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Sample records for mediates neutrophil activation

  1. Cyanate-mediated inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M; Eaton, J W; Wolff, S P

    1997-01-01

    Cyanate (CNO-) forms spontaneously in solutions containing urea, and is present in urine and the body fluids of uraemic patients. We have explored the possibility that CNO- might be one of the unknown substances responsible for the reported impairment, by urine and uraemic plasma, of neutrophil oxidative metabolism (especially as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence). Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence generated by human neutrophils derives predominantly from the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) which produces hypochlorous acid from H2O2 and Cl-. We hypothesized that CNO- (which resembles the 'pseudohalide' thiocyanate, an alternative substrate for MPO) might somehow interfere with the activity of MPO. In support of this, we find: (i) CNO- inhibits both peroxidative and halogenating activities of MPO and also inhibits the enzyme within intact human neutrophils; (ii) the inhibition is H2O2-dependent, irreversible, accompanied by covalent addition of [14C]CNO- (or a carbon-containing fragment thereof) to the enzyme; (iii) CNO- also inhibits Cl-/H2O2/MPO-mediated bacterial killing. Impairment of this arm of neutrophil bactericidal activity by CNO- formed from urea may be one factor in the risk of urinary-tract infection associated with urinary stasis and perhaps in the generalized increase in susceptibility to infection in uraemic patients. PMID:9337863

  2. Human Neutrophil-Mediated Nonoxidative Antifungal Activity against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Mambula, Salamatu S.; Simons, Elizabeth R.; Hastey, Ryan; Selsted, Michael E.; Levitz, Stuart M.

    2000-01-01

    It has long been appreciated that polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) kill Cryptococcus neoformans, at least in part via generation of fungicidal oxidants. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of nonoxidative mechanisms to the inhibition and killing of C. neoformans. Treatment of human PMN with inhibitors and scavengers of respiratory burst oxidants only partially reversed anticryptococcal activity, suggesting that both oxidative and nonoxidative mechanisms were operative. To define the mediators of nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity, PMN were fractionated into cytoplasmic, primary (azurophil) granule, and secondary (specific) granule fractions. Incubation of C. neoformans with these fractions for 18 h resulted in percents inhibition of growth of 67.4 ± 3.4, 84.6 ± 4.4, and 29.2 ± 10.5 (mean ± standard error, n = 3), respectively. Anticryptococcal activity of the cytoplasmic fraction was abrogated by zinc and depletion of calprotectin. Antifungal activity of the primary granules was significantly reduced by pronase treatment, boiling, high ionic strength, and magnesium but not calcium. Fractionation of the primary granules by reverse phase high-pressure liquid chromatography on a C4 column over an acetonitrile gradient revealed multiple peaks with anticryptococcal activity. Of these, peaks 1 and 6 had substantial fungistatic and fungicidal activity. Peak 1 was identified by acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and mass spectroscopy as human neutrophil proteins (defensins) 1 to 3. Analysis of peak 6 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE revealed multiple bands. Thus, human PMN have nonoxidative anticryptococcal activity residing principally in their cytoplasmic and primary granule fractions. Calprotectin mediates the cytoplasmic activity, whereas multiple proteins, including defensins, are responsible for activity of the primary granules. PMID:11035733

  3. Mitraphylline inhibits lipopolysaccharide-mediated activation of primary human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Montserrat-de la Paz, Sergio; Fernandez-Arche, Angeles; de la Puerta, Rocío; Quilez, Ana M; Muriana, Francisco J G; Garcia-Gimenez, Maria Dolores; Bermudez, Beatriz

    2016-02-15

    Mitraphylline (MTP) is the major pentacyclic oxindolic alkaloid presented in Uncaria tomentosa. It has traditionally been used to treat disorders including arthritis, heart disease, cancer, and other inflammatory diseases. However, the specific role of MTP is still not clear, with more comprehensivestudies, our understanding of this ancient herbal medicine will continue growing. Some studies provided its ability to inhibit proinflamatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, through NF-κB-dependent mechanism. TNF-α primes neutrophils and modulates phagocytic and oxidative burst activities in inflammatory processes. Since, neutrophils represent the most abundant pool of leukocytes in human blood and play a crucial role in inflammation, we aimed to determine the ability of MTP to modulate neutrophil activation and differentially regulate inflammatory-related cytokines. To determine the mechanism of action of MTP, we investigated the effects on LPS-activated human primary neutrophils responses including activation surface markers by FACS and the expression of inflammatory cytokines, measured by real time PCR and ELISA. Treatment with MTP reduced the LPS-dependent activation effects. Activated neutrophils (CD16(+)CD62L(-)) diminished after MTP administration. Moreover, proinflamatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-8) expression and secretion were concomitantly reduced, similar to basal control conditions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MTP is able to elicit an anti-inflammatory response that modulates neutrophil activation contributing to the attenuation of inflammatory episodes. Further studies are need to characterize the mechanism by which MTP can affect this pathway that could provide a means to develop MTP as new candidate for inflammatory disease therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. PTPN22 Is a Critical Regulator of Fcγ Receptor–Mediated Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Katherine; Chu, Julia Y.; Salter, Donald; Zamoyska, Rose

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils act as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but they are also important effectors of acute and chronic inflammation. Genome-wide association studies have established that the gene encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) makes an important contribution to susceptibility to autoimmune disease, notably rheumatoid arthritis. Although PTPN22 is most highly expressed in neutrophils, its function in these cells remains poorly characterized. We show in this article that neutrophil effector functions, including adhesion, production of reactive oxygen species, and degranulation induced by immobilized immune complexes, were reduced in Ptpn22−/− neutrophils. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Syk was altered in Ptpn22−/− neutrophils. On stimulation with immobilized immune complexes, Ptpn22−/− neutrophils manifested reduced activation of key signaling intermediates. Ptpn22−/− mice were protected from immune complex–mediated arthritis, induced by the transfer of arthritogenic serum. In contrast, in vivo neutrophil recruitment following thioglycollate-induced peritonitis and in vitro chemotaxis were not affected by lack of PTPN22. Our data suggest an important role for PTPN22-dependent dephosphorylation events, which are required to enable full FcγR-induced activation, pointing to an important role for this molecule in neutrophil function. PMID:27807193

  5. PTPN22 Is a Critical Regulator of Fcγ Receptor-Mediated Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Vermeren, Sonja; Miles, Katherine; Chu, Julia Y; Salter, Donald; Zamoyska, Rose; Gray, Mohini

    2016-12-15

    Neutrophils act as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but they are also important effectors of acute and chronic inflammation. Genome-wide association studies have established that the gene encoding the protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) makes an important contribution to susceptibility to autoimmune disease, notably rheumatoid arthritis. Although PTPN22 is most highly expressed in neutrophils, its function in these cells remains poorly characterized. We show in this article that neutrophil effector functions, including adhesion, production of reactive oxygen species, and degranulation induced by immobilized immune complexes, were reduced in Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Syk was altered in Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils. On stimulation with immobilized immune complexes, Ptpn22(-/-) neutrophils manifested reduced activation of key signaling intermediates. Ptpn22(-/-) mice were protected from immune complex-mediated arthritis, induced by the transfer of arthritogenic serum. In contrast, in vivo neutrophil recruitment following thioglycollate-induced peritonitis and in vitro chemotaxis were not affected by lack of PTPN22. Our data suggest an important role for PTPN22-dependent dephosphorylation events, which are required to enable full FcγR-induced activation, pointing to an important role for this molecule in neutrophil function.

  6. P-SELECTIN MEDIATED PLATELET-NEUTROPHIL AGGREGATE FORMATION ACTIVATES NEUTROPHILS IN MOUSE AND HUMAN SICKLE CELL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Polanowska-Grabowska, Renata; Wallace, Kori; Field, Joshua J.; Chen, Lanlin; Marshall, Melissa A.; Figler, Robert; Gear, Adrian R. L.; Linden, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Objective Both platelet and neutrophil activation occur in sickle cell disease (SCD) but the interdependence of these events is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine the role of platelets in stimulating mouse and human neutrophil activation and pulmonary injury in SCD. Methods and Results Platelet activation and binding to leukocytes was measured in control and SCD mice and patients. Relative to controls, blood obtained from SCD mice or patients contained significantly elevated platelet-neutrophil aggregates (PNAs). Both platelets and neutrophils found in sickle PNAs were activated. Multi-spectral imaging (ImageStream) and conventional flow cytometry revealed a subpopulation of activated neutrophils with multiple adhered platelets that expressed significantly more CD11b and exhibited greater oxidative activity than single neutrophils. On average, wild type and sickle PNAs contained 1.1 and 2.6 platelets per neutrophil, respectively. Hypoxia/reoxygenation induced a further increase in platelet-neutrophil aggregates in SCD mice and additional activation of both platelets and neutrophils. Pretreatment of SCD mice with clopidogrel or P-selectin antibody reduced the formation of PNAs and neutrophil activation and decreased lung vascular permeability. Conclusions In sum, our findings suggest that platelet binding activates neutrophils and contributes to a chronic inflammatory state and pulmonary dysfunction in SCD. Inhibition of platelet activation may be useful to decrease tissue injury in SCD, particularly during the early stages of vaso-occlusive crises. PMID:21071696

