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Sample records for mediates induced indirect

  1. Male-derived butterfly anti-aphrodisiac mediates induced indirect plant defense.

    PubMed

    Fatouros, Nina E; Broekgaarden, Colette; Bukovinszkine'Kiss, Gabriella; van Loon, Joop J A; Mumm, Roland; Huigens, Martinus E; Dicke, Marcel; Hilker, Monika

    2008-07-22

    Plants can recruit parasitic wasps in response to egg deposition by herbivorous insects-a sophisticated indirect plant defense mechanism. Oviposition by the Large Cabbage White butterfly Pieris brassicae on Brussels sprout plants induces phytochemical changes that arrest the egg parasitoid Trichogramma brassicae. Here, we report the identification of an elicitor of such an oviposition-induced plant response. Eliciting activity was present in accessory gland secretions released by mated female butterflies during egg deposition. In contrast, gland secretions from virgin female butterflies were inactive. In the male ejaculate, P. brassicae females receive the anti-aphrodisiac benzyl cyanide (BC) that reduces the females' attractiveness for subsequent mating. We detected this pheromone in the accessory gland secretion released by mated female butterflies. When applied onto leaves, BC alone induced phytochemical changes that arrested females of the egg parasitoid. Microarray analyses revealed a similarity in induced plant responses that may explain the arrest of T. brassicae to egg-laden and BC-treated plants. Thus, a male-derived compound endangers the offspring of the butterfly by inducing plant defense. Recently, BC was shown to play a role in foraging behavior of T. brassicae, by acting as a cue to facilitate phoretic transport by mated female butterflies to oviposition sites. Our results suggest that the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone incurs fitness costs for the butterfly by both mediating phoretic behavior and inducing plant defense.

  2. An Indirect Defence Trait Mediated through Egg-Induced Maize Volatiles from Neighbouring Plants.

    PubMed

    Mutyambai, Daniel M; Bruce, Toby J A; van den Berg, Johnnie; Midega, Charles A O; Pickett, John A; Khan, Zeyaur R

    2016-01-01

    Attack of plants by herbivorous arthropods may result in considerable changes to the plant's chemical phenotype with respect to emission of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). These HIPVs have been shown to act as repellents to the attacking insects as well as attractants for the insects antagonistic to these herbivores. Plants can also respond to HIPV signals from other plants that warn them of impending attack. Recent investigations have shown that certain maize varieties are able to emit volatiles following stemborer egg deposition. These volatiles attract the herbivore's parasitoids and directly deter further oviposition. However, it was not known whether these oviposition-induced maize (Zea mays, L.) volatiles can mediate chemical phenotypic changes in neighbouring unattacked maize plants. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the effect of oviposition-induced maize volatiles on intact neighbouring maize plants in 'Nyamula', a landrace known to respond to oviposition, and a standard commercial hybrid, HB515, that did not. Headspace volatile samples were collected from maize plants exposed to Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) egg deposition and unoviposited neighbouring plants as well as from control plants kept away from the volatile emitting ones. Behavioural bioassays were carried out in a four-arm olfactometer using egg (Trichogramma bournieri Pintureau & Babault (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae)) and larval (Cotesia sesamiae Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)) parasitoids. Coupled Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for volatile analysis. For the 'Nyamula' landrace, GC-MS analysis revealed HIPV production not only in the oviposited plants but also in neighbouring plants not exposed to insect eggs. Higher amounts of EAG-active biogenic volatiles such as (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene were emitted from these plants compared to control plants. Subsequent behavioural assays with female T. bournieri and C

  3. An Indirect Defence Trait Mediated through Egg-Induced Maize Volatiles from Neighbouring Plants

    PubMed Central

    Mutyambai, Daniel M.; Bruce, Toby J. A.; van den Berg, Johnnie; Midega, Charles A. O.; Pickett, John A.; Khan, Zeyaur R.

    2016-01-01

    Attack of plants by herbivorous arthropods may result in considerable changes to the plant’s chemical phenotype with respect to emission of herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs). These HIPVs have been shown to act as repellents to the attacking insects as well as attractants for the insects antagonistic to these herbivores. Plants can also respond to HIPV signals from other plants that warn them of impending attack. Recent investigations have shown that certain maize varieties are able to emit volatiles following stemborer egg deposition. These volatiles attract the herbivore’s parasitoids and directly deter further oviposition. However, it was not known whether these oviposition-induced maize (Zea mays, L.) volatiles can mediate chemical phenotypic changes in neighbouring unattacked maize plants. Therefore, this study sought to investigate the effect of oviposition-induced maize volatiles on intact neighbouring maize plants in ‘Nyamula’, a landrace known to respond to oviposition, and a standard commercial hybrid, HB515, that did not. Headspace volatile samples were collected from maize plants exposed to Chilo partellus (Swinhoe) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) egg deposition and unoviposited neighbouring plants as well as from control plants kept away from the volatile emitting ones. Behavioural bioassays were carried out in a four-arm olfactometer using egg (Trichogramma bournieri Pintureau & Babault (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae)) and larval (Cotesia sesamiae Cameron (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)) parasitoids. Coupled Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) was used for volatile analysis. For the ‘Nyamula’ landrace, GC-MS analysis revealed HIPV production not only in the oviposited plants but also in neighbouring plants not exposed to insect eggs. Higher amounts of EAG-active biogenic volatiles such as (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene were emitted from these plants compared to control plants. Subsequent behavioural assays with female T. bournieri

  4. Sensitivity analysis for direct and indirect effects in the presence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    Questions of mediation are often of interest in reasoning about mechanisms, and methods have been developed to address these questions. However, these methods make strong assumptions about the absence of confounding. Even if exposure is randomized, there may be mediator-outcome confounding variables. Inference about direct and indirect effects is particularly challenging if these mediator-outcome confounders are affected by the exposure because in this case these effects are not identified irrespective of whether data is available on these exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounders. In this paper, we provide a sensitivity analysis technique for natural direct and indirect effects that is applicable even if there are mediator-outcome confounders affected by the exposure. We give techniques for both the difference and risk ratio scales and compare the technique to other possible approaches. PMID:25580387

  5. Jasmonate and ethylene signaling mediate whitefly-induced interference with indirect plant defense in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Jun; Broekgaarden, Colette; Zheng, Si-Jun; Snoeren, Tjeerd A L; van Loon, Joop J A; Gols, Rieta; Dicke, Marcel

    2013-03-01

    Upon herbivore attack, plants activate an indirect defense, that is, the release of a complex mixture of volatiles that attract natural enemies of the herbivore. When plants are simultaneously exposed to two herbivore species belonging to different feeding guilds, one herbivore may interfere with the indirect plant defense induced by the other herbivore. However, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying such interference. Here, we address the effect of herbivory by the phloem-feeding whitefly Bemisia tabaci on the induced indirect defense of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to Plutella xylostella caterpillars, that is, the attraction of the parasitoid wasp Diadegma semiclausum. Assays with various Arabidopsis mutants reveal that B. tabaci infestation interferes with indirect plant defense induced by P. xylostella, and that intact jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling are required for such interference caused by B. tabaci. Chemical analysis of plant volatiles showed that the composition of the blend emitted in response to the caterpillars was significantly altered by co-infestation with whiteflies. Moreover, whitefly infestation also had a considerable effect on the transcriptomic response of the plant to the caterpillars. Understanding the mechanisms underlying a plant's responses to multiple attackers will be important for the development of crop protection strategies in a multi-attacker context.

  6. OH radicals from the indirect actions of X-rays induce cell lethality and mediate the majority of the oxygen enhancement effect.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryoichi; Ito, Atsushi; Noguchi, Miho; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Uzawa, Akiko; Kobashi, Gen; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2013-11-01

    We examined OH radical-mediated indirect actions from X irradiation on cell killing in wild-type Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO and AA8) under oxic and hypoxic conditions, and compared the contribution of direct and indirect actions under both conditions. The contribution of indirect action on cell killing can be estimated from the maximum degree of protection by dimethylsulfoxide, which suppresses indirect action by quenching OH radicals without affecting the direct action of X rays on cell killing. The contributions of indirect action on cell killing of CHO cells were 76% and 50% under oxic and hypoxic conditions, respectively, and those for AA8 cells were 85% and 47%, respectively. Therefore, the indirect action on cell killing was enhanced by oxygen during X irradiation in both cell lines tested. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) at the 10% survival level (D10 or LD90) for CHO and AA8 cells were 2.68 ± 0.15 and 2.76 ± 0.08, respectively. OERs were evaluated separately for indirect and direct actions, which gave the values of 3.75 and 2.01 for CHO, and 4.11 and 1.32 for AA8 cells, respectively. Thus the generally accepted OER value of ∼3 is best understood as the average of the OER values for both indirect and direct actions. These results imply that both indirect and direct actions on cell killing require oxygen for the majority of lethal DNA damage, however, oxygen plays a larger role in indirect than for direct effects. Conversely, the lethal damage induced by the direct action of X rays are less affected by oxygen concentration.

  7. Indirect multi-trophic interactions mediated by induced plant resistance: impact of caterpillar feeding on aphid parasitoids

    PubMed Central

    Hagenbucher, Steffen; Wäckers, Felix L.; Romeis, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Cotton produces insecticidal terpenoids that are induced by tissue-feeding herbivores. Damage by Heliothis virescens caterpillars increases the terpenoid content, which reduces the abundance of aphids. This effect is not evident in Bt-transgenic cotton, which is resistant to H. virescens. We determined whether induction of terpenoids by caterpillars influences the host quality of Aphis gossypii for the parasitoid Lysiphlebus testaceipes and whether this interaction is influenced by Bt cotton. The exposure of parasitoids to terpenoids was determined by quantifying terpenoids in the aphids. We detected several terpenoids in aphids and found a positive relationship between their concentrations in plants and aphids. When L. testaceipes was allowed to parasitize aphids on Bt and non-Bt cotton that was infested or uninfested with H. virescens, fewer parasitoid mummies were found on infested non-Bt than on Bt cotton. Important parasitoid life-table parameters, however, were not influenced by induced resistance following H. virescens infestation, or the Bt trait. Our study provides an example of a tritrophic indirect interaction web, where organisms are indirectly linked through changes in plant metabolites. PMID:24522627

  8. Relative contributions of direct and indirect mechanisms mediating endothelin-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, D. W.; Hubbard, W. C.; Undem, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the mechanism of action of endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contraction of the guinea-pig isolated trachea. 2. ET-1 (1 nM-0.3 microM) produces a concentration-dependent contraction of guinea-pig trachea with an EC50 of approximately 25 nM. The combination of the peptidoleukotriene receptor antagonist, SK&F 104353 (10 microM) and the H1-histamine receptor antagonist, mepyramine (10 microM), which abolishes antigen-induced contraction in guinea-pig trachea, was without effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. Furthermore, the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, WEB 2086, (1 or 10 microM) did not inhibit ET-induced contraction. 3. ET-1 (0.3 microM) did not stimulate histamine or immunoreactive peptidoleukotriene release from guinea-pig isolated trachea. 4. The release of various prostanoids from guinea-pig trachea was increased significantly by ET-1 (0.3 microM); the profile of release was prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) = PGE2 = 6-keto PGF1 alpha (PGI2 metabolite) > thromboxane B2 = PGF2 alpha >> 9 alpha, 11 beta PGF2 (PGD2 metabolite). ET-1-induced release of prostaglandins, which was about 30% of that elicited by antigen in sensitized tissues, was not affected by epithelium removal and was observed in tissues from which the smooth muscle had been removed. Previous studies in our laboratory indicated that indomethacin potentiated contraction produced by high concentrations of ET-1, whereas a thromboxane receptor antagonist was without appreciable effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. 5. Pretreatment of tissues for 1 h with capsaicin (10 microM), which depletes different sensory neurones, produced a small, but significant, inhibitory effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves in the presence but not the absence of the epithelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7507780

  9. Assessing Mediational Models: Testing and Interval Estimation for Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.; Falk, Carl F.; Savalei, Victoria

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical models specifying indirect or mediated effects are common in the social sciences. An indirect effect exists when an independent variable's influence on the dependent variable is mediated through an intervening variable. Classic approaches to assessing such mediational hypotheses (Baron & Kenny, 1986; Sobel, 1982) have in recent years…

  10. Protein hydrolysate-induced cholecystokinin secretion from enteroendocrine cells is indirectly mediated by the intestinal oligopeptide transporter PepT1.

    PubMed

    Liou, Alice P; Chavez, Diana I; Espero, Elvis; Hao, Shuzhen; Wank, Stephen A; Raybould, Helen E

    2011-05-01

    Dietary protein is a major stimulant for cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion by the intestinal I cell, however, the mechanism by which protein is detected is unknown. Indirect functional evidence suggests that PepT1 may play a role in CCK-mediated changes in gastric motor function. However, it is unclear whether this oligopeptide transporter directly or indirectly activates the I cell. Using both the CCK-expressing enteroendocrine STC-1 cell and acutely isolated native I cells from CCK-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) mice, we aimed to determine whether PepT1 directly activates the enteroendocrine cell to elicit CCK secretion in response to oligopeptides. Both STC-1 cells and isolated CCK-eGFP cells expressed PepT1 transcripts. STC-1 cells were activated, as measured by ERK(1/2) phosphorylation, by both peptone and the PepT1 substrate Cefaclor; however, the PepT1 inhibitor 4-aminomethyl benzoic acid (AMBA) had no effect on STC-1 cell activity. The PepT1-transportable substrate glycyl-sarcosine dose-dependently decreased gastric motility in anesthetized rats but had no affect on activation of STC-1 cells or on CCK secretion by CCK-eGFP cells. CCK secretion was significantly increased in response to peptone but not to Cefaclor, cephalexin, or Phe-Ala in CCK-eGFP cells. Taken together, the data suggest that PepT1 does not directly mediate CCK secretion in response to PepT1 specific substrates. PepT1, instead, may have an indirect role in protein sensing in the intestine.

  11. In vitro particulate matter exposure causes direct and lung-mediated indirect effects on cardiomyocyte function.

    PubMed

    Gorr, Matthew W; Youtz, Dane J; Eichenseer, Clayton M; Smith, Korbin E; Nelin, Timothy D; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Wold, Loren E

    2015-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) exposure induces a pathological response from both the lungs and the cardiovascular system. PM is capable of both manifestation into the lung epithelium and entrance into the bloodstream. Therefore, PM has the capacity for both direct and lung-mediated indirect effects on the heart. In the present studies, we exposed isolated rat cardiomyocytes to ultrafine particulate matter (diesel exhaust particles, DEP) and examined their contractile function and calcium handling ability. In another set of experiments, lung epithelial cells (16HBE14o- or Calu-3) were cultured on permeable supports that allowed access to both the basal (serosal) and apical (mucosal) media; the basal media was used to culture cardiomyocytes to model the indirect, lung-mediated effects of PM on the heart. Both the direct and indirect treatments caused a reduction in contractility as evidenced by reduced percent sarcomere shortening and reduced calcium handling ability measured in field-stimulated cardiomyocytes. Treatment of cardiomyocytes with various anti-oxidants before culture with DEP was able to partially prevent the contractile dysfunction. The basal media from lung epithelial cells treated with PM contained several inflammatory cytokines, and we found that monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was a key trigger for cardiomyocyte dysfunction. These results indicate the presence of both direct and indirect effects of PM on cardiomyocyte function in vitro. Future work will focus on elucidating the mechanisms involved in these separate pathways using in vivo models of air pollution exposure. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

    2012-12-03

    A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

  13. Quantifying and Testing Indirect Effects in Simple Mediation Models when the Constituent Paths Are Nonlinear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Andrew F.; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Most treatments of indirect effects and mediation in the statistical methods literature and the corresponding methods used by behavioral scientists have assumed linear relationships between variables in the causal system. Here we describe and extend a method first introduced by Stolzenberg (1980) for estimating indirect effects in models of…

  14. Density-mediated indirect effects from active predators and narrow habitat domain prey.

    PubMed

    Rinehart, S A; Schroeter, S C; Long, J D

    2017-10-01

    The hunting-mode-habitat-domain-range framework suggests that the mechanism driving trophic cascades (i.e., trait-mediated indirect interactions [TMIIs] vs. density-mediated indirect interactions [DMIIs]) should depend upon the functional traits of predators and prey. For example, trophic cascades containing active, broad habitat domain range (BHDR) predators interacting with narrow habitat domain range (NHDR) prey are predicted to arise primarily via TMIIs, because these prey should reduce their conspicuous activity in the presence of these predators. Unfortunately, this hypothesis is difficult to test given the strong bias against studies assessing trophic cascades containing NHDR prey. Furthermore, this hypothesis ignores evidence that (1) active predators can have high consumption rates on prey, (2) continuously responding to active predators foraging across broad areas is energetically costly for prey, and (3) cues from active, BHDR predators may not influence prey density. We examined the TMIIs and total indirect interaction (TII) produced during interactions between an active, BHDR ladybeetle predator (Naemia seriata) and its NHDR prey (scale insects). We exposed scale insects to nonlethal and lethal ladybeetle predators in laboratory mesocosms for 15 weeks. We measured the growth of the scale insect's host plant (cordgrass) and the population density of scale insects. Contrary to theory, nonlethal ladybeetles did not induce TMIIs. However, lethal ladybeetles increased cordgrass total and root dry biomass by 36% and 44%, respectively, suggesting the presence of strong DMIIs. Additionally, both lethal and nonlethal ladybeetles reduced scale insect population density. Our findings suggest that DMIIs, rather than TMIIs, can result from interactions between active BHDR predators and NHDR prey. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. SPSS and SAS procedures for estimating indirect effects in simple mediation models.

    PubMed

    Preacher, Kristopher J; Hayes, Andrew F

    2004-11-01

    Researchers often conduct mediation analysis in order to indirectly assess the effect of a proposed cause on some outcome through a proposed mediator. The utility of mediation analysis stems from its ability to go beyond the merely descriptive to a more functional understanding of the relationships among variables. A necessary component of mediation is a statistically and practically significant indirect effect. Although mediation hypotheses are frequently explored in psychological research, formal significance tests of indirect effects are rarely conducted. After a brief overview of mediation, we argue the importance of directly testing the significance of indirect effects and provide SPSS and SAS macros that facilitate estimation of the indirect effect with a normal theory approach and a bootstrap approach to obtaining confidence intervals, as well as the traditional approach advocated by Baron and Kenny (1986). We hope that this discussion and the macros will enhance the frequency of formal mediation tests in the psychology literature. Electronic copies of these macros may be downloaded from the Psychonomic Society's Web archive at www.psychonomic.org/archive/.

  16. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E

    2010-10-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can involve both trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs) and density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs). Using microcosms, I examined a plant --> predator --> consumer interaction pathway involving the exotic autogenic ecosystem engineer Centaurea maculosa; native Dictyna spiders (which exhibit density and trait [web-building] responses to C. maculosa); Dictyna's insect prey, Urophora affinis; and Urophora's host plant (a secondary receiver species) to quantify DMIIs and TMIIs in an autogenic engineered pathway. Both DMIIs and TMIIs were strong enough to reduce Urophora populations, but only DMIIs, which were 4.3 times stronger than TMIIs, were strong enough to also reduce Urophora's fecundity and increase the fecundity of its host plant. Prior field studies support these results, suggesting that the differences between DMIIs and TMIIs are even stronger in nature. This study illustrates that autogenic ecosystem engineers can initiate powerful indirect interactions that generally parallel predator-initiated interactions but also differ in important functional ways.

  17. Natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions among prey species: potential for enhancing biocontrol services in agroecosystems.

    PubMed

    Chailleux, Anaïs; Mohl, Emily K; Teixeira Alves, Mickaël; Messelink, Gerben J; Desneux, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how arthropod pests and their natural enemies interact in complex agroecosystems is essential for pest management programmes. Theory predicts that prey sharing a predator, such as a biological control agent, can indirectly reduce each other's density at equilibrium (apparent competition). From this premise, we (i) discuss the complexity of indirect interactions among pests in agroecosystems and highlight the importance of natural enemy-mediated indirect interactions other than apparent competition, (ii) outline factors that affect the nature of enemy-mediated indirect interactions in the field and (iii) identify the way to manipulate enemy-mediated interactions for biological control. We argue that there is a need to increase the link between community ecology theory and biological control to develop better agroecological methods of crop protection via conservation biological control. In conclusion, we identify (i) interventions to be chosen depending on agroecosystem characteristics and (ii) several lines of research that will improve the potential for enemy-mediated indirect interactions to be applied to biological control. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. The muon-induced neutron indirect detection EXperiment, MINIDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Carissimo, C.; Gooch, C.; Kneißl, R.; Langford, J.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Vanhoefer, L.

    2017-04-01

    A new experiment to quantitatively measure neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons in selected high-Z materials is introduced. The design of the Muon-Induced Neutron Indirect Detection EXperiment, MINIDEX, and the results from its first data taking period are presented as well as future plans. Neutron production in high-Z materials is of particular interest as such materials are used for shielding in low-background experiments. The design of next-generation large-scale experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay or direct interactions of dark matter requires reliable Monte Carlo simulations of background induced by muon interactions. The first five months of operation already provided a valuable data set on neutron production and neutron transport in lead. A first round of comparisons between MINIDEX data and Monte Carlo predictions obtained with a GEANT4-based package for two different sets of physics models of relevance for neutron production by muons is presented. The rate of muon-induced events is overall a factor three to four higher in data than predicted by the Monte Carlo packages. In addition, the time evolution of the muon-induced signal is not well described by the simulations.

  19. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces both direct and indirect tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser(202)/Thr(205)), PHF-1 (Ser(396)/Ser(404)) and AT180 (Thr(231)) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro.

  20. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Induces Both Direct and Indirect Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B.; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser202/Thr205), PHF-1 (Ser396/Ser404) and AT180 (Thr231) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22768202

  1. Mediation analysis to estimate direct and indirect milk losses due to clinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Detilleux, J; Kastelic, J P; Barkema, H W

    2015-03-01

    Milk losses associated with mastitis can be attributed to either effects of pathogens per se (i.e., direct losses) or effects of the immune response triggered by intramammary infection (indirect losses). The distinction is important in terms of mastitis prevention and treatment. Regardless, the number of pathogens is often unknown (particularly in field studies), making it difficult to estimate direct losses, whereas indirect losses can be approximated by measuring the association between increased somatic cell count (SCC) and milk production. An alternative is to perform a mediation analysis in which changes in milk yield are allocated into their direct and indirect components. We applied this method on data for clinical mastitis, milk and SCC test-day recordings, results of bacteriological cultures (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and streptococci other than Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. uberis), and cow characteristics. Following a diagnosis of clinical mastitis, the cow was treated and changes (increase or decrease) in milk production before and after a diagnosis were interpreted counterfactually. On a daily basis, indirect changes, mediated by SCC increase, were significantly different from zero for all bacterial species, with a milk yield decrease (ranging among species from 4 to 33g and mediated by an increase of 1000 SCC/mL/day) before and a daily milk increase (ranging among species from 2 to 12g and mediated by a decrease of 1000 SCC/mL/day) after detection. Direct changes, not mediated by SCC, were only different from zero for coagulase-negative staphylococci before diagnosis (72g per day). We concluded that mixed structural equation models were useful to estimate direct and indirect effects of the presence of clinical mastitis on milk yield. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Habitat effects on the relative importance of trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions.

    PubMed

    Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Matassa, Catherine M

    2006-11-01

    Classical views of trophic cascades emphasize the primacy of consumptive predator effects on prey populations to the transmission of indirect effects [density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs)]. However, trophic cascades can also emerge without changes in the density of interacting species because of non-consumptive predator effects on prey traits such as foraging behaviour [trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs)]. Although ecologists appreciate this point, measurements of the relative importance of each indirect predator effect are rare. Experiments with a three-level, rocky shore food chain containing an invasive predatory crab (Carcinus maenas), an intermediate consumer (the snail, Nucella lapillus) and a basal resource (the barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides) revealed that the strength of TMIIs is comparable with, or exceeds, that of DMIIs. Moreover, the sign and strength of each indirect predator effect depends on whether it is measured in risky or refuge habitats. Because habitat shifts are often responsible for the emergence of TMIIs, attention to the sign and strength of these interactions in both habitats will improve our understanding of the link between individual behaviour and community dynamics.

  3. Transitions among the diverse oscillation quenching states induced by the interplay of direct and indirect coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debarati; Banerjee, Tanmoy

    2014-12-01

    We report the transitions among different oscillation quenching states induced by the interplay of diffusive (direct) coupling and environmental (indirect) coupling in coupled identical oscillators. This coupling scheme was introduced by Resmi et al. [Phys. Rev. E 84, 046212 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.046212] as a general scheme to induce amplitude death (AD) in nonlinear oscillators. Using a detailed bifurcation analysis we show that, in addition to AD, which actually occurs only in a small region of parameter space, this coupling scheme can induce other oscillation quenching states, namely oscillation death (OD) and a novel nontrvial AD (NAD) state, which is a nonzero bistable homogeneous steady state; more importantly, this coupling scheme mediates a transition from the AD state to the OD state and a new transition from the AD state to the NAD state. We identify diverse routes to the NAD state and map all the transition scenarios in the parameter space for periodic oscillators. Finally, we present the first experimental evidence of oscillation quenching states and their transitions induced by the interplay of direct and indirect coupling.

  4. A cautionary note on the power of the test for the indirect effect in mediation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Loeys, Tom; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    Recent simulation studies have pointed to the higher power of the test for the mediated effect vs. the test for the total effect, even in the presence of a direct effect. This has motivated applied researchers to investigate mediation in settings where there is no evidence of a total effect. In this paper we provide analytical insight into the circumstances under which higher power of the test for the mediated effect vs. the test for the total effect can be expected in the absence of a direct effect. We argue that the acclaimed power gain is somewhat deceptive and comes with a big price. On the basis of the results, we recommend that when the primary interest lies in mediation only, a significant test for the total effect should not be used as a prerequisite for the test for the indirect effect. However, because the test for the indirect effect is vulnerable to bias when common causes of mediator and outcome are not measured or not accounted for, it should be evaluated in a sensitivity analysis. PMID:25628585

  5. 27 CFR 6.42 - Indirect inducement through third party arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect inducement through third party arrangements. 6.42 Section 6.42 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Furnishing Things of Value § 6.42 Indirect...

  6. Aptamer-mediated indirect quantum dot labeling and fluorescent imaging of target proteins in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbo; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Xiaohai; Wang, Kemin; Guo, Qiuping; Huang, Jin; Li, Wei

    2014-12-01

    Protein labeling for dynamic living cell imaging plays a significant role in basic biological research, as well as in clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. We have developed a novel strategy in which the dynamic visualization of proteins within living cells is achieved by using aptamers as mediators for indirect protein labeling of quantum dots (QDs). With this strategy, the target protein angiogenin was successfully labeled with fluorescent QDs in a minor intactness model, which was mediated by the aptamer AL6-B. Subsequent living cell imaging analyses indicated that the QDs nanoprobes were selectively bound to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, gradually internalized into the cytoplasm, and mostly localized in the lysosome organelle, indicating that the labeled protein retained high activity. Compared with traditional direct protein labeling methods, the proposed aptamer-mediated strategy is simple, inexpensive, and provides a highly selective, stable, and intact labeling platform that has shown great promise for future biomedical labeling and intracellular protein dynamic analyses.

  7. Epibiotic mutualists alter coral susceptibility and response to biotic disturbance through cascading trait-mediated indirect interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsma, G. S.

    2012-06-01

    Biotic disturbances are important drivers of community structure, but interactions among community members can determine trajectories of response and recovery. On coral reefs in French Polynesia, epibiotic amphipods induce the formation of branch-like "fingers" on flat colonies of encrusting Montipora coral. The fingers form as coral encrusts the amphipods' tubes and lead to significant changes in colony morphology. I tested whether the induced morphological changes affect Montipora's susceptibility to predation by pincushion ( Culcita novaeguineae) and crown-of-thorns sea stars ( Acanthaster planci). Montipora with fingers were less likely to be attacked and more likely to survive attack than colonies without fingers. Furthermore, the presence of fingers altered A. planci prey preference. Sea stars preferred Montipora without fingers over other common coral genera, but preferred other genera when Montipora had fingers. Amphipods indirectly affected Montipora's resistance and resilience to predation, and the susceptibility of other coral genera to predation, through induced morphological changes. Such trait-mediated indirect interactions likely play an important role in determining how species respond to periodic sea star outbreaks.

  8. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces indirect angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phillips, G D; Aukerman, S L; Whitehead, R A; Knighton, D R

    1993-01-01

    The cytokine macrophage colony-stimulating factor was implanted in the rabbit cornea over a wide dose range (1 ng to 100 microg) to assay its angiogenic activity in vivo. Neovascularization occurred in a dose-dependent manner, and maximum angiogenesis occurred only with 100 microg. Histologic analysis revealed that the corneas were free of inflammation at the lower doses, but had slight inflammation at 50 and 100 microg. Nonspecific esterase staining of frozen sections and transmission electron microscopy revealed that the inflammatory cells were predominantly macrophages, with very few neutrophils present. This association of capillary formation with inflammation suggests an indirect mechanism of angiogenesis. The lack of neutrophils within the inflammatory cell infiltrate demonstrates that indirect angiogenesis can proceed without the local presence of neutrophils. This distinguishes macrophage colony-stimulating factor from other indirect-acting angiogenesis factors that have been identified to date.

  9. Plant genetic variation mediates an indirect ecological effect between belowground earthworms and aboveground aphids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Akanksha; Braun, Julia; Decker, Emilia; Hans, Sarah; Wagner, Agnes; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Zytynska, Sharon E

    2014-10-21

    Interactions between aboveground and belowground terrestrial communities are often mediated by plants, with soil organisms interacting via the roots and aboveground organisms via the shoots and leaves. Many studies now show that plant genetics can drive changes in the structure of both above and belowground communities; however, the role of plant genetic variation in mediating aboveground-belowground interactions is still unclear. We used an earthworm-plant-aphid model system with two aphid species (Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum) to test the effect of host-plant (Vicia faba) genetic variation on the indirect interaction between the belowground earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the aboveground aphid populations. Our data shows that host-plant variety mediated an indirect ecological effect of earthworms on generalist black bean aphids (A. fabae), with earthworms increasing aphid growth rate in three plant varieties but decreasing it in another variety. We found no effect of earthworms on the second aphid species, the pea aphid (A. pisum), and no effect of competition between the aphid species. Plant biomass was increased when earthworms were present, and decreased when A. pisum was feeding on the plant (mediated by plant variety). Although A. fabae aphids were influenced by the plants and worms, they did not, in turn, alter plant biomass. Previous work has shown inconsistent effects of earthworms on aphids, but we suggest these differences could be explained by plant genetic variation and variation among aphid species. This study demonstrates that the outcome of belowground-aboveground interactions can be mediated by genetic variation in the host-plant, but depends on the identity of the species involved.

  10. Plant genetic variation mediates an indirect ecological effect between belowground earthworms and aboveground aphids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interactions between aboveground and belowground terrestrial communities are often mediated by plants, with soil organisms interacting via the roots and aboveground organisms via the shoots and leaves. Many studies now show that plant genetics can drive changes in the structure of both above and belowground communities; however, the role of plant genetic variation in mediating aboveground-belowground interactions is still unclear. We used an earthworm-plant-aphid model system with two aphid species (Aphis fabae and Acyrthosiphon pisum) to test the effect of host-plant (Vicia faba) genetic variation on the indirect interaction between the belowground earthworms (Eisenia veneta) on the aboveground aphid populations. Results Our data shows that host-plant variety mediated an indirect ecological effect of earthworms on generalist black bean aphids (A. fabae), with earthworms increasing aphid growth rate in three plant varieties but decreasing it in another variety. We found no effect of earthworms on the second aphid species, the pea aphid (A. pisum), and no effect of competition between the aphid species. Plant biomass was increased when earthworms were present, and decreased when A. pisum was feeding on the plant (mediated by plant variety). Although A. fabae aphids were influenced by the plants and worms, they did not, in turn, alter plant biomass. Conclusions Previous work has shown inconsistent effects of earthworms on aphids, but we suggest these differences could be explained by plant genetic variation and variation among aphid species. This study demonstrates that the outcome of belowground-aboveground interactions can be mediated by genetic variation in the host-plant, but depends on the identity of the species involved. PMID:25331082

  11. Estimation of Indirect Effects in the Presence of Unmeasured Confounding for the Mediator-Outcome Relationship in a Multilevel 2-1-1 Mediation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talloen, Wouter; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Loeys, Tom; De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    To assess the direct and indirect effect of an intervention, multilevel 2-1-1 studies with intervention randomized at the upper (class) level and mediator and outcome measured at the lower (student) level are frequently used in educational research. In such studies, the mediation process may flow through the student-level mediator (the within…

  12. Estimation of Indirect Effects in the Presence of Unmeasured Confounding for the Mediator-Outcome Relationship in a Multilevel 2-1-1 Mediation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talloen, Wouter; Moerkerke, Beatrijs; Loeys, Tom; De Naeghel, Jessie; Van Keer, Hilde; Vansteelandt, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    To assess the direct and indirect effect of an intervention, multilevel 2-1-1 studies with intervention randomized at the upper (class) level and mediator and outcome measured at the lower (student) level are frequently used in educational research. In such studies, the mediation process may flow through the student-level mediator (the within…

  13. Moving beyond linear food chains: trait-mediated indirect interactions in a rocky intertidal food web.

    PubMed

    Trussell, Geoffrey C; Matassa, Catherine M; Ewanchuk, Patrick J

    2017-03-29

    In simple, linear food chains, top predators can have positive indirect effects on basal resources by causing changes in the traits (e.g. behaviour, feeding rates) of intermediate consumers. Although less is known about trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs) in more complex food webs, it has been suggested that such complexity dampens trophic cascades. We examined TMIIs between a predatory crab (Carcinus maenas) and two ecologically important basal resources, fucoid algae (Ascophyllum nodosum) and barnacles (Semibalanus balanoides), which are consumed by herbivorous (Littorina littorea) and carnivorous (Nucella lapillus) snails, respectively. Because crab predation risk suppresses snail feeding rates, we hypothesized that crabs would also shape direct and indirect interactions among the multiple consumers and resources. We found that the magnitude of TMIIs between the crab and each resource depended on the suite of intermediate consumers present in the food web. Carnivorous snails (Nucella) transmitted TMIIs between crabs and barnacles. However, crab-algae TMIIs were transmitted by both herbivorous (Littorina) and carnivorous (Nucella) snails, and these TMIIs were additive. By causing Nucella to consume fewer barnacles, crab predation risk allowed fucoids that had settled on or between barnacles to remain in the community. Hence, positive interactions between barnacles and algae caused crab-algae TMIIs to be strongest when both consumers were present. Studies of TMIIs in more realistic, reticulate food webs will be necessary for a more complete understanding of how predation risk shapes community dynamics. © 2017 The Author(s).

  14. Salinity and disturbance mediate direct and indirect plant-plant interactions in an assembled marsh community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng-Huan; Li, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Direct and indirect plant-plant interactions play important roles in structuring plant communities, but the relative importance of physical stress and biological disturbance in mediating competitive outcomes remains debated. We conducted two common garden experiments to examine the influence of salinity and disturbance (sediment accretion and clipping) on competitive interactions among three native sedges (Scirpus mariqueter, Scirpus triqueter, and Carex scabrifolia) in the Yangtze estuary. In both experiments, the relative competitive abilities of these plants shifted among different treatments. Competition importance rather than intensity significantly decreased with increasing stress. At the community level, competition importance showed reduced variation along the stress gradient in the disturbance experiment. Notably, the performance of these sedges in three-species mixtures could not be predicted by their competitive relationships in two-species mixtures, which was an indication of indirect interactions. Salinity, disturbance and indirect interactions all affected the competitive dynamics of these sedges, which could explain their different performances and natural distributions in the Yangtze estuary. Our findings of the complex effects of physical factors and multi-species interactions, as well as the different patterns of competition importance along stress gradients at the species level and the community level can improve our understanding of plant community organization in salt marshes and other ecosystems with sharp environmental gradients.

  15. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  16. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  17. Electric current induced anti-traps for indirect excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchliadis, L.; Lai, C. W.; Ivanov, A. L.

    2007-05-01

    In this work we study, both experimentally and theoretically, in-plane localized ring patterns of photoluminescence (PL) from indirect excitons in GaAs/AlGaAs coupled quantum wells (QWs). These spatially pinned PL centers (PLCs) are attributed to transverse current filaments which cross the structure and inject hot electrons in the QWs. We model the experimental data with a set of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations, a thermalization equation and a quantum mass action law. The quantum statistical corrections are explicitly included in the description.

  18. Resource-Mediated Indirect Effects of Grassland Management on Arthropod Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Nadja K.; Gossner, Martin M.; Lewinsohn, Thomas M.; Boch, Steffen; Lange, Markus; Müller, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Socher, Stephanie A.; Türke, Manfred; Fischer, Markus; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive land use is a driving force for biodiversity decline in many ecosystems. In semi-natural grasslands, land-use activities such as mowing, grazing and fertilization affect the diversity of plants and arthropods, but the combined effects of different drivers and the chain of effects are largely unknown. In this study we used structural equation modelling to analyse how the arthropod communities in managed grasslands respond to land use and whether these responses are mediated through changes in resource diversity or resource quantity (biomass). Plants were considered resources for herbivores which themselves were considered resources for predators. Plant and arthropod (herbivores and predators) communities were sampled on 141 meadows, pastures and mown pastures within three regions in Germany in 2008 and 2009. Increasing land-use intensity generally increased plant biomass and decreased plant diversity, mainly through increasing fertilization. Herbivore diversity decreased together with plant diversity but showed no response to changes in plant biomass. Hence, land-use effects on herbivore diversity were mediated through resource diversity rather than quantity. Land-use effects on predator diversity were mediated by both herbivore diversity (resource diversity) and herbivore quantity (herbivore biomass), but indirect effects through resource quantity were stronger. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing both direct and indirect effects of land-use intensity and mode on different trophic levels. In addition to the overall effects, there were subtle differences between the different regions, pointing to the importance of regional land-use specificities. Our study underlines the commonly observed strong effect of grassland land use on biodiversity. It also highlights that mechanistic approaches help us to understand how different land-use modes affect biodiversity. PMID:25188423

  19. Resource-mediated indirect effects of grassland management on arthropod diversity.

    PubMed

    Simons, Nadja K; Gossner, Martin M; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Boch, Steffen; Lange, Markus; Müller, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Socher, Stephanie A; Türke, Manfred; Fischer, Markus; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2014-01-01

    Intensive land use is a driving force for biodiversity decline in many ecosystems. In semi-natural grasslands, land-use activities such as mowing, grazing and fertilization affect the diversity of plants and arthropods, but the combined effects of different drivers and the chain of effects are largely unknown. In this study we used structural equation modelling to analyse how the arthropod communities in managed grasslands respond to land use and whether these responses are mediated through changes in resource diversity or resource quantity (biomass). Plants were considered resources for herbivores which themselves were considered resources for predators. Plant and arthropod (herbivores and predators) communities were sampled on 141 meadows, pastures and mown pastures within three regions in Germany in 2008 and 2009. Increasing land-use intensity generally increased plant biomass and decreased plant diversity, mainly through increasing fertilization. Herbivore diversity decreased together with plant diversity but showed no response to changes in plant biomass. Hence, land-use effects on herbivore diversity were mediated through resource diversity rather than quantity. Land-use effects on predator diversity were mediated by both herbivore diversity (resource diversity) and herbivore quantity (herbivore biomass), but indirect effects through resource quantity were stronger. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing both direct and indirect effects of land-use intensity and mode on different trophic levels. In addition to the overall effects, there were subtle differences between the different regions, pointing to the importance of regional land-use specificities. Our study underlines the commonly observed strong effect of grassland land use on biodiversity. It also highlights that mechanistic approaches help us to understand how different land-use modes affect biodiversity.

  20. Inhibition of direct and indirect TLR-mediated activation of human NK cells by low molecular weight dextran sulfate.

    PubMed

    Millard, Anne-Laure; Spirig, Rolf; Mueller, Nicolas J; Seebach, Jörg D; Rieben, Robert

    2010-08-01

    NK cells express toll-like receptors (TLR) that recognize conserved pathogen or damage associated molecular patterns and play a fundamental role in innate immunity. Low molecular weight dextran sulfate (DXS), known to inhibit the complement system, has recently been reported by us to inhibit TLR4-induced maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC). In this study, we investigated the capability of DXS to interfere with human NK cell activation triggered directly by TLR2 agonists or indirectly by supernatants of TLR4-activated MoDC. Both TLR2 agonists and supernatants of TLR4-activated MoDC activated NK cells phenotypically, as demonstrated by the analysis of NK cell activation markers (CD56, CD25, CD69, NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, DNAM-1 and NKG2D), and functionally as shown by increased NK cell degranulation (CD107a surface expression) and IFN-gamma secretion. DXS prevented the up-regulation of NK cell activation markers triggered by TLR2 ligands or supernatants of TLR4-activated MoDC and dose-dependently abrogated NK cell degranulation and IFN-gamma secretion. In summary our results suggest that DXS may be a useful reagent to inhibit the direct and indirect TLR-mediated activation of NK cells. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Bottom-up and top-down mechanisms indirectly mediate interactions between benthic biotic ecosystem components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Colen, Carl; Thrush, Simon F.; Parkes, Samantha; Harris, Rachel; Woodin, Sally A.; Wethey, David S.; Pilditch, Conrad A.; Hewitt, Judi E.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Vincx, Magda

    2015-04-01

    The loss or decline in population size of key species can instigate a cascade of effects that have implications for interacting species, therewith impacting biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. We examined how top-down and bottom-up interactions may mediate knock-on effects of a coastal deposit-feeding clam, Macomona liliana (hereafter Macomona), on sandflat meiobenthos densities. Therefore we manipulated densities of Macomona in combination with predator exclusion and experimental shading that was expected to alter microphytobenthos biomass. We show that Macomona regulated densities of meiobenthic (38-500 μm) nematodes, copepods, polychaetes, turbellarians, and ostracodes during the three months of incubation via indirect mechanisms. Predator pressure on Macomona by eagle rays (Myliobatis tenuicaudatus) was found to have a negative effect on densities of some meiobenthic taxa. Furthermore, experimental shading resulted in the loss of a positive relation between Macomona and microphytobenthos biomass, while concurrently increasing the density of some meiobenthic taxa. We suggest that this observation can be explained by the release from bioturbation interference effects of the cockle Austrovenus stutchburyi that was found to thrive in the presence of Macomona under non-shaded conditions. Our results highlight the importance of interactions between macrofaunal bioturbation, microphyte biomass, sediment stability, and predation pressure for the structuring of benthic communities. This experiment illustrates that manipulative field experiments may be particularly suitable to study such multiple indirect mechanisms that regulate ecosystem diversity and related functioning because such approaches may best capture the complex feedbacks and processes that determine ecosystem dynamics.

  2. Trait- and density-mediated indirect interactions initiated by an exotic invasive plant autogenic ecosystem engineer

    Treesearch

    Dean E. Pearson

    2010-01-01

    Indirect interactions are important for structuring ecological systems. However, research on indirect effects has been heavily biased toward top-down trophic interactions, and less is known about other indirect-interaction pathways. As autogenic ecosystem engineers, plants can serve as initiators of nontrophic indirect interactions that, like top-down pathways, can...

  3. Defining and estimating causal direct and indirect effects when setting the mediator to specific values is not feasible

    PubMed Central

    Lok, Judith J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural direct and indirect effects decompose the effect of a treatment into the part that is mediated by a covariate (the mediator) and the part that is not. Their definitions rely on the concept of outcomes under treatment with the mediator “set” to its value without treatment. Typically, the mechanism through which the mediator is set to this value is left unspecified, and in many applications it may be challenging to fix the mediator to particular values for each unit or patient. Moreover, how one sets the mediator may affect the distribution of the outcome. This article introduces “organic” direct and indirect effects, which can be defined and estimated without relying on setting the mediator to specific values. Organic direct and indirect effects can be applied for example to estimate how much of the effect of some treatments for HIV/AIDS on mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection is mediated by the effect of the treatment on the HIV viral load in the blood of the mother. PMID:27229743

  4. Epichloë Endophytes Alter Inducible Indirect Defences in Host Grasses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D.; Gundel, Pedro E.; Helander, Marjo; Saikkonen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Epichloë endophytes are common symbionts living asymptomatically in pooid grasses and may provide chemical defences against herbivorous insects. While the mechanisms underlying these fungal defences have been well studied, it remains unknown whether endophyte presence affects the host's own defences. We addressed this issue by examining variation in the impact of Epichloë on constitutive and herbivore-induced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a well-known indirect plant defence, between two grass species, Schedonorus phoenix (ex. Festuca arundinacea; tall fescue) and Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue). We found that feeding by a generalist aphid species, Rhopalosiphum padi, induced VOC emissions by uninfected plants of both grass species but to varying extents, while mechanical wounding failed to do so in both species after one day of damage. Interestingly, regardless of damage treatment, Epichloë uncinata-infected F. pratensis emitted significantly lower quantities of VOCs than their uninfected counterparts. In contrast, Epichloë coenophiala-infected S. phoenix did not differ from their uninfected counterparts in constitutive VOC emissions but tended to increase VOC emissions under intense aphid feeding. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status imposed stronger differences in VOC profiles of F. pratensis than damage treatment, while the reverse was true for S. phoenix. Additionally, both endophytes inhibited R. padi population growth as measured by aphid dry biomass, with the inhibition appearing greater in E. uncinata-infected F. pratensis. Our results suggest, not only that Epichloë endophytes may play important roles in mediating host VOC responses to herbivory, but also that the magnitude and direction of such responses may vary with the identity of the Epichloë–grass symbiosis. Whether Epichloë-mediated host VOC responses will eventually translate into effects on higher trophic levels merits future investigation. PMID:24978701

  5. Predator crypsis enhances behaviourally mediated indirect effects on plants by altering bumblebee foraging preferences

    PubMed Central

    Ings, Thomas C.; Chittka, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Predators of pollinators can influence pollination services and plant fitness via both consumptive (reducing pollinator density) and non-consumptive (altering pollinator behaviour) effects. However, a better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying behaviourally mediated indirect effects of predators is necessary to properly understand their role in community dynamics. We used the tripartite relationship between bumblebees, predatory crab spiders and flowers to ask whether behaviourally mediated effects are localized to flowers harbouring predators, or whether bees extend their avoidance to entire plant species. In a tightly controlled laboratory environment, bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) were exposed to a random mixture of equally rewarding yellow and white artificial flowers, but foraging on yellow flowers was very risky: bees had a 25 per cent chance of receiving a simulated predation attempt by ‘robotic’ crab spiders. As bees learnt to avoid ‘dangerous’ flowers, their foraging preferences changed and they began to visit fewer yellow flowers than expected by chance. Bees avoided spider-free yellow flowers as well as dangerous yellow flowers when spiders were more difficult to detect (the colour of yellow spiders was indistinguishable from that of yellow flowers). Therefore, this interaction between bee learning and predator crypsis could lead flower species harbouring cryptic predators to suffer from reduced reproductive success. PMID:19324797

  6. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, D.; Montaigne, F.; Rougemaille, N.; Belkhou, R.; Raabe, J.; Hehn, M.

    2015-01-01

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer. PMID:26011004

  7. Indirect localization of a magnetic domain wall mediated by quasi walls.

    PubMed

    Lacour, D; Montaigne, F; Rougemaille, N; Belkhou, R; Raabe, J; Hehn, M

    2015-05-26

    The manipulation of magnetic domain walls in thin films and nanostructures opens new opportunities for fundamental and applied research. But controlling reliably the position of a moving domain wall still remains challenging. So far, most of the studies aimed at understanding the physics of pinning and depinning processes in the magnetic layer in which the wall moves (active layer). In these studies, the role of other magnetic layers in the stack has been often ignored. Here, we report an indirect localization process of 180° domain walls that occurs in magnetic tunnel junctions, commonly used in spintronics. Combining Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopy and micromagnetic simulations, magnetic configurations in both layers are resolved. When nucleating a 180° domain wall in the active layer, a quasi wall is created in the reference layer, atop the wall. The wall and its quasi wall must then be moved or positioned together, as a unique object. As a mutual effect, a localized change of the magnetic properties in the reference layer induces a localized quasi wall in the active layer. The two types of quasi walls are shown to be responsible for an indirect localization process of the 180° domain wall in the active layer.

  8. Conceptualizing and Testing Random Indirect Effects and Moderated Mediation in Multilevel Models: New Procedures and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Daniel J.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Gil, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The authors propose new procedures for evaluating direct, indirect, and total effects in multilevel models when all relevant variables are measured at Level 1 and all effects are random. Formulas are provided for the mean and variance of the indirect and total effects and for the sampling variances of the average indirect and total effects.…

  9. Salivary signals of European corn borer induce indirect defenses in tomato.

    PubMed

    Louis, Joe; Luthe, Dawn S; Felton, Gary W

    2013-11-01

    Plants can recognize the insect elicitors and activate its defense mechanisms. European Corn Borer (ECB; Ostrinia nubilalis) saliva, produced from the labial salivary glands and released through the spinneret, is responsible for inducing direct defenses in host plants. Glucose oxidase (GOX) present in the ECB saliva induced direct defenses in tomato. By contrast, GOX activity in ECB saliva was insufficient to trigger defenses in maize, suggesting that host-specific salivary elicitors are responsible for inducing direct defenses in host plants. Our current study further examined whether ECB saliva can trigger indirect defenses in tomato. Relative expression levels of TERPENE SYNTHASE5 (TPS5) and HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE (HPL), marker for indirect defenses in host plants, were monitored. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ECB saliva can induce the expression of TPS5 and HPL, suggesting that salivary signals can induce indirect defenses in addition to the direct defenses. Further experiments are required to identify different ECB elicitors that are responsible for inducing direct and indirect defenses in host plants.

  10. Community genetic interactions mediate indirect ecological effects between a parasitoid wasp and rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zytynska, Sharon E; Fleming, Sarah; Tétard-Jones, Catherine; Kertesz, Michael A; Preziosi, Richard F

    2010-06-01

    Indirect ecological effects (IEEs) clearly influence species dynamics and abundance, yet relatively little is known about how they influence the evolution of species involved. While genetic variation in the species causing and responding to the IEE has obvious effects, the influence of genetic variation in intermediate species remains unexamined. Given the often counterintuitive responses of populations to IEEs this seems a significant omission. Following a community genetics approach, we used a model tetra-trophic system (parasitoid wasp, aphid, barley, and rhizobacteria) to investigate the effect of genetic interactions within the two linking species (aphids and barley) on the IEE of rhizobacteria on wasps. We show that 12.4% of the variation in wasp size, a proxy for fitness, is explained by higher-order interactions between aphid genotype (A), barley genotype (B), and presence or absence of rhizobacteria (R) (Genotype[B] x Genotype[A] x Environment[R]). Thus, the IEE of rhizobacteria on the parasitoid wasp is influenced by the specific combination of aphid and barley genotypes that mediate the interactions. In some cases changes in the genotypes of the intermediate species completely reverse the effect of rhizobacteria on wasp size. Our work demonstrates that within-species genetic variation is important in shaping IEEs in communities, an essential component of community evolutionary processes.

  11. Indirect role for COPI in the completion of FCgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hackam, D J; Botelho, R J; Sjolin, C; Rotstein, O D; Robinson, J M; Schreiber, A D; Grinstein, S

    2001-05-25

    Recent evidence suggests that extension of pseudopods during phagocytosis requires localized insertion of endomembrane vesicles. The nature of these vesicles and the processes mediating their release and insertion are unknown. COPI plays an essential role in the budding and traffic of membrane vesicles in intracellular compartments. We therefore assessed whether COPI is also involved in phagosome formation. We used ldlF cells, a mutant line derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells that express a temperature-sensitive form of epsilonCOP. To confer phagocytic ability to ldlF cells, they were stably transfected with Fc receptors type IIA (FcgammaRIIA). In the presence of functional COPI, FcgammaRIIA-transfected ldlF cells effectively internalized opsonized particles. In contrast, phagocytosis was virtually eliminated after incubation at the restrictive temperature. Similar results were obtained impairing COPI function in macrophages using brefeldin A. Notably, loss of COPI function preceded complete inhibition of phagocytosis, suggesting that COPI is indirectly required for phagocytosis. Despite their inability to internalize particles, COPI-deficient cells nevertheless expressed normal levels of FcgammaRIIA, and signal transduction appeared unimpeded. The opsonized particles adhered normally to COPI-deficient cells and were often found on actin-rich pedestals, but they were not internalized due to the inability of the cells to extend pseudopods. The failure to extend pseudopods was attributed to the inability of COPI-deficient cells to mobilize endomembrane vesicles, including a VAMP3-containing compartment, in response to the phagocytic stimulus.

  12. Plant chemical defense indirectly mediates aphid performance via interactions with tending ants.

    PubMed

    Züst, Tobias; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2017-03-01

    The benefits of mutualistic interactions are often highly context dependent. We studied the interaction between the milkweed aphid Aphis asclepiadis and a tending ant, Formica podzolica. Although this interaction is generally considered beneficial, variation in plant genotype may alter it from mutualistic to antagonistic. Here we link the shift in strength and relative benefit of the ant-aphid interaction to plant genotypic variation in the production of cardenolides, a class of toxic defensive chemicals. In a field experiment with highly variable genotypes of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), we show that plant cardenolides, especially polar forms, are ingested by aphids and excreted in honeydew proportionally to plant concentrations without directly affecting aphid performance. Ants consume honeydew, and aphids that excreted high amounts of cardenolides received fewer ant visits, which in turn reduced aphid survival. On at least some plant genotypes, aphid numbers per plant were reduced in the presence of ants to levels lower than in corresponding ant-exclusion treatments, suggesting antagonistic ant behavior. Although cardenolides appear ineffective as direct plant defenses against aphids, the multi-trophic context reveals an ant-mediated negative indirect effect on aphid performance and population dynamics. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Changes in algal community structure via density- and trait-mediated indirect interactions in a marine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoko; Iwasaki, Keiji; Yusa, Yoichi

    2013-11-01

    In various terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, predators affect resources indirectly via intermediate prey. Such indirect interactions involve reducing the density of the prey (density-mediated indirect interactions, DMIIs) or changing the behavioral, morphological, or life history traits of the prey (trait-mediated indirect interactions, TMIIs). Although the importance of TMIIs has been highlighted recently, the strengths of both DMIIs and TMIIs under natural conditions have rarely been evaluated, especially in the context of resource community structure. We studied a three-level marine food chain involving the carnivorous snail Thais clavigera, its limpet prey Siphonaria sirius, and the limpet's food sources, the algae Lithoderma sp. and Ulva sp. We measured the strengths of DMIIs and TMIIs and observed how the algal community changes under the pressure of natural predation by T. clavigera on S. sirius. Neither DMIIs nor TMIIs affected the total algal cover or chlorophyll content per unit area. However, both types of indirect interactions caused similar changes in algal composition by increasing the cover of Ulva and decreasing the cover of Lithoderma. This change in the algal community was caused by a reduction in the limpet's preferential consumption of the competitively dominant Ulva over Lithoderma. These results suggest that both DMIIs and TMIIs have similar effects on the changes in resource community structure under natural conditions.

  14. MP-4 Contributes to Snake Venom Neutralization by Mucuna pruriens Seeds through an Indirect Antibody-mediated Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Gupta, Chitra; Nair, Deepak T; Salunke, Dinakar M

    2016-05-20

    Mortality due to snakebite is a serious public health problem, and available therapeutics are known to induce debilitating side effects. Traditional medicine suggests that seeds of Mucuna pruriens can provide protection against the effects of snakebite. Our aim is to identify the protein(s) that may be important for snake venom neutralization and elucidate its mechanism of action. To this end, we have identified and purified a protein from M. pruriens, which we have named MP-4. The full-length polypeptide sequence of MP-4 was obtained through N-terminal sequencing of peptide fragments. Sequence analysis suggested that the protein may belong to the Kunitz-type protease inhibitor family and therefore may potentially neutralize the proteases present in snake venom. Using various structural and biochemical tools coupled with in vivo assays, we are able to show that MP-4 does not afford direct protection against snake venom because it is actually a poor inhibitor of serine proteases. Further experiments showed that antibodies generated against MP-4 cross-react with the whole venom and provide protection to mice against Echis carinatus snake venom. This study shows that the MP-4 contributes significantly to the snake venom neutralization activity of M. pruriens seeds through an indirect antibody-mediated mechanism.

  15. Central Tolerance to Tissue-specific Antigens Mediated by Direct and Indirect Antigen Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, Alena M.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Intrathymic expression of tissue-specific antigens (TSAs) by medullary thymic epithelial cells (Mtecs) leads to deletion of autoreactive T cells. However, because Mtecs are known to be poor antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for tolerance to ubiquitous antigens, and very few Mtecs express a given TSA, it was unclear if central tolerance to TSA was induced directly by Mtec antigen presentation or indirectly by thymic bone marrow (BM)-derived cells via cross-presentation. We show that professional BM-derived APCs acquire TSAs from Mtecs and delete autoreactive CD8 and CD4 T cells. Although direct antigen presentation by Mtecs did not delete the CD4 T cell population tested in this study, Mtec presentation efficiently deleted both monoclonal and polyclonal populations of CD8 T cells. For developing CD8 T cells, deletion by BM-derived APC and by Mtec presentation occurred abruptly at the transitional, CD4high CD8low TCRintermediate stage, presumably as the cells transit from the cortex to the medulla. These studies reveal a cooperative relationship between Mtecs and BM-derived cells in thymic elimination of autoreactive T cells. Although Mtecs synthesize TSAs and delete a subset of autoreactive T cells, BM-derived cells extend the range of clonal deletion by cross-presenting antigen captured from Mtecs. PMID:15492126

  16. Indirect food web interactions mediated by predator-rodent dynamics: relative roles of lemmings and voles.

    PubMed

    Ims, Rolf A; Henden, John-André; Thingnes, Anders V; Killengreen, Siw T

    2013-01-01

    Production cycles in birds are proposed as prime cases of indirect interactions in food webs. They are thought to be driven by predators switching from rodents to bird nests in the crash phase of rodent population cycles. Although rodent cycles are geographically widespread and found in different rodent taxa, bird production cycles appear to be most profound in the high Arctic where lemmings dominate. We hypothesized that this may be due to arctic lemmings inducing stronger predator responses than boreal voles. We tested this hypothesis by estimating predation rates in dummy bird nests during a rodent cycle in low-Arctic tundra. Here, the rodent community consists of a spatially variable mix of one lemming (Lemmus lemmus) and two vole species (Myodes rufocanus and Microtus oeconomus) with similar abundances. In consistence with our hypothesis, lemming peak abundances predicted well crash-phase nest predation rates, whereas the vole abundances had no predictive ability. Corvids were found to be the most important nest predators. Lemmings appear to be accessible to the whole predator community which makes them particularly powerful drivers of food web dynamics.

  17. Indirect interband transition induced by optical near fields with large wave numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Optical near fields (ONFs) have Fourier components with large wave numbers that are two or three orders of magnitude larger than those of far-field propagating light owing to their nonuniformity in space. By utilizing these large wave numbers, the ONF is expected to induce an indirect interband transition between Bloch states having different wave numbers and directly generate an electron-hole pair without electron-phonon coupling. We perform time-dependent dynamics calculations of a one-dimensional periodic potential with an indirect band-gap structure and demonstrate that the ONF definitely induces an indirect interband transition. Instead of using the general Bloch boundary condition, which is usually imposed in conventional band structure calculations, we adopt an alternative boundary condition, the Born-von Kármán boundary condition, to appropriately treat indirect interband transitions. The calculated absorption spectra for the far-field and ONF excitations show different absorption edges and spectral patterns. We argue that this difference can be experimentally measured as evidence of the effects of the large wave numbers of the ONF.

  18. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song E; Kim, Han-Na; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol; Kim, Hyung-Lae

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression.

  19. Direct and Indirect Effects of Five Factor Personality and Gender on Depressive Symptoms Mediated by Perceived Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song E.; Cho, Juhee; Kwon, Min-Jung; Chang, Yoosoo; Ryu, Seungho; Shin, Hocheol

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate associations among five factor personality traits, perceived stress, and depressive symptoms and to examine the roles of personality and perceived stress in the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. The participants (N = 3,950) were part of a cohort study for health screening and examination at the Kangbuk Samsung Hospital. Personality was measured with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Perceived stress level was evaluated with a self-reported stress questionnaire developed for the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. A higher degree of neuroticism and lower degrees of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness were significantly associated with greater perceived stress and depressive symptoms. Neuroticism and extraversion had significant direct and indirect effects (via stress as a mediator) on depressive symptoms in both genders. Agreeableness and conscientiousness had indirect effects on depression symptoms in both genders. Multiple mediation models were used to examine the mediational roles of each personality factor and perceived stress in the link between gender and depressive symptoms. Four of the personality factors (except openness) were significant mediators, along with stress, on the relationship between gender and depressive symptoms. Our findings suggest that the links between personality factors and depressive symptoms are mediated by perceived stress. As such, personality is an important factor to consider when examining the link between gender and depression. PMID:27120051

  20. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbacz, P.; Buckingham, A. D.

    2016-11-01

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  1. Chirality-sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance effects induced by indirect spin-spin coupling.

    PubMed

    Garbacz, P; Buckingham, A D

    2016-11-28

    It is predicted that, for two spin-1/2 nuclei coupled by indirect spin-spin coupling in a chiral molecule, chirality-sensitive induced electric polarization can be observed at the frequencies equal to the sum and difference between the spin resonance frequencies. Also, an electric field oscillating at the difference frequency can induce spin coherences which allow the direct discrimination between enantiomers by nuclear magnetic resonance. The dominant contribution to the magnitude of these expected chiral effects is proportional to the permanent electric dipole moment and to the antisymmetric part of the indirect spin-spin coupling tensor of the chiral molecule. Promising compounds for experimental tests of the predictions are derivatives of 1,3-difluorocyclopropene.

  2. Power Doppler imaging in detection of surgically induced indirect neoangiogenesis in adult moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Perren, Fabienne; Horn, Peter; Vajkoczy, Peter; Schmiedek, Peter; Meairs, Stephen

    2005-11-01

    Moyamoya is a rare, chronic disease that leads to the progressive narrowing and/or occlusion of the distal internal carotid and proximal cerebral arteries. Chronic cerebral ischemia ensues due to insufficient collateral blood supply. One potential treatment consists of the restoration of regional cerebral blood flow by direct or indirect revascularization surgery. The extent of neovascularization, especially in indirect procedures such as encephalomyosynangiosis (EMS), is currently evaluated with conventional angiography. Because this method is invasive and carries some risks, the authors investigated power Doppler imaging as an alternative noninvasive bedside procedure that can be used to assess surgically induced indirect revascularization in adult patients with moyamoya disease. Twelve symptomatic patients with adult moyamoya disease (seven women and five men, mean age 38 +/- 17 years) underwent combined (direct and indirect) revascularization. They were then examined using conventional angiography and power Doppler imaging to assess the extent of revascularization within 120 days postsurgery. According to the number of intracranial vessels demonstrating opacification on conventional angiography and power Doppler imaging studies, EMS was graded as follows: 1, absent (0 vessels); 2, moderate (one-four vessels); and 3, extensive (> four vessels) for both methods. Examiners were blinded to the classification results for the procedure that they did not grade. All 24 hemispheres were examined. The visual grading of EMS revealed a highly significant agreement between conventional angiography and power Doppler imaging (Spearman rank coefficient, r = 0.92; p < 0.001) and there was 100% agreement of patency of the bypass between the direct and indirect methods. The authors found excellent agreement between the two methods. Therefore, power Doppler imaging is a valid noninvasive alternative to carotid artery angiography in evaluating direct and indirect revascularization.

