSR with the procedure. No patients had a severe immediate HSR with desensitization or challenge. Thirty-six (22%) patients eventually resumed regular infusions. These patients were more likely to have negative skin test responses and to have experienced a delayed or mild immediate initial HSR. Risk stratification based on the severity of the initial HSR and skin testing to guide taxane reintroduction is safe and allows a significant number of patients to resume regular infusions. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Skin tests in patients with hypersensitivity reaction to iodinated contrast media: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, S H; Lee, S-Y; Kang, H-R; Kim, J-Y; Hahn, S; Park, C M; Chang, Y-S; Goo, J M; Cho, S-H

    2015-06-01

    Patients with a previous history of hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) to iodinated contrast media (ICM) are at high risk of the development of HSR to ICM. Many studies have tried to evaluate the diagnostic potential of skin tests in this population but have not yet reached a common conclusion. We investigated the role of skin tests in patients with HSR to ICM in terms of positive rate, cross-reactivity rate, and tolerability to skin test-negative ICM according to the type of HSR. We performed literature searches of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and included studies where skin tests were performed in patients with HSR to ICM, with extractable outcomes. Outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model. Twenty-one studies were included. Pooled per-patient positive rates of skin tests were 17% (95% CI, 10-26%) in patients with immediate HSR, and up to 52% (95% CI, 31-72%) when confined to severe immediate HSR. Among patients with nonimmediate HSR, the positive rate was 26% (95% CI, 15-41%). The pooled per-patient cross-reactivity rate was higher in nonimmediate HSR (68%; 95% CI, 48-83%) than that in immediate HSR (39%; 95% CI, 29-50%). Median per-test cross-reactivity rates between pairs of ICM were 7% (IQR, 6-9%) in immediate HSR and 38% (IQR, 22-51%) in nonimmediate HSR. Pooled per-patient recurrence rates of HSR to skin test-negative ICM were 7% (95% CI, 4-14%) in immediate HSR and 35% (95% CI, 19-55%) in nonimmediate HSR. Skin tests may be helpful in diagnosing and managing patients with HSR to ICM, especially in patients with severe immediate HSR. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Difference in the Incidences of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Original and Generic Taxanes.

    PubMed

    Ratanajarusiri, Tanchanok; Sriuranpong, Virote; Sitthideatphaiboon, Piyada; Poovoravan, Nattaya; Vinayanuwat, Chanida; Parinyanitikul, Napa; Angspatt, Pattama; Thawinwisan, Wilai; Tanasanvimon, Suebpong

    2017-01-01

    To compare incidences of hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) between original and generic taxanes including paclitaxel and docetaxel. We conducted a prospective study enrolling all patients receiving taxanes at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Taxanes were infused accordingly to the step-wise rate escalation protocol at this hospital. Active surveillance for HSRs was performed. During the study period, there was only 1 generic brand used for each taxane. We primarily compared the incidences of HSR between original and generic drugs for each taxane. During the period from January 1 to December 31, 2013, a total of 258 consecutive patients receiving taxanes were enrolled; 128 received paclitaxel, i.e. 65 and 63 in the original (Taxol) and generic arms, respectively, and 130 received docetaxel, i.e. 66 and 64 in the original (Taxotere) and generic arms, respectively. Premedication, including antihistamines and dexamethasone, was administered to all patients 30 min before taxane infusion. There were 26 (10.0%) HSR events including 24 grade 2 and 2 grade 3 HSRs. In the paclitaxel group, there were 9 (13.8%) and 7 (11.1%) HSRs in the original and generic arms, respectively (p = 0.791). In the docetaxel group, there were 9 (13.6%) and 1 (1.6%) HSRs in the original and generic arms, respectively (p = 0.017). No life-threatening symptoms or permanent discontinuation of taxanes occurred. In this prospective study, the incidences of HSR were similar with generic and original paclitaxel but significantly different with generic and original docetaxel. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Type III and type IV hypersensitivity reactions due to mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Kunkeler, L; Nieboer, C; Bruynzeel, D P

    2000-02-01

    A 71-year-old man developed an exfoliative dermatitis of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet, and a generalized itch, during treatment with intravesical instillations of mitomycin C for an undifferentiated carcinoma of the bladder. Patch tests with mitomycin C 0.03%, 0.1% and 0.3% aq. were positive. Because of the serious consequences of this finding, the patient was retested with mitomycin C in pet. (same concentrations), a more stable preparation. This showed clear positive reactions. During this last series of patch tests, he developed palpable purpura on the legs. We postulated that this reaction was an immune-complex-mediated reaction, caused by the 2nd series of patch tests with mitomycin C. To prove this, we performed histopathological and immunofluorescence investigations, and these showed the reaction to be consistent with Henoch-Schonlein-type purpura. We therefore conclude that this patient developed systemic reactions to mitomycin C, characterized by an eczematous dermatitis as well as purpuric reactions. The intravesical installations with mitomycin C have been stopped. The patient's skin problems (the purpura as well as the eczema) have completely resolved and have not recurred.

  17. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Is cancer a severe delayed hypersensitivity reaction and histamine a blueprint?

    PubMed

    Khatami, Mahin

    2016-12-01

    Longevity and accumulation of multiple context-dependent signaling pathways of long-standing inflammation (antigen-load or oxidative stress) are the results of decreased/altered regulation of immunity and loss of control switch mechanisms that we defined as Yin and Yang of acute inflammation or immune surveillance. Chronic inflammation is initiated by immune disruptors-induced progressive changes in physiology and function of susceptible host tissues that lead to increased immune suppression and multistep disease processes including carcinogenesis. The interrelated multiple hypotheses that are presented for the first time in this article are extension of author's earlier series of 'accidental' discoveries on the role of inflammation in developmental stages of immune dysfunction toward tumorigenesis and angiogenesis. Detailed analyses of data on chronic diseases suggest that nearly all age-associated illnesses, generally categorized as 'mild' (e.g., increased allergies), 'moderate' (e.g., hypertension, colitis, gastritis, pancreatitis, emphysema) or 'severe' (e.g., accelerated neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases or site-specific cancers and metastasis) are variations of hypersensitivity responses of tissues that are manifested as different diseases in immune-responsive or immune-privileged tissues. Continuous release/presence of low level histamine (subclinical) in circulation could contribute to sustained oxidative stress and induction of 'mild' or 'moderate' or 'severe' (immune tsunami) immune disorders in susceptible tissues. Site-specific cancers are proposed to be 'severe' (irreversible) forms of cumulative delayed hypersensitivity responses that would induce immunological chaos in favor of tissue growth in target tissues. Shared or special features of growth from fetus development into adulthood and aging processes and carcinogenesis are briefly compared with regard to energy requirements of highly complex function of Yin and Yang. Features of Yang

  19. Effects of magnolialide isolated from the leaves of Laurus nobilis L. (Lauraceae) on immunoglobulin E-mediated type I hypersensitivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehun; Lee, Sooryun; Ho Kim, Kyeong; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Mar, Woongchon

    2013-09-16

    Laurus nobilis L. (Lauraceae) has been used for folk medicines in the Mediterranean area and Europe to treat various disorders including skin inflammation (dermatitis) and asthma. Our aim was to investigate the scientific evaluation of the compounds from Laurus nobilis L. on immuniglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity responses in vitro such as atopic dermatitis and asthma. Seven compounds were isolated and examined for the mast cell stabilizing effect on IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 mast cells by measuring the β-hexosaminidase activity. In addition, the effects on interleukin (IL)-4 production and IL-5-dependent Y16 early B cell proliferation were investigated as well as their cytotoxic effects on RBL-2H3 cells. Among the seven isolated compounds, magnolialide attenuated the release of β-hexosaminidase from RBL-2H3 cells with an IC50 value of 20.2 μM, while the other compounds revealed no significant effects at concentrations tested. Furthermore, magnolialide significantly inhibited the IL-4 release with an IC50 value of 18.1 μM and IL-4 mRNA expression with an IC50 value of 15.7 μM in IgE-sensitized RBL-2H3 cells. In addition, the inhibition of IL-5-dependent proliferation of early B cells (Y16 cells) by magnolialide was demonstrated with an IC50 value of 18.4 μM. These results suggest that the magnolialide might be a candidate for the treatment of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity responses such as atopic dermatitis and asthma by inhibiting mast cell degranulation, the IL-4 production, and IL-5-dependent early B cell proliferation, key factors in the development and amplification of type I hypersensitivity reactions. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The hypersensitive induced reaction and leucine-rich repeat proteins regulate plant cell death associated with disease and plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Kim, Young Jin; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2011-01-01

    Pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD) is intimately linked with disease resistance and susceptibility. However, the molecular components regulating PCD, including hypersensitive and susceptible cell death, are largely unknown in plants. In this study, we show that pathogen-induced Capsicum annuum hypersensitive induced reaction 1 (CaHIR1) and leucine-rich repeat 1 (CaLRR1) function as distinct plant PCD regulators in pepper plants during Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria infection. Confocal microscopy and protein gel blot analyses revealed that CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 localize to the extracellular matrix and plasma membrane (PM), respectively. Bimolecular fluorescent complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that the extracellular CaLRR1 specifically binds to the PM-located CaHIR1 in pepper leaves. Overexpression of CaHIR1 triggered pathogen-independent cell death in pepper and Nicotiana benthamiana plants but not in yeast cells. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1 distinctly strengthened and compromised hypersensitive and susceptible cell death in pepper plants, respectively. Endogenous salicylic acid levels and pathogenesis-related gene transcripts were elevated in CaHIR1-silenced plants. VIGS of NbLRR1 and NbHIR1, the N. benthamiana orthologs of CaLRR1 and CaHIR1, regulated Bax- and avrPto-/Pto-induced PCD. Taken together, these results suggest that leucine-rich repeat and hypersensitive induced reaction proteins may act as cell-death regulators associated with plant immunity and disease.

  1. Inhibition of immediate hypersensitivity reactions in laboratory animals by a phenanthroline salt (ICI 74,917).

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D P; Thomson, D S

    1975-01-01

    1. The activity of a new anti-allergic compound, I.C.I. 74,917, has been studied in the rat, mouse and guinea-pig. 2. Following intravenous administration, I.C.I. 74,917 inhibits in a dose-dependent manner passive cutaneous anaphylaxis induced in rats and mice by heat-labile homocytotropic antibody. In rats, its potency is approximately 300 times that of disodium cromoglycate. 3. To achieve maximal inhibition, it is necessary to administer I.C.I. 74,917 at the same time as antigenic challenge; dosing before or after challenge has much less effect. 4. Liberation of histamine, provoked by the antigenic challenge of mast cells passively sensitized in vitro by IgE-like antibody, is reduced in the presence of I.C.I. 74,917. 5. Intravenous administration of the compound has no significant effect upon local blueing reactions provoked in the rat by intradermal injection of histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine or Compound 48/80. It has only a slight effect at high doses upon passive cutaneous anaphylaxis induced in the rat by heat-stable homocytotropic or heterologous (guinea-pig) antibodies. 6. Although not a bronchodilator in the guinea-pig, I.C.I. 74,917 partially inhibits systemic anaphylaxis. A consistent reduction in the severity of antigen-induced bronchospasm was demonstrated in the Konzett-Rossler preparation at doses comparable to those inhibiting passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in the rat. However, there was only slight inhibition of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis in the guinea-pig. 7. I.C.I. 74,917 itself induces bronchospasm when administered to anaesthetized guinea-pigs or to a guinea-pig isolated lung preparation. This effect is reversed by salbutamol, but is not prevented by the prior administration of mepyramine, atropine or methysergide. 8. These results indicate that in the rat, mouse and guinea-pig, I.C.I. 74,917 is a potent inhibitor of certain types of immediate hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:48393

  2. Hypersensitivity Reactions to Oxaliplatin: Identifying the Risk Factors and Judging the Efficacy of a Desensitization Protocol.

    PubMed

    Okayama, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Sugatani, Kazuko; Yoshida, Naohisa; Kokura, Satoshi; Matsuda, Kiyomi; Tsukamoto, Shigeru; Ihara, Norihiko; Kuriu, Yoshiaki; Nakanishi, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Terukazu; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Konishi, Hideyuki; Yagi, Nobuaki; Naito, Yuji; Otsuji, Eigo; Hosoi, Hajime; Miki, Tsuneharu; Itoh, Yoshito

    2015-06-01

    We examined the clinical data of patients treated with oxaliplatin to determine the risk factors of oxaliplatin-related hypersensitivity reaction (HSR). In addition, we evaluated the efficacy of rechallenging patients with HSRs with oxaliplatin using prophylactic agents or desensitization procedures. This study consisted of 162 patients with colorectal cancer (88 men and 74 women) who were treated consecutively at the outpatient chemotherapy department at University Hospital, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine. Patients underwent chemotherapy, including oxaliplatin, between March 2006 and June 2012. We analyzed the patients' clinical backgrounds (eg, age, sex, performance status, disease stage, and allergic history) to uncover any connections to the development of HSR to oxaliplatin. In addition, we rechallenged 10 patients who had oxaliplatin-related HSR using prophylactic agents or desensitization procedures. Of 162 patients, 28 (17.2%) developed oxaliplatin-related HSRs (16, 2, 9 and 1 patient had grade 1, 2, 3, and 4 HSRs, respectively). The total cumulative dose of oxaliplatin at the onset of the HSR was 301 to 1126 mg/m(2) (median, 582 mg/m(2)), and the first reactions developed in these patients after 5 to 17 infusions of oxaliplatin (median, 8 infusions). Logistic regression analysis indicated that sex (male: odds ratio = 3.624; 95% CI, 1.181-11.122; P = 0.024) and eosinophil count in peripheral blood (odds ratio = 35.118; 95% CI, 1.058-1166.007; P = 0.046) were independent variables for oxaliplatin-related HSRs. Rechallenging patients with prophylactic agents was successful in 2 (28.6%) of 7 patients who successfully completed their treatment. On the other hand, all 3 patients rechallenged with oxaliplatin using a desensitization protocol successfully completed their treatment without new HSRs. In this retrospective study, we observed that being male and having higher counts of peripheral eosinophil could be predictors for HSR to oxaliplatin. In

  3. Correlation between atopy and hypersensitivity reactions during therapy with three different TNF-alpha blocking agents in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Benucci, M; Manfredi, M; Saviola, G; Baiardi, P; Campi, P

    2009-01-01

    The use of TNF-alpha antagon-ists (infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab) has changed the course of many rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Since their approval, some questions regarding their safety have been raised. Both acute and delayed reactions have been described. The aim of our work was to detect if there is a different incidence of hypersensitivity reactions - infusion reactions to infliximab or injection site reactions with etanercept or adalimumab - in atopic patients versus non- atopic patients. In 90 patients (82 females, 8 males) with rheumatoid arthritis we evaluated, during the first year of therapy with three different TNF-alpha blocking agents, total serum IgE (normal value <100 KU/L) (method ImmunoCAP PHADIA) and serum specific IgE performing a qualitative multi-allergen test for inhal-ant allergens (PHADIATOP, method ImmunoCAP PHADIA). In all patients we evaluated injection site reactions (ISR) to etanercept and adalimumab - erythema, edema and itching at the site of subcutaneous administration - and infusion reactions to infliximab - hypotension/hypertension, chest pain, dyspnea, laryngospasm, fever, urticaria angioedema. We obtained the following results: patients with high value of tot-al IgE were 15/90 (16.6 %), patients with total IgE in normal range were 75/90 (83.4.%), reactions in patients with high total IgE were 6.7% and in patients with normal total IgE were 18.7% (p=0.255 ns). As regards serum specific IgE, patients with specific IgE were 17/90 (18.8%) patients without specific IgE were 73/90 (81.2%), reactions in patients with specific IgE were 11.8% and in patients without specific IgE were 17.8% (p=0.547 ns). Also, when the data were divided for the three groups, the differences were not statistically significant. Adverse reactions to biological agents have been categorized into five types. In hypersensitivity reactions - the Beta type reactions - an immune mechanism is suspected. Our data showed that there was

  4. Respiratory hypersensitivity reactions to NSAIDs in Europe: the global allergy and asthma network (GA(2) LEN) survey.

    PubMed

    Makowska, J S; Burney, P; Jarvis, D; Keil, T; Tomassen, P; Bislimovska, J; Brozek, G; Bachert, C; Baelum, J; Bindslev-Jensen, C; Bousquet, J; Bousquet, P J; Kai-Håkon, C; Dahlen, S E; Dahlen, B; Fokkens, W J; Forsberg, B; Gjomarkaj, M; Howarth, P; Salagean, E; Janson, C; Kasper, L; Kraemer, U; Louiro, C; Lundback, B; Minov, J; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E; Papadopoulos, N; Sakellariou, A G; Todo-Bom, A; Toskala, E; Zejda, J E; Zuberbier, T; Kowalski, M L

    2016-11-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most prevalent drugs inducing hypersensitivity reactions. The aim of this analysis was to estimate the prevalence of NSAID-induced respiratory symptoms in population across Europe and to assess its association with upper and lower respiratory tract disorders. The GA(2) LEN survey was conducted in 22 centers in 15 European countries. Each of 19 centers selected random samples of 5000 adults aged 15-74 from their general population, and in three centers (Athens, Munich, Oslo), a younger population was sampled. Questionnaires including questions about age, gender, presence of symptoms of asthma, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, smoking status, and history of NSAID-induced hypersensitivity reactions were sent to participants by mail. Totally, 62 737 participants completed the questionnaires. The mean prevalence of NSAID-induced dyspnea was 1.9% and was highest in the three Polish centers [Katowice (4.9%), Krakow (4.8%), and Lodz (4.4%)] and lowest in Skopje, (0.9%), Amsterdam (1.1%), and Umea (1.2%). In multivariate analysis, the prevalence of respiratory reactions to NSAIDs was higher in participants with chronic rhinosinusitis symptoms (Odds Ratio 2.12; 95%CI 1.78-2.74), asthma symptoms in last 12 months (2.7; 2.18-3.35), hospitalization due to asthma (1.53; 1.22-1.99), and adults vs children (1.53; 1.24-1.89), but was not associated with allergic rhinitis. Our study documented significant variation between European countries in the prevalence of NSAID-induced respiratory hypersensitivity reactions, and association with chronic airway diseases, but also with environmental factors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Role of the potassium chloride cotransporter isoform 2-mediated spinal chloride homeostasis in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Qian, Ai-Hua; Song, Dan-Dan; Ben, Qi-Wen; Yao, Wei-Yan; Sun, Jing; Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2015-05-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity represents an important hallmark in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), of which the mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to examine whether cation-chloride cotransporter (CCC)-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis of the spinal cord is involved in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Chronic visceral hypersensitivity was induced by exposing male Wistar rats to water avoidance stress (WAS). RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of CCCs in the spinal cord. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on adult spinal cord slices to evaluate Cl(-) homeostasis and Cl(-) extrusion capacity of lamina I neurons. Visceral sensitivity was estimated by measuring the abdominal withdrawal reflex in response to colorectal distension (CRD). After 10 days of WAS exposure, levels of both total protein and the oligomeric form of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2 (KCC2), but not Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the lumbosacral spinal cord. The downregulation of KCC2 resulted in a depolarizing shifted equilibrium potential of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic current and impaired Cl(-) extrusion capacity in lamina I neurons of the lumbosacral spinal cord from WAS rats. Acute noxious CRD disrupted spinal KCC2 expression and function 2 h after the final distention in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. Pharmacological blockade of KCC2 activity by intrathecal injection of a KCC2 inhibitor [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid enhanced visceral nociceptive sensitivity in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. These results suggest that KCC2 downregulation-mediated impairment of spinal cord Cl(-) homeostasis may play an important role in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  6. An IgE immediate reaction to thiocolchicoside.

    PubMed

    Caimmi, D; Caviglioli, S; Raschetti, R; Demoly, P

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions due to muscle relaxant drugs may be related either to a nonspecific release of allergic mediators or to allergic reactions induced by the molecules themselves. Rare cases of hypersensitivity reactions have been associated to thiocolchicoside, and no case of IgE-mediated immediate reaction has actually been reported to date. We report the first documented case of immediate anaphylaxis to thiocolchicoside.

  7. Hypersensitivity reactions in small intestine. I Thymus dependence of experimental 'partial villous atrophy'.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, A; Jarrett, E E

    1975-01-01

    Rats infected with the intestinal nematode Nippostrongylus brasiliensis have crypt hyperplasia with villous atrophy in affected areas of the small intestine. In thymus-deprived (B) rats the course of infection is prolonged but, despite the presence of many worms in the intestinal lumen, villi and crypts appear largely normal. This suggests that the tissue damaged associated with N. brasilliensis infection is caused, not by the worms, but by a local thymus-dependent immune reaction. There is some evidence to implicate lymphocytes rather than antibodies in this reaction. It is already know that T-cell-associated damage to the small intestine, such as occurs in allograft rejection, produces subtotal villous atrophy. The present findings suggest that when T cell react locally with helminth antigens a similar type of damage occurs. The presence of a local cell-mediated immune reaction may be the common factor which causes villous atrophy and crypt hyperplasia in many small intestinal diseases, eg, viral enteritis, giardiasis, cow's milk allergy, and coeliac disease. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 PMID:1079195

  8. [Tc1-mediated contact sensitivity reaction, its mechanism and regulation].

    PubMed

    Zemelka-Wiącek, Magdalena; Szczepanik, Marian

    2014-07-04

    The contact hypersensitivity reaction (CHS) to haptens is a classic example of cell-mediated immune response. In the effector phase, two stages can be distinguished: an early component, that appears only 2 hours after subsequent contact with the hapten, and the late component that develops approximately 24 hours later which is mediated by TCRαβ+ cells. The effector lymphocytes may be CD4+ T helper 1 (Th1) cells or CD8+ T cytotoxic 1 (Tc1) cells, which depends on the employed hapten and/or mice strain. NKT lymphocytes play the crucial role in the CHS initiation, by supporting B1 cells in the antigen-specific IgM antibodies production. The development of an early component is essential for the recruitment of T effector (Teff) cells to the side of hapten deposition and for the complete expansion of inflammatory reaction. The CHS reaction is under T regulatory (Treg) cells control, both in the induction phase as well as in the effector phase. A new view of a negative regulation of the Tc1 mediated CHS response is based on the suppression induced by epicutaneous (EC) application of protein antigen. The DNP-BSA skin application, on a gauze patch, leads to a state of immunosuppression. This maneuver results in rising the population of Treg cells with TCRαβ+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ phenotype. The mechanism of suppression requires direct contact between Treg cells and Teff cells and the participation of CTLA-4 molecule is also necessary. The described method of evoking immune tolerance via EC immunization may contribute to elaborate a new method of allergic contact dermatitis therapy. This is because of its effectiveness, ease of induction and non-invasive protein antigen application.

  9. Calcium is involved in the R Mc1 (blb)-mediated hypersensitive response against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in potato.

    PubMed

    Davies, Laura J; Brown, Charles R; Elling, Axel A

    2015-01-01

    Functional characterization of the Columbia root-knot nematode resistance gene R Mc1 ( blb ) in potato revealed the R gene-mediated resistance is dependent on a hypersensitive response and involves calcium. The resistance (R) gene R Mc1(blb) confers resistance against the plant-parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi. Avirulent and virulent nematodes were used to functionally characterize the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance mechanism in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Histological observations indicated a hypersensitive response (HR) occurred during avirulent nematode infection. This was confirmed by quantifying reactive oxygen species activity in response to avirulent and virulent M. chitwoodi. To gain an insight into the signal transduction pathways mediating the R Mc1(blb)-induced HR, chemical inhibitors were utilized. Inhibiting Ca(2+) channels caused a significant reduction in electrolyte leakage, an indicator of cell death. Labeling with a Ca(2+)-sensitive dye revealed high Ca(2+) levels in the root cells surrounding avirulent nematodes. Furthermore, the calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), StCDPK4 had a higher transcript level in R Mc1(blb) potato roots infected with avirulent nematodes in comparison to roots infected with virulent M. chitwoodi. The results of this study indicate Ca(2+) plays a role in the R Mc1(blb)-mediated resistance against M. chitwoodi in potato.

  10. Testing for Drug Hypersensitivity Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Rive, Craig M; Bourke, Jack; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common cause of patient morbidity and mortality. Type B drug reactions comprise only 20% of all drug reactions but they tend to be primarily immunologically mediated and less dependent on the drug’s pharmacological action and dose. Common Type B reactions seen in clinical practice are those of the immediate, IgE, Gell-Coombs Type I reactions, and the delayed, T-cell mediated, Type IV reactions. Management of these types of reactions, once they have occurred, requires careful consideration and recognition of the utility of routine diagnostic tests followed by ancillary specialised diagnostic testing. For Type I, IgE mediated reactions this includes prick/intradermal skin testing and oral provocation. For Type IV, T-cell mediated reactions this includes a variety of in vivo (patch testing) and ex vivo tests, many of which are currently mainly used in highly specialised research laboratories. The recent association of many serious delayed (Type IV) hypersensitivity reactions to specific drugs with HLA class I and II alleles has created the opportunity for HLA screening to exclude high risk populations from exposure to the implicated drug and hence prevent clinical reactions. For example, the 100% negative predictive value of HLA-B*5701 for true immunologically mediated abacavir hypersensitivity and the development of feasible, inexpensive DNA-based molecular tests has led to incorporation of HLA-B*5701 screening in routine HIV clinical practice. The mechanism by which drugs specifically interact with HLA has been recently characterised and promises to lead to strategies for pre-clinical screening to inform drug development and design. PMID:23592889

  11. Diagnostic tools for hypersensitivity to platinum drugs and taxanes: skin testing, specific IgE, and mast cell/basophil mediators.

    PubMed

    Caiado, Joana; Picard, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinum drugs and taxanes are increasing in cancer patients, and rapid drug desensitization has emerged as a safe and effective method to reintroduce these drugs in reactive patients. Optimal management of patients presenting HSRs to chemotherapy depends on the use of various diagnostic tools, which include measurement of mast cell/basophil mediator release following a HSR and skin testing. Serum tryptase should be measured in patients presenting chemotherapy HSRs, and its elevation would support mast cell/basophil activation. Skin testing to platinum drugs has a high sensitivity and specificity and is critical to guide the management of platinum-reactive patients. Taxane skin testing is also emerging as a useful diagnostic and risk stratification tool in the evaluation of patients with HSRs to taxanes. Platinum sIgE assays have been recently developed and can be helpful in combination with skin testing or as an alternative when skin testing is not available.

  12. The prophylactic conversion to an extended infusion schedule and use of premedication to prevent hypersensitivity reactions in ovarian cancer patients during carboplatin retreatment.

    PubMed

    O'Cearbhaill, Roisin; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Hensley, Martee L; Tew, William P; Aghajanian, Carol; Spriggs, David R; Lichtman, Stuart M; Sabbatini, Paul J

    2010-03-01

    Repeated exposure to carboplatin can lead to hypersensitivity reactions during retreatment with carboplatin. This may prevent its further use in platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients. At our institution, an increasing proportion of patients are prophylactically converted to an extended schedule of infusion after 8 cycles of carboplatin. We sought to determine whether an incrementally increasing, extended 3-hour infusion of carboplatin with appropriate premedication was associated with a lower rate of hypersensitivity reactions compared to the standard 30-minute schedule in sequentially treated patients. We performed a retrospective electronic medical record review of patients with recurrent ovarian cancer retreated with carboplatin at our institution from January 1998 to December 2008. Seven hundred and seventy-seven patients with relapsed ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer were retreated with carboplatin and met study inclusion criteria. Of these, 117 (17%) developed hypersensitivity reactions during second-line or greater carboplatin-based treatment for recurrent disease. Only 6 (3.4%) of the 174 patients who received the extended schedule developed hypersensitivity reactions (0% grade 4; 50% grade 3) compared to 111 (21%) of 533 patients in the standard schedule group (13% grade 4; 77% grade 3). The first hypersensitivity episode occurred after a median of 16 platinum (carboplatin and cisplatin) treatments in the extended group compared to 9 in the standard group. Using the Fisher exact test, there was an association with a reduced incidence of hypersensitivity reactions with the extended infusion schedule (P<0.001). Our data suggest appropriate premedication and prophylactic conversion to an extended infusion during carboplatin retreatment may reduce hypersensitivity reactions.

  13. Nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloys used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; Chen, Weiqing; Ke, Wei; Wu, Shaohua

    2009-11-01

    Although nickel-based (Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr-Be) alloy prothesis is widely used in orthodontics, its potential biologic hazards, hypersensitivity in particular, are still uncertain as yet. And only a few studies in vivo have considered the biocompatibility. However, several case reports show adverse effects of immunologic alterations, such as urticaria, respiratory disease, nickel contact dermatitis, microscopic hematuria and proteinuria, and even exacerbated to hepatocyte injury and renal injury. So nickel-based alloy used in dental restorations may be a potential cause for immune-mediated hypersensitivity. The metal surface would occur electrochemical corrosion as metal edge of porcelain-fused-to-nichrome crown exposed to oral cavity rich in electrolytes after restoration, and metal ion would release to oral cavity then come into contact with cells and tissues in the immediate environment, or be distributed throughout the body, mainly to the intestine canal. Once these ions are not biocompatible, the human system may be injured (toxicity and risk of sensitization) if they are absorbed in sufficient quantity. Thus, it is necessary to determine the long-term biocompatibility properties of nickel-based alloy, reduce sensitization, and grasp the information of individual differences in the appearance of adverse reactions in further research.