  7. Interleukin-17 Promotes Neutrophil-Mediated Immunity by Activating Microvascular Pericytes and Not Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rebecca; Lauridsen, Holly M.; Amezquita, Robert A.; Pierce, Richard W.; Jane-wit, Dan; Fang, Caodi; Pellowe, Amanda S.; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C.; Gonzalez, Anjelica L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2016-01-01

    A classical hallmark of acute inflammation is neutrophil infiltration of tissues, a multi-step process that involves sequential cell-cell interactions of circulating leukocytes with interleukin (IL)-1- or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-activated microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes (PCs) that form the wall of the postcapillary venules. The initial infiltrating cells accumulate perivascularly in close proximity to PCs. IL-17, a pro-inflammatory cytokine that acts on target cells via a heterodimeric receptor formed by IL-17RA and IL-17RC subunits, also promotes neutrophilic inflammation but its effects on vascular cells are less clear. We report that both cultured human ECs and PCs strongly express IL-17RC and, while neither cell type expresses much IL-17RA, PCs express significantly more than ECs. IL-17, alone or synergistically with TNF, significantly alters inflammatory gene expression in cultured human PCs but not ECs. RNA-seq analysis identifies many IL-17-induced transcripts in PCs encoding proteins known to stimulate neutrophil-mediated immunity. Conditioned media (CM) from IL-17-activated PCs, but not ECs, induce pertussis toxin-sensitive neutrophil polarization, likely mediated by PC-secreted chemokines, and also stimulate neutrophil production of pro-inflammatory molecules, including TNF, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8. Furthermore, IL-17-activated PCs but not ECs can prolong neutrophil survival by producing G-CSF and GM-CSF, delaying the mitochondria outer membrane permeabilization and caspase 9 activation. Importantly, neutrophils exhibit enhanced phagocytic capacity after activation by CM from IL-17-treated PCs. We conclude that PCs, not ECs, are the major target of IL-17 within the microvessel wall and that IL-17-activated PCs can modulate neutrophil functions within the perivascular tissue space. PMID:27534549

  8. The Role of Interleukin-1β in Direct and Toll-Like Receptor 4-Mediated Neutrophil Activation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Lynne R.; Allen, Lucy; Jones, Elizabeth C.; Hellewell, Paul G.; Dower, Steven K.; Whyte, Moira K.B.; Sabroe, Ian

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of systemic and local neutrophil activation is crucial to the clearance of infections and the successful resolution of inflammation without progress to tissue damage or disseminated inflammatory reactions. Using purified lipopolysaccharide (pLPS) and highly purified neutrophils, we have previously shown that Toll-like receptor 4 signaling is a potent neutrophil activator, but a poor stimulator of survival. In the presence of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), however, pLPS becomes a potent neutrophil survival factor. Interleukin (IL)-1β has been identified as an important neutrophil activator and prosurvival cytokine, and is produced in abundance by LPS-stimulated PBMCs. We now show that IL-1β fails to activate highly purified neutrophils or enhance their survival, but in the presence of PBMCs, IL-1β induces neutrophil survival. We hypothesized that LPS-primed neutrophils might become responsive to IL-1β, but were unable to demonstrate this. Moreover, IL-1ra failed to prevent pLPS + PBMC-dependent neutrophil survival. In studies of IL-1R1−/− mice, we found that LPS was still able to mediate neutrophil survival, and neutrophil survival was enhanced by the addition of monocytic cells. Thus an important paradigm of neutrophil regulation needs to be viewed in the context of a cellular network in which actions of IL-1β on neutrophils are indirect and mediated by other cells. PMID:15509550

  9. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  10. Pathogen response-like recruitment and activation of neutrophils by sterile immunogenic dying cells drives neutrophil-mediated residual cell killing.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Vandenberk, Lien; Fang, Shentong; Fasche, Tekele; Van Eygen, Sofie; Maes, Jan; Van Woensel, Matthias; Koks, Carolien; Vanthillo, Niels; Graf, Norbert; de Witte, Peter; Van Gool, Stefaan; Salven, Petri; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2017-05-01

    Innate immune sensing of dying cells is modulated by several signals. Inflammatory chemokines-guided early recruitment, and pathogen-associated molecular patterns-triggered activation, of major anti-pathogenic innate immune cells like neutrophils distinguishes pathogen-infected stressed/dying cells from sterile dying cells. However, whether certain sterile dying cells stimulate innate immunity by partially mimicking pathogen response-like recruitment/activation of neutrophils remains poorly understood. We reveal that sterile immunogenic dying cancer cells trigger (a cell autonomous) pathogen response-like chemokine (PARC) signature, hallmarked by co-release of CXCL1, CCL2 and CXCL10 (similar to cells infected with bacteria or viruses). This PARC signature recruits preferentially neutrophils as first innate immune responders in vivo (in a cross-species, evolutionarily conserved manner; in mice and zebrafish). Furthermore, key danger signals emanating from these dying cells, that is, surface calreticulin, ATP and nucleic acids stimulate phagocytosis, purinergic receptors and toll-like receptors (TLR) i.e. TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling on neutrophil level, respectively. Engagement of purinergic receptors and TLR7/8/9-MyD88 signaling evokes neutrophil activation, which culminates into H2O2 and NO-driven respiratory burst-mediated killing of viable residual cancer cells. Thus sterile immunogenic dying cells perform 'altered-self mimicry' in certain contexts to exploit neutrophils for phagocytic targeting of dead/dying cancer cells and cytotoxic targeting of residual cancer cells.

  11. Factor H and factor H-related protein 1 bind to human neutrophils via complement receptor 3, mediate attachment to Candida albicans, and enhance neutrophil antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Losse, Josephine; Zipfel, Peter F; Józsi, Mihály

    2010-01-15

    The host complement system plays an important role in protection against infections. Several human-pathogenic microbes were shown to acquire host complement regulators, such as factor H (CFH), that downregulate complement activation at the microbial surface and protect the pathogens from the opsonic and lytic effects of complement. Because CFH can also bind to host cells, we addressed the role of CFH and CFH-related proteins as adhesion ligands in host-pathogen interactions. We show that the CFH family proteins CFH, CFH-like protein 1 (CFHL1), CFH-related protein (CFHR) 1, and CFHR4 long isoform bind to human neutrophil granulocytes and to the opportunistic human-pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Two major binding sites, one within the N-terminus and one in the C-terminus of CFH, were found to mediate binding to neutrophils. Complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18; alpha(M)beta2 integrin) was identified as the major cellular receptor on neutrophils for CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1, but not for CFHR4 long isoform. CFH and CFHR1 supported cell migration. Furthermore, CFH, CFHL1, and CFHR1 increased attachment of neutrophils to C. albicans. Adhesion of neutrophils to plasma-opsonized yeasts was reduced when CFH binding was inhibited by specific Abs or when using CFH-depleted plasma. Yeast-bound CFH and CFHR1 enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the release of the antimicrobial protein lactoferrin by human neutrophils, and resulted in a more efficient killing of the pathogen. Thus, CFH and CFHR1, when bound on the surface of C. albicans, enhance antimicrobial activity of human neutrophils.

  12. Human neutrophil-mediated fungistasis against Histoplasma capsulatum. Localization of fungistatic activity to the azurophil granules.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S L; Gootee, L; Gabay, J E

    1993-01-01

    Human neutrophils (PMN) demonstrated potent fungistatic activity against Histoplasma capsulatum (Hc) yeasts in a sensitive microassay that quantifies the growth of yeasts by the incorporation of [3H]leucine. At a PMN:yeast ratio of 1:2, PMN inhibited the growth of yeasts by 37%. Maximum inhibition of 85% to 95% was achieved at a PMN/yeast ratio of 10:1 to 50:1. Opsonization of the yeasts in fresh or heat-inactivated serum was required for PMN-mediated fungistasis, but ingestion of the yeasts was not required. Recognition and phagocytosis of opsonized yeasts was via PMN complement receptor (CR) type 1 (CR1), CR3, and FcRIII (CD16). PMN fungistatic activity was evident by 2 h, was maximum at 24 h, and persisted up to 5 d. In contrast, yeasts multiplied within monocytes to a greater extent than in culture medium alone. PMN from three patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) inhibited the growth of Hc yeasts by an average of 97%, compared with 86% in three normal controls. Furthermore, preincubation of PMN with the lysosomotropic agent NH4Cl inhibited fungistatic activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Finally, experiments with subcellular fractions of PMN demonstrated that the principal component of the fungistatic activity of PMN was localized in the azurophil granules. These data demonstrate that human PMN possess potent fungistatic activity against Hc yeasts and further show that fungistasis is mediated by antimicrobial agents contained in the azurophil granules. PMID:8349801

  13. Mechanism of inhibition of human neutrophil activation by the allergic mediator release inhibitor, CI-922

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.D.; Wright, C.D.