  3. Helicoverpa zea gut-associated bacteria indirectly induce defenses in tomato by triggering a salivary elicitor(s).

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Peiffer, Michelle; Hoover, Kelli; Rosa, Cristina; Zeng, Rensen; Felton, Gary W

    2017-05-01

    Insect gut-associated microbes modulating plant defenses have been observed in beetles and piercing-sucking insects, but the role of caterpillar-associated bacteria in regulating plant induced defenses has not been adequately examined. We identified bacteria from the regurgitant of field-collected Helicoverpa zea larvae using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. A combination of biochemical, molecular, and confocal electron microscopy methods were used to determine the role of caterpillar-associated bacteria in mediating defenses in Solanum lycopersicum (tomato). Laboratory-reared H. zea inoculated with one of the bacteria identified in field-collected H. zea, Enterobacter ludwigii, induced expression of the tomato defense-related enzyme polyphenol oxidase and genes regulated by jasmonic acid (JA), whereas the salicylic acid (SA)-responsive pathogenesis-related gene was suppressed. Additionally, saliva and its main component glucose oxidase from inoculated caterpillars played an important role in elevating tomato anti-herbivore defenses. However, there were only low detectable amounts of regurgitant or bacteria on H. zea-damaged tomato leaves. Our results suggest that H. zea gut-associated bacteria indirectly mediate plant-insect interactions by triggering salivary elicitors. These findings provide a proof of concept that introducing gut bacteria to a herbivore may provide a novel approach to pest management through indirect induction of plant resistance. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Contrasting patterns of short-term indirect seed-seed interactions mediated by scatter-hoarding rodents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhishu; Zhang, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that direct effects of seed predators or dispersers can have strong effects on seedling establishment. However, we have limited knowledge about the indirect species interactions between seeds of different species that are mediated by shared seed predators and/or dispersers and their consequences for plant demography and diversity. Because scatter-hoarding rodents as seed dispersers may leave some hoarded seeds uneaten, scatter hoarding may serve to increase seed survival and dispersal. Consequently, the presence of heterospecific seeds could alter whether the indirect interactions mediated by scatter-hoarding rodents have a net positive effect, creating apparent mutualism between seed species, or a net negative effect, creating apparent competition between seed species. We present a testable framework to measure short-term indirect effects between co-occurring plant species mediated by seed scatter-hoarding rodents. We tested this framework in a subtropical forest in south-west China using a replacement design and tracked the fate of individually tagged seeds in experimental patches. We manipulated the benefits to rodents by using low-tannin dormant chestnuts as palatable food and high-tannin non-dormant acorns as unpalatable food. We found that seed palatability changed the amount of scatter hoarding that occurred when seeds co-occurred either among or within patches. Consistent with our predictions, scatter-hoarding rodents created apparent mutualism through increasing seed removal and seed caching, and enhancing survival, of both plant species in mixed patches compared with monospecific patches. However, if we ignore scatter hoarding and treat all seed harvest as seed predation (and not dispersal), then apparent competition between palatable chestnuts and unpalatable acorns was also observed. This study is the first to demonstrate that foraging decisions by scatter-hoarding animals to scatter hoard seeds for later consumption (or loss) or

  5. Nrf2-Mediated HO-1 Induction Coupled with the ERK Signaling Pathway Contributes to Indirect Antioxidant Capacity of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the contributing effect of the nuclear transcription factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated signaling pathway on the indirect antioxidant capacity of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells. The result of an antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase assay showed that CAPE stimulated ARE promoter activity resulting in increased transcriptional and translational activities of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In addition, CAPE treatment enhanced Nrf2 accumulation in the nucleus and the post-translational phosphorylation level of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) among several protein kinases tested. Treatment with ERK inhibitor U126 completely suppressed CAPE-induced ERK phosphorylation and HO-1 expression, but it only partly inhibited CAPE-induced Nrf2 accumulation and ARE promoter. Using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) method, the cellular antioxidant capacity of CAPE against 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH)- or H2O2-induced oxidative stress also was shown to be partially suppressed by the ERK inhibitor. From the overall results it is proposed that the indirect antioxidant activity of CAPE against oxidative stress in HepG2 cells is partially attributed to induction of HO-1, which is regulated by Kelch-like erythroid-cell-derived protein with CNC homology (ECH)-associated protein 1 (Keap1)-independent Nrf2 activation relying on post-translational phosphorylation of ERK. PMID:25007817

  6. Indirect induction of endothelial cell injury by PU- or PTFE-mediated activation of monocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Xue, Yang; Sun, Jiao

    2010-01-01

    Polyurethanes (PUs) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are widely used for making cardiovascular devices, but thrombus formation on the surfaces of these devices is inevitable. Since endothelial injury can lead to thrombosis, most of the studies on PUs or PTFE focused on their damage to endothelial cells. However, few studies have attempted to clarify whether the use of foreign objects as biomaterials can cause endothelial injury by activating the innate immune system. In this study, we aimed to investigate the roles of PU- or PTFE-stimulated immune cells in endothelial-cell injury. First, monocytes (THP-1 cells) were stimulated with PU or PTFE for 24 h and, subsequently, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were treated with the supernatants of the stimulated cells for 24 h. We measured the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) from THP-1 cells treated with PU and PTFE for 24 h, meanwhile hydrogen dioxide (H(2)O(2)), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β in the supernatants were also detected. Then, we assessed the apoptosis rate of the HUVECs and determined the expression of NO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and apoptosis-related proteins (p53, Bax, Bcl-2) in the HUVECs. The results showed that large amounts of ROS and low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) were produced by the stimulated THP-1 cells. After culturing with the supernatants of the PU- or PTFE-stimulated THP-1 cells, the apoptosis rate, NO production and expression of iNOS, p53 and Bax in the HUVECs were up-regulated, while Bcl-2 expression was down-regulated. In conclusion, the release of ROS by PU- or PTFE-treated THP-1 cells may induce iNOS expression and cause apoptosis in HUVECs via the p53, Bax and Bcl-2 proteins. These data provide the interesting finding that endothelial injury in the process of biomaterial-induced thrombosis can be initiated through the release of soluble mediators by monocytes.

  7. Effect Size Measures for Mediation Models: Quantitative Strategies for Communicating Indirect Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preacher, Kristopher J.; Kelley, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The statistical analysis of mediation effects has become an indispensable tool for helping scientists investigate processes thought to be causal. Yet, in spite of many recent advances in the estimation and testing of mediation effects, little attention has been given to methods for communicating effect size and the practical importance of those…

  8. Mediation misgivings: ambiguous clinical and public health interpretations of natural direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Naimi, Ashley I; Kaufman, Jay S; MacLehose, Richard F

    2014-10-01

    Recent methodological innovation is giving rise to an increasing number of applied papers in medical and epidemiological journals in which natural direct and indirect effects are estimated. However, there is a longstanding debate on whether such effects are relevant targets of inference in population health. In light of the repeated calls for a more pragmatic and consequential epidemiology, we review three issues often raised in this debate: (i) the use of composite cross-world counterfactuals and the need for cross-world independence assumptions; (ii) interventional vs non-interventional identifiability; and (iii) the interpretational ambiguity of natural direct and indirect effect estimates. We use potential outcomes notation and directed acyclic graphs to explain 'cross-world' assumptions, illustrate implications of this assumption via regression models and discuss ensuing issues of interpretation. We argue that the debate on the relevance of natural direct and indirect effects rests on whether one takes as a target of inference the mathematical object per se, or the change in the world that the mathematical object represents. We further note that public health questions may be better served by estimating controlled direct effects. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  9. Evaluation of fluorescent dye degradation indirectly induced by x-ray ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Clayton Augusto; Duarte de Menezes, Frederico; de Araujo, Renato E

    2015-08-01

    This work evaluated the fluorescent dye degradation indirectly induced by ionizing radiation with high energy photons (50 keV). Aqueous gels of agarose with low concentrations of Rhodamine 6G and Fluorescein were submitted to doses of x-ray radiation up to 200 Gy. The dye degradation was analyzed by fluorescence spectroscopy, using an excitation light-emitting diode with a peak wavelength of 462 nm. A rate equation model of fluorophores and radicals' species populations was developed to describe the degradation time behavior of the fluorescent solutions. The model suggests fluorescent dyes should be used in dosimetry.

  10. Indirect laser-induced breakdown of transparent thin gel layer for sensitive trace element detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Junshan; Bai, Xueshi; Negre, Erwan; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu, Jin

    2013-06-01

    Optical emissions from major and trace elements embodied in a transparent gel prepared from cooking oil were detected when the gel was spread in thin film on a metallic substrate and a plasma was induced on the substrate surface using nanosecond infrared pulsed laser. Such emissions are due to indirect breakdown of the coating layer. The generated plasma, a mixture of substances from the substrate, the layer, and the ambient gas, was characterized using emission spectroscopy. Temperature higher than 15 000 K determined in the plasma allows considering sensitive detection of trace elements in liquids, gels, biological samples, or thin films.

  11. An apparent trade-off between direct and signal-based induced indirect defence against herbivores in willow trees.

    PubMed

    Yoneya, Kinuyo; Uefune, Masayoshi; Takabayashi, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Signal-based induced indirect defence refers to herbivore-induced production of plant volatiles that attract carnivorous natural enemies of herbivores. Relationships between direct and indirect defence strategies were studied using tritrophic systems consisting of six sympatric willow species, willow leaf beetles (Plagiodera versicolora), and their natural predators, ladybeetles (Aiolocaria hexaspilota). Relative preferences of ladybeetles for prey-infested willow plant volatiles, indicating levels of signal-based induced indirect defence, were positively correlated with the vulnerability of willow species to leaf beetles, assigned as relative levels of direct defence. This correlation suggested a possible trade-off among the species, in terms of resource limitation between direct defence and signal-based induced indirect defence. However, analyses of volatiles from infested and uninfested plants showed that the specificity of infested volatile blends (an important factor determining the costs of signal-based induced indirect defence) did not affect the attractiveness of infested plant volatiles. Thus, the suggested trade-off in resource limitation was unlikely. Rather, principal coordinates analysis showed that this 'apparent trade-off' between direct and signal-based induced indirect defence was partially explained by differential preferences of ladybeetles to infested plant volatiles of the six willow species. We also showed that relative preferences of ladybeetles for prey-infested willow plant volatiles were positively correlated with oviposition preferences of leaf beetles and with the distributions of leaf beetles in the field. These correlations suggest that ladybeetles use the specificity of infested willow plant volatiles to find suitable prey patches.

  12. Interleukin-19 induces angiogenesis in the absence of hypoxia by direct and indirect immune mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Kako, Farah; Gabunia, Khatuna; Ray, Mitali; Kelemen, Sheri E.; England, Ross N.; Kako, Bashar; Scalia, Rosario G.

    2016-01-01

    Neovascularization and inflammation are independent biological processes but are linked in response to injury. The role of inflammation-dampening cytokines in the regulation of angiogenesis remains to be clarified. The purpose of this work was to test the hypothesis that IL-19 can induce angiogenesis in the absence of tissue hypoxia and to identify potential mechanisms. Using the aortic ring model of angiogenesis, we found significantly reduced sprouting capacity in aortic rings from IL-19−/− compared with wild-type mice. Using an in vivo assay, we found that IL-19−/− mice respond to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) significantly less than wild-type mice and demonstrate decreased capillary formation in Matrigel plugs. IL-19 signals through the IL-20 receptor complex, and IL-19 induces IL-20 receptor subunit expression in aortic rings and cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-dependent mechanism. IL-19 activates STAT3, and IL-19 angiogenic activity in aortic rings is STAT3-dependent. Using a quantitative RT-PCR screening assay, we determined that IL-19 has direct proangiogenic effects on aortic rings by inducing angiogenic gene expression. M2 macrophages participate in angiogenesis, and IL-19 has indirect angiogenic effects, as IL-19-stimulated bone marrow-derived macrophages secrete proangiogenic factors that induce greater sprouting of aortic rings than unstimulated controls. Using a quantitative RT-PCR screen, we determined that IL-19 induces expression of angiogenic cytokines in bone marrow-derived macrophages. Together, these data suggest that IL-19 can promote angiogenesis in the absence of hypoxia by at least two distinct mechanisms: 1) direct effects on vascular cells and 2) indirect effects by stimulation of macrophages. PMID:27053520

  13. Acrolein Causes TRPA1-Mediated Sensory Irritation and Indirect Potentiation of TRPV1-Mediated Pulmonary Chemoreflex Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that acute exposure to acrolein causes immediate sensory irritation, with rapid decrease in heart rate (HR) and increase in inspiratory time (Ti), and potentiation of pulmonary chemoreflex response 24hrs later; of these effects only the latter is mediat...

  14. Acrolein Causes TRPA1-Mediated Sensory Irritation and Indirect Potentiation of TRPV1-Mediated Pulmonary Chemoreflex Response

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously demonstrated that acute exposure to acrolein causes immediate sensory irritation, with rapid decrease in heart rate (HR) and increase in inspiratory time (Ti), and potentiation of pulmonary chemoreflex response 24hrs later; of these effects only the latter is mediat...

  15. Trait-mediated indirect interactions of ant shape on the attack of caterpillars and fruits

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Armando; De la Torre, Pedro Luna; Kaminski, Lucas A.; García-Chávez, Juan; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Mainly owing to their high diversity and abundance, ants are formidable as predators and defenders of foliage. Consequently, ants can exclude both invertebrate and vertebrate activity on plants via direct and indirect interactions as already shown in many previous studies. Here we present empirical evidence that objects resembling ant shape on dummy caterpillars were able to repel visually oriented predators. Moreover, we also show that rubber ants on dummy fruits can repel potential fruit dispersers. Our results have direct implications on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of interactions in ant-based systems, as ant presence could affect the fitness of its partners. In short, our study highlights the importance of visual cues in interspecific interactions and opens a new way to study the effects of ant presence to test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses. PMID:27484648

  16. Trait-mediated indirect interactions of ant shape on the attack of caterpillars and fruits.

    PubMed

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; De la Torre, Pedro Luna; Kaminski, Lucas A; García-Chávez, Juan; Rico-Gray, Víctor

    2016-08-01

    Mainly owing to their high diversity and abundance, ants are formidable as predators and defenders of foliage. Consequently, ants can exclude both invertebrate and vertebrate activity on plants via direct and indirect interactions as already shown in many previous studies. Here we present empirical evidence that objects resembling ant shape on dummy caterpillars were able to repel visually oriented predators. Moreover, we also show that rubber ants on dummy fruits can repel potential fruit dispersers. Our results have direct implications on the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of interactions in ant-based systems, as ant presence could affect the fitness of its partners. In short, our study highlights the importance of visual cues in interspecific interactions and opens a new way to study the effects of ant presence to test ecological and evolutionary hypotheses.

  17. Evolutionary change from induced to constitutive expression of an indirect plant resistance.

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin; Greiner, Sabine; Meimberg, Harald; Krüger, Ralf; Noyer, Jean-Louis; Heubl, Günther; Linsenmair, K Eduard; Boland, Wilhelm

    2004-07-08

    Induced plant resistance traits are expressed in response to attack and occur throughout the plant kingdom. Despite their general occurrence, the evolution of such resistances has rarely been investigated. Here we report that extrafloral nectar, a usually inducible trait, is constitutively secreted by Central American Acacia species that are obligately inhabited by ants. Extrafloral nectar is secreted as an indirect resistance, attracting ants that defend plants against herbivores. Leaf damage induces extrafloral nectar secretion in several plant species; among these are various Acacia species and other Fabaceae investigated here. In contrast, Acacia species obligately inhabited by symbiotic ants nourish these ants by secreting extrafloral nectar constitutively at high rates that are not affected by leaf damage. The phylogeny of the genus Acacia and closely related genera indicate that the inducibility of extrafloral nectar is the plesiomorphic or 'original' state, whereas the constitutive extrafloral nectar flow is derived within Acacia. A constitutive resistance trait has evolved from an inducible one, obviously in response to particular functional demands.

  18. The indirect NMDAR antagonist acamprosate induces postischemic neurologic recovery associated with sustained neuroprotection and neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Pehlke, Jens R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Schlechter, Jana; Kilic, Ertugrul; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia stimulates N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) resulting in increased calcium concentration and excitotoxicity. Yet, deactivation of NMDAR failed in clinical studies due to poor preclinical study designs or toxicity of NMDAR antagonists. Acamprosate is an indirect NMDAR antagonist used for patients with chronic alcohol dependence. We herein analyzed the therapeutic potential of acamprosate on brain injury, neurologic recovery and their underlying mechanisms. Mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, treated with intraperitoneal injections of acamprosate or saline (controls), and allowed to survive until 3 months. Acamprosate yielded sustained neuroprotection and increased neurologic recovery when given no later than 12 hours after stroke. The latter was associated with increased postischemic angioneurogenesis, albeit acamprosate did not stimulate angioneurogenesis itself. Rather, increased angioneurogenesis was due to inhibition of calpain-mediated pro-injurious signaling cascades. As such, acamprosate-mediated reduction of calpain activity resulted in decreased degradation of p35, increased abundance of the pro-survival factor STAT6, and reduced N-terminal-Jun-kinase activation. Inhibition of calpain was associated with enhanced stability of the blood-brain barrier, reduction of oxidative stress and cerebral leukocyte infiltration. Taken into account its excellent tolerability, its sustained effects on neurologic recovery, brain tissue survival, and neural remodeling, acamprosate is an intriguing candidate for adjuvant future stroke treatment.

  19. A Novel Small Molecule Inhibitor of Influenza A Viruses that Targets Polymerase Function and Indirectly Induces Interferon

    PubMed Central

    Ortigoza, Mila Brum; Dibben, Oliver; Maamary, Jad; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Abreu, Pablo; Ayllon, Juan; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN) is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule. PMID:22577360

  20. A novel small molecule inhibitor of influenza A viruses that targets polymerase function and indirectly induces interferon.

    PubMed

    Ortigoza, Mila Brum; Dibben, Oliver; Maamary, Jad; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Leyva-Grado, Victor H; Abreu, Pablo; Ayllon, Juan; Palese, Peter; Shaw, Megan L

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses continue to pose a major public health threat worldwide and options for antiviral therapy are limited by the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains. The antiviral cytokine, interferon (IFN) is an essential mediator of the innate immune response and influenza viruses, like many viruses, have evolved strategies to evade this response, resulting in increased replication and enhanced pathogenicity. A cell-based assay that monitors IFN production was developed and applied in a high-throughput compound screen to identify molecules that restore the IFN response to influenza virus infected cells. We report the identification of compound ASN2, which induces IFN only in the presence of influenza virus infection. ASN2 preferentially inhibits the growth of influenza A viruses, including the 1918 H1N1, 1968 H3N2 and 2009 H1N1 pandemic strains and avian H5N1 virus. In vivo, ASN2 partially protects mice challenged with a lethal dose of influenza A virus. Surprisingly, we found that the antiviral activity of ASN2 is not dependent on IFN production and signaling. Rather, its IFN-inducing property appears to be an indirect effect resulting from ASN2-mediated inhibition of viral polymerase function, and subsequent loss of the expression of the viral IFN antagonist, NS1. Moreover, we identified a single amino acid mutation at position 499 of the influenza virus PB1 protein that confers resistance to ASN2, suggesting that PB1 is the direct target. This two-pronged antiviral mechanism, consisting of direct inhibition of virus replication and simultaneous activation of the host innate immune response, is a unique property not previously described for any single antiviral molecule.

  1. Stratospheric Ozone-induced Indirect Radiative Effects on Antarctic Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Y.; Xia, Y.; LIU, J.; Huang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the Antarctic Ozone Hole has important influences on Antarctic sea ice. While all these have focused on stratospheric ozone-induced dynamic effects on sea ice, here we show results that ozone-induced indirect radiative effects have important influences on Antarctic sea ice. Our simulations demonstrate that the recovery of the Antarctic Ozone Hole causes equatorward shift of clouds over the Southern Ocean. The cloud-band shift leads to reduction of downward infrared radiation, which causes surface cooling. On the other hand, it also causes increasing solar radiation on the surface. However, the increase in solar radiation is offset by surface reflection due to increasing sea ice. As a result solar radiation absorbed by the surface is reduced, which also causes surface cooling. Therefore, the overall ozone-induced cloud radiative effect is to cool the surface and causes expansion of sea ice around the Antarctic. As shown in previous studies, the cloud-band shift is associated with the equatorward shift of the westerly jet stream around the Antarctic. Our simulations also demonstrate increasing snow rate near the sea ice edge, which also contributes to Antarctic sea-ice expansion. The ozone-induced cloud radiative effect would mitigate Antarctic sea-ice melting due to greenhouse warming in the 21st century.

  2. Propagation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells in an indirect co-culture system

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sheena; Sheridan, Steven D.; Laurent, Louise C.; Albert, Kelsey; Stubban, Christopher; Ulitsky, Igor; Miller, Bradley; Loring, Jeanne F.; Rao, Raj R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and validated a microporous poly(ethylene terephthalate) membrane-based indirect co-culture system for human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) propagation, which allows real-time conditioning of the culture medium with human fibroblasts while maintaining the complete separation of the two cell types. The propagation and pluripotent characteristics of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line and a human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) line were studied in prolonged culture in this system. We report that hPSCs cultured on membranes by indirect co-culture with fibroblasts were indistinguishable by multiple criteria from hPSCs cultured directly on a fibroblast feeder layer. Thus this co-culture system is a significant advance in hPSC culture methods, providing a facile stem cell expansion system with continuous medium conditioning while preventing mixing of hPSCs and feeder cells. This membrane culture method will enable testing of novel feeder cells and differentiation studies using co-culture with other cell types, and will simplify stepwise changes in culture conditions for staged differentiation protocols. PMID:20117095

  3. Charge dynamics and phonon induced oscillatory relaxation rates of indirect excitons in quantum dot molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolon, J. E.; Wijesundara, K. C.; Stinaff, E. A.; Ulloa, S. E.

    2011-03-01

    Optoelectronic control of quantum dots is a thriving area of research with impact on fundamental physics and quantum information devices. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments, carried out in charge tunable coupled quantum dots, have demonstrated non-monotonic behavior of neutral indirect exciton lifetimes over a wide range of applied electric fields. We present a model for neutral indirect exciton lifetimes in electric field tunable quantum dot molecules. Our model includes field-dependent oscillatory phonon-induced relaxation rates, carrier tunneling rates, and carrier relaxation into nearby charged exciton states. To this end we have used a multi-excitonic Hamiltonian, and calculated the exciton population dynamics using a master equation with electric field dependent rates. We find that lifetime suppression is dominated by scattering with LA phonons at low fields, and that the maximum lifetime gives information on the effective dimensions of the molecule. In contrast, at high fields the lifetime suppression is dominated by the interplay of carrier population exchange with nearby charged excitons. This prompts for ways of controlling exciton lifetimes and possible decoherence in quantum dots. Supported by CONACYT and NSF PIRE and MWN/CIAM.

  4. Possible electric field induced indirect to direct band gap transition in MoSe2.

    PubMed

    Kim, B S; Kyung, W S; Seo, J J; Kwon, J Y; Denlinger, J D; Kim, C; Park, S R

    2017-07-12

    Direct band-gap semiconductors play the central role in optoelectronics. In this regard, monolayer (ML) MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se) has drawn increasing attention due to its novel optoelectronic properties stemming from the direct band-gap and valley degeneracy. Unfortunately, the more practically usable bulk and multilayer MX2 have indirect-gaps. It is thus highly desired to turn bulk and multilayer MX2 into direct band-gap semiconductors by controlling external parameters. Here, we report angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) results from Rb dosed MoSe2 that suggest possibility for electric field induced indirect to direct band-gap transition in bulk MoSe2. The Rb concentration dependent data show detailed evolution of the band-gap, approaching a direct band-gap state. As ionized Rb layer on the surface provides a strong electric field perpendicular to the surface within a few surface layers of MoSe2, our data suggest that direct band-gap in MoSe2 can be achieved if a strong electric field is applied, which is a step towards optoelectronic application of bulk materials.

  5. Fungal composition on leaves explains pollutant-mediated indirect effects on amphipod feeding.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Kosol, Sujitra; Maltby, Lorraine; Stang, Christoph; Duester, Lars; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    The energy stored in coarse particulate organic matter, e.g. leaf litter, is released to aquatic ecosystems by breakdown processes involving microorganisms and leaf shredding invertebrates. The palatability of leaves and thus the feeding of shredders on leaf material are highly influenced by microorganisms. However, implications in the colonization of leaves by microorganisms (=conditioning) caused by chemical stressors are rarely studied. Our laboratory experiments, therefore, investigated for the first time effects of a fungicide on the conditioning process of leaf material by means of food-choice experiments using Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea: Amphipoda). Additionally, microbial analyses were conducted to facilitate the mechanistic understanding of the observed behavior. Gammarids significantly preferred control leaf discs over those conditioned in presence of the fungicide tebuconazole at concentrations of 50 and 500 μg/L. Besides the decrease of fungal biomass with increasing fungicide concentration, also the leaf associated fungal community composition showed that species preferred by gammarids, such as Alatospora acumunata, Clavariopsis aquatica, or Flagellospora curvula, were more frequent in the control. Tetracladium marchalianum, however, which is rejected by gammarids, was abundant in all treatments suggesting an increasing importance of this species for the lower leaf palatability--as other more palatable fungal species were almost absent--in the fungicide treatments. Hence, the food-choice behavior of G. fossarum seems to be a suitable indicator for alterations in leaf associated microbial communities, especially fungal species composition, caused by chemical stressors. Finally, this or similar test systems may be a reasonable supplement to the environmental risk assessment of chemicals in order to achieve its protection goals, as on the one hand, indirect effects may occur far below concentrations known to affect gammarids directly, and on the other

  6. Extracorporeal shock waves stimulate frog sciatic nerves indirectly via a cavitation-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Schelling, G.; Delius, M.; Gschwender, M.; Grafe, P.; Gambihler, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shock waves (SWs) are single pressure pulses with amplitudes up to over 100 MPa, a rise time of only a few nanoseconds, and a short duration of approximately 2 microseconds. Their clinical application for stone destruction causes pain, indicating nerve stimulation by SWs. To examine this phenomenon, sciatic nerves of frogs were exposed to SWs in an organ bath. The SWs were generated with an experimental Dornier lithotripter model XL1 at an operating voltage of 15 kV. The nerves were mounted in a chamber which allowed electrical nerve stimulation and the registration of electrically and SW-induced compound action potentials (SWCAPs). The chamber was filled with frog Ringer's solution. In a standardized protocol. The first experiment established that 95.0 +/- 4.7% of administered SWs induced action potentials which were lower in amplitude (1.45 +/- 1.14 versus 1.95 +/- 0.95 mV, p = 0.004) but similar in shape to electrically induced compound action potentials. In a second experiment, it was shown that the site of origin of the SWCAPs could be correctly determined by simultaneous recording of action potentials at both ends of the nerve. The mechanism of shock wave stimulation was examined by experiments 3 and 4. In experiment 3, in contrast to the previous experiments, SW exposure of the nerves was performed 6 cm outside the shock wave focus. This resulted in a mean probability of inducing a SWCAP of only 4%. After gas bubble administration, this probability increased to 86% for the first SW released immediately after bubble application and declined to 56% for the second, 21% for the third, to 0 for the 10th SW after fluid injection. This indicates that cavitation, the interaction between shock waves and gas bubbles in fluid or tissues, was involved in SWCAP generation. In experiment 4, nerves were again exposed in the focus, however, the Ringer's solution surrounding the nerve was replaced by polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). PVA is a solution with low cavitation activity

  7. An Indirect and Dynamically Induced Energy Mechanism in a Plasma-Neutral Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Vicki W.

    Plasma-neutral interactions play an integral role in governing the dynamics and energy of an upper atmosphere. In the Earth's ionosphere-thermosphere (I/T) region, these interactions can produce significant structure in neutral temperature, winds, mass density, and composition. External sources of momentum and energy that directly affect these properties of the upper atmosphere have been extensively investigated, but these investigations are not sufficient to fully describe thermosphere phenomenology. Considering the strong plasma-neutral coupling in the I/T region, an internal and indirect energy mechanism, or a feedback exchange between hydrodynamics and thermodynamics, can contribute to the resultant structure. The complex, indirect consequences of internal momentum changes on neutral gas properties have not been thoroughly assessed due to the multivariate nature of the problem and limited observations. Through the use of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model, this thesis seeks to simulate, understand, and quantify how plasma-neutral interactions affect the energy distribution of the upper thermosphere via an indirect, dynamically induced mechanism, and to establish that this mechanism can explain the existence of thermospheric density features. The main conclusions that stem from this dissertation are as follows: (1) Changes in the field-aligned ion drag force alter neutral temperature and mass density by means of a divergent neutral wind field, commanding the formation, local time, and solar cycle variations of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly trough; (2) Ion and viscous drag forces produce balanced motion with sustained, divergent winds that change thermal and mass density structure through adiabatic heating; (3) A boundary that delineates the lower and upper thermosphere is recognized and deemed the "thermopause", and helium is demonstrated to be an effective dynamic tracer for a

  8. Arsenic trioxide induced indirect and direct inhibition of glutathione reductase leads to apoptosis in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Ray, Atish; Chatterjee, Sarmishtha; Mukherjee, Sandip; Bhattacharya, Shelley

    2014-06-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) is an essential enzyme which maintains the reduced state of a cell. Therefore GR malfunction is closely associated with several disorders related to oxidative damage. The present study reports toxic manifestation of arsenic trioxide in respect of GR leading to apoptosis. Isolated rat hepatocytes exposed to arsenic trioxide were analyzed for GR expression and activity. Arsenic resulted in a time dependent inhibition of GR mediated by the superoxide anion. The cellular demand of functional enzyme is achieved by concomitant rise in gene expression. However, direct inhibition of GR by arsenic trioxide was also evident. Furthermore, arsenic induced free radical mediated inhibition of GR was found to be partially uncompetitive and associated with time dependent decrease in the substrate binding rate. Externalization of phosphatidylserine, nuclear degradation, apoptosis inducing factor leakage, apoptosome formation, caspase activation, DNA damage and break down of PARP suggest consequential induction of apoptosis due to inhibition of GR. The implication of GR was further established from the reduced rate of caspase activation in the arsenic trioxide treated cell, supplemented with complete and incomplete enzyme systems.

  9. Systems Biology Reveals Cigarette Smoke-Induced Concentration-Dependent Direct and Indirect Mechanisms That Promote Monocyte-Endothelial Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Poussin, Carine; Laurent, Alexandra; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-10-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) affects the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells, a critical step in atherogenesis. Using an in vitro adhesion assay together with innovative computational systems biology approaches to analyze omics data, our study aimed at investigating CS-induced mechanisms by which monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion is promoted. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were treated for 4 h with (1) conditioned media of human monocytic Mono Mac-6 (MM6) cells preincubated with low or high concentrations of aqueous CS extract (sbPBS) from reference cigarette 3R4F for 2 h (indirect treatment, I), (2) unconditioned media similarly prepared without MM6 cells (direct treatment, D), or (3) freshly generated sbPBS (fresh direct treatment, FD). sbPBS promoted MM6 cells-HCAECs adhesion following I and FD, but not D. In I, the effect was mediated at a low concentration through activation of vascular inflammation processes promoted in HCAECs by a paracrine effect of the soluble mediators secreted by sbPBS-treated MM6 cells. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), a major inducer, was actually shed by unstable CS compound-activated TNFα-converting enzyme. In FD, the effect was triggered at a high concentration that also induced some toxicity. This effect was mediated through an yet unknown mechanism associated with a stress damage response promoted in HCAECs by unstable CS compounds present in freshly generated sbPBS, which had decayed in D unconditioned media. Aqueous CS extract directly and indirectly promotes monocytic cell-endothelial cell adhesion in vitro via distinct concentration-dependent mechanisms.

  10. The electronic origin of shear-induced direct to indirect gap transition and anisotropy diminution in phosphorene.

    PubMed

    Sa, Baisheng; Li, Yan-Ling; Sun, Zhimei; Qi, Jingshan; Wen, Cuilian; Wu, Bo

    2015-05-29

    Artificial monolayer black phosphorus, so-called phosphorene, has attracted global interest with its distinguished anisotropic, optoelectronic, and electronic properties. Here, we unraveled the shear-induced direct-to-indirect gap transition and anisotropy diminution in phosphorene based on first-principles calculations. Lattice dynamic analysis demonstrates that phosphorene can sustain up to 10% applied shear strain. The bandgap of phosphorene experiences a direct-to- indirect transition when 5% shear strain is applied. The electronic origin of the direct-to-indirect gap transition from 1.54 eV at ambient conditions to 1.22 eV at 10% shear strain for phosphorene is explored. In addition, the anisotropy diminution in phosphorene is discussed by calculating the maximum sound velocities, effective mass, and decomposed charge density, which signals the undesired shear-induced direct-to-indirect gap transition in applications of phosphorene for electronics and optoelectronics. On the other hand, the shear-induced electronic anisotropy properties suggest that phosphorene can be applied as the switcher in nanoelectronic applications.

  11. Human NKT cells mediate antitumor cytotoxicity directly by recognizing target cell CD1d with bound ligand or indirectly by producing IL-2 to activate NK cells.

    PubMed

    Metelitsa, L S; Naidenko, O V; Kant, A; Wu, H W; Loza, M J; Perussia, B; Kronenberg, M; Seeger, R C

    2001-09-15

    alpha-Galactosylceramide (alphaGalCer) stimulates NKT cells and has antitumor activity in mice. Murine NKT cells may directly kill tumor cells and induce NK cell cytotoxicity, but the mechanisms are not well defined. Newly developed human CD1d/alphaGalCer tetrameric complexes were used to obtain highly purified human alphaGalCer-reactive NKT cell lines (>99%), and the mechanisms of NKT cell cytotoxicity and activation of NK cells were investigated. Human NKT cells were cytotoxic against CD1d(-) neuroblastoma cells only when they were rendered CD1d(+) by transfection and pulsed with alphaGalCer. Four other CD1d(-) tumor cell lines of diverse origin were resistant to NKT cells, whereas Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines, which are constitutively CD1d(+), were killed. Killing of the latter was greatly augmented in the presence of alphaGalCer. Upon human CD1d/alphaGalCer recognition, NKT cells induced potent cytotoxicity of NK cells against CD1d(-) neuroblastoma cell lines that were not killed directly by NKT cells. NK cell activation depended upon NKT cell production of IL-2, and was enhanced by secretion of IFN-gamma. These data demonstrate that cytotoxicity of human NKT cells can be CD1d and ligand dependent, and that TCR-stimulated NKT cells produce IL-2 that is required to induce NK cell cytotoxicity. Thus, NKT cells can mediate potent antitumor activity both directly by targeting CD1d and indirectly by activating NK cells.

  12. Evidence of chemical stimulation of hepatic metabolism by an experimental acetanilide (FOE 5043) indirectly mediating reductions in circulating thyroid hormone levels in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Christenson, W R; Becker, B D; Wahle, B S; Moore, K D; Dass, P D; Lake, S G; Van Goethem, D L; Stuart, B P; Sangha, G K; Thyssen, J H

    1996-02-01

    N-(4-Fluorophenyl)-N-(1-methylethyl)-2-[[5-(trifluoromethyl)-1,3, 4-thiadiazol-2-yl]oxy]acetamide (FOE 5043) is a new acetanilide-type herbicide undergoing regulatory testing. Previous work in this laboratory suggested that FOE 5043-induced reductions in serum thyroxine (T4) levels were mediated via an extrathyroidal site of action. The possibility that the alterations in circulating T4 levels were due to chemical induction of hepatic thyroid hormone metabolism was investigated. Treatment with FOE 5043 at a rate of 1000 ppm as a dietary admixture was found to significantly increase the clearance of [125I]T4 from the serum, suggesting an enhanced excretion of the hormone. In the liver, the activity of hepatic uridine glucuronosyl transferase, a major pathway of thyroid hormone biotransformation in the rat, increased in a statistically significant and dose-dependent manner; conversely, hepatic 5'-monodeiodinase activity trended downward with dose. Bile flow as well as the hepatic uptake and biliary excretion of [125I]T4 were increased following exposure to FOE 5043. Thyroidal function, as measured by the discharge of iodide ion in response to perchlorate, and pituitary function, as measured by the capacity of the pituitary to secrete thyrotropin in response to an exogenous challenge by hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone, were both unchanged from the controlled response. These data suggest that the functional status of the thyroid and pituitary glands has not been altered by treatment with FOE 5043 and that reductions in circulating levels of T4 are being mediated indirectly through an increase in the biotransformation and excretion of thyroid hormone in the liver.

  13. Cascading trait-mediated interactions induced by ant pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Hsun-Yi; Liere, Heidi; Soto, Estelí J; Perfecto, Ivette

    2012-01-01

    Trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMII) can be as important as density-mediated indirect interactions. Here, we provide evidence for a novel trait-mediated cascade (where one TMII affects another TMII) and demonstrate that the mechanism consists of a predator eavesdropping on chemical signaling. Ants protect scale insects from predation by adult coccinellid beetles – the first TMII. However, parasitic phorid flies reduce ant foraging activity by 50% – the second TMII, providing a window of opportunity for female beetles to oviposit in high-quality microsites. Beetle larvae are protected from ant predation and benefit from living in patches with high scale densities. We demonstrate that female beetles can detect pheromones released by the ant when attacked by phorids, and that only females, and especially gravid females, are attracted to the ant pheromone. As ants reduce their movement when under attack by phorids, we conclude that phorids facilitate beetle oviposition, thus producing the TMII cascade. PMID:23139877

  14. Cascading trait-mediated interactions induced by ant pheromones.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsun-Yi; Liere, Heidi; Soto, Estelí J; Perfecto, Ivette

    2012-09-01

    Trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMII) can be as important as density-mediated indirect interactions. Here, we provide evidence for a novel trait-mediated cascade (where one TMII affects another TMII) and demonstrate that the mechanism consists of a predator eavesdropping on chemical signaling. Ants protect scale insects from predation by adult coccinellid beetles - the first TMII. However, parasitic phorid flies reduce ant foraging activity by 50% - the second TMII, providing a window of opportunity for female beetles to oviposit in high-quality microsites. Beetle larvae are protected from ant predation and benefit from living in patches with high scale densities. We demonstrate that female beetles can detect pheromones released by the ant when attacked by phorids, and that only females, and especially gravid females, are attracted to the ant pheromone. As ants reduce their movement when under attack by phorids, we conclude that phorids facilitate beetle oviposition, thus producing the TMII cascade.

  15. Tobacco overexpressing β-ocimene induces direct and indirect responses against aphids in receiver tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Pasquale; Iodice, Luigi; Maffei, Massimo E; Bossi, Simone; Arimura, Gen-Ichiro; Guerrieri, Emilio

    2015-01-15

    In the last decade plant-to-plant communication has received an increasing attention, particularly for the role of Volatile Organic Compounds as possible elicitors of plant defense. The role of β-ocimene as an interspecific elicitor of plant defense has been recently assessed in multitrophic systems including different plant species (Solanaceae, Poaceae, legumes) and different pest species including chewer insects and phytophagous mites. Both chewer insects and phytophagous mites are known to elicit specific plant defensive pathways which are different (at least in part) from those elicited by sap feeders. The aim of this research was to fill this gap of knowledge and to assess the role of β-ocimene as an elicitor of plant defense against aphid pests, which are sap feeders. For this purpose we used as transgenic tobacco plant releasing an odour plume enriched in this compound as emitter and a tomato plant as receiver. We selected the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae and its natural enemy, the parasitoid Aphidius ervi, as the targets of plant induced defense. Tomato plant defense induced by β-ocimene was assessed by characterizing the aphid performance in terms of fixing behaviour, development and reproduction (direct plant defense) and the parasitoid performance in terms of attraction towards tomato plants (indirect plant defense). The characterization of tomato response to β-ocimene was completed by the identification of Volatile Organic Compounds as released by conditioned tomato plants. Tomato plants that were exposed to the volatiles of transgenic tobacco enriched in β-ocimene resulted in less suitable for the aphids in respect to control ones (direct defense). On tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene we recorded: a significant lower number of aphids settled; a significant lower number newborn nymphs; a significant lower weight of aphids feeding. In addition, tomato plants "elicited" by β-ocimene resulted became more attractive towards the parasitoid A. ervi

  16. MSC(TRAIL)-mediated HepG2 cell death in direct and indirect co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xu-Yong; Nong, Jiang; Qin, Ke; Lu, Hong; Moniri, Mani R; Dai, Long-Jun; Warnock, Garth L

    2011-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted great interest in cancer therapy since the discovery of their tumor tropism. This study was performed to investigate the effects of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-engineered MSCs on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells (HepG2) under different culture conditions. MSCs engineered with non-secreting TRAIL (MSC(TRAIL-GFP)) (GFP, green fluorescence protein) and secreting TRAIL (MSC(stTRAIL)) were used for the direct co-cultures, and conditioned media (CM) from corresponding cultures were applied to HepG2 as indirect co-cultures. Immunoblotting, ELISA and FACS analysis were used to detect the expression of TRAIL and TRAIL receptors. Cell death was assessed using live/dead assay. Death receptor (DR) 5 was identified on the HepG2 cells. The expression of TRAIL was confirmed in the cell lysates (MSC(TRAIL-GFP) >MSC(stTRAIL)) and the conditioned media (MSC(stTRAIL) >MSC(TRAIL-GFP)). Higher cell death was observed in high MSC/HepG2 ratio co-cultures. HepG2 cell death was proportionally related to CM from MSC(TRAIL-GFP) and MSC(stTRAIL). MSCs exhibit intrinsic inhibition of HepG2 which is potentiated by TRAIL-transfection.

  17. Dual effects of antioxidants in neurodegeneration: direct neuroprotection against oxidative stress and indirect protection via suppression of glia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yi; Wen, Li-Li; Huang, Ya-Ni; Chen, Yen-Tsun; Ku, Min-Chi

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress, in which production of highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) overwhelms antioxidant defenses, is a feature of many neurological diseases and neurodegeneration. ROS and RNS generated extracellularly and intracellularly by various processes initiate and promote neurodegeneration in CNS. ROS and RNS can directly oxidize and damage macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, culminating in neurodegeneration in the CNS. Neurons are most susceptible to direct oxidative injury by ROS and RNS. ROS and RNS can also indirectly contribute to tissue damage by activating a number of cellular pathways resulting in the expression of stress-sensitive genes and proteins to cause oxidative injury. Moreover, oxidative stress also activates mechanisms that result in a glia-mediated inflammation that also causes secondary neuronal damage. Associated with neuronal injuries caused by many CNS insults is an activation of glial cells (particularly astrocytes and microglia) at the sites of injury. Activated glial cells are thus histopathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Even though direct contact of activated glia with neurons per se may not necessarily be toxic, the immune mediators (e.g. nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines) released by activated glial cells are currently considered to be candidate neurotoxins. Therefore, study of the protective role of antioxidant compounds on inhibition of the inflammatory response and correcting the fundamental oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases are important vistas for further research. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence in support of this critical role played by oxidative stress of neuronal and glial origin in neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanistic basis of the neuroprotective activity of antioxidants does not only rely on the general free radical

  18. On the method of indirectly measuring gas and particulate phase velocities in shock induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, G. D.

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of the gas and particulate phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas flow is described, and this method is assessed by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing 40-micron-diameter glass beads in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel (19.7-cm by 7.6-cm in cross section). Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particle concentration by light extinctiometry, and gas-particle mixture density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to obtain the indirect velocity measurements of both phases. A second indirect measurement of the gas-phase velocity is obtained when the gas pressure is simultaneously recorded along with the particle concentration and shock-front speed when used in conjunction with the conservation of mixture momentum. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented as a means of assessing the indirect velocity measurement method.

  19. First autopsy analysis of a neovascularized arterial network induced by indirect bypass surgery for moyamoya disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Mukawa, Maki; Nariai, Tadashi; Inaji, Motoki; Tamada, Natsumi; Maehara, Taketoshi; Matsushima, Yoshiharu; Ohno, Kikuo; Negi, Mariko; Kobayashi, Daisuke

    2016-05-01

    The object of this study was to analyze the pathology of collateral vessels newly induced by indirect bypass surgery for moyamoya disease (MMD). An autopsy analysis was conducted on a 39-year-old woman with MMD who had died of a brainstem infarction. The patient had undergone bilateral indirect bypass surgeries 22 years earlier. Sufficient revascularization via bilateral external carotid arterial systems was confirmed by cerebral angiography before her death. Macroscopic observation of the operative areas revealed countless meandering vessels on the internal surface of the dura mater connected with small vessels on the brain surface and in the subpial brain tissue. Notably, microscopic analysis of these vessels revealed the characteristic 3-layer structure of an arterial wall. This autopsy analysis was the first to confirm that indirect bypass surgery had induced the formation of a new arterial network (arteriogenesis) and that this network had been maintained for more than 20 years to compensate for the chronic cerebral ischemia caused by the MMD.

  20. Extrafloral nectar production of the ant-associated plant, Macaranga tanarius, is an induced, indirect, defensive response elicited by jasmonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Martin; Koch, Thomas; Hilpert, Andrea; Fiala, Brigitte; Boland, Wilhelm; Linsenmair, K. Eduard

    2001-01-01

    Plant species in at least 66 families produce extrafloral nectar (EFN) on their leaves or shoots and therewith attract predators and parasitoids, such as ants and wasps, which in turn defend them against herbivores. We investigated whether EFN secretion is induced by herbivory and/or artificial damage, and thus can be regarded as an induced defensive response. In addition, we studied the underlying signaling pathway. EFN secretion by field-grown Macaranga tanarius increased after herbivory, artificial leaf damage, and exogenous jasmonic acid (JA) application. Artificial damage strongly enhanced endogenous JA concentrations. The response in EFN production to artificial damage was much less pronounced in those leaves that were treated with phenidone to inhibit endogenous JA synthesis. Quantitative dose–response relations were found between the increase in nectar production and both the intensity of leaf damage and the amounts of exogenously applied JA. The amount of endogenously produced JA was positively correlated with the intensity of leaf damage. Increased numbers of defending insects and decreased numbers of herbivores were observed on leaves after inducing EFN production by exogenous JA treatment. Over 6 weeks, repeatedly applied JA or artificial damage resulted in a ten-fold reduction in herbivory. These results demonstrate that EFN production represents an alternative mechanism for induced, indirect defensive plant responses that are mediated via the octadecanoid signal transduction cascade. PMID:11158598

  1. Optically induced indirect photonic transitions in a slow light photonic crystal waveguide.

    PubMed

    Castellanos Muñoz, Michel; Petrov, Alexander Yu; O'Faolain, Liam; Li, Juntao; Krauss, Thomas F; Eich, Manfred

    2014-02-07

    We demonstrate indirect photonic transitions in a silicon slow light photonic crystal waveguide. The transitions are driven by an optically generated refractive index front that moves along the waveguide and interacts with a signal pulse copropagating in the structure. We experimentally confirm a theoretical model which indicates that the ratio of the frequency and wave vector shifts associated with the indirect photonic transition is identical to the propagation velocity of the refractive index front. The physical origin of the transitions achieved here is fundamentally different than in previously proposed refractive index modulation concepts with fixed temporal and spatial modulation frequencies; as here, the interaction with the refractive index front results in a Doppler-like signal frequency and wave vector shift. Consequently, the bandwidth over which perfect mode frequency and wave vector matching is achieved is not intrinsically limited by the shape of the photonic bands, and tuning of the indirect photonic transitions is possible without any need for geometrical modifications of the structure. Our device is genuinely nonreciprocal, as it provides different frequency shifts for co- and counterpropagating signal and index fronts.

  2. The lazaroid tirilazad is a new inhibitor of direct and indirect UVA-induced lipid peroxidation in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Dissemond, J; Schneider, L A; Wlaschek, M; Brauns, T C; Goos, M; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K

    2003-12-01

    Lipid peroxidation caused by oxidative stress within the tissue leads to destruction and dysfunction of cellular membranes. Human dermal fibroblasts in the skin are subject to constant photooxidative stress caused mainly by deeply penetrating UVA irradiation. Therefore, the membrane damage caused by this photooxidative stress may be a major promoter of photoaging and photocarcinogenic processes initiated and promoted by long-term UVA exposure of the skin. The oxidative destruction is counterbalanced by a complex network of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants creating the skin's line of defence against UVA-induced reactive oxygen species. The lazaroid tirilazad represents a new synthetic group of antioxidants with structural molecular similarity to glucocorticosteroids. We investigated the antioxidative capacity of tirilazad by determining its effects on the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), as a marker of lipid peroxidation, induced directly or indirectly by UVA in human dermal fibroblasts. In a time- and dose-dependent kinetic, we demonstrated that fibroblasts incubated with tirilazad are well protected against subsequent UVA irradiation and show no increase in MDA levels similar to the unirradiated controls. This was also observed when lipid peroxidation was caused chemically by incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with 200 micro M Fe(3+)-citrate and 1 m M ascorbyl phosphate as a model of indirect UVA-induced skin damage. Lysates of fibroblasts treated this way showed a tenfold increase in MDA levels, whereas preincubation with tirilazad resulted in a significantly lower increase in MDA levels. Furthermore, in a comparison with the well-established radical scavenger Trolox, an alpha-tocopherol analogue, tirilazad offered better protection to the membranes. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the lazaroid tirilazad is an effective inhibitor of direct and indirect UVA-induced increases in MDA as a marker of lipid peroxidation in human dermal

  3. The Indirect Effect of Alcohol Use on GPA in First-Semester College Students: The Mediating Role of Academic Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, James M.; DiPlacido, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on first-semester college students, investigating (a) indirect effects of aggregate alcohol use on grade point average (GPA) through academic effort (skipping class and time on schoolwork) and (b) daily effects of alcohol use on reduced effort. Eighty students reported daily alcohol use and academic effort (skipping class and…

  4. The Indirect Effect of Alcohol Use on GPA in First-Semester College Students: The Mediating Role of Academic Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, James M.; DiPlacido, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    This study focused on first-semester college students, investigating (a) indirect effects of aggregate alcohol use on grade point average (GPA) through academic effort (skipping class and time on schoolwork) and (b) daily effects of alcohol use on reduced effort. Eighty students reported daily alcohol use and academic effort (skipping class and…

  5. An indirect method of measuring gas- and particulate-phase velocities of shock-induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, James J.

    1992-03-01

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of both the particulate and gas phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas mixture is described. This method is implemented by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing glass beads 40 microns in diameter in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel 197 mm high by 76 mm wide with a special dust-injection device. Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particulate concentration by light extinctiometry, and combined particulate concentration and gas density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to provide these indirect two-phase velocity measurements. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented for comparison, and the capability of the indirect velocity-measurement method is assessed.

  6. Indirect global warming effects of ozone and stratospheric water vapor induced by surface methane emission

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Grossman, A.S.; Tamaresis, J.S.; Patten, K.O. Jr.; Jain, A.; Grant, K.A.

    1994-07-01

    Methane has indirect effects on climate due to chemical interactions as well as direct radiative forcing effects as a greenhouse gas. We have calculated the indirect, time-varying tropospheric radiative forcing and GWP of O{sub 3} and stratospheric H{sub 2}O due to an impulse of CH{sub 4}. This impulse, applied to the lowest layer of the atmosphere, is the increase of the atmospheric mass of CH{sub 4} resulting from a 25 percent steady state increase in the current emissions as a function of latitude. The direct CH{sub 4} radiative forcing and GWP are also calculated. The LLNL 2-D radiative-chemistry-transport model is used to evaluate the resulting changes in the O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O and CH{sub 4} atmospheric profiles as a function of time. A correlated k-distribution radiative transfer model is used to calculate the radiative forcing at the tropopause of the globally-averaged atmosphere profiles. The O{sub 3} indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}27 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}4 after 500 years, agreeing with the previous estimates to within about 10 percent. The H{sub 2}O indirect GWPs vary from {approximately}2 after a 20 yr integration to {approximately}0.3 after 500 years, and are in close agreement with other estimates. The CH{sub 4} GWPs vary from {approximately}53 at 20 yrs to {approximately}7 at 500 yrs. The 20 year CH{sub 4} GWP is {approximately}20% larger than previous estimates of the direct CH{sub 4} GWP due to a CH{sub 4} response time ({approximately}17 yrs) that is much longer than the overall lifetime (10 yrs). The increased CH{sub 4} response time results from changes in the OH abundances caused by the CH{sub 4} impulse. The CH{sub 4} radiative forcing results are consistent with IPCC values. Estimates are made of latitude effects in the radiative forcing calculations, and UV effects on the O{sub 3} radiative forcing calculations (10%).

  7. The indirect association of job strain with long-term sickness absence through bullying: a mediation analysis using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Heidi; Braeckman, Lutgart; De Clercq, Bart; Casini, Annalisa; De Bacquer, Dirk; Kittel, France; Clays, Els

    2016-08-22

    In this longitudinal study the complex interplay between both job strain and bullying in relation to sickness absence was investigated. Following the "work environment hypothesis", which establishes several work characteristics as antecedents of bullying, we assumed that job strain, conceptualized by the Job-Demand-Control model, has an indirect relation with long-term sickness absence through bullying. The sample consisted of 2983 Belgian workers, aged 30 to 55 years, who participated in the Belstress III study. They completed a survey, including the Job Content Questionnaire and a bullying inventory, at baseline. Their sickness absence figures were registered during 1 year follow-up. Long-term sickness absence was defined as at least 15 consecutive days. A mediation analysis, using structural equation modeling, was performed to examine the indirect association of job strain through bullying with long-term sickness absence. The full structural model was adjusted for several possible confounders: age, gender, occupational group, educational level, company, smoking habits, alcohol use, body mass index, self-rated health, baseline long-term sickness absence and neuroticism. The results support the hypothesis: a significant indirect association of job strain with long-term sickness absence through bullying was observed, suggesting that bullying is an intermediate variable between job strain and long-term sickness absence. No evidence for the reversed pathway of an indirect association of bullying through job strain was found. Bullying was observed as a mediating variable in the relation between job strain and sickness absence. The results suggest that exposure to job strain may create circumstances in which a worker risks to become a target of bullying. Our findings are generally in line with the work environment hypothesis, which emphasizes the importance of organizational work factors in the origin of bullying. This study highlights that remodeling jobs to reduce

  8. Time-scale dependency of host plant biomass- and trait-mediated indirect effects of deer herbivory on a swallowtail butterfly.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Shun; Miyashita, Tadashi

    2015-11-01

    Despite recent attempts to quantify the relative strength of density- and trait-mediated indirect effects, rarely has the issue been properly addressed at the population level. Most research is based on short-term small-scale experiments in which behavioural and/or physiological responses prevail. Here, we estimated the time-scales during which density- and trait-mediated effects manifest, as well as the strength of these effects, using an interaction chain with three organisms (deer-plant-butterfly). A hierarchical Bayesian model was performed by using a long-term data set of deer density in the Boso Peninsula, central Japan (where local densities differ spatially and temporally) as well as densities of the swallowtail butterfly Byasa alcinous and its host plant Aristolochia kaempferi. The time-scale effect of deer on plant quantity and quality was estimated according to the degree of carry-over effects. The negative influence on leaf density showed a temporal saturation pattern over the long term, while the positive influence on leaf quality due to resprouting of leaves after deer browsing showed no clear temporal trend. The net indirect effect changed from positive to negative with time, with the negative density-mediated effect becoming prominent in the long term. Our novel approach is widely applicable in assessing the dynamic impacts of wildlife if the spatio-temporal variability of expansion and/or invasion history is known.

  9. Ordering-induced direct-to-indirect band gap transition in multication semiconductor compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-Sang; Yang, Ji-Hui; Kanevce, Ana; Choi, Sukgeun; Repins, Ingrid L.; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-02-01

    Using first-principles calculations and symmetry analysis, we show that as cation atoms in a zinc blende-based semiconductor are replaced through atomic mutation (e.g., evolve from ZnSe to CuGaS e2 to C u2ZnGeS e4 ), the band gaps of the semiconductors will become more and more indirect because of the band splitting at the zone boundary, and in some cases will even form the segregating states. For example, although ZnSe is a direct band gap semiconductor, quaternary compounds C u2ZnGeS e4 and C u2ZnSnS e4 can be indirect band gap semiconductors if they form the primitive mixed CuAu ordered structures. We also find that the stability and the electronic structure of the quaternary polytypes with different atomic ordering are almost negative-linearly correlated. We suggest that these intrinsic properties of the multication semiconductors can have a large influence on the design and device performance of these materials.

  10. Gunshot induced indirect femoral fracture: mechanism of injury and fracture morphology.

    PubMed

    Kieser, David C; Carr, D J; Leclair, S C J; Horsfall, I; Theis, J C; Swain, M V; Kieser, J A

    2013-12-01

    Indirect ballistic fractures occur when a projectile passes close to, but not contacting, the bone. The mechanism of how these fractures occur is not yet proven, but recently the acoustic shockwave has been excluded as a cause. The objective of this study is to determine whether the expanding temporary cavity, the collapse of this cavity or its oscillation causes these fractures. In addition, we describe the fracture morphology and biomechanical causes of this injury. 40 fresh deer femora were strain gauged and embedded in ballistic gelatin before being shot with four different projectiles with varying distances off the bone. Pressure recordings, chronographs and radar allowed assessment of local pressures and energy transfer. High-speed video allowed the temporal relationship between the temporary cavity and fracture formation to be analysed, while sample dissection allowed the fracture morphology to be described. The fractures produced were consistently wedge-shaped and caused by the expansion of the temporary cavity, flexing the bone beyond its yield point, causing tension failure on the cortex opposite the expanding temporary cavity and a compression wedge on the side of the cavity. Local pressure was not predictive of fracture formation but the energy transfer to the gelatin block was predictive. Indirect fractures are caused by the expansion of the temporary cavity and relate to the proximity of this cavity to the bone. Fractures occur from flexion of the bone and classically display wedge-shaped fracture patterns with the apex of the wedge pointing away from the expanding cavity.

  11. Astroglial U87 Cells Protect Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells from Indirect Effect of Radiation by Reducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Fas Mediated Apoptotic Pathway in Coculture System.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Yasmeen; Rehman, Abdul; Xie, Bingjie; Xu, Jin; Hong, Ma; Hong, Qing; Deng, Yulin

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies provide the evidence that indirect effects of radiation could lead to neuronal cells death but underlying mechanism is not completely understood. On the other hand astroglial cells are known to protect neuronal cells against stress conditions in vivo and invitro. Yet, the fate of neuronal cells and the neuroprotective effect of coculture system (with glial cells) in response to indirect radiation exposure remain rarely discussed. Here, we purpose that the indirect effect of radiation may induce DNA damage by cell cycle arrest and receptor mediated apoptotic cascade which lead to apoptotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. We also hypothesized that coculture (with glial U87) may relieved the neuronal SH-SY5Y cells from toxicity of indirect effects radiation by reducing DNA damage and expression of apoptotic proteins in vitro. In the present study irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) was used as source of indirect effect of radiation. Neuronal SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to ICCM with and without coculture with (glial U87) in transwell coculture system respectively. Various endpoints such as, cell survival number assay, Annexin V/PI assay, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometer, mRNA level of Fas receptor by q RT-PCR, expression of key apoptotic proteins by western blot and estimation of neurotrophic factors by ELISA method were analyzed into neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with and without co culture after ICCM exposure respectively. We found that ICCM induced DNA damage in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells by significant increase in cell cycle arrest at S-phase (***P < 0.001) which was further supported by over expression of P53 protein (**P < 0.01). While coculture (with glial U87), significantly reduced the ICCM induced cell cycle arrest and expression of P53 ((###) P < 0.001) neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Further investigation of the underlying apoptotic mechanism revealed that in coculture system; ICCM induced elevated level of FAS mRNA level was significantly reduced

  12. α-Galactosylceramide-induced airway eosinophilia is mediated through the activation of NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Hui; Wang, Tzu-Chun; Jen, Hsiao-Yu; Yu, Alice L; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2011-04-15

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells bridge innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in the expansion of Ag-specific B and T cell responses. α-Galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), the most studied glycolipid that activates iNKT cells, has been proposed to be an effective adjuvant against infections and tumors. We found that the activation of iNKT cells by intranasal injection of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilia in naive mice. Eosinophils, which mediate tissue damage and dysfunction by secreting mediators, play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of how eosinophils are recruited to the lung by α-GalCer. Our results demonstrated that α-GalCer-induced eosinophil inflammation was mediated through iNKT cells. These cells secreted IL-5 to recruit eosinophils directly to the lung and/or secreted IL-4 and IL-13 to recruit eosinophils indirectly by inducing lung epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and fibroblast to secrete the eosinophil chemoattractant eotaxin. In addition, in the OVA-alum murine model of allergic asthma, α-GalCer administration in OVA-immunized mice also increased airway eosinophilia after challenge. Given our findings, intranasal administration of α-GalCer induced airway eosinophilic inflammation in both naive and allergic mice. Hence, it remains to be determined whether the activation of iNKT cells would be applicable in therapeutics for human diseases.

  13. Ecosystem engineering strengthens bottom-up and weakens top-down effects via trait-mediated indirect interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofei; Pearson, Dean; Wang, Deli; Sanders, Dirk; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Trophic interactions and ecosystem engineering are ubiquitous and powerful forces structuring ecosystems, yet how these processes interact to shape natural systems is poorly understood. Moreover, trophic effects can be driven by both density- and trait-mediated interactions. Microcosm studies demonstrate that trait-mediated interactions may be as strong as density-mediated interactions, but the relative importance of these pathways at natural spatial and temporal scales is underexplored. Here, we integrate large-scale field experiments and microcosms to examine the effects of ecosystem engineering on trophic interactions while also exploring how ecological scale influences density- and trait-mediated interaction pathways. We demonstrate that (i) ecosystem engineering can shift the balance between top-down and bottom-up interactions, (ii) such effects can be driven by cryptic trait-mediated interactions, and (iii) the relative importance of density- versus trait-mediated interaction pathways can be scale dependent. Our findings reveal the complex interplay between ecosystem engineering, trophic interactions, and ecological scale in structuring natural systems. PMID:28931733

  14. A principal stratification approach for evaluating natural direct and indirect effects in the presence of treatment-induced intermediate confounding.