  14. Adrenergic β2-receptors mediates visceral hypersensitivity induced by heterotypic intermittent stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunhua; Rui, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Yuan-Yuan; Ju, Zhong; Zhang, Hong-Hong; Hu, Chuang-Ying; Xiao, Ying; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been difficult to treat effectively partially because its pathophysiology is not fully understood. Recent studies show that norepinephrine (NE) plays an important role in the development of visceral hypersensitivity. In this study, we designed to investigate the role of adrenergic signaling in visceral hypersensitivity induced by heterotypical intermittent stress (HIS). Abdominal withdrawal reflex scores (AWRs) used as visceral sensitivity were determined by measuring the visceromoter responses to colorectal distension. Colon-specific dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRGs) were labeled by injection of DiI into the colon wall and were acutely dissociated for whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Blood plasma level of NE was measured using radioimmunoassay kits. The expression of β2-adrenoceptors was measured by western blotting. We showed that HIS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was attenuated by systemic administration of a β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, in a dose-dependent manner, but not by a α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine. Using specific β-adrenoceptor antagonists, HIS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was alleviated by β2 adrenoceptor antagonist but not by β1- or β3-adrenoceptor antagonist. Administration of a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist also normalized hyperexcitability of colon-innervating DRG neurons of HIS rats. Furthermore, administration of β-adrenoceptor antagonist suppressed sustained potassium current density (IK) without any alteration of fast-inactivating potassium current density (IA). Conversely, administration of NE enhanced the neuronal excitability and produced visceral hypersensitivity in healthy control rats, and blocked by β2-adrenoceptor antagonists. In addition, HIS significantly enhanced the NE concentration in the blood plasma but did not change the expression of β2-adrenoceptor in DRGs and the muscularis externa of the colon. The

  15. The Cryptococcus neoformans Gene DHA1 Encodes an Antigen That Elicits a Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Reaction in Immune Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, M. Alejandra; Grace, Greg G.; Orsborn, Kris I.; Schafer, Fredda; Murphy, Juneann W.; Orbach, Marc J.; Galgiani, John N.

    2000-01-01

    When mice are vaccinated with a culture filtrate from Cryptococcus neoformans (CneF), they mount a protective cell-mediated immune response as detected by dermal delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to CneF. We have identified a gene (DHA1) whose product accounts at least in part for the DTH reactivity. Using an acapsular mutant (Cap-67) of C. neoformans strain B3501, we prepared a culture filtrate (CneF-Cap67) similar to that used for preparing the commonly used skin test antigen made with C. neoformans 184A (CneF-184A). CneF-Cap67 elicited DTH in mice immunized with CneF-184A. Deglycosylation of CneF-Cap67 did not diminish its DTH activity. Furthermore, size separation by either chromatography or differential centrifugation identified the major DTH activity of CneF-Cap67 to be present in fractions that contained proteins of approximately 19 to 20 kDa. Using N-terminal and internal amino acid sequences derived from the 20-kDa band, oligonucleotide primers were designed, two of which produced a 776-bp amplimer by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using RNA from Cap-67 to prepare cDNA for the template. The amplimer was used as a probe to isolate clones containing the full-length DHA1 gene from a phage genomic library prepared from strain B3501. The full-length cDNA was obtained by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and RT-PCR. Analysis of DHA1 revealed a similarity between the deduced open reading frame and that of a developmentally regulated gene from Lentinus edodes (shiitake mushroom) associated with fruiting-body formation. Also, the gene product contained several amino acid sequences identical to those determined biochemically from the purified 20-kDa peptide encoded by DHA1. Recombinant DHA1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was shown to elicit DTH reactions similar to those elicited by CneF-Cap67 in mice immunized against C. neoformans. Thus, DHA1 is the first gene to be cloned from C. neoformans whose product has been shown to possess immunologic

  16. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with L-asparaginase administration in 142 dogs and 68 cats with lymphoid malignancies: 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Blake, Mary Kay; Carr, Brittany J; Mauldin, Glenna E

    2016-02-01

    Clinically significant hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to the chemotherapy drug L-asparaginase are reported in humans and dogs, but frequency in small animals is not well-defined. This study retrospectively evaluated the frequency of HSR to L-asparaginase given by IM injection to dogs and cats with lymphoid malignancies. The medical records of all dogs and cats treated with at least 1 dose of L-asparaginase chemotherapy over a 5-year period were reviewed. A total of 370 doses of L-asparaginase were administered to the dogs, with 88 of 142 dogs receiving multiple doses, and 6 dogs experiencing an HSR. A total of 197 doses were administered to the cats, with 33 of 68 cats receiving multiple doses, and no cats experiencing an HSR. Hypersensitivity reactions were documented in 4.2% of dogs, and in association with 1.6% of L-asparaginase doses administered. These results show that HSRs occur uncommonly among dogs and cats, even with repeated dosing.

  17. Hypersensitivity reactions associated with L-asparaginase administration in 142 dogs and 68 cats with lymphoid malignancies: 2007–2012

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Mary Kay; Carr, Brittany J.; Mauldin, Glenna E.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to the chemotherapy drug L-asparaginase are reported in humans and dogs, but frequency in small animals is not well-defined. This study retrospectively evaluated the frequency of HSR to L-asparaginase given by IM injection to dogs and cats with lymphoid malignancies. The medical records of all dogs and cats treated with at least 1 dose of L-asparaginase chemotherapy over a 5-year period were reviewed. A total of 370 doses of L-asparaginase were administered to the dogs, with 88 of 142 dogs receiving multiple doses, and 6 dogs experiencing an HSR. A total of 197 doses were administered to the cats, with 33 of 68 cats receiving multiple doses, and no cats experiencing an HSR. Hypersensitivity reactions were documented in 4.2% of dogs, and in association with 1.6% of L-asparaginase doses administered. These results show that HSRs occur uncommonly among dogs and cats, even with repeated dosing. PMID:26834270

  18. Bidirectional amygdaloid control of neuropathic hypersensitivity mediated by descending serotonergic pathways acting on spinal 5-HT3 and 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sagalajev, B; Bourbia, N; Beloushko, E; Wei, H; Pertovaara, A

    2015-04-01

    Amygdala is involved in processing of primary emotions and particularly its central nucleus (CeA) also in pain control. Here we studied mechanisms mediating the descending control of mechanical hypersensitivity by the CeA in rats with a peripheral neuropathy in the left hind limb. For drug administrations, the animals had a guide cannula in the right CeA and an intrathecal catheter or another guide cannula in the medullary raphe. Hypersensitivity was tested with monofilaments. Glutamate administration in the CeA produced a bidirectional effect on hypersensitivity that varied from an increase at a low-dose (9μg) to a reduction at high doses (30-100μg). The increase but not the reduction of hypersensitivity was prevented by blocking the amygdaloid NMDA receptor with a dose of MK-801 that alone had no effects. The glutamate-induced increase in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT3 receptor with ondansetron, whereas the reduction in hypersensitivity was reversed by blocking the spinal 5-HT1A receptor with WAY-100635. Both the increase and decrease of hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate treatment were reversed by medullary administration of a 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, that presumably produced autoinhibition of serotonergic cell bodies in the medullary raphe. The results indicate that depending on the dose, glutamate in the CeA has a descending facilitatory or inhibitory effect on neuropathic pain hypersensitivity. Serotoninergic raphe neurons are involved in mediating both of these effects. Spinally, the 5-HT3 receptor contributes to the increase and the 5-HT1A receptor to the decrease of neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by amygdaloid glutamate.

  19. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  20. Ibuprofen-induced hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanau, Radu M; Neuman, Manuela G

    2010-06-01

    Ibuprofen is a widely used antipyretic and analgesic nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID). With the aging of the population, there will be a significant increase in the prevalence of painful degenerative and inflammatory rheumatic conditions. This increase likely will lead to a parallel increase in the use of NSAIDs, including ibuprofen. The primary effect of the NSAIDs is to inhibit cyclooxygenase (prostaglandin synthase), thereby impairing the ultimate transformation of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, prostacyclin, and thromboxanes. Although in the majority of cases it is safe, this NSAID, ibuprofen, can produce an unpredictable, idiosyncratic, type B reaction that may pose a major concern in clinical practice. Type B reactions are known to occur in susceptible individuals. The true hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is a systemic disease defined by the triad of fever, rash, and internal organ involvement that starts 1 day to 12 weeks after the initiation of therapy. HSR has limited the therapeutic use of many drugs, including ibuprofen. Hypersensitivity syndrome associated with ibuprofen is a host-dependent drug reaction that is idiosyncratic in nature. This reaction likely is caused by a combination of metabolic and immunologic factors. Immune mediated components, such as T-cell and their products cytokines and chemokines, can exacerbate cellular responses and create complex pathways that lead to a variety of clinical manifestations. Our review presents an ibuprofen-induced clinical manifestation of hypersensitivity syndrome and the necessity of wisely monitoring the patients clinically and by laboratory investigations when prescribing this drug.

  1. Self-report prevalence and associated factors to drug hypersensitivity in Mexican young adults.

    PubMed

    Bedolla-Barajas, Martín; Puente-Fernández, Cecilia; Flores-Merino, Miriam V; Morales-Romero, Jaime; Domínguez-García, Ma Victoria

    2017-07-01

    Drug hypersensitivity is defined as any unfavorable reaction that occurs after the administration of any drug. It may or may not be mediated by the involvement of the immune system. Epidemiological data related to drug hypersensitivity reactions in our country are scarce. To determine the prevalence of drug hypersensitivity in a group of young adults, as well as to identify associated factors. A structured questionnaire was applied to young people aged 18 to 25 years. The instrument was oriented to identify reactions of drug hypersensitivity, as well as the most prevalent drugs involved. In addition, a personal and family history of atopic diseases was included. Analysis for associations between variables was been done through logistic regression. The prevalence of drug hypersensitivity reactions was 12% (144 of 1,200). The antibiotics were the agents most related to hypersensitivity reactions (9.8%) followed by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (1.6%). Factors associated with drug hypersensitivity were a personal history of asthma, odds ratio (OR) 3.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-6.91), maternal and paternal history of drug hypersensitivity, OR 2.33 (95% CI, 1.21-4.48) and OR 3.11 (95% CI, 1.22-7.92), respectively. The results of this research show that drug hypersensitivity in young adults is a highly prevalent event and it is associated with personal history of asthma and history of drug hypersensitivity in parents.

  2. Specific V beta T cell subsets mediate the immediate hypersensitivity response to ragweed allergen.

    PubMed

    Renz, H; Saloga, J; Bradley, K L; Loader, J E; Greenstein, J L; Larsen, G; Gelfand, E W

    1993-08-15

    T and B cell responses after sensitization to ragweed (RW) were examined in a mouse model in which BALB/c mice were exposed to the allergen by ultrasonic nebulization. Sensitization resulted in the stimulation of an IgE anti-RW response and was paralleled by a rise in IgG1 anti-RW titers. Skin testing for immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity revealed the presence of allergic type I reactions to RW. Sensitization to RW in this way was also associated with the development of increased airways responsiveness as determined by electrical field stimulation of preparations of tracheal smooth muscle. Histologic examination of the airways and the lung indicated the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltrate in the mucosa and submucosa of the airways that was accompanied by an enlargement of local draining lymph nodes of the airways and the lung. T cell populations were analyzed for the frequency of V beta-expressing T cells. Such analysis indicated that RW sensitization stimulated the expression of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, and V beta 13+ T cells in the local lymphoid tissue and of V beta 8.1+, V beta 8.2+, V beta 8.3+, V beta 9+ and V beta 14+ T cells in the spleen. Co-culture of these T cell populations with RW-primed B cells indicated that in the presence of RW, V beta 8.2 T cells stimulated IgE and IgG1 production, whereas the other T cell populations showed a different stimulation profile for Ig isotypes and IgG subclasses. The transfer of V beta 8.2 T cells from sensitized but not from nonsensitized control mice stimulated an allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 response and increased airways responsiveness in naive recipients. These data provide additional support for the pivotal role of specific V beta-expressing T cell subpopulations in the stimulation of IgE/IgG1 production and increased airways responsiveness.

  3. Drug Induced Hypersensitivity and the HLA Complex

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, Ana; Pirmohamed, Munir

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions are of major concern and present a burden for national healthcare systems due to their often severe nature, high rate of hospital admissions and high mortality. They manifest with a wide range of symptoms and signs, and can be initiated by a wide range of structurally diverse chemical compounds. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypersensitivity reactions are not well understood, but it is thought that they are immune mediated. MHC region on Chromosome 6 contains many genes with immune function. Classical MHC molecules are highly polymorphic cell surface glycoproteins whose function is to present peptide antigens to T cells. In addition to conferring protection from some diseases, HLA alleles are also associated with an increased risk of other diseases, including drug-induced hypersensitivity. Pharmacogenetic approach to predict the risk of drug-induced hypersensitivity has been established for several drugs. We will discuss the progress of hypersensitivity pharmacogenetics over the last few years and focus on current efforts of the international community to develop consortia which aim to standardize disease phenotypes and to identify affected individuals through international collaborations. In addition, we will discuss the clinical utility of HLA typing as predictive or diagnostic testing for drug-induced hypersensitivity.

  4. Use of RAST technique in wasp sting hypersensitivity. Cross-reactions between various insect antigens are specially considered.

    PubMed

    Müller, U; Roth, A; Yman, L; Patrizzi, R

    1978-08-01

    Clinical hypersensitivity to wasp stings was found to be fairly well correlated with the presence of serum IgE-antibodies against yellow jacket venom as detected by the RAST technique. Such antibodies were never found in a control group of non-allergic blood donors, but they were detected in a surprisingly large proportion of patients with bee sting allergy without known allergic reactions to wasps. Studies using RAST inhibition technique failed to prove cross-reactions between bee and wasp venoms. Considerably better results were obtained when venom antigens instead of whole body antigens were used in the RAST. RAST inhibition studies suggested that IgE-antibodies detected with RAST using whole body antigen are directed against bee venom constituents in the whole body extract.

  5. Liver dysfunction induced by systemic hypersensitivity reaction to lamotrigine: case report.

    PubMed

    Im, Sung Gyu; Yoo, Sun Hong; Park, Young Min; Lee, Sang Jin; Jang, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Dong Ok; Cho, Hyo Jin; Oh, Mi Jung

    2015-06-01

    Lamotrigine is an anticonvulsant drug used to treat partial and generalized seizure disorders. Hypersensitivity to lamotrigine usually causes mild symptoms such as fever, rash, and slight invasion of internal organs. However, a 33-year-old male patient who was admitted with Stevens-Johnson syndrome after taking lamotrigine for 15 days experienced hepatic failure and died 5 days after admission. This case demonstrates the importance of realizing that lamotrigine can lead to fatal hepatic failure, and that tests for the normal liver function should be performed when administering lamotrigine.

  6. A Review on Dapsone Hypersensitivity Syndrome Among Chinese Patients with an Emphasis on Preventing Adverse Drug Reactions with Genetic Testing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Na; Parimi, Leela; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen

    2017-05-01

    AbstractDapsone is a bactericidal and bacteriostatic against Mycobacterium leprae, a causative agent of leprosy. Dapsone is also applied in a range of medical fields because of its anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is a rare yet serious adverse drug reaction (ADR) caused by dapsone involving multiple organs. We performed a systematic review of published articles describing dapsone-induced hypersensitivity syndrome, including all Chinese articles and the latest literature available in online databases published between October 2009 and October 2015. We determined the prevalence, clinical characteristics, and mortality rate of DHS. Importantly, we also summarized the recent advances in genetic testing allowing prediction of ADRs. In an initial systematic electronic search, we retrieved 191 articles. Subsequently, these articles were further filtered and ultimately 84 articles (60 Chinese case reports, 21 non-Chinese articles, and three epidemiological studies) were selected, which included 877 patients. The prevalence of DHS among Chinese patients was 1.5% with a fatality rate of 9.6%. Early withdrawal of dapsone and appropriate treatment reduced the fatality rate. Most importantly, genetic screening for the HLA-B*13:01 allele among high-risk populations showed a significant utility as a useful genetic marker to DHS. In conclusion, this review discusses the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of DHS among Chinese patients, which may help physicians to understand this syndrome.

  7. Influenza, but not HIV-specific CTL epitopes, elicits delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Riol, Marta; Mothe, Beatriz; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Bhardwaj, Nina; Scadden, David T; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Brander, Christian

    2013-06-01

    The induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is believed to be an important defense mechanism against viral infections. The availability of simple, sensitive, specific and physiologically informative in vivo tests, applicable to humans, would greatly elucidate the nature of protective immune responses and facilitate immune monitoring in large vaccine trials. Here we studied the possibility of using defined HLA-A*02:01-restricted CTL epitopes from influenza matrix protein (GL9, GILGFVFTL) and HIV Gag p17 (SL9, SLYNTVATL) to elicit a cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction. Our results show that the GL9 but not the SL9 epitope was able to induce a DTH reaction. HIV infection status, HIV RNA level and CD4(+) T-cell counts were not predictive of the extent of DTH reactions. However, a markedly reduced expression of skin homing markers CD103 and cutaneous lymphocyte associated Ag (CLA) on epitope-specific CTL populations was associated with a lack of SL9 DTH reactivity. These data demonstrate that DTH reactions can be elicited by optimally defined CTL epitopes per se and point towards specific homing markers that are required for such reactions. These data may offer new insights into the immune pathogenesis of HIV infection and provide the basis of novel immune monitoring approaches for large-scale HIV vaccine trials.

  8. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction.

  9. Repeated PD-1/PD-L1 monoclonal antibody administration induces fatal xenogeneic hypersensitivity reactions in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Christine; Sckisel, Gail D.; Proia, David A.; Mirsoian, Annie; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Chen, Mingyi; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Kelly, Karen; Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting coinhibitory molecules such as PD-1, PD-L1 and CTLA-4 are increasingly used as targets of therapeutic intervention against cancer. While these targets have led to a critical paradigm shift in treatments for cancer, these approaches are also plagued with limitations owing to cancer immune evasion mechanisms and adverse toxicities associated with continuous treatment. It has been difficult to reproduce and develop interventions to these limitations preclinically due to poor reagent efficacy and reagent xenogenecity not seen in human trials. In this study, we investigated adverse effects of repeated administration of PD-1 and PD-L1 mAbs in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We observed rapid and fatal hypersensitivity reactions in tumor bearing mice within 30–60 min after 4–5 administrations of PD-L1 or PD-1 mAb but not CTLA-4 antibody treatment. These events occurred only in mice bearing the highly inflammatory 4T1 tumor and did not occur in mice bearing non-inflammatory tumors. We observed that mortality was associated with systemic accumulation of IgG1 antibodies, antibodies specific to the PD-1 mAb, and accumulation of Gr-1high neutrophils in lungs which have been implicated in the IgG mediated pathway of anaphylaxis. Anti-PD-1 associated toxicities were alleviated when PD-1 blockade was combined with the therapeutic HSP90 inhibitor, ganetespib, which impaired immune responses toward the xenogeneic PD-1 mAb. This study highlights a previously uncharacterized fatal hypersensitivity exacerbated by the PD-1/PD-L1 axis in the broadly used 4T1 tumor model as well as an interesting relationship between this particular class of checkpoint blockade and tumor-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:27057446

  10. Management Strategies for Clopidogrel Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Craig J; Carris, Nicolas W; Ruf, Kathryn M

    2015-06-01

    Clopidogrel is a cornerstone of dual antiplatelet therapy. Hypersensitivity reactions potentially limit the use of this treatment and present a significant clinical challenge. The authors have developed recommendations for the management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity with consideration for the etiology, pathophysiology, and critical evaluation of potential management strategies. The clopidogrel hypersensitivity reaction is complex in mechanism and presents generally around day 5 of treatment. Generalized reactions are most common, but the reaction may also be localized or systemic. Screening patients for hypersensitivity is not always possible because the type IV delayed reaction is not detected reliably by conventional skin prick, intradermal challenge, or patch testing. Proposed strategies for management of clopidogrel hypersensitivity include treatment of the reaction with corticosteroids, clopidogrel desensitization, substituting an alternative P2Y12 inhibitor, or clopidogrel avoidance. The safety, efficacy, and cost of each potential strategy must be considered when managing a patient with clopidogrel hypersensitivity.

  11. [Food and food additives hypersensitivity in adult asthmatics. III. Adverse reaction to sulfites in adult asthmatics].

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Muto, H; Sano, Y; Ito, K

    1998-11-01

    Many studies show that sulfites cause multiple atopic manifestations by oral challenge in USA and Europe, however, there are few reports of sulfites sensitivity in Japan. The aim of this study establishes the presence of sulfites hypersensitivities in asthmatic subjects in Japan. Twenty adult asthmatic patients, who were non-steroid-dependent and without a suggestive history of sulfite sensitivity, underwent challenge with oral solution of metabisulfite. Of 12 patients reacted to metabisulfite. They demonstrated airway obstruction 5 (41.7%), urticaria 4 (36.7%), skin manifestation 2 (16.7%) and nasal congestion 1 (8.3%). All patients who demonstrated airway obstruction, were sensitive to aspirin. Oral sulfite challenge should be made in patients with urticaria, that are not able to find out causative antigen, even though no suggestive history of sulfite sensitivity.

  12. Immediate-type hypersensitivity reaction to ingestion of mycoprotein (Quorn) in a patient allergic to molds caused by acidic ribosomal protein P2.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Michael; Trüeb, Ralph M; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Vieths, Stefan; Wuethrich, Brunello

    2003-05-01

    Quorn is the brand name for a line of foods made with so-called "mycoprotein," which springs from the mold Fusarium venenatum. Since the introduction on the food market, there have been complaints from consumers reporting adverse gastrointestinal reactions after ingestion of mycoprotein. To date, it is not clear whether the reported symptoms are IgE-mediated. The aim of the study was to describe for the first time a case history of an asthmatic patient with severe hypersensitivity reactions to ingested mycoprotein and to identify and characterize the potential allergen that might be responsible for this. The sensitization pattern of the asthmatic subject was characterized, and food allergy to mycoprotein was assessed by double-blinded placebo-controlled food challenge. Afterward, specific IgE antibodies of the serum of this patient were used to screen a Fusarium culmorum cDNA expression library. The coding sequence of one enriched cDNA-clone was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a recombinant protein that was further purified and immunologically characterized. The patient showed high sensitization to many known aeroallergens but apart from Quorn not to any other tested food samples. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enriched cDNA-clone (Fus c 1) showed large identity to the 60S acidic ribosomal protein P2 which is highly conserved among several species and also described as minor allergen in other mold species. The frequency of IgE reactivity of sera from F culmorum -sensitized subjects to rFus c 1 was approximately 35%. By enzyme allergosorbent test inhibition, we found 65% inhibition of mycoprotein IgE reactivity by rFus c 1. On the opposite we found reduced IgE reactivity of rFus c 1 of 68% by using mycoprotein as inhibitor. Sensitization to mold allergens by the respiratory tract and subsequent oral ingestion of cross-reactive proteins may lead to severe food-allergic reactions. Thus, the 60S acidic ribosomal protein P2 of F venenatum probably is

  13. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. The 50 distal amino acids of the 2A(HP) homing protein of Grapevine fanleaf virus elicit a hypersensitive reaction on Nicotiana occidentalis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Isabelle R; Vigne, Emmanuelle; Berthold, François; Komar, Véronique; Lemaire, Olivier; Fuchs, Marc; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne

    2017-04-07

    Avirulence factors are critical for the arm's race between a virus and its host in determining incompatible reactions. The response of plants to viruses from the genus Nepovirus in the family Secoviridae, including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), is well characterized, although the nature and characteristics of the viral avirulence factor remain elusive. By using infectious clones of GFLV strains F13 and GHu in a reverse genetics approach with wild-type, assortant and chimeric viruses, the determinant of necrotic lesions caused by GFLV-F13 on inoculated leaves of Nicotiana occidentalis was mapped to the RNA2-encoded protein 2A(HP) , particularly to its 50 C-terminal amino acids. The necrotic response showed hallmark characteristics of a genuine hypersensitive reaction, such as the accumulation of phytoalexins, reactive oxygen species, pathogenesis-related protein 1c and hypersensitivity-related (hsr) 203J transcripts. Transient expression of the GFLV-F13 protein 2A(HP) fused to an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) tag in N. occidentalis by agroinfiltration was sufficient to elicit a hypersensitive reaction. In addition, the GFLV-F13 avirulence factor, when introduced in GFLV-GHu, which causes a compatible reaction on N. occidentalis, elicited necrosis and partially restricted the virus. This is the first identification of a nepovirus avirulence factor that is responsible for a hypersensitive reaction in both the context of virus infection and transient expression. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  15. Artificial light at night alters delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in response to acute stress in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Aubrecht, Taryn G; Kaugars, Katherine E; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2013-11-01

    Several physiological and behavioral processes rely on precisely timed light information derived from the natural solar cycle. Using this information, traits have adapted to allow individuals within specific niches to optimize survival and reproduction, but urbanization by humans has significantly altered natural habitats. Nighttime light exposure alters immune function in several species, which could lead to decreased fitness or survival, particularly in the face of an environmental challenge. We exposed male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) to five lux of light at night for four weeks, and then administered six hours of acute restraint stress. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response was assessed immediately following stress. Acute restraint increased the DTH reaction in dark nights, but exposure to nighttime light prevented this response. Exposure to light at night prolonged the DTH response in non-stressed control hamsters. These results suggest that light pollution may significantly alter physiological responses in Siberian hamsters, particularly in response to a salient environmental challenge such as stress.

  16. Gac two-component system in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci is required for virulence but not for hypersensitive reaction.

    PubMed

    Marutani, Mizuri; Taguchi, Fumiko; Ogawa, Yujiro; Hossain, Md Mijan; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2008-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 causes wildfire disease on host tobacco plants. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of the expression of virulence, Gac two-component system-defective mutants, DeltagacA and DeltagacS, and a double mutant, DeltagacADeltagacS, were generated. These mutants produced smaller amounts of N-acyl homoserine lactones required for quorum sensing, had lost swarming motility, and had reduced expression of virulence-related hrp genes and the algT gene required for exopolysaccharide production. The ability of the mutants to cause disease symptoms in their host tobacco plant was remarkably reduced, while they retained the ability to induce hypersensitive reaction (HR) in the nonhost plants. These results indicated that the Gac two-component system of P. syringae pv. tabaci 6605 is indispensable for virulence on the host plant, but not for HR induction in the nonhost plants.

  17. Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms/drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: clinical features of 27 patients.

    PubMed

    Avancini, J; Maragno, L; Santi, C G; Criado, P R

    2015-12-01

    Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) [also called drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS)] includes severe reactions to drugs that need to be promptly recognized by physicians. To explore heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of DRESS/DIHS at a large academic hospital in Latin America, using the criteria defined by the European Registry of Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions (RegiSCAR) scoring system. A retrospective medical record review of 60 patients with diagnostic suspicion of DRESS/DIHS admitted to our hospital between July 2008 and April 2012 was performed, including demographic data, clinical features, laboratory findings and treatment. Of the 60 patients, 27 fulfilled the criteria for DRESS/DIHS. Maculopapular exanthema (85.1%), fever (96.2%) and hepatic involvement (85.1%) were the most common features. Anticonvulsants were the most common causal drugs (77.7%); Phenytoin was the most common individual drug (44.4%), followed by carbamazepine (29.6%). All patients were treated initially with prednisone 1 mg/kg/day. Mortality rate was 4%. The major findings of this study (to our knowledge the largest collection of data on DRESS/DIHS in Latin America) include a positive statistical association between presence of atypical lymphocytes and higher levels of alanine aminotransferase (P < 0.001) and reinforce the importance of anticonvulsants in the pathogenesis of this severe reaction. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Assessing the potential to induce respiratory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Holsapple, Michael P; Jones, David; Kawabata, Thomas T; Kimber, Ian; Sarlo, Kathy; Selgrade, MaryJane K; Shah, Jui; Woolhiser, Michael R

    2006-05-01

    Acute and repeat dose inhalation studies have been an important part of the safety assessment of drugs, chemicals, and other products throughout the world for many years. It is known that damage to the respiratory tract can be triggered either by nonspecific irritation or by specific immune-mediated pathogenesis, and it is acknowledged that traditional inhalation studies are not designed to address fully the impact of the latter. It is also recognized that different types of immune-mediated responses can be triggered by different classes of compounds and that some immune reactions in the lung are life threatening. As such, it is important to understand as fully as possible the basis for the immune-mediated damage to the lung in order to characterize adequately the risks of individual chemicals or proteins. It is against this background that a review of the methods used to assess the potential for immune-mediated respiratory hypersensitivity was conducted. The primary objectives of this review are to discuss appropriate methods for identifying and characterizing respiratory hypersensitivity hazards and risks; and to identify key data gaps and related research needs with respect to respiratory hypersensitivity testing. The following working definition of respiratory hypersensitivity was formulated: a hypersensitivity response in the respiratory tract precipitated by a specific immune response, mediated by multiple mechanisms, including IgE antibody. Because of the importance played by various classes of compounds, the subsequent sections of this review will consider protein-specific, chemical-specific, and drug-specific aspects of respiratory hypersensitivity.

  19. CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G+CD11b+ neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β+ T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2+Ly6Chi) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  20. [Evaluation of short-time premedication with d-chlorpheniramine maleate injection for paclitaxel-induced hypersensitivity reaction].