    1986-03-05

    The allergic mediator release inhibitor CI-922 (3,7-dimethoxy-4-phenyl-N-1H-tetrazol-5-yl-4H-furo(3,2-b)indole-2-carboxamide) is a potent inhibitor of human neutrophil (PMN) respiratory and secretory responses in vitro. At concentrations from 1 to 100 micromolar, CI-922 inhibits activation of PMNs by agents which stimulate phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide hydrolysis to generate the second messengers inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, including: the plasma membrane receptor-specific ligands fMet-Leu-Phe and C5a; concanavalin A; and the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein-specific stimulus GTPgammaS. In contrast, CI-922 does not inhibit PMN responses to protein kinase C-specific stimuli such as phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or sn-1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol. CI-922 is also unable to inhibit the synergistic activation of PMNs by suboptimal concentrations of PMA and calcium ionophore A23187. These results suggest that CI-922 inhibits PMN activation at a site distal to signal transduction through the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein required for second messenger generation but proximal cophosphorylation reactions mediated by protein kinase C and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases.

  14. Kinetics of LFA-1 mediated adhesion of human neutrophils to ICAM-1-role of E-selectin signaling post-activation.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    LFA-1 and Mac-1 are the two integrins involved in the arrest and firm adhesion of neutrophils. LFA-1 plays a role in the early stage of cell arrest while Mac-1 stabilizes firm adhesion. Here, we further elucidated the kinetics of LFA-1 activation and its role in mediating neutrophil adhesion to ICAM...

  15. Complement-mediated neutrophil activation in sepsis- and trauma-related adult respiratory distress syndrome. Clarification with radioaerosol lung scans

    SciTech Connect

    Tennenberg, S.D.; Jacobs, M.P.; Solomkin, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    Complement-mediated neutrophil activation (CMNA) has been proposed as an important pathogenic mechanism causing acute microvascular lung injury in the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). To clarify the relationship between CMNA and evolving lung injury, we studied 26 patients with multiple trauma and sepsis within 24 hours of risk establishment for ARDS. Pulmonary alveolar-capillary permeability (PACP) was quantified as the clearance rate of a particulate radioaerosol. Seventeen patients (65%) had increased PACP (six developed ARDS) while nine (35%) had normal PACP (none developed ARDS; clearance rates of 3.4%/min and 1.5%/min, respectively). These patients, regardless of evidence of early lung injury, had elevated plasma C3adesArg levels and neutrophil chemotactic desensitization to C5a/C5adesArg. Plasma C3adesArg levels correlated weakly, but significantly, with PACP. Thus, CMNA may be a necessary, but not a sufficient, pathogenic mechanism in the evolution of ARDS.

  16. Glycoengineered CD20 antibody obinutuzumab activates neutrophils and mediates phagocytosis through CD16B more efficiently than rituximab.

    PubMed

    Golay, Josée; Da Roit, Fabio; Bologna, Luca; Ferrara, Claudia; Leusen, Jeanette H; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Klein, Christian; Introna, Martino

    2013-11-14

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered type 2 CD20 antibody with enhanced CD16A-binding and natural killer-mediated cytotoxicity. CD16B is highly homologous to CD16A and a major FcγR on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We show here that glycoengineered obinutuzumab or rituximab bound CD16B with approximately sevenfold higher affinity, compared with nonglycoengineered wild-type parental antibodies. Furthermore, glycoengineered obinutuzumab activated PMNs, either purified or in chronic lymphoblastic leukemia whole blood, more efficiently than wild-type rituximab. Activation resulted in a 50% increase in CD11b expression and 70% down-modulation of CD62L on neutrophils and in release of tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-6, and IL-8. Activation was not accompanied by generation of reactive oxygen species or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity, but led to up to 47% phagocytosis of glycoengineered anti-CD20 opsonized chronic lymphoblastic leukemia targets by purified PMNs. Significant phagocytosis was observed in whole blood, but only in the presence of glycoengineered antibodies, and was followed by up to 50% PMN death. Finally we show, using anti-CD16B and anti-CD32A Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, that both of these receptors are involved in PMN activation, phagocytosis, and cell death induced by glycoengineered antibodies. We conclude that phagocytosis by PMNs is an additional mechanism of action of obinutuzumab mediated through its higher binding affinity for CD16B.

  17. The activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 reduces neutrophilic protease-mediated vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; da Silva, Rafaela F.; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Capettini, Luciano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pagano, Sabrina; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Quintao, Silvia; Bertolotto, Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Pilet, Lucie; Kuzmanovic, Kristina; Burger, Fabienne; Pane, Bianca; Spinella, Giovanni; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Pende, Aldo; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Santos, Robson A.S.; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2012-01-01

    Aims The activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2)-mediated pathways might represent a promising anti-atherosclerotic treatment. Here, we investigated the expression of the endocannabinoid system in human carotid plaques and the impact of CB2 pharmacological activation on markers of plaque vulnerability in vivo and in vitro. Methods and results The study was conducted using all available residual human carotid tissues (upstream and downstream the blood flow) from our cohort of patients symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 27) for ischaemic stroke. Intraplaque levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and their degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were not different in human plaque portions. In the majority of human samples, CB1 (both mRNA and protein levels) was undetectable. In downstream symptomatic plaques, CB2 protein expression was reduced when compared with asymptomatic patients. In these portions, CB2 levels were inversely correlated (r = −0.4008, P = 0.0170) with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 content and positively (r = 0.3997, P = 0.0174) with collagen. In mouse plaques, CB2 co-localized with neutrophils and MMP-9. Treatment with the selective CB2 agonist JWH-133 was associated with the reduction in MMP-9 content in aortic root and carotid plaques. In vitro, pre-incubation with JWH-133 reduced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated release of MMP-9. This effect was associated with the reduction in TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. Conclusion Cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor is down-regulated in unstable human carotid plaques. Since CB2 activation prevents neutrophil release of MMP-9 in vivo and in vitro, this treatment strategy might selectively reduce carotid vulnerability in humans. PMID:22112961

  18. The activation of the cannabinoid receptor type 2 reduces neutrophilic protease-mediated vulnerability in atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; da Silva, Rafaela F; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Capettini, Luciano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Pagano, Sabrina; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Quintao, Silvia; Bertolotto, Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Pilet, Lucie; Kuzmanovic, Kristina; Burger, Fabienne; Pane, Bianca; Spinella, Giovanni; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Pende, Aldo; Viviani, Giorgio Luciano; Palombo, Domenico; Dallegri, Franco; Roux-Lombard, Pascale; Santos, Robson A S; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Steffens, Sabine; Mach, François

    2012-04-01

    The activation of cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2))-mediated pathways might represent a promising anti-atherosclerotic treatment. Here, we investigated the expression of the endocannabinoid system in human carotid plaques and the impact of CB(2) pharmacological activation on markers of plaque vulnerability in vivo and in vitro. The study was conducted using all available residual human carotid tissues (upstream and downstream the blood flow) from our cohort of patients symptomatic (n = 13) or asymptomatic (n = 27) for ischaemic stroke. Intraplaque levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide N-arachidonoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and their degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase and monoacylglycerol lipase) were not different in human plaque portions. In the majority of human samples, CB(1) (both mRNA and protein levels) was undetectable. In downstream symptomatic plaques, CB(2) protein expression was reduced when compared with asymptomatic patients. In these portions, CB(2) levels were inversely correlated (r = -0.4008, P = 0.0170) with matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 content and positively (r = 0.3997, P = 0.0174) with collagen. In mouse plaques, CB(2) co-localized with neutrophils and MMP-9. Treatment with the selective CB(2) agonist JWH-133 was associated with the reduction in MMP-9 content in aortic root and carotid plaques. In vitro, pre-incubation with JWH-133 reduced tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated release of MMP-9. This effect was associated with the reduction in TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in human neutrophils. Cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptor is down-regulated in unstable human carotid plaques. Since CB(2) activation prevents neutrophil release of MMP-9 in vivo and in vitro, this treatment strategy might selectively reduce carotid vulnerability in humans.