    PubMed

    Taguri, Masataka; Chiba, Yasutaka

    2015-01-15

    Recently, several authors have shown that natural direct and indirect effects (NDEs and NIEs) can be identified under the sequential ignorability assumptions, as long as there is no mediator-outcome confounder that is affected by the treatment. However, if such a confounder exists, NDEs and NIEs will generally not be identified without making additional identifying assumptions. In this article, we propose novel identification assumptions and estimators for evaluating NDEs and NIEs under the usual sequential ignorability assumptions, using the principal stratification framework. It is assumed that the treatment and the mediator are dichotomous. We must impose strong assumptions for identification. However, even if these assumptions were violated, the bias of our estimator would be small under typical conditions, which can be easily evaluated from the observed data. This conjecture is confirmed for binary outcomes by deriving the bounds of the bias terms. In addition, the advantage of our estimator is illustrated through a simulation study. We also propose a method of sensitivity analysis that examines what happens when our assumptions are violated. We apply the proposed method to data from the National Center for Health Statistics.

  15. Indirect detection by semiconductor laser-induced fluorometry in micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Takashi; Imasaka, Totaro

    1995-05-01

    Indirect fluorescence detection of electrically neutral compounds separated by micellar electrokinetic chromatography is performed using a semiconductor laser as an exciting light source. Oxazine 750 is used as a visualizing agent of which absorption maximum is near 680 nm. A surfactant, tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride, is used to form micelles and to prevent adsorption of oxazine 750 with a positive charge on the capillary wall negatively charged. This surfactant coats on the capillary wall so that oxazine 750 is repulsed electrically on the capillary wall. In this technique, some aromatic compounds with relatively polar functional groups, such as aniline and nitrobenzene, could be separated and detected, while nonpolar compounds such as benzene and toluene can not be detected. The range of the detection limit is from 4.2 X 10-4 to 1.6 X 10-3 M (S/N equals 3) for the aromatic compounds. The detection mechanism is based on enhancement of the fluorescence intensity in the micellar solution and on exclusion of the fluorophore attached at the hydrophilic moiety of the micelle by a hydrophilic sample.

  16. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions.

    PubMed

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-13

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics ([Formula: see text]) for low aerosol concentration; here, [Formula: see text] is the phase-relaxation time and [Formula: see text] is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as [Formula: see text], and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  17. Fasciola hepatica tegumental antigens indirectly induce an M2 macrophage-like phenotype in vivo.

    PubMed

    Adams, P N; Aldridge, A; Vukman, K V; Donnelly, S; O'Neill, S M

    2014-10-01

    The M2 subset of macrophages has a critical role to play in host tissue repair, tissue fibrosis and modulation of adaptive immunity during helminth infection. Infection with the helminth, Fasciola hepatica, is associated with M2 macrophages in its mammalian host, and this response is mimicked by its excretory-secretory products (FhES). The tegumental coat of F. hepatica (FhTeg) is another major source of immune-modulatory molecules; we have previously shown that FhTeg can modulate the activity of both dendritic cells and mast cells inhibiting their ability to prime a Th1 immune response. Here, we report that FhTeg does not induce Th2 immune responses but can induce M2-like phenotype in vivo that modulates cytokine production from CD4(+) cells in response to anti-CD3 stimulation. FhTeg induces a RELMα expressing macrophage population in vitro, while in vivo, the expression of Arg1 and Ym-1/2 but not RELMα in FhTeg-stimulated macrophages was STAT6 dependent. To support this finding, FhTeg induces RELMα expression in vivo prior to the induction of IL-13. FhTeg can induce IL-13-producing peritoneal macrophages following intraperitoneal injection This study highlights the important role of FhTeg as an immune-modulatory source during F. hepatica infection and sheds further light on helminth-macrophage interactions.

  18. DPI induces mitochondrial superoxide-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nianyu; Ragheb, Kathy; Lawler, Gretchen; Sturgis, Jennie; Rajwa, Bartek; Melendez, J Andres; Robinson, J Paul

    2003-02-15

    The iodonium compounds diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and diphenyliodonium (IDP) are well-known phagocyte NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitors. However, it has been shown that at high concentrations they can inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain as well. Since inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain has been shown to induce superoxide production and apoptosis, we investigated the effect of iodonium compounds on mitochondria-derived superoxide and apoptosis. Mitochondrial superoxide production was measured on both cultured cells and isolated rat-heart submitochondrial particles. Mitochondria function was examined by monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential. Apoptotic pathways were studied by measuring cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation. Apoptosis was characterized by detecting DNA fragmentation on agarose gel and measuring propidium iodide- (PI-) stained subdiploid cells using flow cytometry. Our results showed that DPI could induce mitochondrial superoxide production. The same concentration of DPI induced apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential and releasing cytochrome c. Addition of antioxidants or overexpression of MnSOD significantly reduced DPI-induced mitochondrial damage, cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis. These observations suggest that DPI can induce apoptosis via induction of mitochondrial superoxide. DPI-induced mitochondrial superoxide production may prove to be a useful model to study the signaling pathways of mitochondrial superoxide.

  19. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  20. Experimental Validation of Lightning-Induced Electromagnetic (Indirect) Coupling to Short Monopole Antennas

    SciTech Connect

    Crull, E W; Brown Jr., C G; Perkins, M P; Ong, M M

    2008-07-30

    For short monopoles in this low-power case, it has been shown that a simple circuit model is capable of accurate predictions for the shape and magnitude of the antenna response to lightning-generated electric field coupling effects, provided that the elements of the circuit model have accurate values. Numerical EM simulation can be used to provide more accurate values for the circuit elements than the simple analytical formulas, since the analytical formulas are used outside of their region of validity. However, even with the approximate analytical formulas the simple circuit model produces reasonable results, which would improve if more accurate analytical models were used. This report discusses the coupling analysis approaches taken to understand the interaction between a time-varying EM field and a short monopole antenna, within the context of lightning safety for nuclear weapons at DOE facilities. It describes the validation of a simple circuit model using laboratory study in order to understand the indirect coupling of energy into a part, and the resulting voltage. Results show that in this low-power case, the circuit model predicts peak voltages within approximately 32% using circuit component values obtained from analytical formulas and about 13% using circuit component values obtained from numerical EM simulation. We note that the analytical formulas are used outside of their region of validity. First, the antenna is insulated and not a bare wire and there are perhaps fringing field effects near the termination of the outer conductor that the formula does not take into account. Also, the effective height formula is for a monopole directly over a ground plane, while in the time-domain measurement setup the monopole is elevated above the ground plane by about 1.5-inch (refer to Figure 5).

  1. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    PubMed Central

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aerosol concentration on the cloud-droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud-droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased, the cloud-droplet mean diameter decreases, as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc<τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc>τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase-relaxation time and τt is the turbulence-correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs−1=τc−1+τt−1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation. PMID:27911802

  2. High plant species diversity indirectly mitigates CO 2- and N-induced effects on grasshopper growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strengbom, Joachim; Reich, Peter B.; Ritchie, Mark E.

    2008-09-01

    We examined how elevated atmospheric [CO 2] and higher rate of nitrogen (N) input may influence grasshopper growth by changing food plant quality and how such effects may be modified by species diversity of the plant community. We reared grasshopper nymphs ( Melanoplus femurrubrum) on Poa pratensis from field-grown monocultures or polycultures (16 species) that were subjected to either ambient or elevated levels of CO 2 and N. Grasshopper growth rate was higher on P. pratensis leaves grown in monocultures than in polycultures, higher on P. pratensis grown under elevated than under ambient [CO 2], and higher on P. pratensis grown under elevated than under ambient [N]. The higher growth rate observed on P. pratensis exposed to elevated [CO 2] was, however, less pronounced for polyculture- than monoculture-grown P. pratensis. Growth rate of the grasshoppers was positively correlated with leaf [N], [C], and concentration of soluble carbohydrates + lipids. Concentration of non-structural carbohydrates + lipids was higher in leaves grown under elevated than under ambient [CO 2], and the difference between P. pratensis grown under ambient and elevated [CO 2] was greater for monoculture- than polyculture-grown P. pratensis. In addition, leaf N concentration was higher in P. pratensis grown in monocultures than in polycultures, suggesting that plant species richness, indirectly, may influence insect performance by changed nutritional value of the plants. Because we found interactive effects between all factors included ([CO 2], [N], and plant species diversity), our results suggest that these parameters may influence plant-insect interactions in a complex way that is not predictable from the sum of single factor manipulations.

  3. Supernatants of human leukocytes contain mediator, different from interferon gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    In this report, data are presented on the regulation of MHC class II antigen expression by a mediator present in supernatants of human mixed leukocyte cultures (MLC-SN), and which is different from IFN-gamma. The capacity of supernatants to induce antigen expression did not correspond to titers of IFN-gamma. Removal of IFN-gamma using either dialysis against pH 2 or neutralizing mAb against human IFN-gamma did not abrogate the MHC class II antigen expression-inducing capacity of MLC-SN when tested on adenocarcinoma cell lines, kidney epithelial cells, and fibroblasts in vitro in an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Therefore, supernatants of human leukocytes contain a mediator, different from IFN-gamma, which induces expression of MHC class II antigens. Dose-response studies revealed that the mediator is produced after allogeneic and lectin stimulation of human leukocytes, and by unstimulated leukocytes. Activation of leukocytes resulted in increased titers of the mediator. The mediator markedly enhances expression of both HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens, whereas IFN-gamma had a similar effect on HLA-DR antigens, and only a minor effect on HLA-DQ antigens. Interaction of the mediator and IFN-gamma resulted in a potentiating effect of these two factors on MHC class II antigen expression. Biochemical analysis revealed a mediator, distinguishable by FPLC from IL-1, IL-2, and human IFN-gamma, and which has a molecular mass of 32 kD. PMID:2941512

  4. Ethanol withdrawal induces hyperalgesia mediated by PKCepsilon.

    PubMed

    Dina, Olayinka A; Messing, Robert O; Levine, Jon D

    2006-07-01

    Symptoms of ethanol withdrawal include heightened responses to sensory stimuli, as well as tremors and convulsions. We tested the hypothesis that repeated episodes of ethanol intake and withdrawal exacerbate the symptoms of alcohol-induced peripheral neuropathy. In contrast to the hyperalgesia produced when an alcohol (6.5%)-containing diet was fed continuously to male rats which took 4 weeks to develop (Dina et al., 2000), feeding alcohol (6.5%) in repeated cycles of 4 days of alcohol followed by 3 days without alcohol resulted in a withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia that began at the end of one weekly cycle and reached a maximum during the fourth cycle. For ethanol withdrawal to produce hyperalgesia, ethanol consumption needed to be terminated for a period of 2 days. Paradoxically, as the amount of alcohol consumed decreased, the hyperalgesia induced by withdrawal developed more rapidly, being maximal between 1.4 and 1.6% ethanol. These results suggest that continued exposure to ethanol also has a neuroprotective effect. Withdrawal-induced hyperalgesia, similar to the hyperalgesia induced by continuous, chronic alcohol intake, was inhibited reversibly by intrathecal administration of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to protein kinase C (PKC)epsilon.

  5. Biomolecular damage induced by ionizing radiation: the direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons on DNA.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  6. Biomolecular Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation: The Direct and Indirect Effects of Low-Energy Electrons on DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Orlando, Thomas M.; Sanche, Léon

    2015-04-01

    Many experimental and theoretical advances have recently allowed the study of direct and indirect effects of low-energy electrons (LEEs) on DNA damage. In an effort to explain how LEEs damage the human genome, researchers have focused efforts on LEE interactions with bacterial plasmids, DNA bases, sugar analogs, phosphate groups, and longer DNA moieties. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the fundamental mechanisms involved in LEE-induced damage of DNA and complex biomolecule films. Results obtained by several laboratories on films prepared and analyzed by different methods and irradiated with different electron-beam current densities and fluencies are presented. Despite varied conditions (e.g., film thicknesses and morphologies, intrinsic water content, substrate interactions, and extrinsic atmospheric compositions), comparisons show a striking resemblance in the types of damage produced and their yield functions. The potential of controlling this damage using molecular and nanoparticle targets with high LEE yields in targeted radiation-based cancer therapies is also discussed.

  7. Plant microtubules reorganization under the indirect UV-B exposure and during UV-B-induced programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Krasylenko, Yuliya; Yemets, Alla; Blume, Yaroslav

    2013-05-01

    The role of microtubules in cellular pathways of UV-B signaling in plants as well as in related structural cell response become into focus of few last publications. As microtubules in plant cell reorient/reorganize (become randomized, fragmented or depolymerized) in a response to direct UV-B exposure, these cytoskeletal components could be involved into UV-B signaling pathways as highly responsive players. In the current addendum, indirect UV-B-induced microtubules reorganization in cells of shielded Arabidopsis thaliana (GFP-MAP4) primary roots and the correspondence of microtubules depolymerization with the typical hallmarks of the programmed cell death in Nicotiana tabacum BY-2 (GFP-MBD) cells are discussed.

  8. Indirect Estimations of Frictional Coefficients of Fractures in Sandstones for Analysis of Injection Induced Microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Y.; Chang, C.; Koh, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The frictional coefficient of fractures, a fundamental parameter needed to analyze a variety of geomechanical problems for microseismicity, is normally determined from laboratory shear tests. However, recovered rock cores are rarely available because of difficulties and high cost in getting undisturbed core samples. In that case, the frictional coefficient should be either assumed or estimated indirectly. We investigate the frictional property of fractures of various sandstones in laboratory tests and attempt to correlate that with other properties measureable relatively readily even without cores. We use various sandstones obtained from different depths of a 1 km deep borehole drilled for coal bed methane development in a Paleozoic sedimentary basin, South Korea. The sandstones have various physical properties (e.g. P-wave velocity (VP) of 2253-5038 m/s) and chemical compositions in terms of clay content (5-31%). We conduct direct shear tests in an artificial saw-cut fracture in the sandstones and determined frictional coefficients in a range of 0.36-0.57. The frictional coefficients have an inverse-linear correlation with clay contents measured from XRD analysis. These results are also quite consistent with those from previous clay gouge experiments (Takahashi et al., 2007; Tembe et al., 2010; Kohli & Zoback, 2013). They also have a linear correlation with VP. Our study demonstrates that frictional coefficients can be estimated empirically from such properties. To check feasibility of such an approach, we apply the obtained empirical relation to the borehole where cores were recovered. The clay contents in sandstone formations are estimated from the borehole gamma ray log calibrated using the XRD clay content data. Clay content estimated from gamma ray varies significantly with depth in a range of 0-45%. This range of clay content corresponds to frictional coefficients of 0.25-0.58. Comparison between estimated and measured frictional coefficients shows a

  9. Intracellular calcium affects prestin's voltage operating point indirectly via turgor-induced membrane tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Lei; Santos-Sacchi, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Recent identification of a calmodulin binding site within prestin's C-terminus indicates that calcium can significantly alter prestin's operating voltage range as gauged by the Boltzmann parameter Vh (Keller et al., J. Neuroscience, 2014). We reasoned that those experiments may have identified the molecular substrate for the protein's tension sensitivity. In an effort to understand how this may happen, we evaluated the effects of turgor pressure on such shifts produced by calcium. We find that the shifts are induced by calcium's ability to reduce turgor pressure during whole cell voltage clamp recording. Clamping turgor pressure to 1kPa, the cell's normal intracellular pressure, completely counters the calcium effect. Furthermore, following unrestrained shifts, collapsing the cells abolishes induced shifts. We conclude that calcium does not work by direct action on prestin's conformational state. The possibility remains that calcium interaction with prestin alters water movements within the cell, possibly via its anion transport function.

  10. UVA-induced damage to DNA and proteins: direct versus indirect photochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, P. M.; Francesconi, S.; Pozzebon, M.; Graindorge, D.; Rochette, P.; Drouin, R.; Sage, E.

    2011-01-01

    UVA has long been known for generating an oxidative stress in cells. In this paper we review the different types of DNA damage induced by UVA, i.e. strand breaks, bipyrimidine photoproducts, and oxidatively damaged bases. Emphasis is given to the mechanism of formation that is further illustrated by the presentation of new in vitro data. Examples of oxidation of proteins involved in DNA metabolism are also given.

  11. The cytotoxic activity of Aplidin in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is mediated by a direct effect on leukemic cells and an indirect effect on monocyte-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Morande, Pablo E; Zanetti, Samanta R; Borge, Mercedes; Nannini, Paula; Jancic, Carolina; Bezares, Raimundo F; Bitsmans, Alicia; González, Miguel; Rodríguez, Andrea L; Galmarini, Carlos M; Gamberale, Romina; Giordano, Mirta

    2012-10-01

    Aplidin is a novel cyclic depsipeptide, currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for solid and hematologic malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Aplidin in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the most common leukemia in the adult. Although there have been considerable advances in the treatment of CLL over the last decade, drug resistance and immunosuppression limit the use of current therapy and warrant the development of novel agents. Here we report that Aplidin induced a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from CLL patients. Interestingly, Aplidin effect was markedly higher on monocytes compared to T lymphocytes, NK cells or the malignant B-cell clone. Hence, we next evaluated Aplidin activity on nurse-like cells (NLC) which represent a cell subset differentiated from monocytes that favors leukemic cell progression through pro-survival signals. NLC were highly sensitive to Aplidin and, more importantly, their death indirectly decreased neoplasic clone viability. The mechanisms of Aplidin-induced cell death in monocytic cells involved activation of caspase-3 and subsequent PARP fragmentation, indicative of death via apoptosis. Aplidin also showed synergistic activity when combined with fludarabine or cyclophosphamide. Taken together, our results show that Aplidin affects the viability of leukemic cells in two different ways: inducing a direct effect on the malignant B-CLL clone; and indirectly, by modifying the microenvironment that allows tumor growth.

  12. Characteristics of indirect laser-induced plasma from a thin film of oil on a metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Jun-Shan; Bai, Xue-Shi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Optical emissions from the major and trace elements embodied in a transparent gel prepared from cooking oil were detected after the gel was spread in a thin film on a metallic substrate. Such emissions are due to the indirect breakdown of the coating layer. The generated plasma, a mixture of substances from the substrate, the layer, and the ambient gas, was characterized using emission spectroscopy. The characteristics of the plasma formed on the metal with and without the coating layer were investigated. The results showed that Al emission induced from the aluminum substrates coated with oil films extends away from the target surface to ablate the oil film. This finally formed a bifurcating circulation of aluminum vapor against a spherical confinement wall in the front of the plume, which differed from the evolution of the plasma induced from the uncoated aluminum target. The strongest emissions of elements from the oil films can be observed at 2 mm above the target after a detection delay of 1.0 μs. A high temperature zone has been observed in the plasma after the delay of 1.0 μs for the plasma induced from the coated metal. This higher temperature determined in the plasma allows the consideration of the sensitive detection of trace elements in liquids, gels, biological samples, or thin films.

  13. Characteristics of indirect laser-induced plasma from a thin film of oil on a metallic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiu, Jun-Shan; Bai, Xue-Shi; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Yu, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Optical emissions from the major and trace elements embodied in a transparent gel prepared from cooking oil were detected after the gel was spread in a thin film on a metallic substrate. Such emissions are due to the indirect breakdown of the coating layer. The generated plasma, a mixture of substances from the substrate, the layer, and the ambient gas, was characterized using emission spectroscopy. The characteristics of the plasma formed on the metal with and without the coating layer were investigated. The results showed that Al emission induced from the aluminum substrates coated with oil films extends away from the target surface to ablate the oil film. This finally formed a bifurcating circulation of aluminum vapor against a spherical confinement wall in the front of the plume, which differed from the evolution of the plasma induced from the uncoated aluminum target. The strongest emissions of elements from the oil films can be observed at 2 mm above the target after a detection delay of 1.0 μs. A high temperature zone has been observed in the plasma after the delay of 1.0 μs for the plasma induced from the coated metal. This higher temperature determined in the plasma allows the consideration of the sensitive detection of trace elements in liquids, gels, biological samples, or thin films.

  14. The Chloroplast-Localized Phospholipases D α4 and α5 Regulate Herbivore-Induced Direct and Indirect Defenses in Rice1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jinfeng; Zhou, Guoxin; Yang, Lijuan; Erb, Matthias; Lu, Yanhua; Sun, Xiaoling; Cheng, Jiaan; Lou, Yonggen

    2011-01-01

    The oxylipin pathway is of central importance for plant defensive responses. Yet, the first step of the pathway, the liberation of linolenic acid following induction, is poorly understood. Phospholipases D (PLDs) have been hypothesized to mediate this process, but data from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) regarding the role of PLDs in plant resistance have remained controversial. Here, we cloned two chloroplast-localized PLD genes from rice (Oryza sativa), OsPLDα4 and OsPLDα5, both of which were up-regulated in response to feeding by the rice striped stem borer (SSB) Chilo suppressalis, mechanical wounding, and treatment with jasmonic acid (JA). Antisense expression of OsPLDα4 and -α5 (as-pld), which resulted in a 50% reduction of the expression of the two genes, reduced elicited levels of linolenic acid, JA, green leaf volatiles, and ethylene and attenuated the SSB-induced expression of a mitogen-activated protein kinase (OsMPK3), a lipoxygenase (OsHI-LOX), a hydroperoxide lyase (OsHPL3), as well as a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase (OsACS2). The impaired oxylipin and ethylene signaling in as-pld plants decreased the levels of herbivore-induced trypsin protease inhibitors and volatiles, improved the performance of SSB and the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, and reduced the attractiveness of plants to a larval parasitoid of SSB, Apanteles chilonis. The production of trypsin protease inhibitors in as-pld plants could be partially restored by JA, while the resistance to rice brown planthopper and SSB was restored by green leaf volatile application. Our results show that phospholipases function as important components of herbivore-induced direct and indirect defenses in rice. PMID:21984727

  15. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant Chandrakar, Kamal; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-12-01

    >1τs‑1=τc‑1+τt‑1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. The result underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for aerosol indirect effects: increasing aerosol concentration changes the albedo and suppresses precipitation formation not only through reduction of the mean droplet diameter but also by narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol/slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  16. Indirect determination of the electric field in plasma discharges using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vaudolon, J. Mazouffre, S.

    2014-09-15

    The evaluation of electric fields is of prime interest for the description of plasma characteristics. In this work, different methods for determining the electric field profile in low-pressure discharges using one- and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) measurements are presented and discussed. The energy conservation, fluid, and kinetic approaches appear to be well-suited for the electric field evaluation in this region of the plasma flow. However, the numerical complexity of a two-dimensional kinetic model is penalizing due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio that can be achieved, making the computation of the electric field subject to large error bars. The ionization contribution which appears in the fluid model makes it unattractive on an experimental viewpoint. The energy conservation and 1D1V kinetic approaches should therefore be preferred for the determination of the electric field when LIF data are used.

  17. Ambient ultraviolet radiation induces protective responses in soybean but does not attenuate indirect defense.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thorsten R; Rostás, Michael

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of ambient ultraviolet (UV) radiation on (i) the performance and chemistry of soybean plants, (ii) the performance of Spodoptera frugiperda and (iii) the foraging behavior of the herbivore's natural enemy Cotesia marginiventris which exploits herbivore-induced plant volatiles (VOC) for host location. The accumulation of protective phenolics was faster in plants receiving ambient UV than in controls exposed to sun light lacking UV. Accordingly, isorhamnetin- and quercetin-based flavonoids were increased in UV exposed plants. No UV effects were found on the performance and feeding behavior of S. frugiperda. Herbivore-damaged plants emitted the same VOC when grown under ambient or attenuated UV for 5, 10 or 30 days. Consequently, C. marginiventris was attracted but did not discriminate between exposed and unexposed soybeans. In summary, ambient UV radiation affected soybean morphology and physiology but did not destabilize interactions between trophic levels.

  18. Hemoglobin induced cell trauma indirectly influences endothelial TLR9 activity resulting in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Zoe; Eigenberger, Paul; Redinius, Katherine; Lisk, Christina; Karoor, Vijaya; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Ferguson, Scott K.; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Stenmark, Kurt; Buehler, Paul; Irwin, David C.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that both inherited and acquired forms of hemolytic disease can promote pulmonary vascular disease consequent of free hemoglobin (Hb) induced NO scavenging, elevations in reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. It has recently been reported that oxidative stress can activate NFkB through a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) mediated pathway; further, TLR9 can be activated by either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA liberated by stress induced cellular trauma. We hypothesis that Hb induced lipid peroxidation and subsequent endothelial cell trauma is linked to TLR9 activation, resulting in IL-6 mediated pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation. We examined the effects of Hb on rat pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells (rPAEC and rPASMC, respectively), and then utilized TLR9 and IL6 inhibitors, as well as the Hb and heme binding proteins (haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hpx), respectively) to further elucidate the aforementioned mediators. Further, we explored the effects of Hb in vivo utilizing endothelial cell (EC) specific myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88 (MyD88) and TLR9 null mice. Our data show that oxidized Hb induces lipid peroxidation, cellular toxicity (5.5 ± 1.7 fold; p≤0.04), increased TLR9 activation (60%; p = 0.01), and up regulated IL6 expression (1.75±0.3 fold; p = 0.04) in rPAEC. Rat PASMC exhibited a more proliferative state (13 ± 1%; p = 0.01) when co-cultured with Hb activated rPAEC. These effects were attenuated with the sequestration of Hb or heme by Hp and Hpx as well as with TLR9 an IL-6 inhibition. Moreover, in both EC-MyD88 and TLR9 null mice Hb-infusion resulted in less lung IL-6 expression compared to WT cohorts. These results demonstrate that Hb-induced lipid peroxidation can initiate a modest TLR9 mediated inflammatory response, subsequently generating an activated SMC phenotype. PMID:28152051

  19. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transgenic plant and somaclone production through direct and indirect regeneration from leaves in Stevia rebaudiana with their glycoside profile.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Ur Rahman, Laiq; Shanker, Karuna; Singh, Manju

    2014-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (EHA-105 harboring pCAMBIA 1304)-mediated transgenic plant production via direct regeneration from leaf and elite somaclones generation through indirect regeneration in Stevia rebaudiana is reported. Optimum direct regeneration frequency along with highest transformation frequency was found on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 1 mg/l NAA, while indirect regeneration from callus was obtained on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 2 mg/l NAA. Successful transfer of GUS-positive (GUS assay and PCR-based confirmation) transgenic as well as four somaclones up to glasshouse acclimatization has been achieved. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) profiling of transgenic and somaclonal plants showed a total of 113 bands, out of which 49 were monomorphic (43.36 %) and 64 were polymorphic (56.64 %). Transgenic plant was found to be closer to mother plant, while on the basis of steviol, stevioside, and rebaudioside A profile, somaclone S2 was found to be the best and showed maximum variability in ISSR profiling.

  20. Direct and indirect effects of sociocultural influences on disordered eating among Malaysian male and female university students. A mediation analysis of psychological distress.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wan Ying; Mohd Nasir, Mohd Taib; Zalilah, Mohd Shariff; Hazizi, Abu Saad

    2011-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the role of psychological distress in the relationships between sociocultural influences (social pressure to be thin and weight teasing) and disordered eating. Data were collected from 584 university students (59.4% females and 40.6% males), aged 18-24 years old (M=20.6, SD=1.4), selected from four universities in the Klang Valley, Malaysia. Participants completed four standardized questionnaires which measured social pressure to be thin, weight-related teasing, psychological distress and disordered eating. A good fit structural equation modeling (SEM) model was developed for both sexes. For males, the SEM model revealed that sociocultural influences showed an indirect effect on disordered eating through psychological distress. For females, the model showed an indirect effect of sociocultural influences on disordered eating through psychological distress, as well as a direct effect of sociocultural influences on disordered eating. In conclusion, psychological distress mediated the relationships between sociocultural influences and disordered eating in both males and females. Our results suggest that disordered eating intervention programs on reducing psychological distress in university students may be beneficial.

  1. TRPA1 mediates formalin-induced pain.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Colleen R; Mandel-Brehm, Josh; Bautista, Diana M; Siemens, Jan; Deranian, Kari L; Zhao, Michael; Hayward, Neil J; Chong, Jayhong A; Julius, David; Moran, Magdalene M; Fanger, Christopher M

    2007-08-14

    The formalin model is widely used for evaluating the effects of analgesic compounds in laboratory animals. Injection of formalin into the hind paw induces a biphasic pain response; the first phase is thought to result from direct activation of primary afferent sensory neurons, whereas the second phase has been proposed to reflect the combined effects of afferent input and central sensitization in the dorsal horn. Here we show that formalin excites sensory neurons by directly activating TRPA1, a cation channel that plays an important role in inflammatory pain. Formalin induced robust calcium influx in cells expressing cloned or native TRPA1 channels, and these responses were attenuated by a previously undescribed TRPA1-selective antagonist. Moreover, sensory neurons from TRPA1-deficient mice lacked formalin sensitivity. At the behavioral level, pharmacologic blockade or genetic ablation of TRPA1 produced marked attenuation of the characteristic flinching, licking, and lifting responses resulting from intraplantar injection of formalin. Our results show that TRPA1 is the principal site of formalin's pain-producing action in vivo, and that activation of this excitatory channel underlies the physiological and behavioral responses associated with this model of pain hypersensitivity.

  2. Strain-induced indirect-to-direct band-gap transition in bulk SnS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram, Babu; Singh, Abhishek K.

    2017-02-01

    While SnS2 is an earth-abundant large-band-gap semiconductor material, the indirect nature of the band gap limits its applications in light harvesting or detection devices. Here, using density functional theory in combination with the many-body perturbation theory, we report indirect-to-direct band-gap transition in bulk SnS2 under moderate, 2.98 % uniform biaxial tensile (BT) strain. Further enhancement of the BT strain up to 9.75 % leads to a semiconductor-to-metal transition. The strain-induced weakening of the interaction of the in-plane orbitals modifies the dispersion as well as the character of the valence- and the conduction-band edges, leading to the transition. A quasiparticle direct band gap of 2.17 eV at the Γ point is obtained at 2.98 % BT strain. By solving the Bethe-Salpeter equation to include excitonic effects on top of the partially self-consistent GW0 calculation, we study the dielectric functions, optical oscillator strength, and exciton binding energy as a function of the applied strain. At 2.98 % BT strain, our calculations show the relatively high exciton binding energy of 170 meV, implying strongly coupled excitons in SnS2. The effect of strain on vibrational properties, including Raman spectra, is also investigated. The Raman shift of both in-plane (E2g 1) and out-of plane (A1 g) modes decreases with the applied BT strain, which can be probed experimentally. Furthermore, SnS2 remains dynamically stable up to 9.75 % BT strain, at which it becomes metallic. A strong coupling between the applied strain and the electronic and optical properties of SnS2 can significantly broaden the applications of this material in strain-detection and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Multiple direct and indirect mechanisms drive estrogen-induced tumor growth in high grade serous ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Alessandra; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Buttarelli, Marianna; Lisi, Lucia; Travaglia, Daniele; Martinelli, Enrica; Scambia, Giovanni; Gallo, Daniela

    2016-02-16

    The notion that menopausal estrogen replacement therapy increases ovarian cancer risk, but only for the two more common types (i.e. serous and endometrioid), while possibly decreasing risk for clear cell tumors, is strongly suggestive of causality. However, whether estradiol (E2) is tumorigenic or promotes development of occult preexisting disease is unknown. The present study investigated molecular and cellular mechanisms by which E2 modulates the growth of high grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). Results showed that ERα expression was necessary and sufficient to induce the growth of HGSOC cells in in vitro models. Conversely, in vivo experimental studies demonstrated that increasing the levels of circulating estrogens resulted in a significant growth acceleration of ERα-negative HGSOC xenografts, as well. Tumors from E2-treated mice had significantly higher proliferation rate, angiogenesis, and density of tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) compared to ovariectomized females. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analysis of ERα-negative tissue specimens from HGSOC patients showed a significantly greater TAM infiltration in premenopausal compared to postmenopausal women. This study describes novel insights into the impact of E2 on tumor microenvironment, independently of its direct effect on tumor cell growth, thus supporting the idea that multiple direct and indirect mechanisms drive estrogen-induced tumor growth in HGSOC.

  4. A mechanism of action for morphine-induced immunosuppression: corticosterone mediates morphine-induced suppression of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Freier, D O; Fuchs, B A

    1994-09-01

    Morphine is a drug of abuse with an ability to down-regulate immune responsiveness that could have potentially serious consequences in both heroin addicts and in the clinical environment. The exact mechanism of action by which morphine induces immunosuppression has yet to be clearly determined. A direct mechanism of action is suggested to operate through lymphocyte opiate receptors, but the nature of such receptors is still in question. The alternative, an indirect mechanism of action is proposed to be mediated by two possible pathways, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation with increased production of adrenal corticosteroids, or activation of the sympathetic nervous system and concomitant catecholamine release. Natural killer (NK) cell activity was used to determine potential indirect mechanisms of action for morphine. NK activity in the B6C3F1 mouse was suppressed between 12 and 48 hr after implantation of 75 mg timed-release morphine pellets. Morphine suppressed NK activity in a dose-responsive manner. The opiate antagonists naloxone and naltrexone completely blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity, whereas naloxone methiodide, a congener that crosses the blood-brain barrier much more slowly than naloxone, produced very little blockade. Implantation of the 75-mg morphine pellets produced a significant elevation in serum corticosterone levels. In vitro exposure to corticosterone is known to suppress NK activity directly, whereas in vitro morphine was unable to alter directly NK activity. The glucocorticoid receptor antagonist Roussel-Uclaf 38486 blocked morphine-induced suppression of NK activity in a dose-responsive fashion. Naltrexone (10-mg pellet) antagonized the morphine-induced elevation in serum corticosterone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  6. BH3 domains of BH3-only proteins differentially regulate Bax-mediated mitochondrial membrane permeabilization both directly and indirectly.

    PubMed

    Kuwana, Tomomi; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Chipuk, Jerry E; Bonzon, Christine; Sullivan, Barbara A; Green, Douglas R; Newmeyer, Donald D

    2005-02-18

    Using a Bax-dependent membrane-permeabilization assay, we show that peptides corresponding to the BH3 domains of Bcl-2 family "BH3-only" proteins have dual functions. Several BH3 peptides relieved the inhibition of Bax caused by the antiapoptotic Bcl-x(L) and/or Mcl-1 proteins, some displaying a specificity for either Bcl-x(L) or Mcl-1. Besides having this derepression function, the Bid and Bim peptides activated Bax directly and were the only BH3 peptides tested that could potently induce cytochrome c release from mitochondria in cultured cells. Furthermore, Bax activator molecules (cleaved Bid protein and the Bim BH3 peptide) synergistically induced cytochrome c release when introduced into cells along with derepressor BH3 peptides. These observations support a unified model of BH3 domain function, encompassing both positive and negative regulation of other Bcl-2 family members. In this model, the simple inhibition of antiapoptotic functions is insufficient to induce apoptosis unless a direct activator of Bax or Bak is present.

  7. Inducible NOS mediates CNP-induced relaxation of intestinal myofibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yishi; Chitapanarux, Taned; Wu, Jianfeng; Soon, Russell K.; Melton, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Contraction of intestinal myofibroblasts (IMF) contributes to the development of strictures and fistulas seen in inflammatory bowel disease, but the mechanisms that regulate tension within these cells are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) signaling in C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)-induced relaxation of IMF. We found that treatment with ODQ, a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor, or NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA) or NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA), inhibitors of NO production, all impaired the relaxation of human and mouse IMF in response to CNP. ODQ, l-NNA, and l-NMMA also prevented CNP-induced elevations in cGMP concentrations, and l-NNA or l-NMMA blocked CNP-induced decreases in myosin light phosphorylation. IMF isolated from transgenic mice deficient in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) had reduced relaxation responses to CNP compared with IMF from control mice and were insensitive to the effects of ODQ, l-NNA, and l-NMMA on CNP treatment. Together these data indicate that stimulation of sGC though NO produced by iNOS activation is required for maximal CNP-induced relaxation in IMF. PMID:23348803

  8. Endotoxemia-mediated inflammation potentiates aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Koo, J.-W.; Quintanilla-Dieck, L.; Jiang, M.; Liu, J.; Urdang, Z. D.; Allensworth, J. J.; Cross, C. P.; Li, H.; Steyger, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotics are essential to treat severe bacterial infections, particularly in neonatal intensive care units. Using a bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) experimental model of sepsis, we tested whether LPS-mediated inflammation potentiates cochlear uptake of aminoglycosides and permanent hearing loss in mice. Using confocal microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that low-dose LPS (endotoxemia) greatly increased cochlear concentrations of aminoglycosides and resulted in vasodilation of cochlear capillaries without inducing paracellular flux across the blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB), or elevating serum concentrations of the drug. Additionally, endotoxemia increased expression of both serum and cochlear inflammatory markers. These LPS-induced changes, classically mediated by Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4), were attenuated in TLR4-hyporesponsive mice. Multiday dosing with aminoglycosides during chronic endotoxemia induced greater hearing threshold shifts and sensory cell loss compared to mice without endotoxemia. Thus, endotoxemia-mediated inflammation enhanced aminoglycoside trafficking across the BLB, and potentiated aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity. These data indicate that patients with severe infections are at greater risk of aminoglycoside-induced hearing loss than previously recognized. PMID:26223301

  9. T-cell mediated immunity and the role of TRAIL in sepsis-induced immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Condotta, Stephanie A.; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Badovinac, Vladimir P.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in most intensive care units, and the death of septic patients usually does not result from the initial septic event but rather from subsequent nosocomial infections. Patients who survive severe sepsis often display severely compromised immune function. Not only is there significant apoptosis of lymphoid and myeloid cells that depletes critical components of the immune system during sepsis, there is also decreased function of the remaining immune cells. Studies in animals and humans suggest the immune defects that occur during sepsis may be critical to the pathogenesis and subsequent mortality. This review is focused on sepsis-induced alterations with the CD8 T-cell compartment that can affect the control of secondary heterologous infections. Understanding how a septic event directly influences CD8 T-cell populations through apoptotic death and homeostatic proliferation and indirectly by immune-mediated suppression will provide valuable starting points for developing new treatment options. PMID:23510024

  10. Ectomycorrhizal fungi mediate indirect effects of a bark beetle outbreak on secondary chemistry and establishment of pine seedlings.

    PubMed

    Karst, Justine; Erbilgin, Nadir; Pec, Gregory J; Cigan, Paul W; Najar, Ahmed; Simard, Suzanne W; Cahill, James F

    2015-11-01

    Dendroctonus ponderosae has killed millions of Pinus contorta in western North America with subsequent effects on stand conditions, including changes in light intensity, needle deposition, and the composition of fungal community mutualists, namely ectomycorrhizal fungi. It is unknown whether these changes in stand conditions will have cascading consequences for the next generation of pine seedlings. To test for transgenerational cascades on pine seedlings, we tested the effects of fungal inoculum origin (beetle-killed or undisturbed stands), light intensity and litter (origin and presence) on seedling secondary chemistry and growth in a glasshouse. We also tracked survival of seedlings over two growing seasons in the same stands from which fungi and litter were collected. Fungal communities differed by inoculum origin. Seedlings grown with fungi collected from beetle-killed stands had lower monoterpene concentrations and fewer monoterpene compounds present compared with seedlings grown with fungi collected from undisturbed stands. Litter affected neither monoterpenes nor seedling growth. Seedling survival in the field was lower in beetle-killed than in undisturbed stands. We demonstrate that stand mortality caused by prior beetle attacks of mature pines have cascading effects on seedling secondary chemistry, growth and survival, probably mediated through effects on below-ground mutualisms. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Culture-induced variation in plants of Coffea arabica cv. caturra rojo, regenerated by direct and indirect somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Teyer, L Felipe; Quiroz-Figueroa, Francisco; Loyola-Vargas, Victor; Infante, Diogenes

    2003-02-01

    Amplified fragment-length polymorphism (AFLP) was used to evaluate the stability of DNA in regenerated plantlets of Coffea arabica obtained by direct (DSE) and indirect somatic embryogenesis (ISE). Cluster analysis using the unweighted pair-group method (UPGMA), showed no specific grouping pattern related to the type of embryogenesis. These results suggest that the somatic embryogenesis (SE) process has a mechanism for the selection of normal and competent cells. Bulked DNA from regenerated plants obtained by DSE and ISE, and from the mother plants, was used to characterize specific AFLP fragments associated with each SE process. Twenty-three primer combinations were tested. A total of 1446 bands were analyzed, with 11.4% being polymorphic and 84% being specific for regenerated plants. Furthermore, specific bands were detected for DSE, ISE, and the mother plants. These results indicate that the SE process induces rearrangements at the DNA level and demonstrates discrepancies between the mechanisms involved in each SE process. Coffea arabica breeding programs that involve DSE and ISE can use AFLP as an additional tool for assessing DNA stability.

  12. Caspase-9 mediates Puma activation in UCN-01-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Nie, C; Luo, Y; Zhao, X; Luo, N; Tong, A; Liu, X; Yuan, Z; Wang, C; Wei, Y

    2014-10-30

    The protein kinase inhibitor 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01) is one of the most potent and frequently used proapoptotic stimuli. The BH3-only molecule of Bcl-2 family proteins has been reported to contribute to UCN-01-induced apoptosis. Here we have found that UCN-01 triggers Puma-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Our data confirmed that Akt-FoxO3a pathway mediated Puma activation. Importantly, we elucidate the detailed mechanisms of Puma-induced apoptosis. Our data have also demonstrated that caspase-9 is a decisive molecule of Puma induction after UCN-01 treatment. Caspase-9 mediates apoptosis through two kinds of feedback loops. On the one hand, caspase-9 enhances Puma activation by cleaving Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL independent of caspase-3. On the other hand, caspase-9 directly activated caspase-3 in the presence of caspase-3. Caspase-3 could cleave XIAP in an another positive feedback loop to further sensitize cancer cells to UCN-01-induced apoptosis. Therefore, caspase-9 mediates Puma activation to determine the threshold for overcoming chemoresistance in cancer cells.

  13. Direct effects of tadalafil on lower urinary tract symptoms versus indirect effects mediated through erectile dysfunction symptom improvement: integrated data analyses from 4 placebo controlled clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Brock, Gerald B; McVary, Kevin T; Roehrborn, Claus G; Watts, Steven; Ni, Xiao; Viktrup, Lars; Wong, David G; Donatucci, Craig

    2014-02-01

    Tadalafil has regulatory approval for the treatment of men with signs/symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia with and without erectile dysfunction. We assessed whether the effects of treatment with tadalafil for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia are independent of improvements in erectile dysfunction. Four separate analyses used integrated data from 4 randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled studies in men with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia with and without erectile dysfunction to test whether total I-PSS (International Prostate Symptom Score) improvement was due to improvement in IIEF-EF (International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function domain score). Unidirectional and bidirectional path analysis models determined direct and indirect treatment effects mediated by improvements in lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia and erectile dysfunction symptoms. A total of 1,496 men, of whom 77% had erectile dysfunction, received at least 1 dose of tadalafil 5 mg once daily or placebo. The placebo adjusted treatment effect for men with erectile dysfunction was represented by a mean decrease of -2.3 (p <0.0001) in total I-PSS vs -2.2 (p = 0.0007) for men without erectile dysfunction. The correlation between change from baseline in total I-PSS and IIEF-EF was weak (r(2) = 0.08, p <0.0001). The unidirectional path analysis model suggested that the total treatment effect on total I-PSS score improvement (2.25) was derived from a direct treatment effect of 1.57 (70%, p <0.001) and an indirect treatment effect of 0.67 (30% via IIEF-EF improvement, p <0.001). Bidirectional path analysis showed that total I-PSS improvement was largely attributed to direct (92.5%, p <0.001) vs indirect (7.5%, p = 0.32) treatment effects via IIEF-EF improvement. Regardless of the analytical approach, self-reported erectile dysfunction status did not appreciably influence tadalafil treatment response in men with

  14. CXCL5 Mediates UVB Irradiation–Induced Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, John M.; Calvo, Margarita; Perkins, James R.; Paterson, Kathryn J.; Kiesewetter, Hannes; Hobbs, Carl; Kaan, Timothy K. Y.; Orengo, Christine; Bennett, David L. H.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Many persistent pain states (pain lasting for hours, days, or longer) are poorly treated because of the limitations of existing therapies. Analgesics such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids often provide incomplete pain relief and prolonged use results in the development of severe side effects. Identification of the key mediators of various types of pain could improve such therapies. Here, we tested the hypothesis that hitherto unrecognized cytokines and chemokines might act as mediators in inflammatory pain. We used ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation to induce persistent, abnormal sensitivity to pain in humans and rats. The expression of more than 90 different inflammatory mediators was measured in treated skin at the peak of UVB-induced hypersensitivity with custom-made polymerase chain reaction arrays. There was a significant positive correlation in the overall expression profiles between the two species. The expression of several genes [interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)], previously shown to contribute to pain hypersensitivity, was significantly increased after UVB exposure, and there was dysregulation of several chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL7, CCL11, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL4, CXCL7, and CXCL8). Among the genes measured, CXCL5 was induced to the greatest extent by UVB treatment in human skin; when injected into the skin of rats, CXCL5 recapitulated the mechanical hypersensitivity caused by UVB irradiation. This hypersensitivity was associated with the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages into the dermis, and neutralizing the effects of CXCL5 attenuated the abnormal pain-like behavior. Our findings demonstrate that the chemokine CXCL5 is a peripheral mediator of UVB-induced inflammatory pain, likely in humans as well as rats. PMID:21734176

  15. Ammonia Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Increases in Glutamate and Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity. PMID:24165886

  16. Ammonia mediates methamphetamine-induced increases in glutamate and excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Laura E; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has been identified to have a significant role in the long-term damage to dopamine and serotonin terminals produced by methamphetamine (METH), but how ammonia contributes to this damage is unknown. Experiments were conducted to identify whether increases in brain ammonia affect METH-induced increases in glutamate and subsequent excitotoxicity. Increases in striatal glutamate were measured using in vivo microdialysis. To examine the role of ammonia in mediating changes in extracellular glutamate after METH exposure, lactulose was used to decrease plasma and brain ammonia. Lactulose is a non-absorbable disaccharide, which alters the intestinal lumen through multiple mechanisms that lead to the increased peripheral excretion of ammonia. METH caused a significant increase in extracellular glutamate that was prevented by lactulose. Lactulose had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. To determine if ammonia contributed to excitotoxicity, the effect of METH and lactulose treatment on calpain-mediated spectrin proteolysis was measured. METH significantly increased calpain-specific spectrin breakdown products, and this increase was prevented with lactulose treatment. To examine if ammonia-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were mediated by excitatory amino-acid transporters, the reverse dialysis of ammonia, the glutamate transporter inhibitor, DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA), or the combination of the two directly into the striatum of awake, freely moving rats was conducted. TBOA blocked the increases in extracellular glutamate produced by the reverse dialysis of ammonia. These findings demonstrate that ammonia mediates METH-induced increases in extracellular glutamate through an excitatory amino-acid transporter to cause excitotoxicity.

  17. Moduli mediation without moduli-induced gravitino problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Tatsuo; Oikawa, Akane; Otsuka, Hajime

    2016-05-01

    We study the moduli-induced gravitino problem within the framework of the phenomenologically attractive mirage mediations. The huge amount of gravitino generated by the moduli decay can be successfully diluted by introducing an extra light modulus field which does not induce the supersymmetry breaking. Since the lifetime of extra modulus field becomes longer than usually considered modulus field, our proposed mechanism is applied to both the low- and high-scale supersymmetry breaking scenarios. We also point out that such an extra modulus field appears in the flux compactification of type II string theory.

  18. Disorder-induced enhancement of indirect absorption in a GeSn photodetector grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Chang, C.; Cheng, H. H.; Sun, G.; Soref, R. A.

    2016-05-09

    We report an investigation on the absorption mechanism of a GeSn photodetector with 2.4% Sn composition in the active region. Responsivity is measured and absorption coefficient is calculated. Square root of absorption coefficient linearly depends on photon energy indicating an indirect transition. However, the absorption coefficient is found to be at least one order of magnitude higher than that of most other indirect materials, suggesting that the indirect optical absorption transition cannot be assisted only by phonon. Our analysis of absorption measurements by other groups on the same material system showed the values of absorption coefficient on the same order of magnitude. Our study reveals that the strong enhancement of absorption for the indirect optical transition is the result of alloy disorder from the incorporation of the much larger Sn atoms into the Ge lattice that are randomly distributed.

  19. Stress-induced indirect to direct band gap transition in β-FeSi2 nanocrystals embedded in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlyagin, A. V.; Goroshko, D. L.; Chusovitin, E. A.; Balagan, S. A.; Dotsenko, S. A.; Galkin, K. N.; Galkin, N. G.; Shamirzaev, T. S.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Iinuma, M.; Terai, Y.

    2017-09-01

    Embedded in silicon β-FeSi2 nanocrystals (NCs) were grown on Si(111) by solid phase epitaxy of a thin iron film followed by Si molecular beam epitaxy. After solid phase epitaxy, a mixture of β-FeSi2 and ɛ-FeSi nanocrystals is formed on the surface, sometimes β and ɛ phases coexist inside one nanocrystal. During initial stage of Si molecular beam epitaxy all ɛ-FeSi transforms into β-FeSi2. β-FeSi2 nanocrystals tend to move following Si growth front. By adjusting growth condition, we manage to prevent the nanocrystals from moving and to fabricate 7-layer n-Si(111)/β-FeSi2_NCs/p+-Si silicon heterostructure with embedded β-FeSi2 NCs. An epitaxial relationship and a stress induced in the nanocrystals by silicon matrix were found to be suitable for indirect to direct band gap transition in β-FeSi2. Of the heterostructure, a n-i-p avalanche photodetector and a light-emitting diode were formed. They have shown relatively good performance: ultrabroadband photoresponse from the visible (400 nm) to short-wavelength infrared (1800 nm) ranges owing to quantum-confined Stark effect in the nanocrystals and optical emission power of up to 25 µW at 9 A/cm2 with an external quantum efficiency of 0.009% at room temperature owing to a direct fundamental transition in stressed β-FeSi2 nanocrystals.

  20. Indirect detection of superoxide in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using microchip electrophoresis coupled to laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    de Campos, Richard P S; Siegel, Joseph M; Fresta, Claudia G; Caruso, Giuseppe; da Silva, José A F; Lunte, Susan M

    2015-09-01

    Superoxide, a naturally produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the human body, is involved in many pathological and physiological signaling processes. However, if superoxide formation is left unregulated, overproduction can lead to oxidative damage to important biomolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins. Superoxide can also lead to the formation of peroxynitrite, an extremely hazardous substance, through its reaction with endogenously produced nitric oxide. Despite its importance, quantitative information regarding superoxide production is difficult to obtain due to its high reactivity and low concentrations in vivo. MitoHE, a fluorescent probe that specifically reacts with superoxide, was used in conjunction with microchip electrophoresis (ME) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection to investigate changes in superoxide production by RAW 264.7 macrophage cells following stimulation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Stimulation was performed in the presence and absence of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitors, diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and 2-metoxyestradiol (2-ME). The addition of these inhibitors resulted in an increase in the amount of superoxide specific product (2-OH-MitoE(+)) from 0.08 ± 0.01 fmol (0.17 ± 0.03 mM) in native cells to 1.26 ± 0.06 fmol (2.5 ± 0.1 mM) after PMA treatment. This corresponds to an approximately 15-fold increase in intracellular concentration per cell. Furthermore, the addition of 3-morpholino-sydnonimine (SIN-1) to the cells during incubation resulted in the production of 0.061 ± 0.006 fmol (0.12 ± 0.01 mM) of 2-OH-MitoE(+) per cell on average. These results demonstrate that indirect superoxide detection coupled with the use of SOD inhibitors and a separation method is a viable method to discriminate the 2-OH-MitoE(+) signal from possible interferences.

  1. Granzyme B mediates both direct and indirect cleavage of extracellular matrix in skin after chronic low-dose ultraviolet light irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Leigh G; Toro, Ana; Zhao, Hongyan; Brown, Keddie; Tebbutt, Scott J; Granville, David J

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a hallmark of many chronic inflammatory diseases that can lead to a loss of function, aging, and disease progression. Ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation from the sun is widely considered as the major cause of visible human skin aging, causing increased inflammation and enhanced ECM degradation. Granzyme B (GzmB), a serine protease that is expressed by a variety of cells, accumulates in the extracellular milieu during chronic inflammation and cleaves a number of ECM proteins. We hypothesized that GzmB contributes to ECM degradation in the skin after UV irradiation through both direct cleavage of ECM proteins and indirectly through the induction of other proteinases. Wild-type and GzmB-knockout mice were repeatedly exposed to minimal erythemal doses of solar-simulated UV irradiation for 20 weeks. GzmB expression was significantly increased in wild-type treated skin compared to nonirradiated controls, colocalizing to keratinocytes and to an increased mast cell population. GzmB deficiency significantly protected against the formation of wrinkles and the loss of dermal collagen density, which was related to the cleavage of decorin, an abundant proteoglycan involved in collagen fibrillogenesis and integrity. GzmB also cleaved fibronectin, and GzmB-mediated fibronectin fragments increased the expression of collagen-degrading matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings indicate a significant role for GzmB in ECM degradation that may have implications in many age-related chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:25495009

  2. Synthesis of Cu(2+)-mediated nano-sized salbutamol-imprinted polymer and its use for indirect recognition of ultra-trace levels of salbutamol.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Taher; Fard, Leyla Abolghasemi

    2013-03-26

    Cu(2+)-mediated salbutamol-imprinted polymer nanoparticles, synthesized by precipitation polymerization, were mixed with graphite powder and n-eicosane in order to fabricate a modified carbon paste electrode. This electrode was then applied for indirect differential pulse voltammetry determination of salbutamol. In the presence of Cu(2+) ions, the formed Cu(2+)-salbutamol complex was adsorbed in to the pre-designed cavities of the MIP particles, situated on the electrode surface. Since the electrochemical signal of salbutamol was intrinsically small, the oxidation peak of the participant Cu(2+), after reduction step, was recorded and used as an indication of salbutamol amount, adsorbed in the electrode. Different variables influencing the sensor performance were studied and the best conditions were chosen for the determination purpose. Correlation between the sensor response to salbutamol and its concentration was linear in the range of 1.0×10(-9)-5.5×10(-8) M. Detection limit was calculated equal to 6.0×10(-10) M (S/N). Five replicated determination of salbutamol (1×10(-8) M) resulted in standard error of 3.28%, meaning a satisfactory precision of the determination method. The prepared sensor was applied for real sample analysis. In order to minimize the interference effect, the synthesized polymer was successfully used as a solid phase sorbent for salbutamol extraction, before analysis of real samples by the developed sensor.

  3. IB4(+) nociceptors mediate persistent muscle pain induced by GDNF

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Chen, Xiaojie; Bogen, Oliver; Green, Paul G.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a well-known source of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which can produce mechanical hyperalgesia. Since some neuromuscular diseases are associated with both increased release of GDNF and intense muscle pain, we explored the role of GDNF as an endogenous mediator in muscle pain. Intramuscularly injected GDNF induced a dose-dependent (0.1–10 ng/20 μl) persistent (up to 3 wk) mechanical hyperalgesia in the rat. Once hyperalgesia subsided, injection of prostaglandin E2 at the site induced a prolonged mechanical hyperalgesia (>72 h) compared with naïve rats (<4 h; hyperalgesic priming). Selective neurotoxic destruction of IB4(+) nociceptors attenuated both GDNF hyperalgesia and hyperalgesic priming. Ergonomic muscular injury induced by eccentric exercise or mechanical vibration increased muscle GDNF levels at 24 h, a time point where rats also exhibited marked muscle hyperalgesia. Intrathecal antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to mRNA encoding GFRα1, the canonical binding receptor for GDNF, reversibly inhibited eccentric exercise- and mechanical vibration-induced muscle hyperalgesia. Finally, electrophysiological recordings from nociceptors innervating the gastrocnemius muscle in anesthetized rats, revealed significant increase in response to sustained mechanical stimulation after local GDNF injection. In conclusion, these data indicate that GDNF plays a role as an endogenous mediator in acute and induction of chronic muscle pain, an effect likely to be produced by GDNF action at GFRα1 receptors located in IB4(+) nociceptors. PMID:22914655

  4. The use of Olaparib (AZD2281) potentiates SN-38 cytotoxicity in colon cancer cells by indirect inhibition of Rad51-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Makiko; Inoue, Takeshi; Sato, Futoshi; Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Horie, Hisanaga; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Fujii, Hirofumi; Kotake, Kenjiro; Sugano, Kokichi

    2014-05-01

    Potent application of topoisomerase I inhibitor plus PARP inhibitor has been suggested to be an effective strategy for cancer therapy. Reportedly, mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient colon cancer cells are sensitive to topoisomerase I inhibitor, presumably due to microsatellite instability (MSI) of the MRE11 locus. We examined the synergy of SN-38, an active metabolite of irinotecan, in combination with the PARP inhibitor olaparib in colon cancer cells showing different MMR status, such as MSI or microsatellite stable (MSS) phenotype. Treatment with SN-38 and olaparib in combination almost halved the IC50 of SN-38 for a broad spectrum of colon cancer cells independent of the MMR status. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated S-phase-specific double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) induced by SN-38, which is followed by Rad51 recruitment. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rad51, but not Mre11 or Rad50, increased the sensitivity to olaparib and/or SN-38 treatment in colon cancer cells. In vivo study using mouse xenograft demonstrated that olaparib was effective to potentiate the antitumor effect of irinotecan. In conclusion, olaparib shows a synergistic effect in colon cancer cells in combination with SN-38 or irinotecan, potentiated by the Rad51-mediated HR pathway, irrespective of the Mre11-mediated failure of the MRN complex. These results may contribute to future clinical trials using PARP inhibitor plus topoisomerase I inhibitor in combination. Furthermore, the synergistic effect comprising topoisomerase I-mediated DNA breakage-reunion reaction, PARP and Rad51-mediated HR pathway suggests the triple synthetic lethal pathways contribute to this event and are applicable as a potential target for future chemotherapy.

  5. Host-plant-mediated competition via induced resistance: interactions between pest herbivores on potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Margaret E; Kaplan, Ian; Dively, Galen P; Denno, Robert F

    2006-06-01

    Plant-mediated competition among insect herbivores occurs when one species induces changes in plant chemistry, nutrition, or morphology that render plants resistant to attack by others. We explored plant-mediated interspecific interactions between the potato leafhopper (Empoasca fabae) and the Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata), two important pests on potatoes. Leafhoppers colonize fields in advance of beetles, and thus the possibility exists that previous feeding by leafhoppers induces changes in potato plants that have adverse consequences for beetles. The consequences of leafhopper-induced resistance for beetle performance were studied in the greenhouse, field cages, and in large open-field plots. Potato plants were exposed to four densities of leafhoppers (none, low, moderate, and high), and visible feeding symptoms were measured as percentage leaf curling, chlorosis, and necrosis. The oviposition preference, performance, and survivorship of Colorado potato beetles were then measured on the four categories of induced plants in field-cage and greenhouse settings. In open field plots, survival on the four categories of induced plants was determined by placing cohorts of beetle adults onto plants and measuring the densities of resulting eggs, larvae, and emerging Fl adults. Leafhopper-induced symptoms on potato plants were density dependent, with the percentage of curled, chlorotic, and necrotic leaves increasing with leafhopper density. Previous feeding by leafhoppers adversely affected oviposition and larval performance of beetles. Fewer egg masses were deposited on plants that incurred high levels of leafhopper feeding. Similarly, larval development was delayed and emerging adult beetles weighed less when fed induced foliage from the high leafhopper-density treatment. Beetles survived less well in the field on plants experiencing moderate and high levels of leafhopper feeding as evidenced by lower densities of eggs, larvae, and emerging F1

  6. Leukotriene B4 mediates neutrophil migration induced by heme.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Pinheiro, Carla S; Luna-Gomes, Tatiana; Alves, Liliane R; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Porto, Barbara N; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Benjamim, Claudia F; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Marcelo T; Canetti, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of free heme found during hemolytic events or cell damage leads to inflammation, characterized by neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species, through mechanisms not yet elucidated. In this study, we provide evidence that heme-induced neutrophilic inflammation depends on endogenous activity of the macrophage-derived lipid mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). In vivo, heme-induced neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity of mice was attenuated by pretreatment with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors and leukotriene B(4) receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor antagonists as well as in 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice. Heme administration in vivo increased peritoneal levels of LTB(4) prior to and during neutrophil recruitment. Evidence that LTB(4) was synthesized by resident macrophages, but not mast cells, included the following: 1) immuno-localization of heme-induced LTB(4) was compartmentalized exclusively within lipid bodies of resident macrophages; 2) an increase in the macrophage population enhanced heme-induced neutrophil migration; 3) depletion of resident mast cells did not affect heme-induced LTB(4) production or neutrophil influx; 4) increased levels of LTB(4) were found in heme-stimulated peritoneal cavities displaying increased macrophage numbers; and 5) in vitro, heme was able to activate directly macrophages to synthesize LTB(4). Our findings uncover a crucial role of LTB(4) in neutrophil migration induced by heme and suggest that beneficial therapeutic outcomes could be achieved by targeting the 5-LO pathway in the treatment of inflammation associated with hemolytic processes.

  7. The C-terminus of the {gamma}2 chain but not of the {beta}3 chain of laminin-332 is indirectly but indispensably necessary for integrin-mediated cell reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navdaev, Alexei; Heitmann, Vanessa; Santana Evangelista, Karla de; Moergelin, Matthias; Wegener, Joachim; Eble, Johannes A.

    2008-02-01

    Using a recombinant mini-laminin-332, we showed that truncation of the three C-terminal amino acids of the {gamma}2 chain, but not of the C-terminal amino acid of the {beta}3 chain, completely abolished {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding and its cellular functions, such as attachment and spreading. However, a synthetic peptide mimicking the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus did not interfere with {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin binding or cell adhesion and spreading on laminin-332 as measured by protein interaction assays and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing. Nor was the soluble peptide able to restore the loss of integrin-mediated cell adhesiveness to mini-laminin-332 after deletion of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus. These findings spoke against the hypothesis that the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus of laminin-332 is a part of the {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin interaction site. In addition, structural studies with electron microscopy showed that truncation of the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus opened up the compact supradomain structure of LG1-3 domains. Thus, by inducing or stabilizing an integrin binding-competent conformation or array of the LG1-3 domains, the {gamma}2 chain C-terminus plays an indirect but essential role in laminin-332 recognition by {alpha}3{beta}1 integrin and, hence, its cellular functions.

  8. Auditory-Induced Emotion Mediates Perceptual Categorization of Everyday Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Penny; Västfjäll, Daniel; Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Asutay, Erkin

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that emotion categorization plays an important role in perception and categorization in the visual domain. In the present paper, we investigated the role of auditory-induced emotions for auditory perception. We further investigated whether the emotional responses mediate other perceptual judgments of sounds. In an experiment, participants either rated general dissimilarities between sounds or dissimilarities of specific aspects of sounds. The results showed that the general perceptual salience map could be explained by both the emotional responses to, and perceptual aspects of, the sounds. Importantly, the perceptual aspects were mediated by emotional responses. Together these results show that emotions are an integral part of auditory perception that is used as the intuitive basis for categorizing everyday sounds. PMID:27790172

  9. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-05-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways.