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomohiko; Doi, Masakazu; Yamada, Yasuhiko; Akase, Tomohide

    2008-08-01

    Paclitaxel(referred to hereinafter as PTX )is used in ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, breast cancer, gastric cancer, and endometrial cancer with positive treatment result reports. However, severe allergic reactions such as decreases in blood pressure and impaired breathing occur with relatively high frequency. For the prevention of such allergic reactions, administration of a premedication composed of the three components, dexamethasone sodium phosphate injection, diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablet, and ranitidine hydrochloride injection solution(or injectable famodine), is advised in the appended documentation. Administration is difficult because, among these three components, only diphenhydramine hydrochloride is administered orally and thus must be provided through the internal medicine department. Particularly when this combined dosage is administered as outpatient chemotherapy, the doctor must prescribe diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the patient must not forget to bring them on the day in which chemotherapy is administered. Also, checks by the medical staff such as pharmacists and nurses are required, complicating the administration of this therapy further. Taking this situation into consideration, our hospital uses a short-time premedication method wherein d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate injections are substituted for diphenhydramine hydrochloride tablets, and the time required for premedication is reduced to 15 minutes. This study investigated the allergic reaction ratio to consider the safety and usefulness of the short-time premedication method used at our hospital. The chemotherapy regimens conducted for the subject patients were 9 cases of PTX+CBDCA, 6 cases of biweekly- PTX, and 5 cases of weekly-PTX. A total of 67 PTX injections were given, 15 of them being first-time administrations. The ratio of allergic/hypersensitivity reactions was 10.0%(2 cases in 20). The short-time premedication method using d-Chlorpheniramine Maleate

  1. Spinal toll-like receptor 4-mediated signalling pathway contributes to visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colonic irritation in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z-Y; Zhang, X-W; Yu, L; Hua, R; Zhao, X-P; Qin, X; Zhang, Y-M

    2015-02-01

    Although visceral hypersensitivity is a major pathophysiological feature of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), its underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is a critical pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system. In this study, we investigated whether the TLR4/myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88)/nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway in the spinal cord contributed to the visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colonic irritation (CI) in rats. The Sprague-Dawley rat model of IBS was induced by colon irritation on post-natal day (PND) 8, PND10 and PND12. Experiments were conducted in adult rats. TLR4 mRNA and protein, and its downstream signalling molecules, MyD88, inhibitory nuclear factor-kappa B (IκB) and NF-κB protein expressions in L2-S4 spinal segments were detected by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction as well as Western blotting. TLR4 co-localization was determined by immunohistochemistry. Levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We found that neonatal CI treatment induced long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity without identifiable structural abnormalities in descending colons of adult rats. Neonatal CI treatment evoked a significant up-regulation of the expressions of TLR4 in glia, MyD88, p-IκB-α and NF-κB in adult rats. Neonatal CI treatment also increased the levels of its downstream inflammatory agents TNF-α and IL-1β in the L2-S4 regions of the spinal cord of adult rats. These results suggest that neonatal CI stimulates the production of IL-1β and TNF-α through the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signalling pathway in the spinal cord, which contributed to visceral hypersensitivity induced by neonatal CI in rats. © 2014 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  2. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and humidifier lung. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis is a rare immune system disorder that affects the lungs. It occurs in ...

  3. Suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions and lymphokine production by cyclosporin A in the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, A W; Moon, D K; Nelson, D S

    1983-01-01

    Two consecutive daily i.m. injections of cyclosporin A (Cs A) (greater than 50 mg/kg) inhibited delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in mice immunized with SRBC. Maximal suppression was observed when Cs A was administered 24 and 48 h after sensitization. Culture of spleen cells from these animals with antigen, insoluble concanavalin A (iCon A) or PHA revealed inhibition of the production of two lymphokines: that inducing macrophage procoagulant activity (MPCA) and macrophage chemotactic factor (LDCF). The inhibitory effect on lymphokine production was not due to depletion of T cells. In vitro, 25 ng/ml Cs A suppressed T cell proliferative responses to antigen and mitogen but much higher doses were required to impair the response to LPS. Similar doses of Cs A also suppressed lymphokine production, but the responses of macrophages to these lymphokines was unaffected, even at doses which totally inhibited lymphokine production. Production of interleukin 1 by LPS stimulated macrophages was inhibited by Cs A only at concentrations much greater than those required to suppress lymphokine production. PMID:6872317

  4. Molecular mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated delayed hypersensitivity: implications for allergies, asthma, and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kalish, R S; Askenase, P W

    1999-02-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is defined as the recruitment of T cells into tissues to be activated by antigen-presenting cells to produce cytokines that mediate local inflammation. CD8+ T cells are now known to mediate DTH responses in allergic contact dermatitis, drug eruptions, asthma, and autoimmune diseases. This inflammatory effector capability of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells was previously poorly recognized, but there is now considerable evidence that these diseases may be mediated by CD8+ DTH. The difference between CD8+ T cells and CD4+ T cells mediating DTH relates to the molecular mechanisms by which antigens are processed and presented to the T cells. Antigens external to the cell are phagocytosed and processed for presentation on MHC class II molecules (eg, HLA-DR) to CD4+ T cells. In contrast, internal cytoplasmic antigens are processed by the endogenous pathway for presentation on MHC class I molecules (eg, HLA-A, -B, and -C) to CD8+ T cells. External allergens can also enter the endogenous pathway to be presented to CD8+ T cells. These include many contact sensitizers, chemical and protein respiratory allergens, viral antigens, metabolic products of drugs, and autoantigens. The resulting CD8+ T-cell response explains the role of CD8+ T-cell DTH mechanisms in allergic contact dermatitis, asthma, drug eruptions, and autoimmune diseases.

  5. Immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions to proton pump inhibitors: usefulness of skin tests in the diagnosis and assessment of cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kepil Özdemir, S; Yılmaz, I; Aydin, Ö; Büyüköztürk, S; Gelincik, A; Demirtürk, M; Erdoğdu, D; Cömert, S; Erdoğan, T; Karakaya, G; Kalyoncu, A F; Oner Erkekol, F; Dursun, A B; Misirligil, Z; Bavbek, S

    2013-08-01

    Data are limited about the value of skin tests in the diagnosis of proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypersensitivity reactions and the cross-reactivity between PPIs. We aimed to assess the role of skin testing in the diagnosis of PPI-related immediate hypersensitivity reactions and the cross-reactivity patterns among PPIs. The study was designed in a prospective, national, multicentre nature. Sixty-five patients with a suggestive history of a PPI-induced immediate hypersensitivity reaction and 30 control subjects were included. Standardized skin prick and intradermal tests were carried out with a panel of PPIs. Single-blind, placebo-controlled oral provocation tests (OPTs) with the PPIs other than the culprit PPI that displayed negative results in skin tests (n = 61) and diagnostic OPTs with the suspected PPI (n = 12) were performed. The suspected PPIs were lansoprazole (n = 52), esomeprazole (n = 11), pantoprazole (n = 9), rabeprazole (n = 2), and omeprazole (n = 1). The sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of the skin tests with PPIs were 58.8%, 100%, 70.8%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen of the 31 patients with a hypersensitivity reaction to lansoprazole had a positive OPT or skin test result with at least one of the alternative PPIs (8/52 pantoprazole, 6/52 omeprazole, 5/52 esomeprazole, 3/52 rabeprazole). Considering the high specificity, skin testing seems to be a useful method for the diagnosis of immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs and for the evaluation of cross-reactivity among PPIs. However, OPT should be performed in case of negativity on skin tests. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Topical azithromycin and clarithromycin inhibit acute and chronic skin inflammation in sensitized mice, with apparent selectivity for Th2-mediated processes in delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ivetić Tkalčević, Vanesa; Cužić, Snježana; Kramarić, Miroslava Dominis; Parnham, Michael J; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2012-02-01

    Macrolide antibiotics inhibit the secretion of Th1 cytokines while their effects on the release of Th2 cytokines are variable. We investigated molecular and cellular markers of Th1- and Th2-mediated inflammatory mechanisms and the anti-inflammatory activity of azithromycin and clarithromycin in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and oxazolone (OXA)-induced skin inflammation. Dexamethasone (50 μg/ear), azithromycin, and clarithromycin (500 μg/ear) reduced TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-1β concentration in ear tissue by inhibiting inflammatory cell accumulation in PMA-induced inflammation. In OXA-induced early delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), the macrolides (2 mg/ear) and dexamethasone (25 μg/ear) reduced ear tissue inflammatory cell infiltration and secretion of IL-4 while clarithromycin also decreased IFN-γ concentration. Macrolides showed better activity when administered after the challenge. In OXA-induced chronic DTH, azithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced the number of ear tissue mast cells and decreased the concentration of IL-4 in ear tissue and of immunoglobulin (Ig)E in serum. Clarithromycin (1 mg/ear) reduced serum IgE concentration, possibly by a mechanism independent of IL-4, while both macrolides attenuated mast cell degranulation. In conclusion, azithromycin and clarithromycin attenuate pro-inflammatory cytokine production and leukocyte infiltration during innate immune reactions, while selectively affecting Th2 rather than Th1 immunity in DTH reactions.

  7. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  8. Hypersensitive reactions to local dental anesthetics and patient information: critical review of a drug leaflet

    PubMed Central

    Simonet, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the case of a patient who experienced adverse reactions to a local anesthetic. It reviews symptoms of adverse reactions, possible causes, patient management, and alternative anesthesia modes. The second part of the paper discusses the product leaflet information and the associated legal issues. PMID:22915891

  9. Drug reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) / Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS): a review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Criado, Roberta Fachini Jardim; Avancini, João de Magalhães; Santi, Claudia Giuli

    2012-01-01

    The Drug Reaction with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms syndrome, also known as Drug Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome presents clinically as an extensive mucocutaneous rash, accompanied by fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis, hematologic abnormalities with eosinophilia and atypical lymphocytes, and may involve other organs with eosinophilic infiltration, causing damage to several systems, especially to the kidneys, heart, lungs, and pancreas. Recognition of this syndrome is of paramount importance, since the mortality rate is about 10% to 20%, and a specific therapy may be necessary. The pathogenesis is related to specific drugs, especially the aromatic anticonvulsants, altered immune response, sequential reactivation of herpes virus and association with HLA alleles. Early recognition of the syndrome and withdrawal of the offending drug are the most important and essential steps in the treatment of affected patients. Corticosteroids are the basis of the treatment of the syndrome, which may be associated with intravenous immunoglobulin and, in selected cases, Ganciclovir. The article reviews the current concepts involving this important manifestation of adverse drug reaction.

  10. Skin test-positive immediate hypersensitivity reaction to iodinated contrast media: the role of controlled challenge testing.

    PubMed

    Prieto-García, A; Tomás, M; Pineda, R; Tornero, P; Herrero, T; Fuentes, V; Zapatero, L; de Barrio, M

    2013-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions (IHR) to iodinated contrast media (ICM) have traditionally been considered nonallergic; however, the increasingly frequent reporting of positive skin test and basophil activation test results suggests a specific allergic mechanism in some patients. Skin tests have been proposed as a useful tool for diagnosis, although their sensitivity and predictive values remain to be determined. The role of controlled challenge testing has not been assessed. We aimed to evaluate the role of controlled challenge testing in skin test-positive IHR to ICM. We evaluated 106 patients with IHR to ICM by performing skin tests with the agent that caused the reaction. Patients with a positive result were selected. Skin tests were extended to a series of 8 ICMs; 5 patients underwent controlled challenge test with an alternative skin test-negative ICM; a further 2 patients underwent computed tomography with an alternative skin test-negative ICM. No premedication was administered. Intradermal test results were positive to the ICM that caused the reaction in 11 out of 106 patients (10.4%). Five of the 11 patients tolerated a controlled challenge test with an alternative skin test-negative ICM. The 2 patients who underwent computed tomography with an alternative skin test-negative ICM tolerated the medium. Skin tests are useful for the diagnostic workup in patients with an allergic IHR to ICM. Since ICM cannot be avoided in many patients because they are irreplaceable in some diagnostic or therapeutic techniques, an alternative safe ICM should be investigated for future procedures. We propose the use of controlled challenge tests based on skin test results to address this need in skin test-positive reactions in order to identify an alternative non-cross-reactive ICM.

  11. Reactions of Buckwheat-Hypersensitive Patients during Oral Food Challenge Are Rare, but Often Anaphylactic.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Noriyuki; Sato, Sakura; Takahashi, Kyohei; Nagakura, Ken-Ichi; Ogura, Kiyotake; Asaumi, Tomoyuki; Ebisawa, Motohiro

    2017-01-01

    Buckwheat (BW) is a common cause of life-threatening allergy in Asia. Few have examined oral food challenges (OFCs) using BW. We here describe the OFC outcomes for the diagnosis or confirmation of tolerance acquisition and clarify risk factors for positive OFCs. Between July 2005 and March 2014, we retrospectively reviewed data from children who underwent OFCs using 3,072 mg of BW protein at Sagamihara National Hospital. Children were suspected of having BW allergy because of positive results for BW-specific IgE or because they had been previously diagnosed with BW allergy owing to immediate reactions to BW. Of 476 such patients, we analyzed 419 aged 1-17 years (median age 6.7 years). Forty-four (10.5%) reacted to the BW OFC and 24 (54.5%) experienced anaphylaxis. Among patients with suspected BW allergies (n = 369), 30 (8.1%) reacted to OFC. However, among patients with definitive BW allergies (n = 50) who underwent OFCs a median of 7.0 years after their last immediate reaction, 14 (28.0%) reacted to OFC. Among 12 patients with past anaphylactic reactions to BW, 8 exhibited tolerance to BW. A history of immediate reaction to BW and high BW-specific IgE levels were significant risk factors for a positive OFC. BW allergies are rare among children suspected of having BW allergies due to positivity for BW-specific IgE. Most children with definitive BW allergies can tolerate BW, even after anaphylactic reactions. Nevertheless, careful observation is needed when performing BW OFCs, considering the high incidence of anaphylactic reactions. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bonnetblanc, J M

    1993-01-01

    Some types of hypersensitivity to drugs are defined either by the generic name of the drug or descriptive terms. They are sometimes assimilated to pseudolymphoma because the causative drugs are often the same, although the eruption lacks clinical and histopathological criteria of pseudolymphoma. It is then suggested to use 'idiosyncratic drug hypersensitivity syndrome' to define this type of drug reaction. As the skin and other organs may be involved, a generic name would help to determine a better definition and a surveillance program.

  13. Visible Light Mediated Photoredox Catalytic Arylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Indrajit; Marzo, Leyre; Das, Amrita; Shaikh, Rizwan; König, Burkhard

    2016-08-16

    Introducing aryl- and heteroaryl moieties into molecular scaffolds are often key steps in the syntheses of natural products, drugs, or functional materials. A variety of cross-coupling methods have been well established, mainly using transition metal mediated reactions between prefunctionalized substrates and arenes or C-H arylations with functionalization in only one coupling partner. Although highly developed, one drawback of the established sp2-sp2 arylations is the required transition metal catalyst, often in combination with specific ligands and additives. Therefore, photoredox mediated arylation methods have been developed as alternative over the past decade. We begin our survey with visible light photo-Meerwein arylation reactions, which allow C-H arylation of heteroarenes, enones, alkenes, and alkynes with organic dyes, such as eosin Y, as the photocatalyst. A good number of examples from different groups illustrate the broad application of the reaction in synthetic transformations. While initially only photo-Meerwein arylation-elimination processes were reported, the reaction was later extended to photo-Meerwein arylation-addition reactions giving access to the photoinduced three component synthesis of amides and esters from alkenes, aryl diazonium salts, nitriles or formamides, respectively. Other substrates with redox-active leaving groups have been explored in photocatalyzed arylation reactions, such as diaryliodonium and triarylsulfonium salts, and arylsulfonyl chlorides. We discus some examples with their scope and limitations. The scope of arylation reagents for photoredox reactions was extended to aryl halides. The challenge here is the extremely negative reduction potential of aryl halides in the initial electron transfer step compared to, e.g., aryl diazonium or diaryliodonium salts. In order to reach reduction potentials over -2.0 V vs SCE two consecutive photoinduced electron transfer steps were used. The intermediary formed colored radical

  14. Type I allergic hypersensitivity reactions due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters in patients with thalassaemia: report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Belen, Burcu; Polat, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a highly reactive gas used in sterilisation of heat sensitive medical devices, such as infusion sets, cannulae, intubation materials, ventriculoperitoneal shunts, dialysis catheters and stents. Allergic reactions due to EO have been reported in haemodialysis patients, patients undergoing extracorporeal photopheresis and donors of plasmapheresis. Clinical manifestations vary considerably and generally do not allow differentiation between IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. We report four patients with thalassaemia who experienced anaphylaxis during transfusion due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that frequently transfused patients can have allergic reactions due to EO particles left in leucocyte filters. PMID:25725028

  15. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47phox subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  16. Early skin testing is effective for diagnosis of hypersensitivity reactions occurring during anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Javaloyes, G; Berroa, F; Goikoetxea, M J; Moncada, R; Núñez-Córdoba, J M; Cabrera-Freitag, P; D'Amelio, C; Sanz, M L; Gastaminza, G

    2013-06-01

    Allergic skin tests have to be performed 4-6 weeks after an allergic anesthetic reaction. Patients with allergic reactions during anesthesia were prospectively included (n = 44). Skin tests were performed in two stages: (i) Stage 1 (S1), 0-4 days after the reaction; and (ii) Stage 2 (S2), 4-8 weeks after. Five (11.5%) surgical procedures were suspended due to the reaction. Positive skin tests were obtained in 25/44 patients (57%). Allergic diagnosis was carried out at S1 in 15/25 (60%) and at S2 in 10/25 (40%). Three patients resulted positive only in S1. Overall agreement among S1 and S2 skin tests was 70.45%. The kappa statistic was 0.41 (P-value = 0.002). Odds ratio of obtaining a false negative in S1 (compared with S2) was 3.33. Early allergological study is useful, could minimize false negatives, but should be considered as a complement to late skin tests. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-02-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment.

  18. Long-term follow-up of re-sting reactions in children with moderate to severe venom hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ertoy Karagol, Hacer Ilbilge; Bakirtas, Arzu; Yilmaz, Ozlem; Topal, Erdem; Arga, Mustafa; Demirsoy, Mehmet Sadik; Turktas, Ipek

    2015-07-01

    Few data exists about re-sting reactions and their prognosis in children with moderate to severe venom hypersensitivity. The reasons behind not consenting to or prematurely ending venom immunotherapy (VIT) and the preparedness of children who refused or quit VIT for future moderate-severe systemic reaction (SR) to re-stings have not been studied. Data on children with moderate to severe SR after Hymenoptera stings was collected for a 17-year period using our database. A standardized questionnaire was administered to patients who accepted to be interviewed at the clinic. These patients were evaluated in terms of their preparedness for future moderate-severe SR to re-stings. A total of 55 children, 75 % of whom commenced on VIT, were included in the analysis. Different reasons exist for not consenting to VIT; the most common of which is living at a distance from the allergy center. There were no differences in terms of the number of re-stung patients (27.7 and 27.2 %, respectively) and moderate-severe SR (60 and 16.6 %, respectively) between children who prematurely ended or who did not consent to VIT and children who completed VIT. Sixty-four percent of the children who refused or discontinued VIT were not prepared for future moderate-severe SR to re-stings. Long-term prognosis for re-sting reactions is good in children with moderate to severe SR to venoms. Some of the reasons behind refusing or discontinuing VIT may be related to quality of life issues. Preparedness of children who refused or discontinue VIT in emergencies is very low.

  19. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  20. IgE antibodies and skin tests in immediate hypersensitivity reactions to infliximab in inflammatory bowel disease: impact on infliximab retreatment.

    PubMed

    Fréling, Estelle; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent; Poreaux, Claire; Morali, Alain; Waton, Julie; Schmutz, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Barbaud, Annick

    2015-10-01

    Infliximab (IFX) is used for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions (HR) to IFX are frequently reported. We investigated immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated mechanisms underlying immediate HR to IFX. We also evaluated the clinical utility of allergological tests as well as the tolerability of IFX retreatment in these patients. This was a prospective single-center study including IBD patients with previous immediate HR to IFX. Skin tests to IFX, including prick tests and intradermal tests, and measurement of anti-IFX IgE antibodies were performed at least 4 weeks after HR. In case of negative skin tests and absence of IgE antibodies, readministration of IFX was performed with a twice-reduced infusion rate. In case of positive tests or recurrence of HR during readministration of IFX, a 12-step desensitization or induction of tolerance protocol was proposed. A total of 24 IBD patients were included (Crohn's disease: n=20). Prick tests to IFX were all negative. Intradermal test was positive in one patient. Anti-IFX IgE antibodies were not detected in 21 patients and were detected in three patients (significant level in one patient and intermediate level in two patients). No relationship was observed between positive skin tests and the presence of anti-IFX IgE antibodies. Switch to adalimumab was well tolerated in 10/11 patients. The readministration of IFX was well tolerated in 4/11 patients. Desensitization to IFX was successful in three out of four patients. The vast majority of immediate HR to IFX is not IgE-mediated. Allergological tests are of poor clinical utility. Desensitization or induction of tolerance protocol may allow continuation of IFX therapy in IBD patients with a history of immediate HR.

  1. Single-tree nut immunotherapy attenuates allergic reactions in mice with hypersensitivity to multiple tree nuts.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Mike; Li, Yifan; Lane, Hannah; Pons, Laurent; Burks, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Allergic reactions to tree nuts are often severe and are outgrown in less than 10% of diagnosed patients. To determine whether treatment of underlying tree nut sensitization will prevent allergic reactions to cross-reacting tree nuts and to determine the effects of single-tree nut immunotherapy on true multi-tree nut sensitization. Cross-reactivity model: Cashew-sensitized mice underwent immunotherapy with cashew and were subsequently challenged with cashew and pistachio. Multisensitization model: Cashew plus walnut-sensitized mice were treated with cashew alone, walnut alone, or both cashew and walnut and then underwent challenges to cashew and walnut. Challenges were assessed on the basis of symptoms, changes in body temperature, and mouse mast cell protease-1 release. In the cross-reactivity model, cashew immunotherapy completely prevented allergic reactions on challenges with cashew or the cross-reactive pistachio. In the multisensitization model, mice with cashew plus walnut allergy were significantly protected from anaphylactic reactions on cashew challenge in both the cashew-alone and walnut-alone immunotherapy groups. Results from the walnut challenge demonstrated significantly decreased allergic responses in the walnut immunotherapy group, whereas mice in the cashew immunotherapy group experienced significantly lower symptoms. In the cross-reactivity model, immunotherapy effectively decreased IL-4 and IL-5 production and increased IL-12 relative to placebo while also inducing a 5-fold increase in specific IgG(1). Single-tree nut immunotherapy can effectively decrease allergic responses in both the cross-reactivity and multisensitization mouse models. Further studies are needed to determine which single-tree nut immunotherapies will be most effective for specific multi-tree nut allergy profiles. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The N-terminal fragment of the tomato torrado virus RNA1-encoded polyprotein induces a hypersensitive response (HR)-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2016-07-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) is a defence reaction observed during incompatible plant-pathogen interactions in plants infected with a wide range of fungi, bacteria and viruses. Here, we show that an N-terminal polyprotein fragment encoded by tomato torrado virus RNA1, located between the first ATG codon and the protease cofactor (ProCo) motif, induces an HR-like reaction in Nicotiana benthamiana. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of the first 105 amino acids (the calculated molecular weight of the fragment was ca. 11.33 kDa, hereafter refered to as the 11K domain) from ToTV RNA1 induced an HR-like phenotype in infiltrated leaves. To investigate whether the 11K domain could influence the virulence and pathogenicity of a recombinant virus, we created a potato virus X (PVX) with the 11K coding sequence inserted under a duplicated coat protein promoter. We found that 11K substantially increased the virulence of the recombinant virus. Disease phenotype induced in N. benthamiana by PVX-11K was characterized by strong local and systemic necrosis. This was not observed when the 11K domain was expressed from PVX in an antisense orientation. Further analyses revealed that the 11K domain could not suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the N. benthamiana 16c line. In silico analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 11K domain indicated the presence of two putative helices that are highly conserved in tomato-infecting representatives of the genus Torradovirus.

  3. Hypersensitivity reactions due to black henna tattoos and their components: are the clinical pictures related to the immune pathomechanism?

    PubMed

    Calogiuri, Gianfranco; Di Leo, Elisabetta; Butani, Lavjay; Pizzimenti, Stefano; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Macchia, Luigi; Nettis, Eustachio

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to para-phenylenediamine (PPD) and related compounds induced by temporary black henna tattoos has become a serious health problem worldwide. Different patterns of sensitization with various clinical aspects are described in literature due to PPD associated to henna tattoo and these manifestations are likely correlated with the immunological and dermatological pathomechanisms involved. Henna is the Persian name of the plant Lawsonia inermis, Fam. Lythraceae. It is a woody shrub that grow in regions of North Africa, South Asia, India and Sri Lanka. Nowadays it is rather frequent to see temporary "tattoos" performed with henna. To make tattoos darker and long-lasting PPD has been associated to henna in tattoo drawings mixtures, so obtaining "black henna". In these years there has been a rise of contact sensitization to PPD and in medical literature an increased number of cases have been reported on temporary henna tattoo application. Here we review the various clinical patterns related to PPD and henna tattoo, to investigate the possible link between clinic-morphological pictures and the immunological response to PPD and henna. The literature underlines that different clinical manifestations are related to black henna containing PPD, and its derivative products may cause delayed-type as well as immediate-type reactions. Further studies are needed to investigate the relationship between clinical and morphological aspects of PPD contact dermatitis and the T cell subsets predominance.

  4. Circulating T cells to infliximab are detectable mainly in treated patients developing anti‐drug antibodies and hypersensitivity reactions

    PubMed Central

    Vultaggio, A.; Petroni, G.; Pratesi, S.; Nencini, F.; Cammelli, D.; Milla, M.; Prignano, F.; Annese, V.; Romagnani, S.; Matucci, A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antibodies recognizing infliximab (IFX) may develop in a proportion of treated patients, leading to loss of response or hypersensitivity reactions (HRs). T cell response to IFX has been poorly investigated. This paper was addressed to detect IFX‐specific T cells in treated patients with inflammatory diseases developing, or not, anti‐drug antibodies (ADA) and to correlate the presence of specific T cells with the clinical outcomes of the treatment. A co‐culture system of IFX‐loaded dendritic cells and purified autologous CD4+ T cells was used to detect memory T cells in 32 ADA+ and 39 ADA– IFX‐treated patients and control groups. The cytokine profile of IFX‐specific T cells was also studied in culture supernatants. IFX‐specific cell proliferation was detected mainly in cells from ADA+ patients, irrespective of their different diseases. HR patients displayed higher T cell proliferation than non‐responder and tolerant patients. A mixed [interferon (IFN)‐γ, interleukin (IL)‐13, IL‐10] cytokine profile was shown in cells from ADA+ patients, while IL‐10 was the most frequently detected cytokine in the supernatants of cultures from ADA‐ patients. Immunoglobulin (Ig)E+ADA+ patients with previous HRs exhibited a more pronounced type 2 profile than IgE–ADA+ patients. This work provides evidence that IFX‐specific circulating T cells are detectable mainly in ADA+ patients with HRs, regardless of their disease. The IFX‐induced cytokine pattern partially correlates with the ADA isotype. PMID:27569750

  5. Is there any predictor for hypersensitivity reactions in gynecologic cancer patients treated with paclitaxel-based therapy?

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Tadashi; Takano, Masashi; Miyamoto, Morikazu; Yoshikawa, Tomoyuki; Soyama, Hiroaki; Kato, Kento; Ishibashi, Hiroki; Iwahashi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Masaya; Yajima, Isao; Shimizu, Yukihiro; Aizawa, Yusuke; Suguchi, Yuki; Moriiwa, Miki; Goto, Tomoko; Sasa, Hidenori; Nagaoka, Isao; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Furuya, Kenichi

    2017-07-01

    Recently, generic drugs of paclitaxel have been commonly used mainly by economic reasons; however, predictive factors for toxicities are not fully determined. Hypersensitivity reaction (HSR) is one of the most important adverse events in the paclitaxel-based therapy, and sometimes leads to lethal condition. The aim of the study was to identify predictors for HSR in patients treated with paclitaxel-based regimens. All the patients treated with chemotherapy including paclitaxel at our hospital between 1998 and 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. Clinicopathological factors of the patients that developed HSR and those without HSR were compared, and predictive factors for HSR were identified. Among 414 patients enrolled in the study, 26 patients (6.3%) developed HSR. Multivariate analyses showed that younger age (odds ratio 6.31), a history of allergy (odds ratio 3.79), and short-course premedication (odds ratio 14.1) were identified as predictive factors for HSR. There was no significant difference in the incidence of HSR between original paclitaxel and generic drug. The incidence of HSR was higher as the number of these predictors was accumulated. Three factors were identified as predictive factors for HSR: younger age, a history of allergy, and short-course premedication. Accumulation of these factors increased the incidence of HSR; however, the use of generic drug was not associated HSR in gynecologic cancer patients.

  6. Hypersensitivity reactions to β-lactams: relevance of hapten-protein conjugates.

    PubMed

    Ariza, A; Mayorga, C; Fernandez, T D; Barbero, N; Martín-Serrano, A; Pérez-Sala, D; Sánchez-Gómez, F J; Blanca, M; Torres, M J; Montanez, M I

    2015-01-01

    β-Lactams (BL) are the drugs most frequently involved in allergic reactions. They are classified according to their chemical structure as penicillins, cephalosporins, monobactams, carbapenems, and clavams. All BL antibiotics have a BL ring that is fused to a 5-member or 6-member ring (except in monobactams) and has 1, 2 or 3 side chains (except in clavams). Differences in chemical structure mean that a wide range of BLs are recognized by the immune system, and patients may experience clinical reactions to one BL while tolerating others. Diagnosis is based on skin and in vitro testing, although both display low sensitivity, possibly because they are based on drugs or drug conjugates that are not optimally recognized by the immune system. BLs are haptens that need to bind to proteins covalently to elicit an immune response. These drugs have a high capacity to form covalent adducts with proteins through nucleophilic attack of amino groups in proteins on the BL ring. Allergenic determinants have been described for all BLs, although benzylpenicillin is the most widely studied. Moreover, formation of BL-protein adducts is selective, as we recently demonstrated for amoxicillin, which mainly modifies albumin, transferrin, and immunoglobulin heavy and light chains in human serum. Given the complexity of BL allergy, understanding the immunological mechanisms involved and optimization of diagnostic methods require multidisciplinary approaches that take into account the chemical structures of the drugs and the carrier molecules, as well as the patient immune response.