  19. Neutrophil IL-1β processing induced by pneumolysin is mediated by the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome and caspase-1 activation and is dependent on K+ efflux.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Mausita; Katsnelson, Michael; Malak, Hesham A; Greene, Neil G; Howell, Scott J; Hise, Amy G; Camilli, Andrew; Kadioglu, Aras; Dubyak, George R; Pearlman, Eric

    2015-02-15

    Although neutrophils are the most abundant cells in acute infection and inflammation, relatively little attention has been paid to their role in inflammasome formation and IL-1β processing. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which neutrophils process IL-1β in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using a murine model of S. pneumoniae corneal infection, we demonstrated a requirement for IL-1β in bacterial clearance, and we showed that Nod-like receptor protein 3 (NLRP3), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC), and caspase-1 are essential for IL-1β production and bacterial killing in the cornea. Neutrophils in infected corneas had multiple specks with enzymatically active caspase-1 (YVAD-FLICA 660), and bone marrow neutrophils stimulated with heat-killed S. pneumoniae (signal 1) and pneumolysin (signal 2) exhibited multiple specks when stained for NLRP3, ASC, or Caspase-1. High-molecular mass ASC complexes were also detected, consistent with oligomer formation. Pneumolysin induced K(+) efflux in neutrophils, and blocking K(+) efflux inhibited caspase-1 activation and IL-1β processing; however, neutrophils did not undergo pyroptosis, indicating that K(+) efflux and IL-1β processing is not a consequence of cell death. There was also no role for lysosomal destabilization or neutrophil elastase in pneumolysin-mediated IL-1β processing in neutrophils. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an essential role for neutrophil-derived IL-1β in S. pneumoniae infection, and they elucidate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in cleavage and secretion of IL-1β in neutrophils. Given the ubiquitous presence of neutrophils in acute bacterial and fungal infections, these findings will have implications for other microbial diseases. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Mast cells mediate neutrophil recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression.

    PubMed

    Wezel, Anouk; Lagraauw, H Maxime; van der Velden, Daniël; de Jager, Saskia C A; Quax, Paul H A; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze

    2015-08-01

    Activated mast cells have been identified in the intima and perivascular tissue of human atherosclerotic plaques. As mast cells have been described to release a number of chemokines that mediate leukocyte fluxes, we propose that activated mast cells may play a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment during atherosclerotic plaque progression. Systemic IgE-mediated mast cell activation in apoE(-/-)μMT mice resulted in an increase in atherosclerotic lesion size as compared to control mice, and interestingly, the number of neutrophils was highly increased in these lesions. In addition, peritoneal mast cell activation led to a massive neutrophil influx into the peritoneal cavity in C57Bl6 mice, whereas neutrophil numbers in mast cell deficient Kit(W(-sh)/W(-sh)) mice were not affected. Within the newly recruited neutrophil population, increased levels of CXCR2(+) and CXCR4(+) neutrophils were observed after mast cell activation. Indeed, mast cells were seen to contain and release CXCL1 and CXCL12, the ligands for CXCR2 and CXCR4. Intriguingly, peritoneal mast cell activation in combination with anti-CXCR2 receptor antagonist resulted in decreased neutrophil recruitment, thus establishing a prominent role for the CXCL1/CXCR2 axis in mast cell-mediated neutrophil recruitment. Our data suggest that chemokines, and in particular CXCL1, released from activated mast cells induce neutrophil recruitment to the site of inflammation, thereby aggravating the ongoing inflammatory response and thus affecting plaque progression and destabilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neutrophil IL-1β processing induced by pneumolysin is mediated by the NLRP3/ASC inflammasome and caspase-1 activation, and is dependent on K+ efflux

    PubMed Central

    Karmakar, Mausita; Katsnelson, Michael; Malak, Hesham A.; Greene, Neil G.; Howell, Scott J.; Hise, Amy G.; Camilli, Andrew; Kadioglu, Aras; Dubyak, George R.; Pearlman, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Although neutrophils are the most abundant cells in acute infection and inflammation, relatively little attention has been paid to their role in inflammasome formation and IL-1β processing. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism by which neutrophils process IL-1β in response to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using a murine model of S. pneumoniae corneal infection, we demonstrated a requirement for IL-1β in bacterial clearance, and showed that NLRP3, ASC and caspase-1 are essential for IL-1β production and bacterial killing in the cornea. Neutrophils in infected corneas had multiple specks with enzymatically active caspase-1 (FLICA-660+), and bone marrow neutrophils stimulated with heat killed S. pneumoniae (signal 1) and pneumolysin (signal 2) exhibited multiple specks after staining with FLICA-660, NLRP3 or ASC. High molecular weight ASC complexes were also detected, consistent with oligomer formation. Pneumolysin induced K+ efflux in neutrophils, and blocking K+ efflux inhibited caspase-1 activation and IL-1β processing; however, neutrophils did not undergo pyroptosis, indicating that K+ efflux and IL-1β processing is not a consequence of cell death. There was also no role for lysosomal destabilization or neutrophil elastase in pneumolysin mediated IL-1β processing in neutrophils. Together, these findings demonstrate an essential role for neutrophil derived IL-1β in S. pneumoniae infection, and elucidate the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophil cleavage and secretion of mature IL-1β. Given the ubiquitous presence of neutrophils in acute bacterial and fungal infections, these findings will have implications for other microbial diseases. PMID:25609842

  2. Adhesive Dynamics Simulation of G-Protein-Mediated Chemokine-Activated Neutrophil Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Kelly E.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract To reach sites of inflammation, a blood-borne neutrophil first rolls over the vessel wall, becoming firmly adherent on activation, and then transmigrates through the endothelium. In this study, we simulate the transition to firm adhesion via chemokine-induced integrin activation. To recreate the transition from rolling to firm adhesion, we use an integrated signaling adhesive dynamics simulation that includes selectin, integrin, and chemokine interactions between the cell and an adhesive substrate. Integrin bonds are of low affinity until activated by chemokine binding to G-protein coupled receptors on the model cell. The signal propagates within the cell through probabilistic diffusion and reaction of the signaling elements to induce the high-affinity integrins required for firm adhesion. This model showed that integrins become progressively active as cells roll and interact with chemokines, leading to a slight slowing before firm adhesion on a timescale similar to that observed in experiments. Increasing the density of chemokine resulted in decreases in the rolling time before stopping, consistent with experimental observations. However, a limit is reached where further increases in chemokine density do not increase adhesion. We found that the timescale for integrin activation correlated with the time to stop. Further, altering parameters within the intracellular signaling cascade that changed the speed of integrin activation, such as effector activation and dissociation rates, correspondingly affected the time to firm adhesion. For all conditions tested, the number of active integrin bonds at the point of firm adhesion was relatively constant. The model predicts that the time to stop would be relatively independent of selectin or integrin density, but strongly dependent on the shear rate because higher shear rates limit the intrinsic activation rate of integrins and require more integrins for adhesion. PMID:19383446

  3. Differential neutrophil activation in viral infections: Enhanced TLR‐7/8‐mediated CXCL8 release in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Van Ly, David; Spann, Kirsten; Reading, Patrick C.; Burgess, Janette K.; Hartl, Dominik; Baines, Katherine J.; Oliver, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective Respiratory viral infections are a major cause of asthma exacerbations. Neutrophils accumulate in the airways and the mechanisms that link neutrophilic inflammation, viral infections and exacerbations are unclear. This study aims to investigate anti‐viral responses in neutrophils from patients with and without asthma and to investigate if neutrophils can be directly activated by respiratory viruses. Methods Neutrophils from peripheral blood from asthmatic and non‐asthmatic individuals were isolated and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (1 μg/mL), f‐met‐leu‐phe (fMLP) (100 nM), imiquimod (3 μg/mL), R848 (1.5 μg/mL), poly I:C (10 μg/mL), RV16 (multiplicity of infection (MOI)1), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (MOI1) or influenza virus (MOI1). Cell‐free supernatants were collected after 1 h of neutrophil elastase (NE) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‐9 release, or after 24 h for CXCL8 release. Results LPS, fMLP, imiquimod and R848 stimulated the release of CXCL8, NE and MMP‐9 whereas poly I:C selectively induced CXCL8 release only. R848‐induced CXCL8 release was enhanced in neutrophils from asthmatics compared with non‐asthmatic cells (P < 0.01). RSV triggered the release of CXCL8 and NE from neutrophils, whereas RV16 or influenza had no effect. Conclusion Neutrophils release CXCL8, NE and MMP‐9 in response to viral surrogates with R848‐induced CXCL8 release being specifically enhanced in asthmatic neutrophils. Toll‐like receptor (TLR7/8) dysregulation may play a role in neutrophilic inflammation in viral‐induced exacerbations. PMID:26477783