  10. Akt and MAPK signaling mediate pregnancy-induced cardiac adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eunhee; Yeung, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although the signaling pathways underlying exercise-induced cardiac adaptation have been extensively studied, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that result in the response of the heart to pregnancy. The objective of this study was to define the morphological, functional, and gene expression patterns that define the hearts of pregnant mice, and to identify the signaling pathways that mediate this response. Mice were divided into three groups: nonpregnant diestrus control, midpregnancy, and late pregnancy. Both time points of pregnancy were associated with significant cardiac hypertrophy. The prosurvival signaling cascades of Akt and ERK1/2 were activated in the hearts of pregnant mice, while the stress kinase, p38, was decreased. Given the activation of Akt in pregnancy and its known role in cardiac hypertrophy, the hypertrophic response to pregnancy was tested in mice expressing a cardiac-specific activated (myristoylated) form of Akt (myrAkt) or a cardiac-specific constitutively active (antipathologic hypertrophic) form of its downstream target, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (caGSK3β). The pregnancy-induced hypertrophic responses of hearts from these mice were significantly attenuated. Finally, we tested whether pregnancy-associated sex hormones could induce hypertrophy and alter signaling pathways in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). In fact, progesterone, but not estradiol treatment increased NRVM cell size via phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Inhibition of MEK1 effectively blocked progesterone-induced cellular hypertrophy. Taken together, our study demonstrates that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy is mediated by activation of Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. PMID:22345431

  11. Plant systemic induced responses mediate interactions between root parasitic nematodes and aboveground herbivorous insects

    PubMed Central

    Wondafrash, Mesfin; Van Dam, Nicole M.; Tytgat, Tom O. G.

    2013-01-01

    Insects and nematodes are the most diverse and abundant groups of multicellular animals feeding on plants on either side of the soil–air interface. Several herbivore-induced responses are systemic, and hence can influence the preference and performance of organisms in other plant organs. Recent studies show that plants mediate interactions between belowground plant parasitic nematodes (PPNs) and aboveground herbivorous insects. Based on the knowledge of plant responses to pathogens, we review the emerging insights on plant systemic responses against root-feeding nematodes and shoot-feeding insects. We discuss the potential mechanisms of plant-mediated indirect interactions between both groups of organisms and point to gaps in our knowledge. Root-feeding nematodes can positively or negatively affect shoot herbivorous insects, and vice versa. The outcomes of the interactions between these spatially separated herbivore communities appear to be influenced by the feeding strategy of the nematodes and the insects, as well as by host plant susceptibility to both herbivores. The potential mechanisms for these interactions include systemic induced plant defense, interference with the translocation and dynamics of locally induced secondary metabolites, and reallocation of plant nutritional reserves. During evolution, PPNs as well as herbivorous insects have acquired effectors that modify plant defense responses and resource allocation patterns to their advantage. However, it is also known that plants under herbivore attack change the allocation of their resources, e.g., for compensatory growth responses, which may affect the performance of other organisms feeding on the plant. Studying the chemical and molecular basis of these interactions will reveal the molecular mechanisms that are involved. Moreover, it will lead to a better understanding of the ecological relevance of aboveground–belowground interactions, as well as support the development of sustainable pest

  12. Defect-mediated discrete solitons in optically induced photorefractive lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yongyao; Pang Wei; Chen Yongzhu; Yu Zhiqiang; Zhou Jianying; Zhang Huarong

    2009-10-15

    Theoretical analysis to the defect mediated discrete solitons in one- and two-dimensional periodical waveguide lattices is presented. The waveguide arrays with these functional defects are assumed to respond to the light field as an optically induced photorefraction and they are patterned by a holographic technique. It is found that the spatial energy distributions of the solitary waves can be controlled by the defects in the waveguide arrays, and this gives rise to an additional freedom to externally shaping the light field distribution to a special shape.

  13. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  14. Magnetic Nanoparticle Mediated Steroid Delivery Mitigates Cisplatin Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Bharath; Roy, Soumen; Apolo, Andrea B.; Shapiro, Benjamin; Depireux, Didier A.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) is widely used as a chemotherapeutic drug for genitourinary, breast, lung and head and neck cancers. Though effective in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, cisplatin treatment causes severe hearing loss among patients. Steroids have been shown to mitigate cisplatin-induced hearing loss. However, steroids may interfere with the anti-cancer properties of cisplatin if administered systemically, or are rapidly cleared from the middle and inner ear and hence lack effectiveness when administered intra-tympanically. In this work, we deliver prednisolone-loaded nanoparticles magnetically to the cochlea of cisplatin-treated mice. This magnetic delivery method substantially reduced hearing loss in treated animals at high frequency compared to control animals or animals that received intra-tympanic methylprednisolone. The method also protected the outer hair cells from cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity. PMID:28955202

  15. Magnetic Nanoparticle Mediated Steroid Delivery Mitigates Cisplatin Induced Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Bharath; Roy, Soumen; Apolo, Andrea B; Shapiro, Benjamin; Depireux, Didier A

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) is widely used as a chemotherapeutic drug for genitourinary, breast, lung and head and neck cancers. Though effective in inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, cisplatin treatment causes severe hearing loss among patients. Steroids have been shown to mitigate cisplatin-induced hearing loss. However, steroids may interfere with the anti-cancer properties of cisplatin if administered systemically, or are rapidly cleared from the middle and inner ear and hence lack effectiveness when administered intra-tympanically. In this work, we deliver prednisolone-loaded nanoparticles magnetically to the cochlea of cisplatin-treated mice. This magnetic delivery method substantially reduced hearing loss in treated animals at high frequency compared to control animals or animals that received intra-tympanic methylprednisolone. The method also protected the outer hair cells from cisplatin-mediated ototoxicity.

  16. NLRP3 Inflammasome Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Vascular Damage.

    PubMed

    Bruder-Nascimento, Thiago; Ferreira, Nathanne S; Zanotto, Camila Z; Ramalho, Fernanda; Pequeno, Isabela O; Olivon, Vania C; Neves, Karla B; Alves-Lopes, Rheure; Campos, Eduardo; Silva, Carlos Alberto A; Fazan, Rubens; Carlos, Daniela; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Prado, Douglas; Pereira, Felipe V; Braga, Tarcio; Luiz, Joao Paulo M; Cau, Stefany B; Elias, Paula C; Moreira, Ayrton C; Câmara, Niels O; Zamboni, Dario S; Alves-Filho, Jose Carlos; Tostes, Rita C

    2016-12-06

    Inflammation is a key feature of aldosterone-induced vascular damage and dysfunction, but molecular mechanisms by which aldosterone triggers inflammation remain unclear. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a pivotal immune sensor that recognizes endogenous danger signals triggering sterile inflammation. We analyzed vascular function and inflammatory profile of wild-type (WT), NLRP3 knockout (NLRP3(-/-)), caspase-1 knockout (Casp-1(-/-)), and interleukin-1 receptor knockout (IL-1R(-/-)) mice treated with vehicle or aldosterone (600 µg·kg(-1)·d(-1) for 14 days through osmotic mini-pump) while receiving 1% saline to drink. Here, we show that NLRP3 inflammasome plays a central role in aldosterone-induced vascular dysfunction. Long-term infusion of aldosterone in mice resulted in elevation of plasma interleukin-1β levels and vascular abnormalities. Mice lacking the IL-1R or the inflammasome components NLRP3 and caspase-1 were protected from aldosterone-induced vascular damage. In vitro, aldosterone stimulated NLRP3-dependent interleukin-1β secretion by bone marrow-derived macrophages by activating nuclear factor-κB signaling and reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, chimeric mice reconstituted with NLRP3-deficient hematopoietic cells showed that NLRP3 in immune cells mediates aldosterone-induced vascular damage. In addition, aldosterone increased the expression of NLRP3, active caspase-1, and mature interleukin-1β in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Hypertensive patients with hyperaldosteronism or normal levels of aldosterone exhibited increased activity of NLRP3 inflammasome, suggesting that the effect of hyperaldosteronism on the inflammasome may be mediated through high blood pressure. Together, these data demonstrate that NLRP3 inflammasome, through activation of IL-1R, is critically involved in the deleterious vascular effects of aldosterone, placing NLRP3 as a potential target for therapeutic interventions in conditions with high aldosterone levels

  17. Dysregulation of cytokine mediated chemotherapy induced cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaojia; St Clair, Daret K; Butterfield, D Allan

    2017-03-01

    One of the major complaints patients who survive cancer often make is chemotherapy induced cognitive impairment (CICI), which survivors often call "chemo brain." CICI is a side effect of chemotherapy due to the cytotoxicity and neurotoxicity of anti-cancer drugs causing structural and functional changes in brain, even when drugs that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) are used. Diminished cognitive functions including diminution of learning and memory, concentration and attention, processing speed and executive functions that reduce quality of life and ability to work are common signs and symptoms of CICI. There still is not a clarified and complete mechanism for CICI, but researchers have pointed to several biochemical candidates. Chemotherapy-induced, cytokine-mediated involvement in CICI will be mainly discussed in this review paper with emphasis on different types of cytokines, correlated with BBB and epigenetic changes. Mechanisms of ROS-generating, anti-cancer drugs and their relation to cytokine-mediated CICI will be emphasized.

  18. Calpain mediated cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liang; Wang, Aimei

    2013-01-01

    Ototoxic drug-induced apoptosis of inner ear cells has been shown to be associated with calpain expression. Cisplatin has severe ototoxicity, and can induce cochlear cell apoptosis. This study assumed that cisplatin activated calpain expression in apoptotic cochlear cells. A mouse model of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity was established by intraperitoneal injection with cisplatin (2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 mg/kg). Immunofluorescence staining, image analysis and western blotting were used to detect the expression of calpain 1 and calpain 2 in the mouse cochlea. At the same time, the auditory brainstem response was measured to observe the change in hearing. Results revealed that after intraperitoneal injection with cisplatin for 5 days, the auditory brainstem response threshold shifts increased in mice. Calpain 1 and calpain 2 expression significantly increased in outer hair cells, the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Calpain 2 protein expression markedly increased with an increased dose of cisplatin. Results suggested that calpain 1 and calpain 2 mediated cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in BALB/c mice. During this process, calpain 2 plays a leading role. PMID:25206508

  19. Inducible NorA-mediated multidrug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Kaatz, G W; Seo, S M

    1995-01-01

    The NorA protein of Staphylococcus aureus mediates the active efflux of hydrophilic fluoroquinolones from the cell, conferring low-level resistance upon the organism. The protein also is capable of transporting additional structurally diverse compounds, indicating that it has a broad substrate specificity. Increased transcription of the norA gene, leading to a greater quantity of the NorA protein within the cytoplasmic membrane, is felt to be the mechanism by which strains possessing such changes resist fluoroquinolones. S. aureus SA-1199 and its in vivo-selected derivative SA-1199B are fluoroquinolone-susceptible and -resistant isolates, respectively; SA-1199B resists hydrophilic fluoroquinolones via a NorA-mediated mediated mechanism in a constitutive manner. SA-1199-3 is an in vitro-produced derivative of SA-1199 in which NorA-mediated multidrug resistance is expressed inducibly. Compared with organisms exposed to subinhibitory concentrations of a NorA substrate for the first time, preexposure of SA-1199-3 to such a compound followed by growth in the presence of that substrate results in the elimination of a 2- to 6-h period of organism killing that occurs prior to the onset of logarithmic growth. The uptake of radiolabeled fluoroquinolone is markedly reduced by preexposure of SA-1199-3 to NorA substrates: such prior exposure also results in a dramatic increase in RNa transcripts that hybridize with a norA probe. Preexposure of SA-1199 and SA-1199B to such substrates results in small increases or no increases in these transcripts. No sequence differences between SA-1199 and SA-1199-3 within the norA gene or flanking DNA were found. It appears likely that the regulation of norA in SA-1193, which may be effected by one or more genetic loci outside the norA region of the chromosome, differs from that of SA-1199 and SA-1199B. PMID:8592996

  20. Indirect inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Since Doug MacAyeal's pioneering studies of the ice-stream basal traction optimizations by control methods, inversions for unknown parameters (e.g., basal traction, accumulation patterns, etc) have become a hallmark of the present-day ice-sheet modeling. The common feature of such inversion exercises is a direct relationship between optimized parameters and observations used in the optimization procedure. For instance, in the standard optimization for basal traction by the control method, ice-stream surface velocities constitute the control data. The optimized basal traction parameters explicitly appear in the momentum equations for the ice-stream velocities (compared to the control data). The inversion for basal traction is carried out by minimization of the cost (or objective, misfit) function that includes the momentum equations facilitated by the Lagrange multipliers. Here, we build upon this idea, and demonstrate how to optimize for parameters indirectly related to observed data using a suite of nested constraints (like Russian dolls) with additional sets of Lagrange multipliers in the cost function. This method opens the opportunity to use data from a variety of sources and types (e.g., velocities, radar layers, surface elevation changes, etc.) in the same optimization process.

  1. High quality reduced graphene oxide flakes by fast kinetically controlled and clean indirect UV-induced radical reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyunt, Roman; Knolle, Wolfgang; Kahnt, Axel; Halbig, Christian E.; Lotnyk, Andriy; Häupl, Tilmann; Prager, Andrea; Eigler, Siegfried; Abel, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the GO is not excited directly. While the direct photoexcitation of aqueous GO (when GO is the only light-absorbing component) takes several hours of reaction time at ambient temperature (4 h) leading only to a partial GO reduction, the addition of small amounts of isopropanol and acetone (2% and 1%) leads to a dramatically shortened reaction time by more than two orders of magnitude (2 min) and a very efficient and soft reduction of graphene oxide. This method avoids the formation of non-volatile species and in turn contamination of the produced rGO and it is based on the highly efficient generation of reducing carbon centered isopropanol radicals via the reaction of triplet acetone with isopropanol. While the direct photolysis of GO dispersions easily leads to degradation of the carbon lattice of GO and thus to a relatively low electric conductivity of the films of flakes, our indirect photoreduction of GO instead largely avoids the formation of defects, keeping the carbon lattice intact. Mechanisms of the direct and indirect photoreduction of GO have been elucidated and compared. Raman spectroscopy, XPS and conductivity measurements prove the efficiency of the indirect photoreduction in comparison with the state-of-the-art reduction method for GO (hydriodic acid/trifluoroacetic acid). The rapid reduction times and water solvent containing only small amounts of isopropanol and acetone may allow easy process up-scaling for technical applications and low-energy consumption.This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the

  2. High quality reduced graphene oxide flakes by fast kinetically controlled and clean indirect UV-induced radical reduction.

    PubMed

    Flyunt, Roman; Knolle, Wolfgang; Kahnt, Axel; Halbig, Christian E; Lotnyk, Andriy; Häupl, Tilmann; Prager, Andrea; Eigler, Siegfried; Abel, Bernd

    2016-04-14

    This work highlights a surprisingly simple and kinetically controlled highly efficient indirect method for the production of high quality reduced graphene oxide (rGO) flakes via UV irradiation of aqueous dispersions of graphene oxide (GO), in which the GO is not excited directly. While the direct photoexcitation of aqueous GO (when GO is the only light-absorbing component) takes several hours of reaction time at ambient temperature (4 h) leading only to a partial GO reduction, the addition of small amounts of isopropanol and acetone (2% and 1%) leads to a dramatically shortened reaction time by more than two orders of magnitude (2 min) and a very efficient and soft reduction of graphene oxide. This method avoids the formation of non-volatile species and in turn contamination of the produced rGO and it is based on the highly efficient generation of reducing carbon centered isopropanol radicals via the reaction of triplet acetone with isopropanol. While the direct photolysis of GO dispersions easily leads to degradation of the carbon lattice of GO and thus to a relatively low electric conductivity of the films of flakes, our indirect photoreduction of GO instead largely avoids the formation of defects, keeping the carbon lattice intact. Mechanisms of the direct and indirect photoreduction of GO have been elucidated and compared. Raman spectroscopy, XPS and conductivity measurements prove the efficiency of the indirect photoreduction in comparison with the state-of-the-art reduction method for GO (hydriodic acid/trifluoroacetic acid). The rapid reduction times and water solvent containing only small amounts of isopropanol and acetone may allow easy process up-scaling for technical applications and low-energy consumption.

  3. Involvement of Bim in Photofrin-mediated photodynamically induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianwang; He, Xiaobing; Hu, Shujuan; Sun, Anbang; Lu, Chengbiao

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising noninvasive technique, which has been successfully applied to the treatment of human cancers. Studies have shown that the Bcl-2 family proteins play important roles in PDT-induced apoptosis. However, whether Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) is involved in photodynamic treatment remains unknown. In this study, we attempt to determine the effect of Bim on Photofrin photodynamic treatment (PPT)-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma ASTC-a-1 cells. The translocation of Bim/Bax of the cells were monitored by laser confocal scanning microscope. The levels of Bim protein and activated caspase-3 in cells were detected by western blot assay. Caspase-3 activities were measured by Caspase-3 Fluorogenic Substrate (Ac-DEVD-AFC) analysis. The induction of apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33258 and PI staining as well as flow cytometry analysis. The effect of Bim on PPT-induced apoptosis was determined by RNAi. BimL translocated to mitochondria in response to PPT, similar to the downstream pro-apoptotic protein Bax activation. PPT increased the level of Bim and activated caspase-3 in cells and that knockdown of Bim by RNAi significantly protected against caspase-3 activity. PPT-induced apoptosis were suppressed in cells transfected with shRNA-Bim. We demonstrated the involvement of Bim in PPT-induced apoptosis in human ASTC-a-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells and suggested that enhancing Bim activity might be a potential strategy for treating human cancers. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. The Alarmin HMGB1 Mediates Age-Induced Neuroinflammatory Priming

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthew G.; Kitt, Meagan M.; D'Angelo, Heather M.; Norden, Diana M.; Weber, Michael D.; Barrientos, Ruth M.; Godbout, Jonathan P.; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Amplified neuroinflammatory responses following an immune challenge occur with normal aging and can elicit or exacerbate neuropathology. The mechanisms mediating this sensitized or “primed” immune response in the aged brain are not fully understood. The alarmin high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) can be released under chronic pathological conditions and initiate inflammatory cascades. This led us to investigate whether HMGB1 regulates age-related priming of the neuroinflammatory response. Here, we show that HMGB1 protein and mRNA were elevated in the hippocampus of unmanipulated aged rats (24-month-old F344XBN rats). Furthermore, aged rats had increased HMGB1 in the CSF, suggesting increased HMGB1 release. We demonstrate that blocking HMGB1 signaling with an intracisterna magna (ICM) injection of the competitive antagonist to HMGB1, Box-A, downregulates basal expression of several inflammatory pathway genes in the hippocampus of aged rats. This indicates that blocking the actions of HMGB1 might reduce age-associated inflammatory priming. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated whether HMGB1 antagonism blocks the protracted neuroinflammatory and sickness response to peripheral Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection in aged rats. ICM pretreatment of aged rats with Box-A 24 h before E. coli infection prevented the extended hippocampal cytokine response and associated cognitive and affective behavioral changes. ICM pretreatment with Box-A also inhibited aging-induced potentiation of the microglial proinflammatory response to lipopolysaccharide ex vivo. Together, these results suggest that HMGB1 mediates neuroinflammatory priming in the aged brain. Blocking the actions of HMGB1 appears to “desensitize” aged microglia to an immune challenge, thereby preventing exaggerated behavioral and neuroinflammatory responses following infection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The world's population is aging, highlighting a need to develop treatments that promote quality of life in aged

  5. Inhibition of BMI1 induces autophagy-mediated necroptosis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anindya; Mustafi, Soumyajit Banerjee; Saha, Sounik; Kumar Dhar Dwivedi, Shailendra; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Bhattacharya, Resham

    2016-01-01

    The clonal self-renewal property conferred by BMI1 is instrumental in maintenance of not only normal stem cells but also cancer-initiating cells from several different malignancies that represent a major challenge to chemotherapy. Realizing the immense pathological significance, PTC-209, a small molecule inhibitor of BMI1 transcription has recently been described. While targeting BMI1 in various systems significantly decreases clonal growth, the mechanisms differ, are context-dependent, and somewhat unclear. We report here that genetic or pharmacological inhibition of BMI1 significantly impacts clonal growth without altering CDKN2A/INK4/ARF or CCNG2 and induces autophagy in ovarian cancer (OvCa) cells through ATP depletion. While autophagy can promote survival or induce cell death, targeting BMI1 engages the PINK1-PARK2-dependent mitochondrial pathway and induces a novel mode of nonapoptotic, necroptosis-mediated cell death. In OvCa, necroptosis is potentiated by activation of the RIPK1-RIPK3 complex that phosphorylates its downstream substrate, MLKL. Importantly, genetic or pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy or RIPK3 rescue clonal growth in BMI1 depleted cells. Thus, we have established a novel molecular link between BMI1, clonal growth, autophagy and necroptosis. In chemoresistant OvCa where apoptotic pathways are frequently impaired, necroptotic cell death modalities provide an important alternate strategy that leverage overexpression of BMI1.

  6. Ion channels induced by the prion protein: mediators of neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Isaac H; Biasini, Emiliano; Harris, David A

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of rapidly progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative disorders for which there are no effective treatments. While conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to a β-sheet rich isoform (PrP(Sc) ) is known to be a critical event in propagation of infectious prions, the identity of the neurotoxic form of PrP and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Insights into this mechanism have been provided by studying PrP molecules harboring deletions and point mutations in the conserved central region, encompassing residues 105-125. When expressed in transgenic mice, PrP deleted for these residues (Δ105-125) causes a spontaneous neurodegenerative illness that is reversed by co-expression of wild-type PrP. In cultured cells, Δ105-125 PrP confers hypersensitivity to certain cationic antibiotics and induces spontaneous ion channel activity that can be recorded by electrophysiological techniques. We have utilized these drug-hypersensitization and current-inducing activities to identify which PrP domains and subcellular locations are required for toxicity. We present an ion channel model for the toxicity of Δ105-125 PrP and related mutants and speculate how a similar mechanism could mediate PrP(Sc)-associated toxicity. Therapeutic regimens designed to inhibit prion-induced toxicity, as well as formation of PrP(Sc) , may prove to be the most clinically beneficial.

  7. Human chorionic gonadotropin suppresses human breast cancer cell growth directly via p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and indirectly via ovarian steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Yuri, Takashi; Kinoshita, Yuichi; Emoto, Yuko; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Tsubura, Airo

    2014-03-01

    The tumor-suppressive effects of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) against human breast cancer cells were examined. In cell viability assays, hCG inhibited the growth of three human breast cancer cell lines (estrogen receptor (ER)-positive KPL-1 and MCF-7, and ER-negative MKL-F cells), and the growth inhibition activity of hCG was most pronounced against KPL-1 cells (luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor (LHCGR)-positive and luminal-A subtype). In hCG-treated KPL-1 cells, immunoblotting analysis revealed the expression of tumor suppressor protein p53 peaking at 12 h following treatment, followed by cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 24 h and 48 h, respectively. KPL-1-transplanted athymic mice were divided into 3 groups: a sham-treated group that received an inoculation of KPL-1 cells at 6 weeks of age followed by daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of saline; an in vitro hCG-treated KPL-1 group that received an inoculation of KPL-1 cells pre-treated with 100 IU/ml hCG in vitro for 48 h at 6 weeks of age, followed by daily i.p. injection of saline; and an in vivo hCG-treated group that received an KPL-1 cell inoculation at 6 weeks of age, followed by daily i.p. injection of 100 IU hCG. The daily injections of saline or hCG continued until the end of the experiment when mice reached 11 weeks of age. KPL-1 tumor growth was retarded in in vitro and in vivo hCG-treated mice compared to sham-treated controls, and the final tumor volume and tumor weight tended to be suppressed in the in vitro hCG-treated group and were significantly suppressed in the in vivo hCG-treated group. In vivo 100-IU hCG injections for 5 weeks elevated serum estradiol levels (35.7 vs. 23.5 pg/ml); thus, the mechanisms of hCG action may be directly coordinated via the p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and indirectly through ovarian steroid secretion that elevates estrogen levels. It is thus concluded that hCG may be an attractive agent for treating human breast

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior is mediated by indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activation in mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, J.C.; Lawson, M.A.; André, C.; Moreau, M.; Lestage, J.; Castanon, N.; Kelley, K.W.; Dantzer, R.

    2009-01-01

    Although elevated activity of the tryptophan-degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase(IDO) has been proposed to mediate comorbid depression in inflammatory disorders, its causative role has never been tested. We report that peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates IDO and culminates in a distinct depressive-like behavioral syndrome, measured by increased duration of immobility in both the forced swim and tail suspension tests. Blockade of IDO activation either indirectly with the anti-inflammatory tetracycline derivative minocycline, that attenuates LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines, or directly with the IDO antagonist 1-methyltryptophan (1-MT), prevents development of depressive-like behavior. Both minocycline and 1-MT normalize the kynurenine/tryptophan ratio in the plasma and brain of LPS-treated mice without changing the LPS-induced increase in turnover of brain serotonin. Administration of L-kynurenine, a metabolite of tryptophan that is generated by IDO, to naïve mice dose-dependently induces depressive-like behavior. These results implicate IDO as a critical molecular mediator of inflammation-induced depressive-like behavior, probably through the catabolism of tryptophan along the kynurenine pathway. PMID:18195714

  9. Ethanol-Induced Motor Impairment Mediated by Inhibition of α7 Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McDaid, John; Abburi, Chandrika; Wolfman, Shannon L.; Gallagher, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine and ethanol (EtOH) are among the most widely co-abused substances, and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) contribute to the behavioral effects of both drugs. Along with their role in addiction, nAChRs also contribute to motor control circuitry. The α7 nAChR subtype is highly expressed in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDTg), a brainstem cholinergic center that contributes to motor performance through its projections to thalamic motor relay centers, including the mediodorsal thalamus. We demonstrate that EtOH concentrations just above the legal limits for intoxication in humans can inhibit α7 nAChRs in LDTg neurons from rats. This EtOH-induced inhibition is mediated by a decrease in cAMP/PKA signaling. The α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator PNU120596 [N-(5-chloro-2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-N′-(5-methyl-3-isoxazolyl)-urea], which interferes with receptor desensitization, completely eliminated EtOH modulation of these receptors. These data suggest that EtOH inhibits α7 responses through a PKA-dependent enhancement of receptor desensitization. EtOH also inhibited the effects of nicotine at presynaptic α7 nAChRs on glutamate terminals in the mediodorsal thalamus. In vivo administration of PNU120596 either into the cerebral ventricles or directly into the mediodorsal thalamus attenuated EtOH-induced motor impairment. Thus, α7 nAChRs are likely important mediators of the motor impairing effects of moderate EtOH consumption. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The motor-impairing effects of ethanol contribute to intoxication-related injury and death. Here we explore the cellular and neural circuit mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced motor impairment. Physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol inhibit activity of a nicotinic receptor subtype that is expressed in brain areas associated with motor control. That receptor inhibition is mediated by decreased receptor phosphorylation, suggesting an indirect modulation of cell signaling pathways to achieve

  10. MLKL Mediated Necroptosis Accelerates JEV-Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bian, Peiyu; Zheng, Xuyang; Wei, Li; Ye, Chuantao; Fan, Hong; Cai, Yanhui; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Fanglin; Jia, Zhansheng; Lei, Yingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most prevalent cause of viral encephalitis in Asia and the western Pacific. Neuronal death caused by JEV infection and inflammation induced cytotoxicity leads to progression and deterioration of Japanese encephalitis (JE). Mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) mediated necroptosis is a newly discovered pathway of programmed cell death and participates in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that necroptosis was involved in the neuronal loss during JE via immune-electron microscopy and immunochemistry. The expression of MLKL in neurons was upregulated in presence of JEV infection in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of MLKL alleviated the progression of JE and decreased the level of inflammatory cytokines in mice model. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the participation of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of JEV infection.

  11. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-11-26

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction.

  12. Hypoxia-induced anapyrexia: implications and putative mediators.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Branco, Luiz G S

    2002-01-01

    Hypoxia elicits an array of compensatory responses in animals ranging from protozoa to mammals. Central among these responses is anapyrexia, the regulated decrease of body temperature. The importance of anapyrexia lies in the fact that it reduces oxygen consumption, increases the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen, and blunts the energetically costly responses to hypoxia. The mechanisms of anapyrexia are of intense interest to physiologists. Several substances, among them lactate, adenosine, opioids, and nitric oxide, have been suggested as putative mediators of anapyrexia, and most appear to act in the central nervous system. Moreover, there is evidence that the drop in body temperature in response to hypoxia, unlike the ventilatory response to hypoxia, does not depend on the activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of hypoxia-induced anapyrexia are reviewed.

  13. MLKL Mediated Necroptosis Accelerates JEV-Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Peiyu; Zheng, Xuyang; Wei, Li; Ye, Chuantao; Fan, Hong; Cai, Yanhui; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Fanglin; Jia, Zhansheng; Lei, Yingfeng

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the most prevalent cause of viral encephalitis in Asia and the western Pacific. Neuronal death caused by JEV infection and inflammation induced cytotoxicity leads to progression and deterioration of Japanese encephalitis (JE). Mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) mediated necroptosis is a newly discovered pathway of programmed cell death and participates in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that necroptosis was involved in the neuronal loss during JE via immune-electron microscopy and immunochemistry. The expression of MLKL in neurons was upregulated in presence of JEV infection in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of MLKL alleviated the progression of JE and decreased the level of inflammatory cytokines in mice model. Taken together, this study provides evidence for the participation of necroptosis in the pathogenesis of JEV infection. PMID:28293227

  14. TRPV3 channels mediate strontium-induced mouse egg activation

    PubMed Central

    Carvacho, Ingrid; Lee, Hoi Chang; Fissore, Rafael A.; Clapham, David E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, calcium influx is required for oocyte maturation and egg activation. The molecular identities of the calcium-permeant channels that underlie the initiation of embryonic development are not established. Here, we describe a Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channel current activated by TRP agonists that is absent in TrpV3−/− eggs. TRPV3 current is differentially expressed during oocyte maturation, reaching a peak of maximum density and activity at metaphase of meiosis II (MII), the stage of fertilization. Selective activation of TRPV3 channels provokes egg activation by mediating massive calcium entry. Widely used to activate eggs, strontium application is known to yield normal offspring in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer. We show that TRPV3 is required for strontium influx, as TrpV3−/− eggs failed to permeate Sr2+ or undergo strontium-induced activation. We propose that TRPV3 is the major mediator of calcium influx in mouse eggs and is a putative target for artificial egg activation. PMID:24316078

  15. Tip60 HAT Action Mediates Environmental Enrichment Induced Cognitive Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Songjun; Panikker, Priyalakshmi; Iqbal, Sahira; Elefant, Felice

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) conditions have beneficial effects for reinstating cognitive ability in neuropathological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While EE benefits involve epigenetic gene control mechanisms that comprise histone acetylation, the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) involved remain largely unknown. Here, we examine a role for Tip60 HAT action in mediating activity- dependent beneficial neuroadaptations to EE using the Drosophila CNS mushroom body (MB) as a well-characterized cognition model. We show that flies raised under EE conditions display enhanced MB axonal outgrowth, synaptic marker protein production, histone acetylation induction and transcriptional activation of cognition linked genes when compared to their genotypically identical siblings raised under isolated conditions. Further, these beneficial changes are impaired in both Tip60 HAT mutant flies and APP neurodegenerative flies. While EE conditions provide some beneficial neuroadaptive changes in the APP neurodegenerative fly MB, such positive changes are significantly enhanced by increasing MB Tip60 HAT levels. Our results implicate Tip60 as a critical mediator of EE-induced benefits, and provide broad insights into synergistic behavioral and epigenetic based therapeutic approaches for treatment of cognitive disorder. PMID:27454757

  16. Bacteria-Induced Uroplakin Signaling Mediates Bladder Response to Infection

    PubMed Central

    Thumbikat, Praveen; Berry, Ruth E.; Zhou, Ge; Billips, Benjamin K.; Yaggie, Ryan E.; Zaichuk, Tetiana; Sun, Tung-Tien; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Klumpp, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are the second most common infectious disease in humans and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). A majority of UPEC isolates express the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, and cell culture and murine studies demonstrate that FimH is involved in invasion and apoptosis of urothelial cells. FimH initiates bladder pathology by binding to the uroplakin receptor complex, but the subsequent events mediating pathogenesis have not been fully characterized. We report a hitherto undiscovered signaling role for the UPIIIa protein, the only major uroplakin with a potential cytoplasmic signaling domain, in bacterial invasion and apoptosis. In response to FimH adhesin binding, the UPIIIa cytoplasmic tail undergoes phosphorylation on a specific threonine residue by casein kinase II, followed by an elevation of intracellular calcium. Pharmacological inhibition of these signaling events abrogates bacterial invasion and urothelial apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. Our studies suggest that bacteria-induced UPIIIa signaling is a critical mediator of bladder responses to insult by uropathogenic E. coli. PMID:19412341

  17. Chondroitin sulfate-E mediates estrogen-induced osteoanabolism

    PubMed Central

    Koike, Toshiyasu; Mikami, Tadahisa; Shida, Miharu; Habuchi, Osami; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder of bone remodeling in which bone resorption outstrips bone matrix deposition. Although anticatabolic agents are frequently used as first-line therapies for osteoporosis, alternative anabolic strategies that can enhance anabolic, osteogenic potential are actively sought. Sex steroid hormones, particularly estrogens, are bidirectional regulators for bone homeostasis; therefore, estrogen-mediated events are important potential targets for such anabolic therapies. Here, we show that estrogen-induced, osteoanabolic effects were mediated via enhanced production of chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E), which could act as an osteogenic stimulant in our cell-based system. Conversely, estrogen deficiency caused reduced expression of CS-E-synthesizing enzymes, including GalNAc4S-6ST, and led to decreased CS-E production in cultures of bone marrow cells derived from ovariectomized mice. Moreover, Galnac4s6st-deficient mice had abnormally low bone mass that resulted from impaired osteoblast differentiation. These results indicated that strategies aimed at boosting CS-E biosynthesis are promising alternative therapies for osteoporosis. PMID:25759206

  18. Peroxynitrite mediates testosterone-induced vasodilation of microvascular resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P; White, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation.

  19. TRPA1 channel mediates organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiang; Fang, Sui; Chen, Xueqin; Wang, Youxin; Li, Jian; Tian, Fuyun; Xu, Xiang; Attali, Bernard; Xie, Xin; Gao, Zhaobing

    2017-01-01

    The organophosphate-induced delayed neuropathy (OPIDN), often leads to paresthesias, ataxia and paralysis, occurs in the late-stage of acute poisoning or after repeated exposures to organophosphate (OP) insecticides or nerve agents, and may contribute to the Gulf War Syndrome. The acute phase of OP poisoning is often attributed to acetylcholinesterase inhibition. However, the underlying mechanism for the delayed neuropathy remains unknown and no treatment is available. Here we demonstrate that TRPA1 channel (Transient receptor potential cation channel, member A1) mediates OPIDN. A variety of OPs, exemplified by malathion, activates TRPA1 but not other neuronal TRP channels. Malathion increases the intracellular calcium levels and upregulates the excitability of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro. Mice with repeated exposures to malathion also develop local tissue nerve injuries and pain-related behaviors, which resembles OPIDN. Both the neuropathological changes and the nocifensive behaviors can be attenuated by treatment of TRPA1 antagonist HC030031 or abolished by knockout of Trpa1 gene. In the classic hens OPIDN model, malathion causes nerve injuries and ataxia to a similar level as the positive inducer tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate (TOCP), which also activates TRPA1 channel. Treatment with HC030031 reduces the damages caused by malathion or tri-ortho-cresyl phosphate. Duloxetine and Ketotifen, two commercially available drugs exhibiting TRPA1 inhibitory activity, show neuroprotective effects against OPIDN and might be used in emergency situations. The current study suggests TRPA1 is the major mediator of OPIDN and targeting TRPA1 is an effective way for the treatment of OPIDN.

  20. Separation and detection of VX and its methylphosphonic acid degradation products on a microchip using indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Heleg-Shabtai, Vered; Gratziany, Natzach; Liron, Zvi

    2006-05-01

    The application of indirect LIF (IDLIF) technique for on-chip electrophoretic separation and detection of the nerve agent O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothiolate (VX) and its major phosphonic degradation products, ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA) and methylphosphonic acid (MPA) was demonstrated. Separation and detection of MPA degradation products of VX and the nerve agent isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate (GB) are presented. The negatively charged dye eosin was found to be a good fluorescent marker for both the negatively charged phosphonic acids and the positively charged VX, and was chosen as the IDLIF visualization fluorescent dye. Separation and detection of VX, EMPA, and MPA in a simple-cross microchip were completed within less than a minute, and consumed only a 50 pL sample volume. A characteristic system peak that appeared in all IDLIF electropherograms served as an internal standard that increased the reliability of peak identification. The negative peak of both VX and the MPAs is in agreement with indirect detection theory and with previous reports in the literature. The LOD of VX and EMPA by IDLIF was 30 and 37 microM, respectively. Despite the fact that the detection sensitivity is relatively low, the rapid simultaneous on-chip analysis of both VX and its degradation products as well as the separation and detection of the MPA degradation products of both VX and GB, increases detection reliability and may present a choice when sensitivity is not critical compared with speed and simplicity of the assay.

  1. TLR4 mediates LPS-induced VEGF expression in odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Botero, Tatiana M; Shelburne, Charles E; Holland, G Rex; Hanks, Carl T; Nör, Jacques E

    2006-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from gram-negative bacteria cell walls such as Prevotella intermedia and Escherichia coli induce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in odontoblasts, but not in undifferentiated dental pulp cells. CD14 and TLR4 are responsible for LPS signaling in macrophages, but their expression levels and function in dental pulp cells are unknown. We showed here that murine odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) express CD14 and TLR4 by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. In contrast, undifferentiated dental pulp cells (OD-21) presented low or no expression of these two receptors. MDPC-23 cells showed CD14 and TLR4 up-regulation upon exposure to LPS, as determined by real time PCR. Dominant negative murine TLR4 (DN-mTLR4) transfected MDPC-23 cells did not show upregulated VEGF expression in response to LPS stimulation. These results demonstrate that odontoblast-like cells express CD14 and TLR4, and that LPS-induced VEGF expression is mediated, at least in part, by TLR4 signaling.

  2. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity.

  3. Oxytocin mediates copulation-induced hypoalgesia of male rats.

    PubMed

    Futagami, Hiroko; Sakuma, Yasuo; Kondo, Yasuhiko

    2016-04-08

    Copulatory behavior has been reported to raise the pain threshold in male rats. In this study, we examined the effect of copulatory behavior with or without ejaculation on pain threshold measured by electrical shock via an electrode attached to the tail. It was demonstrated that ejaculation is not necessary to raise the pain threshold in male rats. In addition, we examined whether oxytocin, a hypothalamic neuropeptide, was involved in copulation-induced hypoalgesia. Sexually experienced males were subjected to stereotaxic implantation of a guide cannula targeting the lateral ventricle. After the recovery period, half of the males were intracerebroventricularly treated with an oxytocin antagonist (OTA, 100ng d(CH2)51,Tyr(Me)2,Thr4, Orn8,Tyr-NH29]-vasotocin/1μL saline) and the remaining half were administered saline without anesthesia. Fifteen minutes later, half of each group were given sexual behavior with receptive females. We found no effect of OTA on sexual activity. Immediately after ejaculation, pain threshold was measured. While raised pain threshold was observed after sexual behavior in saline-treated males, no change in pain threshold was found in OTA-treated males even after copulation. The results suggest that central oxytocin mediates copulation-induced hypoalgesia in male rats.

  4. TRPA1 receptors mediate environmental irritant-induced meningeal vasodilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kunkler, Phillip Edward; Ballard, Carrie Jo; Oxford, Gerry Stephen; Hurley, Joyce Harts

    2010-01-01

    The TRPA1 receptor is a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of ion channels expressed in nociceptive neurons. TRPA1 receptors are targeted by pungent compounds from mustard and garlic and environmental irritants such as formaldehyde and acrolein. Ingestion or inhalation of these chemical agents causes irritation and burning in the nasal and oral mucosa and respiratory lining. Headaches have been widely reported to be induced by inhalation of environmental irritants, but it is unclear how these agents produce headache. Stimulation of trigeminal neurons releases CGRP and substance P and induces neurogenic inflammation associated with the pain of migraine. Here we test the hypothesis that activation of TRPA1 receptors are the mechanistic link between environmental irritants and peptide mediated neurogenic inflammation. Known TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants stimulate CGRP release from dissociated rat trigeminal ganglia neurons and this release is blocked by a selective TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031. Further, TRPA1 agonists and environmental irritants increase meningeal blood flow following intranasal administration. Prior dural application of the CGRP antagonist, CGRP8–37, or intranasal or dural administration of HC-030031, blocks the increases in blood flow elicited by environmental irritants. Together these results demonstrate that TRPA1 receptor activation by environmental irritants stimulates CGRP release and increases cerebral blood flow. We suggest that these events contribute to headache associated with environmental irritants. PMID:21075522

  5. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  6. TRPM2 channels mediate acetaminophen-induced liver damage

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpezhouh, Ehsan; Ma, Linlin; Morphett, Arthur; Barritt, Greg J.; Rychkov, Grigori Y.

    2014-01-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is the most frequently used analgesic and antipyretic drug available over the counter. At the same time, acetaminophen overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure and the leading cause of chronic liver damage requiring liver transplantation in developed countries. Acetaminophen overdose causes a multitude of interrelated biochemical reactions in hepatocytes including the formation of reactive oxygen species, deregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis, covalent modification and oxidation of proteins, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Although an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration in hepatocytes is a known consequence of acetaminophen overdose, its importance in acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity is not well understood, primarily due to lack of knowledge about the source of the Ca2+ rise. Here we report that the channel responsible for Ca2+ entry in hepatocytes in acetaminophen overdose is the Transient Receptor Potential Melanostatine 2 (TRPM2) cation channel. We show by whole-cell patch clamping that treatment of hepatocytes with acetaminophen results in activation of a cation current similar to that activated by H2O2 or the intracellular application of ADP ribose. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TRPM2 in hepatocytes inhibits activation of the current by either acetaminophen or H2O2. In TRPM2 knockout mice, acetaminophen-induced liver damage, assessed by the blood concentration of liver enzymes and liver histology, is significantly diminished compared with wild-type mice. The presented data strongly suggest that TRPM2 channels are essential in the mechanism of acetaminophen-induced hepatocellular death. PMID:24569808

  7. Homocysteine induces blood vessel global hypomethylation mediated by LOX-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Tian, J; Liang, Y; Ma, C J; Yang, A N; Wang, J; Ma, S C; Cheng, Y; Hua, X; Jiang, Y D

    2014-05-16

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis through its involvement with the methionine cycle. In this study, we aimed to determine the blood vessel global methylation rate in Hcy-induced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice, and to explore the possible mechanism of this change in endothelial cells. ApoE-/- mice were divided into a hyperlipidemia (HLP) group, a hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) group, and an HHcy + folate + vitamin B12 (HHcy+FA+VB) group. Wild-type C57BL/6J mice were prepared as controls. Total Hcy, lipids, S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) contents in serum were measured with an automatic biochemistry analyzer and high-performance liquid chromatography. Methylation of B1 repetitive elements in blood vessels was tested using nested methylation-specific-polymerase chain reaction (nMS-PCR). Endothelial cells (ECs) were pretreated with Hcy or by adding FA and VB. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) expressions were determined by quantitative PCR, Western blot, and nMS-PCR. The HHcy group displayed severe HLP and HHcy. SAM and SAH contents were also elevated in the HHcy group compared with other groups. Methylation of B1 repetitive elements was significantly increased in the HHcy group (0.5050 ± 0.0182) compared to the HLP (0.5158 ± 0.0163) and control (0.5589 ± 0.0236) groups. mRNA and protein expressions of LOX-1 increased (0.2877 ± 0.0341, 0.6090 ± 0.0547), whereas methylation expression decreased (0.5527 ± 0.0148) after 100 μM Hcy stimulation in ECs. In conclusion, Hcy-induced atherosclerosis was closely associated with induced hypomethylation status in the blood vessel, and this process was partially mediated by LOX-1 DNA methylation.

  8. Meta-metallation of N,N-dimethylaniline: Contrasting direct sodium-mediated zincation with indirect sodiation-dialkylzinc co-complexation

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David R; Hevia, Eva; Kennedy, Alan R; O'Hara, Charles T; Robertson, Stuart D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Previously we reported that direct zincation of N,N-dimethylaniline by the mixed-metal zincate reagent 1 ((TMEDA)Na(TMP)(t-Bu)Zn(t-Bu)) surprisingly led to meta-metallation (zincation) of the aniline, as manifested in the crystalline complex 2 ((TMEDA)Na(TMP)(m-C6H4-NMe2)Zn(t-Bu)), and that iodination of these isolated crystals produced the meta-isomer N,N-dimethyl-3-iodoaniline quantitatively. Completing the study here we find that treating the reaction solution with iodine produces a 72% conversion and results in a mixture of regioisomers of N,N-dimethyliodoaniline, with the meta-isomer still the major product (ortho:meta:para ratio, 6:73:21), as determined by NMR. In contrast to this bimetallic method, sodiation of N,N-dimethylaniline with n-BuNa produced the dimeric, ortho-sodiated complex 3 (((TMEDA)Na(o-C6H4-NMe2))2), as characterised by X-ray crystallography and NMR. No regioisomers were observed in the reaction solution. Introducing t-Bu2Zn to this reaction solution afforded a cocrystalline product in the solid-state, composed of the bis-anilide 4 ((TMEDA)Na(o-C6H4-NMe2)2Zn(t-Bu)) and the Me2N–C cleavage product 5 ({(TMEDA)2Na}+{(t-Bu2Zn)2(µ-NMe2)}−), which was characterised by X-ray crystallography. NMR studies of the reaction mixture that produces 4 and 5 revealed one additional species, but the mixture as a whole contained only ortho-species and a trace amount of para-species as established by iodine quenching. In an indirect variation of the bimetallic reaction, TMP(H) was added at room temperature to the reaction mixture that afforded 4 and 5. This gave the crystalline product 6 ((TMEDA)Na(TMP)(o-C6H4-NMe2)Zn(t-Bu)), the ortho-isomer of the meta-complex 2, as determined from X-ray crystallographic and NMR data. Monitoring the regioselectivity of the reaction by iodination revealed a 16.6:1.6:1.0 ortho:meta:para ratio. Interestingly, when the TMP(H) containing solution was heated under reflux for 18 hours more meta-isomer was produced

  9. Direct and indirect effects of a dense understory on tree seedling recruitment in temperate forests: habitat-mediated predation versus competition

    Treesearch

    Alejandro A. Royo; Walter P. Carson

    2008-01-01

    In forests characterized by a dense woody and herbaceous understory layer, seedling recruitment is often directly suppressed via interspecific competition. Alternatively, these dense layers may indirectly lower tree recruitment by providing a haven for seed and seedling predators that prey on neighboring plant species. To simultaneously...

  10. [Which route leads from chronic back pain to depression? A path analysis on direct and indirect effects using the cognitive mediators catastrophizing and helplessness/hopelessness in a general population sample].

    PubMed

    Fahland, R A; Kohlmann, T; Hasenbring, M; Feng, Y-S; Schmidt, C O

    2012-12-01

    Chronic pain and depression are highly comorbid; however, the longitudinal link is only partially understood. This study examined direct and indirect effects of chronic back pain on depression using path analysis in a general population sample, focussing on cognitive mediator variables. Analyses are based on 413 participants (aged 18-75 years) in a population-based postal survey on back pain who reported chronic back pain at baseline. Follow-up data were collected after 1 year. Depression was measured with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Fear-avoidance-beliefs (FABQ), catastrophizing and helplessness/hopelessness (KRSS) were considered as cognitive mediators. Data were analyzed using path analysis. Chronic back pain had no direct effect on depression at follow-up when controlling for cognitive mediators. A mediating effect emerged for helplessness/hopelessness but not for catastrophizing or fear-avoidance beliefs. These results support the cognitive mediation hypothesis which assumes that psychological variables mediate the association between pain and depression. The importance of helplessness/hopelessness is of relevance for the treatment of patients with chronic back pain.

  11. The effects of psychotherapy treatment on outcome in bulimia nervosa: Examining indirect effects through emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy within the mediation model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carol B; Berg, Kelly C; Crosby, Ross D; Lavender, Jason M; Accurso, Erin C; Ciao, Anna C; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the indirect effects of Integrative Cognitive-Affective Therapy (ICAT-BN) and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy-Enhanced (CBT-E) on bulimia nervosa (BN) treatment outcome through three hypothesized maintenance variables: emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy. Eighty adults with BN were randomized to 21 sessions of ICAT-BN or CBT-E. A regression-based bootstrapping approach was used to test the indirect effects of treatment on outcome at end of treatment through emotion regulation and self-directed behavior measured at mid-treatment, as well as the indirect effects of treatment at follow-up through emotion regulation, self-directed behavior, and self-discrepancy measured at end of treatment. No significant differences in outcome between treatment conditions were observed, and no significant direct or indirect effects were found. Examination of the individual paths within the indirect effects models revealed comparable treatment effects. Across treatments, improvements in emotion regulation and self-directed behavior between baseline and mid-treatment predicted improvements in global eating disorder scores but not binge eating and purging frequency at end of treatment. Baseline to end of treatment improvements in emotion regulation and self-directed behavior also predicted improvements in global eating disorder scores at follow-up. Baseline to end of treatment improvements in emotion regulation predicted improvements in binge eating and baseline to end of treatment increases in positive self-directed behavior predicted improvements in purging at follow-up. These findings suggest that emotion regulation and self-directed behavior are important treatment targets and that ICAT-BN and CBT-E are comparable in modifying these psychological processes among individuals with BN. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The Proteasome Inhibitor Carfilzomib Suppresses Parathyroid Hormone-induced Osteoclastogenesis through a RANKL-mediated Signaling Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanmei; Blair, Harry C.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Wang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) induces osteoclast formation and activity by increasing the ratio of RANKL/OPG in osteoblasts. The proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib (CFZ) has been used as an effective therapy for multiple myeloma via the inhibition of pathologic bone destruction. However, the effect of combination of PTH and CFZ on osteoclastogenesis is unknown. We now report that CFZ inhibits PTH-induced RANKL expression and secretion without affecting PTH inhibition of OPG expression, and it does so by blocking HDAC4 proteasomal degradation in osteoblasts. Furthermore, we used different types of culture systems, including co-culture, indirect co-culture, and transactivation, to assess the effect of CFZ on PTH action to induce osteoclastogenesis. Our results demonstrated that CFZ blocks PTH-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption by its additional effect to inhibit RANKL-mediated IκB degradation and NF-κB activation in osteoclasts. This study showed for the first time that CFZ targets both osteoblasts and osteoclasts to suppress PTH-induced osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. These findings warrant further investigation of this novel combination in animal models of osteoporosis and in patients. PMID:25979341

  13. Viewpoints on Acid-induced inflammatory mediators in esophageal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Karen M; Rieder, Florian; Behar, Jose; Biancani, Piero

    2010-10-01

    We have focused on understanding the onset of gastroesophageal reflux disease by examining the mucosal response to the presence of acid in the esophageal lumen. Upon exposure to HCl, inflammation of the esophagus begins with activation of the transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1) in the mucosa, and production of IL-8, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and platelet activating factor (PAF). Production of SP and CGRP, but not PAF, is abolished by the neural blocker tetrodotoxin suggesting that SP and CGRP are neurally released and that PAF arises from non neural pathways. Epithelial cells contain TRPV1 receptor mRNA and protein and respond to HCl and to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin with production of PAF. PAF, SP and IL-8 act as chemokines, inducing migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. PAF and SP activate peripheral blood leukocytes inducing the production of H(2)O(2). In circular muscle, PAF causes production of IL-6, and IL-6 causes production of additional H(2)O(2), through activation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases. Among these, NADPH oxidase 5 cDNA is significantly up-regulated by exposure to PAF; H(2)O(2) content of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter circular muscle is elevated in human esophagitis, causing dysfunction of esophageal circular muscle contraction and reduction in esophageal sphincter tone. Thus esophageal keratinocytes, that constitute the first barrier to the refluxate, may also serve as the initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, secreting inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines and affecting leukocyte recruitment and activity.

  14. Viewpoints on Acid-Induced Inflammatory Mediators in Esophageal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Karen M; Rieder, Florian; Behar, Jose

    2010-01-01

    We have focused on understanding the onset of gastroesophageal reflux disease by examining the mucosal response to the presence of acid in the esophageal lumen. Upon exposure to HCl, inflammation of the esophagus begins with activation of the transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subfamily member-1 (TRPV1) in the mucosa, and production of IL-8, substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and platelet activating factor (PAF). Production of SP and CGRP, but not PAF, is abolished by the neural blocker tetrodotoxin suggesting that SP and CGRP are neurally released and that PAF arises from non neural pathways. Epithelial cells contain TRPV1 receptor mRNA and protein and respond to HCl and to the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin with production of PAF. PAF, SP and IL-8 act as chemokines, inducing migration of peripheral blood leukocytes. PAF and SP activate peripheral blood leukocytes inducing the production of H2O2. In circular muscle, PAF causes production of IL-6, and IL-6 causes production of additional H2O2, through activation of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases. Among these, NADPH oxidase 5 cDNA is significantly up-regulated by exposure to PAF; H2O2 content of esophageal and lower esophageal sphincter circular muscle is elevated in human esophagitis, causing dysfunction of esophageal circular muscle contraction and reduction in esophageal sphincter tone. Thus esophageal keratinocytes, that constitute the first barrier to the refluxate, may also serve as the initiating cell type in esophageal inflammation, secreting inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines and affecting leukocyte recruitment and activity. PMID:21103419

  15. Antivascular effect induced by photo-mediated ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinmai; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Haonan; Mordovanakis, Aghapi; Paulus, Yannis M.; Wang, Xueding

    2017-02-01

    We developed a novel localized antivascular method, namely photo-mediated ultrasound therapy (PUT), by applying synchronized laser and ultrasound pulses. PUT relies on high optical contrast among biological tissues. Taking advantage of the high optical absorption of hemoglobin, PUT can selectively target microvessels without causing unwanted damages to the surrounding tissue. Moreover, PUT working at different optical wavelengths can selectively treat veins or arteries by utilizing the contrast in the optical spectra between deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin. Through our experiments, we demonstrated that cavitation might have played a key role in PUT. The addition of a laser pulse to an existing ultrasound field can significantly improve the likelihood of inertial cavitation, which can induce microvessel damage through its mechanical effect. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, such as photothermolysis and photocoagulation, the laser energy level needed in PUT is significantly lower. When a nanosecond laser was used, our in vivo experiments showed that the needed laser fluence was in the range of 4 to 40 mJ/cm2.

  16. Symbiont-induced odorant binding proteins mediate insect host hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B; Vigneron, Aurélien; Broderick, Nichole A; Wu, Yineng; Sun, Jennifer S; Carlson, John R; Aksoy, Serap; Weiss, Brian L

    2017-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria assist in maintaining homeostasis of the animal immune system. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie symbiont-mediated host immunity are largely unknown. Tsetse flies (Glossina spp.) house maternally transmitted symbionts that regulate the development and function of their host’s immune system. Herein we demonstrate that the obligate mutualist, Wigglesworthia, up-regulates expression of odorant binding protein six in the gut of intrauterine tsetse larvae. This process is necessary and sufficient to induce systemic expression of the hematopoietic RUNX transcription factor lozenge and the subsequent production of crystal cells, which actuate the melanotic immune response in adult tsetse. Larval Drosophila’s indigenous microbiota, which is acquired from the environment, regulates an orthologous hematopoietic pathway in their host. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that underlie enteric symbiont-stimulated systemic immune system development, and indicate that these processes are evolutionarily conserved despite the divergent nature of host-symbiont interactions in these model systems. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19535.001 PMID:28079523

  17. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  18. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor.

    PubMed

    Bertolin, Agustina P; Katz, Maximiliano J; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-09-19

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3' UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available.

  19. siRNA-Mediated Knockdown of the mTOR Inhibitor RTP801 Promotes Retinal Ganglion Cell Survival and Axon Elongation by Direct and Indirect Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Morgan-Warren, Peter J; O'Neill, Jenna; de Cogan, Felicity; Spivak, Igor; Ashush, Hagit; Kalinski, Hagar; Ahmed, Zubair; Berry, Martin; Feinstein, Elena; Scott, Robert A H; Logan, Ann

    2016-02-01

    To investigate, using in vivo and in vitro models, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) neuroprotective and axon regenerative effects and underlying mechanisms of siRTP801, a translatable small-interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting the mTOR negative regulator RTP801. Adult rats underwent optic nerve (ON) crush (ONC) followed by intravitreal siRTP801 or control siRNA (siEGFP) every 8 days, with Brn3a+ RGC survival, GFAP+ reactive gliosis, and GAP43+ regenerating axons analyzed immunohistochemically 24 days after injury. Retinal cultures, prepared from uninjured animals or 5 days after ONC to activate retinal glia, were treated with siRTP801/controls in the presence/absence of rapamycin and subsequently assessed for RGC survival and neurite outgrowth, RTP801 expression, glial responses, and mTOR activity. Conditioned medium was analyzed for neurotrophin titers by ELISA. Intravitreal siRTP801 enabled 82% RGC survival compared to 45% with siEGFP 24 days after ONC, correlated with greater GAP43+ axon regeneration at 400 to 1200 μm beyond the ONC site, and potentiated the reactive GFAP+ Müller glial response. In culture, siRTP801 had a direct RGC neuroprotective effect, but required GFAP+ activated glia to stimulate neurite elongation. The siRTP801-induced neuroprotection was significantly reduced, but not abolished, by rapamycin. The siRTP801 potentiated the production and release of neurotrophins NGF, NT-3, and BDNF, and prevented downregulation of RGC mTOR activity. The RTP801 knockdown promoted RGC survival and axon elongation after ONC, without increasing de novo regenerative sprouting. The neuroprotection was predominantly direct, with mTORC1-dependent and -independent components. Enhanced neurite/axon elongation by siRTP801 required the presence of activated retinal glia and was mediated by potentiated secretion of neurotrophic factors.

  20. Regulation of local host-mediated anti-tumor mechanisms by cytokines: direct and indirect effects on leukocyte recruitment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M.; McCormick, K. L.; Volker, K.; Ortaldo, J. R.; Wigginton, J. M.; Brunda, M. J.; Wiltrout, R. H.; Fogler, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of tumor growth by cytokine-induced alterations in host effector cell recruitment and activation is intimately associated with leukocyte adhesion and angiogenic modulation. In the present study, we have developed a novel tumor model to investigate this complex series of events in response to cytokine administration. Gelatin sponges containing recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhFGFb) and B16F10 melanoma cells were implanted onto the serosal surface of the left lateral hepatic lobe in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. The tumor model was characterized by progressive tumor growth initially localized within the sponge and the subsequent development of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Microscopic examination of the sponge matrix revealed well developed tumor-associated vascular structures and areas of endothelial cell activation as evidenced by leukocyte margination. Treatment of mice 3 days after sponge implantation with a therapeutic regimen consisting of pulse recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) combined with recombinant murine interleukin-12 (rmIL-12) resulted in a marked hepatic mononuclear infiltrate and inhibition of tumor growth. In contrast to the control group, sponges from mice treated with rhIL-2/rmIL-12 demonstrated an overall lack of cellularity and vascular structure. The regimen of rhIL-2 in combination with rmIL-12 was equally effective against gelatin sponge implants of rhFGFb/B16F10 melanoma in SCID mice treated with anti-asialo-GM1 in the absence of a mononuclear infiltration, suggesting that T, B, and/or NK cells were not the principal mediators of the anti-tumor response in this tumor model. The absence of vascularity within the sponge after treatment suggests that a potential mechanism of rhIL-2/rmIL-12 anti-tumor activity is the inhibition of neovascular growth associated with the establishment of tumor lesions. This potential mechanism could be dissociated from the known activities of these two cytokines to induce the

  1. Determination of nicotinyl pesticide residues in vegetables by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with quantum dot indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Hua; Sun, Juan; Dai, Yong-Jia; Dong, Min

    2012-07-01

    A new assay was developed by use of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with indirect LIF fluorescence for the determination of thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid residues in vegetables, in which the cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs) synthesized in aqueous phase were used as fluorescent background substance and their excitation and emission wavelengths matched with LIF detector by engineering their size. The factors that affected the peak height and the resolution were optimized. The running buffer was composed of 4.4 μM cadmium telluride QDs as fluorescent background substance, 40 mM borate and 60 mM SDS, and its pH was adjusted to 8.0. The separation voltage was 25 kV. Under the optimum conditions, the detection limits were 0.05, 0.01, and 0.009 mg/kg; the linear dynamic ranges were 0.5-30, 0.1-30, and 0.1-30 mg/L; and the average recoveries of spiked samples were 72.0-101.2, 74.0-106.7, and 77.8-105.1% for thiamethoxam, acetamiprid, and imidacloprid, respectively. The assay can meet the requirement of maximum residue limits to these three pesticides in the regulations of European Union and Japan, and has been applied for determining their residues in vegetables. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Quantum-size-induced phase transitions in quantum dots: Indirect-band gap GaAs nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex; Luo, Jun-Wei; Franceschetti, Alberto

    2008-03-01

    Quantum nanostructures are often advertised as having stronger absorption than the bulk material from which they are made, to the potential benefit of nanotechnology. However, nanostructures made of direct gap materials such as GaAs can convert to indirect-gap, weakly-aborbing systems when the quantum size becomes small. This is the case for spherical GaAs dots of radius 15 å or less (about 1000 atoms) embedded in a wide-gap matrix. The nature of the transition: γ-to-X or γ-to-L is however, controversial. The distinction can not be made on the basis of electronic structure techniques that misrepresent the magnitude of the various competing effective mass tensors (e.g, LDA or GGA) or wavefunction coupling (e.g, tight-binding). Using a carefully fit screened pseudopotential method we show that the transition occurs from γ to X, and, more importantly, that the transition involves a finite V (γ-X) interband coupling, manifested as an ``anti-crossing'' between the confined electron states of GaAs as the dot size crosses 15 å. The physics of this reciprocal-space γ-X transition, as well as the real-space (type II) transition in GaAs/AlGaAs will be briefly discussed.