  7. Current advances in ant venom proteins causing hypersensitivity reactions in the Asia-Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Srisong, Hathairat; Daduang, Sakda; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-01-01

    The main insects causing allergy reactions to stinging insect in humans are Apidae (bees), Vespidae (wasps, yellow jackets and hornets) and Formicidae (ants). Their venom stings are composed of various biologically active peptides and protein components, some of which can cause toxicity or anaphylaxis in humans. The protein venom demonstrate some common allergenic activity such as for fire ants and vespids, which have two common allergens that are phospholipase A1 (enzymatic activity) and antigen 5 with unknown biological activity. The common allergens seem to share some degree of immunological cross-reactivity, particularly when the sequence homology is above 70%. Therefore immunotherapeutic approaches targeting more than one specific species are of interest. Recent widespread increases of various ant species in many countries have resulted in higher number of reported about serious allergic reactions to stings. Most insect-allergy related cases have been reported for species from Solenopsis, Myrmecia and Pachycondyla genera, and their stings can often result in human fatalities. In addition, stinging ants can have serious health effects on livestock, agricultural damage adversely affecting the biodiversity of the region. This review discusses the impact of important ant species on human health in the Asia-Pacific region along with the molecular immunological aspects of the identified venoms and current status of diagnostics and therapeutics. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Localized Changes in Peroxidase Activity Accompany Hydrogen Peroxide Generation during the Development of a Nonhost Hypersensitive Reaction in Lettuce1

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, Charles S.; Brown, Ian R.; Mansfield, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Peroxidase activity was characterized in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) leaf tissue. Changes in the activity and distribution of the enzyme were examined during the development of a nonhost hypersensitive reaction (HR) induced by Pseudomonas syringae (P. s.) pv phaseolicola and in response to an hrp mutant of the bacterium. Assays of activity in tissue extracts revealed pH optima of 4.5, 6.0, 5.5 to 6.0, and 6.0 to 6.5 for the substrates tetramethylbenzidine, guaiacol, caffeic acid, and chlorogenic acid, respectively. Inoculation with water or with wild-type or hrp mutant strains of P. s. pv phaseolicola caused an initial decline in total peroxidase activity; subsequent increases depended on the hydrogen donor used in the assay. Guaiacol peroxidase recovered more rapidly in tissues undergoing the HR, whereas changes in tetramethylbenzidine peroxidase were generally similar in the two interactions. In contrast, increases in chlorogenic acid peroxidase were significantly higher in tissues inoculated with the hrp mutant. During the HR, increased levels of Mn2+/2,4-dichlorophenol-stimulated NADH and NADPH oxidase activities, characteristic of certain peroxidases, were found in intercellular fluids and closely matched the accumulation of H2O2 in the apoplast. Histochemical analysis of peroxidase distribution by electron microscopy revealed a striking, highly localized increase in activity within the endomembrane system and cell wall at the sites of bacterial attachment. However, no clear differences in peroxidase location were observed in tissue challenged by the wild-type strain or the hrp mutant. Our results highlight the significance of the subcellular control of oxidative reactions leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species, cell wall alterations, and the HR. PMID:9808752

  9. In vitro tests for drug hypersensitivity reactions: an ENDA/EAACI Drug Allergy Interest Group position paper.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Celik, G; Rouzaire, P; Whitaker, P; Bonadonna, P; Rodrigues-Cernadas, J; Vultaggio, A; Brockow, K; Caubet, J C; Makowska, J; Nakonechna, A; Romano, A; Montañez, M I; Laguna, J J; Zanoni, G; Gueant, J L; Oude Elberink, H; Fernandez, J; Viel, S; Demoly, P; Torres, M J

    2016-08-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) are a matter of great concern, both for outpatient and in hospital care. The evaluation of these patients is complex, because in vivo tests have a suboptimal sensitivity and can be time-consuming, expensive and potentially risky, especially drug provocation tests. There are several currently available in vitro methods that can be classified into two main groups: those that help to characterize the active phase of the reaction and those that help to identify the culprit drug. The utility of these in vitro methods depends on the mechanisms involved, meaning that they cannot be used for the evaluation of all types of DHRs. Moreover, their effectiveness has not been defined by a consensus agreement between experts in the field. Thus, the European Network on Drug Allergy and Drug Allergy Interest Group of the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has organized a task force to provide data and recommendations regarding the available in vitro methods for DHR diagnosis. We have found that although there are many in vitro tests, few of them can be given a recommendation of grade B or above mainly because there is a lack of well-controlled studies, most information comes from small studies with few subjects and results are not always confirmed in later studies. Therefore, it is necessary to validate the currently available in vitro tests in a large series of well-characterized patients with DHR and to develop new tests for diagnosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Flavohaemoglobin HmpX from Erwinia chrysanthemi confers nitrosative stress tolerance and affects the plant hypersensitive reaction by intercepting nitric oxide produced by the host.

    PubMed

    Boccara, Martine; Mills, Catherine E; Zeier, Jürgen; Anzi, Chiara; Lamb, Chris; Poole, Robert K; Delledonne, Massimo

    2005-07-01

    Host cells respond to infection by generating nitric oxide (NO) as a cytotoxic weapon to facilitate killing of invading microbes. Bacterial flavohaemoglobins are well-known scavengers of NO and play a crucial role in protecting animal pathogens from nitrosative stress during infection. Erwinia chrysanthemi, which causes macerating diseases in a wide variety of plants, possesses a flavohaemoglobin (HmpX) whose function in plant pathogens has remained unclear. Here we show that HmpX consumes NO and prevents inhibition by NO of cell respiration, indicating a role in protection from nitrosative stress. Furthermore, infection of Saintpaulia ionantha plants with an HmpX-deficient mutant of E. chrysanthemi revealed that the lack of NO scavenging activity causes the accumulation of unusually high levels of NO in host tissue and triggers hypersensitive cell death. Introduction of the wild-type hmpX gene in an incompatible strain of Pseudomonas syringae had a dramatic effect on the hypersensitive cell death in soya bean cell suspensions, and markedly reduced the development of macroscopic symptoms in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. These observations indicate that HmpX not only protects against nitrosative stress but also attenuates host hypersensitive reaction during infection by intercepting NO produced by the plant for the execution of the hypersensitive cell death programme.

  11. Lymphoid tissue phospholipase A2 group IID resolves contact hypersensitivity by driving antiinflammatory lipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yoshimi; Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Hiroyasu; Shimo, Kanako; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Kabashima, Kenji; Arita, Makoto; Arai, Hiroyuki; Lambeau, Gérard; Bollinger, James M.; Hara, Shuntaro; Gelb, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is an active process that is mediated in part by antiinflammatory lipid mediators. Although phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes have been implicated in the promotion of inflammation through mobilizing lipid mediators, the molecular entity of PLA2 subtypes acting upstream of antiinflammatory lipid mediators remains unknown. Herein, we show that secreted PLA2 group IID (PLA2G2D) is preferentially expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and displays a pro-resolving function. In hapten-induced contact dermatitis, resolution, not propagation, of inflammation was compromised in skin and LNs of PLA2G2D-deficient mice (Pla2g2d−/−), in which the immune balance was shifted toward a proinflammatory state over an antiinflammatory state. Bone marrow-derived DCs from Pla2g2d−/− mice were hyperactivated and elicited skin inflammation after intravenous transfer into mice. Lipidomics analysis revealed that PLA2G2D in the LNs contributed to mobilization of a pool of polyunsaturated fatty acids that could serve as precursors for antiinflammatory/pro-resolving lipid mediators such as resolvin D1 and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2, which reduced Th1 cytokine production and surface MHC class II expression in LN cells or DCs. Altogether, our results highlight PLA2G2D as a “resolving sPLA2” that ameliorates inflammation through mobilizing pro-resolving lipid mediators and points to a potential use of this enzyme for treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:23690440

  12. Suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity mediated by macrophage-like cells in mice with experimental liver injury.

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, S; Nishimura, N; Ito, K

    1985-01-01

    The intensity of picryl chloride-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (PCl-DTH) was significantly lowered in mice with experimental liver injury induced by the injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or 1-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT). Adherent spleen cells prepared from mice with liver injury suppressed the PCl-DTH in normal syngeneic mice by adoptive transfer at the time of immunization with picryl chloride (PCl). Cianidanol, administered orally to recipient mice immediately after the transfer of adherent spleen cells, caused total prevention of the PCl-DTH from suppression by the transferred adherent spleen cells. In in vitro studies, the adherent spleen cells from both CCl4-treated and ANIT-treated mice produced higher amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than those from normal mice. The addition of cianidanol at the beginning of incubation caused an inhibition of PGE2 production of the adherent spleen cells. Furthermore, the spleen cell suspensions from CCl4-treated mice gave a marked increase in generation of superoxide anions (O2-), also inhibited by the addition of cianidanol. Gathered results support the adherent spleen cell as being the cell causing the suppression of DTH in mice with experimental liver injury; the important role of PGE2 and O2- in the suppression of DTH mediated by the adherent spleen cells was demonstrated. Cianidanol eliminated the suppression of DTH, owing principally to the inhibitory effect on the production of PGE2 and O2- from the adherent spleen cells. PMID:2982732

  13. Natural evolution of skin-test sensitivity in patients with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins.

    PubMed

    Romano, A; Gaeta, F; Valluzzi, R L; Zaffiro, A; Caruso, C; Quaratino, D

    2014-06-01

    There are studies demonstrating that skin-test sensitivity to penicillins can decrease over time and that allergic patients may lose sensitivity if the responsible compounds are avoided. With regard to subjects with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to cephalosporins, however, such studies are lacking. We evaluated prospectively in a 5-year follow-up 72 cephalosporin-allergic patients. After the first evaluation, patients were classified into two groups according to their patterns of allergologic-test positivity: to both penicillins and cephalosporins (group A), or only to cephalosporins (group B). Skin tests and serum-specific IgE assays were repeated 1 year later and, in case of persistent positivity, 3 and 5 years after the first allergologic examination. Seven (43.7%) of the 16 subjects of group A and 38 (67.8%) of the 56 patients of group B became negative; one was lost to follow-up. Patients of group B became negative sooner and more frequently than group A subjects.

  14. Cell penetrable-mouse forkhead box P3 suppresses type 1 T helper cell-mediated immunity in a murine model of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xia; Wang, Jun; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Qihong; Yin, Lei; Wu, Weijiang; Xia, Sheng; Shao, Qixiang

    2017-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), which is a transcription factor, has a primary role in the development and function of regulatory T cells, and thus contributes to homeostasis of the immune system. A previous study generated a cell-permeable fusion protein of mouse FOXP3 conjugated to a protein transduction domain (PTD-mFOXP3) that successfully blocked differentiation of type 17 T helper cells in vitro and alleviated experimental arthritis in mice. In the present study, the role of PTD-mFOXP3 in type 1 T helper (Th1) cell-mediated immunity was investigated and the possible mechanisms for its effects were explored. Under Th1 polarization conditions, cluster of differentiation 4+ T cells were treated with PTD-mFOXP3 and analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro, which revealed that PTD-mFOXP3 blocked Th1 differentiation in vitro. Mice models of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions were generated by subcutaneous sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to the ears of mice. PTD-mFOXP3, which was administered via local subcutaneous injection, significantly reduced DTH-induced inflammation, including ear swelling (ear swelling, P<0.001; pinnae weight, P<0.05 or P<0.01 with 0.25 and 1.25 mg/kg PTD-mFOXP3, respectively), infiltration of T cells, and expression of interferon-γ at local inflammatory sites (mRNA level P<0.05) compared with the DTH group. The results of the present study demonstrated that PTD-mFOXP3 may attenuate DTH reactions by suppressing the infiltration and activity of Th1 cells.

  15. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  16. Ten weeks of infection with a tissue-invasive helminth protects against local immune complex-mediated inflammation, but not cutaneous type I hypersensitivity, in previously sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E.; Mitre, Blima K.; Morris, C. Paul; Kim, So-Young; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect chronic helminth infection has on allergic disease in mice previously sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). 10 weeks of infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis reduced immunological markers of type I hypersensitivity, including OVA-specific IgE, basophil activation, and mast cell degranulation. Despite these reductions, there was no protection against immediate clinical hypersensitivity following intradermal OVA challenge. However, late phase ear swelling, due to type III hypersensitivity, was significantly reduced in chronically infected animals. Levels of total IgG2a, OVA-specific IgG2a, and OVA-specific IgG1 were reduced in the setting of infection. These reductions were likely due to increased antibody catabolism as ELISPOT assays demonstrated that infected animals do not have suppressed antibody production. Ear histology 24 hours after challenge showed infected animals have reduced cellular infiltration in the ear, with significant decreases in numbers of neutrophils and macrophages. Consistent with this, infected animals had less neutrophil-specific chemokines CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 in the ear following challenge. Additionally, in vitro stimulation with immune-complexes resulted in significantly less CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 production by eosinophils from chronically infected mice. Expression of FcγRI was also significantly reduced on eosinophils from infected animals. These data indicate that chronic filarial infection suppresses eosinophilic responses to antibody-mediated activation and has the potential to be used as a therapeutic for pre-existing hypersensitivity diseases. PMID:26324775

  17. Management of hypersensitivity reactions to Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in an outpatient oncology infusion center: a 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Aleena; Lax, Timothy; Guyer, Autumn; Hurwitz, Shelley; Camargo, Carlos A; Long, Aidan A

    2014-01-01

    A high incidence of hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to carboplatin and Taxol is limiting the use of carboplatin and Taxol. We conducted a 5-year study of all patients with HSR to carboplatin or Taxol to better understand the nature of infusion HSR and success or failure of management plans after the initial HSR. We performed a retrospective chart review of all safety reports from the Massachusetts General Hospital outpatient chemotherapy infusion center between January 2006 and February 2011. All the patients with HSRs to carboplatin or Taxol were identified and included in the final analysis. We reviewed patient characteristics, clinical symptoms, timing, and treatment of the initial HSR, and determined if the patient was rechallenged despite an initial HSR. We identified 152 patients with HSR to carboplatin (n = 45) or Taxol (n = 107). Carboplatin HSR was less severe than Taxol HSR. When comparing the 2 groups, the patients with carboplatin HSRs more commonly described itchy palms and feet, generalized itch, and general urticaria and/or erythema, whereas patients with Taxol HSR more commonly described facial flushing, back pain, and chest or throat tightness (all P < .05). Among 40 patients with mild-to-moderate carboplatin HSRs, only 7 were rechallenged, and 100% tolerated rechallenge without desensitization. None of the patients with severe carboplatin HSRs (n = 5) were rechallenged. Most patients (75%) with Taxol HSRs were rechallenged, and 91% tolerated rechallenge without desensitization; the patients with a severe HSR to Taxol were less likely to be rechallenged. The clinical symptoms and timing of carboplatin HSR are distinct from Taxol HSR. Most patients with carboplatin HSR were not rechallenged, whereas most patients with Taxol HSR were successfully rechallenged. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Transglutaminase activity changes during the hypersensitive reaction, a typical defense response of tobacco NN plants to TMV.

    PubMed

    Del Duca, Stefano; Betti, Lucietta; Trebbi, Grazia; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Torrigiani, Patrizia

    2007-10-01

    The occurrence of glutamyl polyamines (PAs) and changes in activity and levels of transglutaminase (TGase, EC 2.3.2.13), the enzyme responsible for their synthesis, are reported during the progression of the hypersensitive reaction (HR) of resistant NN tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun) to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Mature leaves of tobacco were collected over 0-72 h after inoculation with TMV or phosphate buffer (mock). In vivo synthesis of polyamine glutamyl derivatives (glutamyl PAs), catalyzed by TGase activity, was evaluated after supplying labeled putrescine (Pu, a physiological substrate of TGase) to leaves. Results show that, starting from 24 h, mono-(gamma-glutamyl)-Pu and bis-(gamma-glutamyl)-Sd were recovered in TMV-inoculated samples but not in mock-inoculated ones; 2 days later, in the former, the amount of glutamyl derivatives further increased. An in vitro radiometric assay showed that, in TMV-inoculated leaves, TGase activity increased from 24 h onwards relative to mock controls. An immunoblot analysis with AtPng1p polyclonal antibody detected a 72-kDa protein whose amount increased at 72 h in TMV-inoculated leaves and in the lesion-enriched areas. A biotin-labeled cadaverine incorporation assay showed that TGase activity occurred in S1 (containing soluble proteins), S2 (proteins released by both cell walls and membranes) and S3 (membrane intrinsic proteins) fractions. In S3 fraction, where changes were the most relevant, TGase activity was enhanced in both mock-inoculated and TMV-inoculated samples, but the stimulation persisted only in the latter case. These data are discussed in the light of a possible role of TGase activity and glutamyl PAs in the defense against a viral plant pathogen.

  19. Type I allergic hypersensitivity reactions due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters in patients with thalassaemia: report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Belen, Burcu; Polat, Meltem

    2015-02-27

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is a highly reactive gas used in sterilisation of heat sensitive medical devices, such as infusion sets, cannulae, intubation materials, ventriculoperitoneal shunts, dialysis catheters and stents. Allergic reactions due to EO have been reported in haemodialysis patients, patients undergoing extracorporeal photopheresis and donors of plasmapheresis. Clinical manifestations vary considerably and generally do not allow differentiation between IgE-mediated anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. We report four patients with thalassaemia who experienced anaphylaxis during transfusion due to ethylene oxide sterilised leucocyte filters. The aim of this report is to highlight the fact that frequently transfused patients can have allergic reactions due to EO particles left in leucocyte filters. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  20. T cell-mediated reactions to iodinated contrast media: evaluation by skin and lymphocyte activation tests.

    PubMed

    Kanny, Gisèle; Pichler, Werner; Morisset, Martine; Franck, Patricia; Marie, Béatrice; Kohler, Chantal; Renaudin, Jean-Marie; Beaudouin, Etienne; Laudy, Jean Sainte; Moneret-Vautrin, D Anne

    2005-01-01

    In addition to immediate reactions, late adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media (ICM) were reported in 2% to 5% of patients exposed to ICM and, as a consequence, have recently gained more attention. A few well-documented case reports postulate a hypersensitivity mechanism. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a T cell-mediated mechanism to the ICM by using in vitro and ex vivo tests. We analyzed 12 patients with 13 adverse ICM reactions, 9 of whom were women. Clinical history suggested an immune reaction to ICM. Skin tests (skin prick, intradermal, and patch tests) were performed with various ICM and read after 15 minutes and 24 and 48 hours. Skin biopsy specimens of positive test sites of 11 patients were evaluated by means of immunohistology. T-cell reactivity to ICM in vitro was analyzed with lymphocyte activation tests. Seven patients showed generalized maculopapular eruptions, one of them with fever; 4 had a so-called drug hypersensitivity syndrome with exanthema, eosinophilia, and fever; 1 had maculopapular eruptions and fever; 1 had late-onset urticaria with loss of consciousness; and 1 had facial edema and respiratory distress. An immune reaction to ICM was inferred from positive skin prick test (2 patients), positive patch test (10 patients), and positive intradermal test (9 patients) at 24 and 48 hours. Skin biopsy specimens revealed a T-cell infiltrate in the dermis with predominantly CD4 + T cells in 8 patients, CD8 + T cells in 1 patient, and equal numbers in 1 patient. Cross-sensitivities to several ICM were observed (9/12). Other drug allergies were noted in 6 of the 12 patients. Delayed reactions to ICM are most likely caused by immune reactions to these drugs and can elicit different clinical features. The involvement of T cells is suggested by positive skin test, as well as positive proliferative responses, to the drugs in vitro . A high degree of cross-reactivity with other than the eliciting ICM was observed. Moreover, 50% of these

  1. Detection of feline herpes virus 1 via polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry in cats with ulcerative facial dermatitis, eosinophilic granuloma complex reaction patterns and mosquito bite hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Persico, Paola; Roccabianca, Paola; Corona, Antonio; Vercelli, Antonella; Cornegliani, Luisa

    2011-12-01

    Ulcerative dermatitis caused by feline herpes virus 1 (FHV-1) is an uncommon disease characterized by cutaneous ulcers secondary to epidermal, adnexal and dermal necrosis. Differential diagnoses for FHV-1 lesions include, but are not limited to, mosquito bite hypersensitivity and eosinophilic granuloma complex. Histopathological diagnosis of FHV-1 dermatitis is based on the detection of the intranuclear inclusion bodies. In cases where intranuclear inclusions are missing but clinical and histological findings are compatible with FHV-1 dermatitis, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and PCRs have been used. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the presence of FHV-1 by IHC and PCR in skin biopsies and compared the results of the two tests. Sixty-four skin biopsy specimens from cats with compatible lesions were reviewed and tested via PCR and IHC for evidence of FHV-1. Polymerase chain reaction was positive in 12 of 64 biopsies; PCR and IHC were positive only in two of 64 biopsies, and these cases were considered true positive cases. The higher number of PCR-positive cases was possibly attributed to amplification of viral DNA from a live attenuated vaccination, but a previous FHV-1 infection with subsequent amplification of latently inserted FHV-1 could not be excluded. If clinical signs and histopathology suggest FHV-1 infection in the absence of typical inclusion bodies, IHC is the preferred diagnostic test; PCR may be useful for initial screening, but due to false positives is not sufficient for a definitive diagnosis.

  2. Heat shock proteins HSP27 and HSP70 are present in the skin and are important mediators of allergic contact hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Huang, Chun-Ming; Huber, Brad S; Jaleel, Tarannum; Lin, Hui-Yi; Xu, Hui; Elmets, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of murine skin has shown that a variety of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are constitutively expressed in the skin. Using murine allergic contact hypersensitivity as a model, we investigated the role of two heat shock proteins – HSP27 and HSP70 – in the induction of cutaneous cell-mediated immune responses. Immunohistochemical examination of skin specimens showed that HSP27 was present in the epidermis and HSP70 was present in both the epidermis and dermis. Inhibition of HSP27 and HSP70 produced a reduction in the DNFB contact hypersensitivity response and resulted in the induction of antigen specific unresponsiveness. Treatment of dendritic cell cultures with recombinant HSP27 caused in the upregulation of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12p70 and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19, which was inhibited when antibodies to HSP27 were added. DNFB conjugated dendritic cells that had been treated with HSP27 had an increased capacity to initiate contact hypersensitivity responses compared to control dendritic cells. This augmented capacity required TLR4 signaling because neither cytokine production by dendritic cells nor the increased induction of contact hypersensitivity responses occurred in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. Our findings indicate that a cascade of events occurs following initial interaction of hapten with the skin that includes increased activity of heat shock proteins, their interaction with TLR4 and, in turn, increased production of cytokines that are known to enhance antigen presentation by T-cells. The results suggest that heat shock proteins form a link between adaptive and innate immunity during the early stages of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:19109201

  3. Heat shock proteins HSP27 and HSP70 are present in the skin and are important mediators of allergic contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Huang, Chun-Ming; Huber, Brad S; Jaleel, Tarannum; Lin, Hui-Yi; Xu, Hui; Elmets, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of murine skin has shown that a variety of heat shock proteins (HSPs) are constitutively expressed in the skin. Using murine allergic contact hypersensitivity as a model, we investigated the role of two heat shock proteins, HSP27 and HSP70, in the induction of cutaneous cell-mediated immune responses. Immunohistochemical examination of skin specimens showed that HSP27 was present in the epidermis and HSP70 was present in both the epidermis and dermis. Inhibition of HSP27 and HSP70 produced a reduction in the 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene contact hypersensitivity response and resulted in the induction of Ag-specific unresponsiveness. Treatment of dendritic cell cultures with recombinant HSP27 caused in the up-regulation of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12p70, and IL-12p40 but not IL-23p19, which was inhibited when Abs to HSP27 were added. The 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-conjugated dendritic cells that had been treated with HSP27 had an increased capacity to initiate contact hypersensitivity responses compared with control dendritic cells. This augmented capacity required TLR4 signaling because neither cytokine production by dendritic cells nor the increased induction of contact hypersensitivity responses occurred in TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice. Our findings indicate that a cascade of events occurs following initial interaction of hapten with the skin that includes increased activity of HSPs, their interaction with TLR4, and, in turn, increased production of cytokines that are known to enhance Ag presentation by T cells. The results suggest that HSPs form a link between adaptive and innate immunity during the early stages of contact hypersensitivity.

  4. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  5. PDIA3 gene induces visceral hypersensitivity in rats with irritable bowel syndrome through the dendritic cell-mediated activation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhaomeng; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiaoteng; Tao, Liyuan

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism of protein disulfide-isomerase A3 (PDIA3)-induced visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Rats were treated with saline (control), acetic acid and restraint stress (IBS model), empty vector (RNAi control) and PDIA3-RNAi vector (PDIA3-RNAi). Mesenteric lymph node DCs (MLNDCs) and splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cells were isolated for co-cultivation. Compared with control, MLNDCs co-cultured with CD4+ or CD8+ T cells showed an increased ability to promote T cell proliferation and produced more IL-4 or IL-9 secretion. Compared with the RNAi control, MLNDCs from the PDIA3 knockdown models were less effective in promoting the proliferation of CD4+/CD8+ T cells. It is concluded that PDIA3 plays an important role in the development of IBS through the DC-mediated activation of T cells, resulting in degranulation of MCs and visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:27896022

  6. Targeting a Cross-Reactive Gly m 5 Soy Peptide as Responsible for Hypersensitivity Reactions in a Milk Allergy Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L.; Candreva, Angela M.; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Methods Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Results Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Conclusions Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide. PMID:24416141

  7. Targeting a cross-reactive Gly m 5 soy peptide as responsible for hypersensitivity reactions in a milk allergy mouse model.

    PubMed

    Curciarello, Renata; Smaldini, Paola L; Candreva, Angela M; González, Virginia; Parisi, Gustavo; Cauerhff, Ana; Barrios, Ivana; Blanch, Luis Bruno; Fossati, Carlos A; Petruccelli, Silvana; Docena, Guillermo H

    2014-01-01

    Cross-reactivity between soybean allergens and bovine caseins has been previously reported. In this study we aimed to map epitopes of the major soybean allergen Gly m 5 that are co-recognized by casein specific antibodies, and to identify a peptide responsible for the cross-reactivity. Cow's milk protein (CMP)-specific antibodies were used in different immunoassays (immunoblotting, ELISA, ELISA inhibition test) to evaluate the in vitro recognition of soybean proteins (SP). Recombinant Gly m 5 (α), a truncated fragment containing the C-terminal domain (α-T) and peptides of α-T were obtained and epitope mapping was performed with an overlapping peptide assay. Bioinformatics tools were used for epitope prediction by sequence alignment, and for modelling the cross-recognized soy proteins and peptides. The binding of SP to a monoclonal antibody was studied by surface Plasmon resonance (SPR). Finally, the in vivo cross-recognition of SP was assessed in a mouse model of milk allergy. Both α and α-T reacted with the different CMP-specific antibodies. α-T contains IgG and IgE epitopes in several peptides, particularly in the peptide named PA. Besides, we found similar values of association and dissociation constants between the α-casein specific mAb and the different milk and soy components. The food allergy mouse model showed that SP and PA contain the cross-reactive B and T epitopes, which triggered hypersensitivity reactions and a Th2-mediated response on CMP-sensitized mice. Gly m 5 is a cross-reactive soy allergen and the α-T portion of the molecule contains IgG and IgE immunodominant epitopes, confined to PA, a region with enough conformation to be bound by antibodies. These findings contribute to explain the intolerance to SP observed in IgE-mediated CMA patients, primarily not sensitised to SP, as well as it sets the basis to propose a mucosal immunotherapy for milk allergy using this soy peptide.