  4. Norepinephrine-mediated Suppression of Phagocytosis by Wound Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gosain, Ankush; Gamelli, Richard L.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The systemic response to injury is characterized by massive release of norepinephrine (NE) into the circulation as a result of global sympathetic activation. Multiple authors have demonstrated NE-mediated alterations in migration of circulating neutrophils to wounds. We hypothesized that NE further alters wound neutrophil phagocytic function through adrenergic signaling pathways. Materials and Methods A standard subcutaneous sponge wound model was employed. Murine wound neutrophils were harvested at 24 and 120 hours after injury and treated with physiologic (10−9M) and pharmacologic (10−6M) doses of norepinephrine. Phagocytosis of green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli was assayed by flow cytometry. The signaling pathways mediating NE modulation of phagocytosis by wound neutrophils were defined by pharmacologic manipulation of alpha- and beta-adrenorecptors (ARs) and protein kinase A (PKA). Results Pharmacologic-dose NE, but not-physiologic-dose NE, suppressed the phagocytic efficiency of 120-hour wound neutrophils. This alteration in phagocytic efficiency appears to be mediated through alpha- and beta-ARs and downstream PKA. Phagocytosis by 24-hour wound neutrophils was not impacted by NE treatment. Conclusions The present study is the first to demonstrate NE-mediated alterations in the process of phagocytosis by wound neutrophils. We conclude that NE plays a temporally- and dose-defined immunomodulatory role in cutaneous wound healing through alterations in phagocytosis by wound neutrophils, and may represent a target for therapeutic manipulation of the innate immune response. PMID:18952237

  5. Neutrophil-Mediated Phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Bestebroer, Jovanka; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Initial elimination of invading Staphylococcus aureus from the body is mediated by professional phagocytes. The neutrophil is the major phagocyte of the innate immunity and plays a key role in the host defense against staphylococcal infections. Opsonization of the bacteria with immunoglobulins and complement factors enables efficient recognition by the neutrophil that subsequently leads to intracellular compartmentalization and killing. Here, we provide a review of the key processes evolved in neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus and briefly describe killing. As S. aureus is not helpless against the professional phagocytes, we will also highlight its immune evasion arsenal related to phagocytosis. PMID:25309547

  6. Exosomes Mediate LTB4 Release during Neutrophil Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Ritankar; Tavakoli Tameh, Aidin; Parent, Carole A.

    2016-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is secreted by chemotactic neutrophils, forming a secondary gradient that amplifies the reach of primary chemoattractants. This strategy increases the recruitment range for neutrophils and is important during inflammation. Here, we show that LTB4 and its synthesizing enzymes localize to intracellular multivesicular bodies that, upon stimulation, release their content as exosomes. Purified exosomes can activate resting neutrophils and elicit chemotactic activity in a LTB4 receptor-dependent manner. Inhibition of exosome release leads to loss of directional motility with concomitant loss of LTB4 release. Our findings establish that the exosomal pool of LTB4 acts in an autocrine fashion to sensitize neutrophils towards the primary chemoattractant, and in a paracrine fashion to mediate the recruitment of neighboring neutrophils in trans. We envision that this mechanism is used by other signals to foster communication between cells in harsh extracellular environments. PMID:26741884

  7. Osteopontin Undergoes Polymerization in Vivo and Gains Chemotactic Activity for Neutrophils Mediated by Integrin α9β1*

    PubMed Central

    Nishimichi, Norihisa; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Chen, Chun; Matsuda, Haruo; Sheppard, Dean; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is an integrin-binding inflammatory cytokine that undergoes polymerization catalyzed by transglutaminase 2. We have previously reported that polymeric OPN (polyOPN), but not unpolymerized OPN (OPN*), attracts neutrophils in vitro by presenting an acquired binding site for integrin α9β1. Among many in vitro substrates for transglutaminase 2, only a few have evidence for in vivo polymerization and concomitant function. Although polyOPN has been identified in bone and aorta, the in vivo functional significance of polyOPN is unknown. To determine whether OPN polymerization contributes to neutrophil recruitment in vivo, we injected OPN* into the peritoneal space of mice. Polymeric OPN was detected by immunoblotting in the peritoneal wash of mice injected with OPN*, and both intraperitoneal and plasma OPN* levels were higher in mice injected with a polymerization-incompetent mutant, confirming that OPN* polymerizes in vivo. OPN* injection induced neutrophil accumulation, which was significantly less following injection of a mutant OPN that was incapable of polymerization. The importance of in vivo polymerization was further confirmed with cystamine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, which blocked the polymerization and attenuated OPN*-mediated neutrophil recruitment. The thrombin-cleaved N-terminal fragment of OPN, another ligand for α9β1, was not responsible for neutrophil accumulation because a thrombin cleavage-incompetent mutant recruited similar numbers of neutrophils as wild type OPN*. Neutrophil accumulation in response to both wild type and thrombin cleavage-incompetent OPN* was reduced in mice lacking the integrin α9 subunit in leukocytes, indicating that α9β1 is required for polymerization-induced recruitment. We have illustrated a physiological role of molecular polymerization by demonstrating acquired chemotactic properties for OPN. PMID:21321126

  8. Mediators of neutrophil recruitment in human abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Houard, Xavier; Touat, Ziad; Ollivier, Véronique; Louedec, Liliane; Philippe, Monique; Sebbag, Uriel; Meilhac, Olivier; Rossignol, Patrick; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2009-01-01

    Aims Neutrophils/platelet interactions are involved in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The intraluminal thrombus (ILT) is a human model of platelet/neutrophil interactions. The present study focused on mediators involved in neutrophil recruitment in AAA. Methods and results Conditioned media from luminal, intermediate, and abluminal layers of 29 human ILTs were analysed for neutrophil markers [elastase/α1-antitrypsin and MMP9/NGAL complexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO), and α-defensin peptides], RANTES, platelet factor 4 (PF4), and interleukin-8 (IL-8). Their time-dependent release into serum from clots generated in vitro and their plasma concentrations in AAA patients and controls were determined. Immunohistochemistry for neutrophils, platelets, IL-8, PF4, and RANTES on AAA sections was performed; and molecules involved in ILT neutrophil chemotactic function were analysed in vitro. Neutrophils and platelets colocalized in the luminal layer of the thrombus. Consistently, neutrophil markers and platelet-derived RANTES and PF4 were released predominantly by the luminal thrombus pole, where their concentrations were significantly correlated. The luminal ILT layer was also the main source of IL-8, whose immunostaining colocalized with neutrophils. All were also released time dependently from clots and were increased in plasma of AAA patients. Luminal ILT layers displayed potent neutrophil chemotactic activity in vitro, which was inhibited by RANTES- and IL-8-blocking antibodies as well as by reparixin, an antagonist of the IL-8 receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that platelet-derived RANTES and neutrophil-derived IL-8 are involved in attracting neutrophils to the luminal layer of AAA ILT. PMID:19201759

  9. Inhibition by polyphenolic phytochemicals and sulfurous compounds of the formation of 8-chloroguanosine mediated by hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase, and activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiki; Masuda, Mitsuharu; Suzuki, Toshinori; Ohshima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) of activated neutrophils can react with nucleic acid bases to form chlorinated nucleosides such as 8-chloroguanosine (Cl-Guo). Chlorination is enhanced by nicotine. We investigated the effects of various natural antioxidants including polyphenolic phytochemicals on the formation of Cl-Guo by HOCl in the presence and the absence of nicotine. Polyphenols, including catechins, curcumin, resveratrol, silibinin, and sulfurous compound α-lipoic acid, were found to inhibit both HOCl- and human MPO-induced Cl-Guo formation dose-dependently. Among the test compounds, (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) showed the strongest inhibitory effect. Cl-Guo formation, mediated by activated human neutrophils in the presence of nicotine, was inhibited by EGCG, silibinin, and α-lipoic acid. These results suggest that polyphenols and sulfurous compounds have the potential to inhibit the induction of nucleobase damage mediated by chlorination, with possible application to reducing DNA damage associated with inflammation and cigarette-smoke inhalation.

  10. Leukotriene B4 mediates neutrophil migration induced by heme.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Ana Paula T; Pinheiro, Carla S; Luna-Gomes, Tatiana; Alves, Liliane R; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Porto, Barbara N; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Benjamim, Claudia F; Peters-Golden, Marc; Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Bozza, Marcelo T; Canetti, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    High concentrations of free heme found during hemolytic events or cell damage leads to inflammation, characterized by neutrophil recruitment and production of reactive oxygen species, through mechanisms not yet elucidated. In this study, we provide evidence that heme-induced neutrophilic inflammation depends on endogenous activity of the macrophage-derived lipid mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)). In vivo, heme-induced neutrophil recruitment into the peritoneal cavity of mice was attenuated by pretreatment with 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) inhibitors and leukotriene B(4) receptor 1 (BLT1) receptor antagonists as well as in 5-LO knockout (5-LO(-/-)) mice. Heme administration in vivo increased peritoneal levels of LTB(4) prior to and during neutrophil recruitment. Evidence that LTB(4) was synthesized by resident macrophages, but not mast cells, included the following: 1) immuno-localization of heme-induced LTB(4) was compartmentalized exclusively within lipid bodies of resident macrophages; 2) an increase in the macrophage population enhanced heme-induced neutrophil migration; 3) depletion of resident mast cells did not affect heme-induced LTB(4) production or neutrophil influx; 4) increased levels of LTB(4) were found in heme-stimulated peritoneal cavities displaying increased macrophage numbers; and 5) in vitro, heme was able to activate directly macrophages to synthesize LTB(4). Our findings uncover a crucial role of LTB(4) in neutrophil migration induced by heme and suggest that beneficial therapeutic outcomes could be achieved by targeting the 5-LO pathway in the treatment of inflammation associated with hemolytic processes.