  3. Predicting Parental Mediation Behaviors: The Direct and Indirect Influence of Parents' Critical Thinking about Media and Attitudes about Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Eric C.; White, Shawna R.; King, Andy J.; Holiday, Steven; Densley, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Many parents fail to interact with their children regularly about media content and past research has identified few predictors of parents' engagement in parental mediation behaviors. This correlational study explored the relationship between parents' critical thinking about media and parents' provision of both active and restrictive mediation of…

  4. Predicting Parental Mediation Behaviors: The Direct and Indirect Influence of Parents' Critical Thinking about Media and Attitudes about Parent-Child Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Eric C.; White, Shawna R.; King, Andy J.; Holiday, Steven; Densley, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Many parents fail to interact with their children regularly about media content and past research has identified few predictors of parents' engagement in parental mediation behaviors. This correlational study explored the relationship between parents' critical thinking about media and parents' provision of both active and restrictive mediation of…

  5. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  6. Wheel running alters patterns of uncontrollable stress-induced cfos mRNA expression in rat dorsal striatum direct and indirect pathways: a possible role for plasticity in adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Peter J.; Ghasem, Parsa R.; Mika, Agnieszka; Day, Heidi E.; Herrera, Jonathan J.; Greenwood, Benjamin N.; Fleshner, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that adenosine is a major regulator of striatum activity, in part, through the antagonistic modulation of dopaminergic function. Exercise can influence adenosine and dopamine activity, which may subsequently promote plasticity in striatum adenosine and dopamine systems. Such changes could alter activity of medium spiny neurons and impact striatum function. The purpose of this study was two-fold. The first was to characterize the effect of long-term wheel running on adenosine 1 (A1R), adenosine 2A (A2AR), dopamine 1 (D1R), and dopamine 2 (D2R) receptor mRNA expression in adult rat dorsal and ventral striatum structures using in situ hybridization. The second was to determine if changes to adenosine and dopamine receptor mRNA from running are associated with altered cfos mRNA induction in dynorphin- (direct pathway) and enkephalin- (indirect pathway) expressing neurons of the dorsal striatum following stress exposure. We report that chronic running, as well as acute uncontrollable stress, reduced A1R and A2AR mRNA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Running also modestly elevated D2R mRNA levels in striatum regions. Finally, stress-induced cfos was potentiated in dynorphin and attenuated in enkephalin expressing neurons of running rats. These data suggest striatum adenosine and dopamine systems are targets for neuroplasticity from exercise, which may contribute to changes in direct and indirect pathway activity. These findings may have implications for striatum mediated motor and cognitive processes, as well as exercise facilitated stress-resistance. PMID:25017571

  7. Direct and indirect influences of fate control belief, gambling expectancy bias, and self-efficacy on problem gambling and negative mood among Chinese college students: a multiple mediation analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; Wu, Anise M S

    2010-12-01

    A multiple mediation model was proposed to integrate core concepts of the social axioms framework and the social cognitive theory in order to understand gambling behavior. It was hypothesized that the influence of general fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood would be mediated by gambling-specific beliefs. Data from 773 Chinese college recreational gamblers were collected. The bootstrapping procedure was used to test the multiple mediation hypotheses. Significant indirect effects of fate control belief on problem gambling and negative mood through two gambling-specific mediators were found. Gambling expectancy bias was a more salient mediator than gambling self-efficacy. Fate control belief was also found to have a significant direct effect on negative mood. In general, a high level of general fate control belief was related to greater gambling expectancy bias and lower self-efficacy in resisting gambling, which were in turn related to problem gambling and negative mood. Limitations and implications of the study were discussed.

  8. Effects of indirect actions and oxygen on relative biological effectiveness: estimate of DSB induction and conversion induced by gamma rays and helium ions

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Chen, Fang-Hsin; Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage other than double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be detrimental to cells and can lead to mutagenesis or cell death. In addition to DSBs induced by ionizing radiation, misrepair of non-DSB clustered damage contributes extra DSBs converted from DNA misrepair via pathways for base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair. This study aimed to quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) when DSB induction and conversion from non-DSB clustered damage misrepair were used as biological endpoints. The results showed that both linear energy transfer (LET) and indirect action had a strong impact on the yields for DSB induction and conversion. RBE values for DSB induction and maximum DSB conversion of helium ions (LET = 120 keV/μm) to 60Co gamma rays were 3.0 and 3.2, respectively. These RBE values increased to 5.8 and 5.6 in the absence of interference of indirect action initiated by addition of 2-M dimethylsulfoxide. DSB conversion was ∼1–4% of the total non-DSB damage due to gamma rays, which was lower than the 10% estimate by experimental measurement. Five to twenty percent of total non-DSB damage due to helium ions was converted into DSBs. Hence, it may be possible to increase the yields of DSBs in cancerous cells through DNA repair pathways, ultimately enhancing cell killing. PMID:25902742

  9. Neuropeptide Y and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediate injury-induced neuroregeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), injury induces ATP release, and subsequent activation of P2 purinergic receptors by ATP promotes neuroregeneration by increasing basal progenitor cell proliferation. The molecular mechanisms underlying ATP-induced increases in OE neuroregeneration have not been established. In the present study, the roles of neuroproliferative factors neuropeptide Y (NPY) and fibroblast growth factor2 (FGF2), and p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) on ATP-mediated increases of neuroregeneration in the OE were investigated. ATP increased basal progenitor cell proliferation in the OE via activation of P2 purinergic receptors in vitro and in vivo as monitored by incorporation of 5′-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine, a thymidine analog, into DNA, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein levels. ATP induced p44/42 ERK activation in globose basal cells (GBC) but not horizontal basal cells (HBC). ATP differentially regulated p44/42 ERK over time in the OE both in vitro and in vivo with transient inhibition (5–15 min) followed by activation (30 min – 1 hr) of p44/42 ERK. In addition, ATP indirectly activated p44/42 ERK in the OE via ATP-induced NPY release and subsequent activation of NPY Y1 receptors in the basal cells. There were no synergistic effects of ATP and NPY or FGF2 on OE neuroregeneration. These data clearly have implications for the pharmacological modulation of neuroregeneration in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:22154958

  10. HDAC3 mediates smoking-induced pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Xu, Shiping; Chheda, Chintan; Morvaridi, Susan; Hu, Robert W.; Grippo, Paul J.; Mascariñas, Emman; Principe, Daniel R.; Knudsen, Beatrice; Xue, Jing; Habtezion, Aida; Uyeminami, Dale; Pinkerton, Kent E.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for developing pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC); however, little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here we employed a genetic animal model of early stages of PDAC that overexpresses oncogenic Kras in the pancreas to investigate the mechanisms of smoking-induced promotion of the disease in vivo. We confirmed the regulation of the interactions between the tumor microenvironment cells using in vitro cellular systems. Aerial exposure to cigarette smoke stimulated development of pancreatic intraepithelial neaoplasia (PanIN) lesions associated with a tumor microenvironment-containing features of human PDAC including fibrosis, activated stellate cells, M2-macrophages and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The pro-cancer effects of smoking were prevented by Histone Deacetylase HDAC I/II inhibitor Saha. Smoking decreased histone acetylation associated with recruitment of and phenotypic changes in macrophages; which in turn, stimulated survival and induction of EMT of the pre-cancer and cancer cells. The interaction between the cancer cells and macrophages is mediated by IL-6 produced under the regulation of HDAC3 translocation to the nucleus in the cancer cells. Pharmacological and molecular inhibitions of HDAC3 decreased IL-6 levels in cancer cells. IL-6 stimulated the macrophage phenotype change through regulation of the IL-4 receptor level of the macrophage. This study demonstrates a novel pathway of interaction between cancer cells and tumor promoting macrophages involving HDAC3 and IL-6. It further demonstrates that targeting HDAC3 prevents progression of the disease and could provide a strategy for treating the disease considering that the HDAC inhibitor we used is FDA approved for a different disease. PMID:26745602

  11. GDNF mediates glioblastoma-induced microglia attraction but not astrogliosis.

    PubMed

    Ku, Min-Chi; Wolf, Susanne A; Respondek, Dorota; Matyash, Vitali; Pohlmann, Andreas; Waiczies, Sonia; Waiczies, Helmar; Niendorf, Thoralf; Synowitz, Michael; Glass, Rainer; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Their malignancy is promoted by the complex crosstalk between different cell types in the central nervous system. Microglia/brain macrophages infiltrate high-grade gliomas and contribute to their progression. To identify factors that mediate the attraction of microglia/macrophages to malignant brain tumors, we established a glioma cell encapsulation model that was applied in vivo. Mouse GL261 glioma cell line and human high-grade glioma cells were seeded into hollow fibers (HF) that allow the passage of soluble molecules but not cells. The glioma cell containing HF were implanted into one brain hemisphere and simultaneously HF with non-transformed fibroblasts (controls) were introduced into the contralateral hemisphere. Implanted mouse and human glioma- but not fibroblast-containing HF attracted microglia and up-regulated immunoreactivity for GFAP, which is a marker of astrogliosis. In this study, we identified GDNF as an important factor for microglial attraction: (1) GL261 and human glioma cells secret GDNF, (2) reduced GDNF production by siRNA in GL261 in mouse glioma cells diminished attraction of microglia, (3) over-expression of GDNF in fibroblasts promoted microglia attraction in our HF assay. In vitro migration assays also showed that GDNF is a strong chemoattractant for microglia. While GDNF release from human or mouse glioma had a profound effect on microglial attraction, the glioma-induced astrogliosis was not affected. Finally, we could show that injection of GL261 mouse glioma cells with GDNF knockdown by shRNA into mouse brains resulted in reduced tumor expansion and improved survival as compared to injection of control cells.

  12. Cocaine-induced adaptations in D1 and D2 accumbens projection neurons (a dichotomy not necessarily synonymous with direct and indirect pathways).

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel J; Lobo, Mary Kay; Spencer, Sade; Kalivas, Peter W

    2013-08-01

    Cocaine exposure causes enduring neuroadaptations in ventral striatum, or nucleus accumbens (NAc), an area critically involved in reward learning and relapse of drug seeking. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in striatum are dichotomous in their expression of either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors, along with other receptors and neuropeptides. In dorsal striatum, these two subpopulations show non-overlapping innervation of distinct terminal fields via the direct or indirect pathways. However, NAc D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs are not fully segregated in this manner, with both cell types innervating ventral pallidum. Recent studies show that D1-MSNs and D2-MSNs play opposing roles in cocaine-associated behaviors. Further, cocaine induces differential adaptations in these two subpopulations in NAc, including changes to synaptic plasticity, glutamatergic signaling, and spine morphology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  14. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    PubMed

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT-mediated

  15. Hypoxia induces H19 expression through direct and indirect Hif-1α activity, promoting oncogenic effects in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weining; Hu, Qi; Nie, Er; Yu, Tianfu; Wu, Youzhi; Zhi, Tongle; Jiang, Kuan; Shen, Feng; Wang, Yingyi; Zhang, Junxia; You, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    H19 expression is elevated in many human tumors including glioblastomas, suggesting an oncogenic role for the long noncoding RNA; yet the upregulation of H19 in glioblastomas remains unclear. Here we report that hypoxia significantly stimulated H19 expression in glioblastoma cell lines, which was related to hypoxia-inducible factors 1α (Hif-1α). Hif-1α promoted H19 expression in U87 and U251 cells. Meanwhile PTEN is an advantageous factor to affect H19 expression, through attenuating Hif-1α stability. Hif-1α also positively correlates with H19 in human glioblastoma samples depending on PTEN status. ChIP and luciferase reporter assays showed that Hif-1α induced H19 transcription through directly binding to the H19 promoter. Furthermore, Hif-1α upregulated specific protein 1 (SP1) expression in glioblastomas cells in vitro and in vivo, and SP1 also strongly interacted with the H19 promoter to promote H19 expression under hypoxia. We also showed that H19 acts as a molecular sponge that binds miR-181d, relieving inhibition of β-catenin expression. Therefore, H19 participates in hypoxia-driven migration and invasion in glioblastoma cells. In summary, our results uncover the mechanisms that stimulate H19 expression under hypoxia to promote malignant effects in glioblastomas and suggest H19 might be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:28327666

  16. Signal-Induced Transcriptional Activation by Dif Requires the dTRAP80 Mediator Module

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Mo; Kim, Jung Mo; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Se Nyun; Kim-Ha, Jeongsil; Hoe Kim, Jung; Kim, Young-Joon

    2003-01-01

    The Mediator complex is the major multiprotein transcriptional coactivator complex in Drosophila melanogaster. Mediator components interact with diverse sets of transcriptional activator proteins to elicit the sophisticated regulation of gene expression. The distinct phenotypes associated with certain mutations in some of the Mediator genes and the specific in vitro interactions of Mediator gene products with transcriptional activator proteins suggest the presence of activator-specific binding subunits within the Mediator complex. However, the physiological relevance of these selective in vitro interactions has not been addressed. Therefore, we analyzed dTRAP80, one of the putative activator-binding subunits of the Mediator, for specificity of binding to a number of natural transcriptional activators from Drosophila. Among the group of activator proteins that requires the Mediator complex for transcriptional activation, only a subset of these proteins interacted with dTRAP80 in vitro and only these dTRAP80-interacting activators were defective for activation under dTRAP80-deficient in vivo conditions. In particular, activation of Drosophila antimicrobial peptide drosomycin gene expression by the NF-κB-like transcription factor Dif during induction of the Toll signaling pathway was dependent on the dTRAP80 module. These results, and the indirect support from the dTRAP80 artificial recruitment assay, indicate that dTRAP80 serves as a genuine activator-binding target responsible for a distinct group of activators. PMID:12556495

  17. Memantine, a Low-Affinity NMDA Receptor Antagonist, Protects against Methylmercury-Induced Cytotoxicity of Rat Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons, Involvement of Ca(2+) Dyshomeostasis Antagonism, and Indirect Antioxidation Effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhaofa; Yang, Tianyao; Xu, Bin; Deng, Yu; Feng, Shu

    2017-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an extremely dangerous environmental pollutant that induces severe toxic effects in the central nervous system. Neuronal damage plays critical roles mediating MeHg-induced loss of brain function and neurotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms of MeHg neurotoxicity are incompletely understood. The objective of the study is to explore mechanisms that contribute to MeHg-induced neurocyte injuries focusing on neuronal Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis and alteration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) expression, as well as oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. In addition, the neuroprotective effects of memantine against MeHg cytotoxicity were also investigated. The cortical neurons were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 2 μM methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) for 0.5-12 h, or pre-treated with 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 μM memantine for 0.5-6 h, respectively; cell viability and LDH release were then quantified. For further experiments, 2.5, 5, and 10 μM of memantine pre-treatment for 3 h followed by 1 μM MeHgCl for 6 h were performed for evaluation of neuronal injuries, specifically addressing apoptosis; intracellular free Ca(2+) concentrations; ATPase activities; calpain activities; expressions of NMDAR subunits (NR1, NR2A, NR2B); NPSH levels; and ROS formation. Exposure of MeHgCl resulted in toxicity of cortical neurons, which were shown as a loss of cell viability, high levels of LDH release, morphological changes, and cell apoptosis. Moreover, intracellular Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis, ATPase activities inhibition, calpain activities, and NMDARs expression alteration were observed with 1 μM MeHgCl administration. Last but not least, NPSH depletion and reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction showed an obvious oxidative stress in neurons. However, memantine pre-treatment dose-dependently antagonized MeHg-induced neuronal toxic effects, apoptosis, Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis, NMDARs expression alteration, and oxidative stress. In conclusion

  18. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-06-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling - given by the Dark Penguin - in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  19. Collider study on the loop-induced dark matter mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-06-21

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For DM couplings involving light mediators, especially for the loop-mediated interactions, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory. In this note we discuss the study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, focusing on a model with anarchic dark flavor structure. By including the momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling – given by the Dark Penguin – in collider processes, we study bounds from monophoton, diphoton, and non-pointing photon searches at the LHC. We also compare our results to constraints from the direct detection experiments.

  20. Resveratrol inhibits estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis through induction of NRF2-mediated protective pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupendra; Shoulson, Rivka; Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Bhat, Nimee K.; Dim, Daniel C.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of estrogens in the etiology of breast cancer is widely recognized. Estrogen-induced oxidative stress has been implicated in this carcinogenic process. Resveratrol (Res), a natural antioxidant phytoestrogen has chemopreventive effects against a variety of illnesses including cancer. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mechanism(s) of Res-mediated protection against estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. Female August Copenhagen Irish rats were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2), Res and Res + E2 for 8 months. Cotreatment of rats with Res and E2 inhibited E2-mediated proliferative changes in mammary tissues and significantly increased tumor latency and reduced E2-induced breast tumor development. Resveratrol treatment alone or in combination with E2 significantly upregulated expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in mammary tissues. Expression of NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes NQO1, SOD3 and OGG1 that are involved in protection against oxidative DNA damage was increased in Res- and Res + E2-treated mammary tissues. Resveratrol also prevented E2-mediated inhibition of detoxification genes AOX1 and FMO1. Inhibition of E2-mediated alterations in NRF2 promoter methylation and expression of NRF2 targeting miR-93 after Res treatment indicated Res-mediated epigenetic regulation of NRF2 during E2-induced breast carcinogenesis. Resveratrol treatment also induced apoptosis and inhibited E2-mediated increase in DNA damage in mammary tissues. Increased apoptosis and decreased DNA damage, cell migration, colony and mammosphere formation in Res- and Res + E2-treated MCF-10A cells suggested a protective role of Res against E2-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of NRF2 inhibited Res-mediated preventive effects on the colony and mammosphere formation. Taken together, these results suggest that Res inhibits E2-induced breast carcinogenesis via induction of NRF2-mediated protective

  1. Wavelength dependence of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage distribution: involvement of direct or indirect mechanisms and possible artefacts.

    PubMed

    Kuluncsics, Z; Perdiz, D; Brulay, E; Muel, B; Sage, E

    1999-03-01

    DNA damage profiles have been established in plasmid DNA using purified DNA repair enzymes and a plasmid relaxation assay, following exposure to UVC, UVB, UVA or simulated sunlight (SSL). Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) are revealed as T4 endonuclease V-sensitive sites, oxidation products at purine and pyrimidine as Fpg- and Nth-sensitive sites, and abasic sites are detected by Nfo protein from Escherichia coli. CPDs are readily detected after UVA exposure, though produced 10(3) and 10(5) times less efficiently than by UVB or UVC, respectively. We demonstrate that CPDs are induced by UVA radiation and not by contaminating UVB wavelengths. Furthermore, they are produced at doses compatible with human exposure and are likely to contribute to the mutagenic specificity of UVA [E. Sage et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93 (1996) 176-180]. Oxidative damage is induced with a linear dose dependence, for each region of the solar spectrum, with the exception of oxidized pyrimidine and abasic sites, which are not detectable after UVB irradiation. The distribution of the different classes of photolesions varies markedly, depending on wavelengths. However, the unexpectedly high yield of oxidative lesions, as compared to CPDs, by UVA and SSL led us to investigate their production mechanism. An artificial formation of hydroxyl radicals is observed, which depends on the material of the sample holder used for UVA irradiation and is specific for long UV wavelengths. Our study sheds light on a possible artefact in the production of oxidative damage by UVA radiation. Meanwhile, after eliminating some potential sources of the artefact ratios of CPDs to oxidized purine of three and five upon irradiation with UVA and SSL, respectively, are still observed, whereas these ratios are about 140 and 200 after UVC and UVB irradiation.

  2. Cannabinoids mediate opposing effects on inflammation-induced intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Alhamoruni, A; Wright, K L; Larvin, M; O'Sullivan, S E

    2012-04-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptors decreases emesis, inflammation, gastric acid secretion and intestinal motility. The ability to modulate intestinal permeability in inflammation may be important in therapy aimed at maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cannabinoids modulate the increased permeability associated with inflammation in vitro. Confluent Caco-2 cell monolayers were treated for 24 h with IFNγ and TNFα (10 ng·mL(-1) ). Monolayer permeability was measured using transepithelial electrical resistance and flux measurements. Cannabinoids were applied either apically or basolaterally after inflammation was established. Potential mechanisms of action were investigated using antagonists for CB(1) , CB(2) , TRPV1, PPARγ and PPARα. A role for the endocannabinoid system was established using inhibitors of the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids. Δ(9) -Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol accelerated the recovery from cytokine-induced increased permeability; an effect sensitive to CB(1) receptor antagonism. Anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol further increased permeability in the presence of cytokines; this effect was also sensitive to CB(1) antagonism. No role for the CB(2) receptor was identified in these studies. Co-application of THC, cannabidiol or a CB(1) antagonist with the cytokines ameliorated their effect on permeability. Inhibiting the breakdown of endocannabinoids worsened, whereas inhibiting the synthesis of endocannabinoids attenuated, the increased permeability associated with inflammation. These findings suggest that locally produced endocannabinoids, acting via CB(1) receptors play a role in mediating changes in permeability with inflammation, and that phytocannabinoids have therapeutic potential for reversing the disordered intestinal permeability associated with inflammation. This article is part of a themed section on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view

  3. Cannabinoids mediate opposing effects on inflammation-induced intestinal permeability

    PubMed Central

    Alhamoruni, A; Wright, KL; Larvin, M; O'Sullivan, SE

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Activation of cannabinoid receptors decreases emesis, inflammation, gastric acid secretion and intestinal motility. The ability to modulate intestinal permeability in inflammation may be important in therapy aimed at maintaining epithelial barrier integrity. The aim of the present study was to determine whether cannabinoids modulate the increased permeability associated with inflammation in vitro. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Confluent Caco-2 cell monolayers were treated for 24 h with IFNγ and TNFα (10 ng·mL−1). Monolayer permeability was measured using transepithelial electrical resistance and flux measurements. Cannabinoids were applied either apically or basolaterally after inflammation was established. Potential mechanisms of action were investigated using antagonists for CB1, CB2, TRPV1, PPARγ and PPARα. A role for the endocannabinoid system was established using inhibitors of the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids. KEY RESULTS Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol accelerated the recovery from cytokine-induced increased permeability; an effect sensitive to CB1 receptor antagonism. Anandamide and 2-arachidonylglycerol further increased permeability in the presence of cytokines; this effect was also sensitive to CB1 antagonism. No role for the CB2 receptor was identified in these studies. Co-application of THC, cannabidiol or a CB1 antagonist with the cytokines ameliorated their effect on permeability. Inhibiting the breakdown of endocannabinoids worsened, whereas inhibiting the synthesis of endocannabinoids attenuated, the increased permeability associated with inflammation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These findings suggest that locally produced endocannabinoids, acting via CB1 receptors play a role in mediating changes in permeability with inflammation, and that phytocannabinoids have therapeutic potential for reversing the disordered intestinal permeability associated with inflammation. LINKED ARTICLES This

  4. Effects of indirect actions and oxygen on relative biological effectiveness: estimate of DSB induction and conversion induced by gamma rays and helium ions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Chen, Fang-Hsin; Hsieh, Tsung-Yu; Hsiao, Ya-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Clustered DNA damage other than double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be detrimental to cells and can lead to mutagenesis or cell death. In addition to DSBs induced by ionizing radiation, misrepair of non-DSB clustered damage contributes extra DSBs converted from DNA misrepair via pathways for base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair. This study aimed to quantify the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) when DSB induction and conversion from non-DSB clustered damage misrepair were used as biological endpoints. The results showed that both linear energy transfer (LET) and indirect action had a strong impact on the yields for DSB induction and conversion. RBE values for DSB induction and maximum DSB conversion of helium ions (LET = 120 keV/μm) to (60)Co gamma rays were 3.0 and 3.2, respectively. These RBE values increased to 5.8 and 5.6 in the absence of interference of indirect action initiated by addition of 2-M dimethylsulfoxide. DSB conversion was ∼1-4% of the total non-DSB damage due to gamma rays, which was lower than the 10% estimate by experimental measurement. Five to twenty percent of total non-DSB damage due to helium ions was converted into DSBs. Hence, it may be possible to increase the yields of DSBs in cancerous cells through DNA repair pathways, ultimately enhancing cell killing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  5. TRPV4 mediates pain-related behavior induced by mild hypertonic stimuli in the presence of inflammatory mediator.

    PubMed

    Alessandri-Haber, Nicole; Joseph, Elizabeth; Dina, Olayinka A; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Levine, Jon D

    2005-11-01

    The ligand-gated ion channel, TRPV4, functions as a transducer of hypotonic stimuli in primary afferent nociceptive neurons and contributes to inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Hypertonic saline also stimulates primary afferent nociceptors and the injection of mild hypertonic saline (2-5%) is widely used as an experimental model of pain in humans. Therefore, we tested whether TRPV4 participates in the transduction of hypertonic stimuli. Intradermal injection of 2% (607 mOsm) or 10% (3,250 mOsm) saline solution in the hind paw of rats induced a concentration-dependent pain-related behavior, flinching. Sensitization with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) caused a 7-fold increase in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline but failed to increase those caused by 10% saline. Spinal administration of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides to TRPV4 caused a 46% decrease in the number of flinches induced by 2% saline, but there was no change in flinching induced by 10% saline. Similarly, only the nociceptive behavior caused by 2% saline was reduced in TRPV4(-/-) knockout mice. The TRPV4-mediated nociceptive behaviors induced by hyper- and hypotonic stimuli were dependent on Src tyrosine kinase. We suggest TRPV4 is a transducer in primary afferents that mediates nociceptive behavior induced by small increases or decreases in osmolarity. Such changes in osmolarity might contribute to pain in inflammatory and neuropathic states.

  6. Hep-2 cell based indirect immunofluorescence assay for antinuclear antibodies as a potential diagnosis of drug-induced autoimmunity in nonclinical toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Hong, Min; Ma, Ben; Lin, Zhi; Zhou, Xiaobing; Geng, Xingchao; Shen, Lianzhong; Li, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are important biomarkers in the diagnosis of autoimmune diseases in humans; however, the diagnostic performance of ANA in nonclinical safety studies are not well understood. Here, we studied the use of ANAs as potential nonclinical biomarkers for drug-induced autoimmunity (DIA) using a Hep-2 based indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). Initially, MRL-fas(lpr)/J mice and HgCl₂-treated rats were used as SLE-positive models. Serum samples obtained from 94 normal mice or 204 normal rats aged one to four months served as the negative control. The IFA effectively distinguished ANAs-positive samples in both species with a cut-off titer of 1:100. Brown Norway rats were treated with 450 mg/kg D-penicillamine for 30 consecutive days. ANAs were generated and corresponded with DIA development. Human Hep-2 cells, mice Neuro 2A cells, and Chinese Hamster Lung cells served as antigen from different species, which were found cross-reactive with ANA-positive serum samples from mice, rats, and humans without any differences in diagnosis. This methodology showed no species-specificity for ANA detection. Furthermore, we found approximately 20 percentage of the mice aged seven to eight months demonstrated age-related ANAs, which was consistent with humans. Overall, our findings demonstrated the use of ANA detection using IFA in the nonclinical diagnosis of murine drug-induced autoimmunity, and age-related ANAs should be considered when aged animals are used.

  7. Bioechnology of indirect liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, R.; Jain, M.K.; Worden, R.M.; Grethlein, A.J.; Soni, B.; Zeikus, J.G.; Grethlein, H.

    1990-05-07

    The project on biotechnology of indirect liquefaction was focused on conversion of coal derived synthesis gas to liquid fuels using a two-stage, acidogenic and solventogenic, anaerobic bioconversion process. The acidogenic fermentation used a novel and versatile organism, Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, which was fully capable of using CO as the sole carbon and energy source for organic acid production. In extended batch CO fermentations the organism was induced to produce butyrate at the expense of acetate at low pH values. Long-term, steady-state operation was achieved during continuous CO fermentations with this organism, and at low pH values (a pH of 6.0 or less) minor amounts of butanol and ethanol were produced. During continuous, steady-state fermentations of CO with cell recycle, concentrations of mixed acids and alcohols were achieved (approximately 12 g/l and 2 g/l, respectively) which are high enough for efficient conversion in stage two of the indirect liquefaction process. The metabolic pathway to produce 4-carbon alcohols from CO was a novel discovery and is believed to be unique to our CO strain of B. methylotrophicum. In the solventogenic phase, the parent strain ATCC 4259 of Clostridium acetobutylicum was mutagenized using nitrosoguanidine and ethyl methane sulfonate. The E-604 mutant strain of Clostridium acetobutylicum showed improved characteristics as compared to parent strain ATCC 4259 in batch fermentation of carbohydrates.

  8. Co(i)-ordinating defenses: NaCOI1 mediates herbivore- induced resistance in Nicotiana attenuata and reveals the role of herbivore movement in avoiding defenses.

    PubMed

    Paschold, Anja; Halitschke, Rayko; Baldwin, Ian T

    2007-07-01

    Arabidopsis and tomato plants mutated in the F-box protein COI1 mediating jasmonate (JA) responses are more susceptible to herbivores in laboratory trials, but the exact mechanisms of COI1-mediated resistance are not known. We silenced COI1 by transformation with an inverted repeat construct (ir-coi1) in Nicotiana attenuata, a plant the direct and indirect defenses of which against various herbivores have been well studied. ir-coi1 plants are male sterile and impaired in JA-elicited direct [nicotine, caffeoylputrescine and trypsin proteinase inhibitor (TPI) activity] and indirect (cis-alpha-bergamotene emission) defense responses; responses not elicited by JA treatment (ethylene production and flower TPI activity) were unaffected. Larvae of Manduca sexta, a common herbivore of N. attenuata, gained three times more mass feeding on ir-coi1 than on wild-type (WT) plants in glasshouse experiments. By regularly moving caterpillars to unattacked leaves of the same plant, we demonstrate that larvae on WT plants can grow and consume leaves as fast as those on ir-coi1 plants, a result that underscores the role of COI1 in mediating locally induced resistance in attacked leaves, and the importance of herbivore movement in avoiding the induced defenses of a plant. When transplanted into native habitats in the Great Basin Desert, ir-coi1 plants suffer greatly from damage by the local herbivore community, which includes herbivores not commonly found on N. attenuata WT plants. Choice assays with field-grown plants confirmed the increased attractiveness of ir-coi1 plants for both common and unusual herbivores. We conclude that NaCOI1 is essential for induced resistance in N. attenuata, and that ir-coi1 plants highlight the benefits of herbivore movement for avoiding induced defenses.

  9. Lenalidomide Induces Immunomodulation in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Enhances Antitumor Immune Responses Mediated by NK and CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Ana Pilar; Fernandez-Guizan, Azahara; Payer, Angel R.; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with therapeutic activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). However, it has pleiotropic effects, and the mechanism of action responsible for its therapeutic activity has not been well defined yet. Herein, we show that lenalidomide treatment does not have an effect on the proliferation of leukemia cells, but it increases the proliferation of B cells from healthy donors. Lenalidomide did not exert a direct effect on the apoptosis of leukemia cells obtained from CLL patients, although it indirectly induced their apoptosis through the activation of nonmalignant immune cells. Thus, lenalidomide markedly increased the proliferation of NK and CD4 T cells. The effect of lenalidomide on NK cells was secondary to the induction of IL-2 production by CD4 T cells. Accordingly, depletion of T cells or blockade of IL-2 activity completely abrogated the proliferation of NK cells. Additionally, lenalidomide enhanced NK and NKT-like cell-mediated natural cytotoxicity against leukemia cells from CLL patients. Lenalidomide also upregulated CD20 expression on leukemia cells and, accordingly, it had a synergistic effect with rituximab on promoting antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity against primary leukemia cells. Overall, these observations provide a support for combining lenalidomide with rituximab as a treatment in CLL. PMID:25313353

  10. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis preferentially via a Bim-mediated intrinsic pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guiqi; Zhao, ChuBiao; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Hongyu; Quan, Yingyao; Chai, Liuying; Wu, Shengnan; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-08-01

    This report is designed to dissect the detail molecular mechanism by which dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a derivative of artemisinin, induces apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. DHA induced a loss of the mitochondrial transmemberane potential (ΔΨm), release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases, and externalization of phosphatidylserine indicative of apoptosis induction. Compared with the modest inhibitory effects of silencing Bax, silencing Bak largely prevented DHA-induced ΔΨm collapse and apoptosis though DHA induced a commensurable activation of Bax and Bak, demonstrating a key role of the Bak-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. DHA did not induce Bid cleavage and translocation from cytoplasm to mitochondria and had little effects on the expressions of Puma and Noxa, but did increase Bim and Bak expressions and decrease Mcl-1 expression. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of DHA was remarkably reduced by silencing Bim, and modestly but significantly reduced by silencing Puma or Noxa. Silencing Bim or Noxa preferentially reduced DHA-induced Bak activation, while silencing Puma preferentially reduced DHA-induced Bax activation, demonstrating that Bim and to a lesser extent Noxa act as upstream mediators to trigger the Bak-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. In addition, silencing Mcl-1 enhanced DHA-induced Bak activation and apoptosis. Taken together, our data demonstrate a crucial role of Bim in preferentially regulating the Bak/Mcl-1 rheostat to mediate DHA-induced apoptosis in HCC cells.

  11. Redox-Mediated and Ionizing-Radiation-Induced Inflammatory Mediators in Prostate Cancer Development and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Lu; Holley, Aaron K.; Zhao, Yanming; St. Clair, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Radiation therapy is widely used for treatment of prostate cancer. Radiation can directly damage biologically important molecules; however, most effects of radiation-mediated cell killing are derived from the generated free radicals that alter cellular redox status. Multiple proinflammatory mediators can also influence redox status in irradiated cells and the surrounding microenvironment, thereby affecting prostate cancer progression and radiotherapy efficiency. Recent Advances: Ionizing radiation (IR)–generated oxidative stress can regulate and be regulated by the production of proinflammatory mediators. Depending on the type and stage of the prostate cancer cells, these proinflammatory mediators may lead to different biological consequences ranging from cell death to development of radioresistance. Critical Issues: Tumors are heterogeneous and dynamic communication occurs between stromal and prostate cancer cells, and complicated redox-regulated mechanisms exist in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory strategies should be carefully evaluated for each patient at different stages of the disease to maximize therapeutic benefits while minimizing unintended side effects. Future Directions: Compared with normal cells, tumor cells are usually under higher oxidative stress and secrete more proinflammatory mediators. Thus, redox status is often less adaptive in tumor cells than in their normal counterparts. This difference can be exploited in a search for new cancer therapeutics and treatment regimes that selectively activate cell death pathways in tumor cells with minimal unintended consequences in terms of chemo- and radio-resistance in tumor cells and toxicity in normal tissues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1481–1500. PMID:24093432

  12. Phenotypic plasticity in female mate choice behavior is mediated by an interaction of direct and indirect genetic effects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Filice, David C S; Long, Tristan A F

    2017-05-01

    Female mate choice is a complex decision-making process that involves many context-dependent factors. In Drosophila melanogaster, a model species for the study of sexual selection, indirect genetic effects (IGEs) of general social interactions can influence female mate choice behaviors, but the potential impacts of IGEs associated with mating experiences are poorly understood. Here, we examined whether the IGEs associated with a previous mating experience had an effect on subsequent female mate choice behaviors and quantified the degree of additive genetic variation associated with this effect. Females from 21 different genetic backgrounds were housed with males from one of two distinct genetic backgrounds for either a short (3 hr) or long (48 hr) exposure period and their subsequent mate choice behaviors were scored. We found that the genetic identity of a previous mate significantly influenced a female's subsequent interest in males and preference of males. Additionally, a hemiclonal analysis revealed significant additive genetic variation associated with experience-dependent mate choice behaviors, indicating a genotype-by-environment interaction for both of these parameters. We discuss the significance of these results with regard to the evolution of plasticity in female mate choice behaviors and the maintenance of variation in harmful male traits.

  13. X-ray induced, substrate-carrier mediated deposition of metal on GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qing; Divan, R.; Mancini, D. C.; Rosenberg, R. A.; Quintana, J. P.; Keane, D. T.

    2006-08-21

    A wet metal deposition process on GaAs surfaces is described. The process is induced by high energy x-ray photons and is mediated by photon-generated carriers through the photoelectrochemical mechanism similar to that for light-induced wet etching. The micrometer to submicrometer feature fabrication using this process is demonstrated.

  14. P53-Mediated Repression of the Reprogramming in Cloned Bovine Embryos Through Direct Interaction with HDAC1 and Indirect Interaction with DNMT3A.

    PubMed

    Ma, P J; Zhang, H; Li, R; Wang, Y S; Zhang, Y; Hua, S

    2015-06-01

    P53 is a transcriptional activator, regulating growth arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. We found that the expression level of P53 and the epigenetic profiles were significantly different in bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos from those in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos. So we inferred that abnormally expression of P53 might contribute to the incomplete reprogramming. Using bovine foetal fibroblasts, we constructed and screened a highly efficient shRNA vector targeting bovine P53 gene and then reconstituted somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos (RNAi-SCNT). The results indicated that expression levels of P53 were downregulated significantly in RNAi-SCNT embryos, and the blastulation rate and the total number of cell increased significantly. Moreover, methylation levels of CpG islands located 5' region of OCT4, NANOG, H19 and IGF2R in RNAi -SCNT embryos were significantly normalized to that IVF embryos, and the methylation levels of genome DNA, H3K9 and H4K5 acetylation levels were also returned to levels similar to the IVF embryos. Differentially expressed genes were identified by microarray, and 28 transcripts were found to be significantly different (> twofolds) in RNAi-SCNT embryos compared to the control nuclear transfer embryos (SCNT). Among the 28 differentially expressed transcripts, just HDAC1 and DNMT3A were closely associated with the epigenetic modifications. Finally, ChIP further showed that P53 might repress the epigenetic reprogramming by regulating HDAC1 directly and DNMT3A indirectly. These findings offer significant references to further elucidate the mechanism of epigenetic reprogramming in SCNT embryos. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Spin dynamics and magnetic field induced polarization of excitons in ultrathin GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with indirect band gap and type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamirzaev, T. S.; Rautert, J.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Debus, J.; Gornov, A. Yu.; Glazov, M. M.; Ivchenko, E. L.; Bayer, M.

    2017-07-01

    The exciton spin dynamics are investigated both experimentally and theoretically in two-monolayer-thick GaAs/AlAs quantum wells with an indirect band gap and a type-II band alignment. The magnetic field induced circular polarization of photoluminescence Pc is studied as function of the magnetic field strength and direction as well as sample temperature. The observed nonmonotonic behavior of these functions is provided by the interplay of bright and dark exciton states contributing to the emission. To interpret the experiment, we have developed a kinetic master equation model which accounts for the dynamics of the spin states in this exciton quartet, radiative and nonradiative recombination processes, and redistribution of excitons between these states as result of spin relaxation. The model offers quantitative agreement with experiment and allows us to evaluate, for the studied structure, the heavy-hole g factor, gh h=+3.5 , and the spin relaxation times of electron, τs e=33 μ s , and hole, τs h=3 μ s , bound in the exciton.

  16. Determination of five quinolone antibiotic residues in foods by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with quantum dot indirect laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Meng, Hong-Lian; Chen, Guan-Hua; Guo, Xin; Chen, Ping; Cai, Qing-Hong; Tian, Yi-Fang

    2014-05-01

    A new assay was developed for the determination of five quinolone antibiotic residues in foods, loxacin, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, and norfloxacin, by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with indirect laser-induced fluorescence, in which cadmium telluride quantum dots were used as a fluorescent background substance. Some factors that affected the peak height and the resolution were examined. The optimized running buffer was composed of 20 mM SDS, 7.2 mg/L quantum dots, and 10 mM borate at pH 8.8. The separation voltage was 20 kV. Under these conditions, five quinolone antibiotic residues were separated successfully within 8 min. The detection limits ranged from 0.003 to 0.008 mg/kg; the linear dynamic ranges were all 0.01 ∼ 10 mg/kg; and the average recoveries of the spiked samples were 81.4 ∼ 94.6 %. The assay can meet the requirement of maximum residue limits to these five quinolone antibiotics in the regulations of the European Union and Japan and has been applied for determining their residues in animal-derived food.

  17. Ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes induce microhomology-mediated illegitimate recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cecilia Y; Kiechle, Markus; Manivasakam, Palaniyandi; Schiestl, Robert H

    2007-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks can be repaired by illegitimate recombination without extended sequence homology. A distinct mechanism namely microhomology-mediated recombination occurs between a few basepairs of homology that is associated with deletions. Ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes have been shown to increase the frequency of nonhomologous integration in yeast. However, the mechanism of such enhanced recombination events is not known. Here, we report that both ionizing radiation and restriction enzymes increase the frequency of microhomology-mediated integration. Irradiated yeast cells displayed 77% microhomology-mediated integration, compared to 27% in unirradiated cells. Radiation-induced integration exhibited lack of deletions at genomic insertion sites, implying that such events are likely to occur at undamaged sites. Restriction enzymes also enhanced integration events at random non-restriction sites via microhomology-mediated recombination. Furthermore, generation of a site-specific I-SceI-mediated double-strand break induces microhomology-mediated integration randomly throughout the genome. Taken together, these results suggest that double-strand breaks induce a genome-wide microhomology-mediated illegitimate recombination pathway that facilitates integration probably in trans at non-targeted sites and might be involved in generation of large deletions and other genomic rearrangements.

  18. Evaluative decision latencies mediated by induced affective states.

    PubMed

    Hermans, D; De Houwer, J; Eelen, P

    1996-01-01

    Recent priming studies (e.g. Hermans, De Houwer & Eelen, 1994, Cognition and Emotion, 8, 515-533) have demonstrated that response latencies to target stimuli are mediated by the affective relation between prime and target. The time needed to evaluate or pronounce targets is facilitated if preceded by similarly valenced primes, but is inhibited for trials on which prime and target have an opposite affective valence. These data suggest that information stored in memory is associatively linked with similarly evaluated information, through association with some general representation of goodness or badness. To investigate whether affective priming is merely one type of conventional semantic priming, or whether it is mediated by affective responses, the affective context provided by the primes was replaced in this study by the induction of an emotional state using a Musical Mood Induction procedure (Depression/Elation). Subjects had to evaluate target pictures as quickly as possible. The data revealed a significant Mood Change (More Depressed/Less Depressed/No Change) x Target Valence (Positive/Negative) interaction, indicating that emotional states can mediate evaluate response latencies to affectively valenced target stimuli. The results are interpreted in the context of a biphasic emotion theory, and are related to previous research on mood congruency effects on perceptual responses.

  19. Proteomic Analyses of Cellular Events Mediating/Inhibiting Chemical-Induced Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-21

    Electrophoresis 1999,20:3659-3669. 36. Teder P, Heldin P: Mechanism of impaired local hyaluronan turnover in bleomycin - induced lung injury in rat. Am J...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Mediating/Inhibiting Chemical- Induced Injury FA9550-06-1-0083 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...used to induce lung injury in the rats over a 1.5 minute volatilization period using an IN-TOX jet nebulizer system. At a mean time of 42 minutes

  20. 27 CFR 6.26 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.26 Section 6.26 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail License § 6.26 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  1. 27 CFR 6.32 - Indirect interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indirect interest. 6.32 Section 6.32 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS âTIED-HOUSEâ Unlawful Inducements Interest in Retail Property § 6.32 Indirect interest. Industry member interest in...

  2. Indirect determination of Li via 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced by neutrons from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Reddy, G. L. N.; Rao, Pritty; Verma, Rakesh; Ramana, J. V.; Vikramkumar, S.; Raju, V. S.

    2012-03-01

    An indirect method to determine Li by 74Ge(n,γ)75mGe activation reaction induced in a high purity Ge (detector) crystal by neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a typical particle-induced γ-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy experimental set-up is described. Performed with proton beams of energies in excess of 1.88 MeV, the threshold energy (Eth) of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, the determination involves the activity measurement of 75mGe isotope that has a half-life of 47.7 s and decays with the emission of 139 keV γ-rays. Rapidity, selectivity and sensitivity down to ppm levels are the attractive features of the method. It is a suitable alternative to 7Li(p,p'γ)7Li reaction based PIGE technique in the analyses of matrices that contain light elements such as Be, B, F, Na and Al in significant proportions. Interferences can arise from elements, for example V and Ti, that have Eth ⩽ 1.88 MeV for (p,n) reaction. In the case of elements such as Cu, Mo which have with Eth > 1.88 MeV, the incident proton beam energy can be judiciously selected to avoid or minimize an interference. The method, under optimized irradiation conditions, does not entail a risk of neutron stimulated degradation of the performance of the detector. Besides analytical purposes, the measurement of the 75mGe activity can serve as a powerful tool to monitor even low (˜25 n/cm2 s) thermal neutron fluxes.

  3. Two stage indirect evaporative cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian E.; Callaway, Duncan

    2005-08-23

    A two stage indirect evaporative cooler that moves air from a blower mounted above the unit, vertically downward into dry air passages in an indirect stage and turns the air flow horizontally before leaving the indirect stage. After leaving the dry passages, a major air portion travels into the direct stage and the remainder of the air is induced by a pressure drop in the direct stage to turn 180.degree. and returns horizontally through wet passages in the indirect stage and out of the unit as exhaust air.

  4. Modeling Indirect Tunneling in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Edward

    Indirect tunneling in silicon p-n junctions catches people's attention again in recent years. First, the phenomenon induces a serious leakage problem, so called gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) effect, in modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Second, it is utilized to develop a novel tunneling transistor with the sharp turn-on ability for continuing ITRS roadmap. Although the indirect tunneling is important for the state-of-the-art transistor-technology, the accuracy of the present tunneling models in technology computer-aided design (TCAD) tools is still vague. In the research work, the theory of indirect tunneling in silicon has been thoroughly studied. The phonon-assisted tunneling model has been developed and compared with the existing ones in the Sentaurus-Synopsys, Medici-Synopsys, and Atlas-Silvaco TCAD tools. Beyond these existing models, ours successfully predicts the indirect tunneling current under the different field direction in silicon. In addition, bandgap narrowing in heavily-doped p-n junctions under the reverse-biased condition is also studied during the model development. At the end of the research work, the application to low standby power (LSTP) transistors is demonstrated to show the capability of our tunneling model in the device level.

  5. Influenza virus induces apoptosis via BAD-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors. Here we report a novel proviral role for the proapoptotic protein BAD in influenza virus replication. We show that influenza virus-induced cytopathology and cell death are considerably inhibited in BAD knockdown cells and that both virus replication and viral protein production are dramatically reduced, which suggests that virus-induced apoptosis is BAD dependent. Our data showed that influenza viruses induced phosphorylation of BAD at residues S112 and S136 in a temporal manner. Viral infection also induced BAD cleavage, late in the viral life cycle, to a truncated form that is reportedly a more potent inducer of apoptosis. We further demonstrate that knockdown of BAD resulted in reduced cytochrome c release and suppression of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during influenza virus replication, as seen by an inhibition of caspases-3, caspase-7, and procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP) cleavage. Our data indicate that influenza viruses carefully modulate the activation of the apoptotic pathway that is dependent on the regulatory function of BAD and that failure of apoptosis activation resulted in unproductive viral replication.

  6. Influenza Virus Induces Apoptosis via BAD-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Anh T.; Cortens, John P.; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors. Here we report a novel proviral role for the proapoptotic protein BAD in influenza virus replication. We show that influenza virus-induced cytopathology and cell death are considerably inhibited in BAD knockdown cells and that both virus replication and viral protein production are dramatically reduced, which suggests that virus-induced apoptosis is BAD dependent. Our data showed that influenza viruses induced phosphorylation of BAD at residues S112 and S136 in a temporal manner. Viral infection also induced BAD cleavage, late in the viral life cycle, to a truncated form that is reportedly a more potent inducer of apoptosis. We further demonstrate that knockdown of BAD resulted in reduced cytochrome c release and suppression of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during influenza virus replication, as seen by an inhibition of caspases-3, caspase-7, and procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP) cleavage. Our data indicate that influenza viruses carefully modulate the activation of the apoptotic pathway that is dependent on the regulatory function of BAD and that failure of apoptosis activation resulted in unproductive viral replication. PMID:23135712

  7. Chorioamnionitis-induced fetal gut injury is mediated by direct gut exposure of inflammatory mediators or by lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Thuijls, Geertje; Kemp, Matthew W; Saito, Masatoshi; Willems, Monique G M; Senthamarai-Kannan, Paranthaman; Newnham, John P; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G

    2014-03-01

    Intra-amniotic exposure to proinflammatory agonists causes chorioamnionitis and fetal gut inflammation. Fetal gut inflammation is associated with mucosal injury and impaired gut development. We tested whether this detrimental inflammatory response of the fetal gut results from a direct local (gut derived) or an indirect inflammatory response mediated by the chorioamnion/skin or lung, since these organs are also in direct contact with the amniotic fluid. The gastrointestinal tract was isolated from the respiratory tract and the amnion/skin epithelia by fetal surgery in time-mated ewes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (controls) was selectively infused in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, or amniotic compartment at 2 or 6 days before preterm delivery at 124 days gestation (term 150 days). Gastrointestinal and intratracheal LPS exposure caused distinct inflammatory responses in the fetal gut. Inflammatory responses could be distinguished by the influx of leukocytes (MPO(+), CD3(+), and FoxP3(+) cells), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ expression and differential upregulation of mRNA levels for Toll-like receptor 1, 2, 4, and 6. Fetal gut inflammation after direct intestinal LPS exposure resulted in severe loss of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and increased mitosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Inflammation of the fetal gut after selective LPS instillation in the lungs caused only mild disruption of ZO-1, loss in epithelial cell integrity, and impaired epithelial differentiation. LPS exposure of the amnion/skin epithelia did not result in gut inflammation or morphological, structural, and functional changes. Our results indicate that the detrimental consequences of chorioamnionitis on fetal gut development are the combined result of local gut and lung-mediated inflammatory responses.

  8. Chorioamnionitis-induced fetal gut injury is mediated by direct gut exposure of inflammatory mediators or by lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Wolfs, Tim G. A. M.; Kramer, Boris W.; Thuijls, Geertje; Kemp, Matthew W.; Saito, Masatoshi; Willems, Monique G. M.; Senthamarai-Kannan, Paranthaman; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Intra-amniotic exposure to proinflammatory agonists causes chorioamnionitis and fetal gut inflammation. Fetal gut inflammation is associated with mucosal injury and impaired gut development. We tested whether this detrimental inflammatory response of the fetal gut results from a direct local (gut derived) or an indirect inflammatory response mediated by the chorioamnion/skin or lung, since these organs are also in direct contact with the amniotic fluid. The gastrointestinal tract was isolated from the respiratory tract and the amnion/skin epithelia by fetal surgery in time-mated ewes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline (controls) was selectively infused in the gastrointestinal tract, trachea, or amniotic compartment at 2 or 6 days before preterm delivery at 124 days gestation (term 150 days). Gastrointestinal and intratracheal LPS exposure caused distinct inflammatory responses in the fetal gut. Inflammatory responses could be distinguished by the influx of leukocytes (MPO+, CD3+, and FoxP3+ cells), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ expression and differential upregulation of mRNA levels for Toll-like receptor 1, 2, 4, and 6. Fetal gut inflammation after direct intestinal LPS exposure resulted in severe loss of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens protein 1 (ZO-1) and increased mitosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Inflammation of the fetal gut after selective LPS instillation in the lungs caused only mild disruption of ZO-1, loss in epithelial cell integrity, and impaired epithelial differentiation. LPS exposure of the amnion/skin epithelia did not result in gut inflammation or morphological, structural, and functional changes. Our results indicate that the detrimental consequences of chorioamnionitis on fetal gut development are the combined result of local gut and lung-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:24458021

  9. Natural Direct and Indirect Effects on the Exposed: Effect Decomposition under Weaker Assumptions

    PubMed Central

    Vansteelandt, Stijn; VanderWeele, Tyler J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We define natural direct and indirect effects on the exposed. We show that these allow for effect decomposition under weaker identification conditions than population natural direct and indirect effects. When no confounders of the mediator-outcome association are affected by the exposure, identification is possible under essentially the same conditions as for controlled direct effects. Otherwise, identification is still possible with additional knowledge on a nonidentifiable selection-bias function which measures the dependence of the mediator effect on the observed exposure within confounder levels, and which evaluates to zero in a large class of realistic data-generating mechanisms. We argue that natural direct and indirect effects on the exposed are of intrinsic interest in various applications. We moreover show that they coincide with the corresponding population natural direct and indirect effects when the exposure is randomly assigned. In such settings, our results are thus also of relevance for assessing population natural direct and indirect effects in the presence of exposure-induced mediator-outcome confounding, which existing methodology has not been able to address. PMID:22989075

  10. Centrally formed acetaldehyde mediates ethanol-induced brain PKA activation.

    PubMed

    Tarragon, E; Baliño, P; Aragon, C M G

    2014-09-19

    Centrally formed acetaldehyde has proven to be responsible for several psychopharmacological effects induced by ethanol. In addition, it has been suggested that the cAMP-PKA signaling transduction pathway plays an important role in the modulation of several ethanol-induced behaviors. Therefore, we hypothesized that acetaldehyde might be ultimately responsible for the activation of this intracellular pathway. We used three pharmacological agents that modify acetaldehyde activity (α-lipoic acid, aminotriazole, and d-penicillamine) to study the role of this metabolite on EtOH-induced PKA activation in mice. Our results show that the injection of α-lipoic acid, aminotriazole and d-penicillamine prior to acute EtOH administration effectively blocks the PKA-enhanced response to EtOH in the brain. These results strongly support the hypothesis of a selective release of acetaldehyde-dependent Ca(2+) as the mechanism involved in the neurobehavioral effects elicited by EtOH.

  11. Mechanically Induced Actin-mediated Rocketing of Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Anderson, Kurt I.; Engel, Ulrike; Gerisch, Günther

    2006-01-01

    Actin polymerization can be induced in Dictyostelium by compressing the cells to bring phagosomes filled with large particles into contact with the plasma membrane. Asymmetric actin assembly results in rocketing movement of the phagosomes. We show that the compression-induced assembly of actin at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane involves the Arp2/3 complex. We also identify two other proteins associated with the mechanically induced actin assembly. The class I myosin MyoB accumulates at the plasma membrane–phagosome interface early during the initiation of the response, and coronin is recruited as the actin filaments are disassembling. The forces generated by rocketing phagosomes are sufficient to push the entire microtubule apparatus forward and to dislocate the nucleus. PMID:16971511

  12. Indirect genomic effects on survival from gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    Ferkingstad, Egil; Frigessi, Arnoldo; Lyng, Heidi

    2008-01-01

    In cancer, genes may have indirect effects on patient survival, mediated through interactions with other genes. Methods to study the indirect effects that contribute significantly to survival are not available. We propose a novel methodology to detect and quantify indirect effects from gene expression data. We discover indirect effects through several target genes of transcription factors in cancer microarray data, pointing to genetic interactions that play a significant role in tumor progression. PMID:18358079

  13. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. Nitric Oxide Mediates Bleomycin-Induced Angiogenesis and Pulmonary Fibrosis via Regulation of VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A.; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M.; Wright, Clayton A.; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  15. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shuji; Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells.

  16. Role of ATP as a Key Signaling Molecule Mediating Radiation-Induced Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Yasuhiro; Nakatsukasa, Hiroko; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signaling molecule for adaptive responses to a variety of cytotoxic agents and plays an important role in mediating the radiation stress-induced responses that serve to mitigate or repair the injurious effects of γ radiation on the body. Indeed, low doses of radiation may have a net beneficial effect by activating a variety of protective mechanisms, including antitumor immune responses. On the other hand, ATP signaling may be involved in the radiation resistance of cancer cells. Here, focusing on our previous work, we review the evidence that low-dose γ irradiation (0.25-0.5 Gy) induces release of extracellular ATP, and that the released ATP mediates multiple radiation-induced responses, including increased intracellular antioxidant synthesis, cell-mediated immune responses, induction of DNA damage repair systems, and differentiation of regulatory T cells. PMID:28250717

  17. Kidney Dysfunction Mediates Salt-Induced Increases in Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic excess salt intake increases the risk for hypertension and moderation of salt intake is an important strategy for prevention of cardiovascular and kidney disease, especially in salt-sensitive subjects. Although short-term blood pressure (BP) responses to high salt intake over several days are highly variable, chronic high salt intake worsens BP salt-sensitivity. Aging, diabetes, hypertension, and various acquired and genetic kidney disorders also exacerbate salt-sensitivity of BP. Kidney dysfunction, characterized by impaired pressure natriuresis, has been demonstrated in all forms of experimental and human genetic or acquired salt-sensitive hypertension studied thus far. Abnormalities of kidney function that directly or indirectly increase NaCl reabsorption, decrease glomerular capillary filtration coefficient, or cause nephron injury/loss exacerbate BP salt-sensitivity. In most cases, salt-sensitive hypertension is effectively treated with drugs that increase glomerular filtration rate or reduce renal NaCl reabsorption (e.g. diuretics, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers). Increased vascular resistance may occur concomitantly or secondarily to kidney dysfunction and increased BP in salt-sensitive hypertension. However, primary increases in non-renal vascular resistance have not been shown to cause salt-sensitive hypertension or long-term changes in BP in the absence of impaired renal-pressure natriuresis. The mechanisms responsible for increased total peripheral resistance (TPR) during high salt intake in salt-sensitive subjects are not fully understood but likely involve pressure-dependent and/or flow-dependent autoregulation in peripheral tissues as well as neurohormonal factors that occur concomitantly with kidney dysfunction. Physiological studies have demonstrated that increased BP almost invariably initiates secondary pressure-dependent functional and structural vascular changes that increase TPR. PMID:26927007

  18. Indirection and computer security.

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    The discipline of computer science is built on indirection. David Wheeler famously said, 'All problems in computer science can be solved by another layer of indirection. But that usually will create another problem'. We propose that every computer security vulnerability is yet another problem created by the indirections in system designs and that focusing on the indirections involved is a better way to design, evaluate, and compare security solutions. We are not proposing that indirection be avoided when solving problems, but that understanding the relationships between indirections and vulnerabilities is key to securing computer systems. Using this perspective, we analyze common vulnerabilities that plague our computer systems, consider the effectiveness of currently available security solutions, and propose several new security solutions.

  19. Octopamine mediates starvation-induced hyperactivity in adult Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Yu, Yue; Zhang, Vivian; Tian, Yinjun; Qi, Wei; Wang, Liming

    2015-04-21

    Starved animals often exhibit elevated locomotion, which has been speculated to partly resemble foraging behavior and facilitate food acquisition and energy intake. Despite its importance, the neural mechanism underlying this behavior remains unknown in any species. In this study we confirmed and extended previous findings that starvation induced locomotor activity in adult fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster. We also showed that starvation-induced hyperactivity was directed toward the localization and acquisition of food sources, because it could be suppressed upon the detection of food cues via both central nutrient-sensing and peripheral sweet-sensing mechanisms, via induction of food ingestion. We further found that octopamine, the insect counterpart of vertebrate norepinephrine, as well as the neurons expressing octopamine, were both necessary and sufficient for starvation-induced hyperactivity. Octopamine was not required for starvation-induced changes in feeding behaviors, suggesting independent regulations of energy intake behaviors upon starvation. Taken together, our results establish a quantitative behavioral paradigm to investigate the regulation of energy homeostasis by the CNS and identify a conserved neural substrate that links organismal metabolic state to a specific behavioral output.

  20. PUMA mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis in portal hypertensive gastropathy.

    PubMed

    Tan, S; Wei, X; Song, M; Tao, J; Yang, Y; Khatoon, S; Liu, H; Jiang, J; Wu, B

    2014-03-13

    Mucosal apoptosis has been demonstrated to be an essential pathological feature in portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG). p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) was identified as a BH3-only Bcl-2 family protein that has an essential role in apoptosis induced by a variety of stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, whether PUMA is involved in mucosal apoptosis in PHG remains unclear, and whether PUMA induces PHG by mediating ER stress remains unknown. The aim of the study is to investigate whether PUMA is involved in PHG by mediating ER stress apoptotic signaling. To identify whether PUMA is involved in PHG by mediating ER stress, gastric mucosal injury and apoptosis were studied in both PHG patients and PHG animal models using PUMA knockout (PUMA-KO) and PUMA wild-type (PUMA-WT) mice. The induction of PUMA expression and ER stress signaling were investigated, and the mechanisms of PUMA-mediated apoptosis were analyzed. GES-1 and SGC7901 cell lines were used to further identify whether PUMA-mediated apoptosis was induced by ER stress in vitro. Epithelial apoptosis and PUMA were markedly induced in the gastric mucosa of PHG patients and mouse PHG models. ER stress had a potent role in the induction of PUMA and apoptosis in PHG models, and the apoptosis was obviously attenuated in PUMA-KO mice. Although the targeted deletion of PUMA did not affect ER stress, mitochondrial apoptotic signaling was downregulated in mice. Meanwhile, PUMA knockdown significantly ameliorated ER stress-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in vitro. These results indicate that PUMA mediates ER stress-induced mucosal epithelial apoptosis through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in PHG, and that PUMA is a potentially therapeutic target for PHG.

  1. Oxytocin mediates stress-induced analgesia in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, D A; Wei, F; Wang, G D; Li, P; Kim, S J; Vogt, S K; Muglia, L J; Zhuo, M

    2002-01-01

    As a neurohormone and as a neurotransmitter, oxytocin has been implicated in the stress response. Descending oxytocin-containing fibres project to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, an area important for processing nociceptive inputs. Here we tested the hypothesis that oxytocin plays a role in stress-induced analgesia and modulates spinal sensory transmission. Mice lacking oxytocin exhibited significantly reduced stress-induced antinociception following both cold-swim (10 °C, 3 min) and restraint stress (30 min). In contrast, the mice exhibited normal behavioural responses to thermal and mechanical noxious stimuli and morphine-induced antinociception. In wild-type mice, intrathecal injection of the oxytocin antagonist dOVT (200 μm in 5 μl) significantly attenuated antinociception induced by cold-swim. Immunocytochemical staining revealed that, in the mouse, oxytocin-containing neurones in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus are activated by stress. Furthermore, oxytocin-containing fibres were present in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To test whether descending oxytocin-containing fibres could alter nociceptive transmission, we performed intracellular recordings of dorsal horn neurones in spinal slices from adult mice. Bath application of oxytocin (1 and 10 μm) inhibited excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by dorsal root stimulation. This effect was reversed by the oxytocin antagonist dOVT (1 μm). Whole-cell recordings of dorsal horn neurones in postnatal rat slices revealed that the effect of oxytocin could be blocked by the addition of GTP-γ-S to the recording pipette, suggesting activation of postsynaptic oxytocin receptors. We conclude that oxytocin is important for both cold-swim and restraint stress-induced antinociception, acting by inhibiting glutamatergic spinal sensory transmission. PMID:11956346

  2. Ring Substituents on Substituted Benzamide Ligands Indirectly Mediate Interactions with Position 7.39 of Transmembrane Helix 7 of the D4 Dopamine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Spencer S.; Cummings, David F.; Teer, Michael E.; Amdani, Shahnawaz

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to delineate how specific molecular interactions of dopamine receptor ligand classes vary between D2-like dopamine receptor subtypes, a conserved threonine in transmembrane (TM) helix 7 (Thr7.39), implicated as a key ligand interaction site with biogenic amine G protein-coupled receptors, was substituted with alanine in D2 and D4 receptors. Interrogation of different ligand chemotypes for sensitivity to this substitution revealed enhanced affinity in the D4, but not the D2 receptor, specifically for substituted benzamides (SBAs) having polar 4- (para) and/or 5- (meta) benzamide ring substituents. D4-T7.39A was fully functional, and the mutation did not alter the sodium-mediated positive and negative allostery observed with SBAs and agonists, respectively. With the exception of the non-SBA ligand (+)-butaclamol, which, in contrast to certain SBAs, had decreased affinity for the D4-T7.39A mutant, the interactions of numerous other ligands were unaffected by this mutation. SBAs were docked into D4 models in the same mode as observed for eticlopride in the D3 crystal structure. In this mode, interactions with TM5 and TM6 residues constrain the SBA ring position that produces distal steric crowding between pyrrolidinyl/diethylamine moieties and D4-Thr7.39. Ligand-residue interaction energy profiles suggest this crowding is mitigated by substitution with a smaller alanine. The profiles indicate sites that contribute to the SBA binding interaction and site-specific energy changes imparted by the D4-T7.39A mutation. Substantial interaction energy changes are observed at only a few positions, some of which are not conserved among the dopamine receptor subtypes and thus seem to account for this D4 subtype-specific structure-activity relationship. PMID:22588261

  3. Programmed cell death receptor ligand 1 modulates the regulatory T cells' capacity to repress shock/sepsis-induced indirect acute lung injury by recruiting phosphatase SRC homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas-Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild-type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis-induced experimental indirect acute lung injury (iALI), and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs' capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1 mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 h after cecal ligation and puncture. We found that in PD-L1-recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage, failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [myeloperoxidase activity], or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also, a significant increase in interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine, but no changes in IL-6, IL-10, and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1(-/-) iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs' protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Tregs' ability to suppress iALI, and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation.