  8. Suppression of gastric acid increases the risk of developing Immunoglobulin E-mediated drug hypersensitivity: human diclofenac sensitization and a murine sensitization model

    PubMed Central

    Riemer, A. B.; Gruber, S.; Pali-Schöll, I.; Kinaciyan, T.; Untersmayr, E.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Hypersensitivity reactions towards non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) are common, although true allergies are detectable only in a subgroup of patients. The current study was prompted by a case observation, where a patient experienced generalized urticaria following his second course of diclofenac and proton pump inhibitor medication, and was found to have diclofenac-specific IgE. During recent years, our group has been investigating the importance of gastric digestion in the development of food allergies, demonstrating anti-acid medication as a risk factor for sensitization against food proteins. Objective Here, we aimed to investigate whether the mechanism of food allergy induction described can also be causative in NSAID allergy, using diclofenac as a paradigm. Methods We subjected BALB/c mice to several oral immunization regimens modelled after the patient’s medication intake. Diclofenac was applied with or without gastric acid suppression, in various doses, alone or covalently coupled to albumin, a protein abundant in gastric juices. Immune responses were assessed on the antibody level, and functionally examined by in vitro and in vivo crosslinking assays. Results Only mice receiving albumin-coupled diclofenac under gastric acid suppression developed anti-diclofenac IgG1 and IgE, whereas no immune responses were induced by the drug alone or without gastric acid suppression. Antibody induction was dose dependent with the group receiving the higher dose of the drug showing sustained anti-diclofenac titres. The antibodies induced triggered basophil degranulation in vitro and positive skin tests in vivo. Conclusion Gastric acid suppression was found to be a causative mechanism in the induction of IgE-mediated diclofenac allergy. PMID:19817752

  9. Impact of European medicines agency recommendations for hypersensitivity reactions on intravenous iron prescription in haemodialysis centres of the Lombardy region.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Rodolfo F; Guido, Davide; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Corghi, Enzo; D'Amico, Marco; Camerini, Corrado; Spotti, Donatella; Galassi, Andrea; Pozzi, Claudio; Cancarini, Giovanni; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has recommended measures to minimize the risk of hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to intravenous iron (IVFe). We analysed the effects of these recommendations on IVFe clinical management among haemodialysis centres (HDCs) in Lombardy, Italy. A questionnaire was sent to all 117 HDCs to collect information on centre characteristics, e.g. HDC type [hospital centre (HC) vs. centre with limited assistance (CAL)], presence/absence of intensive care unit (ICU) and/or emergency trained staff, IVFe therapy regarding molecules, administration modalities, side effects, and percentage variations in iron prescription between 2014 and 2013 (outcome, Δ-IVFe%). A linear regression model was applied to evaluate the focus effect (β) of HDC type on the outcome, controlling for possible confounding effects of the other characteristics. Response rate was 73.5 %. IVFe therapy was used in 69.1 % (HDC range 11-100) of patients. Following EMA recommendations, prescription was reduced by 12.6 %, with the largest reduction observed in CALs. No severe HSRs were reported. HCs had more frequently an ICU [97.2 vs. 20 %, odds ratio (OR) = 63.6 (95 % confidence interval 15.56; 537.47), p < 0.001], emergency trained staff [97.2 vs. 61.2 %, OR = 10.7 (2.68; 85.33), p < 0.001] and instrumental facilities (91.7 vs. 58 %, OR = 5.8 (2.03; 23.55), p < 0.001] than CALs. Linear regression demonstrated a significant raw effect of HDC type on Δ- IVFe% [β =  19.6 (9.82; 30.63), p < 0.001]. No association was found when HDC type was adjusted for ICU-presence [β = 6.7 (-2.32; 18.30), p = 0.199] or for all-confounding factors [β = 5.6 (-5.50; 17.08), p = 0.337]. This survey shows a disparity in IVFe therapy prescription following EMA recommendations, which is largely influenced by the presence/absence of ICUs in HD centres.

  10. Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media: prevalence, risk factors and the role of skin tests in diagnosis--a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Goksel, Ozlem; Aydın, Omur; Atasoy, Cetin; Akyar, Serdar; Demirel, Yavuz Selim; Misirligil, Zeynep; Bavbek, Sevim

    2011-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to contrast media (CMs) may be common and serious. To evaluate the prevalence of CM hypersensitivity, risk factors associated with it and the role of skin testing in its diagnosis. A structured questionnaire was administered to patients who underwent computed tomography during a 1-year period. Skin tests with CMs, including skin prick tests (SPTs), intradermal tests (IDTs) and patch tests (PTs), were conducted on CM reactors (n = 24). Volunteers who tolerated CM exposure or had never been exposed to any CMs served as controls (n = 37). A total of 1,131 patients (630 females and 501 males; mean age 55 ± 14.2 years) were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of historical and current CM reactors was 33/1,131 (2.92%) and 8/1,105 (0.72%), respectively. The skin was the most affected site, with mild to moderate reactions. Female gender, a history of doctor-diagnosed asthma, drug allergy, food allergy and psychiatric diseases were significant risk factors. The sensitivities of SPTs and early readings of IDTs in the diagnosis of immediate reactions were 0 and 20%, respectively, and the specificities were 94.6 and 91.4%, respectively. For early readings of IDTs, the positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 40 and 80%, respectively. For nonimmediate reactions, the sensitivities of delayed readings of IDTs and PTs were 14.3 and 25%, respectively; specificity was 100% for both tests. The PPV was 100% for both of these tests, and the NPVs were 85.4 and 82.4%, respectively. Our findings are comparable with the incidence, profile and risk factors associated with CM hypersensitivity reported previously. Skin testing with CMs has a high specificity, but its role in diagnosis is limited due to low sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Arthritis as a hypersensitivity reaction in a case of sporotrichosis transmitted by a sick cat: clinical and serological follow up of 13 months.

    PubMed

    Orofino-Costa, R; Bóia, M N; Magalhães, G A P; Damasco, P S; Bernardes-Engemann, A R; Benvenuto, F; Silva, I C; Lopes-Bezerra, L M

    2010-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii, which is commonly acquired by traumatic inoculation of the fungus carried in a contaminated material into the skin. Joint involvement is the most frequent extracutaneous manifestation in immunosuppressed patients. We report the case of an immunocompetent woman who acquired sporotrichosis through the scratch of a sick cat. She presented skin lesions and arthritis possibly because of a hypersensitivity reaction. Treatment resulted in complete cure up to 13 months of clinical and serological follow-up.

  12. Clinical heterogeneity of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Roujeau, Jean-Claude

    2005-04-15

    Skin is the most frequent target of drug reactions that are reported, may be because they are easily detected. Most (probably more than 90%) are related to drug hypersensitivity, i.e. an individually tailored, unexpected effect mediated by a drug specific activation of the immune response. The clinical presentation of "drug eruptions" is highly variable, from the most common transient and benign erythema that occurs 6-9 days after the introduction of a new drug in 1 to 3 % of users to the most severe forms, that fortunately affect less than 1/10,000 users. Even though there are some overlapping or unclassifiable cases, it is important for clinicians to recognize and categorize severe cutaneous adverse reactions/SCAR (bullous fixed drug eruptions/bFDE, acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis/AGEP, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms/DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/SJS, toxic epidermal necrolysis/TEN). First they must suspect rapidly that an unusual eruption with high fever and severe constitutional symptoms is caused by a medication and not by an infection. Second they have to look for involvement of organs that differ according to the type of reaction. Third they can determine a prognosis, the mortality rate being virtually 0 for bFDE, 5% for AGEP, 10% for "hypersensitivity syndrome"/DRESS and 25% for SJS or TEN. In addition if some medications are "usual suspects" for all types (e.g. anticonvulsants), some other are more specific of a given pattern (pristinamycine, hydroxychloroquine, diltiazem for AGEP, minocycline for DRESS, anti-infectious sulfonamides, allopurinol for epidermal necrolysis). The "phenotypic" diversity of the final expression drug reactions can be explained by the engagement of a variety of cytokines and inflammatory cells and by regulatory mechanisms. For example, memory cytotoxic T-Cells are key effectors in both localized blisters of bFDE and in extensive blisters of epidermal necrolysis.

  13. Antibody-mediated cofactor-driven reactions

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reactions capable of being rate-enhanced by auxiliary species which interact with the reactants but do not become chemically bound to them in the formation of the final product are performed in the presence of antibodies which promote the reactions. The antibodies contain regions within their antigen binding sites which recognize the auxiliary species in a conformation which promotes the reaction. The antigen binding site frequently recognizes a particular transition state complex or other high energy complex along the reaction coordinate, thereby promoting the progress of the reaction along the desired route as opposed to other less favorable routes. Various classes of reaction together with appropriate antigen binding site specificities tailored for each are disclosed.

  14. Pustular-type drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms due to carbamazepine with systemic muscle involvement.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Haruna; Saito, Kanami; Takayanagi, Yoshikazu; Okazaki, Toshio; Kashima, Kenji; Ishikawa, Kazushi; Kai, Yoshitaka; Takeo, Naoko; Hatano, Yutaka; Okamoto, Osamu; Fujiwara, Sakuhei

    2013-02-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS)/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) is a severe reaction usually associated with maculopapular eruptions and systemic involvement. Here we report the first case, to our knowledge, of DIHS/DRESS due to carbamazepine with acute generalized pustular bacterid-like (AGPB-like) eruptions and skeletal muscle involvement. Reviewing our case and the published work, we discuss pustular-type DIHS/DRESS which, in most cases, involves acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP)-like skin eruptions in response to carbamazepine. Pustular eruptions may appear in relatively few cases of DIHS/DRESS, in particular, when the causative drug is carbamazepine and, even in cases of intractable pustular bacterid-like eruptions, a reaction to a drug should be suspected. Skeletal muscle involvement may be associated with DIHS/DRESS as one of its systemic manifestations. © 2012 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  15. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs.

  16. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  17. Multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiriac, Anca M; Demoly, Pascal

    2013-08-01

    The multiple drug hypersensitivity syndrome (MDH) is a distinct clinical entity, different from cross-reactivity and flare-up reactions. Following its initial description in 1989 by Sullivan et al., several authors have addressed the issues surrounding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity. Whether this syndrome is single or can be further classified in several entities is still a matter of debate. Case reports, case series or studies involving large populations on MDH are few. The use of this term in the literature is heterogeneous, and the definitions variable. Given the major advances in the study of drug hypersensitivities in general, and ongoing research regarding severe cutaneous adverse reactions in particular, careful study of the subgroup of patients with demonstrated immunological basis of MDH has enabled the generation of possible pathogenetic hypotheses. Together with the studies (despite their limitations) to estimate the prevalence of this syndrome in adult and paediatric patients these emerging data need confirmation through larger studies with well defined populations. Bringing together the experience of groups involved in the field of drug allergy should help to move knowledge regarding this peculiar form of drug hypersensitivity forward.

  18. Penicillin allergy: anti-penicillin IgE antibodies and immediate hypersensitivity skin reactions employing major and minor determinants of penicillin.

    PubMed

    Chandra, R K; Joglekar, S A; Tomas, E

    1980-11-01

    300 children considered to have had adverse reactions to penicillin were examined. Informed consent was obtained from the parents. Skin tests were conducted by the scratch/prick and intradermal techniques, using benzylpenicilloyl polylysine conjugate and a mixture of minor determinants of penicillin. Specific anti-penicillin IgE antibodies were estimated by the radioallergosorbent test. There was a good correlation between the two methods. The overall frequency of positive tests was 19%. 11 children showed cutaneous reactivity only to the minor determinants mixture. Positive results were found more often in those with accelerated adverse reactions, particularly anaphylaxis, serum sickness, angio-oedema, or urticaria. The validity of penicillin-negative results was confirmed by drug challenge in 56 subjects, only 2 of whom showed a slight skin rash. Of 5 patients with positive tests, inadvertent administration of penicillin produced accelerated urticaria in all. 14 of 42 children with positive tests had lost hypersensitivity to penicillin one year later. In a separate group of 50 children with a history of adverse response to ampicillin, the overall frequency of positive tests was 12%; 38% showed evidence of recent E-B virus infection. It was concluded that penicillin allergy is often overdiagnosed. The diagnosis can be reliably confirmed by skin tests using major and minor determinants of benzylpenicillin and by the radioallergosorbent test; such hypersensitivity is not permanent.

  19. Colonic mucosal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated visceral hypersensitivity in a mouse model of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qing Qing; Chen, Fei Xue; Zhao, Dong Yan; Li, Li Xiang; Wang, Peng; Li, Yan Qing; Zuo, Xiu Li

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether colonic mucosal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) participates in visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). C57BL/6 mice were administered intrarectally with trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) for the establishment of an IBS-like visceral hypersensitivity model. Those received an equivalent volume of 50% ethanol were regarded as the controls. Abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) scores in response to colorectal distention (CRD) were used to assess visceral sensitivity. NMDAR levels in the colonic mucosa were detected by both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The concentrations of glutamate and ammonia in the feces of the mice were measured. Changes in visceral sensitivity after the intracolonic administration of ammonia or NMDAR antagonist were recorded. The established IBS-like mouse model of visceral hypersensitivity showed no evident inflammation in the colon. NMDAR levels in the colonic mucosa of the IBS-like mice were significantly higher compared with the controls, and were positively associated with AWR scores. The glutamate level in the feces of the TNBS-treated mice was similar to that of the controls, although the ammonia level was significantly higher. Intracolonic administration of ammonia induced visceral hypersensitivity in mice, which was repressed by pretreatment with NMDAR antagonist MK801. Overexpressed NMDAR in the colonic mucosa may participate in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity in IBS. Our study identifies the effect of ammonia in the colonic lumen on NMDAR in the colonic mucosa as a potential novel targeted mechanism for IBS treatment. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Mechanochemical Lignin-Mediated Strecker Reaction.

    PubMed

    Dabral, Saumya; Turberg, Mathias; Wanninger, Andrea; Bolm, Carsten; Hernández, José G

    2017-01-17

    A mechanochemical Strecker reaction involving a wide range of aldehydes (aromatic, heteroaromatic and aliphatic), amines, and KCN afforded a library of α-aminonitriles upon mechanical activation. This multicomponent process was efficiently activated by lignocellulosic biomass as additives. Particularly, commercially available Kraft lignin was found to be the best activator for the addition of cyanide to the in situ formed imines. A comparative study of the (31)P-NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) along with IR (Infrared) data analysis for the Kraft lignin and methylated Kraft lignin samples ascertained the importance of the free hydroxyl groups in the activation of the mechanochemical reaction. The solvent-free mechanochemical Strecker reaction was then coupled with a lactamization process leading to the formation of the N-benzylphthalimide (5a) and the isoindolinone derivative 6a.

  2. Efficient copper-mediated reactions of nitrenes derived from sulfonimidamides.

    PubMed

    Leca, Dominique; Toussaint, Aurélie; Mareau, Camille; Fensterbank, Louis; Lacôte, Emmanuel; Malacria, Max

    2004-09-30

    [reaction: see text] Sulfonimidamides lead efficiently to nitrenes and have been converted to sulfimides, sulfoximines, and aziridines in good yields, through a copper-mediated multicomponent reaction. The stereogenic sulfur atom and the trivalent nitrogen atom present in the molecules open the way to asymmetric synthesis, whose first results are presented.

  3. Pro and Contra: Provocation Tests in Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Soyer, Ozge; Sahiner, Umit Murat; Sekerel, Bulent Enis

    2017-01-01

    Drug provocation test (DPT) is the controlled administration of a drug to diagnose immune- or non-immune-mediated drug hypersensitivity and the last step for accurate recognition of drug hypersensitivity reactions when the previous diagnostic evaluations are negative or unavailable. A DPT is performed only if other conventional tests fail to yield conclusive results. In each clinical presentation, “to provoke or not to provoke” a patient should be decided after careful assessment of the risk–benefit ratio. Well-defined benefits of DPT include confirmative exclusion of diagnoses of drug hypersensitivity and provision of safe alternatives. However, disadvantages such as safety, difficulty in interpretations of results, lack of objective biomarkers, risks of resensitization, efficiency in daily practice, and lack of standardized protocols, are poorly debated. This review summarizes the current published research concerning DPT, with particular emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of DPT in an evidence-based manner. PMID:28677662

  4. Surface Ligand Mediated Plasmon Driven Photochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Kafle, Bijesh; Poveda, Marisa; Habteyes, Terefe G

    2017-02-07

    Contrary to the general expectation that surface ligands reduce the reactivity of surfaces by blocking the active sites, we present experimental evidence that surface ligands can in fact increase reactivity and induce important reaction pathways in plasmon-driven surface photochemistry. The remarkable effect of surface ligands is demonstrated by comparing the photochemistry of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) on resonant plasmonic gold nanorods (AuNRs) in the presence of citrate, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), and no surface ligands under visible light irradiation. The use of AuNRs with citrate and no surface ligand results in the usual azo-coupling reaction. In contrast, CTAB coated AuNRs oxidize PATP primarily to p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP). Strong correlation has been observed between the N-O and Au-Br vibration band intensities, suggesting that CTAB influences the reaction pathway through the Br- counterions that can minimize electron-hole recombination rate by reacting with hole, and hence increasing the concentration of hot electrons that drive the oxidation reaction.

  5. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Real-time PCR mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive sites using a novel ligation-mediated amplification technique

    PubMed Central

    Follows, George A.; Janes, Mary E.; Vallier, Ludovic; Green, Anthony R.; Gottgens, Berthold

    2007-01-01

    Mapping sites within the genome that are hypersensitive to digestion with DNaseI is an important method for identifying DNA elements that regulate transcription. The standard approach to locating these DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) has been to use Southern blotting techniques, although we, and others, have recently published alternative methods using a range of technologies including high-throughput sequencing and genomic array tiling paths. In this article, we describe a novel protocol to use real-time PCR to map DHS. Advantages of the technique reported here include the small cell numbers required for each analysis, rapid, relatively low-cost experiments with minimal need for specialist equipment. Presented examples include comparative DHS mapping of known TAL1/SCL regulatory elements between human embryonic stem cells and K562 cells. PMID:17389645

  7. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  8. Nude mice produce a T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that mediates the early component of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W R; Meade, R; Pettinicchi, A; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1989-03-15

    The elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in mice is caused by the sequential action of two different T cells. An early-acting, DTH-initiating T cell produces an Ag-specific T cell factor, that is analogous to IgE antibody and initiates DTH by sensitizing the local tissues for release of the vasoactive amine serotonin. In picryl chloride or oxazolone contact sensitivity, this T cell factor is Ag-specific, but MHC unrestricted. We, therefore, hypothesized that DTH-initiating T cells are primitive T cells with Ag receptors that can bind Ag without MHC restriction. In order to characterize the origin of this DTH-initiating T cell and the conditions that are necessary for its development, we contact-sensitized various strains of immunodeficient mice. Surprisingly, we found that the early phase of DTH was present in athymic nude mice. In contrast, the early component of DTH was absent in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. These mice lack T and B cells, but have NK cells. These findings suggested that the early component of DTH was not caused by NK cells, and was caused by cells belonging to a lineage from a rearranging gene family. The early component of DTH in nude mice was Ag specific, was caused by MHC unrestricted Thy-1+ T cells, and was mediated by Ag-binding, Ag-specific T cell factors. We found that DTH-initiating, T cell-derived, Ag-binding molecules from nude mice and normal CBA/J mice had the same functional properties. The early component of DTH was elicited in two different systems (contact sensitivity and SRBC-specific DTH) in two strains of nude mice (BALB/c athymic nudes and CByB6F1/J-nu) from two different suppliers, but not in BALB/c and athymic nudes from a third supplier. From these findings we concluded that DTH-initiating T cells, which produce IgE-like Ag-specific T cell factors, are present in some strains of athymic nude mice and thus are relatively thymic independent T cells.

  9. Acute hypersensitivity reaction to Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (CroFab) as initial presentation of galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) allergy.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Justin; Brill, Kaitlin; Charlton, Nathan; King, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab antivenom (CroFab), commonly used for the treatment of clinically significant North American crotalinae envenomation, is generally well-tolerated. A novel form of anaphylaxis due to an IgE antibody response to the mammalian oligosaccharide galactose-α-1,3-galactose (α-gal) has been established following red-meat consumption as well as IV administration of cetuximab, which contain the α-gal epitope. We present a case of α-gal allergy discovered after acute hypersensitivity reaction to FabAV. A 61-year-old healthy female was bitten on her left ankle by Agkistrodon contortrix. Given the patient's rapid progression of pain and swelling, she was given FabAV. During infusion of FabAV, she developed diffuse hives over her entire body and itching, but denied respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms and her vital signs remained stable. The FabAV was immediately discontinued and she received intravenous diphenhydramine and famotidine with gradual resolution of symptoms. On further discussion, she denied a history of α-gal or papaya allergy but rarely ate red meat and endorsed sustaining frequent tick bites. Subsequent antibody testing was significant for an α-1,3-galactose IgE concentration of 45,000 U/L (normal <3500 U/L), confirming α-gal allergy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of FabAV hypersensitivity associated with an underlying α-gal allergy.

  10. Jaundice induced by stanozolol hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Davidson, J. F.; Patrick, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    A 66-year-old male patient developed jaundice after 7 months of treatment with the anabolic steroid, stanozolol. When the drug was withdrawn he made a full and uneventful recovery. A liver biopsy showed the histology of a hypersensitivity reaction. This is believed to be the first time jaundice has been recorded with stanozolol therapy and the first time a hypersensitivity-type jaundice has been recorded with any anabolic steroid. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:1273017

  11. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:19147836

  12. Ablation of type I hypersensitivity in experimental allergic conjunctivitis by eotaxin-1/CCR3 blockade.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Dai; Nakamura, Takao; Ohbayashi, Masaharu; Kuo, Chuan Hui; Komatsu, Naoki; Yakura, Keiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Inoue, Yoshitsugu; Higashi, Hidemitsu; Murata, Meguru; Takeda, Shuzo; Fukushima, Atsuki; Liu, Fu-Tong; Rothenberg, Marc E; Ono, Santa Jeremy

    2009-02-01

    The immune response is regulated, in part, by effector cells whose activation requires multiple signals. For example, T cells require signals emanating from the T cell antigen receptor and co-stimulatory molecules for full activation. Here, we present evidence indicating that IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in vivo also require cognate signals to activate mast cells. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions in the conjunctiva are ablated in mice deficient in eotaxin-1, despite normal numbers of tissue mast cells and levels of IgE. To further define the co-stimulatory signals mediated by chemokine receptor 3 (CCR3), an eotaxin-1 receptor, effects of CCR3 blockade were tested with an allergic conjunctivitis model and in ex vivo isolated connective tissue-type mast cells. Our results show that CCR3 blockade significantly suppresses allergen-mediated hypersensitivity reactions as well as IgE-mediated mast cell degranulation. We propose that a co-stimulatory axis by CCR3, mainly stimulated by eotaxin-1, is pivotal in mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions.

  13. Usefulness of In Vivo and In Vitro Diagnostic Tests in the Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Quinolones and in the Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity: A Comprehensive Study Including the Latest Quinolone Gemifloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Gelincik, Asli; Akdeniz, Nilgun; Aktas-Cetin, Esin; Olgac, Muge; Unal, Derya; Ertek, Belkis; Coskun, Raif; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Deniz, Gunnur; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Reports evaluating diagnosis and cross reactivity of quinolone hypersensitivity have revealed contradictory results. Furthermore, there are no reports investigating the cross-reactivity between gemifloxacin (GFX) and the others. We aimed to detect the usefulness of diagnostic tests of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones and to evaluate the cross reactivity between different quinolones including the latest quinolone GFX. Methods We studied 54 patients (mean age 42.31±10.39 years; 47 female) with 57 hypersensitivity reactions due to different quinolones and 10 nonatopic quinolone tolerable control subjects. A detailed clinical history, skin test (ST), and single-blind placebo-controlled drug provocation test (SBPCDPT), as well as basophil activation test (BAT) and lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) were performed with the culprit and alternative quinolones including ciprofloxacin (CFX), moxifloxacin (MFX), levofloxacin (LFX), ofloxacin (OFX), and GFX. Results The majority (75.9%) of the patients reported immediate type reactions to various quinolones. The most common culprit drug was CFX (52.6%) and the most common reaction type was urticaria (26.3%). A quarter of the patients (24.1%) reacted to SBPCDPTs, although their STs were negative; while false ST positivity was 3.5% and ST/SBPCDPTs concordance was only 1.8%. Both BAT and LTT were not found useful in quinolone hypersensitivity. Cross-reactivity was primarily observed between LFX and OFX (50.0%), whereas it was the least between MFX and the others, and in GFX hypersensitive patients the degree of cross-reactivity to the other quinolones was 16.7%. Conclusions These results suggest that STs, BAT, and LTT are not supportive in the diagnosis of a hypersensitivity reaction to quinolone as well as in the prediction of cross-reactivity. Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are necessary to identify both culprit and alternative quinolones. PMID:28497922

  14. Usefulness of In Vivo and In Vitro Diagnostic Tests in the Diagnosis of Hypersensitivity Reactions to Quinolones and in the Evaluation of Cross-Reactivity: A Comprehensive Study Including the Latest Quinolone Gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Demir, Semra; Gelincik, Asli; Akdeniz, Nilgun; Aktas-Cetin, Esin; Olgac, Muge; Unal, Derya; Ertek, Belkis; Coskun, Raif; Colakoğlu, Bahattin; Deniz, Gunnur; Buyukozturk, Suna

    2017-07-01

    Reports evaluating diagnosis and cross reactivity of quinolone hypersensitivity have revealed contradictory results. Furthermore, there are no reports investigating the cross-reactivity between gemifloxacin (GFX) and the others. We aimed to detect the usefulness of diagnostic tests of hypersensitivity reactions to quinolones and to evaluate the cross reactivity between different quinolones including the latest quinolone GFX. We studied 54 patients (mean age 42.31±10.39 years; 47 female) with 57 hypersensitivity reactions due to different quinolones and 10 nonatopic quinolone tolerable control subjects. A detailed clinical history, skin test (ST), and single-blind placebo-controlled drug provocation test (SBPCDPT), as well as basophil activation test (BAT) and lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) were performed with the culprit and alternative quinolones including ciprofloxacin (CFX), moxifloxacin (MFX), levofloxacin (LFX), ofloxacin (OFX), and GFX. The majority (75.9%) of the patients reported immediate type reactions to various quinolones. The most common culprit drug was CFX (52.6%) and the most common reaction type was urticaria (26.3%). A quarter of the patients (24.1%) reacted to SBPCDPTs, although their STs were negative; while false ST positivity was 3.5% and ST/SBPCDPTs concordance was only 1.8%. Both BAT and LTT were not found useful in quinolone hypersensitivity. Cross-reactivity was primarily observed between LFX and OFX (50.0%), whereas it was the least between MFX and the others, and in GFX hypersensitive patients the degree of cross-reactivity to the other quinolones was 16.7%. These results suggest that STs, BAT, and LTT are not supportive in the diagnosis of a hypersensitivity reaction to quinolone as well as in the prediction of cross-reactivity. Drug provocation tests (DPTs) are necessary to identify both culprit and alternative quinolones.

  15. Sensitization of P2X3 receptors by cystathionine β-synthetase mediates persistent pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhu, Hongyan; Zou, Kang; Yuan, Bo; Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Xinghong; Yan, Jun; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-03-20

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a major cause of discogenic low back pain and sciatica, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is becoming recognized for its involvement in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. The present study was designed to investigate the roles of the H2S signaling pathway in the regulation of expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2XRs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats with LDH. LDH was induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP), harvested from rat tail, in lumbar 5 and 6 spinal nerve roots. Implantation of autologous NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, which was partially reversed by an intrathecal injection of A317491, a potent inhibitor of P2X3Rs and P2X2/3Rs. The NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity was associated with the increased expression of P2X3Rs, but not P2X1Rs and P2X2Rs, receptors in L5-6 DRGs. NP implantation also produced a 2-fold increase in ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons when compared to those of controls (P < 0.05). Interestingly, NP implantation significantly enhanced expression of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme, cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS). Systematic administration of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of CBS, suppressed the upregulation of P2X3R expression and the potentiation of ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons (P < 0.05). Intrathecal injection of AOAA markedly attenuated NP induced- persistent pain hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that sensitization of P2X3Rs, which is likely mediated by CBS-H2S signaling in primary sensory neurons, contributes to discogenic pain. Targeting CBS/H2S-P2X3R signaling may represent a potential treatment for neuropathic pain caused by LDH.

  16. Basophil activation after nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs stimulation in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to these drugs.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Fernandez, Tahia D; Doña, Inmaculada; Aranda, Ana; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Melendez, Lidia; Canto, Gabriela; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, Maria J; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2014-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the drugs most frequently involved in allergic reactions of which two main types exist: IgE-mediated and crossintolerance. The diagnosis of crossintolerance reactions is often based on the drug provocation test. The potential value of the basophil activation test (BAT) was evaluated using different basophil markers in the diagnosis of patients with crossintolerance to NSAIDs and cutaneous symptoms. We studied 46 patients with crossintolerance to NSAIDs and 45 tolerant controls. BAT was performed with acetyl salicylic acid, paracetamol, diclofenac, dipyrone, naproxen, and ibuprofen at four different concentrations using CD193 and CD203c as basophil markers and CD63 as activation marker. We compared BAT results using CD193⁺ or CD193⁺ CD203c⁺ for basophil selection and found a significant increase in the stimulation index when using CD193⁺ CD203c⁺ in both patients and controls (P = 0.004 and P = 0.017, respectively). Selection of living cells only produced an increase in basophil stimulation in patients for both CD193⁺ and CD193⁺ CD203c⁺ (P < 0.001 for both), whereas in controls there was no change with CD193⁺ and a decrease with CD193⁺ CD203c⁺ (P = 0.001). We found that CD193⁺ CD203c⁺ increased the percentage of positive cases in patients and controls when compared with CD193⁺. When excluding dead cells, there was an increase of 21.7% in patients and 10% in controls. These results indicate that using CD193⁺ CD203⁺, excluding dead cells, is the best approach for BAT although this test is not recommended for the diagnosis of patients with crossintolerance to NSAIDs owing to its low sensitivity and specificity.