  11. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  12. Exposure to Leishmania braziliensis triggers neutrophil activation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Falcão, Sarah A C; Weinkopff, Tiffany; Hurrell, Benjamin P; Celes, Fabiana S; Curvelo, Rebecca P; Prates, Deboraci B; Barral, Aldina; Borges, Valeria M; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; de Oliveira, Camila I

    2015-03-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are rapidly recruited to the sites of Leishmania inoculation. During Leishmania braziliensis infection, depletion of inflammatory cells significantly increases the parasite load whereas co-inoculation of neutrophils plus L. braziliensis had an opposite effect. Moreover, the co-culture of infected macrophages and neutrophils also induced parasite killing leading us to ask how neutrophils alone respond to an L. braziliensis exposure. Herein we focused on understanding the interaction between neutrophils and L. braziliensis, exploring cell activation and apoptotic fate. Inoculation of serum-opsonized L. braziliensis promastigotes in mice induced neutrophil accumulation in vivo, peaking at 24 h. In vitro, exposure of thyoglycollate-elicited inflammatory or bone marrow neutrophils to L. braziliensis modulated the expression of surface molecules such as CD18 and CD62L, and induced the oxidative burst. Using mCherry-expressing L. braziliensis, we determined that such effects were mainly observed in infected and not in bystander cells. Neutrophil activation following contact with L. braziliensis was also confirmed by the release of TNF-α and neutrophil elastase. Lastly, neutrophils infected with L. braziliensis but not with L. major displayed markers of early apoptosis. We show that L. braziliensis induces neutrophil recruitment in vivo and that neutrophils exposed to the parasite in vitro respond through activation and release of inflammatory mediators. This outcome may impact on parasite elimination, particularly at the early stages of infection.

  13. Marathon Race Affects Neutrophil Surface Molecules: Role of Inflammatory Mediators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue induced by marathon races was observed in terms of inflammatory and immunological outcomes. Neutrophil survival and activation are essential for inflammation resolution and contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marathon races on surface molecules related to neutrophil adhesion and extrinsic apoptosis pathway and its association with inflammatory markers. We evaluated 23 trained male runners at the São Paulo International Marathon 2013. The following components were measured: hematological and inflammatory mediators, muscle damage markers, and neutrophil function. The marathon race induced an increased leukocyte and neutrophil counts; creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), CK-MB, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations were significantly higher 24 h and 72 h after the marathon race. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased 72 h after the marathon race. We also observed an increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and decreasedTNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) expression immediately after and 24 h after the marathon race. We observed an increased DNA fragmentation and L-selectin and Fas receptor expressions in the recovery period, indicating a possible slow rolling phase and delayed neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Marathon racing affects neutrophils adhesion and survival in the course of inflammation, supporting the “open-window” post-exercise hypothesis. PMID:27911915

  14. Marathon Race Affects Neutrophil Surface Molecules: Role of Inflammatory Mediators.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; Sierra, Ana Paula Renno; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Caçula, Kim Guimarães; Momesso, César Miguel; Sato, Fabio Takeo; Silva, Maysa Braga Barros; Oliveira, Heloisa Helena; Passos, Maria Elizabeth Pereira; de Souza, Diego Ribeiro; Gondim, Olivia Santos; Benetti, Marino; Levada-Pires, Adriana Cristina; Ghorayeb, Nabil; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tânia Cristina; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The fatigue induced by marathon races was observed in terms of inflammatory and immunological outcomes. Neutrophil survival and activation are essential for inflammation resolution and contributes directly to the pathogenesis of many infectious and inflammatory conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of marathon races on surface molecules related to neutrophil adhesion and extrinsic apoptosis pathway and its association with inflammatory markers. We evaluated 23 trained male runners at the São Paulo International Marathon 2013. The following components were measured: hematological and inflammatory mediators, muscle damage markers, and neutrophil function. The marathon race induced an increased leukocyte and neutrophil counts; creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), CK-MB, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and IL-8 levels. C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plasma concentrations were significantly higher 24 h and 72 h after the marathon race. Hemoglobin and hematocrit levels decreased 72 h after the marathon race. We also observed an increased intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and decreasedTNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) expression immediately after and 24 h after the marathon race. We observed an increased DNA fragmentation and L-selectin and Fas receptor expressions in the recovery period, indicating a possible slow rolling phase and delayed neutrophil activation and apoptosis. Marathon racing affects neutrophils adhesion and survival in the course of inflammation, supporting the "open-window" post-exercise hypothesis.

  15. Chemokine CXCL1 mediated neutrophil recruitment: Role of glycosaminoglycan interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Dutta, Amit K.; Sepuru, Krishna Mohan; Troshkina, Anna; Garofalo, Roberto P.; Rajarathnam, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL1/MGSA plays a pivotal role in the host immune response by recruiting and activating neutrophils for microbial killing at the tissue site. CXCL1 exists reversibly as monomers and dimers, and mediates its function by binding glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and CXCR2 receptor. We recently showed that both monomers and dimers are potent CXCR2 agonists, the dimer is the high-affinity GAG ligand, lysine and arginine residues located in two non-overlapping domains mediate GAG interactions, and there is extensive overlap between GAG and receptor-binding domains. To understand how these structural properties influence in vivo function, we characterized peritoneal neutrophil recruitment of a trapped monomer and trapped dimer and a panel of WT lysine/arginine to alanine mutants. Monomers and dimers were active, but WT was more active indicating synergistic interactions promote recruitment. Mutants from both domains showed reduced GAG heparin binding affinities and reduced neutrophil recruitment, providing compelling evidence that both GAG-binding domains mediate in vivo trafficking. Further, mutant of a residue that is involved in both GAG binding and receptor signaling showed the highest reduction in recruitment. We conclude that GAG interactions and receptor activity of CXCL1 monomers and dimers are fine-tuned to regulate neutrophil trafficking for successful resolution of tissue injury. PMID:27625115

  16. Adherent neutrophils mediate permeability after atelectasis.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, G; Welbourn, R; Rothlein, R; Wiles, M; Kobzik, L; Valeri, C R; Shepro, D; Hechtman, H B

    1992-01-01

    Re-expansion of atelectatic lung is associated with increased permeability. This study tests whether neutrophils mediate this event. Right middle lobar atelectasis was induced in anesthesized rabbits (n = 18) by intraluminal obstruction of the bronchus after a 20-minute ventilation with 100% O2. After 1 hour of bronchial obstruction and 20 minutes after lobar re-expansion, leukopenia was noted, 2870 +/- 210 white blood cells (WBC)/mm3, relative to control animals treated with a noninflated balloon catheter, 6500 +/- 410 WBC/mm3 (p less than 0.05). Three hours after re-expansion, neutrophils were sequestered in the previously atelectatic region 78 +/- 7 polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)/10 high-power field (HPF), as well as in nonatelectatic areas, 40 +/- 3 PMN/10 HPF, higher than control values of 26 +/- 3 PMN/10 HPF (p less than 0.05). In the atelectatic region, neutrophil sequestration was associated with increased protein concentration in lobar bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of 1370 +/- 100 micrograms/mL, higher than control values of 270 +/- 20 micrograms/mL (p less than 0.05). Reexpansion also induced increases in lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/d) of 6.2 +/- 0.2, higher than control values of 4.3 +/- 0.1 (p less than 0.05). Rendering rabbits neutropenic (n = 18) (0 to 4 PMN/mm3) limited the atelectasis-induced protein accumulations in BAL (520 +/- 60 micrograms/mL) and increase in lung W/d (5.2 +/- 0.1) (both p less than 0.05). Intravenous (I.V.; treatment of another group (n = 18) with an anti-CD 18 monoclonal antibody (R 15.7, 1 mg/kg) before balloon deflation prevented leukopenia (6550 +/- 560 WBC/mm3), minimized neutrophil sequestration (36 +/- 2 PMN/10 HPF), and attenuated protein leak (710 +/- 95 micrograms/mL) and the increased lung W/d (5.6 +/- 0.1) (all p less than 0.05). A final atelectatic group (n = 9) was treated I.V. with the anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody (RR 1/1, 1 mg/kg), which also prevented leukopenia and showed