  4. Comparison of the GEM and the ECAL indirect calorimeters against the Deltatrac for measures of RMR and diet-induced thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, S; Ryan, L; Fraser, A; Clegg, M E

    2014-01-01

    The Deltatrac™ II Metabolic Monitor (Datex-Ohmeda Inc.) is considered the standard reference machine in indirect calorimetry; however, it is no longer commercially available thus there is a need for new machines. The gas exchange measurement (GEM; GEM Nutrition Ltd) and the ECAL (Health Professional Solutions) are alternative measuring systems. The aim of this study was to compare the ECAL and GEM with Deltatrac for measures of RMR and the GEM to the Deltatrac for measures of diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT). Twenty healthy participants were tested on test day 1 (T1) and test day 2 (T2). RMR was measured in a randomised order for 30 min on the Deltatrac, the GEM and the ECAL. Following this, a 1553 kJ meal was consumed and DIT was measured on the Deltatrac and the GEM in alternating 15 min intervals for 4 h. The GEM reported consistently higher values than the Deltatrac for VO2, VCO2, RMR and fat oxidation (P < 0·005). The ECAL was significantly higher than the Deltatrac for measures of VO2, RMR, carbohydrate oxidation (T2) and respiratory quotient and fat oxidation (T1, T2) (P < 0·05). There were no significant differences within repeated RMR measures on the ECAL, the GEM or the Deltatrac. DIT measures were consistently higher on the GEM (T1) (P < 0·005); however, there were no significant differences between repeated measures. The findings suggest that while the GEM and the ECAL were not accurate alternatives to the Deltatrac, they may be reliable for repeated measures.

  5. Significance of Neuronal Cytochrome P450 Activity in Opioid-Mediated Stress-Induced Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Lindsay B.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Yang, Weizhu; Ding, Xinxin

    2014-01-01

    Stressful environmental changes can suppress nociceptive transmission, a phenomenon known as “stress-induced analgesia”. Depending on the stressor and the subject, opioid or non-opioid mechanisms are activated. Brain μ opioid receptors mediate analgesia evoked either by exogenous agents (e.g. morphine), or by the release of endogenous opioids following stressful procedures. Recent work with morphine and neuronal cytochrome P450 (P450)-deficient mice proposed a signal transduction role for P450 enzymes in μ analgesia. Since μ opioid receptors also mediate some forms of stress-induced analgesia, the present studies assessed the significance of brain P450 activity in opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia. Two widely-used models of opioid stress-induced analgesia (restraint and warm water swim) were studied in both sexes of wild-type control and P450-deficient (Null) mice. In control mice, both stressors evoked moderate analgesic responses which were blocked by pretreatment with the opioid antagonist naltrexone, confirming the opioid nature of these responses. Consistent with literature, sex differences (control female > control male) were seen in swim-induced, but not restraint-induced, analgesia. Null mice showed differential responses to the two stress paradigms. As compared with control subjects, Null mice showed highly attenuated restraint-induced analgesia, showing a critical role for neuronal P450s in this response. However, warm water swim-induced analgesia was unchanged in Null vs. control mice. Additional control experiments confirmed the absence of morphine analgesia in Null mice. These results are the first to show that some forms of opioid-mediated stress-induced analgesia require brain neuronal P450 activity. PMID:25020125

  6. AAV2-mediated follistatin overexpression induces ovine primary myoblasts proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Mahmood; Salabi, Fatemeh; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Fuping; Wei, Caihong; Du, Lixin

    2014-10-21

    Follistatin (FST) has been shown to bind to some TGF-β family members and can function as a potent myostatin (MSTN) antagonist. Recent studies have revealed that over-expression of FST by adeno-associated viruses increases muscle growth in mice, humans and nonhuman primates. In the present study, to determine the effect of FST on ovine primary myoblast (OPM) proliferation, FST was over-expressed using an adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV 2) vector. Western blot results showed that AAV induced the expression of FST protein in transduced OPM cells. Real-time quantitative PCR results indicated that over-expression of FST resulted in a dramatic increase in Akt I and CDK2 expression and a decrease in p21 expression. Moreover, cell cycle analysis confirmed that FST down-regulated p21, a CDK inhibitor, and increased the level of CDK2 expression in OPM cells. Hence, follistatin positively regulated the G1 to S progression. Our results showed that FST induced proliferation through a down-regulation of p21, as only the p21 expression level was down-regulated as a result of FST over-expression in myoblasts, whereas no change was observed in the level of p57 expression. These results expanded our understanding of the regulation mechanism of FST in ovine primary myoblasts. Our results provide the first evidence that the AAV viral system can be used for gene transfer in ovine myoblast cells. Moreover, the results showed that an AAV vector can successfully induce the expression of FST in OPM cells in vitro. These findings demonstrated that FST over-expression induces proliferation through a down-regulation of the p21 gene under proliferating conditions.

  7. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo.

  8. Ceramide Production Mediates Aldosterone-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell (HUVEC) Damages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yumei; Pan, Yu; Bian, Zhixiang; Chen, Peihua; Zhu, Shijian; Gu, Huiyi; Guo, Liping; Hu, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the underlying mechanism of aldosterone (Aldo)-induced vascular endothelial cell damages by focusing on ceramide. We confirmed that Aldo (at nmol/L) inhibited human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) survival, and induced considerable cell apoptosis. We propose that ceramide (mainly C18) production might be responsible for Aldo-mediated damages in HUVECs. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), an anti-ceramide lipid, attenuated Aldo-induced ceramide production and following HUVEC damages. On the other hand, the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP or the ceramide (C6) potentiated Aldo-induced HUVEC apoptosis. Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, almost completely blocked Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production and HUVEC damages. Molecularly, ceramide synthase 1 (CerS-1) is required for C18 ceramide production by Aldo. Knockdown of CerS-1 by targeted-shRNA inhibited Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and protected HUVECs from Aldo. Reversely, CerS-1 overexpression facilitated Aldo-induced C18 ceramide production, and potentiated HUVEC damages. Together, these results suggest that C18 ceramide production mediates Aldo-mediated HUVEC damages. MR and CerS-1 could be the two signaling molecule regulating C18 ceramide production by Aldo. PMID:26788916

  9. Gap Junction Intercellular Communication Mediates Ammonia-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Arús, Bernardo Assein; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Quincozes-Santos, André

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are important brain targets of ammonia, a neurotoxin implicated in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. During hyperammonemia, the pivotal role of astrocytes in brain function and homeostasis is impaired. These cells are abundantly interconnected by gap junctions (GJ), which are intercellular channels that allow the exchange of signaling molecules and metabolites. This communication may also increase cellular vulnerability during injuries, while GJ uncoupling could limit the extension of a lesion. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate whether astrocyte coupling through GJ contributes to ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. We found that carbenoxolone (CBX), an effective GJ blocker, prevented the following effects induced by ammonia in astrocyte primary cultures: (1) decrease in cell viability and membrane integrity; (2) increase in reactive oxygen species production; (3) decrease in GSH intracellular levels; (4) GS activity; (5) pro-inflammatory cytokine release. On the other hand, CBX had no effect on C6 astroglial cells, which are poorly coupled via GJ. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that GJ play a role in ammonia-induced cytotoxicity. Although more studies in vivo are required to confirm our hypothesis, our data suggest that GJ communication between astrocytes may transmit damage signals and excitotoxic components from unhealthy to normal cells, thereby contributing to the propagation of the neurotoxicity of ammonia.

  10. Gut Microbiota Mediates Protection Against Enteropathy Induced by Indomethacin

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xue; Nakatsu, Geicho; Jin, Ye; Wong, Sunny; Yu, Jun; Lau, James Y. W.

    2017-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can cause significant small bowel injuries. The role of gut microbiota in this NSAID-induced enteropathy is poorly understood. We studied the dynamic changes in gut microbiota following indomethacin administration in mice, and investigated the effects of these adaptive changes on subsequent NSAID-induced enteropathy. The changes in gut microbiota were studied using 16S rRNA sequencing, and the effects of such changes were investigated using antibiotics and a faecal transplantation model. After indomethacin treatment, significant adaptive changes in gut microbiota were observed, including increased abundance of Firmicutes and decreased abundance in that of Bacteroidetes. Depletion of gut microbiota with antibiotics led to a higher mortality (P = 0.0021) in mice compared to controls. Mice pre-transplanted with adaptively changed microbiota showed less small bowel injury and lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines when exposed to indomethacin. In summary, this study identifies adaptive changes in the gut microbiota upon indomethacin administration, which can in turn ameliorate further NSAID-induced injury. The heightened mortality with antibiotic depletion of the adaptively changed microbiota suggests its important role in protecting against such injury. This study provides insight for future efforts to target the microbiota as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:28067296

  11. Cyclin C mediates stress-induced mitochondrial fission and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; Yan, Ruilan; Cooper, Katrina F.; Strich, Randy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo constant fission and fusion cycles. In response to cellular damage, this balance is shifted dramatically toward fission. Cyclin C–Cdk8 kinase regulates transcription of diverse gene sets. Using knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we demonstrate that cyclin C directs the extensive mitochondrial scission induced by the anticancer drug cisplatin or oxidative stress. This activity is independent of transcriptional regulation, as Cdk8 is not required for this activity. Furthermore, adding purified cyclin C to unstressed permeabilized MEF cultures induced complete mitochondrial fragmentation that was dependent on the fission factors Drp1 and Mff. To regulate fission, a portion of cyclin C translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, where it associates with Drp1 and is required for its enhanced mitochondrial activity in oxidatively stressed cells. In addition, although HeLa cells regulate cyclin C in a manner similar to MEF cells, U2OS osteosarcoma cultures display constitutively cytoplasmic cyclin C and semifragmented mitochondria. Finally, cyclin C, but not Cdk8, is required for loss of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability and apoptosis in cells treated with cisplatin. In conclusion, this study suggests that cyclin C connects stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfission and programmed cell death in mammalian cells. PMID:25609094

  12. Fructokinase activity mediates dehydration-induced renal injury.

    PubMed

    Roncal Jimenez, Carlos A; Ishimoto, Takuji; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Rivard, Christopher J; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Ejaz, A Ahsan; Cicerchi, Christina; Inaba, Shinichiro; Le, MyPhuong; Miyazaki, Makoto; Glaser, Jason; Correa-Rotter, Ricardo; González, Marvin A; Aragón, Aurora; Wesseling, Catharina; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-08-01

    The epidemic of chronic kidney disease in Nicaragua (Mesoamerican nephropathy) has been linked with recurrent dehydration. Here we tested whether recurrent dehydration may cause renal injury by activation of the polyol pathway, resulting in the generation of endogenous fructose in the kidney that might subsequently induce renal injury via metabolism by fructokinase. Wild-type and fructokinase-deficient mice were subjected to recurrent heat-induced dehydration. One group of each genotype was provided water throughout the day and the other group was hydrated at night, after the dehydration. Both groups received the same total hydration in 24 h. Wild-type mice that received delayed hydration developed renal injury, with elevated serum creatinine, increased urinary NGAL, proximal tubular injury, and renal inflammation and fibrosis. This was associated with activation of the polyol pathway, with increased renal cortical sorbitol and fructose levels. Fructokinase-knockout mice with delayed hydration were protected from renal injury. Thus, recurrent dehydration can induce renal injury via a fructokinase-dependent mechanism, likely from the generation of endogenous fructose via the polyol pathway. Access to sufficient water during the dehydration period can protect mice from developing renal injury. These studies provide a potential mechanism for Mesoamerican nephropathy.

  13. Regulator of G Protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) Mediates Doxorubicin-induced ATM and p53 Activation by a Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Yang, Jianqi; Maity, Biswanath; Mayuzumi, Daisuke; Fisher, Rory A.

    2011-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DXR), among the most widely used cancer chemotherapy agents, promotes cancer cell death via activation of ATM and the resultant up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53. The exact mechanism by which DXR activates ATM is not fully understood. Here we discovered a novel role for Regulator of G protein Signaling 6 (RGS6) in mediating activation of ATM and p53 by DXR. RGS6 was robustly induced by DXR, and genetic loss of RGS6 dramatically impaired DXR-induced activation of ATM and p53, as well as its in vivo apoptotic actions in heart. The ability of RGS6 to promote p53 activation in response to DXR was independent of RGS6 interaction with G proteins but required ATM. RGS6 mediated activation of ATM and p53 by DXR via a ROS-dependent and DNA damage-independent mechanism. This mechanism represents the primary means by which DXR promotes activation of the ATM-p53-apoptosis pathway that underlies its cytotoxic activity. Our findings contradict the canonical theories that DXR activates ATM primarily by promoting DNA damage either directly or indirectly (via ROS) and that RGS6 function is mediated by its interactions with G proteins. These findings reveal a new mechanism for the chemotherapeutic actions of DXR and identify RGS6 as a novel target for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:21859827

  14. Regulator of G protein signaling 6 mediates doxorubicin-induced ATM and p53 activation by a reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Yang, Jianqi; Maity, Biswanath; Mayuzumi, Daisuke; Fisher, Rory A

    2011-10-15

    Doxorubicin (DXR), among the most widely used cancer chemotherapy agents, promotes cancer cell death via activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and the resultant upregulation of tumor suppressor p53. The exact mechanism by which DXR activates ATM is not fully understood. Here, we discovered a novel role for regulator of G protein signaling 6 (RGS6) in mediating activation of ATM and p53 by DXR. RGS6 was robustly induced by DXR, and genetic loss of RGS6 dramatically impaired DXR-induced activation of ATM and p53, as well as its in vivo apoptotic actions in heart. The ability of RGS6 to promote p53 activation in response to DXR was independent of RGS6 interaction with G proteins but required ATM. RGS6 mediated activation of ATM and p53 by DXR via a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent and DNA damage-independent mechanism. This mechanism represents the primary means by which DXR promotes activation of the ATM-p53 apoptosis pathway that underlies its cytotoxic activity. Our findings contradict the canonical theories that DXR activates ATM primarily by promoting DNA damage either directly or indirectly (via ROS) and that RGS6 function is mediated by its interactions with G proteins. These findings reveal a new mechanism for the chemotherapeutic actions of DXR and identify RGS6 as a novel target for cancer chemotherapy.

  15. Platycodi Radix attenuates dimethylnitrosamine-induced liver fibrosis in rats by inducing Nrf2-mediated antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Ho; Jin, Sun Woo; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Khanal, Tilak; Hwang, Yong Pil; Lee, Kyung Jin; Choi, Chul Yung; Chung, Young Chul; Lee, Young Chun; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-fibrotic effects of the aqueous extract of the Platycodi Radix root (Changkil: CK) on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced liver fibrosis in rats. DMN treatment for 4 weeks led to marked liver fibrosis as assessed by serum biochemistry, histopathological examination, and hepatic lipid peroxidation and collagen content. CK significantly inhibited DMN-induced increases in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities, fibrosis score, and hepatic malondialdehyde and collagen content. CK also inhibited DMN-induced reductions in rat body and liver weights. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses revealed that CK inhibited DMN-induced increases in matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA, and collagen type I and α-smooth muscle actin protein. DMN-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation was reduced by CK treatment. Furthermore, CK induced activation of nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated antioxidant enzymes such as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) in HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that CK attenuates DMN-induced liver fibrosis through the activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant enzymes.

  16. Decorin-inducible Peg3 Evokes Beclin 1-mediated Autophagy and Thrombospondin 1-mediated Angiostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Annabel; Gubbiotti, Maria A.; Iozzo, Renato V.

    2017-01-01

    We previously discovered that systemic delivery of decorin for treatment of breast carcinoma xenografts induces paternally expressed gene 3 (Peg3), an imprinted gene encoding a zinc finger transcription factor postulated to function as a tumor suppressor. Here we found that de novo expression of Peg3 increased Beclin 1 promoter activity and protein expression. This process required the full-length Peg3 as truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal SCAN domain or the zinc fingers failed to translocate to the nucleus and promote Beclin 1 transcription. Importantly, overexpression of Peg3 in endothelial cells stimulated autophagy and concurrently inhibited endothelial cell migration and evasion from a 3D matrix. Mechanistically, we found that Peg3 induced the secretion of the powerful angiostatic glycoprotein Thrombospondin 1 independently of Beclin 1 transcriptional induction. Thus, we provide a new mechanism whereby Peg3 can simultaneously evoke autophagy in endothelial cells and attenuate angiogenesis. PMID:28174297

  17. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  18. Pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis is mediated in part via Toll-like receptor 2-induced inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Chie; Madrigal, Andres G; Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Goswami, Sulip; Gudino, Cynthia V; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2010-01-01

    Studies in humans have established that polymorphisms in genes encoding the innate immune Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are associated with inflammatory atherosclerosis. In hyperlipidemic mice, TLR2 and TLR4 have been reported to contribute to atherosclerosis progression. Human and mouse studies support a role for the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis, although the mechanisms by which this pathogen stimulates inflammatory atherosclerosis via innate immune system activation is not known. Using a genetically defined apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model we demonstrate that pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis occurs via both TLR2-dependent and TLR2-independent mechanisms. P. gingivalis infection in mice possessing functional TLR2 induced the accumulation of macrophages as well as inflammatory mediators including CD40, IFN-gamma and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atherosclerotic lesions. The expression of these inflammatory mediators was reduced in atherosclerotic lesions from P. gingivalis-infected TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. These studies provide a mechanistic link between an innate immune receptor and pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis by a clinically and biologically relevant bacterial pathogen.

  19. Pathogen-Mediated Inflammatory Atherosclerosis Is Mediated in Part via Toll-Like Receptor 2-Induced Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Chie; Madrigal, Andres G.; Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Goswami, Sulip; Gudino, Cynthia V.; Gibson, III, Frank C.; Genco, Caroline A.

    2010-01-01

    Studies in humans have established that polymorphisms in genes encoding the innate immune Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are associated with inflammatory atherosclerosis. In hyperlipidemic mice, TLR2 and TLR4 have been reported to contribute to atherosclerosis progression. Human and mouse studies support a role for the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis, although the mechanisms by which this pathogen stimulates inflammatory atherosclerosis via innate immune system activation is not known. Using a genetically defined apolipoprotien E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mouse model we demonstrate that pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis occurs via both TLR2-dependent and TLR2-independent mechanisms. P. gingivalis infection in mice possessing functional TLR2 induced the accumulation of macrophages as well as inflammatory mediators including CD40, IFN-γ and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in atherosclerotic lesions. The expression of these inflammatory mediators was reduced in atherosclerotic lesions from P. gingivalis-infected TLR2-deficient (TLR2−/−) mice. These studies provide a mechanistic link between an innate immune receptor and pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis by a clinically and biologically relevant bacterial pathogen. PMID:20505314

  20. Inflammasomes are important mediators of cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Francis M; Vivar, Nivardo P; Kennis, James G; Pratt-Thomas, Jeffery D; Lowe, Danielle W; Shaner, Brooke E; Nietert, Paul J; Spruill, Laura S; Purves, J Todd

    2014-02-01

    Bladder inflammation (cystitis) underlies numerous bladder pathologies and is elicited by a plethora of agents such as urinary tract infections, bladder outlet obstruction, chemotherapies, and catheters. Pattern recognition receptors [Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nod-like receptors (NLRs)] that recognize pathogen- and/or damage-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and/or DAMPs, respectively) are key components of the innate immune system that coordinates the production (TLRs) and maturation (NLRs) of proinflammatory IL-1β. Despite multiple studies of TLRs in the bladder, none have investigated NLRs beyond one small survey. We now demonstrate that NLRP3 and NLRC4, and their binding partners apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a COOH-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC) and NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP), are expressed in the bladder and localized predominantly to the urothelia. Activated NLRs form inflammasomes that activate caspase-1. Placement of a NLRP3- or NLRC4-activating PAMP or NLRP3-activating DAMPs into the lumen of the bladder stimulated caspase-1 activity. To investigate inflammasomes in vivo, we induced cystitis with cyclophosphamide (CP, 150 mg/kg ip) in the presence or absence of the inflammasome inhibitor glyburide. Glyburide completely blocked CP-induced activation of caspase-1 and the production of IL-1β at 4 h. At 24 h, glyburide reduced two markers of inflammation by 30-50% and reversed much of the inflammatory morphology. Furthermore, glyburide reversed changes in bladder physiology (cystometry) induced by CP. In conclusion, NLRs/inflammasomes are present in the bladder urothelia and respond to DAMPs and PAMPs, whereas NLRP3 inhibition blocks bladder dysfunction in the CP model. The coordinated response of NLRs and TLRs in the urothelia represents a first-line innate defense that may provide an important target for pharmacological intervention.

  1. Mediation of a corticosterone-induced reproductive conflict.

    PubMed

    Love, Oliver P; Breuner, Creagh W; Vézina, François; Williams, Tony D

    2004-06-01

    Current research in birds suggests that a conflict should exist during reproduction for the role of the glucocorticoid corticosterone (CORT). While elevated levels have been correlated with the increased energetic demand of raising offspring, elevated CORT levels have traditionally been implicated in reproductive abandonment. We examined the relationship between CORT and nest desertion in breeding wild female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) incorporating analyses of both total circulating levels and 'free', unbound CORT through analysis of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). Free baseline CORT levels of nest-abandoning birds were significantly higher than nonabandoning birds within each stage, with chick-rearing birds exhibiting the highest free baseline CORT levels, while concurrently remaining the most resistant stage to nest desertion. Elevated free baseline CORT levels in chick-rearing birds were not due to increased total CORT secretion, but rather to a decrease in CBG levels. Overall, our results suggest that CORT and CBG interact to play a role in mediating the increased energetic demand of offspring, while minimizing the chances of nest desertion, thereby alleviating any potential behavioral conflict for CORT during reproduction. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that the traditional view of the role of CORT during reproduction is much more complex than previously appreciated. Together with mounting evidence, we suggest that elevated corticosteroid levels are an inherent and necessary part of reproduction in nonmammalian tetrapods.

  2. Microhomology-mediated end joining induces hypermutagenesis at breakpoint junctions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fuyang; Villarreal, Diana; Shim, Jae Hoon; Myung, Kyungjae; Shim, Eun Yong; Lee, Sang Eun

    2017-01-01

    Microhomology (MH) flanking a DNA double-strand break (DSB) drives chromosomal rearrangements but its role in mutagenesis has not yet been analyzed. Here we determined the mutation frequency of a URA3 reporter gene placed at multiple locations distal to a DSB, which is flanked by different sizes (15-, 18-, or 203-bp) of direct repeat sequences for efficient repair in budding yeast. Induction of a DSB accumulates mutations in the reporter gene situated up to 14-kb distal to the 15-bp MH, but more modestly to those carrying 18- and 203-bp or no homology. Increased mutagenesis in MH-mediated end joining (MMEJ) appears coupled to its slower repair kinetics and the extensive resection occurring at flanking DNA. Chromosomal translocations via MMEJ also elevate mutagenesis of the flanking DNA sequences 7.1 kb distal to the breakpoint junction as compared to those without MH. The results suggest that MMEJ could destabilize genomes by triggering structural alterations and increasing mutation burden. PMID:28419093

  3. Phosphoinositide-mediated oligomerization of a defensin induces cell lysis

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Ivan KH; Baxter, Amy A; Lay, Fung T; Mills, Grant D; Adda, Christopher G; Payne, Jennifer AE; Phan, Thanh Kha; Ryan, Gemma F; White, Julie A; Veneer, Prem K; van der Weerden, Nicole L; Anderson, Marilyn A; Kvansakul, Marc; Hulett, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) such as defensins are ubiquitously found innate immune molecules that often exhibit broad activity against microbial pathogens and mammalian tumor cells. Many CAPs act at the plasma membrane of cells leading to membrane destabilization and permeabilization. In this study, we describe a novel cell lysis mechanism for fungal and tumor cells by the plant defensin NaD1 that acts via direct binding to the plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). We determined the crystal structure of a NaD1:PIP2 complex, revealing a striking oligomeric arrangement comprising seven dimers of NaD1 that cooperatively bind the anionic headgroups of 14 PIP2 molecules through a unique ‘cationic grip’ configuration. Site-directed mutagenesis of NaD1 confirms that PIP2-mediated oligomerization is important for fungal and tumor cell permeabilization. These observations identify an innate recognition system by NaD1 for direct binding of PIP2 that permeabilizes cells via a novel membrane disrupting mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01808.001 PMID:24692446

  4. Anaphylatoxin C3a induced mediator release from mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Herrscher, R.; Hugli, T.E.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the biochemical and functional consequences of the binding of highly purified human C3a to isolated rat serosal mast cells. C3a caused a dose-dependent (1-30 ..mu..M), noncytotoxic release of up to 64% (+/- 7 SEM) of the mast cell histamine content. C3a (10..mu..M) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup + +/ uptake 8.2- fold (+/- 2.2 SEM) above unstimulated control values within 10 minutes. Arachidonyl-diacylglycerol and arachidonyl-monoacylglycerol levels increased significantly within 2 minutes after C3a (10 ..mu..M) stimulation. Turnover of phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine were increased within 15 minutes. In contrast to antigen, C3a stimulation (10 ..mu..M) was not enhanced by exogenous phosphatidylserine, and was not inhibited by ethanol (100 ..mu..mM). C3a suppressed arachidonic acid (AA) release to 38% (+/- 9 SEM) below baseline, and did not cause PGD/sub 2/ formation. C3a and the desarginine form of C3a caused identical responses in all experiments. These studies indicate that C3a stimulation activates mast cell preformed mediator release in a manner very similar to antigen-IgE stimulation, but C3a suppresses free AA levels and does not stimulate PGD/sub 2/ synthesis.

  5. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2016-09-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (-3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles.

  6. Lipid membrane-mediated attraction between curvature inducing objects

    PubMed Central

    van der Wel, Casper; Vahid, Afshin; Šarić, Anđela; Idema, Timon; Heinrich, Doris; Kraft, Daniela J.

    2016-01-01

    The interplay of membrane proteins is vital for many biological processes, such as cellular transport, cell division, and signal transduction between nerve cells. Theoretical considerations have led to the idea that the membrane itself mediates protein self-organization in these processes through minimization of membrane curvature energy. Here, we present a combined experimental and numerical study in which we quantify these interactions directly for the first time. In our experimental model system we control the deformation of a lipid membrane by adhering colloidal particles. Using confocal microscopy, we establish that these membrane deformations cause an attractive interaction force leading to reversible binding. The attraction extends over 2.5 times the particle diameter and has a strength of three times the thermal energy (−3.3 kBT). Coarse-grained Monte-Carlo simulations of the system are in excellent agreement with the experimental results and prove that the measured interaction is independent of length scale. Our combined experimental and numerical results reveal membrane curvature as a common physical origin for interactions between any membrane-deforming objects, from nanometre-sized proteins to micrometre-sized particles. PMID:27618764

  7. Modeling of [Formula: see text]-mediated calcium signaling in vascular endothelial cells induced by fluid shear stress and ATP.

    PubMed

    Li, Long-Fei; Xiang, Cheng; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2015-10-01

    The calcium signaling plays a vital role in flow-dependent vascular endothelial cell (VEC) physiology. Variations in fluid shear stress and ATP concentration in blood vessels can activate dynamic responses of cytosolic-free [Formula: see text] through various calcium channels on the plasma membrane. In this paper, a novel dynamic model has been proposed for transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 [Formula: see text]-mediated intracellular calcium dynamics in VECs induced by fluid shear stress and ATP. Our model includes [Formula: see text] signaling pathways through P2Y receptors and [Formula: see text] channels (indirect mechanism) and captures the roles of the [Formula: see text] compound channels in VEC [Formula: see text] signaling in response to fluid shear stress (direct mechanism). In particular, it takes into account that the [Formula: see text] compound channels are regulated by intracellular [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] concentrations. The simulation studies have demonstrated that the dynamic responses of calcium concentration produced by the proposed model correlate well with the existing experimental observations. We also conclude from the simulation studies that endogenously released ATP may play an insignificant role in the process of intracellular [Formula: see text] response to shear stress.

  8. Biocontrol agents-mediated suppression of oxalic acid induced cell death during Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-pea interaction.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akansha; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2015-05-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) is an important pathogenic factor during early Sclerotinia sclerotiorum-host interaction and might work by reducing hydrogen peroxide production (H2 O2 ). In the present investigation, oxalic acid-induced cell death in pea was studied. Pea plants treated with biocontrol agents (BCAs) viz., Pseudomonas aeruginosa PJHU15, Bacillus subtilis BHHU100, and Trichoderma harzianum TNHU27 either singly and/or in consortium acted on S. sclerotiorum indirectly by enabling plants to inhibit the OA-mediated suppression of oxidative burst via induction of H2 O2 . Our results showed that BCA treated plants upon treatment with culture filtrate of the pathogen, conferred the resistance via. significantly decreasing relative cell death of pea against S. sclerotiorum compared to control plants without BCA treatment but treated with the culture filtrate of the pathogen. The results obtained from the present study indicate that the microbes especially in consortia play significant role in protection against S. sclerotiorum by modulating oxidative burst and partially enhancing tolerance by increasing the H2 O2 generation, which is otherwise suppressed by OA produced by the pathogen. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Un-Ho; Song, Kwon-Ho; Motomura, Muneo; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Gu, Yeun-Hwa; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Moon, Tae-Chul; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-03-01

    Caffeic acid phenyl ester (CAPE), a biologically active ingredient of propolis, has several interesting biological properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, immunostimulatory, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive, anti-metastatic and carcinostatic activities. Recently, several groups have reported that CAPE is cytotoxic to tumor cells but not to normal cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of CAPE-induced apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia U937 cells. Treatment of U937 cells with CAPE decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. DNA fragmentation assay revealed the typical ladder profile of oligonucleosomal fragments in CAPE-treated U937 cells. In addition, as evidenced by the nuclear DAPI staining experiment, we observed that the nuclear condensation, a typical phenotype of apoptosis, was found in U937 cells treated with 5 microg/ml of CAPE. Therefore, it was suggested that CAPE is a potent agent inducing apoptosis in U937 cells. Apoptotic action of the CAPE was accompanied by release of cytochrome C, reduction of Bcl-2 expression, increase of Bax expression, activation/cleavage of caspase-3 and activation/cleavage of PARP in U937 cells, but not by Fas protein, an initial mediator in the death signaling, or by phospho-eIF2 alpha and CHOP, crucial mediators in ER-mediated apoptosis. From the results, it was concluded that CAPE induces the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis but not death receptors- or ER-mediated apoptosis in U937 cells.

  11. A bile‐inducible membrane protein mediates bifidobacterial bile resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Lorena; O'Connell‐Motherway, Mary; Zomer, Aldert; de los Reyes‐Gavilán, Clara G.; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bbr_0838 from Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is predicted to encode a 683 residue membrane protein, containing both a permease domain that displays similarity to transporters belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, as well as a CBS (cystathionine beta synthase) domain. The high level of similarity to bile efflux pumps from other bifidobacteria suggests a significant and general role for Bbr_0838 in bile tolerance. Bbr_0838 transcription was shown to be monocistronic and strongly induced upon exposure to bile. Further analysis delineated the transcriptional start site and the minimal region required for promoter activity and bile regulation. Insertional inactivation of Bbr_0838 in B. breve UCC2003 resulted in a strain, UCC2003:838800, which exhibited reduced survival upon cholate exposure as compared with the parent strain, a phenotype that was reversed when a functional, plasmid‐encoded Bbr_0838 gene was introduced into UCC2003:838800. Transcriptome analysis of UCC2003:838800 grown in the presence or absence of bile demonstrated that transcription of Bbr_0832, which is predicted to encode a macrolide efflux transporter gene, was significantly increased in the presence of bile, representing a likely compensatory mechanism for bile removal in the absence of Bbr_0838. This study represents the first in‐depth analysis of a bile‐inducible locus in bifidobacteria, identifying a key gene relevant for bifidobacterial bile tolerance. PMID:22296641

  12. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R.; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; de Araújo, Cintia Maria Monteiro; Tiburcio, Taynã; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Willebrords, Joost; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Farhood, Anwar; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-hour time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity. PMID:26739117

  13. Connexin32: a mediator of acetaminophen-induced liver injury?

    PubMed

    Maes, Michaël; McGill, Mitchell R; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Lebofsky, Margitta; Maria Monteiro de Araújo, Cintia; Tiburcio, Taynã; Veloso Alves Pereira, Isabel; Willebrords, Joost; Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Farhood, Anwar; Zaidan Dagli, Maria Lucia; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-02-01

    Connexin32 is the building block of hepatocellular gap junctions, which control direct intercellular communication and thereby act as goalkeepers of liver homeostasis. This study was set up to investigate whether connexin32 is involved in hepatotoxicity induced by the analgesic and antipyretic drug acetaminophen. To this end, whole body connexin32 knock-out mice were overdosed with acetaminophen followed by sampling at different time points within a 24-h time frame. Evaluation was done based upon a series of clinically and mechanistically relevant read-outs, including protein adduct formation, histopathological examination, measurement of alanine aminotransferase activity, cytokine production, levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione and hepatic protein amounts of proliferating cell nuclear antigen. In essence, it was found that genetic ablation of connexin32 has no influence on several key events in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity, including cell death, inflammation or oxidative stress, yet it does affect production of protein adducts as well as proliferating cell nuclear antigen steady-state protein levels. This outcome is not in line with previous studies, which are contradicting on their own, as both amplification and alleviation of this toxicological process by connexin32 have been described. This could question the suitability of the currently available models and tools to investigate the role of connexin32 in acetaminophen-triggered hepatotoxicity.

  14. TREK-1 mediates isoflurane-induced cytotoxicity in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haiyun; Peng, Zhengwu; Yang, Liu; Liu, Xue; Xie, Yaning; Cai, Yanhui; Xiong, Lize; Zeng, Yi

    2017-09-05

    There are growing concerns that anaesthetic exposure can cause extensive apoptotic degeneration of neurons and the impairment of normal synaptic development and remodelling. However, little attention has been paid to exploring the possible cytotoxicity of inhalation anaesthetics, such as isoflurane, in astrocytes. In this research, we determined that prolonged exposure to an inhalation anaesthetic caused cytotoxicity in astrocytes, and we identified the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for this process. Astrocytes were exposed to isoflurane, and astrocytic survival was then measured via LDH release assays, MTT assays, and TUNEL staining. TWIK-related potassium (K(+)) channel-1 (TREK-1) over-expression and knockdown models were also created using lentiviruses. The levels of TREK-1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were measured via Western blot and qRT-PCR. Prolonged exposure to isoflurane decreased primary astrocytic viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, with prolonged exposure to isoflurane, the TREK-1 level increased, and the BDNF level was reduced. TREK-1 knockdown promoted the survival of astrocytes and increased BDNF expression following isoflurane exposure. Overdoses of and prolonged exposure to isoflurane induce cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes. TREK-1 plays an important role in isoflurane-induced cultured astrocytic cytotoxicity by down-regulating the expression of BDNF.

  15. P53 mediates amosite asbestos-induced alveolar epithelial cell mitochondria-regulated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Surapureddi, Sailesh; Soberanes, Saul; Weitzman, Sigmund A; Chandel, Navdeep; Kamp, David W

    2006-04-01

    Asbestos causes pulmonary toxicity in part by generating reactive oxygen species that cause DNA damage. We previously showed that the mitochondria-regulated (intrinsic) death pathway mediates alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) DNA damage and apoptosis. Because p53 regulates the DNA damage response in part by inducing intrinsic cell death, we determined whether p53-dependent transcriptional activity mediates asbestos-induced AEC mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. We show that inhibitors of p53-dependent transcriptional activation (pifithrin and type 16-E6 protein) block asbestos-induced AEC mitochondrial membrane potential change (DeltaPsim), caspase 9 activation, and apoptosis. We demonstrate that asbestos activates p53 promoter activity, mRNA levels, protein expression, and Bax and p53 mitochondrial translocation. Further, pifithrin, E6, phytic acid, or rho(0)-A549 cells (cells incapable of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production) block asbestos-induced p53 activation. Finally, we show that asbestos augments p53 expression in cells at the bronchoalveolar duct junctions of rat lungs and that phytic acid prevents this. These data suggest that p53-dependent transcription pathways mediate asbestos-induced AEC mitochondria-regulated apoptosis. This suggests an important interactive effect between p53 and the mitochondria in the pathogenesis of asbestos-induced pulmonary toxicity that may have broader implications for our understanding of pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer.

  16. Endothelial cation channel PIEZO1 controls blood pressure by mediating flow-induced ATP release

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ShengPeng; Chennupati, Ramesh; Kaur, Harmandeep; Iring, Andras; Wettschureck, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Arterial blood pressure is controlled by vasodilatory factors such as nitric oxide (NO) that are released from the endothelium under the influence of fluid shear stress exerted by flowing blood. Flow-induced endothelial release of ATP and subsequent activation of Gq/G11–coupled purinergic P2Y2 receptors have been shown to mediate fluid shear stress–induced stimulation of NO formation. However, the mechanism by which fluid shear stress initiates these processes is unclear. Here, we have shown that the endothelial mechanosensitive cation channel PIEZO1 is required for flow-induced ATP release and subsequent P2Y2/Gq/G11–mediated activation of downstream signaling that results in phosphorylation and activation of AKT and endothelial NOS. We also demonstrated that PIEZO1-dependent ATP release is mediated in part by pannexin channels. The PIEZO1 activator Yoda1 mimicked the effect of fluid shear stress on endothelial cells and induced vasorelaxation in a PIEZO1-dependent manner. Furthermore, mice with induced endothelium-specific PIEZO1 deficiency lost the ability to induce NO formation and vasodilation in response to flow and consequently developed hypertension. Together, our data demonstrate that PIEZO1 is required for the regulation of NO formation, vascular tone, and blood pressure. PMID:27797339

  17. Matricellular protein CCN1 mediates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Mo, Fan-E

    2016-06-14

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic agent however its clinical use is limited by its cumulative cardiotoxicity. Matricellular protein CCN1 mediates work-overload-induced cardiac injury. We aimed to assess the role of CCN1 in DOX-associated cardiomyopathy. Here we discovered CCN1 expression in the myocardium 1 day after DOX treatment (15 mg/kg; i.p.) in mice. Whereas CCN1 synergizes with Fas ligand (FasL) to induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis, we found that FasL was also induced by DOX in the heart. To assess the function of CCN1 in vivo, knockin mice (Ccn1dm/dm) expressing an a6β1-binding defective CCN1 mutant were treated with a single dose of DOX (15 mg/kg; i.p.). Compared with wild-type mice, Ccn1dm/dm mice were resistant to DOX-induced cardiac injury and dysfunction 14 days after injection. Using rat cardiomyoblast H9c2 cells, we demonstrated that DOX induced reactive oxygen species accumulation to upregulate CCN1 and FasL expression. CCN1 mediated DOX cardiotoxicity by engaging integrin a6β1 to promote p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and the release of mitochondrial Smac and HtrA2 to cytosol, thereby counteracting the inhibition of XIAP and facilitating apoptosis. In summary, CCN1 critically mediates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Disrupting CCN1/a6β1 engagement abolishes DOX-associated cardiomyopathy in mice.

  18. Curdlan induces DC-mediated Th17 polarization via Jagged1 activation in human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Takehiro; Hashimoto, Kumiko; Takagi, Rie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Matsushita, Sho

    2010-06-01

    Th17-inducing activity is carried by certain polysaccharides such as beta-glucan derived from Candia albicans. Our previous studies have shown that Th1- and Th2-inducing activities can be qualitatively evaluated by the expression patterns of Notch ligand isoforms, using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (Mo-DCs) and some leukemic cell lines such as THP-1. The association of Th17-inducing activities with Notch ligand expression patterns has been unclear. Mo-DCs from healthy volunteers were co-cultured with HLA-DR-nonshared allogeneic CD4+ naïve T cells to induce a mixed lymphocyte reaction, in the presence of adjuvants, such as curdlan. Culture supernatants were assayed for IFNgamma, IL-5 and IL-17 by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Notch ligand expression on Mo-DCs and THP-1 cells was evaluated by using RT-PCR. The present study shows that curdlan, one of the beta-glucans, has the ability to induce DC-mediated Th17 differentiation. It is also interesting to note that Jagged1 mRNA in Mo-DCs and THP-1 cells is up-regulated by curdlan. Furthermore, polyclonal anti-Jagged1 antibody inhibited such DC-mediated Th17 differentiation. This study suggests that curdlan induces human DC-mediated Th17 polarization via Jagged1 activation in DCs.

  19. Growth hormone release induced by growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide is not mediated by thyrotropin-releasing hormone in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Kacsóh, B; Kacsóh, G; Guzzardo, M B; Black, A C; Bisat, T

    1997-02-01

    GH-releasing hexapeptide (GHRP-6) and nursing stimulate GH secretion in rat pups via GH-releasing factors (GRFs: distinct from GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). It was determined whether GH secretion induced by GHRP-6 or nursing was mediated by TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) in 2-d-old rats. In vitro. GHRP-6 and TRH stimulated GH secretion of neonatal pituitary glands. At their maximally effective doses, GHRP-6 and TRH evoked approximately equal GH responses. Treatment with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH resulted in a GH response comparable to that evoked by either treatment alone. GHRP-6 in vivo induced a greater GH response than did TRH. Treatment in vivo with a combination of the maximally effective doses of GHRP-6 and TRH synergistically increased serum GH levels. Unlike GHRP-6 TRH was an effective stimulus of prolactin secretion either in vitro or in vivo. Nursing was an effective stimulus for GH secretion, but only marginally increased serum prolactin levels. The effects of either of the peptides and nursing on GH secretion were additive. These results suggest that GHRP-6 stimulates GH secretion both by acting directly on the pituitary gland and indirectly via a hypothalamic GRF. The indirect effect appears to be greater. The alternative GRFs released by GHRP-6 or nursing are distinct from each other and from TRH. These findings suggest that alternative GRFs play a significant role in the regulation of GH secretion in neonatal rats.

  20. Mediators of burn-induced neuromuscular changes in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tomera, J. F.; Martyn, J.

    1989-01-01

    1. Muscle paresis and aberrant pharmacological responses are two important pathophysiological changes that have been observed at the neuromuscular junction following thermal injury. By use of the mouse model of 20%, 30% and 50% total body surface area (BSA) burn, we examined the significance of intracellular mediators, adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in perturbing the physiological function of tension development and the pharmacological response to (+)-tubocurarine (+)-Tc at day 21 post-burn. 2. Cyclic AMP levels increased with the size of burn. The relationship between mean cyclic AMP levels and burn size was significant (R2 = 0.96, r = 0.98). Significant (P less than 0.05) reductions in tension development (g) were observed for the 30% and 50% BSA burn group compared to controls (30.3 +/- 8.3 and 34.1 +/- 5.9 vs 59.1 +/- 1.0, respectively). Tension alterations were associated with increased cyclic AMP levels; the relationship between increased cyclic AMP levels and tension decrease was significant (R2 = 0.82, r = 0.91). The dose of (+)-Tc required to inhibit twitch tension increased in proportion to burn size and was statistically significant in the 50% BSA burn group compared to controls (0.3320 +/- 0.09 vs 0.1093 +/- 0.11 mg kg-1, P less than 0.05). The alterations in the effective dose of (+)-Tc were significantly correlated to increases in cyclic AMP levels (R2 = 0.70, r = 0.83). Although PGE2 levels were elevated in the 30% and 50% burn groups, no relation was seen to either tension or (+)-Tc doses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2556207

  1. Cigarette Smoke–Induced CXCR3 Receptor Up-Regulation Mediates Endothelial Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Green, Linden A.; Petrusca, Daniela; Rajashekhar, Gangaraju; Gianaris, Tom; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Wang, Liang; Justice, Matthew J.; Petrache, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial monocyte–activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) and interferon-inducible protein (IP)–10 are proinflammatory mediators, which in addition to their chemokine activities, selectively induce apoptosis in endothelial cells and are up-regulated in the lungs of cigarette smoke–exposed humans. Previously, we showed that EMAP II is an essential mediator of cigarette smoke–induced lung emphysema in mice linking endothelial cell apoptosis with inflammation. Here we addressed the role of the CXCR3 receptor in EMAP II–induced and IP-10–induced apoptosis in endothelial cells and its regulation by cigarette smoke. We found that both neutralizing antibodies and small inhibitory RNA to CXCR3 abrogated EMAP II–induced and IP-10–induced endothelial caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation. CXCR3 receptor surface expression in human lung microvascular endothelial cells and in lung tissue endothelium was up-regulated by exposure to cigarette smoke. In tissue culture conditions, EMAP II–induced and IP-10–induced apoptosis was enhanced by preincubation with cigarette smoke extract. Interestingly, serum starvation also induced CXCR3 up-regulation and enhanced EMAP II–induced endothelial apoptosis. Signal transduction via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was essential for CXCR3-induced cell death, but not for CXCR3 receptor up-regulation by cigarette smoke. In turn, protein nitration was required for CXCR3 receptor up-regulation by cigarette smoke and consequently for subsequent CXCR3-induced cell death. In conclusion, the concerted up-regulation of proinflammatory EMAP II, IP-10, and CXCR3 by cigarette smoke could sustain a cascade of cell death that may promote the alveolar tissue loss noted in human emphysema. PMID:22936405

  2. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  3. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  4. Peer-Mediated Procedures to Induce Swallowing and Food Acceptance in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, R. Douglas; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A peer modeling procedure was shown to induce swallowing in a young child with dysphagia, and to increase food acceptance in a young child who consistently declined food. A peer-mediated procedure, consisting of rotated opportunities to consume food with a peer, increased consumption more than did modeling alone. (Author/JDD)

  5. GENETIC INFLUENCES ON IN VTIRO PARTICULATE MATTER-INDUCED AIRWAY EPITHELIAL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY MEDIATOR RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENETIC INFLUENCES ON IN VITRO PARTICULATE MATTER-INDUCED AIRWAY EPITHELIAL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY MEDIATOR RELEASE.
    JA Dye, JH Richards, DA Andrews, UP Kodavanti. US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is capable of damaging the airway epitheli...

  6. GENETIC INFLUENCES ON IN VTIRO PARTICULATE MATTER-INDUCED AIRWAY EPITHELIAL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY MEDIATOR RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENETIC INFLUENCES ON IN VITRO PARTICULATE MATTER-INDUCED AIRWAY EPITHELIAL INJURY AND INFLAMMATORY MEDIATOR RELEASE.
    JA Dye, JH Richards, DA Andrews, UP Kodavanti. US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.

    Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is capable of damaging the airway epitheli...

  7. TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Kitajima, Naoyuki; Kuroda, Takuya; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Miyano, Kei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Sato, Yoji; Ide, Tomomi; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Sumimoto, Hideki; Mori, Yasuo; Nishida, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Structural cardiac remodeling, accompanying cytoskeletal reorganization of cardiac cells, is a major clinical outcome of diastolic heart failure. A highly local Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane has been suggested to code signals to induce Rho GTPase-mediated fibrosis, but it is obscure how the heart specifically decodes the local Ca2+ influx as a cytoskeletal reorganizing signal under the conditions of the rhythmic Ca2+ handling required for pump function. We found that an inhibition of transient receptor potential canonical 3 (TRPC3) channel activity exhibited resistance to Rho-mediated maladaptive fibrosis in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. Proteomic analysis revealed that microtubule-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEF-H1, participates in TRPC3-mediated RhoA activation induced by mechanical stress in cardiomyocytes and transforming growth factor (TGF) β stimulation in cardiac fibroblasts. We previously revealed that TRPC3 functionally interacts with microtubule-associated NADPH oxidase (Nox) 2, and inhibition of Nox2 attenuated mechanical stretch-induced GEF-H1 activation in cardiomyocytes. Finally, pharmacological TRPC3 inhibition significantly suppressed fibrotic responses in human cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts. These results strongly suggest that microtubule-localized TRPC3-GEF-H1 axis mediates fibrotic responses commonly in cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts induced by physico-chemical stimulation. PMID:27991560

  8. Peer-Mediated Procedures to Induce Swallowing and Food Acceptance in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, R. Douglas; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A peer modeling procedure was shown to induce swallowing in a young child with dysphagia, and to increase food acceptance in a young child who consistently declined food. A peer-mediated procedure, consisting of rotated opportunities to consume food with a peer, increased consumption more than did modeling alone. (Author/JDD)

  9. URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRUCTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    URBAN PARTICLE-INDUCED PULMONARY ARTERY CONSTRICTION IS MEDIATED BY SUPEROXIDE PRODUCTION.Jacqueline D. Carter, Zhuowei Li, Lisa A. Dailey, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina, and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

    Exposure to particulate matter...

  10. IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis is mediated by Janus kinase 3 (JAK3).

    PubMed

    Henkels, Karen M; Frondorf, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Doseff, Andrea L; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2011-01-03

    Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase vital to the regulation of T-cells. We report that JAK3 is a mediator of interleukin-8 (IL-8) stimulation of a different class of hematopoietic relevant cells: human neutrophils. IL-8 induced a time- and concentration-dependent activation of JAK3 activity in neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 leukemic cells. JAK3 was more robustly activated by IL-8 than other kinases: p70S6K, mTOR, MAPK or PKC. JAK3 silencing severely inhibited IL-8-mediated chemotaxis. Thus, IL-8 stimulates chemotaxis through a mechanism mediated by JAK3. Further, JAK3 activity and chemotaxis were inhibited by the flavonoid apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) at ∼5nM IC(50). These new findings lay the basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of cell migration as it relates to neutrophil-mediated chronic inflammatory processes.

  11. Intravenous immunoglobulins induce CD32-mediated platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pollreisz, A; Assinger, A; Hacker, S; Hoetzenecker, K; Schmid, W; Lang, G; Wolfsberger, M; Steinlechner, B; Bielek, E; Lalla, E; Klepetko, W; Volf, I; Ankersmit, H J

    2008-09-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) and cytomegalovirus immunoglobulins (CMVIg) are currently finding increased acceptance in clinical states of high immune activity and in transplant recipients. A rare side-effect of their application is intravascular thrombosis, which is thought to be related to pre-existing hyperviscosity. In a previous study we have shown that rabbit antithymocyte globulin causes platelet aggregation in vitro via the Fc IgG receptor (CD32). To investigate if IVIg and CMVIg have the potential to cause CD32-dependent platelet aggregation. The influence of CMVIg or IVIg on platelets pre-incubated with or without monoclonal antibody AT10 was studied in an aggregometer. Expression of platelet surface activation marker CD62P was determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and presence of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All in vitro experiments were performed using platelet concentrates from the blood bank, at therapeutic concentrations of immunoglobulins. Results Incubation of platelets with CMVIg and IVIg markedly induced platelet aggregation, and increased expression of CD62P and secretion of sCD40L. The capacity of CMVIg and IVIg to induce platelet aggregation was completely abrogated by adding the blocking antibody AT10 directed against the low-affinity Fc IgG receptor (CD32). Our results suggest that CMVIg and IVIg solutions with activating Fc domains are able to bind CD32 on platelets and cause platelet aggregation in vitro. These results indicate a mechanism by which in vivo intravascular thrombosis may be explained and suggest caution with concomitant use of packed platelets and IVIg in autoimmune diseases in the clinical setting.

  12. Central Mechanisms Mediating Thrombospondin-4-induced Pain States.

    PubMed

    Park, John; Yu, Yanhui Peter; Zhou, Chun-Yi; Li, Kang-Wu; Wang, Dongqing; Chang, Eric; Kim, Doo-Sik; Vo, Benjamin; Zhang, Xia; Gong, Nian; Sharp, Kelli; Steward, Oswald; Vitko, Iuliia; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Eroglu, Cagla; Barres, Ben; Zaucke, Frank; Feng, Guoping; Luo, Z David

    2016-06-17

    Peripheral nerve injury induces increased expression of thrombospondin-4 (TSP4) in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia that contributes to neuropathic pain states through unknown mechanisms. Here, we test the hypothesis that TSP4 activates its receptor, the voltage-gated calcium channel Cavα2δ1 subunit (Cavα2δ1), on sensory afferent terminals in dorsal spinal cord to promote excitatory synaptogenesis and central sensitization that contribute to neuropathic pain states. We show that there is a direct molecular interaction between TSP4 and Cavα2δ1 in the spinal cord in vivo and that TSP4/Cavα2δ1-dependent processes lead to increased behavioral sensitivities to stimuli. In dorsal spinal cord, TSP4/Cavα2δ1-dependent processes lead to increased frequency of miniature and amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents in second-order neurons as well as increased VGlut2- and PSD95-positive puncta, indicative of increased excitatory synapses. Blockade of TSP4/Cavα2δ1-dependent processes with Cavα2δ1 ligand gabapentin or genetic Cavα2δ1 knockdown blocks TSP4 induced nociception and its pathological correlates. Conversely, TSP4 antibodies or genetic ablation blocks nociception and changes in synaptic transmission in mice overexpressing Cavα2δ1 Importantly, TSP4/Cavα2δ1-dependent processes also lead to similar behavioral and pathological changes in a neuropathic pain model of peripheral nerve injury. Thus, a TSP4/Cavα2δ1-dependent pathway activated by TSP4 or peripheral nerve injury promotes exaggerated presynaptic excitatory input and evoked sensory neuron hyperexcitability and excitatory synaptogenesis, which together lead to central sensitization and pain state development. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Endothelin-induced contraction and mediator release in human bronchus.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, D. W.; Hubbard, W. C.; Undem, B. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. To elucidate the role of acetylcholine and various autacoids in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced contraction in human bronchus, the effects of various receptor antagonists were examined. In addition, the ability of ET-1 to stimulate the release of histamine, peptidoleukotrienes and prostanoids was determined. 2. ET-1 was a potent and effective contractile agonist in human bronchus, possessing similar potency and efficacy to leukotriene D4 (LTD4); EC50 (-log M): ET-1 = 7.76 +/- 0.09, n = 7; LTD4 = 8.46 +/- 0.53, n = 7; P > 0.2; maximum response (% 10 microM pre-carbachol): ET-1 = 103.8 +/- 17.4, n = 7; LTD4 = 95.5 +/- 9.3, n = 7; P > 0.6. 3. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, sodium meclofenamate (1 microM) or the potent and selective thromboxane receptor antagonist, SQ 29,548 (1 microM) were without significant effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. 4. In the presence of sodium meclofenamate (1 microM), the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 microM), the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, WEB 2086 (1 microM) or the combination of the H1-histamine receptor antagonist, mepyramine (10 microM) and the leukotriene receptor antagonist, SK&F 104353 (10 microM), were without marked effect on ET-1 concentration-response curves. In addition, the combination of all four receptor antagonists did not antagonize ET-1-induced contraction. 5. ET-1 (0.3 microM) did not stimulate the release of histamine or immunoreactive leukotrienes from human bronchus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7693285

  14. Cofilin mediates ATP depletion-induced endothelial cell actin alterations.

    PubMed

    Suurna, Maria V; Ashworth, Sharon L; Hosford, Melanie; Sandoval, Ruben M; Wean, Sarah E; Shah, Bijal M; Bamburg, James R; Molitoris, Bruce A

    2006-06-01

    Ischemia and sepsis lead to endothelial cell damage, resulting in compromised microvascular flow in many organs. Much remains to be determined regarding the intracellular structural events that lead to endothelial cell dysfunction. To investigate potential actin cytoskeletal-related mechanisms, ATP depletion was induced in mouse pancreatic microvascular endothelial cells (MS1). Fluorescent imaging and biochemical studies demonstrated a rapid and progressive increase in F-actin along with a decrease in G-actin at 60 min. Confocal microscopic analysis showed ATP depletion resulted in destruction of actin stress fibers and accumulation of F-actin aggregates. We hypothesized these actin alterations were secondary to dephosphorylation/activation of actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins. Cofilin, the predominant isoform expressed in MS1 cells, was rapidly dephosphorylated/activated during ATP depletion. To directly investigate the role of cofilin activation on the actin cytoskeleton during ischemia, MS1 cells were infected with adenoviruses containing the cDNAs for wild-type Xenopus laevis ADF/cofilin green fluorescent protein [XAC(wt)-GFP], GFP, and the constitutively active and inactive isoforms XAC(S3A)-GFP and XAC(S3E)-GFP. The rate and extent of cortical actin destruction and actin aggregate formation were increased in ATP-depleted XAC(wt)-GFP- and XAC(S3A)-GFP-expressing cells, whereas increased actin stress fibers were observed in XAC(S3E)-GFP-expressing cells. To investigate the upstream signaling pathway of ADF/cofilin, LIM kinase 1-GFP (LIMK1-GFP) was expressed in MS1 cells. Cells expressing LIMK1-GFP protein had higher levels of phosphorylated ADF/cofilin, increased stress fibers, and delayed F-actin cytoskeleton destruction during ATP depletion. These results strongly support the importance of cofilin regulation in ischemia-induced endothelial cell actin cytoskeleton alterations leading to cell damage and microvascular dysfunction.

  15. Fishing indirectly structures macroalgal assemblages by altering herbivore behavior.

    PubMed

    Madin, Elizabeth M P; Gaines, Steven D; Madin, Joshua S; Warner, Robert R

    2010-12-01

    Fishing has clear direct effects on harvested species, but its cascading, indirect effects are less well understood. Fishing disproportionately removes larger, predatory fishes from marine food webs. Most studies of the consequent indirect effects focus on density-mediated interactions where predator removal alternately drives increases and decreases in abundances of successively lower trophic-level species. While prey may increase in number with fewer predators, they may also alter their behavior. When such behavioral responses impact the food resources of prey species, behaviorally mediated trophic cascades can dramatically shape landscapes. It remains unclear whether this pathway of change is typically triggered by ocean fishing. By coupling a simple foraging model with empirical observations from coral reefs, we provide a mechanistic basis for understanding and predicting how predator harvest can alter the landscape of risk for herbivores and consequently drive dramatic changes in primary producer distributions. These results broaden trophic cascade predictions for fisheries to include behavioral changes. They also provide a framework for detecting the presence and magnitude of behaviorally mediated cascades. This knowledge will help to reconcile the disparity between expected and observed patterns of fishing-induced cascades in the sea.

  16. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (–/–) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (–/–) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (–/–) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22512859

  17. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Duong, Chu Xuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (-/-) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (-/-) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (-/-) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuropeptide Y mediates glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis and marrow adiposity in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, F-S; Lian, W-S; Weng, W-T; Sun, Y-C; Ke, H-J; Chen, Y-S; Ko, J-Y

    2016-09-01

    Increased neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression occurred in the glucocorticoid-induced osteoporotic skeleton. NPY knockout mice exhibited a minor response to the glucocorticoid-mediated exacerbation of bone accretion and fatty marrow pathogenesis. NPY deletion restored SITR1 signaling and enhanced PPARγ ubiquitination of bone tissue, an alternative strategy for ameliorating glucocorticoid-induced skeletal deterioration. Glucocorticoid excess is observed to worsen the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and fatty marrow. This study was undertaken to investigate the contribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY) to glucocorticoid-induced bone loss and marrow adiposity. NPY knockout and wild-type mice were administered methylprednisolone for four consecutive weeks. Bone mineral density, microarchitecture, and calcein-labeled mineral acquisition were quantified by μCT, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and histomorphometry. Expression of osteogenic and adipogenic markers and acetylation states of PPARγ were detected by RT-quantitative PCR, immunoprecipitation, and immunoblotting. High NPY levels were associated with glucocorticoid-induced trabecular bone deterioration and marrow fat accumulation. Mice lacking NPY had high bone mass concomitant with spacious trabecular and cortical bone microstructure. NPY deletion shielded skeletal tissues from the glucocorticoid-induced impediment of bone mass, trabecular morphometric characteristics, mineral accretion activity, and fatty marrow development. Ex vivo, NPY deficiency sustained osteogenic differentiation capacity and curtailed the glucocorticoid-mediated escalation of adipocyte formation reactions of primary bone-marrow mesenchymal cells. NPY deletion appeared to modulate Y1 and Y2 receptors, sirtuin 1, ERK, and p38 signaling pathways, an effect that facilitated hypoacetylation and ubiquitination of adipogenic transcription factor PPARγ in the skeletal tissues exposed to glucocorticoid stress. NPY mediates the glucocorticoid-induced

  19. Dexamethasone-induced apoptosis of osteocytic and osteoblastic cells is mediated by TAK1 activation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Heyuan; Wang, Tao; Xu, Dongli; Cha, Bingbing; Liu, Jun; Li, Yiming

    2015-05-01

    Increased apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes is the main mechanism of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced osteonecrosis. In the current study, we investigated whether dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblastic and osteocytic cell apoptosis is mediated through activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), and whether TAK1 inhibition could promote survival opposing the deleterious effects of Dex. We found that TAK1 was activated by Dex in both osteocytic MLO-Y4 and osteoblastic OB-6 cells, which was prevented by two known anti-oxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and ebselen. TAK1 inhibitors, including LYTAK1 and 5Z-7-oxozeaenol (57-OZ), inhibited Dex-induced apoptosis of MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. Meanwhile shRNA-mediated knockdown of TAK1 also suppressed Dex-induced damages to MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. On the other hand, exogenously over-expressing TAK1 enhanced Dex-induced MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cell apoptosis. At the molecular level, we found that TAK1 mediated Dex-induced pro-apoptotic Pyk2-JNK activation. Inhibition or silencing of TAK1 almost abolished Pyk2-JNK phosphorylations by Dex in MLO-Y4 and OB-6 cells. TAK1 over-expression, on the other hand, increased Dex's activity on Pyk2-JNK phosphorylations in above cells. We conclude that part of the pro-apoptotic actions of Dex on osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are mediated through TAK1 activation, and that inhibition of TAK1 might protect from GC-induced damages to osteoblasts and osteocytes.