  17. Flow Giese reaction using cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Takahide; Kawamoto, Takuji; Kobayashi, Mikako

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tin-free Giese reactions, employing primary, secondary, and tertiary alkyl iodides as radical precursors, ethyl acrylate as a radical trap, and sodium cyanoborohydride as a radical mediator, were examined in a continuous flow system. With the use of an automated flow microreactor, flow reaction conditions for the Giese reaction were quickly optimized, and it was found that a reaction temperature of 70 °C in combination with a residence time of 10–15 minutes gave good yields of the desired addition products. PMID:24062844

  18. Expression of CD73 slows down migration of skin dendritic cells, affecting the sensitization phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions in mice.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, A; Ring, S; Silva-Vilches, C; Schrader, J; Enk, A; Mahnke, K

    2017-09-01

    Application of haptens to the skin induces release of immune stimulatory ATP into the extracellular space. This "danger" signal can be converted to immunosuppressive adenosine (ADO) by the action of the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73, expressed by skin and immune cells. Thus, the expression and regulation of CD73 by skin derived cells may have crucial influence on the outcome of contact hypersensitivity (CHS) reactions. To investigate the role of CD73 expression during 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB) induced CHS reactions. Wild type (wt) and CD73 deficient mice were subjected to TNCB induced CHS. In the different mouse strains the resulting ear swelling reaction was recorded along with a detailed phenotypic analysis of the skin migrating subsets of dendritic cells (DC). In CD73 deficient animals the motility of DC was higher as compared to wt animals and in particular after sensitization we found increased migration of Langerin(+) DC from skin to draining lymph nodes (LN). In the TNCB model this led to a stronger sensitization as indicated by increased frequency of interferon-γ producing T cells in the LN and an increased ear thickness after challenge. CD73 derived ADO production slows down migration of Langerin(+) DC from skin to LN. This may be a crucial mechanism to avoid over boarding immune reactions against haptens. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  20. Tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in a model of hu-PBMC-SCID mice grafted with autologous skin.

    PubMed Central

    Tsicopoulos, A.; Pestel, J.; Fahy, O.; Vorng, H.; Vandenbusche, F.; Porte, H.; Eraldi, L.; Wurtz, A.; Akoum, H.; Hamid, Q.; Wallaert, B.; Tonnel, A. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an animal model to study human delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Previous studies in humans have shown after tuberculin injection the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltration, with almost no eosinophils, associated with a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile. Human skin graft obtained from tuberculin-reactive donors was grafted onto the back of severe combined immunodeficient mice. After healing, mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with peripheral mononuclear cells. Tuberculin and diluent were injected intradermally, and skin biopsies were performed 72 hours later. Skin grafts were divided into two parts, one for immunohistochemistry and one for in situ hybridization studies. Immunohistochemistry was performed on cryostat sections using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique. In the tuberculin-injected sites as compared with the diluent-injected sites, there were significant increases in the number of CD45+ pan leukocytes and CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+ T cells but not in CD68+ monocytes/macrophages and EG2 or MBP+ eosinophils. The activation markers CD25 and HLA-DR were up-regulated in the tuberculin-injected sites. In situ hybridization was performed using 35S-labeled riboprobes for interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-4, and IL-5. After tuberculin injection, a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile was observed with significant increases in the numbers of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells. These results are similar to those reported after tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans, suggesting that this model might be useful to study cutaneous inflammatory reaction. Images Figure 4 PMID:9626072

  1. The Absence of CYP3A5*3 Is a Protective Factor to Anticonvulsants Hypersensitivity Reactions: A Case-Control Study in Brazilian Subjects

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Bernardo; Talib, Leda Leme; Yamaguti, Célia; Rodrigues, Helcio; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Although aromatic anticonvulsants are usually well tolerated, they can cause cutaneous adverse drug reactions in up to 10% of patients. The clinical manifestations of the antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions (AHR) vary from mild skin rashes to severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions which are related to high mortality and significant morbidity. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes are associated with altered enzymatic activity and may contribute to the risk of AHR. Here we present a case-control study in which we genotyped SNPs of CYP2C19, 2C9 and 3A5 of 55 individuals with varying severities of AHR, 83 tolerant, and 366 healthy control subjects from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical characterization was based on standardized scoring systems and drug patch test. All in vivo investigation followed the ENDA (European Network of Drug Allergy) recommendations. Genotype was determined by real time PCR using peripheral blood DNA as a template. Of all 504 subjects, 65% were females, 45% self-identified as Afro-American, 38% as Caucasian and 17% as having non-African mixed ascendancy. Amongst 55 subjects with AHR, 44 had severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions. Of the 46 drug patch tests performed, 29 (63%) were positive. We found a strong association between the absence of CYP3A5*3 and tolerant subjects when compared to AHR (p = 0.0002, OR = 5.28 [CI95% 2.09–14.84]). None of our groups presented positive association with CYP2C19 and 2C9 polymorphisms, however, both SNPs contributed to separation of cases and tolerants in a Classification and Regression Tree. Our findings indicate that drug metabolism genes can contribute in the tolerability of antiepileptics. CYP3A5*3 is the most prevalent CYP3A5 allele associated with reduced enzymatic function. The current study provides evidence that normal CYP3A5 activity might be a protective factor to aromatic antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Brazilian subjects. PMID:26291084

  2. The Absence of CYP3A5*3 Is a Protective Factor to Anticonvulsants Hypersensitivity Reactions: A Case-Control Study in Brazilian Subjects.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Luciana Kase; Kerr, Daniel Shikanai; dos Santos, Bernardo; Talib, Leda Leme; Yamaguti, Célia; Rodrigues, Helcio; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kalil, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Although aromatic anticonvulsants are usually well tolerated, they can cause cutaneous adverse drug reactions in up to 10% of patients. The clinical manifestations of the antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions (AHR) vary from mild skin rashes to severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions which are related to high mortality and significant morbidity. Genetic polymorphisms in cytochrome P450 genes are associated with altered enzymatic activity and may contribute to the risk of AHR. Here we present a case-control study in which we genotyped SNPs of CYP2C19, 2C9 and 3A5 of 55 individuals with varying severities of AHR, 83 tolerant, and 366 healthy control subjects from São Paulo, Brazil. Clinical characterization was based on standardized scoring systems and drug patch test. All in vivo investigation followed the ENDA (European Network of Drug Allergy) recommendations. Genotype was determined by real time PCR using peripheral blood DNA as a template. Of all 504 subjects, 65% were females, 45% self-identified as Afro-American, 38% as Caucasian and 17% as having non-African mixed ascendancy. Amongst 55 subjects with AHR, 44 had severe cutaneous drug adverse reactions. Of the 46 drug patch tests performed, 29 (63%) were positive. We found a strong association between the absence of CYP3A5*3 and tolerant subjects when compared to AHR (p = 0.0002, OR = 5.28 [CI95% 2.09-14.84]). None of our groups presented positive association with CYP2C19 and 2C9 polymorphisms, however, both SNPs contributed to separation of cases and tolerants in a Classification and Regression Tree. Our findings indicate that drug metabolism genes can contribute in the tolerability of antiepileptics. CYP3A5*3 is the most prevalent CYP3A5 allele associated with reduced enzymatic function. The current study provides evidence that normal CYP3A5 activity might be a protective factor to aromatic antiepileptics-induced hypersensitivity reactions in Brazilian subjects.

  3. [Hypersensitivity to mosquito bite manifested as Skeeter síndrome].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vanzzini, Rafael; González-Díaz, Sandra Nora; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Palma-Gómez, Samuel; Yong-Rodríguez, Adrián; Gutiérrez-Mujica, José Julio; García-Calderín, Diego; Ibarra, Jesús Arturo

    2015-01-01

    The reactions to mosquito bites are immunological reactions with involvement of IgE, IgG and T cells mediated hypersensitivity. These reactions are common and range from small local reactions, large local reactions to systemic allergic reactions. Skeeter syndrome is defined as a large local induced inflammatory reaction to mosquito bite and sometimes accompanied by systemic symptoms such as fever and vomiting. Diagnosis is based on clinical history and physical examination, supported by the identification of specific IgE by skin testing. Treatment includes prevention, antihistamines and steroids in some cases. Specific immunotherapy still requires further study. This paper reports two cases of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to mosquito bites, which were evaluated in our center presenting positive skin tests.

  4. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, R.J.; Tse, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents. Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects. For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test. It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs. PMID:445303

  5. Lymphocyte transformation studies in drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Warrington, R J; Tse, K S

    1979-05-05

    In a group of patients with clinically diagnosed drug hypersensitivity the in vitro lymphocyte response to the suspected drug was assessed by the lymphocyte transformation test. The test gave positive results in all 15 patients with penicillin-induced immediate or accelerated allergic reactions and positive immediate skin-test reactivity to the major or the minor antigenic determinant of penicillin, or both, but in only 3 of the 12 patients with delayed-onset maculopapular rashes induced by penicillin, despite positive immediate reactivity to the skin-test reagents.Lymphocyte stimulation greater than five times the control level was demonstrated for five patients with penicillin-induced erythroderma, Stevens-Johnson syndrome or a serum-sickness-like illness, or with methicillin-induced interstitial nephritis, all of whom had negative reactions to the appropriate skin-test reagents. A low level of stimulation was seen in eight other skin-test-negative patients with possible allergic reactions induced by penicillins. However, in all subjects tested the stimulation was significantly greater than the mean for control subjects.For 9 of 11 patients with isoniazid-induced hepatitis or maculopapular rashes, but for only 8 of 31 patients with eruptions induced by a variety of drugs other than penicillins and isoniazid, significant stimulation occurred in the lymphocyte transformation test.It is concluded that the lymphocyte transformation test is useful in the detection of hypersensitivity to the penicillins (although in IgE-mediated reactions skin testing is clearly preferable) and isoniazid but is of limited value in the demonstration of hypersensitivity to other drugs.

  6. Unique microRNAs appear at different times during the course of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Nicholas; Løvendorf, Marianne B; Zibert, John R; Akat, Kemal M; Renwick, Neil; Tuschl, Thomas; Krueger, James G

    2015-12-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that induces delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression and have been implicated in various inflammatory skin diseases, but their role in DTH reactions is not well understood. We generated global miRNA expression profiles (using next-generation sequencing) of DPCP reactions in skin of seven healthy volunteers at 3, 14 and 120 days after challenge. Compared to placebo-treated sites, DPCP-challenged skin at 3 days (peak inflammation) had 127 miRNAs significantly deregulated. At 14 days (during resolution of inflammation), 43 miRNAs were deregulated and, at 120 days (when inflammation had completely resolved), six miRNAs were upregulated. While some miRNAs have been observed in psoriasis or atopic dermatitis, most of the deregulated miRNAs have not yet been studied in the context of skin biology or immunology. Across the three time points studied, many but not all miRNAs were uniquely expressed. As various miRNAs may influence T cell activation, this may indicate that the miRNAs exclusively expressed at different time points function to promote or resolve skin inflammation, and therefore, may inform on the paradoxical ability of DPCP to treat both autoimmune conditions (alopecia areata) and conditions of ineffective immunity (melanoma). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Murine eosinophils labeled with indium-111 oxine: localization to delayed hypersensitivity reactions against a schistosomal antigen and to lymphokine in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.H.; Clanton, J.A.; Runge, V.; English, D.; Colley, D.G.

    1983-04-01

    We have evaluated a method for quantitation of eosinophil migration to stimuli in vivo. Upon transfusion into normal syngeneic mice, 111In-labeled eosinophils had an intravascular half-life of 9.5 hr and distributed predominantly into spleen, bone marrow, and liver. In either Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice or recipients of lymphoid cells from infected mice, intradermal (ear pinna) injection of the schistosomal egg antigenic preparation (SEA) elicited time-dependent accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils detectable by either gamma scintillation counting of tissue samples or by nuclear medicine external imaging. Intradermal administration of a lymphokine fraction (containing eosinophil stimulation promoter activity) similarly caused accumulation of 111In-labeled eosinophils. Both reactions depended on the concentration of stimulus (SEA or lymphokine). 111In-labeled neutrophils or macrophages or 125I-albumin did not preferentially accumulate at the reactions examined to the extent found with 111In-labeled eosinophils, indicating that localization of label depends on an active process and is due to eosinophils rather than a contaminating cell type. The method was used to estimate how long eosinotactic lymphokine remained at dermal sites: 60% of initial activity was present 12 hr after injection. The model is discussed with regard to the role of lymphokines in hypersensitivity reactions with eosinophil involvement, such as the granulomatous response to S. mansoni eggs.

  8. Practical Management of Patients with a History of Immediate Hypersensitivity to Common non-Beta-Lactam Drugs.

    PubMed

    Macy, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Immediate hypersensitivity reactions to medications are among the most feared adverse drug reactions, because of their close association with anaphylaxis. This review discusses a practical management approach for patients with a history of an immediate hypersensitivity to a non-beta-lactam medication, where reexposure to the implicated, or similar, medication is clinically necessary. Mechanisms associated with severe immediate hypersensitivity reactions include IgE-mediated mast cell activation, complement-mediated mast cell activation, and direct mast cell activation. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions may also be mediated by vasodilators, other pharmacologic mechanisms, or be secondary to underlying patient-specific biochemical abnormalities such as endocrine tumors or chronic spontaneous urticaria. The key features in the reaction history and the biochemistry of the implicated medication are discussed. Most individuals with a history of immediate hypersensitivity to a medication, who require reuse of that drug, can be safely retreated with a therapeutic course of the implicated drug after a full-dose challenge, graded challenge, or desensitization, with or without premedication and/or any preliminary diagnostic testing, depending on the specific situation.

  9. Hypersensitivity to contrast media and dyes.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-08-01

    This article updates current knowledge on hypersensitivity reactions to diagnostic contrast media and dyes. After application of a single iodinated radiocontrast medium (RCM), gadolinium-based contrast medium, fluorescein, or a blue dye, a hypersensitivity reaction is not a common finding; however, because of the high and still increasing frequency of those procedures, patients who have experienced severe reactions are nevertheless frequently encountered in allergy departments. Evidence on allergologic testing and management is best for iodinated RCM, limited for blue dyes, and insufficient for fluorescein. Skin tests can be helpful in the diagnosis of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to these compounds.

  10. Outcomes of corticosteroid prophylaxis for hypersensitivity reactions to low osmolar contrast media in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Woo; Choi, Young Hun; Park, Chang Min; Park, Heung Woo; Cho, Sang-Heon; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2016-09-01

    Corticosteroid prophylaxis has been widely adopted for the prevention of acute allergic-like reactions to iodinated contrast media, but its use is still controversial because there is no strong evidence supporting its efficacy before administration of nonionic low osmolar contrast media (LOCM). To assess the outcomes of premedication in patients with previous acute allergic-like reactions to LOCM in clinical practice. A retrospective study was performed on 322 high-risk patients who were reexposed to LOCM after premedication composed of antihistamines and/or systemic corticosteroids because of a previous history of acute allergic-like reactions to LOCM. After premedication, 275 patients (85.4%) did not experience any reaction, but 47 patients (14.6%) still experienced a breakthrough reaction. The premedication rate and amount of corticosteroid administered were significantly higher in the nonrecurrence group than in the recurrence group (P = .04 and P = .04, respectively), and a linear trend was observed in the use of corticosteroid premedication and the efficacy of prevention (P for trend = .02). Multivariate binary logistic regression revealed that corticosteroid premedication was effective in preventing recurrence (odds ratio, 0.284; 95% confidence interval, 0.103-0.784). Nonetheless, despite corticosteroid premedication, 3.4% of high-risk patients still experienced moderate to severe reactions, and 14.3% of patients with a severe index reaction again had a severe reaction. Premedication with corticosteroids seems to be helpful in reducing the overall rate of recurrence of acute allergic-like reactions to LOCM in high-risk patients, but patients with severe index reactions are still at risk of developing severe reactions despite corticosteroid premedication. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypersensitive response-like reaction is associated with hybrid necrosis in interspecific crosses between tetraploid wheat and Aegilops tauschii coss.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Hosogi, Naoki; Park, Pyoyun; Takumi, Shigeo

    2010-06-25

    Hybrid speciation is classified into homoploid and polyploid based on ploidy level. Common wheat is an allohexaploid species that originated from a naturally occurring interploidy cross between tetraploid wheat and diploid wild wheat Aegilops tauschii Coss. Aegilops tauschii provides wide naturally occurring genetic variation. Sometimes its triploid hybrids with tetraploid wheat show the following four types of hybrid growth abnormalities: types II and III hybrid necrosis, hybrid chlorosis, and severe growth abortion. The growth abnormalities in the triploid hybrids could act as postzygotic hybridization barriers to prevent formation of hexaploid wheat. Here, we report on the geographical and phylogenetic distribution of Ae. tauschii accessions inducing the hybrid growth abnormalities and showed that they are widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Molecular and cytological characterization of the type III necrosis phenotype was performed. The hybrid abnormality causing accessions were widely distributed across growth habitats in Ae. tauschii. Transcriptome analysis showed that a number of defense-related genes such as pathogenesis-related genes were highly up-regulated in the type III necrosis lines. Transmission electron microscope observation revealed that cell death occurred accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species in leaves undergoing type III necrosis. The reduction of photosynthetic activity occurred prior to the appearance of necrotic symptoms on the leaves exhibiting hybrid necrosis. Taking these results together strongly suggests that an autoimmune response might be triggered by intergenomic incompatibility between the tetraploid wheat and Ae. tauschii genomes in type III necrosis, and that genetically programmed cell death could be regarded as a hypersensitive response-like cell death similar to that observed in Arabidopsis intraspecific and Nicotiana interspecific hybrids. Only Ae. tauschii accessions without such

  12. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome treated with intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Dredge, David C; Parsons, Elizabeth C; Carter, Lindsay P; Staley, Kevin J

    2010-07-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome is a severe, potentially life-threatening, reaction to the aromatic anticonvulsant medications. Reported here is a case of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome secondary to phenobarbital in a 2-year-old boy; he responded to drug withdrawal, corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin. The literature regarding treatment of this syndrome is reviewed.

  13. Phosphorylated CaMKII post-synaptic binding to NR2B subunits in the anterior cingulate cortex mediates visceral pain in visceral hypersensitive rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Haiyan; Cao, Zhijun; Chen, Shengliang; Cao, Bing; Liu, Jin

    2012-05-01

    The NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is up-regulated in viscerally hypersensitive (VH) rats induced by colonic anaphylaxis. It plays a critical role in modulation of ACC sensitization and visceral pain responses. Given the key role of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptic plasticity and behavior learning and memory, we hypothesize that phosphorylation of CaMKII binding to NR2B mediates visceral pain in VH states. We performed in vivo electroporation of CaMKII siRNA produced inhibition of colorectal distension-induced visceromotor response in the VH rats. The NR2B, CaMKII and P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein levels were increased in 180%, 220% and 304% fold in the post-synaptic density (PSD) fraction in VH rats separately. Western blotting following co-immunoprecipitation showed that P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ bound to NR2B in the PSD, which was increased to 267% of control in VH rats. Administration of CaMKII antagonist Antennapedia-CaMKIINtide suppressed visceromotor response in VH rats in parallel with decrease of NR2B levels and reduction of the NR2B-P-CaMKII-Thr²⁸⁶ protein complex in PSD. In conclusion, CaMKII is a critical signaling molecule in the ACC glutamatergic synaptic transmission and phosphorylation of CaMKII at Thr286, which binds to NR2B subunit at post-synaptic site, modulates visceral pain in viscerally hypersensitive state.

  14. Nerve growth factor-mediated neuronal plasticity in spinal cord contributes to neonatal maternal separation-induced visceral hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsang, S W; Zhao, M; Wu, J; Sung, J J Y; Bian, Z-X

    2012-04-01

    Visceral hyperalgesia is a multifactorial gastrointestinal disorder which featured with alterations of abdominal motility and/or gut sensitivity, and is believed to be triggered by environmental stressor or psychological factors. However, its etiology remains incompletely understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neuronal plasticity is involved in neonatal maternal separation (NMS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats, and whether NGF antagonist can attenuate or block such development. In our experiments, animals subjected to NMS were developed with visceral hyperalgesia at age of 8 weeks. The threshold for visceral pain among these NMS rats was remarkably lowered than that of the normal handling (NH) rats; however, the expression levels of NGF, c-fos, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), Substance P, and tyrosine kinases A (TrkA) were notably elevated in lumbosacral spinal cord and/or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) when comparing to those of the NH rats. Further, as intra-peritoneal administration of NGF (10 μl at 1 μg/kg/day) was given to NH rats during neonatal period, effects that comparable to NMS induction were observed in the adulthood. In contrast, when NMS rats were treated with NGF antagonist K252a (10 μl/day from postnatal days 2-14), which acts against tyrosine kinases, the neonatal stress-induced down-shifted visceral pain threshold was restored and neuronal activation, specifically NGF and neuropeptide production, was attenuated. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that NGF triggers neuronal plasticity and plays a crucial role in NMS-induced visceral hypersensitivity in which NGF antagonism provides positive inhibition via blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation of TrkA.

  15. Investigation of a stereoselective co-mediated rearrangement reaction.

    PubMed

    Carbery, David R; Reignier, Serge; Miller, Neil D; Adams, Harry; Harrity, Joseph P A

    2003-05-30

    A stereocontrolled approach to alpha-alkyl beta-alkynyl cyclohexanones is reported through a Lewis acid mediated rearrangement reaction of enol ethers bearing an Co-alkyne moiety. The reaction proceeds with high levels of stereoselectivity in the presence of Ti- and B-Lewis acids to provide a range of alpha,beta-disubstituted cyclohexanones in high yield although the products are prone to epimerization at the alpha-position in the presence of the B-promoter system. The potential for an enantioselective variant of this process is outlined, and a rationale for the observed stereochemical trends and detailed structural analyses of the ketone products are described.

  16. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug). We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug) interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. Case presentation We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die) that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. Conclusions The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration) and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse. PMID:20205923

  17. Is the drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) due to human herpesvirus 6 infection or to allergy-mediated viral reactivation? Report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Ivan; Talamo, Maria; Borgia, Guglielmo

    2010-03-06

    Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) is a severe and rare systemic reaction triggered by a drug (usually an antiepileptic drug). We present a case of DISH and we review studies on the clinical features and treatment of DIHS, and on its pathogenesis in which two elements (Herpesvirus infection and the drug) interact with the immune system to trigger such a syndrome that can lead to death in about 20% of cases. We report the case of a 26-year old woman with fever, systemic maculopapular rash, lymphadenopathy, hepatitis and eosinophilic leukocytosis. She had been treated with antibiotics that gave no benefit. She was taking escitalopram and lamotrigine for a bipolar disease 30 days before fever onset. Because the patient's general condition deteriorated, betamethasone and acyclovir were started. This treatment resulted in a mild improvement of symptoms. Steroids were rapidly tapered and this was followed with a relapse of fever and a worsening of laboratory parameters. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) DNA was positive as shown by PCR. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DIHS) was diagnosed. Symptoms regressed on prednisone (at a dose of 50 mg/die) that was tapered very slowly. The patient recovered completely. The search for rare causes of fever led to complete resolution of a very difficult case. As DIHS is a rare disease the most relevant issue is to suspect and include it in differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin. Once diagnosed, the therapy is easy (steroidal administration) and often successful. However our case strongly confirms that attention should be paid on the steroidal tapering that should be very slow to avoid a relapse.

  18. Insect and arachnid hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Bevier, D E

    1999-11-01

    Insect hypersensitivity reactions can have a large number of clinical presentations. The majority of reactions are pruritic and involve the short- or sparsely haired areas of the body. Most are associated with eosinophilic infiltration into the skin, often in a perivascular pattern. The diagnosis may be based on compatible clinical signs and improvement with aggressive insect control and, in some cases, confirmation via provocative exposure. Intradermal, prick, or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE can be used to document the presence of reaginic antibodies against insect allergens. Treatments include avoidance, aggressive insect control, and symptomatic support; in some cases, immunotherapy may be useful in decreasing the severity of clinical reactions to insects.

  19. Outpatient rapid 4-step desensitization for gynecologic oncology patients with mild to low-risk, moderate hypersensitivity reactions to carboplatin/cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Cohn, David; Waller, Allyson; Backes, Floor; Copeland, Larry; Fowler, Jeffrey; Salani, Ritu; O'Malley, David

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to assess the efficacy and safety of an outpatient, 4-step, one-solution desensitization protocol in gynecologic oncology patients with history of mild to low-risk, moderate hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to platinums (carboplatin and cisplatin). This was a single institutional retrospective review. Gynecologic oncology patients with a documented history of mild or low-risk, moderate immediate HSRs to carboplatin/cisplatin and continued treatment with 4-step, one-solution desensitization protocols in the outpatient infusion center were included. Patients with delayed HSRs or immediate high-risk, moderate or severe HSRs were excluded. The primary end point was the rate of successful administrations of each course of platinums. From January 2011 to June 2013, eighteen eligible patients were evaluated for outpatient 4-step, one-solution desensitization. Thirteen patients had a history of HSRs to carboplatin and 5 with HSRs to cisplatin. All of 18 patients successfully completed 94 (98.9%) of 95 desensitization courses in the outpatient infusion center. Eight of 8 (100%) patients with initial mild HSRs completed 29/29 (100%) desensitization courses, and 9 of 10 (90%) of patients with initial moderate HSRs completed 65/66 (94%) desensitization courses. In total, 65/95 (68%) desensitizations resulted in no breakthrough reactions, and mild, moderate and severe breakthrough reactions were seen in 19%, 12% and 1% desensitizations, respectively. No patients were hospitalized during desensitization. The outpatient rapid, 4-step, one-solution desensitization protocol was effective and appeared safe among gynecologic oncology patients who experienced mild to low-risk, moderate HSRs to carboplatin/cisplatin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of contact hypersensitivity in immunotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Descotes, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The histopathological examination of lymphoid organs together with a T-dependent antibody (TDAR) assay are the primary components of preclinical immunotoxicity assessment. Additional testing including measurement of cellular immunity may be considered. Besides ex vivo lymphocyte proliferation assays, either delayed or contact hypersensitivity models can be used. Contact hypersensitivity testing is typically performed either in mice or in guinea pigs and is directly derived from classical models used for the detection of contact sensitizing chemicals. Whatever the selected model, it is comprised of a sensitizing phase where the animals are applied a strong contact sensitizer topically, then a rest phase, and finally an eliciting phase where sensitized animals are challenged topically with the same contact sensitizer.In mice, the ear-swelling test is the reference procedure in which mice are sensitized to the ear or shaved abdominal skin and then challenged on the ear. Ear swelling usually measured from ear thickness reflects a cell-mediated immune response. In guinea pigs, a strong sensitizer is applied on the shaved skin of the abdomen or the interscapular area. The sensitized animals are challenged on another area of the shaved abdomen, and the cell-mediated response is assessed semiquantitatively from the magnitude of induced erythema inconsistently associated with edema. Treatment or exposure with immunosuppressive chemicals can result in a significantly decreased ear swelling or skin reaction. Contact hypersensitivity models are seldom used nowadays in preclinical immunotoxicity testing, most likely because of the lack of standardization and extensive validation as well as their use being restricted to mice or guinea pigs.

  1. The 9-lipoxygenase GhLOX1 gene is associated with the hypersensitive reaction of cotton Gossypium hirsutum to Xanthomonas campestris pv malvacearum.

    PubMed

    Marmey, Philippe; Jalloul, Aïda; Alhamdia, Majd; Assigbetse, Komi; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Voloudakis, Andreas E; Champion, Antony; Clerivet, Alain; Montillet, Jean-Luc; Nicole, Michel

    2007-08-01

    Hypersensitive reaction (HR) cell death of cotton to the incompatible race 18 from Xanthomonas campestris pathovar malvacearum (Xcm) is associated with 9S-lipoxygenase activity (LOX) responsible for lipid peroxidation. Here, we report the cloning of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) LOX gene (GhLOX1) and the sequencing of its promoter. GhLOX1 was found to be highly expressed during Xcm induced HR. Sequence analysis showed that GhLOX1 is a putative 9-LOX, and GhLOX1 promoter contains SA and JA responsive elements. Investigation on LOX signalisation on cotyledons infiltrated with salicylic acid (SA), or incubated with methyl-jasmonate (MeJA) revealed that both treatments induced LOX activity and GhLOX1 gene expression. HR-like symptoms were observed when LOX substrates were then injected in treated (MeJA and SA) cotyledons or when Xcm compatible race 20 was inoculated on MeJA treated cotyledons. Together these results support the fact that GhLOX1 encodes a 9 LOX whose activity would be involved in cell death during cotton HR.

  2. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E.; Montañez, María I.; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier. PMID:27731424

  3. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in tobacco. Molecular cloning and gene expression during the hypersensitive reaction to tobacco mosaic virus and the response to a fungal elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, L; Rohfritsch, O; Fritig, B; Legrand, M

    1994-01-01

    A tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Samsun NN) cDNA clone coding the enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) was isolated from a cDNA library made from polyadenylated RNA purified from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-infected leaves. Southern analysis indicated that, in tobacco, PAL is encoded by a small family of two to four unclustered genes. Northern analysis showed that PAL genes are weakly expressed under normal physiological conditions, they are moderately and transiently expressed after wounding, but they are strongly induced during the hypersensitive reaction to TMV or to a fungal elicitor. Ribonuclease protection experiments confirmed this evidence and showed the occurrence of two highly homologous PAL messengers originating from a single gene or from two tightly co-regulated genes. By in situ RNA-RNA hybridization PAL transcripts were shown to accumulate in a narrow zone of leaf tissue surrounding necrotic lesions caused by TMV infection or treatment with the fungal elicitor. In this zone, no cell specificity was observed and there was a decreasing gradient of labeling from the edge of necrosis. Some labeling was also found in various cell types of young, healthy stems and was shown to accumulate in large amounts in the same cell types after the deposition of an elicitor solution at the top of the decapitated plant. PMID:7824656

  4. The influence of the carrier molecule on amoxicillin recognition by specific IgE in patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to betalactams.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Salas, María; Doña, Inmaculada; Martín-Serrano, Ángela; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Guzmán, Antonio E; Montañez, María I; Torres, María J

    2016-10-12

    The optimal recognition of penicillin determinants, including amoxicillin (AX), by specific IgE antibodies is widely believed to require covalent binding to a carrier molecule. The nature of the carrier and its contribution to the antigenic determinant is not well known. Here we aimed to evaluate the specific-IgE recognition of different AX-derived structures. We studied patients with immediate hypersensitivity reactions to AX, classified as selective or cross-reactors to penicillins. Competitive immunoassays were performed using AX itself, amoxicilloic acid, AX bound to butylamine (AXO-BA) or to human serum albumin (AXO-HSA) in the fluid phase, as inhibitors, and amoxicilloyl-poli-L-lysine (AXO-PLL) in the solid-phase. Two distinct patterns of AX recognition by IgE were found: Group A showed a higher recognition of AX itself and AX-modified components of low molecular weights, whilst Group B showed similar recognition of both unconjugated and conjugated AX. Amoxicilloic acid was poorly recognized in both groups, which reinforces the need for AX conjugation to a carrier for optimal recognition. Remarkably, IgE recognition in Group A (selective responders to AX) is influenced by the mode of binding and/or the nature of the carrier; whereas IgE in Group B (cross-responders to penicillins) recognizes AX independently of the nature of the carrier.