  17. Neutrophil adhesion and activation under flow

    PubMed Central

    Zarbock, Alexander; Ley, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil recruitment into inflamed tissue in response to injury or infection is tightly regulated. Reduced neutrophil recruitment can result in a reduced ability to fight invading microorganisms. During inflammation, neutrophils roll along the endothelial wall of postcapillary venules and integrate inflammatory signals. Neutrophil activation by selectins and chemokines regulates integrin adhesiveness. Binding of activated integrins to their counter-receptors on endothelial cells induces neutrophil arrest and firm adhesion. Adherent neutrophils can be further activated to undergo cytoskeletal rearrangement, crawling, transmigration, superoxide production and respiratory burst. Signaling through G-protein coupled receptors, selectin ligands, Fc receptors and outside-in signaling of integrins are all involved in neutrophil activation, but their interplay in the multistep process of recruitment are only beginning to emerge. This review provides an overview of signaling in rolling and adherent neutrophils. PMID:19037827

  18. IL-4 induces neutrophilic maturation of HL-60 cells and activation of human peripheral blood neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Bober, L A; Waters, T A; Pugliese-Sivo, C C; Sullivan, L M; Narula, S K; Grace, M J

    1995-01-01

    IL-4 is a T-helper cell derived cytokine that has effects on myelomonocytic cell maturation and activation. We have studied the effect of IL-4 on neutrophilic maturation using the cell line HL-60 and found that it has a profound effect on the maturation and activation of the cell line. The treatment of HL-60 cells with recombinant hu IL-4 (0.15 to 15.0 ng/ml) induced a shift in the percentage of HL-60 cells staining positive for chloroacetate esterase enzyme activity (indicating commitment to the neutrophilic lineage). IL-4 increased surface expression of the neutrophil-lineage antigen WEM G11, the complement receptors CR3 (CD11b) and CR1 (CD35), but not for the monocyte differentiation antigen CD14. IL-4 treated HL-60 cells demonstrated enhanced Fc- and complement-mediated phagocytic capacity and increased hexose-monophosphate shunt activity. In addition, IL-4 was capable of sustaining the neutrophil maturation of HL-60 cells that had been pre-treated for 24 h with DMSO. To investigate the effect of IL-4 on the mature neutrophil, we studied freshly isolated and rested human peripheral blood neutrophils. In the absence of other stimuli, neutrophils were induced by IL-4 to have significantly elevated phagocytic responses. The response was specific since treatment with anti-human IL-4 abolished phagocytic stimulation. Finally, IL-4 treatment also stimulated resting neutrophils to migrate toward zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) and human IL-5. The results demonstrate that IL-4 is a potent maturation factor for myelocytes to become neutrophils and that IL-4 can stimulate resting mature neutrophils. PMID:7529148

  19. The impact of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like mediators on the functional activity of neutrophils: anti-inflammatory effects of human PAF-acetylhydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, T W; Van Den Berg1, J M; Tool, A T J; Roos, D

    2001-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory agent in infectious and inflammatory diseases, partly due to the activation of infiltrating phagocytes. PAF exerts its actions after binding to a monospecific PAF receptor (PAFR). The potent bioactivity is reflected by its ability to activate neutrophils at picomolar concentrations, as defined by changes in levels of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and induction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization at nanomolar concentration. The role of PAF in neutrophil survival is, however, less well appreciated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of synthetic PAFR-antagonists on various neutrophil functions were compared with the effect of recombinant human plasma-derived PAF-acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH), as an important enzyme for PAF degradation in blood and extracellular fluids. We found that endogenously produced PAF (–like) substances were involved in the spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils. At concentrations of 8 µg/ml or higher than normal plasma levels, rPAF-AH prevented spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis (21 ± 4% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; control) versus 62 ± 12% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; rPAF-AH 20 µg/ml); P < 0·01), during overnight cultures of 15 h. This effect depended on intact enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH and was not due to the resulting product lyso-PAF. The anti-inflammatory activity of rPAF-AH toward neutrophils was substantiated by its inhibition of PAF-induced chemotaxis and changes in [Ca2+]i. In conclusion, the efficient and stable enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH over so many hours of coculture with neutrophils demonstrates the potential for its use in the many inflammatory processes in which PAF (–like) substances are believed to be involved. PMID:11298128

  20. Cationic liposomes evoke proinflammatory mediator release and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) toward human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Hsu, Ching-Yun; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chen, Chun-Han; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-04-01

    Cationic liposomes are widely used as nanocarriers for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The cationic components of liposomes can induce inflammatory responses. This study examined the effect of cationic liposomes on human neutrophil activation. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate (SME) was incorporated into liposomes as the cationic additive. The liposomes' cytotoxicity and their induction of proinflammatory mediators, intracellular calcium, and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were investigated. The interaction of the liposomes with the plasma membrane triggered the stimulation of neutrophils. CTAB liposomes induced complete leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at all concentrations tested, whereas SME liposomes released LDH in a concentration-dependent manner. CTAB liposomes proved to more effectively activate neutrophils compared with SME liposomes, as indicated by increased superoxide anion and elastase levels. Calcium influx increased 9-fold after treatment with CTAB liposomes. This influx was not changed by SME liposomes compared with the untreated control. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence images indicated the presence of NETs after treatment with cationic liposomes. NETs could be quickly formed, within minutes, after CTAB liposomal treatment. In contrast to this result, NET formation was slowly and gradually increased by SME liposomes, within 4h. Based on the data presented here, it is important to consider the toxicity of cationic liposomes during administration in the body. This is the first report providing evidence of NET production induced by cationic liposomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-01-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. PMID:24909063

  2. Human filarial Wolbachia lipopeptide directly activates human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tamarozzi, F; Wright, H L; Johnston, K L; Edwards, S W; Turner, J D; Taylor, M J

    2014-10-01

    The host inflammatory response to the Onchocerca volvulus endosymbiont, Wolbachia, is a major contributing factor in the development of chronic pathology in humans (onchocerciasis/river blindness). Recently, the toll-like pattern recognition receptor motif of the major inflammatory ligands of filarial Wolbachia, membrane-associated diacylated lipoproteins, was functionally defined in murine models of pathology, including mediation of neutrophil recruitment to the cornea. However, the extent to which human neutrophils can be activated in response to this Wolbachia pattern recognition motif is not known. Therefore, the responses of purified peripheral blood human neutrophils to a synthetic N-terminal diacylated lipopeptide (WoLP) of filarial Wolbachia peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (PAL) were characterized. WoLP exposure led to a dose-dependent activation of healthy, human neutrophils that included gross morphological alterations and modulation of surface expressed integrins involved in tethering, rolling and extravasation. WoLP exposure induced chemotaxis but not chemokinesis of neutrophils, and secretion of the major neutrophil chemokine, interleukin 8. WoLP also induced and primed the respiratory burst, and enhanced neutrophil survival by delay of apoptosis. These results indicate that the major inflammatory motif of filarial Wolbachia lipoproteins directly activates human neutrophils in vitro and promotes a molecular pathway by which human neutrophils are recruited to sites of Onchocerca parasitism. © 2014 The Authors. Parasite Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Flow cytometric study of in vitro neutrophil activation by biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Gorbet, M B; Yeo, E L; Sefton, M V

    1999-03-05

    Neutrophil activation for adherent and nonadherent cells, as measured by flow cytometry, was not strongly dependent on material surface chemistry. We had hypothesized that material-induced neutrophil activation was an important parameter associated with material failure. All materials tested [cellophane, an acrylonitrile copolymer (AN69), Pellethane, nylon, polyethylene terephthalate, low density polyethylene, and polydimethylsiloxane] activated isolated human neutrophils, which were resuspended in plasma or serum, to similar extents based on L-selectin shedding, CD11b upregulation, and stimulation of the oxidative burst after 30-min exposure. Inhibition of complement activation by sCR1 unexpectedly had little effect if any on nonadherent neutrophils. However, neutrophil adhesion, but not the level of activation of the adherent cells, was strongly dependent on complement activation. Pretreatment with albumin did not inhibit adhesion or reduce neutrophil activation, but plasma pretreatment resulted in increased activation for nonadherent and adherent cells. More adhesion and a higher level of activation of adherent cells was observed following pretreatment with fibrinogen, a ligand of CD11b. Taken together these results suggest that upon contact with a material, neutrophil activation may occur though mechanisms that are not mediated by complement. For example, the presence of plasma proteins such as fibrinogen at the interface may trigger activation and the release of other activating agents. Although the material differences are small, the extent of activation may be significant and warrant further study of the mechanism and consequences of that activation.