  20. Nuclear factor-κB mediates placental growth factor induced pro-labour mediators in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Prostaglandins, pro-inflammatory cytokines, extracellular matrix remodelling enzymes and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) are involved in the mechanisms of term and preterm parturition. Recent studies have reported an increase in angiogenesis-related genes during term and preterm labour, including placental growth factor (PLGF). In non-gestational tissues, PLGF induces inflammation via NF-κB. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of PLGF on the gene expression and release of pro-labour mediators in human placenta. Samples were obtained from normal pregnancies at the time of Caesarean section. Human placenta was incubated in the absence (basal control) or presence of a 10 ng/ml PLGF for 24 h. Inflammatory gene expression was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, concentration of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins was quantified by ELISA, and secretory matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) activity by zymography. NF-κB DNA-binding activity and IκB-α (inhibitor of NF-κB) protein degradation were analysed by ELISA and Western blotting, respectively. PLGF significantly increased interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 gene expression and secretion, cyclooxygenase-2 expression and resultant prostaglandin (PG) E(2) and PGF(2α) release, and MMP-9 gene expression and enzyme production. PLGF induced the degradation of IκB-α whilst increasing NF-κB p65 DNA-binding activity. The PLGF-induced pro-labour responses were abrogated by co-treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7082. In summary, the pro-inflammatory and pro-labour effects of PLGF in human placenta are mediated by NF-κB.

  1. Mercury induces inflammatory mediator release from human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury is known to be neurotoxic, but its effects on the immune system are less well known. Mast cells are involved in allergic reactions, but also in innate and acquired immunity, as well as in inflammation. Many patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) have "allergic" symptoms; moreover, the prevalence of ASD in patients with mastocytosis, characterized by numerous hyperactive mast cells in most tissues, is 10-fold higher than the general population suggesting mast cell involvement. We, therefore, investigated the effect of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) on human mast cell activation. Methods Human leukemic cultured LAD2 mast cells and normal human umbilical cord blood-derived cultured mast cells (hCBMCs) were stimulated by HgCl2 (0.1-10 μM) for either 10 min for beta-hexosaminidase release or 24 hr for measuring vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and IL-6 release by ELISA. Results HgCl2 induced a 2-fold increase in β-hexosaminidase release, and also significant VEGF release at 0.1 and 1 μM (311 ± 32 pg/106 cells and 443 ± 143 pg/106 cells, respectively) from LAD2 mast cells compared to control cells (227 ± 17 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to the proinflammatory neuropeptide substance P (SP, 0.1 μM) had synergestic action in inducing VEGF from LAD2 mast cells. HgCl2 also stimulated significant VEGF release (360 ± 100 pg/106 cells at 1 μM, n = 5, p < 0.05) from hCBMCs compared to control cells (182 ± 57 pg/106 cells), and IL-6 release (466 ± 57 pg/106 cells at 0.1 μM) compared to untreated cells (13 ± 25 pg/106 cells, n = 5, p < 0.05). Addition of HgCl2 (0.1 μM) to SP (5 μM) further increased IL-6 release. Conclusions HgCl2 stimulates VEGF and IL-6 release from human mast cells. This phenomenon could disrupt the blood-brain-barrier and permit brain inflammation. As a result, the findings of the present study provide a biological mechanism for how low levels of mercury may contribute to ASD

  2. Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) mediates epilepsy-induced sleep disruption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Rung; Jou, Shuo-Bin; Chou, Yu-Ju; Yi, Pei-Lu; Chen, Chun-Jen; Chang, Fang-Chia

    2016-11-22

    Sleep disruptions are common in epilepsy patients. Our previous study demonstrates that homeostatic factors and circadian rhythm may mediate epilepsy-induced sleep disturbances when epilepsy occurs at different zeitgeber hours. The proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 (IL-1), is a somnogenic cytokine and may also be involved in epileptogenesis; however, few studies emphasize the effect of IL-1 in epilepsy-induced sleep disruption. We herein hypothesized that IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mediates the pathogenesis of epilepsy and epilepsy-induced sleep disturbances. We determined the role of IL-1R1 by using IL-1R1 knockout (IL-1R1 -/- KO) mice. Our results elucidated the decrease of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the light period in IL-1R -/- mice and confirmed the somnogenic role of IL-1R1. Rapid electrical amygdala kindling was performed to induce epilepsy at the particular zeitgeber time (ZT) point, ZT13. Our results demonstrated that seizure thresholds induced by kindling stimuli, such as the after-discharge threshold and successful kindling rates, were not altered in IL-1R -/- mice when compared to those obtained from the wildtype mice (IL-1R +/+ mice). This result suggests that IL-1R1 is not involved in kindling-induced epileptogenesis. During sleep, ZT13 kindling stimulation significantly enhanced NREM sleep during the subsequent 6 h (ZT13-18) in wildtype mice, and sleep returned to the baseline the following day. However, the kindling-induced sleep alteration was absent in the IL-1R -/- KO mice. These results indicate that the IL-1 signal mediates epilepsy-induced sleep disturbance, but dose not participate in kindling-induced epileptogenesis.

  3. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  4. Unique copper-induced oligomers mediate alpha-synuclein toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Josephine A; Wang, Xiaoyan; Brown, David R

    2009-08-01

    Parkinson's disease and a number of other neurodegenerative diseases have been linked to either genetic mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene or show evidence of aggregates of the alpha-synuclein protein, sometimes in the form of Lewy bodies. There currently is no clear evidence of a distinct neurotoxic species of alpha-synuclein to explain the death of neurons in these diseases. We undertook to assess the toxicity of alpha-synuclein via exogenous application in cell culture. Initially, we showed that only aggregated alpha-synuclein is neurotoxic and requires the presence copper but not iron. Other members of the synuclein family showed no toxicity in any form and inherited point mutations did not alter the effective toxic concentration of alpha-synuclein. Through protein fractionation techniques, we were able to isolate an oligomeric species responsible for the toxicity of alpha-synuclein. This oligomeric species has a unique stellate appearance under EM and again, requires association with copper to induce cell death. The results allow us to suggest that the toxic species of alpha-synuclein in vivo could possibly be these stellate oligomers and not fibrils. Our data provide a link between the recently noted association of copper and alpha-synuclein and a potential role for the combination in causing neurodegeneration.

  5. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  6. Altered Histone Monoubiquitylation Mediated by Mutant Huntingtin Induces Transcriptional Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee-Ohk; Chawla, Prianka; Overland, Ryan P.; Xia, Eva; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh

    2008-01-01

    Although transcriptional dysregulation is a critical pathogenic mechanism in Huntington's disease (HD), it is still not known how mutant huntingtin causes it. Here we show that alteration of histone monoubiquitylation is a key mechanism. Disrupted interaction of huntingtin with Bmi-1, a component of the hPRC1L E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, increases monoubiquityl histone H2A (uH2A) levels in a cell culture model of HD. Genes with expression that is repressed in transgenic R6/2 mouse brain have increased uH2A and decreased uH2B at their promoters, whereas actively transcribed genes show the opposite pattern. Reduction in uH2A reverses transcriptional repression and inhibits methylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 in cell culture. In contrast, reduction in uH2B induces transcriptional repression and inhibits methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4. This is the first report to demonstrate hPRC1L as a huntingtin-interacting histone modifying complex and a crucial role for histone monoubiquitylation in mammalian brain gene expression, which broadens our understanding of histone code. These findings also provide a rationale for targeting histone monoubiquitylation for therapy in HD. PMID:18400894

  7. Allergen-induced generation of mediators in the mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Mattoli, S

    2001-01-01

    The inhalation of antigens does not normally lead to allergic inflammation, but airway resident cells and their products may affect the outcome of antigen exposure. It is therefore important to elucidate how potential allergens interact with airway epithelial cells and other cells located within and below the epithelium. Some studies have indicated that certain antigens, particularly the major house dust mite antigen Der p1, penetrate the airway epithelium by intracellular transportation or paracellular passage, depending on their concentrations, time of exposure, and ability of the cells to inactivate them. If an antigen possesses proteolytic activity, such as Der p1, and it reaches high concentrations or the exposure is prolonged, the disruption of the tight junction can also favor the transepithelial passage of other antigens. In this way, the antigens can easily encounter the effector cells located between epithelial cells and below the basement membrane. The magnitude of this phenomenon may be more prominent in the airways of asthmatic patients, as their epithelium is more permeable to Der p1 than the epithelium of nonasthmatic patients and releases cytokines after exposure to very low concentrations of this antigen for brief periods. Epithelial cell activation may facilitate the development of allergic mucosal sensitization to Der p1 and contribute to the antigen-induced inflammatory response by affecting the migration and function of dendritic cells, mast cells, and eosinophils. Also, there might be a secondary release of interleukin-6 and endothelin-1, which can have a detrimental effect on the cardiovascular function. PMID:11544162

  8. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M.

    1982-08-01

    Alternative methods for quantifying the economic impacts associated with future increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ were examined. A literature search was undertaken, both to gain a better understanding of the ways in which CO/sub 2/ buildup could affect crop growth and to identify the different methods available for assessing the impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields. The second task involved identifying the scope of both the direct and indirect economic impacts that could occur as a result of CO/sub 2/-induced changes in crop yields. The third task then consisted of a comprehensive literature search to identify what types of economic models could be used effectively to assess the kinds of direct and indirect economic impacts that could conceivably occur as a result of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon national and multi-regional agricultural sector models, multi-country agricultural trade models, and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The fourth and final task of this research involved synthesizing the information gathered in the previous tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes related to agricultural production.

  9. A simple method to prevent hard X-ray-induced preheating effects inside the cone tip in indirect-drive fast ignition implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dongxiao; Shan, Lianqiang; Zhou, Weimin; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Bi, Bi; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shui, Min; He, Yingling; Gu, Yuqiu Zhang, Baohan; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Wang, Feng; Yang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao; Chen, Li; Chen, Ming; and others

    2016-06-15

    During fast-ignition implosions, preheating of inside the cone tip caused by hard X-rays can strongly affect the generation and transport of hot electrons in the cone. Although indirect-drive implosions have a higher implosion symmetry, they cause stronger preheating effects than direct-drive implosions. To control the preheating of the cone tip, we propose the use of indirect-drive fast-ignition targets with thicker tips. Experiments carried out at the ShenGuang-III prototype laser facility confirmed that thicker tips are effective for controlling preheating. Moreover, these results were consistent with those of 1D radiation hydrodynamic simulations.

  10. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells. PMID:26488306

  11. Exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays a role in radiation-induced bystander effect.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuai; Wang, Jufang; Ding, Nan; Hu, Wentao; Zhang, Xurui; Wang, Bing; Hua, Junrui; Wei, Wenjun; Zhu, Qiyun

    2015-01-01

    Bystander effects can be induced through cellular communication between irradiated cells and non-irradiated cells. The signals that mediate this cellular communication, such as cytokines, reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide and even microRNAs, can be transferred between cells via gap junctions or extracellular medium. We have previously reported that miR-21, a well described DDR (DNA damage response) microRNA, is involved in radiation-induced bystander effects through a medium-mediated way. However, the mechanisms of the microRNA transfer have not been elucidated in details. In the present study, it was found that exosomes isolated from irradiated conditioned medium could induce bystander effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated plenty of evidences that miR-21, which is up-regulated as a result of mimic transfection or irradiation, can be transferred from donor or irradiated cells into extracellular medium and subsequently get access to the recipient or bystander cells through exosomes to induce bystander effects. Inhibiting the miR-21 expression in advance can offset the bystander effects to some extent. From all of these results, it can be concluded that the exosome-mediated microRNA transfer plays an important role in the radiation-induced bystander effects. These findings provide new insights into the functions of microRNAs and the cellular communication between the directly irradiated cells and the non-irradiated cells.

  12. Fas-induced programmed cell death is mediated by a Ras-regulated O2- synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Gulbins, E; Brenner, B; Schlottmann, K; Welsch, J; Heinle, H; Koppenhoefer, U; Linderkamp, O; Coggeshall, K M; Lang, F

    1996-01-01

    Fas induces apoptosis in lymphocytes via a poorly defined intracellular signalling cascade. Previously, we have demonstrated the involvement and significance of a signalling cascade from the Fas receptor via sphingomyelinases and ceramide to Ras in Fas-induced apoptosis. Here we demonstrate rapid and transient synthesis of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) via activation of Ras after Fas. Genetic inhibition of Ras by transfection of transdominant inhibitory N17Ras blocked Fas-mediated ROI synthesis and programmed cell death. Likewise, the antioxidants N-acetyl-cysteine and N-t-butyl-phenylnitrone abolished Fas-induced cell death, pointing to an important role for Ras-triggered ROI synthesis in Fas-mediated programmed cell death. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8943716

  13. Effect of M-711 on experimental skin reactions induced by chemical mediators in rats.

    PubMed

    Shichinohe, K; Shimizu, M; Kurokawa, K

    1996-05-01

    We investigated the mechanism of anti-allergic action of Moku-boi-to (M-711) and effects on the skin reactions induced by chemical mediators as the model of allergic dermatitis. More than 20 mg/kg BW of M-711 significantly suppressed the enhancement of capillary permeability induced by histamine, LTC4, and anti-serum in the rat skin. Anti-histaminic effect of 40 mg/kg BW of M-711 was equipotent to same as the optimal doses of azelastine and diphenhydramine, respectively. As to anti-LTC4 action, 20 mg of M-711 was compared to the optimal dose of diphenhydramine. Those data showed that M-711 has the suppressive effects on the chemical mediators such as histamine and LTC4 and reduced the skin reaction induced by antigen-antibody response.

  14. Nicotine induces Nme2-mediated apoptosis in mouse testes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yunqi; Xu, Wangjie; Nie, Dongsheng; Zhang, Dong; Dai, Jingbo; Zhao, Xianglong; Zhang, Meixing; Wang, Zhaoxia; Chen, Zhong; Qiao, Zhongdong

    2016-04-15

    In mouse testes, germ cell apoptosis can be caused by cigarette smoke and lead to declining quality of semen, but the exact molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To evaluate the effects of nicotine exposure on apoptosis during spermatogenesis, we first constructed a nicotine-treated mouse model and detected germ cell apoptosis activity in the testes using the TUNEL method. Then we analyzed the variation of telomere length and telomerase activity by real-time PCR and TRAP-real-time PCR, respectively. Further, we investigated a highly expressed gene, Nme2, in mouse testes after nicotine treatment from our previous results, which has close correlation with the apoptosis activity predicted by bioinformatics. We performed NME2 overexpression in Hela cells to confirm whether telomere length and telomerase activity were regulated by the Nme2 gene. Finally, we examined methylation of CpG islands in the Nme2 promoter with the Bisulfite Sequencing (BSP) method. The results showed that apoptosis had increased significantly, and then telomerase activity became weak. Further, telomere length was shortened in the germ cells among the nicotine-treated group. In Hela cells, both overexpression of the Nme2 gene and nicotine exposure can suppress the activity of telomerase activity and shorten telomere length. BSP results revealed that the Nme2 promoter appeared with low methylation in mouse testes after nicotine treatment. We assume that nicotine-induced apoptosis may be caused by telomerase activity decline, which is inhibited by the up expression of Nme2 because of its hypomethylation in mouse germ cells.

  15. HIV-infected microglia mediate cathepsin B induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zenón, Frances; Cantres-Rosario, Yisel; Adiga, Radhika; Gonzalez, Mariangeline; Rodriguez-Franco, Eillen; Langford, Dianne; Melendez, Loyda M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HIV-1-infected mononuclear phagocytes release soluble factors that affect the homeostasis in tissue. HIV-1 can prompt metabolic encephalopathy with the addition of neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. Recently, we reported that HIV-1 enhances the expression and secretion of bioactive cathepsin B in monocyte-derived macrophages, ultimately contributing to neuronal apoptosis. In this research, we request if microglia respond to HIV infection similarly by modifying the expression, secretion, neurotoxic potential of cathepsin B and the in vivo relevance of these findings. METHODS HIV-ADA infected human primary microglia and CHME-5 were assessed for expression and activity of cathepsin B, its inhibitors, cystatins B and C, and neurotoxicity associated with these changes. Human primary neurons were exposed to supernatants from HIV-infected and uninfected microglia in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors and apoptosis was assessed by TUNEL. Microglial expression of cathepsin B was validated in brain tissue from HIVE patients. RESULTS HIV-infected microglia secreted significantly greater levels of cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C compared to uninfected cells. Increased apoptosis was observed in neurons exposed to supernatants from HIV-1 infected microglia at days 12 post-infection. The cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 and cathepsin B antibody prevented neuronal apoptosis. Increased microglia-derived cathepsin B, cystatin B, and cystatin C and caspase-3+ neurons were detected in HIVE brains compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that HIV-1-induced cathepsin B production in microglia contributes to neuronal apoptosis and may be an important factor in neuronal death associated with HIVE. PMID:26092112

  16. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  17. Stretch-induced hypertrophy activates NFkB-mediated VEGF secretion in adult cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Leychenko, Anna; Konorev, Eugene; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Matter, Michelle L

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension and myocardial infarction are associated with the onset of hypertrophy. Hypertrophy is a compensatory response mechanism to increases in mechanical load due to pressure or volume overload. It is characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling and hypertrophic growth of adult cardiomyocytes. Production of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), which acts as an angiogenic factor and a modulator of cardiomyocyte function, is regulated by mechanical stretch. Mechanical stretch promotes VEGF secretion in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Whether this effect is retained in adult cells and the molecular mechanism mediating stretch-induced VEGF secretion has not been elucidated. Our objective was to investigate whether cyclic mechanical stretch induces VEGF secretion in adult cardiomyocytes and to identify the molecular mechanism mediating VEGF secretion in these cells. Isolated primary adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCMs) were subjected to cyclic mechanical stretch at an extension level of 10% at 30 cycles/min that induces hypertrophic responses. Cyclic mechanical stretch induced a 3-fold increase in VEGF secretion in ARCMs compared to non-stretch controls. This increase in stretch-induced VEGF secretion correlated with NFkB activation. Cyclic mechanical stretch-mediated VEGF secretion was blocked by an NFkB peptide inhibitor and expression of a dominant negative mutant IkBα, but not by inhibitors of the MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K pathways. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated an interaction of NFkB with the VEGF promoter in stretched primary cardiomyocytes. Moreover, VEGF secretion is increased in the stretched myocardium during pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. These findings are the first to demonstrate that NFkB activation plays a role in mediating VEGF secretion upon cyclic mechanical stretch in adult cardiomyocytes. Signaling by NFkB initiated in response to cyclic mechanical stretch may therefore coordinate the hypertrophic response in adult

  18. Stretch-Induced Hypertrophy Activates NFkB-Mediated VEGF Secretion in Adult Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Leychenko, Anna; Konorev, Eugene; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Matter, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension and myocardial infarction are associated with the onset of hypertrophy. Hypertrophy is a compensatory response mechanism to increases in mechanical load due to pressure or volume overload. It is characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling and hypertrophic growth of adult cardiomyocytes. Production of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), which acts as an angiogenic factor and a modulator of cardiomyocyte function, is regulated by mechanical stretch. Mechanical stretch promotes VEGF secretion in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Whether this effect is retained in adult cells and the molecular mechanism mediating stretch-induced VEGF secretion has not been elucidated. Our objective was to investigate whether cyclic mechanical stretch induces VEGF secretion in adult cardiomyocytes and to identify the molecular mechanism mediating VEGF secretion in these cells. Isolated primary adult rat cardiomyocytes (ARCMs) were subjected to cyclic mechanical stretch at an extension level of 10% at 30 cycles/min that induces hypertrophic responses. Cyclic mechanical stretch induced a 3-fold increase in VEGF secretion in ARCMs compared to non-stretch controls. This increase in stretch-induced VEGF secretion correlated with NFkB activation. Cyclic mechanical stretch-mediated VEGF secretion was blocked by an NFkB peptide inhibitor and expression of a dominant negative mutant IkBα, but not by inhibitors of the MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K pathways. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated an interaction of NFkB with the VEGF promoter in stretched primary cardiomyocytes. Moreover, VEGF secretion is increased in the stretched myocardium during pressure overload-induced hypertrophy. These findings are the first to demonstrate that NFkB activation plays a role in mediating VEGF secretion upon cyclic mechanical stretch in adult cardiomyocytes. Signaling by NFkB initiated in response to cyclic mechanical stretch may therefore coordinate the hypertrophic response in adult

  19. PD-L1 regulates the Tregs’ capacity to repress shock/sepsis induced indirect lung injury (iALI) by recruiting phosphatase SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lunxian; Bai, Jianwen; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas–Neira, Joanne; Chen, Yaping; Huang, Xin; Ayala, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that adoptively transferred (AT) exogenous CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) to wild type (WT) mice can directly act to repress shock/sepsis induced experimental iALI and this is mediated in part by programmed cell death receptor 1 (PD-1). In this study, we further determine whether recipient mouse lacking PD-L1, one of the primary ligands for PD-1, contributes to the manipulation of the Tregs’ capacity to repress lung injury. To do this, Tregs isolated from the spleen of WT mice were AT into PD-L1−/− mice subjected to hemorrhagic shock [Hem] and subsequent to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce iALI. Samples were collected for analyses 24 hours after CLP. We found that in PD-L1−/− recipient mice, AT WT-Tregs lost the ability to reverse the development of iALI seen in WT recipient mice (i.e., no reduction of lung injury indices assessed by histology and vascular leakage; failure to decrease the lung neutrophil influx [MPO activity] or the rise in lung apoptosis [caspase 3 activity]). Also a significant increase of interlukin-1β (IL-1β) and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), but no changes in IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17A levels in lung tissues were seen in these mice compared with iALI mice without AT of Tregs. Furthermore, we noted that the lung tissue tyrosine phosphatase Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), but not SHP-2, was activated with the AT of Tregs in PD-L1−/− iALI mice. Finally, through local depletion of CD4+ T cells or CD25+ (Tregs) in the lung, prior to inducing iALI, we found that SHP-1 activation was associated with the loss of Tregs’ protective effects in vivo. Collectively, our data reveal that PD-L1 is a critical modulator of Treg’s ability to suppress iALI and this appears to involve SHP-1 activation. PMID:25057927

  20. NMDA and PACAP Receptor Signaling Interact to Mediate Retinal-Induced SCN Cellular Rhythmicity in the Absence of Light

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Ian C.; Coolen, Lique M.; Lehman, Michael N.

    2013-01-01

    The “core” region of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a central clock responsible for coordinating circadian rhythms, shows a daily rhythm in phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (pERK). This cellular rhythm persists under constant darkness and, despite the absence of light, is dependent upon inputs from the eye. The neural signals driving this rhythmicity remain unknown and here the roles of glutamate and PACAP are examined. First, rhythmic phosphorylation of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit (pNR1, a marker for receptor activation) was shown to coincide with SCN core pERK, with a peak at circadian time (CT) 16. Enucleation and intraocular TTX administration attenuated the peak in the pERK and pNR1 rhythms, demonstrating that activation of the NMDA receptor and ERK in the SCN core at CT16 are dependent on retinal inputs. In contrast, ERK and NR1 phosphorylation in the SCN shell region were unaffected by these treatments. Intraventricular administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 also attenuated the peak in SCN core pERK, indicating that ERK phosphorylation in this region requires NMDA receptor activation. As PACAP is implicated in photic entrainment and is known to modulate glutamate signaling, the effects of a PAC1 receptor antagonist (PACAP 6-38) on SCN core pERK and pNR1 also were examined. PACAP 6-38 administration attenuated SCN core pERK and pNR1, suggesting that PACAP induces pERK directly, and indirectly via a modulation of NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these data indicate that, in the absence of light, retinal-mediated NMDA and PAC1 receptor activation interact to induce cellular rhythms in the SCN core. These results highlight a novel function for glutamate and PACAP release in the hamster SCN apart from their well-known roles in the induction of photic circadian clock resetting. PMID:24098484

  1. Drug-mediated shortening of action potentials in LQTS2 human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gary; Firth, Karl; George, Vinoj; Hoang, Minh Duc; Staniforth, Andrew; Smith, Godfrey; Denning, Chris

    2017-10-09

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are now a well-established modality for modelling genetic disorders of the heart. This is especially so for long QT syndrome (LQTS), which is caused by perturbation of ion channel function, and can lead to fainting, malignant arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. LQTS2 is caused by mutations in KCNH2, a gene whose protein product contributes to IKr (also known as HERG), which is the predominant repolarising potassium current in CMs. b-blockers are the mainstay treatment for patients with LQTS, functioning by reducing heart rate and arrhythmogenesis. However, they are not effective in around a quarter of LQTS2 patients, in part because they do not correct the defining feature of the condition, which is excessively prolonged QT interval. Since new therapeutics are needed, in this report, we biopsied skin fibroblasts from a patient who was both genetically and clinically diagnosed with LQTS2. By producing LQTS-hiPSC-CMs, we assessed the impact of different drugs on action potential duration (APD), which is used as an in vitro surrogate for QT interval. Not surprisingly, the patient's own b-blocker medication, propranolol, had a marginal effect on APD in the LQTS-hiPSC-CMs. However, APD could be significantly reduced by up to 19% with compounds that enhanced the IKr current by direct channel binding or by indirect mediation via the PPARd/protein 14-3-3 epsilon/HERG pathway. Drug-induced enhancement of an alternative potassium current, IKATP, also reduced APD by up to 21%. This study demonstrates the utility of LQTS-hiPSC-CMs is evaluating whether drugs can shorten APD and, importantly, shows that PPARd agonists may form a new class of therapeutics for this condition.

  2. 17Beta-estradiol mediates the sex difference in capsaicin-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chao-Wei; Wang, Su-Yi; Wu, Fong-Sen

    2009-12-01

    We have previously shown that the male sex steroid testosterone inhibits slightly, but the female sex steroid 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) potentiates dramatically, the capsaicin receptor-mediated current in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here, we used pharmacological methods and the nociceptive behavioral test to determine whether there is a sex difference in capsaicin-induced acute pain in rats in vivo and what mechanism underlies this sex difference. Results revealed that intradermal injection of capsaicin induced a dose-dependent nocifensive response in males and females, with the dose required to produce a comparable level of nociception being approximately 3- to 4-fold higher in males than in females. In addition, females during the proestrus stage exhibited significantly greater capsaicin-induced nocifensive responses compared with the estrus stage. Moreover, the female's enhanced sensitivity to the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response was completely reversed by ovariectomy 6 weeks before capsaicin injection. It is noteworthy that intradermal coinjection of E(2) but not progesterone with capsaicin potentiated the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in ovariectomized rats. Likewise, intradermal E(2) injection dose-dependently potentiated the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in male rats. Furthermore, potentiation by E(2) of the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in male rats was not significantly reduced by a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or by a selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, indicating that neither PKC nor PKA was involved in the effect of E(2). These data demonstrate that E(2) mediates the female's enhanced sensitivity to capsaicin-induced acute pain, consistent with potentiation by E(2) of the capsaicin receptor-mediated current in rat DRG neurons.

  3. Polyphosphate induces matrix metalloproteinase-3-mediated proliferation of odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hase, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kawai, Rie; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-05-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate [Poly(P)] may represent a physiological source of phosphate and has the ability to induce bone differentiation in osteoblasts. We previously reported that cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 accelerates the proliferation of purified odontoblast-like cells. In this study, MMP-3 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was transfected into odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate whether MMP-3 activity is induced by Poly(P) and/or is associated with cell proliferation and differentiation into odontoblast-like cells. Treatment with Poly(P) led to an increase in both cell proliferation and additional odontoblastic differentiation. Poly(P)-treated cells showed a small but significant increase in dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1) mRNA expression, which are markers of mature odontoblasts. The cells also acquired additional odontoblast-specific properties including adoption of an odontoblastic phenotype typified by high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and a calcification capacity. In addition, Poly(P) induced expression of MMP-3 mRNA and protein, and increased MMP-3 activity. MMP-3 siRNA-mediated disruption of the expression of these effectors potently suppressed the expression of odontoblastic biomarkers ALP, DSPP, and DMP-1, and blocked calcification. Interestingly, upon siRNA-mediated silencing of MMP-3, we noted a potent and significant decrease in cell proliferation. Using specific siRNAs, we revealed that a unique signaling cascade, Poly(P)→MMP-3→DSPP and/or DMP-1, was intimately involved in the proliferation of odontoblast-like cells. - Highlights: • Polyphosphate increases proliferation of iPS cell-derived odontoblast-like cells. • Polyphosphate-induced MMP-3 results in an increase of cell proliferation. • Induced cell proliferation involves MMP-3, DSPP, and/or DMP-1 sequentially. • Induced MMP-3 also results in an increase of odontoblastic

  4. Complement regulates conventional DC-mediated NK-cell activation by inducing TGF-β1 in Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Qing, Xiaoping; Koo, Gloria C; Salmon, Jane E

    2012-07-01

    Complement activation modulates DC-mediated T-cell activation, but whether complement affects DC-mediated priming of NK cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that conventional DCs (cDCs) from C3(-/-) and C5aR(-/-) mice are hyperresponsive to polyI:C, a TLR3 ligand, leading to enhanced NK-cell activation. We found that cDCs lack C5a receptor (C5aR) and do not respond to C5a directly. Depletion of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells augments polyI:C-induced cDC activation in WT but not in C3(-/-) or C5aR(-/-) mice, indicating that the effect of complement activation on cDCs is indirectly mediated through C5aR-expressing Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. We further demonstrated that the mechanism by which Gr-1(+) myeloid cells regulate the activity of cDCs involves C5a-dependent TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells. C5a enhances and blocking C5aR decreases TGF-β1 production in cultured bone marrow Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. C5aR deficiency is associated with reduced circulating TGF-β1 levels, while depleting Gr-1(+) myeloid cells abrogates this difference between WT and C5aR(-/-) mice. Lastly, we showed that enhanced cDC-NK-cell activity in C3(-/-) mice led to delayed melanoma tumor growth. Thus, complement activation indirectly regulates cDC-NK-cell activation in response to inflammatory stimuli such as TLR3 by promoting TGF-β1 production in Gr-1(+) myeloid cells at steady state.

  5. Food restriction alters pramipexole-induced yawning, hypothermia, and locomotor activity in rats: Evidence for sensitization of dopamine D2 receptor-mediated effects

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Gregory T.; Calinski, Diane M.; Newman, Amy Hauck; Grundt, Peter; Woods, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Food restriction enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of a variety of drugs of abuse including opiates, nicotine, and psychostimulants. Food restriction has also been shown to alter a variety of behavioral and pharmacological responses to dopaminergic agonists including an increased sensitivity to the locomotor stimulatory effects of direct- and indirect-dopamine agonists, elevated extracellular dopamine levels in responses to psychostimulants, as well as suppression of agonist-induced yawning. Behavioral and molecular studies suggests that augmented dopaminergic responses observed in food-restricted animals result from a sensitization of the dopamine D2 receptor, however, little is known about how food restriction affects dopamine D3 receptor function. The current studies were aimed at better defining the effects of food restriction on D2 and D3 receptor function by assessing the capacity of pramipexole to induce yawning, penile erection (PE), hypothermia, and locomotor activity in free-fed and food-restricted rats. Food restriction resulted in a suppression of pramipexole-induced yawning, a sensitized hypothermic response, and an enhanced locomotor response to pramipexole, effects that are suggestive of an enhanced D2 receptor activity; no effect on pramipexole-induced PE was observed. Antagonist studies further supported a food restriction-induced enhancement of D2 receptor activity as the D2 antagonist, L-741,626, recovered pramipexole-induced yawning to free-fed levels, while yawning and PE were suppressed following pretreatment with the D3 antagonist, PG01037. The results of the current studies suggest that food restriction sensitized rats to the D2-mediated effects of pramipexole while having no effect on the D3-mediated effects of pramipexole. PMID:18305018

  6. Mitochondrial damage elicits a TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-mediated antiviral response

    PubMed Central

    Kozaki, Tatsuya; Komano, Jun; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Takahama, Michihiro; Misawa, Takuma; Satoh, Takashi; Takeuchi, Osamu; Kawai, Taro; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Akira, Shizuo; Saitoh, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system senses RNA viruses by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and protects the host from virus infection. PRRs mediate the production of immune modulatory factors and direct the elimination of RNA viruses. Here, we show a unique PRR that mediates antiviral response. Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (TIPARP), a Cysteine3 Histidine (CCCH)-type zinc finger-containing protein, binds to Sindbis virus (SINV) RNA via its zinc finger domain and recruits an exosome to induce viral RNA degradation. TIPARP typically localizes in the nucleus, but it accumulates in the cytoplasm after SINV infection, allowing targeting of cytoplasmic SINV RNA. Redistribution of TIPARP is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent oxidization of the nuclear pore that affects cytoplasmic-nuclear transport. BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) and BCL2 antagonist/killer 1 (BAK1), B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) family members, mediate mitochondrial damage to generate ROS after SINV infection. Thus, TIPARP is a viral RNA-sensing PRR that mediates antiviral responses triggered by BAX- and BAK1-dependent mitochondrial damage. PMID:28213497

  7. Asparagine deprivation mediated by Salmonella asparaginase causes suppression of activation-induced T cell metabolic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Torres, AnnMarie; Luke, Joanna D; Kullas, Amy L; Kapilashrami, Kanishk; Botbol, Yair; Koller, Antonius; Tonge, Peter J; Chen, Emily I; Macian, Fernando; van der Velden, Adrianus W M

    2016-02-01

    Salmonellae are pathogenic bacteria that induce immunosuppression by mechanisms that remain largely unknown. Previously, we showed that a putative type II l-asparaginase produced by Salmonella Typhimurium inhibits T cell responses and mediates virulence in a murine model of infection. Here, we report that this putative L-asparaginase exhibits L-asparagine hydrolase activity required for Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cells. We show that L-asparagine is a nutrient important for T cell activation and that L-asparagine deprivation, such as that mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase, causes suppression of activation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, autophagy, Myc expression, and L-lactate secretion. We also show that L-asparagine deprivation mediated by the Salmonella Typhimurium L-asparaginase causes suppression of cellular processes and pathways involved in protein synthesis, metabolism, and immune response. Our results advance knowledge of a mechanism used by Salmonella Typhimurium to inhibit T cell responses and mediate virulence, and provide new insights into the prerequisites of T cell activation. We propose a model in which l-asparagine deprivation inhibits T cell exit from quiescence by causing suppression of activation-induced metabolic reprogramming.

  8. Oestrogen receptors mediate oestrogen-induced increases in post-exercise rat skeletal muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Enns, D L; Iqbal, S; Tiidus, P M

    2008-09-01

    Our laboratory recently demonstrated that increases in post-exercise muscle satellite cell numbers are augmented by oestrogen. We investigated whether muscle oestrogen receptors (ORs) mediate this effect through administration of an OR antagonist, ICI 182,780. Ovariectomized female rats were divided into three groups: sham, oestrogen (0.25 mg pellet) and oestrogen plus OR blocker (ICI 182,780). Each group was divided into control and exercised groups. ICI 182,780 (5 mg kg(-1) sc) was administered 1 day prior to and 6 days following oestrogen pellet implantation. After 8 days of oestrogen exposure, animals ran downhill for 90 min (17 m min(-1), -13.5 degrees grade) on a treadmill. Soleus and white vastus muscles were removed 24 and 72 h post-exercise and immunostained for total (Pax7), activated (MyoD) and proliferating (BrdU) satellite cells. Muscle damage was indirectly assessed by measuring beta-glucuronidase activity. Two markers (His48 and ED1) of leucocyte infiltration were also examined. beta-Glucuronidase activities and His48+ and ED1+ leucocytes increased post-exercise, and these increases were attenuated with oestrogen. ICI 182,780 did not influence the attenuating effect of oestrogen on leucocyte infiltration or beta-glucuronidase activities in muscle. Total (Pax7+), activated (MyoD+) and proliferating (BrdU+) satellite cells increased post-exercise, and these increases were augmented with oestrogen. Interestingly, ICI 182,780 abolished both exercise- and oestrogen-mediated increases in these satellite cell markers. Oestrogen may augment increases in muscle satellite cells following exercise through OR-mediated mechanisms; furthermore, the attenuation of post-exercise muscle damage and leucocyte infiltration by oestrogen appears to be a non-OR-mediated process.

  9. PKCα mediates acetylcholine-induced activation of TRPV4-dependent calcium influx in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Adapala, Ravi K.; Talasila, Phani K.; Bratz, Ian N.; Zhang, David X.; Suzuki, Makoto; Meszaros, J. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid channel 4 (TRPV4) is a polymodally activated nonselective cationic channel implicated in the regulation of vasodilation and hypertension. We and others have recently shown that cyclic stretch and shear stress activate TRPV4-mediated calcium influx in endothelial cells (EC). In addition to the mechanical forces, acetylcholine (ACh) was shown to activate TRPV4-mediated calcium influx in endothelial cells, which is important for nitric oxide-dependent vasodilation. However, the molecular mechanism through which ACh activates TRPV4 is not known. Here, we show that ACh-induced calcium influx and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation but not calcium release from intracellular stores is inhibited by a specific TRPV4 antagonist, AB-159908. Importantly, activation of store-operated calcium influx was not altered in the TRPV4 null EC, suggesting that TRPV4-dependent calcium influx is mediated through a receptor-operated pathway. Furthermore, we found that ACh treatment activated protein kinase C (PKC) α, and inhibition of PKCα activity by the specific inhibitor Go-6976, or expression of a kinase-dead mutant of PKCα but not PKCε or downregulation of PKCα expression by chronic 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment, completely abolished ACh-induced calcium influx. Finally, we found that ACh-induced vasodilation was inhibited by the PKCα inhibitor Go-6976 in small mesenteric arteries from wild-type mice, but not in TRPV4 null mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that a specific isoform of PKC, PKCα, mediates agonist-induced receptor-mediated TRPV4 activation in endothelial cells. PMID:21705673

  10. Memory CD4 T Cells Induce Antibody-Mediated Rejection of Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Gorbacheva, Victoria; Fan, Ran; Fairchild, Robert L; Baldwin, William M; Valujskikh, Anna

    2016-11-01

    Despite advances in immunosuppression, antibody-mediated rejection is a serious threat to allograft survival. Alloreactive memory helper T cells can induce potent alloantibody responses and often associate with poor graft outcome. Nevertheless, the ability of memory T cells to elicit well characterized manifestations of antibody-mediated rejection has not been tested. We investigated helper functions of memory CD4 T cells in a mouse model of renal transplantation. Whereas the majority of unsensitized C57Bl/6 recipients spontaneously accepted fully MHC-mismatched A/J renal allografts, recipients containing donor-reactive memory CD4 T cells rapidly lost allograft function. Increased serum creatinine levels, high serum titers of donor-specific alloantibody, minimal T cell infiltration, and intense C4d deposition in the grafts of sensitized recipients fulfilled all diagnostic criteria for acute renal antibody-mediated rejection in humans. IFNγ neutralization did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells, and CD8 T cell depletion at the time of transplantation or depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells also did not prevent the renal allograft rejection induced by memory helper T cells starting at day 4 after transplantation. However, B cell depletion inhibited alloantibody generation and significantly extended allograft survival, indicating that donor-specific alloantibodies (not T cells) were the critical effector mechanism of renal allograft rejection induced by memory CD4 T cells. Our studies provide direct evidence that recipient T cell sensitization may result in antibody-mediated rejection of renal allografts and introduce a physiologically relevant animal model with which to investigate mechanisms of antibody-mediated rejection and novel therapeutic approaches for its prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Selective loss of bi-directional synaptic plasticity in the direct and indirect striatal output pathways accompanies generation of parkinsonism and l-DOPA induced dyskinesia in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Sherri L; Chen, Betty; Lo, Charlotte; Gertler, Tracey S; Warre, Ruth; Surmeier, James D; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Nash, Joanne E

    2014-11-01

    Parkinsonian symptoms arise due to over-activity of the indirect striatal output pathway, and under-activity of the direct striatal output pathway. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) is caused when the opposite circuitry problems are established, with the indirect pathway becoming underactive, and the direct pathway becoming over-active. Here, we define synaptic plasticity abnormalities in these pathways associated with parkinsonism, symptomatic benefits of l-DOPA, and LID. We applied spike-timing dependent plasticity protocols to cortico-striatal synapses in slices from 6-OHDA-lesioned mouse models of parkinsonism and LID, generated in BAC transgenic mice with eGFP targeting the direct or indirect output pathways, with and without l-DOPA present. In naïve mice, bidirectional synaptic plasticity, i.e. LTP and LTD, was induced, resulting in an EPSP amplitude change of approximately 50% in each direction in both striatal output pathways, as shown previously. In parkinsonism and dyskinesia, both pathways exhibited unidirectional plasticity, irrespective of stimulation paradigm. In parkinsonian animals, the indirect pathway only exhibited LTP (LTP protocol: 143.5±14.6%; LTD protocol 177.7±22.3% of baseline), whereas the direct pathway only showed LTD (LTP protocol: 74.3±4.0% and LTD protocol: 63.3±8.7%). A symptomatic dose of l-DOPA restored bidirectional plasticity on both pathways to levels comparable to naïve animals (Indirect pathway: LTP protocol: 124.4±22.0% and LTD protocol: 52.1±18.5% of baseline. Direct pathway: LTP protocol: 140.7±7.3% and LTD protocol: 58.4±6.0% of baseline). In dyskinesia, in the presence of l-DOPA, the indirect pathway exhibited only LTD (LTP protocol: 68.9±21.3% and LTD protocol 52.0±14.2% of baseline), whereas in the direct pathway, only LTP could be induced (LTP protocol: 156.6±13.2% and LTD protocol 166.7±15.8% of baseline). We conclude that normal motor control requires bidirectional plasticity of both striatal outputs

  12. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates sidestream cigarette smoke-induced endothelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Low, Brad; Liang, Mei; Fu, Jian

    2007-07-01

    Second-hand smoke is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. So far, little is known about the signaling mechanisms of second-hand smoke-induced vascular dysfunction. Endothelial junctions are fundamental structures important for maintaining endothelial barrier function. Our study showed that sidestream cigarette smoke (SCS), a major component of second-hand smoke, was able to disrupt endothelial junctions and increase endothelial permeability. Sidestream cigarette smoke stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and myosin light chain (MLC). A selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK (SB203580) prevented SCS-induced loss of endothelial barrier integrity as evidenced by transendothelial resistance measurements. Resveratrol, an antioxidant that was able to inhibit SCS-induced p38 MAPK and MLC phosphorylation, also protected endothelial cells from the damage. Thus, p38 MAPK mediates SCS-induced endothelial permeability. Inhibition of p38 MAPK may have therapeutic potential for second-hand smoke-induced vascular injury.

  13. Weak silica nanomaterial-induced genotoxicity can be explained by indirect DNA damage as shown by the OGG1-modified comet assay and genomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pfuhler, Stefan; Downs, Thomas R; Allemang, Ashley J; Shan, Yuching; Crosby, Meredith E

    2017-01-01

    In a previous study, 15-nm silica nanoparticles (NPs) caused small increases in DNA damage in liver as measured in the in vivo comet and micronucleus assays after intravenous administration to rats at their maximum tolerated dose, a worst-case exposure scenario. Histopathological examination supported a particle-induced, tissue damage-mediated inflammatory response. This study used a targeted approach to provide insight into the mode of action (MoA) by examining transcriptional regulation of genes in liver in a time and dose-dependent manner at 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 h after intravenous administration of 15-nm silica NPs. DNA damage was assessed using the standard comet assay and hOGG1 glycosylase-modified comet assay that also measures oxidative DNA damage. Potassium bromate, an IARC Class 2B carcinogen that specifically operates via an oxidative stress MoA, was used as a positive control for the hOGG1 comet assay and gave a strong signal in its main target organ, the kidney, while showing less activity in liver. Treatment of rats with silica NPs at 50 mg/kg body weight (bw) caused small, statistically insignificant increases in DNA damage in liver measured by the standard comet assay, while a statistically significant increase was observed at 4 h with the hOGG1 comet assay, consistent with a MoA involving reactive oxygen species. Histopathology showed liver damage and neutrophil involvement while genomic analysis and response pattern of key genes involved in inflammation and oxidative stress supported a tissue damage-mediated inflammatory response involving the complement system for removing/phagocytising damaged cells. No changes were observed for histopathology or gene array for the low-dose (5 mg/kg bw) silica NPs. The results of this study confirm our hypothesis that the weak DNA damage observed by silica NPs occurs secondary to inflammation/immune response, indicating that a threshold can be applied in the risk assessment of these materials. © The Author 2016

  14. Resveratrol induces apoptosis via a Bak-mediated intrinsic pathway in human lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Wang, Xiaoping; Chen, Tongsheng

    2012-05-01

    Our recent study have shown that resveratrol (RV), a natural plant polyphenol found in red grape skins as well as other food product, induced apoptosis via the downstream factors, caspase-independent AIF and to lesser extent caspase-9, of intrinsic apoptosis pathway in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. This report is designed to explore the roles of the upstream mediators of the intrinsic pathway, such as Bak/Bax, Bim, Puma and Noxa, during RV-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1 and A549) cell lines. RV treatment remarkably induced the activation of Bak but not Bax, and silencing Bak but not Bax by shRNA almost completely prevented RV-induced cell death, mitochondrial dysfunction and also largely prevented RV-induced AIF release, demonstrating the preferential engagement of Bak but not Bax during RV-induced apoptosis. In addition, although RV treatment induced a significant degradation of Mcl-1, knockdown of Mcl-1 by shRNA only modestly increased RV-induced Bak activation. Interestingly, silencing Bim but not Puma and Noxa remarkably attenuated RV-induced cell death, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and Bak activation, suggesting the important roles of Bim. Collectively, our findings for the first time demonstrate that RV induces apoptosis dominantly via a Bak- but not Bax-mediated AIF-dependent mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway in which Bim but not Puma and Noxa may supply the force to trigger Bak activation and subsequent apoptosis in both ASTC-a-1 and A549 cell lines. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Wip1 inhibitor GSK2830371 inhibits neuroblastoma growth by inducing Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenghu; Wang, Long; Yao, Dayong; Yang, Tianshu; Cao, Wen-Ming; Dou, Jun; Pang, Jonathan C.; Guan, Shan; Zhang, Huiyuan; Yu, Yang; Zhao, Yanling; Wang, Yongfeng; Xu, Xin; Shi, Yan; Patel, Roma; Zhang, Hong; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Liu, Shangfeng; Yang, Jianhua; Nuchtern, Jed G.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial tumor in children. Unlike in most adult tumors, tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53) mutations occur with a relatively low frequency in NB and the downstream function of p53 is intact in NB cell lines. Wip1 is a negative regulator of p53 and hindrance of Wip1 activity by novel inhibitor GSK2830371 is a potential strategy to activate p53’s tumor suppressing function in NB. Yet, the in vivo efficacy and the possible mechanisms of GSK2830371 in NB have not yet been elucidated. Here we report that novel Wip1 inhibitor GSK2830371 induced Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis in NB cells in a p53-dependent manner. In addition, GSK2830371 suppressed the colony-formation potential of p53 wild-type NB cell lines. Furthermore, GSK2830371 enhanced doxorubicin- (Dox) and etoposide- (VP-16) induced cytotoxicity in a subset of NB cell lines, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. More importantly, GSK2830371 significantly inhibited tumor growth in an orthotopic xenograft NB mouse model by inducing Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis in vivo. Taken together, this study suggests that GSK2830371 induces Chk2/p53-mediated apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo in a p53 dependent manner. PMID:27991505

  16. 8-Mercapto-Cyclic GMP Mediates Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Stomatal Closure in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kenji; Yamada, Naotake; Yoshida, Riichiro; Ihara, Hideshi; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki; Iwai, Sumio

    2015-08-01

    Plants are exposed to hydrogen sulfide (H2S) both exogenously, as it exists as a pollutant gas in the environment, and endogenously, as it is synthesized in cells. H2S has recently been found to function as a gaseous signaling molecule, but its signaling cascade remains unknown. Here, we examined H2S-mediated guard cell signaling in Arabidopsis. The H2S donor GYY4137 (morpholin-4-ium-4-methoxyphenyl [morpholino] phosphinodithioate) induced stomatal closure, which peaked after 150 min at 1 µM or after 90 min at 10 and 100 µM. After reaching maximal closure, stomatal apertures gradually increased in size in response to further exposure to GYY4137. GYY4137 induced nitric oxide (NO) generation in guard cells, and GYY4137-induced stomatal closure was reduced by an NO scavenger and inhibitors of NO-producing enzymes. Mass spectrometry analyses showed that GYY4137 induces the synthesis of 8-nitro-cGMP and 8-mercapto-cGMP and that this synthesis is mediated by NO. In addition, 8-mercapto-cGMP triggered stomatal closure. Moreover, inhibitor and genetic studies showed that calcium, cADP ribose and slow anion channel 1 act downstream of 8-mercapto-cGMP. This study therefore demonstrates that 8-mercapto-cGMP mediates the H2S signaling cascade in guard cells.

  17. DNA methyltransferase I is a mediator of doxorubicin-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Hwee Hong; Porter, Alan George

    2009-05-01

    Doxorubicin can induce the formation of extra-nuclear bodies during mitosis termed micronuclei but the underlying causes remain unknown. Here, we show that sub-lethal exposure to doxorubicin-induced micronuclei formation in human cancer cells but not in non-tumorigenic cells. Occurrence of micronuclei coincided with stability of DNMT1 upon doxorubicin assault, and DNMT1 was localized to the micronuclei structures. Furthermore, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-mediated DNMT1 depletion or siDNMT1 knock-down attenuated the frequency of doxorubicin-induced micronucleated cells. Human DNMT1{sup -/-} cells displayed significantly fewer micronuclei compared to DNMT1{sup +/+} cells when challenged with doxorubicin, providing additional evidence for the involvement of DNMT1 in mediating such chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our results demonstrate a role for DNMT1 in promoting DNA damage-induced genotoxicity in human cancer cells. DNMT1, recently identified as a candidate for doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity, is over-expressed in various cancer cell types. We propose that DNMT1 levels in tumor cells may determine the effectiveness of doxorubicin in chemotherapy.

  18. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  19. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced responses of opossum esophageal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.; Du, C.; Conklin, J.L.; Ledlow, A.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerves of the opossum esophagus mediate relaxation of circular muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the off contraction of circular esophageal muscle. The latencies between the end of the stimulus and the off contraction describe a gradient such that the latency is longest in muscle from the caudad esophagus. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of these nerve-induced responses. Both electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic esophageal nerves and exogenous NO relaxed LES muscle. Only EFS-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-NNA. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the inhibitory effect of L-NNA. Exogenous NO neither relaxed nor contracted circular esophageal muscle. Both the amplitude and the latency of the off contraction were diminished by L-NNA. L-arginine antagonized the action of L-NNA. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine also attenuated the gradient in the latency of the off response by shortening latencies in muscle form the caudad esophagus. It had no effect on cholinergic nerve-induced contraction of longitudinal esophageal muscle. These data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophagus and LES.

  20. Glutamate‑mediated effects of caffeine and interferon‑γ on mercury-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Engin, Ayse Basak; Engin, Evren Doruk; Golokhvast, Kirill; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M

    2017-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms mediating mercury‑induced neurotoxicity are not yet completely understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the severity of MeHg‑ and HgCl2‑mediated cytotoxicity to SH‑SY5Y human dopaminergic neurons can be attenuated by regulating glutamate‑mediated signal‑transmission through caffeine and interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ). The SH‑SY5Y cells were exposed to 1, 2 and 5 µM of either MeHgCl2 or HgCl2 in the presence or absence of L‑glutamine. To examine the effect of adenosine receptor antagonist, the cells were treated with 10 and 20 µM caffeine. The total mitochondrial metabolic activity and oxidative stress intensity coefficient were determined in the 1 ng/ml IFN‑γ‑ and glutamate‑stimulated SH‑SY5Y cells. Following exposure to mercury, the concentration‑dependent decrease in mitochondrial metabolic activity inversely correlated with oxidative stress intensity. MeHg was more toxic than HgCl2. Mercury‑induced neuronal death was dependent on glutamate‑mediated excitotoxicity. Caffeine reduced the mercury‑induced oxidative stress in glutamine-containing medium. IFN‑γ treatment decreased cell viability and increased oxidative stress in glutamine‑free medium, despite caffeine supplementation. Although caffeine exerted a protective effect against MeHg-induced toxicity with glutamate transmission, under co‑stimulation with glutamine and IFN‑γ, caffeine decreased the MeHg‑induced average oxidative stress only by half. Thereby, our data indicate that the IFN‑γ stimulation of mercury‑exposed dopaminergic neurons in neuroinflammatory diseases may diminish the neuroprotective effects of caffeine.

  1. Activation of G proteins mediates flow-induced prostaglandin E2 production in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, K. M.; McAllister, T. N.; Gudi, S.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow may play a role in load-induced bone remodeling. Previously, we have shown that fluid flow stimulates osteoblast production of cAMP inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and PGE2. Flow-induced increases in cAMP and IP3 were shown to be a result of PG production. Thus, PGE2 production appears to be an important component in fluid flow induced signal transduction. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of flow-induced PGE2 synthesis. Flow-induced a 20-fold increase in PGE2 production in osteoblasts. Increases were also observed with ALF4-(10mM) (98-fold), an activator of guanidine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), and calcium ionophore A23187 (2 microM) (100-fold) in stationary cells. We then investigated whether flow stimulation is mediated by G proteins and increases in intracellular calcium. Flow-induced PGE2 production was inhibited by the G protein inhibitors GDP beta S (100 microM) and pertussis toxin (1 microgram/ml) by 83% and 72%, respectively. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA (2 mM) and intracellular calcium by quin-2/AM (30 microM) blocked flow stimulation by 87% and 67%, respectively. These results suggest that G proteins and calcium play an important role in mediating mechanochemical signal transduction in osteoblasts.

  2. AP-1 transcription factor mediates VEGF-induced endothelial cell migration and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Ye, Taiyang; Cui, Pengfei; Hua, Qian; Zeng, Huiyan; Zhao, Dezheng

    2016-05-01

    VEGF, upon binding to its endothelial cell specific receptors VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2, can induce endothelial cell migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of these effects still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether VEGF promotes human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) migration and proliferation through activator protein-1 transcription factor (AP-1) family. We first showed that VEGF induces immediate-early genes AP-1 family gene expression differentially with the profound induction of JunB (both mRNA and protein) under various conditions (PBS, DMSO or control adenoviruses). The increase in AP-1 mRNA expression occurs primarily at the transcriptional level. Inhibition of AP-1 DNA binding activity by adenovirus expressing a potent dominant negative form of c-Fos (Afos) significantly attenuated VEGF-induced HUVEC migration and proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Knockdown of JunB with adenovirus expressing JunB shRNA reduces VEGF-induced JunB expression and attenuated HUVEC migration. However the shJunB-expressing virus has no effect on VEGF-induced cyclin D1 protein expression and proliferation. These results suggest that VEGF-induced endothelial migration is mediated primarily by induction of JunB whereas the promotion of endothelial proliferation by VEGF is mediated by JunB-independent AP-1 family members.

  3. A posttranslational modification cascade involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK mediates oncogene-induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Seit-Nebi, Alim; Han, Xuemei; Aslanian, Aaron; Tat, John; Liao, Rong; Yates, John R; Sun, Peiqing

    2013-06-06

    Oncogene-induced senescence is an important tumor-suppressing defense mechanism. However, relatively little is known about the signaling pathway mediating the senescence response. Here, we demonstrate that a multifunctional acetyltransferase, Tip60, plays an essential role in oncogenic ras-induced senescence. Further investigation reveals a cascade of posttranslational modifications involving p38, Tip60, and PRAK, three proteins that are essential for ras-induced senescence. Upon activation by ras, p38 induces the acetyltransferase activity of Tip60 through phosphorylation of Thr158; activated Tip60 in turn directly interacts with and induces the protein kinase activity of PRAK through acetylation of K364 in a manner that depends on phosphorylation of both Tip60 and PRAK by p38. These posttranslational modifications are critical for the prosenescent function of Tip60 and PRAK, respectively. These results have defined a signaling pathway that mediates oncogene-induced senescence, and identified posttranslational modifications that regulate the enzymatic activity and biological functions of Tip60 and PRAK.

  4. Proline induces calcium-mediated oxidative burst and salicylic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiugeng; Zhang, Yueqin; Wang, Cuiping; Lü, Weitao; Jin, Jing Bo; Hua, Xuejun

    2011-05-01

    Although free proline accumulation is a well-documented phenomenon in many plants in response to a variety of environmental stresses, and is proposed to play protective roles, high intracellular proline content, by either exogenous application or endogenous over-production, in the absence of stresses, is found to be inhibitory to plant growth. We have shown here that exogenous application of proline significantly induced intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation in tobacco and calcium-dependent ROS production in Arabidopsis seedlings, which subsequently enhanced salicylic acid (SA) synthesis and PR genes expression. This suggested that proline can promote a reaction similar to hypersensitive response during pathogen infection. Other amino acids, such as glutamate, but not arginine and phenylalanine, were also found to be capable of inducing PR gene expression. In addition, proline at concentration as low as 0.5 mM could induce PR gene expression. However, proline could not induce the expression of PDF1.2 gene, the marker gene for jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Furthermore, proline-induced SA production is mediated by NDR1-dependent signaling pathway, but not that mediated by PAD4. Our data provide evidences that exogenous proline, and probably some other amino acids can specifically induce SA signaling and defense response.

  5. Activation of G proteins mediates flow-induced prostaglandin E2 production in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reich, K. M.; McAllister, T. N.; Gudi, S.; Frangos, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow may play a role in load-induced bone remodeling. Previously, we have shown that fluid flow stimulates osteoblast production of cAMP inositol trisphosphate (IP3), and PGE2. Flow-induced increases in cAMP and IP3 were shown to be a result of PG production. Thus, PGE2 production appears to be an important component in fluid flow induced signal transduction. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of flow-induced PGE2 synthesis. Flow-induced a 20-fold increase in PGE2 production in osteoblasts. Increases were also observed with ALF4-(10mM) (98-fold), an activator of guanidine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), and calcium ionophore A23187 (2 microM) (100-fold) in stationary cells. We then investigated whether flow stimulation is mediated by G proteins and increases in intracellular calcium. Flow-induced PGE2 production was inhibited by the G protein inhibitors GDP beta S (100 microM) and pertussis toxin (1 microgram/ml) by 83% and 72%, respectively. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA (2 mM) and intracellular calcium by quin-2/AM (30 microM) blocked flow stimulation by 87% and 67%, respectively. These results suggest that G proteins and calcium play an important role in mediating mechanochemical signal transduction in osteoblasts.

  6. DGCR8 Mediates Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage Independently of RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Calses, Philamer C; Dhillon, Kiranjit K; Tucker, Nyka; Chi, Yong; Huang, Jen-Wei; Kawasumi, Masaoki; Nghiem, Paul; Wang, Yemin; Clurman, Bruce E; Jacquemont, Celine; Gafken, Philip R; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Saijo, Masafumi; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-04-04

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a carcinogen that generates DNA lesions. Here, we demonstrate an unexpected role for DGCR8, an RNA binding protein that canonically functions with Drosha to mediate microRNA processing, in the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions. Treatment with UV induced phosphorylation on serine 153 (S153) of DGCR8 in both human and murine cells. S153 phosphorylation was critical for cellular resistance to UV, the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions, and the recovery of RNA synthesis after UV exposure but not for microRNA expression. The RNA-binding and Drosha-binding activities of DGCR8 were not critical for UV resistance. DGCR8 depletion was epistatic to defects in XPA, CSA, and CSB for UV sensitivity. DGCR8 physically interacted with CSB and RNA polymerase II. JNKs were involved in the UV-induced S153 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that UV-induced S153 phosphorylation mediates transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA lesions in a manner independent of microRNA processing.

  7. Different contributions of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of vascular endothelial cadherin to lipopolysaccharide-induced vascular hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Lianyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Shijin; Tan, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Vascular hyperpermeability induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a common pathogenic process in cases of severe trauma and sepsis. Vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cad) is a key regulatory molecule involved in this process, although the detailed mechanism through which this molecule acts remains unclear. We assessed the role of clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad in LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability in the human vascular endothelial cell line CRL-2922 and determined that vascular permeability and VE-cad localization at the plasma membrane were negatively correlated after LPS treatment. Additionally, the loss of VE-cad at the plasma membrane was caused by both clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was dominant early after LPS treatment, and caveolae-mediated endocytosis was dominant hours after LPS treatment. The caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad was activated through the LPS-Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-Src signaling pathway. Structural changes in the actin cytoskeleton, specifically from polymerization to depolymerization, were important reasons for the switching of the VE-cad endocytosis pathway from clathrin-mediated to caveolae-mediated. Our findings suggest that clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytosis of VE-cad contribute to LPS-induced vascular hyperpermeability, although they contribute via different mechanism. The predominant means of endocytosis depends on the time since LPS treatment.