  5. Statistical properties of multistep enzyme-mediated reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Nemenman, Ilya; Sinitsyn, Nikolai A; De Ronde, Wiet H; Daniels, Bryan C; Mugler, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated reactions may proceed through multiple intermediate conformational states before creating a final product molecule, and one often wishes to identify such intermediate structures from observations of the product creation. In this paper, we address this problem by solving the chemical master equations for various enzymatic reactions. We devise a perturbation theory analogous to that used in quantum mechanics that allows us to determine the first () and the second (variance) cumulants of the distribution of created product molecules as a function of the substrate concentration and the kinetic rates of the intermediate processes. The mean product flux V=d/dt (or 'dose-response' curve) and the Fano factor F=variance/ are both realistically measurable quantities, and while the mean flux can often appear the same for different reaction types, the Fano factor can be quite different. This suggests both qualitative and quantitative ways to discriminate between different reaction schemes, and we explore this possibility in the context of four sample multistep enzymatic reactions. We argue that measuring both the mean flux and the Fano factor can not only discriminate between reaction types, but can also provide some detailed information about the internal, unobserved kinetic rates, and this can be done without measuring single-molecule transition events.

  6. A physiologic differentiation between delayed and immediate hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Apicella, Michael A.; Allen, James C.

    1969-01-01

    Studies have been made of movement of various macromolecules into and out of the pleural space of guinea pigs during the course of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to purified protein derivative (PPD), and a passively transferred immediate hypersensitivity reaction to ovalbumin. While the immediate hypersensitivity reaction transiently alters vascular permeability as shown by increased movement of macromolecules into the chest, the delayed hypersensitivity reaction is marked by a decreased capacity to resorb macromolecules from the pleural space. The data suggest that the two hypersensitivity reactions may be distinguished by these physiologic differences. Additional data from studies of a chemically induced pleural effusion in these animals suggest that some type of outflow obstruction is necessary for the development of effusion, but that the outflow defect caused by the irritating chemical is based on a different mechanism than that seen during the delayed hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:4179171

  7. Recommendations for HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 genetic testing to reduce the risk of carbamazepine-induced hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Amstutz, Ursula; Shear, Neil H; Rieder, Michael J; Hwang, Soomi; Fung, Vincent; Nakamura, Hidefumi; Connolly, Mary B; Ito, Shinya; Carleton, Bruce C

    2014-04-01

    To systematically review evidence on genetic risk factors for carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) and provide practice recommendations addressing the key questions: (1) Should genetic testing for HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 be performed in patients with an indication for CBZ therapy to reduce the occurrence of CBZ-induced HSRs? (2) Are there subgroups of patients who may benefit more from genetic testing for HLA-B*15:02 or HLA-A*31:01 compared to others? (3) How should patients with an indication for CBZ therapy be managed based on their genetic test results? A systematic literature search was performed for HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 and their association with CBZ-induced HSRs. Evidence was critically appraised and clinical practice recommendations were developed based on expert group consensus. Patients carrying HLA-B*15:02 are at strongly increased risk for CBZ-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) in populations where HLA-B*15:02 is common, but not CBZ-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) or maculopapular exanthema (MPE). HLA-B*15:02-positive patients with CBZ-SJS/TEN have been reported from Asian countries only, including China, Thailand, Malaysia, and India. HLA-B*15:02 is rare among Caucasians or Japanese; no HLA-B*15:02-positive patients with CBZ-SJS/TEN have been reported so far in these groups. HLA-A*31:01-positive patients are at increased risk for CBZ-induced HSS and MPE, and possibly SJS/TEN and acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP). This association has been shown in Caucasian, Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and patients of mixed origin; however, HLA-A*31:01 is common in most ethnic groups. Not all patients carrying either risk variant develop an HSR, resulting in a relatively low positive predictive value of the genetic tests. This review provides the latest update on genetic markers for CBZ HSRs, clinical practice recommendations as a basis for informed decision making regarding

  8. Rituximab-Induced Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Tonelli, Adriano R.; Lottenberg, Richard; Allan, Robert W.; Sriram, P.S.

    2009-01-01

    Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody used to treat CD20+ non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although pulmonary adverse reactions such as cough, rhinitis, bronchospasm, dyspnea and sinusitis are relatively common, other respiratory conditions like cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, interstitial pneumonitis and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage have rarely been reported. Only 2 possible cases of rituximab-associated hypersensitivity pneumonitis have been described to date. We present a case of hypersensitivity pneumonitis with classic radiographic and histopathologic findings in a patient treated with rituximab who responded to prednisone. PMID:18843175

  9. Multiple Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Werner J.; Srinoulprasert, Yuttana; Yun, James; Hausmann, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Multiple drug hypersensitivity (MDH) is a syndrome that develops as a consequence of massive T-cell stimulations and is characterized by long-lasting drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) to different drugs. The initial symptoms are mostly severe exanthems or drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Subsequent symptoms due to another drug often appear in the following weeks, overlapping with the first DHR, or months to years later after resolution of the initial presentation. The second DHR includes exanthema, erythroderma, DRESS, Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), hepatitis, and agranulocytosis. The eliciting drugs can be identified by positive skin or in vitro tests. The drugs involved in starting the MDH are the same as for DRESS, and they are usually given in rather high doses. Fixed drug combination therapies like sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim or piperacillin/tazobactam are frequently involved in MDH, and 30–40% of patients with severe DHR to combination therapy show T-cell reactions to both components. The drug-induced T-cell stimulation appears to be due to the p-i mechanism. Importantly, a permanent T-cell activation characterized by PD-1+/CD38+ expression on CD4+/CD25low T cells can be found in the circulation of patients with MDH for many years. In conclusion, MDH is a drug-elicited syndrome characterized by a long-lasting hyperresponsiveness to multiple, structurally unrelated drugs with clinically diverse symptoms. PMID:28315874

  10. Affinity of Avr2 for tomato cysteine protease Rcr3 correlates with the Avr2-triggered Cf-2-mediated hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Van't Klooster, John W; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Vervoort, Jacques; Beekwilder, Jules; Boeren, Sjef; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Thomma, Bart P H J; De Wit, Pierre J G M

    2011-01-01

    The Cladosporium fulvum Avr2 effector is a novel type of cysteine protease inhibitor with eight cysteine residues that are all involved in disulphide bonds. We have produced wild-type Avr2 protein in Pichia pastoris and determined its disulphide bond pattern. By site-directed mutagenesis of all eight cysteine residues, we show that three of the four disulphide bonds are required for Avr2 stability. The six C-terminal amino acid residues of Avr2 contain one disulphide bond that is not embedded in its overall structure. Avr2 is not processed by the tomato cysteine protease Rcr3 and is an uncompetitive inhibitor of Rcr3. We also produced mutant Avr2 proteins in which selected amino acid residues were individually replaced by alanine, and, in one mutant, all six C-terminal amino acid residues were deleted. We determined the inhibitory constant (K(i) ) of these mutants for Rcr3 and their ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated hypersensitive response (HR) in tomato. We found that the two C-terminal cysteine residues and the six amino acid C-terminal tail of Avr2 are required for both Rcr3 inhibitory activity and the ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated HR. Individual replacement of the lysine-17, lysine-20 or tyrosine-21 residue by alanine did not affect significantly the biological activity of Avr2. Overall, our data suggest that the affinity of the Avr2 mutants for Rcr3 correlates with their ability to trigger a Cf-2-mediated HR.

  11. CXCL12/CXCR4 chemokine signaling in spinal glia induces pain hypersensitivity through MAPKs-mediated neuroinflammation in bone cancer rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Liu, Yan-Nan; Zhang, Hai-Long; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Li-Ping; Shen, Wen

    2015-02-01

    The activation of MAPK pathways in spinal cord and subsequent production of proinflammatory cytokines in glial cells contribute to the development of spinal central sensitization, the basic mechanism underlying bone cancer pain (BCP). Our previous study showed that spinal CXCL12 from astrocytes mediates BCP generation by binding to CXCR4 in both astrocyters and microglia. Here, we verified that CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling contributed to BCP through a MAPK-mediated mechanism. In naïve rats, a single intrathecal administration of CXCL12 considerably induced pain hyperalgesia and phosphorylation expression of spinal MAPK members (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase), which could be partially prevented by pre-treatment with CXCR4 inhibitor AMD3100. This CXCL12-induced hyperalgesia was also reduced by MAPK inhibitors. In bone cancer rats, tumor cell inoculation into the tibial cavity caused prominent and persistent pain hyperalgesia, and associated with up-regulation of CXCL12 and CXCR4, activation of glial cells, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and production of proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord. These tumor cell inoculation-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations were all suppressed by blocking CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling or MAPK pathways. Taken together, these results demonstrate that spinal MAPK pathways mediated CXCL12/CXCR4-induced pain hypersensitivity in bone cancer rats, which could be druggable targets for alleviating BCP and glia-derived neuroinflammation. Following tumor cell inoculation, chemokine CXCL12 from astrocytes spreads around the spinal environment, resulting in functional activation of CXCR4-expressing astrocytes and microglia. Once glia are activated, they may initiate MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways, and subsequently produce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Among them, CXCL12 could reinforce the astrocytic and microglial activation in autocrine and paracrine manners

  12. Cicatrizing Conjunctivitis in a Patient Diagnosed With Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms/Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome but With Features of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Kelley J; Ciralsky, Jessica B; Harp, Joanna L; Bajaj, Shirin; Sippel, Kimberly C

    2016-06-01

    Severe cutaneous adverse reactions to drugs (SCARs) such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN) and drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms/drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DRESS/DIHS) serve as one of the main reasons for inpatient ophthalmic consultation. Although it is well-recognized that SJS/TEN is associated with severe ocular mucosal inflammation and cicatrizing, potentially blinding, sequelae, this association has not been described in relation to other SCARs. We present a patient fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for probable DRESS/DIHS but not for SJS/TEN, yet exhibiting the severe ocular surface involvement characteristic of SJS/TEN. Case report. A 64-year-old man presented with bilateral pseudomembranous conjunctivitis and conjunctival denudation (sloughing) in the setting of a maculopapular rash, fever, liver dysfunction, and hematologic abnormalities 1 month after initiating several medications. A skin biopsy was not consistent with SJS/TEN. The patient was diagnosed with probable DRESS/DIHS and treated with high-dose systemic corticosteroids. The ocular surface inflammation was addressed with intensive topical corticosteroid ointment. The pseudomembranes resolved over a 6-week period, but the patient exhibited residual conjunctival scarring of all palpebral surfaces. The development of severe ocular surface mucosal inflammation and denudation with cicatrizing sequelae in a patient carrying a diagnosis of DRESS/DIHS has diagnostic and therapeutic implications for the ophthalmologist. Careful ophthalmic assessment is indicated in any SCAR patient with ophthalmic symptoms, regardless of formal diagnosis. Furthermore, the early therapeutic interventions recently recommended in SJS/TEN to limit the ophthalmic cicatricial sequelae, such as systemic or topical corticosteroids, may be indicated.

  13. Metal hypersensitivity in total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Michelle L; Coop, Christopher A; Webb, Charles N

    2014-08-01

    To review the clinical manifestations, testing methods, and treatment options for hypersensitivity reactions to total joint arthroplasty procedures. Studies were identified using MEDLINE and reference lists of key articles. Randomized controlled trials were selected when available. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of peer-reviewed literature were included, as were case series and observational studies of clinical interest. Total joint arthroplasty procedures are increasing, as are the hypersensitivity reactions to these implants. Evidence is not conclusive as to whether metal joint implants increase metal sensitivity or whether metal sensitivity leads to prosthesis failure. Currently, patch testing is still the most widely used method for determining metal hypersensitivity; however, there are no standardized commercial panels specific for total joint replacements available currently. In vitro testing has shown comparable results in some studies, but its use in the clinical setting may be limited by the cost and need for specialized laboratories. Hypersensitivity testing is generally recommended before surgery for patients with a reported history of metal sensitivity. In cases of metal hypersensitivity-related joint failure, surgical revision ultimately may be required. Knowledge about joint replacement hypersensitivity reactions becomes vital because the approach to the evaluation depends on appropriate testing to guide recommendations for future arthroplasty procedures. Evaluation of hypersensitivity reactions after total joint arthroplasty requires a systematic approach, including a careful history, targeted evaluation with skin testing, and in vitro studies. Copyright © 2014 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cockroach hypersensitivity in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Pola, J; Valdivieso, R; Zapata, C; Moneo, I; Duce, F; Larrad, L; Losada, E

    1988-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cockroach antigen has been recognized as an important cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and asthma. To assess the frequency of cockroach hypersensitivity in our country, 150 asthmatic atopic subjects were studied using skin testing and in vitro assays for cockroach-specific IgE antibodies (Oriental and German cockroaches). Twenty-two of 61 patients who had a positive history of cockroach exposure had positive skin tests, and only 3 of 89 patients who had no history of exposure had positive skin reactions. Of 25 patients with positive skin tests, 23 showed specific IgE antibodies against oriental and German cockroaches using RAST and EIA techniques. In summary, approximately 15% of asthmatic atopics in Madrid area are sensitive to cockroaches (positive skin test + specific IgE antibodies). These results indicate that cockroach hypersensitivity should be considered in every patient with perennial asthma.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effect of 1-methylnicotinamide in contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone in mice; involvement of prostacyclin.

    PubMed

    Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Biedron, Rafal; Jakubowski, Andrzej; Chlopicki, Stefan; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2008-01-14

    1-methylnicotinamide (MNA) displays anti-inflammatory effects in patients with contact dermatitis, though the mechanisms involved remain unknown. Herein, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of MNA and its parent molecule, nicotinamide, in the contact hypersensitivity reaction to oxazolone in CBA/J inbred mice. Feeding mice with MNA or nicotinamide (100 mg/kg, 10 days) resulted in the inhibition of the development of contact hypersensitivity reaction by 37% and 35%, respectively, as assessed by the magnitude of ear swelling. This effect was not associated with changes in the expression of adhesion molecules (CD49d(+) and CD54(+)) on CD4(+) and CD8(+) oxazolone-specific T lymphocytes, the major cell component of an inflammatory infiltrate in contact hypersensitivity reaction. Furthermore, in the adoptive transfer model of contact hypersensitivity reaction, pretreatment of mice (recipients of oxazolone-specific T cells), with MNA, resulted in a remarkable anti-inflammatory effect (inhibition of contact hypersensitivity reaction by 66%). Interestingly, in the presence of prostanoid IP receptor antagonist R-3-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-2-[5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-benzofuran-2-ylmethoxycarbonylamino]-propionic acid (RO-3244794) (10 mg/kg) the MNA was inactive. In summary, pretreatment with MNA profoundly attenuated contact hypersensitivity reaction in vivo. In particular, the vessel dependent phase of contact hypersensitivity reaction was affected, in spite of the fact that MNA did not alter the expression of adhesive molecules on oxazolone-specific T lymphocytes. However, the anti-inflammatory action of MNA was completely reversed by the antagonist of prostanoid IP receptor. Accordingly, our results demonstrate for the first time that anti-inflammatory properties of MNA are linked to endothelial, PGI(2)-mediated mechanisms.

  16. HYPERSENSITIVE TO RED AND BLUE 1, a ZZ-type zinc finger protein, regulates phytochrome B-mediated red and cryptochrome-mediated blue light responses.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xiaojun; Chong, Jason; Ni, Min

    2005-03-01

    Plant photoreceptors that regulate photomorphogenic development include red/far-red-light-absorbing phytochromes and blue/UV-A-light-absorbing cryptochromes. We have undertaken a genetic screen to identify additional components downstream of the photoreceptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified a short hypocotyl mutant under red and blue light, hypersensitive to red and blue 1 (hrb1). Mutation in HRB1 also enhances the end-of-day far-red light response, inhibits leaf expansion and petiole elongation, and attenuates the expression of CAB3 and CHS. Double mutant analysis indicates that phyB is epistatic to hrb1 under red light, and cry1 cry2 is epistatic to hrb1 under blue light for both hypocotyl growth and light-regulated gene expression responses. HRB1 localizes to the nucleus and belongs to a protein family of Drought induced 19 (Di19). HRB1 and all other family members contain a ZZ-type zinc finger domain, which in other organisms is implicated in protein-protein interactions between dystrophin and calmodulin and between transcriptional adaptors and activators. HRB1 activity is also required for red and blue light-induced expression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4). pif4 shows a very similar hypersensitive response as hrb1 to both red light and blue light and is epistatic to hrb1 in control of light-regulated gene expression responses. Thus, the roles of HRB1 and PIF4 together in regulating both red and blue light responses may represent points where red light signaling and blue light signaling intersect.

  17. Calcium is involved in the RMc1(blb)-mediated hypersensitive response against Meloidogyne chitwoodi in potato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The resistance (R) gene RMc1(blb) confers resistance against the plant-parasitic nematode, Meloidogyne chitwoodi. Avirulent and virulent nematodes were used to functionally characterize the RMc1(blb)-mediated resistance mechanism in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Histological observations indicated a h...

  18. Silibinin attenuates mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Ho; Yan, Guang Hai

    2009-05-01

    Silibinin is known to have hepatoprotective, anti-carcinogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, roles of silibinin in the immediate-type allergic reactions (anaphylaxis) have not fully been investigated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that silibinin attenuated mast cell-mediated anaphylaxis-like reactions involved in allergic diseases. Oral administration of silibinin inhibited compound 48/80-induced passive cutaneous anaphylaxis-like reaction in mice. Silibinin also attenuated anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) immunoglobulin (Ig) E-mediated passive systemic and cutaneous anaphylaxis. Silibinin had no cytotoxicity on rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC). Silibinin dose-dependently reduced histamine release from RPMC activated by compound 48/80 or anti-DNP IgE. Moreover, silibinin inhibited the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in RPMC. Pretreatment of silibinin suppressed the antigen-stimulated calcium uptake and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) in RPMC. Furthermore, silibinin increased the intracellular cAMP level. Increased cAMP, decreased calcium uptake and suppressed NF-kappaB activity might be involved in the inhibitory effect of silibinin on the secretory response. Our findings provide possibility that silibinin may serve as an effective therapeutic agent for allergic diseases.

  19. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs.

  20. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals That Ethylene/H2O2-Mediated Hypersensitive Response and Programmed Cell Death Determine the Compatible Interaction of Sand Pear and Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Jing; Chang, Youhong; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    A major restriction on sand pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) production is black spot disease caused by the necrotrophic fungus Alternaria alternata. However, the pear response mechanism to A. alternata is unknown at the molecular level. Here, host responses of a resistant cultivar Cuiguan (CG) and a susceptible cultivar Sucui1 (SC1) to A. alternata infection were investigated. We found that the primary necrotic lesion formed at 1 dpi and the expansion of lesions was aggressive in SC1. Data from transcriptomic profiles using RNA-Seq technology identified a large number of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between CG and SC1 in the early phase of A. alternata infection. K-mean cluster and Mapman analysis revealed that genes involved in ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and ET signaling pathway, such as ACS, ACOs, and ERFs, and in hypersensitive response (HR) and programmed cell death (PCD) were significantly enriched and up-regulated in the susceptible cultivar SC1. Conversely, genes involved in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide were differentially up-regulated in the resistant cultivar CG after inoculation with the fungus. Furthermore, ET levels were highly accumulated in SC1, but not in CG. Higher activities of detoxifying enzymes such as catalases were detected in CG. Our results demonstrate that the ET-/H2O2-mediated PCD and detoxifying processes play a vital role in the interaction of pear and A. alternata. PMID:28261248

  1. Spinal 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending facilitation and contribute to behavioral hypersensitivity via a reciprocal neuron-glial signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recently recognized that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in the brainstem and the 5-HT3 receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT3 receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. Results In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via the chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Glial hyperactivation in spinal dorsal horn after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Conclusions These findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neurons and glia. PMID:24913307

  2. How to manage asparaginase hypersensitivity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Burke, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Outcomes for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have improved significantly in recent decades, primarily due to dose-intensified, multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, of which asparaginase has played a prominent role. Despite this success, hypersensitivity remains a significant problem, often requiring the termination of asparaginase. Failure to complete the entire asparaginase therapy course due to clinical hypersensitivity, subclinical hypersensitivity (i.e., silent inactivation), or other treatment-related toxicity is associated with poor ALL outcomes. Thus, it is critical to rapidly identify patients who develop clinical/subclinical hypersensitivity and switch these patients to an alternate asparaginase formulation. This article provides an overview of asparaginase hypersensitivity, identification and management of hypersensitivity and subclinical hypersensitivity, and issues related to switching patients to asparaginase Erwinia chrysanthemi following hypersensitivity reaction.

  3. Perceived personal networks as mediators of stress reactions.

    PubMed

    Steinglass, P; Weisstub, E; De-Nour, A K

    1988-10-01

    The evacuation of an Israeli community in the Sinai peninsula afforded an unusual opportunity to study the longitudinal relationships between personal network characteristics and psychosocial adjustment. Friendship network characteristics proved highly stable longitudinally but were poor predictors of long-term adjustment. The kinship network characteristics before relocation were better predictors, despite the fact that kin were not actually present in the community before relocation. These data support a hypothesis that the perception of social embeddedness rather than the actual availability of social supports mediates reactions to stressful life events.

  4. Defect-mediated turbulence in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chun; Wang, Hongli; Ouyang, Qi

    2009-01-01

    Statistical properties of topological defects in defect-mediated turbulence due to the Doppler instability are examined experimentally in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. By applying the phase space reconstruction approach, processes of defect creation, annihilation, and defect movement are analyzed. The defect dynamics can be well interpreted within the framework of stochastic Markovian process. In contrast to previous studies that made direct measure of the gain and loss rates, which is practically difficult, we demonstrate that the rates can be obtained directly from the analysis of the time series of defects, and the shape of the probability distribution function can be reproduced in a simple way.

  5. α-Regioselective Barbier Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds and Allyl Halides Mediated by Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Wu, San; Li, Ying; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-09-02

    The first utility of praseodymium as a mediating metal in the Barbier reaction of carbonyl compounds with allyl halides was reported in this paper. In contrast to the traditional metal-mediated or catalyzed Barbier reactions, exclusive α-adducts were obtained in this one-pot reaction with a broad scope of substrates and feasible reaction conditions.

  6. IgE-mediated allergic reactions to fruit gums and investigation of cross-reactivity between gelatine and modified gelatine-containing products.

    PubMed

    Wahl, R; Kleinhans, D

    1989-01-01

    A 32-year-old female reacted with a contact urticaria syndrome after eating 'gummy bears' (fruit gums). The reaction began in the oral mucosa and led to treatment on an inpatient basis. RAST measurements with allergen discs produced with gelatine and gelatine-containing products (among them 'gummy bears') demonstrated the presence of IgE antibodies in the serum of this patient. Proteins with molecular weights in the range of 40-120 kD were identified as the allergens in gelatine by using Western blot analysis. RAST inhibition showed cross-reactivity between gelatine, gelatine-containing products and the modified gelatine used in some plasma substitutes. Allergic reactions towards coloured fruit candies and 'gummy bears' may result from an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity towards gelatine. The long-known anaphylactoid reactions towards gelatine-containing plasma substitutes may, at least in part, be of an allergic nature.

  7. The Multi-Resistant Reaction of Drought-Tolerant Coffee 'Conilon Clone 14' to Meloidogyne spp. and Late Hypersensitive-Like Response in Coffea canephora.

    PubMed

    Lima, Edriana A; Furlanetto, Cleber; Nicole, Michel; Gomes, Ana C M M; Almeida, Maria R A; Jorge-Júnior, Aldemiro; Correa, Valdir R; Salgado, Sônia Maria; Ferrão, Maria A G; Carneiro, Regina M D G

    2015-06-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKN), Meloidogyne spp., have major economic impact on coffee production in Central and South America. Genetic control of RKN constitutes an essential part for integrated pest management strategy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Coffea canephora genotypes (clones) to Meloidogyne spp. Sensitive and drought-tolerant coffee genotypes were used to infer their resistance using nematode reproduction factor and histopathology. Eight clonal genotypes were highly resistant to M. paranaensis. 'Clone 14' (drought-tolerant) and 'ESN2010-04' were the only genotypes highly resistant and moderately resistant, respectively, to both M. incognita races 3 and 1. Several clones were highly resistant to both avirulent and virulent M. exigua. Clone 14 and ESN2010-04 showed multiple resistance to major RKNs tested. Roots of 'clone 14' (resistant) and 'clone 22' (susceptible) were histologically studied against infection by M. incognita race 3 and M. paranaensis. Reduction of juvenile (J2) penetration in clone 14 was first seen at 2 to 6 days after inoculation (DAI). Apparent early hypersensitive reaction (HR) was seen in root cortex between 4 and 6 DAI, which led to cell death and prevention of some nematode development. At 12 to 20 DAI, giant cells formed in the vascular cylinder, besides normal development into J3/J4. From 32 to 45 DAI, giant cells were completely degenerated. Late, intense HR and cell death were frequently observed around young females and giant cells reported for the first time in coffee pathosystem. These results provide rational bases for future studies, including prospection, characterization, and expression profiling of genomic loci involved in both drought tolerance and resistance to multiple RKN species.

  8. Re-exposure to low osmolar iodinated contrast media in patients with prior moderate-to-severe hypersensitivity reactions: A multicentre retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Jung; Park, Jung-Won; Yang, Min-Suk; Kim, Mi-Yeong; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Nam, Young-Hee; Kim, Gun-Woo; Kim, Sujeong; Park, Hye-Kyung; Jung, Jae-Woo; Park, Jong-Sook; Kang, Hye-Ryun

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the outcomes of re-exposure to low-osmolar iodinated contrast medium (LOCM) in patients with a history of moderate-to-severe hypersensitivity reaction (HSR). We retrospectively evaluated a cohort comprising all subjects satisfying the following conditions at 11 centres: (1) experienced a moderate-to-severe HSR to LOCM by December 2014, and (2) underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomography after the initial HSR between January 2014 and December 2014. A total of 150 patients with 328 instances of re-exposure were included; the recurrence rate of HSR was 19.5%. Patients with severe initial HSR exhibited a higher recurrence rate of severe HSR compared to patients with moderate initial HSR, despite more intensive premedication. In the multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for recurrence of HSR were diabetes, chronic urticaria, drug allergy other than to iodinated contrast media (ICM) and severe initial HSR. The risk of recurrent HSR was 67.1% lower in cases where the implicated ICM was changed to another one (odds ratio: 0.329; P = 0.001). However, steroid premedication did not show protective effects against recurrent HSR. In high-risk patients who have previously experienced a moderate-to-severe initial HSR to LOCM, we should consider changing the implicated ICM to reduce recurrence risk. • In patients with moderate-to-severe HSR, steroid premedication only shows limited effectiveness. • Changing the implicated ICM can reduce the recurrence of HSR to ICM. • Diabetes, chronic urticaria and drug allergies increase the risk of ICM HSR.

  9. Intradermal injections of equine allogeneic umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells are well tolerated and do not elicit immediate or delayed hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Carrade, Danielle D; Affolter, Verena K; Outerbridge, Catherine A; Watson, Johanna L; Galuppo, Larry D; Buerchler, Sabine; Kumar, Vijay; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2011-11-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS. The use of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to treat acute equine lesions would greatly expand equine cellular therapy options; however, the safety and antigenicity of these cells have not been well-studied. We hypothesized that equine allogeneic umbilical cord tissue (UCT)-derived MSC would not elicit acute graft rejection or a delayed-type hypersensitivity response when injected intradermally. METHODS. Six Quarterhorse yearlings received 12 intradermal injections (autologous MSC, allogeneic MSC, positive control and negative control, in triplicate) followed by the same series of 12 injections, 3-4 weeks later, at another site. Wheals were measured and palpated at 0.25, 4, 24, 48, 72 h and 7 days post-injection. Biopsies were obtained at 48 and 72 h and 7 days post-injection. Mixed leukocyte reactions were performed 1 week prior to the first injections and 3 weeks after the second injections. RESULTS. There were no adverse local or systemic responses to two intradermal injections of allogeneic MSC. MSC injection resulted in minor wheal formation, characterized by mild dermatitis, dermal edema and endothelial hyperplasia, that fully resolved by 48-72 h. No differences were noted between allogeneic and autologous MSC. The second injection of MSC did not elicit more significant physical or histomorphologic alterations compared with the first MSC injection. Neither allogeneic nor autologous UCT-derived MSC stimulated or suppressed baseline T-cell proliferation in vitro prior to or after two MSC administrations. CONCLUSIONS. Equine allogeneic UCT MSC may be safely administered intradermally on multiple occasions without eliciting a measurable cellular immune response.

  10. Squid hypersensitivity: a clinical and immunologic study.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, T; Castillo, R; Caminero, J; Cuevas, M; Rodriguez, J C; Acosta, O; Rodriguez de Castro, F

    1992-06-01

    Hypersensitivity to mollusk has rarely been described in the literature. Among the mollusks, the cephalopods are a group of great importance as a food source. We report seven patients who had had symptoms highly suggestive of IgE-mediated reactions after ingesting squid or inhaling vapors from cooking squid. All had previously suffered from persistent rhinitis or asthma for years. In addition, six of the seven patients had had symptoms after ingesting shrimp. Skin prick tests were strongly positive for boiled squid extract and for various commercial crustacean extracts. Specific IgE antibodies against boiled extract and several crustacean extracts were demonstrated in all patients by RAST and reverse enzyme immunoassay. Cross reactivity between squid and shrimp and other crustaceans was demonstrated by reverse immunoassay inhibition studies. Cross reactivity could not be demonstrated between squid and octopus, which are both cephalopods, nor between squid and other mollusks.

  11. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Vandenplas, O; Campo, P; Cruz, M J; de Blay, F; Koschel, D; Moscato, G; Pala, G; Raulf, M; Sastre, J; Siracusa, A; Tarlo, S M; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Cormier, Y

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this document was to provide a critical review of the current knowledge on hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the occupational environment and to propose practical guidance for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis (OHP) is an immunologic lung disease resulting from lymphocytic and frequently granulomatous inflammation of the peripheral airways, alveoli, and surrounding interstitial tissue which develops as the result of a non-IgE-mediated allergic reaction to a variety of organic materials or low molecular weight agents that are present in the workplace. The offending agents can be classified into six broad categories that include bacteria, fungi, animal proteins, plant proteins, low molecular weight chemicals, and metals. The diagnosis of OHP requires a multidisciplinary approach and relies on a combination of diagnostic tests to ascertain the work relatedness of the disease. Both the clinical and the occupational history are keys to the diagnosis and often will lead to the initial suspicion. Diagnostic criteria adapted to OHP are proposed. The cornerstone of treatment is early removal from exposure to the eliciting antigen, although the disease may show an adverse outcome even after avoidance of exposure to the causal agent.

  12. Monocyte- and macrophage-mediated immune reactions against Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Taubert, Anja; Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Sühwold, Anke; Zahner, Horst; Hermosilla, Carlos

    2009-10-14

    Innate immune reactions conducted by macrophages may affect the outcome of primary infections and are crucial for the transition to adaptive immune responses. In bovine coccidiosis little is known on early monocyte/macrophage-mediated responses. We therefore investigated in vivo, in vitro and ex vivo reactions of monocytes and macrophages against Eimeria bovis, one of the most pathogenic Eimeria species in cattle. Macrophages significantly infiltrate the gut mucosa of E. bovis-infected calves, particularly after challenge infection. Furthermore, peripheral monocytes of infected animals, as precursor cells of macrophages, exhibited enhanced ex vivo phagocytic and oxidative burst activities. Enhanced levels of both activities were found early after infection and towards the end of first merogony. In vitro exposure of macrophages to sporozoites led to phagocytosis of the pathogen, whilst monocytes failed to do so. Phagocytosis occurred independently of the viability of the sporozoites, indicating that active invasion by the parasites was negligible. Phagocytosis occurred in the absence of immune serum, but could clearly be enhanced by addition of immune serum, suggesting macrophage-derived antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Furthermore, co-culture of macrophages with sporozoites and stimulation with merozoite I antigen induced distinct levels of cytokine and chemokine gene transcription. Thus, the transcription of genes encoding for IFN-gamma, IL-12, TNF-alpha, IL-6, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL10 and COX-2 was upregulated after sporozoite encounter. In contrast, soluble merozoite I antigen only induced the gene transcription of IL-6 and IL-12 and failed to upregulate IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha gene transcripts. In monocytes, IFN-gamma and CXCL10 were found upregulated, all other immunoregulatory molecules tested were not affected. In summary, our results strongly suggest that macrophage-mediated, innate immune reactions play an important role in the early immune response to E

  13. Hydrogen transfer in SAM-mediated enzymatic radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Hioe, Johnny; Zipse, Hendrik

    2012-12-14

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) plays an essential role in a variety of enzyme-mediated radical reactions. One-electron reduction of SAM is currently believed to generate the C5'-desoxyadenosyl radical, which subsequently abstracts a hydrogen atom from the actual substrate in a catalytic or a non-catalytic fashion. Using a combination of theoretical and experimental bond dissociation energy (BDE) data, the energetics of these radical processes have now been quantified. SAM-derived radicals are found to react with their respective substrates in an exothermic fashion in enzymes using SAM in a stoichiometric (non-catalytic) way. In contrast, the catalytic use of SAM appears to be linked to a sequence of moderately endothermic and exothermic reaction steps. The use of SAM in spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) appears to fit neither of these general categories and appears to constitute the first example of a SAM-initiated radical reaction propagated independently of the cofactor. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Hypersensitivity to biomedical implants: Prevention and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Gregory A; Fonacier, Luz S

    2017-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential for adverse immunologic reactions to metals in biomedical devices and increasing referrals for the evaluation and management of metal hypersensitivity reactions reported in orthopedic, cardiac, gynecologic, and dental implant devices. However, there are few studies that give evidence-based recommendations on how to evaluate this issue in our practices. We reviewed reasonable evidence and expert opinion on biomedical device hypersensitivity and published guidelines on pre- and postimplantation evaluation of delayed hypersensitivity reactions in patients suspected of possible metal hypersensitivity to biomedical devices. There is consensus that routine preimplantation evaluation in individuals with no history of adverse cutaneous reactions to metals or a history of implant-related adverse events is not necessary. However, patients with a history of metal hypersensitivity of a magnitude sufficient to cause concern for the patient or health care provider may benefit from evaluation by patch testing (PT) before device implantation. Patients after implantation and with chronic unexplained implant failure or with dermatitis may benefit from patch test evaluation after other causes, such as infection and biomechanical issues, are ruled out. However, a positive metal patch test result does not prove symptom causality, and the decision regarding implant revision can only be made after a thorough discussion among the patient, the allergist or dermatologist, and the orthopedic surgeon. Consensus guidelines for the evaluation of hypersensitivity to biomedical devices can be used by the practicing physician while awaiting for the results of further investigations.

  15. Carbamazepine-induced anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome--pathogenic and diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Scerri, L; Shall, L; Zaki, I

    1993-11-01

    Two epileptic patients developed an infectious mononucleosis-like illness which subsequently proved to be a carbamazepine-induced anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome. Patch testing to carbamazepine 3 years later was positive in the one patient tested and negative in normal controls. The second patient died a few weeks after the illness, secondary to long-standing cardiac disease without having undergone patch testing. A skin biopsy was, however, consistent with an immune complex mediated drug reaction. Patch testing for systemically administered drugs is generally believed to be of little value in diagnosing drug allergies. However, we reinforce a previous suggestion that this investigation may be helpful in some cases of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome caused by carbamazepine. The pathogenic role of type 3 and 4 hypersensitivity is also discussed.

  16. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  17. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pelikan, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (p<0.01), 13 SLCR (p<0.001), and eight SDYCR (p<0.01) to nasal challenges with allergens (NPTs), the NPTs and 32 control tests with PBS were repeated and supplemented with the determination of these factors in tears. The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of histamine, tryptase, ECP, LTC4, and IL-4. The SLCRs were accompanied by significant changes in concentrations of histamine, ECP, LTB4, LTC4, MPO, IL-4, and IL-5. The SDYCRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of LTB4, MPO, IFN-γ, and IL-2. No significant changes in these factors were recorded in tears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC.

  18. Mediator profiles in tears during the conjunctival response induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The allergic reaction occurring primarily in the nasal mucosa can induce a secondary conjunctival response of an immediate (SICR), late (SLCR), or delayed (SDYCR) type in some patients with allergic conjunctivitis (AC). Objectives To investigate the concentration changes of histamine, tryptase, eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), leukotrienes (LTB 4, LTC4, LTE4), myeloperoxidase (MPO), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5) in tears during the SICR, SLCR, and SDYCR. Methods In 32 patients with AC, 11 SICR (p<0.01), 13 SLCR (p<0.001), and eight SDYCR (p<0.01) to nasal challenges with allergens (NPTs), the NPTs and 32 control tests with PBS were repeated and supplemented with the determination of these factors in tears. Results The SICRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of histamine, tryptase, ECP, LTC4, and IL-4. The SLCRs were accompanied by significant changes in concentrations of histamine, ECP, LTB4, LTC4, MPO, IL-4, and IL-5. The SDYCRs were associated with significant concentration changes in tears (p<0.05) of LTB4, MPO, IFN-γ, and IL-2. No significant changes in these factors were recorded in tears during the 32 PBS controls (p>0.1) or in the ten control patients (p>0.1). Conclusions These results provide evidence for causal involvement of nasal allergy in some patients with AC, inducing secondary conjunctival response of immediate (SICR), late SLCR, or delayed SDYCR type, associated with different mediator, cytokine, and cellular profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also emphasize the diagnostic value of nasal allergen challenge combined with monitoring of the conjunctival response in some patients with AC. PMID:23869165

  19. Prediction of hypersensitivity to antibiotics: what factors need to be considered?

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Fernández, Tahía D; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Blanca, Miguel; Torres, María José

    2013-12-01

    This review focuses on the epidemiology and different risk factors related to the development of hypersensitivity reactions to antibiotics, with a focus on betalactams and fluoroquinolones, the compounds most frequently involved in these reactions, due to their high level of consumption. The true prevalence of allergic drug reactions is unknown and the corresponding morbidity, mortality and associated economic costs are often underestimated. It is reported that multiple risk factors, related to both the drug and the patient, can modify the clinical expression of immune-mediated drug reactions. These include the chemical properties, molecular weight and administration route of the drug and the age, gender, concomitant diseases and genetic factors of the patient.

  20. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Chloroplast-generated reactive oxygen species are involved in hypersensitive response-like cell death mediated by a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Pike, Sharon; Pallardy, Stephen; Gassmann, Walter; Zhang, Shuqun

    2007-09-01

    Plant defense against pathogens often includes rapid programmed cell death known as the hypersensitive response (HR). Recent genetic studies have demonstrated the involvement of a specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade consisting of three tobacco MAPKs, SIPK, Ntf4 and WIPK, and their common upstream MAPK kinase (MAPKK or MEK), NtMEK2. Potential upstream MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs or MEKKs) in this cascade include the orthologs of Arabidopsis MEKK1 and tomato MAPKKKalpha. Activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK pathway induces cell death with phenotypes identical to pathogen-induced HR at macroscopic, microscopic and physiological levels, including loss of membrane potential, electrolyte leakage and rapid dehydration. Loss of membrane potential in NtMEK2(DD) plants is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is preceded by disruption of metabolic activities in chloroplasts and mitochondria. We observed rapid shutdown of carbon fixation in chloroplasts after SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK activation, which can lead to the generation of ROS in chloroplasts under illumination. Consistent with a role of chloroplast-generated ROS in MAPK-mediated cell death, plants kept in the dark do not accumulate H(2)O(2) in chloroplasts after MAPK activation, and cell death is significantly delayed. Similar light dependency was observed in HR cell death induced by tobacco mosaic virus, which is known to activate the same MAPK pathway in an N-gene-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of the SIPK/Ntf4/WIPK cascade by pathogens actively promotes the generation of ROS in chloroplasts, which plays an important role in the signaling for and/or execution of HR cell death in plants.

  2. A novel methodology for quantitating the enhancement of cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity by IMREG-1: a measure of the immunopotentiation of cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Sizemore, R C; Kern, C H; Gottlieb, M S; Gottlieb, A A

    1995-09-01

    IMREG-1, a low-molecular-weight immunomodulator derived from normal human leukocyte dialysates, has been shown to enhance cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses to recall antigens. Both IMREG-1 and the biologically active peptides (Tyr-Gly[YG] and Tyr-Gly-Gly[YGG]) identified therein are able to accelerate and enhance DTH in a concentration-dependent manner. In this study, we describe a novel methodology for analyzing and quantitating this response and demonstrate its use with data comparing drug to placebo. Subjects demonstrating prior sensitivity to a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) received intradermal injections of tetanus toxoid alone (control) and either dilutions of IMREG-1 plus antigen, or placebo plus antigen, on the volar surface of the forearm. The response, as measured by area of erythema, was calculated and plotted as a function of time. The area under the resulting curve (AUC) was then determined by use of the trapezoidal rule, whereby the area of a trapezoid formed between each sequential pair of time points was calculated. The AUC computed for each site receiving a dilution of IMREG-1 or placebo (test) was compared with the AUC computed at the site that received antigen alone (control) by means of a test to control (T/C) ratio. The respective T/C ratios for designated dilutions of IMREG-1 or placebo provided a basis of comparison between responses to IMREG-1 and to placebo, while also controlling for individual sensitivity in response to antigen. We demonstrate in this study that the enhanced response to IMREG-1 plus antigen is statistically different from that seen with placebo plus antigen. This response, as a function to time, predominantly appears in the 12- to 24-hr period after injection, illustrating the ability of the immunomodulator to accelerate, enhance, and sustain a DTH response. We further conclude that the effect of IMREG-1 in this context is one of immunopotentiation of cell-mediated immunity.

  3. DOLICHOL PHOSPHATE MANNOSE SYNTHASE1 Mediates the Biogenesis of Isoprenyl-Linked Glycans and Influences Development, Stress Response, and Ammonium Hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Jadid, Nurul; Mialoundama, Alexis Samba; Heintz, Dimitri; Ayoub, Daniel; Erhardt, Mathieu; Mutterer, Jérôme; Meyer, Denise; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rahier, Alain; Camara, Bilal; Bouvier, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The most abundant posttranslational modification in nature is the attachment of preassembled high-mannose-type glycans, which determines the fate and localization of the modified protein and modulates the biological functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored and N-glycosylated proteins. In eukaryotes, all mannose residues attached to glycoproteins from the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) derive from the polyprenyl monosaccharide carrier, dolichol P-mannose (Dol-P-Man), which is flipped across the ER membrane to the lumen. We show that in plants, Dol-P-Man is synthesized when Dol-P-Man synthase1 (DPMS1), the catalytic core, interacts with two binding proteins, DPMS2 and DPMS3, that may serve as membrane anchors for DPMS1 or provide catalytic assistance. This configuration is reminiscent of that observed in mammals but is distinct from the single DPMS protein catalyzing Dol-P-Man biosynthesis in bakers’ yeast and protozoan parasites. Overexpression of DPMS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in disorganized stem morphology and vascular bundle arrangements, wrinkled seed coat, and constitutive ER stress response. Loss-of-function mutations and RNA interference–mediated reduction of DPMS1 expression in Arabidopsis also caused a wrinkled seed coat phenotype and most remarkably enhanced hypersensitivity to ammonium that was manifested by extensive chlorosis and a strong reduction of root growth. Collectively, these data reveal a previously unsuspected role of the prenyl-linked carrier pathway for plant development and physiology that may help integrate several aspects of candidate susceptibility genes to ammonium stress. PMID:21558543

  4. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  5. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  6. Lyn Is Essential for Fcγ Receptor III–Mediated Systemic Anaphylaxis but Not for the Arthus Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Yuasa, Takae; Ono, Masao; Watanabe, Takeshi; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2001-01-01

    The Src family kinase Lyn initiates intracellular signal transduction by associating with a variety of immune receptors such as antigen receptor on B cells and high-affinity Fc receptor (FcR) for immunoglobulin Ig(E) (FcεRI) on mast cells. Involvement of Lyn in the IgE-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity is well documented, but the physiological significance of Lyn in IgG-dependent, type III low-affinity FcR for IgG (FcγRIII)-mediated responses is largely unknown. In this study, we generated a double-mutant mouse strain deficient in both type II FcR for IgG (FcγRIIB) and Lyn to exclude any involvement of inhibitory signaling by FcγRIIB, which otherwise downregulates FcγRIII-mediated cellular responses. FcγRIIB-deficient but Lyn-sufficient mice served as controls. The Lyn deficiency attenuated IgG-mediated systemic anaphylaxis in vivo, and significantly reduced calcium mobilization and degranulation responses of bone marrow–derived mast cells (BMMCs) in vitro. However, we found that either interleukin 4 or tumor necrosis factor α release by BMMCs was comparable to that from Lyn-deficient and control mice, and the reverse-passive Arthus reaction was equally induced in both mutant mice, indicating that Lyn is not involved in the onset of the IgG-mediated, FcγRIII-dependent late phase responses of mast cells. These findings provide us with insight into distinct signaling mechanisms in mast cells underlying the development of diverse pathologies as well as a therapeutic potential for selective treatment of allergic disorders. PMID:11238587

  7. Sequelae in 145 patients with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms: survey conducted by the Asian Research Committee on Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions (ASCAR).

    PubMed

    Kano, Yoko; Tohyama, Mikiko; Aihara, Michiko; Matsukura, Setsuko; Watanabe, Hideaki; Sueki, Hirohiko; Iijima, Masafumi; Morita, Eishin; Niihara, Hiroyuki; Asada, Hideo; Kabashima, Kenji; Azukizawa, Hiroaki; Hashizume, Hideo; Nagao, Keisuke; Takahashi, Hayato; Abe, Riichiro; Sotozono, Chie; Kurosawa, Michiko; Aoyama, Yumi; Chu, Chia-Yu; Chung, Wen-Hung; Shiohara, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome/drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DIHS/DRESS) is a severe adverse drug reaction caused by specific drug. It is characterized by visceral organ involvement and reactivation of various human herpesviruses. Although sporadic reports have documented certain conditions that appear after the resolution of DIHS/DRESS, little information is available on sequelae after resolution of DIHS/DRESS in a large patient population. The Asian Research Committee on Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions, comprised of doctors from Japan and Taiwan, conducted a survey on sequelae and deterioration of the underlying disease in patients with DIHS/DRESS. This was achieved by directly interviewing patients who had been followed-up by experts or through a questionnaire mailed to patients. Questions were asked about new onset cardiovascular disease, collagen disease or autoimmune disease, gastrointestinal disease, renal disease, respiratory disease, neoplasms, and other diseases such as herpes zoster and diabetes mellitus, as well as deterioration of the underlying disease. A total of 145 patients were analyzed in this study. The following newly developed diseases after recovery from DIHS/DRESS were observed: Graves' disease (n = 2), Hashimoto's disease (n = 3), painless thyroiditis (n = 2), fulminant type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 5), and infectious diseases (n = 7). Several DIHS/DRESS patients with pre-existing renal dysfunction required lifelong hemodialysis. DIHS/DRESS is a condition that increases the risk of new onset of disease. Long-term observation of DIHS/DRESS can provide an opportunity to investigate substantial diseases from onset to the full-blown stage. Patients with DIHS/DRESS require careful long-term follow-up. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. PMN-mediated immune reactions against Eimeria bovis.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Jan Hillern; Hermosilla, Carlos; Hardt, Martin; Failing, Klaus; Zahner, Horst; Taubert, Anja

    2008-02-14

    For successful in vivo infection, Eimeria bovis sporozoites have to traverse the mucosal layer of the ileum to infect lymphatic endothelial cells and may, thereby, be exposed to the interstitial fluid and to the lymph representing potential targets for leukocytes. To mimic this situation in vitro, we exposed E. bovis sporozoites to bovine PMN and found enhanced elimination of the parasites. Addition of immune serum clearly increased these reactions, whereas neonatal calf serum had no effect, thus proposing a PMN-derived antibody-dependent cytotoxicity. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy showed PMN engulfing sporozoites or extending filopodia towards them and occasionally incorporating the parasites. PMN reacted with enhanced transcription of IL-6, MCP-1, GROalpha, TNF-alpha, and iNOS genes after exposure to sporozoites while stimulation with merozoite-antigen, in addition, upregulated IL-8, IP-10 and IL-12 gene transcription. Furthermore, enhanced in vitro oxidative burst and phagocytic activities were observed after contact of PMN with viable sporozoites. To verify the potential role of PMN in the in vivo situation, we analysed the general phagocytic and oxidative burst activities of PMN obtained ex vivo from E. bovis experimentally infected calves. Enhanced levels of both activities were found early p.i. (1-5 days) and towards the end of the first schizogony (days 13-22 p.i.) underlining the in vitro data. Our results suggest that PMN-mediated, innate immune reactions play an important role in the early immune response to E. bovis infections in calves.

  9. Influence of third party expertise on disputants' reactions to mediation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Josh A

    2007-10-01

    When people cannot resolve their conflicts, they often turn to a third party, called a mediator, for help. What guides disputants' choice of mediators is the present focus. Two kinds of mediator's expertise were compared, which might affect disputants' judgment of mediators and their recommendations--process expertise and content expertise. The mediator's particular content expertise about the details of the dispute appeared to be irrelevant if the mediator was considered to be an expert in the process of conflict resolution. When mediators were seen as process experts, disputants viewed them as more credible and were more favorably disposed toward engaging their services. These judgments extended to the mediators' recommendations. Those recommendations offered by process expert mediators were viewed as higher quality and were judged more favorably. When the mediator was perceived as lacking process expertise, disputants' perceptions of how well the mediator understood the particular details of the dispute increased their evaluations of the mediator and the mediator's recommendation.

  10. Severe bullous hypersensitivity reactions after exposure to carbamazepine in a Han-Chinese child with a positive HLA-B*1502 and negative in vitro toxicity assays: evidence for different pathophysiological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Elzagallaai, Abdelbaset A; Garcia-Bournissen, Facundo; Finkelstein, Yaron; Bend, John R; Rieder, Michael J; Koren, Gideon

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) can present in several clinical forms ranging from simple maculopapular skin rash to severe bullous reactions and multi-system dysfunction. Genetic analysis of DHS patients has revealed a striking association between carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced severe bullous reactions, such as Steven-Johnson Syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis in individuals from Southeast Asia who carry a specific HLA allele (HLA-B*1502). This ethnic-specific relationship with a disease phenotype has raised the question of the commonality of the pathogenesis mechanisms of these diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic and metabolic bases of DHS development to help predict patient susceptibility. A case of carbamazepine-induced Steven-Johnson Syndrome reaction in a HLA-B*1502 positive child of Han Chinese origin, a carbamazepine-induced DHS case in a Caucasian patient and 3 healthy controls were investigated. We performed two types of in vitro toxicity assay, the lymphocyte toxicity assay (LTA) and the novel in vitro platelet toxicity assay (iPTA) on cells taken from the Chinese child 3 and 9 months after recovery from the reaction and from two healthy volunteers. We also tested the Caucasian patient, who developed CBZ-induced DHS, 3 months after the reaction. Both LTA and iPTA tests were negative 3 and 9 months after the reaction on samples from the Chinese child whereas the tests were positive in the Caucasian patient. These results strongly suggest more than one mechanistic pathway for different CBZ-induced hypersensitivity reactions in patients with different ethnic backgrounds.

  11. Spinal TLR4 mediates the transition to a persistent mechanical hypersensitivity after the resolution of inflammation in serum-transferred arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Christina A.; Dumlao, Darren S.; Stokes, Jennifer A.; Dennis, Edward A.; Svensson, Camilla I.; Corr, Maripat; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2012-01-01

    Persistent pain after resolution of clinically appreciable signs of arthritis poses a therapeutic challenge and immunosuppressive therapies do not meet this medical need. To investigate this conversion to persistent pain, we utilized the K/BxN serum transfer arthritis model, which has persistent mechanical hypersensitivity despite the resolution of visible inflammation. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in neuropathic and other pain models. We compared the relative courses of serum transfer arthritis and mechanical hypersensitivity in wild type (WT) and Tlr4−/− mice. K/BxN serum transfer induced similar joint swelling and inflammation from days 4–22 in WT and Tlr4−/− mice. Unlike WT mice, Tlr4−/− mice displayed a significant reversal in mechanical hypersensitivity and diminished appearance of glial activation markers after resolution of peripheral inflammation. Intrathecal (IT) delivery of a TLR4 antagonist, LPS-RS (10μg), on days 6, 9, and 12 abrogated the transition to persistent mechanical hypersensitivity in WT arthritic mice, while later administration had no impact. We utilized a lipodomics LC/MS/MS methodology to determine spinal cord profiles of bioactive lipid species following early LPS-RS treatment compared to vehicle treated controls. WT arthritic mice had reduced spinal levels of the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15d-PGJ2 on day 6, compared to IT LPS-RS treated mice. Direct IT application of 15d-PGJ2 (0.5μg) on day 6 improved mechanical hypersensitivity in arthritic mice within 15 minutes. Hence, TLR4 signaling altered spinal bioactive lipid profiles in the serum transfer model and played a critical role in the transition from acute to chronic post-inflammatory mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:22019135

  12. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  13. Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome secondary to carbamazepine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Shannon C.

    2017-01-01

    Anticonvulsant hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is a potentially fatal multiorgan drug reaction that presents with various cutaneous eruptions. There is a genetic predisposition to such reactions. We present a young woman with AHS due to carbamazepine that presented as an atypical erythema multiforme with elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28127149

  14. Radiocontrast media hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suh-Young; Lim, Kyoung-Whan; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Radiocontrast media (RCM) is a major cause of drug hypersensitivity reactions as the medical application of RCM is increasing recently. RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions are considered as unpredictable type B reactions. Underlying mechanism of RCM induced hypersensitivity was previously regarded as nonimmunological mechanisms but recent studies suggest that immunological mechanisms could also be involved. As a result, the roles of skin tests and premedication are revisiting. As there has been no report that comprehensively summarized and analyzed the results of the studies on RCM hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region, we aimed to review the literatures on hypersensitivity reactions to RCM in terms of prevalence clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and preventive measures in the Asia Pacific region.

  15. Radiocontrast media hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suh-Young; Lim, Kyoung-Whan

    2014-01-01

    Radiocontrast media (RCM) is a major cause of drug hypersensitivity reactions as the medical application of RCM is increasing recently. RCM induced hypersensitivity reactions are considered as unpredictable type B reactions. Underlying mechanism of RCM induced hypersensitivity was previously regarded as nonimmunological mechanisms but recent studies suggest that immunological mechanisms could also be involved. As a result, the roles of skin tests and premedication are revisiting. As there has been no report that comprehensively summarized and analyzed the results of the studies on RCM hypersensitivity in the Asia Pacific region, we aimed to review the literatures on hypersensitivity reactions to RCM in terms of prevalence clinical manifestations, diagnostic approach, and preventive measures in the Asia Pacific region. PMID:24809018

  16. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  17. Sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Trimmer, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    The study of sea urchin sperm antigens mediating the acrosome reactions (AR) has been undertaken. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated reacting with a number of sperm surface antigens. These mAbs have been used in functional assays to attempt to infer the roles of these proteins in the induction of the AR. These mAbs have also been used to isolate protein for biochemical characterization and reconstitution studies. mAbs reacting with a 210 kD protein of the sea urchin sperm plasma membrane have been used to identify this protein as playing a role in the regulation of ion fluxes during the induction of the AR. mAbs reacting with certain extracellular regions inhibit the induction of: the AR, the long duration {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into the mitochondrion, and H{sup +} efflux. Addition of these same mAbs, however, induces an increase in sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} to levels much higher than those induced by FSG, as monitored by the fluorescent Ca{sup 2+} indicators fura 2 and indo 1. This (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} increase occurs without an increase in pH{sub i}, and thus allows for the first time the analysis of the effects of increasing sperm (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} ion the absence of increased pH{sub i}.

  18. Treating dentin hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Wataha, John C.; Zhou, Lingmei; Manning, Walter; Trantow, Michael; Bettendorf, Meishan M.; Heaton, Lisa J.; Berg, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Background Methods used by dental practitioners to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity are not well documented. The authors conducted a survey of dentists in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) to ascertain the treatment methods they used. Methods Via an Internet survey, the authors collected data regarding methods used for diagnosis and treatment of dentin hypersensitivity from 209 Northwest PRECEDENT dentists. Results The PRECEDENT dentists indicated that they most often used fluoride varnishes and gels, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet, bonding agents, restorative materials and glutaraldehyde/2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to treat dentin hypersensitivity. They reported that the most successful treatments were fluorides, glutaraldehyde/HEMA, bonding agents, potassium nitrates and restorative treatments; they considered observation, advice regarding toothbrushing and diet and laser therapy to be the least successful. Dentists listed fluorides, calcium phosphates, glutaraldehyde/HEMA and bonding agents as the treatments most desirable for inclusion in a future randomized clinical trial of dental hypersensitivity treatments. Conclusions Dentists rely on patients to assess the severity of dentin hypersensitivity. Modalities for the diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitivity are diverse. Methods used to diagnose and treat dentin hypersensitivity in practice are challenging to justify. Clinical Implications Practitioners should be aware of the diversity of methods available for diagnosing and treating dentin hypersensitivity as they manage the care of their patients with this condition. PMID:20807910

  19. Hypersensitivity to laminaria: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Tania; Figueroa, Melissa M; Chen, Katherine T; Lunde, Britt; Jacobs, Adam

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of laminaria hypersensitivity treated with diphenhydramine and corticosteroids. A literature review identified 10 previously reported cases, with 8 recognized as anaphylaxis, and good outcomes with corticosteroids and antihistamines despite limited epinephrine utilization. Laminaria hypersensitivity is likely IgE mediated with an increased anaphylaxis risk with prior exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Base-mediated synthesis of quinazolines: Cyclization reaction between 2-nitrobenzylalcohol and benzylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Mu, Wanlu; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Yong;