  8. Effect of Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors on hyperalgesia in rats with CFA-induced inflammation via direct and indirect mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jianping; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Xiaolong; Huo, Yuping; Chen, Tingjun; Hu, Fenjuan; Quirion, Rémi; Hong, Yanguo

    2013-11-01

    Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) receptors are exclusively distributed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We investigated the effects of MrgC receptor activation on inflammatory hyperalgesia and its mechanisms. A selective MrgC receptor agonist, bovine adrenal medulla peptide 8-22 (BAM8-22) or melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) or the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTAP was administered intrathecally (i.t.) in rats injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in one hindpaw. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed. Neurochemicals were measured by immunocytochemistry, Western blot, ELISA and RT-PCR. CFA injection increased mRNA for MrgC receptors in lumbar DRG. BAM8-22 or MSH, given i.t., generated instant short and delayed long-lasting attenuations of CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. These effects were associated with decreased up-regulation of neuronal NOS (nNOS), CGRP and c-Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn and/or DRG. However, i.t. administration of CTAP blocked the induction by BAM8-22 of delayed anti-hyperalgesia and inhibition of nNOS and CGRP expression in DRG. BAM8-22 also increased mRNA for MORs and pro-opiomelanocortin, along with β-endorphin content in the lumbar spinal cord and/or DRG. MrgC receptors and nNOS were co-localized in DRG neurons. Activation of MrgC receptors suppressed up-regulation of pronociceptive mediators and consequently inhibited inflammatory pain, because of the activation of up-regulated MrgC receptors and subsequent endogenous activity at MORs. The uniquely distributed MrgC receptors could be a novel target for relieving inflammatory pain. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Effect of Mas-related gene (Mrg) receptors on hyperalgesia in rats with CFA-induced inflammation via direct and indirect mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianping; Wang, Dongmei; Zhou, Xiaolong; Huo, Yuping; Chen, Tingjun; Hu, Fenjuan; Quirion, Rémi; Hong, Yanguo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mas oncogene-related gene (Mrg) receptors are exclusively distributed in small-sized neurons in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia (DRG). We investigated the effects of MrgC receptor activation on inflammatory hyperalgesia and its mechanisms. Experimental Approach A selective MrgC receptor agonist, bovine adrenal medulla peptide 8-22 (BAM8-22) or melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) or the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonist CTAP was administered intrathecally (i.t.) in rats injected with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) in one hindpaw. Thermal and mechanical nociceptive responses were assessed. Neurochemicals were measured by immunocytochemistry, Western blot, ELISA and RT-PCR. Key Results CFA injection increased mRNA for MrgC receptors in lumbar DRG. BAM8-22 or MSH, given i.t., generated instant short and delayed long-lasting attenuations of CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. These effects were associated with decreased up-regulation of neuronal NOS (nNOS), CGRP and c-Fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn and/or DRG. However, i.t. administration of CTAP blocked the induction by BAM8-22 of delayed anti-hyperalgesia and inhibition of nNOS and CGRP expression in DRG. BAM8-22 also increased mRNA for MORs and pro-opiomelanocortin, along with β-endorphin content in the lumbar spinal cord and/or DRG. MrgC receptors and nNOS were co-localized in DRG neurons. Conclusions and Implications Activation of MrgC receptors suppressed up-regulation of pronociceptive mediators and consequently inhibited inflammatory pain, because of the activation of up-regulated MrgC receptors and subsequent endogenous activity at MORs. The uniquely distributed MrgC receptors could be a novel target for relieving inflammatory pain. PMID:23909597

  10. C/EBPβ Mediates TNF-α-Induced Cancer Cell Migration by Inducing MMP Expression Dependent on p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Xia, Peiyi; Zhang, Rui; Ge, Gaoxiang

    2015-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is a pleiotropic cytokine that triggers cell proliferation, cell death, or inflammation. Besides its cytotoxic effect on cancer cells, TNF-α exerts tumor promoting activity. Aberrant TNF-α signaling promotes cancer cell motility, invasiveness, and enhances cancer metastasis. Exaggerated tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis by TNF-α has been attributed to the activation of NF-κB signaling. It is yet to be elucidated if other signaling pathways and effector molecules are involved in TNF-α-induced cancer cell migration and metastasis. Expression of C/EBPβ, a transcription factor involved in metabolism, inflammation, and cancer, is increased upon TNF-α treatment. TNF-α induces C/EBPβ expression by enhancing its transcription and protein stability. Activation of p38 MAPK, but not NF-κB or JNK, is responsible for TNF-α-induced stabilization of C/EBPβ protein. C/EBPβ is involved in TNF-α-induced cancer cell migration. Knockdown of C/EBPβ inhibits TNF-α-induced cell migration, while overexpression of C/EBPβ increases migration of cancer cells. C/EBPβ is translated into transcriptional activator LAP1 and LAP2 and transcriptional repressor LIP utilizing alternative in-frame translation start sites. Despite TNF-α induces expression of all three isoforms, LAP1/2, but not LIP, promote cancer cell migration. TNF-α induced MMP1/3 expression, which was abrogated by C/EBPβ knockdown or p38 MAPK inhibition. MMP inhibitor or knockdown of MMP1/3 diminished TNF-α- and C/EBPβ-induced cell migration. Thus, C/EBPβ mediates TNF-α-induced cancer cell migration by inducing MMP1/3 expression, and may participate in the regulation of inflammation-associated cancer metastasis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel; Montanez, Cecilia; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2010-05-28

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  12. High avidity autoreactive CD4+ T cells induce host CTL, overcome Tregs and mediate tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andrew G.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Ha, Sung P.; Sidney, John; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Touloukian, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress made over the past 25 years, existing immunotherapies have limited clinical effectiveness in patients with cancer. Immune tolerance consistently blunts the generated immune response, and the largely solitary focus on CD8+ T cell immunity has proven ineffective in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. To address these twin-tier deficiencies, we developed a translational model of melanoma immunotherapy focused on the exploitation of high avidity CD4+ T cells that become generated in germline antigen deficient mice. We had previously identified a TRP-1 specific HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted epitope. Using this epitope in conjunction with a newly described TRP-1 germline-knockout, we demonstrate that endogenous TRP-1 expression alters the functionality of the auto-reactive T cell repertoire. More importantly, we show, by using MHC-mismatched combinations, that CD4+ T cells derived from the self-antigen deficient host indirectly triggers the eradication of established B16 lung metastases. We demonstrate that the treatment effect is mediated entirely by endogenous CD8+ T cells and is not affected by the depletion of host Tregs. These findings suggest that high avidity CD4+ T cells can overcome endogenous conditions and mediate their anti-tumor effects exclusively through the elicitation of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:19561540

  13. The Natural Product Honokiol Inhibits Calcineurin Inhibitor-induced and Ras-mediated Tumor Promoting Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Pallavi; Basu, Aninda; Arbiser, Jack L.; Pal, Soumitro

    2013-01-01

    Although calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) are very useful in preventing allograft rejection, they can mediate a rapid progression of post-transplantation malignancies. The CNI cyclosporine A (CsA) can promote renal tumor growth through activation of the proto-oncogene ras and over-expression of the angiogenic cytokine VEGF; the ras activation also induces over-expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1, which promotes survival of renal cancer cells. Here, we show that the natural product honokiol significantly inhibited CsA-induced and Ras-mediated survival of renal cancer cells through the down-regulations of VEGF and HO-1. Thus, honokiol treatment may help to prevent tumor-promoting effects of CsA in transplant patients. PMID:23752066

  14. The natural product honokiol inhibits calcineurin inhibitor-induced and Ras-mediated tumor promoting pathways.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pallavi; Basu, Aninda; Arbiser, Jack L; Pal, Soumitro

    2013-09-28

    Although calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) are very useful in preventing allograft rejection, they can mediate a rapid progression of post-transplantation malignancies. The CNI cyclosporine A (CsA) can promote renal tumor growth through activation of the proto-oncogene ras and over-expression of the angiogenic cytokine VEGF; the ras activation also induces over-expression of the cytoprotective enzyme HO-1, which promotes survival of renal cancer cells. Here, we show that the natural product honokiol significantly inhibited CsA-induced and Ras-mediated survival of renal cancer cells through the down-regulations of VEGF and HO-1. Thus, honokiol treatment may help to prevent tumor-promoting effects of CsA in transplant patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect Of Free Radical Quenchers On Dye-Mediated Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Leukemic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James L.; Fay, Joseph W.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of free radical quenchers (ascorbate, catalase, and mannitol) on merocyanine 540 (MC540) mediated, laser light induced photolysis of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) was investigated. Results show that in the presence of human albumin (0.25%), dye-mediated (2014/m1), laser light induced photolysis of leukemic cells resulted in a 99.9999% cell kill. Seventy percent of the normal bone marrow cells survived the treatment. The addition of free radical quenchers prior to laser irradiation procedure increases the HL-60 cell survival. Increases of 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, were observed in the presence of catalase and ascorbate or mannitol. In the presence of a mixture of catalase and mannitol or catalase and ascorbate, this increase in viability was not observed. However, the viability of normal bone marrow cells under these conditions also decreased from 70% to 63%. These findings may be useful in ex-vivo bone marrow purging.

  16. CREB Mediates Prostaglandin F2α-Induced MUC5AC Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Wen-Cheng; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Sun, Hongxia; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Koo, Ja Seok

    2009-01-01

    Mucus secretion is an important protective mechanism for the luminal lining of open tubular organs, but mucin overproduction in the respiratory tract can exacerbate the inflammatory process and cause airway obstruction. Production of MUC5AC, a predominant gel-forming mucin secreted by airway epithelia, can be induced by various inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins. The two major prostaglandins involved in inflammation are prostaglandin (PG) E2 and F2α. PGE2-induced mucin production has been well studied, but the effect of PGF2α on mucin production remains poorly understood. To elucidate the effect and underlying mechanism of PGF2α on MUC5AC production, we investigated the signal transduction of PGF2α associated with this effect using normal human tracheobronchial epithelial cells. Our results demonstrated that PGF2α induces MUC5AC overproduction via a signaling cascade involving protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p90 ribosomal S6 protein kinase, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). The regulation of PGF2α-induced MUC5AC expression by CREB was further confirmed by cAMP response element-dependent MUC5AC promoter activity and by interaction between CREB and MUC5AC promoter. The abrogation of all downstream signaling activities via suppression of each signaling molecule along the pathway indicates that a single pathway from PGF2α receptor to CREB is responsible for inducing MUC5AC overproduction. As CREB also mediates mucin overproduction induced by PGE2 and other inflammatory mediators, our findings have important clinical implication for the management of airway mucus hypersecretion. PMID:19201889

  17. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  18. Matricellular protein CCN1 mediates doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Mo, Fan-E

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective chemotherapeutic agent however its clinical use is limited by its cumulative cardiotoxicity. Matricellular protein CCN1 mediates work-overload-induced cardiac injury. We aimed to assess the role of CCN1 in DOX-associated cardiomyopathy. Here we discovered CCN1 expression in the myocardium 1 day after DOX treatment (15 mg/kg; i.p.) in mice. Whereas CCN1 synergizes with Fas ligand (FasL) to induce cardiomyocyte apoptosis, we found that FasL was also induced by DOX in the heart. To assess the function of CCN1 in vivo, knockin mice (Ccn1dm/dm) expressing an β6β1-binding defective CCN1 mutant were treated with a single dose of DOX (15 mg/kg; i.p.). Compared with wild-type mice, Ccn1dm/dm mice were resistant to DOX-induced cardiac injury and dysfunction 14 days after injection. Using rat cardiomyoblast H9c2 cells, we demonstrated that DOX induced reactive oxygen species accumulation to upregulate CCN1 and FasL expression. CCN1 mediated DOX cardiotoxicity by engaging integrin β6β1 to promote p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and the release of mitochondrial Smac and HtrA2 to cytosol, thereby counteracting the inhibition of XIAP and facilitating apoptosis. In summary, CCN1 critically mediates DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. Disrupting CCN1/β6β1 engagement abolishes DOX-associated cardiomyopathy in mice. PMID:27167338

  19. Antigen receptor-induced B lymphocyte apoptosis mediated via a protease of the caspase family.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, S; Liou, H C

    1998-02-01

    An extensive body of data, in a variety of systems, denoted the caspase family of proteases as a key player in the execution of programmed cell death. This family consists of cysteine proteases that cleave after asparagine-containing motifs. It is well established that the caspases are essential for the apoptosis mediated by Fas (CD95) and TNF receptor p55, molecules that contain the "death domain" in the cytoplasmic tail. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the antigen receptor-mediated cell death in B lymphocytes, a process instrumental in negative selection of potentially autoreactive B cells. Here, we investigated the involvement of caspases in cell death triggered via the antigen receptor in B lymphocytes (BCR) by using specific inhibitors. Initially, we used a well-established cell line, CH31, which is a model of B cell tolerance, to demonstrate that these proteases indeed participate in the BCR-induced apoptotic pathway. Next, we confirmed the physiological relevance of the caspase-mediated cell death pathway in splenic B cell populations isolated ex vivo that were induced to undergo apoptosis by extensive cross-linking of their BCR. Most interestingly, our data demonstrated that caspases regulate not only the nuclear DNA fragmentation, but also the surface membrane phosphatidylserine translocation as well as the degradation of a specific nuclear substrate. Taken together, this report supports the hypothesis that regulation of the caspase family is crucial in controlling the life/death decision in B lymphocytes mediated by the antigen receptor signal transduction.

  20. Astaxanthin Inhibits Expression of Retinal Oxidative Stress and Inflammatory Mediators in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Po-Ting; Huang, Hsin-Wei; Yang, Chung-May; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Yang, Chang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated whether orally administered astaxanthin (AST) protects against oxidative damage in the ocular tissues of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Methods and Results Fifty 6-week-old female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to receive an injection of STZ to induce diabetes (n = 40) or to remain uninduced (n = 10). The diabetic rats were randomly selected into four groups and they were separately administered normal saline, 0.6 mg/kg AST, 3 mg/kg AST, or 0.5 mg/kg lutein daily for eight weeks. Retinal functions of each group were evaluated by electroretinography. The expression of oxidative stress and inflammatory mediators in the ocular tissues was then assessed by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis, ELISA, RT-PCR, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Retinal functions were preserved by AST and lutein in different levels. Ocular tissues from AST- and lutein-treated rats had significantly reduced levels of oxidative stress mediators (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, nitrotyrosine, and acrolein) and inflammatory mediators (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and fractalkine), increased levels of antioxidant enzymes (heme oxygenase-1 and peroxiredoxin), and reduced activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Conclusion The xanthophyll carotenoids AST and lutein have neuroprotective effects and reduce ocular oxidative stress, and inflammation in the STZ diabetic rat model, which may be mediated by downregulation of NF-κB activity. PMID:26765843

  1. Analysis of methods and models for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes in the agricultural sector of the US economy

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M.; Cronin, F.J.; Currie, J.W.; Tawil, J.

    1982-08-01

    The overall purpose of this research was to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in developing methods for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts due to the effects of increases in the ambient concentration of CO/sub 2/ on agricultural production. First, a comprehensive literature search was undertaken to determine what types of models and methods have been developed, which could be effectively used to conduct assessments of the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. Specific attention was focused upon models and methods for assessing the physical impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes on crop yields; national and multi-regional agricultural sector models; and macroeconomic models of the US economy. The second task involved a thorough investigation of the research efforts being conducted by other public and private sector organizations in order to determine how more recent analytical methods being developed outside of DOE could be effectively integrated into a more comprehensive analysis of the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ buildup. The third and final task involved synthesizing the information gathered in the first two tasks into a systematic framework for assessing the direct and indirect economic impacts of CO/sub 2/-induced environmental changes originating in the agricultural sector of the US economy. It is concluded that the direct economic impacts of CO/sub 2/ on the agricultural sector and the indirect economic impacts caused by spillover effects from agriculture to other sectors of the economy will be pervasive; however, the direction and magnitude of these impacts on producers and consumers cannot be determined a priori.

  2. Indirect decentralized learning control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longman, Richard W.; Lee, Soo C.; Phan, M.

    1992-01-01

    The new field of learning control develops controllers that learn to improve their performance at executing a given task, based on experience performing this specific task. In a previous work, the authors presented a theory of indirect learning control based on use of indirect adaptive control concepts employing simultaneous identification and control. This paper develops improved indirect learning control algorithms, and studies the use of such controllers in decentralized systems. The original motivation of the learning control field was learning in robots doing repetitive tasks such as on an assembly line. This paper starts with decentralized discrete time systems, and progresses to the robot application, modeling the robot as a time varying linear system in the neighborhood of the nominal trajectory, and using the usual robot controllers that are decentralized, treating each link as if it is independent of any coupling with other links. The basic result of the paper is to show that stability of the indirect learning controllers for all subsystems when the coupling between subsystems is turned off, assures convergence to zero tracking error of the decentralized indirect learning control of the coupled system, provided that the sample time in the digital learning controller is sufficiently short.

  3. Yeast elicitor-induced stomatal closure and peroxidase-mediated ROS production in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Munemasa, Shintaro; Uraji, Misugi; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2010-11-01

    Yeast elicitor (YEL) induces stomatal closure. We investigated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, nitric oxide (NO) production and [Ca(2+)](cyt) oscillations to clarify YEL signaling in Arabidopsis guard cells. YEL induced ROS accumulation in guard cells. A peroxidase inhibitor [salicylhydroxamic acid (SHAM)] inhibited the stomatal closure and the ROS accumulation, but neither the atrbohD atrbohF mutation nor an NADPH oxidase inhibitor [diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI)] had any effect. An NO scavenger [2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO)] inhibited the YEL-induced stomatal closure and SHAM abolished NO production. YEL-elicited [Ca(2+)](cyt) oscillations were inhibited by SHAM but not by the atrbohD atrbohF mutation. These results indicate that YEL induces stomatal closure accompanied by ROS production mediated by peroxidases and NO production.

  4. Ciprofloxacin-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia: No cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Sim, D W; Yu, J E; Jeong, J; Koh, Y-I

    2017-08-08

    Fluoroquinolone-induced immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is uncommon, and no reports of cross-reactivity among fluoroquinolones exist. Here, we describe a case of ciprofloxacin-induced immune thrombocytopenia with no cross-reactivity with gemifloxacin. A 77-year-old woman showed profound thrombocytopenia immediately after two ciprofloxacin injections for pneumonia. Platelet counts recovered rapidly after ciprofloxacin discontinuation. She had experienced thrombocytopenia after ciprofloxacin administration 4 years earlier, which was assumed to be ciprofloxacin-induced immune-related. Interestingly, no thrombocytopenia occurred following the subsequent exposure to another fluoroquinolone, gemifloxacin. No cross-reactivity occurred between ciprofloxacin and gemifloxacin in this fluoroquinolone-induced immune thrombocytopenia case. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Non-viable Borrelia burgdorferi induce inflammatory mediators and apoptosis in human oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Geetha; Fevrier, Helene B; Philipp, Mario T

    2013-11-27

    In previous studies, exposure to live Borrelia burgdorferi was shown to induce inflammation and apoptosis of human oligodendrocytes. In this study we assessed the ability of non-viable bacteria (heat killed or sonicated) to induce inflammatory mediators and cell death. Both heat-killed and sonicated bacteria induced release of CCL2, IL-6, and CXCL8 from oligodendrocytes in a dose dependent manner. In addition, non-viable B. burgdorferi also induced cell death as evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and another cell viability assay. These results suggest that spirochetal residues left after bacterial demise, due to treatment or otherwise, may continue to be pathogenic to the central nervous system.

  6. Intrinsic Pathway-Mediated Apoptosis in Elastase-Induced Aneurysms in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Ding, Yong Hong; Dai, Daying; Lewis, Debra A; Kallmes, David F

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives The pathophysiology of saccular aneurysms is complex and multifactorial. The aim of the present study was to understand the mechanism of apoptosis in elastase-induced model aneurysms in rabbits. Methods Elastase-induced saccular aneurysms were created at the origin of the right common carotid artery in 20 rabbits. Aneurysm samples were harvested at 2 and 12 weeks after creation. Expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, including caspases and Bcl-2 proteins, were assessed by Western blot analysis (n=5 at both time points). TUNEL staining, which indicates the presence of apoptosis, was performed in tissue sections (n=5 at both time points). The unoperated, contralateral common carotid artery was used as a control. Results Expression of active caspase-3, the final executioner of apoptosis, and caspase-9, the mediator of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, was observed in aneurysms at 2 weeks, whereas the expression of activated caspase-8, the mediator of the extrinsic death receptor pathway, was absent at both time points. Expression of anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and phospho-Bad, was down-regulated in aneurysms as compared to controls at 2 weeks. None of these proteins was differentially expressed at 12 weeks. These results were confirmed by the presence of TUNEL positive cells in some aneurysms at the early time point. Conclusion In this study of elastase induced aneurysms in a rabbit model, activation of apoptosis in elastase-induced model aneurysms is mediated predominantly by the Bcl-2 mediated-intrinsic pathway through the activation of caspase-9. PMID:19749227

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate lethality induced by far-UV in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A A; Silva-Júnior, A C T; Oliveira, E B; Asad, L M B O; Reis, N C S C; Felzenszwalb, I; Kovary, K; Asad, N R

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of DNA damage to Escherichia coli cells caused by UVC (254 nm) irradiation was studied. We verified the expression of the soxS gene induced by UVC (254 nm) and its inhibition by sodium azide, a singlet oxygen (1O2) scavenger. Additional results showed that a water-soluble carotenoid (norbixin) protects against the lethal effects of UVC. These results suggest that UVC radiation can also cause ROS-mediated lethality.

  8. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor Dock7 mediates HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion via Rac activation

    PubMed Central

    Murray, D W; Didier, S; Chan, A; Paulino, V; Van Aelst, L; Ruggieri, R; Tran, N L; Byrne, A T; Symons, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly invasive primary brain tumour, remains an incurable disease. Rho GTPases and their activators, guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), have central roles in GBM invasion. Anti-angiogenic therapies may stimulate GBM invasion via HGF/c-Met signalling. We aim to identify mediators of HGF-induced GBM invasion that may represent targets in a combination anti-angiogenic/anti-invasion therapeutic paradigm. Methods: Guanine nucleotide exchange factor expression was measured by microarray analysis and western blotting. Specific depletion of proteins was accomplished using siRNA. Cell invasion was determined using matrigel and brain slice assays. Cell proliferation and survival were monitored using sulforhodamine B and colony formation assays. Guanine nucleotide exchange factor and GTPase activities were determined using specific affinity precipitation assays. Results: We found that expression of Dock7, a GEF, is elevated in human GBM tissue in comparison with non-neoplastic brain. We showed that Dock7 mediates serum- and HGF-induced glioblastoma cell invasion. We also showed that Dock7 co-immunoprecipitates with c-Met and that this interaction is enhanced upon HGF stimulation in a manner that is dependent on the adaptor protein Gab1. Dock7 and Gab1 also co-immunoprecipitate in an HGF-dependent manner. Furthermore, Gab1 is required for HGF-induced Dock7 and Rac1 activation and glioblastoma cell invasion. Conclusions: Dock7 mediates HGF-induced GBM invasion. Targeting Dock7 in GBM may inhibit c-MET-mediated invasion in tumours treated with anti-angiogenic regimens. PMID:24518591

  9. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  10. A novel fur- and iron-regulated small RNA, NrrF, is required for indirect fur-mediated regulation of the sdhA and sdhC genes in Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Mellin, J R; Goswami, Sulip; Grogan, Susan; Tjaden, Brian; Genco, Caroline A

    2007-05-01

    Iron is both essential for bacterial growth and toxic at higher concentrations; thus, iron homeostasis is tightly regulated. In Neisseria meningitidis the majority of iron-responsive gene regulation is mediated by the ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur), a protein classically defined as a transcriptional repressor. Recently, however, microarray studies have identified a number of genes in N. meningitidis that are iron and Fur activated, demonstrating a new role for Fur as a transcriptional activator. Since Fur has been shown to indirectly activate gene transcription through the repression of small regulatory RNA molecules in other organisms, we hypothesized that a similar mechanism could account for Fur-dependent, iron-activated gene transcription in N. meningitidis. In this study, we used a bioinformatics approach to screen for the presence of Fur-regulated small RNA molecules in N. meningitidis MC58. This screen identified one small RNA, herein named NrrF (for neisserial regulatory RNA responsive to iron [Fe]), which was demonstrated to be both iron responsive and Fur regulated and which has a well-conserved orthologue in N. gonorrhoeae. In addition, this screen identified a number of other likely, novel small RNA transcripts. Lastly, we utilized a new bioinformatics approach to predict regulatory targets of the NrrF small RNA. This analysis led to the identification of the sdhA and sdhC genes, which were subsequently demonstrated to be under NrrF regulation in an nrrF mutant. This study is the first report of small RNAs in N. meningitidis and the first to use a bioinformatics approach to identify, a priori, regulatory targets of a small RNA.

  11. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea

    PubMed Central

    De Jonghe, Bart C.; Holland, Ruby; Olivos, Diana R.; Rupprecht, Laura E.; Kanoski, Scott E.; Hayes, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting is clinically controlled in the acute (<24h) phase following treatment, the anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48hr) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments. PMID:26522737

  12. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-09

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  13. NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates radiation-induced pyroptosis in bone marrow-derived macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-gang; Chen, Ji-kuai; Zhang, Zi-teng; Ma, Xiu-juan; Chen, Yong-chun; Du, Xiu-ming; Liu, Hong; Zong, Ying; Lu, Guo-cai

    2017-01-01

    A limit to the clinical benefit of radiotherapy is not an incapacity to eliminate tumor cells but rather a limit on its capacity to do so without destroying normal tissue and inducing inflammation. Recent evidence reveals that the inflammasome is essential for mediating radiation-induced cell and tissue damage. In this study, using primary cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and a mouse radiation model, we explored the role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and the secondary pyroptosis underlying radiation-induced immune cell death. We observed an increasing proportion of pyroptosis and elevating Caspase-1 activation in 10 and 20 Gy radiation groups. Nlrp3 knock out significantly diminished the quantity of cleaved-Caspase-1 (p10) and IL-1β as well as the proportion of pyroptosis. Additionally, in vivo research shows that 9.5 Gy of radiation promotes Caspase-1 activation in marginal zone cells and induces death in mice, both of which can be significantly inhibited by knocking out Nlrp3. Thus, based on these findings, we conclude that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation mediates radiation-induced pyroptosis in BMDMs. Targeting NLRP3 inflammasome and pyroptosis may serve as effective strategies to diminish injury caused by radiation. PMID:28151471

  14. Protein kinase C-δ isoform mediates lysosome labilization in DNA damage-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    PARENT, NICOLAS; SCHERER, MAX; LIEBISCH, GERHARD; SCHMITZ, GERD; BERTRAND, RICHARD

    2013-01-01

    A lysosomal pathway, characterized by the partial rupture or labilization of lysosomal membranes (LLM) and cathepsin release into the cytosol, is evoked during the early events of 20-S-camptothecin lactone (CPT)-induced apoptosis in human cancer cells, including human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells. These lysosomal events begin rapidly and simultaneously with mitochondrial permeabilization and caspase activation within 3 h after drug treatment. Recently, in a comparative proteomics analysis performed on highly-enriched lysosomal extracts, we identified proteins whose translocation to lysosomes correlated with LLM induction after CPT treatment, including protein kinase C-δ (PKC-δ). In this study, we show that the PKC-δ translocation to lysosomes is required for LLM, as silencing its expression with RNA interference or suppressing its activity with the inhibitor, rottlerin, prevents CPT-induced LLM. PKC-δ translocation to lysosomes is associated with lysosomal acidic sphingomyelinase (ASM) phosphorylation and activation, which in turn leads to an increase in ceramide (CER) content in lysosomes. The accumulation of endogenous CER in lysosomes is a critical event for CPT-induced LLM as suppressing PKC-δ or ASM activity reduces both the CPT-mediated CER generation in lysosomes and CPT-induced LLM. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which PKC-δ mediates ASM phosphorylation/activation and CER accumulation in lysosomes in CPT-induced LLM, rapidly activating the lysosomal pathway of apoptosis after CPT treatment. PMID:21174057

  15. Mast Cells Mediate Hyperoxia-Induced Airway Hyper-reactivity in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Eric D.; Potts, Erin N.; Mason, Stanley N.; Foster, W. Michael; Auten, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Premature infants are at increased risk of developing airway hyper-reactivity following oxidative stress and inflammation. Mast cells contribute to airway hyper-reactivity partly by mediator release, so we sought to determine if blocking mast cell degranulation or recruitment prevents hyperoxia-induced airway hyper-reactivity, mast cell accumulation, and airway smooth muscle changes. Rats were exposed at birth to air or 60% O2 for 14 days, inducing significantly increased airway hyper-reactivity (AHR) in the latter group, induced by nebulized methacholine challenge, measured by forced oscillometry. Daily treatment (postnatal days 1-14) with intraperitoneal cromolyn prevented hyperoxia-induced AHR, as did treatment with imatinib on postnatal days 5-14, compared with vehicle treated controls. Cromolyn prevented mast cell degranulation in the trachea but not hilar airways, and blocked mast cell accumulation in the hilar airways. Imatinib treatment completely blocked mast cell accumulation in tracheal/hilar airway tissues. Hyperoxia-induced AHR in neonatal rats is mediated, at least in part, via the mast cell. PMID:20386143

  16. Lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced Fas aggregation in M624 melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elyassaki, Walid; Wu, Shiyong

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) induces aggregation of Fas-receptor through a Fas-ligand-independent pathway. However, the mechanism of ultraviolet light-induced Fas-receptor aggregation is not known. In this report, we show that lipid rafts mediate ultraviolet light-induced aggregation of Fas. Our data show that UV induces a redistribution of Fas-receptor in a 25-5% Optiprep continuous gradient. The amount of Fas-receptorS is significantly increased in a gradient fraction that contain lipid rafts and is associated with an increase of FADD and caspase-8. Our data also show that the active dimeric form of caspase-8 (p44/p41) is increased in the lipid raft fraction. In addition, our data show that cholesterol, a major component of lipid rafts, is significantly reduced in only the lipid raft fractions after UV-irradiation. However, ceramide, another major lipid raft component, is increased evenly in all gradient fractions after UV-irradiation. These results suggest that UV alters the composition of major lipid raft components, which leads to the recruitment of Fas-receptor and FADD, with subsequent activation of caspase-8. Based on our results, we propose a novel mechanism by which UV induces apoptosis through a membrane lipid raft-mediated signaling pathway.

  17. Chlorpyrifos inhibits neural induction via Mfn1-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kubo, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Daiju; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2017-01-01

    Organophosphates, such as chlorpyrifos (CPF), are widely used as insecticides in agriculture. CPF is known to induce cytotoxicity, including neurodevelopmental toxicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of CPF toxicity at early fetal stage have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined the mechanisms of CPF-induced cytotoxicity using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We found that exposure to CPF at micromolar levels decreased intracellular ATP levels. As CPF suppressed energy production that is a critical function of the mitochondria, we focused on the effects of CPF on mitochondrial dynamics. CPF induced mitochondrial fragmentation via reduction of mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 1 (Mfn1) in iPSCs. In addition, CPF reduced the expression of several neural differentiation marker genes in iPSCs. Moreover, knockdown of Mfn1 gene in iPSCs downregulated the expression of PAX6, a key transcription factor that regulates neurogenesis, suggesting that Mfn1 mediates neural induction in iPSCs. Taken together, these results suggest that CPF induces neurotoxicity via Mfn1-mediated mitochondrial fragmentation in iPSCs. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction in iPSCs could be used as a possible marker for cytotoxic effects by chemicals. PMID:28112198

  18. Hindbrain GLP-1 receptor mediation of cisplatin-induced anorexia and nausea.

    PubMed

    De Jonghe, Bart C; Holland, Ruby A; Olivos, Diana R; Rupprecht, Laura E; Kanoski, Scott E; Hayes, Matthew R

    2016-01-01

    While chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting are clinically controlled in the acute (<24 h) phase following treatment, the anorexia, nausea, fatigue, and other illness-type behaviors during the delayed phase (>24 h) of chemotherapy are largely uncontrolled. As the hindbrain glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) system contributes to energy balance and mediates aversive and stressful stimuli, here we examine the hypothesis that hindbrain GLP-1 signaling mediates aspects of chemotherapy-induced nausea and reductions in feeding behavior in rats. Specifically, hindbrain GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) blockade, via 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) exendin-(9-39) injections, attenuates the anorexia, body weight reduction, and pica (nausea-induced ingestion of kaolin clay) elicited by cisplatin chemotherapy during the delayed phase (48 h) of chemotherapy-induced nausea. Additionally, the present data provide evidence that the central GLP-1-producing preproglucagon neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the caudal brainstem are activated by cisplatin during the delayed phase of chemotherapy-induced nausea, as cisplatin led to a significant increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity in NTS GLP-1-immunoreactive neurons. These data support a growing body of literature suggesting that the central GLP-1 system may be a potential pharmaceutical target for adjunct anti-emetics used to treat the delayed-phase of nausea and emesis, anorexia, and body weight loss that accompany chemotherapy treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. RAGE/NF-κB signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide induced acute lung injury in neonate rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhong; Wu, Rong; Tian, Yian; Yu, Min; Tang, Yun; Cheng, Huaipin; Tian, Zhaofang

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is known to induce acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Accumulating data suggest the crucial role of RAGE in the pathogenesis of ALI/ARDS. However, the mechanism by which RAGE mediates inflammatory lung injury in the neonates remains elusive. In this study we established LPS-induced ALI model in neonate rats, and investigated the role of RAGE/NF-κB signaling in mediating ALI. We found that RAGE antibody or bortezomib reduced LPS-induced histopathological abnormalities in the lung and lung damage score. RAGE antibody or bortezomib also reduced TNF-α level in both serum and BALF of the rats. Furthermore, RAGE antibody or bortezomib significantly reduced LPS-induced upregulation of RAGE and NF-κB expression in the lung. In conclusion, we established ALI model in neonate rats to demonstrate that LPS induced inflammatory lung injury via RAGE/NF-κB signaling. Interference with RAGE/NF-κB signaling is a potential approach to prevent and treat sepsis-related ALI/ARDS.

  20. Guard cell hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide mediate elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shi, Kai; Li, Xin; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Guanqun; Liu, Yaru; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Chen, Zhixiang; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-10-01

    Climate change as a consequence of increasing atmospheric CO2 influences plant photosynthesis and transpiration. Although the involvement of stomata in plant responses to elevated CO2 has been well established, the underlying mechanism of elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement remains largely unknown. We used diverse techniques, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, biochemical methodologies and gene silencing to investigate the signaling pathway for elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Elevated CO2 -induced stomatal closure was dependent on the production of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE 1 (RBOH1)-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and NITRATE REDUCTASE (NR)-mediated nitric oxide (NO) in guard cells in an abscisic acid (ABA)-independent manner. Silencing of OPEN STOMATA 1 (OST1) compromised the elevated CO2 -induced accumulation of H2 O2 and NO, upregulation of SLOW ANION CHANNEL ASSOCIATED 1 (SLAC1) gene expression and reduction of stomatal aperture, whereas silencing of RBOH1 or NR had no effects on the expression of OST1. Our results demonstrate that as critical signaling molecules, RBOH1-dependent H2 O2 and NR-dependent NO act downstream of OST1 that regulate SLAC1 expression and elevated CO2 -induced stomatal movement. This information is crucial to deepen the understanding of CO2 signaling pathway in guard cells.

  1. Bacopa monnieri-Induced Protective Autophagy Inhibits Benzo[a]pyrene-Mediated Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Das, Durgesh Nandini; Naik, Prajna Paramita; Nayak, Aditi; Panda, Prashanta Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Subhadip; Sinha, Niharika; Bhutia, Sujit K

    2016-11-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) is capable of inducing oxidative stress and cellular injuries leading to cell death and associates with a significant risk of cancer development. Prevention of B[a]P-induced cellular toxicity with herbal compound through regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress might protect cell death and have therapeutic benefit to human health. In this study, we demonstrated the cytoprotective role of Bacopa monnieri (BM) against B[a]P-induced apoptosis through autophagy induction. Pretreatment with BM rescued the reduction in cell viability in B[a]P-treated human keratinocytes (HaCaT) cells indicating the cytoprotective potential of BM against B[a]P. Moreover, BM was found to inhibit B[a]P-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced apoptosis activation in HaCaT cells. Furthermore, BM was found to preserve mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibited release of cytochrome c in B[a]P-treated HaCaT cells. Bacopa monnieri induced protective autophagy; we knocked down Beclin-1, and data showed that BM was unable to protect from B[a]P-induced mitochondrial ROS-mediated apoptosis in Beclin-1-deficient HaCaT cells. Moreover, we established that B[a]P-induced damaged mitochondria were found to colocalize and degraded within autolysosomes in order to protect HaCaT cells from mitochondrial injury. In conclusion, B[a]P-induced apoptosis was rescued by BM treatment and provided cytoprotection through Beclin-1-dependent autophagy activation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. FOXO3-mediated up-regulation of Bim contributes to rhein-induced cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiao; Liu, Shu; Yin, Yancun; Li, Mingjin; Wang, Bo; Yang, Li; Jiang, Yangfu

    2015-03-01

    The anthraquinone compound rhein is a natural agent in the traditional Chinese medicine rhubarb. Preclinical studies demonstrate that rhein has anticancer activity. Treatment of a variety of cancer cells with rhein may induce apoptosis. Here, we report that rhein induces atypical unfolded protein response in breast cancer MCF-7 cells and hepatoma HepG2 cells. Rhein induces CHOP expression, eIF2α phosphorylation and caspase cleavage, while it does not induce glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) expression in both MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. Meanwhile, rhein inhibits thapsigargin-induced GRP78 expression and X box-binding protein 1 splicing. In addition, rhein inhibits Akt phosphorylation and stimulates FOXO transactivation activity. Rhein induces Bim expression in MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, which can be abrogated by FOXO3a knockdown. Knockdown of FOXO3a or Bim abrogates rhein-induced caspase cleavage and apoptosis. The chemical chaperone 4-phenylbutyrate acid antagonizes the induction of FOXO activation, Bim expression and caspase cleavage by rhein, indicating that protein misfolding may be involved in triggering these deleterious effects. We conclude that FOXO3a-mediated up-regulation of Bim is a key mechanism underlying rhein-induced cancer cells apoptosis.

  3. Aflatoxin B1 Induces Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Autophagy and Extracellular Trap Formation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    An, Yanan; Shi, Xiaochen; Tang, Xudong; Wang, Yang; Shen, Fengge; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Jiang, Mingguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxins are a group of highly toxic mycotoxins with high carcinogenicity that are commonly found in foods. Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is the most toxic member of the aflatoxin family. A recent study reported that AFB1 can induce autophagy, but whether AFB1 can induce extracellular traps (ETs) and the relationships among innate immune responses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and autophagy and the ETs induced by AFB1 remain unknown. Here, we demonstrated that AFB1 induced a complete autophagic process in macrophages (MΦ) (THP-1 cells and RAW264.7 cells). In addition, AFB1 induced the generation of MΦ ETs (METs) in a dose-dependent manner. In particular, the formation of METs significantly reduced the AFB1 content. Further analysis using specific inhibitors showed that the inhibition of either autophagy or ROS prevented MET formation caused by AFB1, indicating that autophagy and ROS were required for AFB1-induced MET formation. The inhibition of ROS prevented autophagy, indicating that ROS generation occurred upstream of AFB1-induced autophagy. Taken together, these data suggest that AFB1 induces ROS-mediated autophagy and ETs formation and an M1 phenotype in MΦ. PMID:28280716

  4. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  5. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity.

  6. Prazosin induces p53-mediated autophagic cell death in H9C2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Fan; Wu, Chau-Chung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Chen, Yuh-Lien; Su, Ming-Jai

    2011-08-01

    Prazosin, a quinazoline-based α(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, is known to induce cell death, and this effect is independent of its α-blockade activity. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms involved are still not fully understood. In this study, we found that prazosin, but not doxazosin, could induce patterns of autophagy in H9C2 cells, including intracellular vacuole formation, microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) conversion, and acidic vesicular organelle (AVO) augmentation. Western blot analysis of phosphorylated proteins showed that exposure to prazosin increased the levels of phospho-p53 and phospho-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but dramatically decreased the levels of phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phospho-protein kinase B (Akt), and phospho-ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K). Furthermore, although pretreatments with the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and the p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α suppressed prazosin-induced AVO formation, they did not reverse prazosin-induced decline in cell viability but enhanced prazosin-induced caspase-3 activation. From these results we suggest that prazosin induces autophagic cell death via a p53-mediated mechanism. When the autophagy pathway was inhibited, prazosin still induced programmed cell death, at least in part through apoptotic caspase-3 cascade enhancement. Thus, our results indicate a potential new target in prazosin-induced cell death.

  7. P53/Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission mediates aldosterone-induced podocyte injury and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yanggang; Zhang, Aiqing; Qi, Jia; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xi; Zhao, Min; Duan, Suyan; Huang, Zhimin; Zhang, Chengning; Wu, Lin; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Aihua; Xing, Changying

    2017-06-28

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is increasingly recognized as an important factor in glomerular diseases. Previous study showed that mitochondrial fission contributed mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanism of mitochondrial fission on mitochondrial dysfunction in aldosterone-induced podocyte injury remains ambiguous. This study aimed to investigate the pathogenic effect of mitochondrial fission both in vivo and in vitro. In an animal model of aldosterone-induced nephropathy, inhibition of the mitochondrial fission protein Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1) suppressed aldosterone-induced podocyte injury. In cultured podocytes, aldosterone dose-dependently induced Drp1 expression. Knockdown of Drp1 inhibited aldosterone-induced mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial dysfunction and podocyte apoptosis. Furthermore, aldosterone dose-dependently induced p53 expression. Knockdown of p53 inhibited aldosterone-induced Drp1 expression, mitochondrial dysfunction and podocyte apoptosis. These findings implicated that aldosterone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and podocyte injury mediated by p53/Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which may provide opportunities for therapeutic intervention for podocyte injury. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Renal Physiology.

  8. AKAP12 mediates PKA-induced phosphorylation of ATR to enhance nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Stuart G.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; D'Orazio, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Loss-of-function in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS protein-coupled receptor that regulates signal transduction through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) in melanocytes, is a major inherited melanoma risk factor. Herein, we report a novel cAMP-mediated response for sensing and responding to UV-induced DNA damage regulated by A-kinase-anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12). AKAP12 is identified as a necessary participant in PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) at S435, a post-translational event required for cAMP-enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER). Moreover, UV exposure promotes ATR-directed phosphorylation of AKAP12 at S732, which promotes nuclear translocation of AKAP12–ATR-pS435. This complex subsequently recruits XPA to UV DNA damage and enhances 5′ strand incision. Preventing AKAP12's interaction with PKA or with ATR abrogates ATR-pS435 accumulation, delays recruitment of XPA to UV-damaged DNA, impairs NER and increases UV-induced mutagenesis. Our results define a critical role for AKAP12 as an UV-inducible scaffold for PKA-mediated ATR phosphorylation, and identify a repair complex consisting of AKAP12–ATR-pS435-XPA at photodamage, which is essential for cAMP-enhanced NER. PMID:27683220

  9. Sulforaphane-induced autophagy flux prevents prion protein-mediated neurotoxicity through AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, J-K; Park, S-Y

    2014-10-10

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative and infectious disorders that involve accumulation of misfolded scrapie prion protein, and which are characterized by spongiform degeneration. Autophagy, a major homeostatic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, has garnered attention as the potential target for neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease. We focused on protective effects of sulforaphane found in cruciferous vegetables on prion-mediated neurotoxicity and the mechanism of sulforaphane related to autophagy. In human neuroblastoma cells, sulforaphane protected prion protein (PrP) (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and increased autophagy flux marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II protein levels, following a decrease of p62 protein level. Pharmacological and genetical inhibition of autophagy by 3MA, wortmannin and knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) led to block the effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore we demonstrated that both sulforaphane-induced autophagy and protective effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity are dependent on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present results indicated that sulforaphane of cruciferous vegetables enhanced autophagy flux led to the protection effects against prion-mediated neurotoxicity, which was regulated by AMPK signaling pathways in human neuron cells. Our data also suggest that sulforaphane has a potential value as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disease including prion diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Induced resistance to periwinkle grazing in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Phaeophyceae): molecular insights and seaweed-mediated effects on herbivore interactions.

    PubMed

    Flöthe, Carla R; Molis, Markus; John, Uwe

    2014-06-01

    Herbivory is a key factor for controlling seaweed biomass and community structure. To cope with grazers, constitutive and inducible defenses have evolved in macroalgae. Inducible chemical defenses show grazer-specificity and, at the same time, have the potential to mediate interactions among different herbivores. Furthermore, temporal variations in defense patterns, which may adjust antiherbivory responses to grazing pressure, were reported in two brown seaweeds. However, underlying cellular processes are only rudimentarily characterized. To investigate the response of Fucus vesiculosus (L.) to periwinkle (Littorina obtusata) grazing, feeding assays were conducted at several times during a 33 d induction experiment. Underlying cellular processes were analyzed through gene expression profiling. Furthermore, direct processes driving the antiherbivory response to periwinkle grazing and indirect effects on another herbivore, the isopod Idotea baltica, were elucidated. F. vesiculosus showed multiple defense pulses in response to periwinkle grazing, suggesting a high level of temporal variability in antiherbivory traits. Defense induction was accompanied by extensive transcriptome changes. Approximately 400 genes were significantly up-/down-regulated relative to controls, including genes relevant for translation and the cytoskeleton. Genes involved in photosynthesis were mostly down-regulated, while genes related to the respiratory chain were up-regulated, indicating alterations in resource allocation. The comparison of genes regulated in response to isopod (previous study) and periwinkle grazing suggests specific induction of several genes by each herbivore. However, grazing by both herbivores induced similar metabolic processes in F. vesiculosus. These common defense-related processes reflected in strong indirect effects as isopods were also repelled after previous grazing by L. obtusata.

  11. Inhibition of Cathepsin S Induces Mitochondrial ROS That Sensitizes TRAIL-Mediated Apoptosis Through p53-Mediated Downregulation of Bcl-2 and c-FLIP.

    PubMed

    Seo, Bo Ram; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Woo, Seon Min; Choe, Misun; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Young-Kyung; Yoon, Gyesoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2017-08-01

    Cathepsin S is highly expressed in various cancer cells, and it has protumoral effects, including promotion of migration, invasion, and neovascularization. In this study, we show that inhibition of cathepsin S could sensitize cancer cells to tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis. An inhibitor of cathepsin S (Z-FL-COCHO; ZFL) markedly induced apoptosis in human renal cancer cells treated with TRAIL. In contrast, combined treatment with ZFL and TRAIL had no effect on normal cells. ZFL downregulated Bcl-2 expression at the transcriptional level in a p53-dependent manner, and overexpression of Bcl-2 also markedly blocked apoptosis induced by combined treatment with ZFL and TRAIL. In addition, ZFL induced downregulation of c-FLIP, and overexpression of c-FLIP blocked the apoptosis induced by ZFL plus TRAIL. Moreover, ZFL increased the expression of Cbl, an E3 ligase of c-FLIP, in a p53-dependent manner, and knockdown of Cbl markedly prevented c-FLIP downregulation and the apoptosis induced by ZFL plus TRAIL. Interestingly, ZFL induced p53 expression via production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also demonstrated that downregulation of cathepsin S by small interfering RNA sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in Caki cells. These results reveal the importance of cathepsin S on resistance against TRAIL, and inhibition of cathepsin S activity plays a crucial role in TRAIL-mediated cell death of cancer cells. Our results indicated that inhibition of cathepsin S stimulates TRAIL-induced apoptosis through downregulation of Bcl-2 and Cbl-mediated c-FLIP by ROS-mediated p53 expression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 215-233.

  12. NFAT2 mediates high glucose-induced glomerular podocyte apoptosis through increased Bax expression

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruizhao; Zhang, Li; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Bin; Liang, Xinling; Liu, Shuangxin; Wang, Wenjian

    2013-04-15

    Background: Hyperglycemia promotes podocyte apoptosis and plays a key role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. However, the mechanisms that mediate hyperglycemia-induced podocyte apoptosis is still far from being fully understood. Recent studies reported that high glucose activate nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) in vascular smooth muscle or pancreatic β-cells. Here, we sought to determine if hyperglycemia activates NFAT2 in cultured podocyte and whether this leads to podocyte apoptosis. Meanwhile, we also further explore the mechanisms of NFAT2 activation and NFAT2 mediates high glucose-induced podocyte apoptosis. Methods: Immortalized mouse podocytes were cultured in media containing normal glucose (NG), or high glucose (HG) or HG plus cyclosporine A (a pharmacological inhibitor of calcinerin) or 11R-VIVIT (a special inhibitor of NFAT2). The activation of NFAT2 in podocytes was detected by western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. The role of NFAT2 in hyperglycemia-induced podocyte apoptosis was further evaluated by observing the inhibition of NFAT2 activation by 11R-VIVIT using flow cytometer. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} was monitored in HG-treated podcocytes using Fluo-3/AM. The mRNA and protein expression of apoptosis gene Bax were measured by real time-qPCR and western blotting. Results: HG stimulation activated NFAT2 in a time- and dose-dependent manner in cultured podocytes. Pretreatment with cyclosporine A (500 nM) or 11R-VIVIT (100 nM) completely blocked NFAT2 nuclear accumulation. Meanwhile, the apoptosis effects induced by HG were also abrogated by concomitant treatment with 11R-VIVIT in cultured podocytes. We further found that HG also increased [Ca{sup 2+}]i, leading to activation of calcineurin, and subsequent increased nuclear accumulation of NFAT2 and Bax expression in cultured podocytes. Conclusion: Our results identify a new finding that HG-induced podocyte apoptosis is mediated by calcineurin/NFAT2/Bax signaling pathway

  13. Tristetraprolin mediates radiation-induced TNF-α production in lung macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ray, Dipankar; Shukla, Shirish; Allam, Uday Sankar; Helman, Abigail; Ramanand, Susmita Gurjar; Tran, Linda; Bassetti, Michael; Krishnamurthy, Pranathi Meda; Rumschlag, Matthew; Paulsen, Michelle; Sun, Lei; Shanley, Thomas P; Ljungman, Mats; Nyati, Mukesh K; Zhang, Ming; Lawrence, Theodore S

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of radiation therapy for lung cancer is limited by radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT). Although tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) signaling plays a critical role in RILT, the molecular regulators of radiation-induced TNF-α production remain unknown. We investigated the role of a major TNF-α regulator, Tristetraprolin (TTP), in radiation-induced TNF-α production by macrophages. For in vitro studies we irradiated (4 Gy) either a mouse lung macrophage cell line, MH-S or macrophages isolated from TTP knockout mice, and studied the effects of radiation on TTP and TNF-α levels. To study the in vivo relevance, mouse lungs were irradiated with a single dose (15 Gy) and assessed at varying times for TTP alterations. Irradiation of MH-S cells caused TTP to undergo an inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-178 and proteasome-mediated degradation, which resulted in increased TNF-α mRNA stabilization and secretion. Similarly, MH-S cells treated with TTP siRNA or macrophages isolated from ttp (-/-) mice had higher basal levels of TNF-α, which was increased minimally after irradiation. Conversely, cells overexpressing TTP mutants defective in undergoing phosphorylation released significantly lower levels of TNF-α. Inhibition of p38, a known kinase for TTP, by either siRNA or a small molecule inhibitor abrogated radiation-induced TNF-α release by MH-S cells. Lung irradiation induced TTP(Ser178) phosphorylation and protein degradation and a simultaneous increase in TNF-α production in C57BL/6 mice starting 24 h post-radiation. In conclusion, irradiation of lung macrophages causes TTP inactivation via p38-mediated phosphorylation and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to TNF-α production. These findings suggest that agents capable of blocking TTP phosphorylation or stabilizing TTP after irradiation could decrease RILT.

  14. Novel lipid mediator aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 induces heme oxygenase-1 in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Silva, V; Arruda, M A; Barja-Fidalgo, C; Villela, C G; Fierro, I M

    2005-09-01

    Lipoxins (LX) and aspirin-triggered LX (ATL) are eicosanoids generated during inflammation via transcellular biosynthetic routes that elicit distinct anti-inflammatory and proresolution bioactions, including inhibition of leukocyte-mediated injury, stimulation of macrophage clearance of apoptotic neutrophils, repression of proinflammatory cytokine production, and inhibition of cell proliferation and migration. Recently, it was reported that aspirin induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on endothelial cells (EC) in a COX-independent manner, what confers protection against prooxidant insults. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether an aspirin-triggered lipoxin A(4) stable analog, 15-epi-16-(para-fluoro)-phenoxy-lipoxin A(4) (ATL-1) was able to induce endothelial HO-1. Western blot analysis showed that ATL-1 increased HO-1 protein expression associated with increased mRNA levels on EC in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. This phenomenon appears to be mediated by the activation of the G protein-coupled LXA(4) receptor because pertussis toxin and Boc-2, a receptor antagonist, significantly inhibited ATL-1-induced HO-1 expression. We demonstrate that treatment of EC with ATL-1 inhibited VCAM and E-selectin expression induced by TNF-alpha or IL-1beta. This inhibitory effect of the analog is modulated by HO-1 because it was blocked by SnPPIX, a competitive inhibitor that blocks HO-1 activity. Our results establish that ATL-1 induces HO-1 in human EC, revealing an undescribed mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of these lipid mediators.

  15. miR-206 Mediates YAP-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Survival.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfei; Del Re, Dominic P; Nakano, Noritsugu; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Zhai, Peiyong; Park, Jiyeon; Sayed, Danish; Shirakabe, Akihiro; Matsushima, Shoji; Park, Yongkyu; Tian, Bin; Abdellatif, Maha; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2015-10-23

    In Drosophila, the Hippo signaling pathway negatively regulates organ size by suppressing cell proliferation and survival through the inhibition of Yorkie, a transcriptional cofactor. Yes-associated protein (YAP), the mammalian homolog of Yorkie, promotes cardiomyocyte growth and survival in postnatal hearts. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for the beneficial effect of YAP in cardiomyocytes remains unclear. We investigated whether miR-206, a microRNA known to promote hypertrophy in skeletal muscle, mediates the effect of YAP on promotion of survival and hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes. Microarray analysis indicated that YAP increased miR-206 expression in cardiomyocytes. Increased miR-206 expression induced cardiac hypertrophy and inhibited cell death in cultured cardiomyocytes, similar to that of YAP. Downregulation of endogenous miR-206 in cardiomyocytes attenuated YAP-induced cardiac hypertrophy and survival, suggesting that miR-206 plays a critical role in mediating YAP function. Cardiac-specific overexpression of miR-206 in mice induced hypertrophy and protected the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury, whereas suppression of miR-206 exacerbated ischemia/reperfusion injury and prevented pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. miR-206 negatively regulates Forkhead box protein P1 expression in cardiomyocytes and overexpression of Forkhead box protein P1 attenuated miR-206-induced cardiac hypertrophy and survival, suggesting that Forkhead box protein P1 is a functional target of miR-206. YAP increases the abundance of miR-206, which in turn plays an essential role in mediating hypertrophy and survival by silencing Forkhead box protein P1 in cardiomyocytes. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Dancs, Péter; Kerék, Margit; Németh, Tamás; Faragó, Bernadett; Balogh, Andrea; Patil, Renukadevi; Jennings, Brett L.; Liliom, Károly; Malik, Kafait U.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Tigyi, Gabor; Benyó, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) has been implicated as a mediator of several cardiovascular functions, but its potential involvement in the control of vascular tone is obscure. Here, we show that both LPA (18:1) and VPC31143 (a synthetic agonist of LPA1–3 receptors) relax intact mouse thoracic aorta with similar Emax values (53.9 and 51.9% of phenylephrine-induced precontraction), although the EC50 of LPA- and VPC31143-induced vasorelaxations were different (400 vs. 15 nM, respectively). Mechanical removal of the endothelium or genetic deletion of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) not only diminished vasorelaxation by LPA or VPC31143 but converted it to vasoconstriction. Freshly isolated mouse aortic endothelial cells expressed LPA1, LPA2, LPA4 and LPA5 transcripts. The LPA1,3 antagonist Ki16425, the LPA1 antagonist AM095, and the genetic deletion of LPA1, but not that of LPA2, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3 kinase–protein kinase B/Akt pathway by wortmannin or MK-2206 failed to influence the effect of LPA. However, pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC) by U73122 or edelfosine, but not genetic deletion of PLCε, abolished LPA-induced vasorelaxation and indicated that a PLC enzyme, other than PLCε, mediates the response. In summary, the present study identifies LPA as an endothelium-dependent vasodilator substance acting via LPA1, PLC, and eNOS.—Ruisanchez, É., Dancs, P., Kerék, M., Németh, T., Faragó, B., Balogh, A., Patil, R., Jennings, B. L., Liliom, K., Malik, K. U., Smrcka, A. V., Tigyi, G., Benyó, Z. Lysophosphatidic acid induces vasodilation mediated by LPA1 receptors, phospholipase C, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase. PMID:24249637

  17. Mutant analysis suggests that cyclic GMP mediates the cyclic AMP-induced Ca2+ uptake in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Menz, S; Bumann, J; Jaworski, E; Malchow, D

    1991-05-01

    Previous work has shown that streamer F (stmF) mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum exhibit prolonged chemotactic elongation in aggregation fields. The mutants carry an altered structural gene for cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase resulting in low activities of this enzyme. Chemotactic stimulation by cyclic AMP causes a rapid transient increase in the cyclic GMP concentration followed by association of myosin heavy chains with the cytoskeleton. Both events persist several times longer in stmF mutants than in the parental strain, indicating that the change in association of myosin with the cytoskeleton is transmitted directly or indirectly by cyclic GMP. We measured the cyclic AMP-induced Ca2+ uptake with a Ca(2+)-sensitive electrode and found that Ca2+ uptake was prolonged in stmF mutants but not in the parental strain. The G alpha 2 mutant strain HC33 (fgdA), devoid of InsP3 release and receptor/guanylate cyclase coupling, lacked Ca2+ uptake. However, the latter response and cyclic GMP formation were normal in the signal-relay mutant strain agip 53 where cyclic AMP-stimulated cyclic AMP synthesis is absent. LiCl, which inhibits InsP3 formation in Dictyostelium, blocked Ca2+ uptake in a dose-dependent manner. The data indicate that the receptor-mediated Ca2+ uptake depends on the InsP3 pathway and is regulated by cyclic GMP. The rate of Ca2+ uptake was correlated in time with the association of myosin with the cytoskeleton, suggesting that Ca2+ uptake is involved in the motility response of the cells.

  18. Cadmium-induced teratogenicity: Association with ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Hua; Xu, Zhong Mei; Ji, Yan-Li; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Zhang, Cheng; Meng, Xiu-Hong; Zhao, Mei; Xu, De-Xiang

    2012-03-01

    The placenta is essential for sustaining the growth of the fetus. An increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been associated with the impaired placental and fetal development. Cadmium (Cd) is a potent teratogen that caused fetal malformation and growth restriction. The present study investigated the effects of maternal Cd exposure on placental and fetal development. The pregnant mice were intraperitoneally injected with CdCl{sub 2} (4.5 mg/kg) on gestational day 9. As expected, maternal Cd exposure during early limb development significantly increased the incidences of forelimb ectrodactyly in fetuses. An obvious impairment in the labyrinth, a highly developed tissue of blood vessels, was observed in placenta of mice treated with CdCl{sub 2}. In addition, maternal Cd exposure markedly repressed cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in placenta. An additional experiment showed that maternal Cd exposure significantly upregulated the expression of GRP78, an ER chaperone. Moreover, maternal Cd exposure induced the phosphorylation of placental eIF2α, a downstream molecule of PERK signaling. In addition, maternal Cd exposure significantly increased the level of placental CHOP, another target of PERK signaling, indicating that the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling was activated in placenta of mice treated with CdCl{sub 2}. Interestingly, alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone, a free radical spin-trapping agent, significantly alleviated Cd-induced placental ER stress and UPR. Taken together, these results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated ER stress might be involved in Cd-induced impairment on placental and fetal development. Antioxidants may be used as pharmacological agents to protect against Cd-induced fetal malformation and growth restriction. -- Highlights: ► Cd induces fetal malformation and growth restriction. ► Cd induced placental ER stress and UPR. ► PBN alleviates Cd-induced ER stress and UPR in placenta. ► ROS-mediated ER

  19. Obesity-Mediated Autophagy Insufficiency Exacerbates Proteinuria-induced Tubulointerstitial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamahara, Kosuke; Kume, Shinji; Koya, Daisuke; Tanaka, Yuki; Morita, Yoshikata; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Isshiki, Keiji; Araki, Shin-ichi; Haneda, Masakazu; Matsusaka, Taiji; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Maegawa, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for renal dysfunction in patients with CKDs, including diabetic nephropathy, but the mechanism underlying this connection remains unclear. Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system that maintains intracellular homeostasis by removing damaged proteins and organelles, and autophagy insufficiency is associated with the pathogenesis of obesity-related diseases. We therefore examined the role of autophagy in obesity-mediated exacerbation of proteinuria-induced proximal tubular epithelial cell damage in mice and in human renal biopsy specimens. In nonobese mice, overt proteinuria, induced by intraperitoneal free fatty acid–albumin overload, led to mild tubular damage and apoptosis, and activated autophagy in proximal tubules reabsorbing urinary albumin. In contrast, diet-induced obesity suppressed proteinuria-induced autophagy and exacerbated proteinuria-induced tubular cell damage. Proximal tubule-specific autophagy-deficient mice, resulting from an Atg5 gene deletion, subjected to intraperitoneal free fatty acid–albumin overload developed severe proteinuria-induced tubular damage, suggesting that proteinuria-induced autophagy is renoprotective. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a potent suppressor of autophagy, was activated in proximal tubules of obese mice, and treatment with an mTOR inhibitor ameliorated obesity-mediated autophagy insufficiency. Furthermore, both mTOR hyperactivation and autophagy suppression were observed in tubular cells of specimens obtained from obese patients with proteinuria. Thus, in addition to enhancing the understanding of obesity-related cell vulnerability in the kidneys, these results suggest that restoring the renoprotective action of autophagy in proximal tubules may improve renal outcomes in obese patients. PMID:24092929

  20. Signalling mechanisms mediating Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and cell death in microglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mortadza, Sharifah Syed; Sim, Joan A.; Stacey, Martin; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Excessive Zn2+ causes brain damage via promoting ROS generation. Here we investigated the role of ROS-sensitive TRPM2 channel in H2O2/Zn2+-induced Ca2+ signalling and cell death in microglial cells. H2O2/Zn2+ induced concentration-dependent increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c), which was inhibited by PJ34, a PARP inhibitor, and abolished by TRPM2 knockout (TRPM2-KO). Pathological concentrations of H2O2/Zn2+ induced substantial cell death that was inhibited by PJ34 and DPQ, PARP inhibitors, 2-APB, a TRPM2 channel inhibitor, and prevented by TRPM2-KO. Further analysis indicate that Zn2+ induced ROS production, PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death, all of which were suppressed by chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, DPI, a NADPH-dependent oxidase (NOX) inhibitor, GKT137831, a NOX1/4 inhibitor, and Phox-I2, a NOX2 inhibitor. Furthermore, Zn2+-induced PARP-1 stimulation, increase in the [Ca2+]c and cell death were inhibited by PF431396, a Ca2+-sensitive PYK2 inhibitor, and U0126, a MEK/ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our study shows PKC/NOX-mediated ROS generation and PARP-1 activation as an important mechanism in Zn2+-induced TRPM2 channel activation and, TRPM2-mediated increase in the [Ca2+]c to trigger the PYK2/MEK/ERK signalling pathway as a positive feedback mechanism that amplifies the TRPM2 channel activation. Activation of these TRPM2-depenent signalling mechanisms ultimately drives Zn2+-induced Ca2+ overloading and cell death. PMID:28322340

  1. Circulating leptin mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced anorexia and fever in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachot, Christelle; Poole, Stephen; Luheshi, Giamal N

    2004-11-15

    Anorexia and fever are important features of the host's response to inflammation that can be triggered by the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the appetite suppressant leptin. Previous studies have demonstrated that LPS induces leptin synthesis and secretion in the periphery, and that the action of leptin on appetite suppression and fever are dependent on brain interleukin (IL)-1beta. However, the role of leptin as a neuroimmune mediator of LPS-induced inflammation has not been fully elucidated. To address this issue, we neutralized circulating leptin using a leptin antiserum (LAS) and determined how this neutralization affected LPS-induced anorexia, fever and hypothalamic IL-1beta. Adult male rats were separated into four treatment groups, namely LPS + normal sheep serum (NSS), LPS + LAS, saline + LAS and saline + NSS. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS (100 microg kg(-1)) induced a significant reduction in food intake and body weight, which were significantly reversed in the presence of LAS (1 ml kg(-1)), 8 and 24 h after treatment. In addition, LPS-induced fever was significantly attenuated by LAS over the duration of the fever response (8 h). Lipopolysaccharide induced an increase of circulating IL-6, another potential circulating pyrogen, which was not affected by neutralization of leptin at 2 h. Interleukin-1beta mRNA at 1 and 8 h, and IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra) at 2 h were significantly upregulated in the hypothalamus of LPS-treated animals. The induction of these cytokines was attenuated in the presence of LAS. These results are the first to demonstrate that leptin is a circulating mediator of LPS-induced anorexia and fever, probably through a hypothalamic IL-1beta-dependent mechanism.

  2. TLR4-Mediated Signaling Induces MMP9-Dependent Cleavage of