  4. Cell Wall-Anchored Nuclease of Streptococcus sanguinis Contributes to Escape from Neutrophil Extracellular Trap-Mediated Bacteriocidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Masanobu; Okahashi, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Yamashiro, Takashi; Hayashi, Mikako; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis, a member of the commensal mitis group of streptococci, is a primary colonizer of the tooth surface, and has been implicated in infectious complications including bacteremia and infective endocarditis. During disease progression, S. sanguinis may utilize various cell surface molecules to evade the host immune system to survive in blood. In the present study, we discovered a novel cell surface nuclease with a cell-wall anchor domain, termed SWAN (streptococcal wall-anchored nuclease), and investigated its contribution to bacterial resistance against the bacteriocidal activity of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Recombinant SWAN protein (rSWAN) digested multiple forms of DNA including NET DNA and human RNA, which required both Mg2+ and Ca2+ for optimum activity. Furthermore, DNase activity of S. sanguinis was detected around growing colonies on agar plates containing DNA. In-frame deletion of the swan gene mostly reduced that activity. These findings indicated that SWAN is a major nuclease displayed on the surface, which was further confirmed by immuno-detection of SWAN in the cell wall fraction. The sensitivity of S. sanguinis to NET killing was reduced by swan gene deletion. Moreover, heterologous expression of the swan gene rendered a Lactococcus lactis strain more resistant to NET killing. Our results suggest that the SWAN nuclease on the bacterial surface contributes to survival in the potential situation of S. sanguinis encountering NETs during the course of disease progression. PMID:25084357

  5. On-chip evaluation of neutrophil activation and neutrophil-endothelial cell interaction during neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyuk; Haynes, Christy L

    2013-11-19

    Neutrophils are always surrounded by/interacting with other components of the immune system; however, the current mechanistic understanding of neutrophil function is largely based on how neutrophils respond to a single chemical signal in a simplified environment. Such approaches are unable to recapitulate the in vivo microenvironment; thus, cell behavior may not fully represent the physiological behavior. Herein, we exploit a microfluidic model of the complex in vivo milieu to investigate how cell-cell interactions influence human neutrophil migration and surface marker expression. Neutrophil migration against a bacterially derived chemoattractant (formyl-met-leu-phe, fMLP), with and without preactivation by interleukins (interleukin-2 or interleukin-6), was evaluated in the presence and absence of endothelial support cells. Preactivation by interleukins or interaction with endothelial cells resulted in altered migration rates compared to naïve neutrophils, and migration trajectories deviated from the expected movement toward the fMLP signal. Interestingly, interaction with both interleukins and endothelial cells simultaneously resulted in a slight compensation in the deviation-on endothelial cells, 34.4% of untreated neutrophils moved away from the fMLP signal, while only 15.2 or 22.2% (interleukin-2-or interleukin-6-activated) of preactivated cells moved away from fMLP. Neutrophils interacting with interleukins and/or endothelial cells were still capable of prioritizing the fMLP signal over a competing chemoattractant, leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Fluorescence imaging of individual human neutrophils revealed that neutrophils treated with endothelial-cell-conditioned media showed up-regulation of the surface adhesion molecules cluster determinant 11b and 66b (CD11b and CD66b) upon stimulation. On the other hand, CD11b and CD66b down-regulation was observed in untreated neutrophils. These results leverage single cell analysis to reveal that the interaction between

  6. mTOR mediates IL-23 induction of neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22 production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feidi; Cao, Anthony; Yao, Suxia; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Liu, Han; Wu, Wei; Carlsen, Eric D.; Dann, Sara M; Soong, Lynn; Sun, Jiaren; Zhao, Qihong; Cong, Yingzi

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown recently that neutrophils are able to produce IL-22 and IL-17, which differentially regulate the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, it is still largely unknown how the neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 is regulated, and their role in the pathogenesis of IBD. In this study, we found that IL-23 promoted neutrophil production of IL-17 and IL-22. IL-23 stimulated the neutrophil expression of IL-23 receptor as well as rorc and ahr. RORγt and AhR differentially regulated IL-23 induction of neutrophil IL-17 and IL-22. Additionally, IL-23 induced the activation of mTOR in neutrophils. Blockade of mTOR pathway inhibited IL-23-induced expression of rorc and ahr as well as IL-17 and IL-22 production. By utilizing a microbiota antigen specific T-cell mediated colitis model, we demonstrated that depletion of neutrophils, as well as blockade of IL-22, resulted in a significant increase in the severity of colitis, thereby indicating a protective role of neutrophils and IL-22 in chronic colitis. Collectively, our data revealed that neutrophils negatively regulate microbiota antigen specific T cell induction of colitis, and IL-23 induces neutrophil production of IL-22 and IL-17 through induction of rorc and ahr, which is mediated by mTOR pathway. PMID:27067005

  7. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  8. Chemotactic and Phagocytic Activity of Blood Neutrophils in Allergic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Tainá; Menezes, Maria C S; Silva, Ademir Veras; Stirbulov, Roberto; Forte, Wilma C N

    2015-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease, and has been considered a T helper-2-biased response. Studies suggest that neutrophils may be associated with exacerbation and asthma severity. We sought to evaluate the chemotactic activity and phagocytic capacity by peripheral blood neutrophils from individuals with controlled and uncontrolled allergic asthma, and compare the results with non-asthmatic controls groups. Blood neutrophils were isolated from 95 patients: 24 with controlled asthma, 24 uncontrolled asthma, 24 healthy subjects and 23 patients with IgE-mediated allergies other than asthma. The neutrophil chemotaxis, stimulated with LPS, autologous serum or homologous serum, was determined using Boyden chambers. The phagocytic capacity was assessed by ingestion of zimosan particles, and digestion phase was analyzed by NBT test. The phagocytic digestion phase and chemotaxis by neutrophils from asthmatic patients was higher than in non-asthmatic controls (p  < 0.05). Autologous serum-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with uncontrolled asthma was greater (p  < 0.05) than in other study groups. The ingestion phase of phagocytosis showed similar values in asthmatics and non-asthmatics. We conclude that the blood neutrophil from controlled and uncontrolled asthmatic patients exhibit activation markers, particularly phagocytic digestion and chemotactic activities.

  9. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibits neutrophil activation following permanent cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Tsung-Kuei; Chen, Wen-Ying; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Liao, Su-Lan; Raung, Shue-Ling; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-07-31

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) against ischemic stroke and highlighted its crucial role in anti-inflammatory activity. This study provides evidence of an alternative target for TMP and sheds light on the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action against ischemic brain injury. We report a global inhibitory effect of TMP on inflammatory cell intracerebral activation and infiltration in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia. The results of immunohistochemistry, enzymatic assay, flow cytometric analysis, and cytological analysis revealed that intraperitoneal TMP administration reduced neuronal loss, macrophage/microglia activation, brain parenchyma infiltrative neutrophils, and circulating neutrophils after cerebral ischemia. Biochemical studies of cultured neutrophils further demonstrated that TMP attenuated neutrophil migration, endothelium adhesion, spontaneous nitric oxide (NO) production, and stimuli-activated NO production after cerebral ischemia. In parallel with these anti-neutrophil phenomena, TMP also attenuated the activities of ischemia-induced inflammation-associated signaling molecules, including plasma high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) and neutrophil toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Another finding in this study was that the anti-neutrophil effect of TMP was accompanied by a further elevated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in neutrophils after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, our results suggest that both the promotion of endogenous anti-inflammatory defense capacity and the attenuation of pro-inflammatory responses via targeting of circulating neutrophils by elevating Nrf2/HO-1 expression and inhibiting HMGB1/TLR4, Akt, and ERK signaling might actively contribute to TMP-mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia.

  10. Protein Kinase B (AKT) Mediates Phospholipase D Activation via ERK1/2 and Promotes Respiratory Burst Parameters in Formylpeptide-stimulated Neutrophil-like HL-60 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satyananda; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Raoul-Des-Essarts, Yannick; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel; Périanin, Axel

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD), a major source of lipid second messengers (phosphatidic acid, diglycerides) in many cell types, is tightly regulated by protein kinases, but only a few of them have been identified. We show here that protein kinase B (AKT) is a novel major signaling effector of PLD activity induced by the formylpeptide f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) in human neutrophil-like HL-60 cells (dHL-60 cells). AKT inhibition with the selective antagonist AKTib1/2 almost completely prevented fMLP-mediated activity of PLD, its upstream effector ERK1/2, but not p38 MAPK. Immunoprecipitation studies show that phosphorylated AKT, ERK, and PLD2 form a complex induced by fMLP, which can be prevented by AKTib1/2. In cell-free systems, AKT1 stimulated PLD activity via activation of ERK. AKT1 actually phosphorylated ERK2 as a substrate (Km 1 μm). Blocking AKT activation with AKTib1/2 also prevented fMLP- but not phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-mediated NADPH oxidase activation (respiratory burst, RB) of dHL-60 cells. Impaired RB was associated with defective membrane translocation of NADPH oxidase components p67phox and p47phox, ERK, AKT1, AKT2, but not AKT3. Depletion of AKT1 or AKT2 with antisense oligonucleotides further indicates a partial contribution of both isoforms in fMLP-induced activation of ERK, PLD, and RB, with a predominant role of AKT1. Thus, formylpeptides induce sequential activation of AKT, ERK1/2, and PLD, which represents a novel signaling pathway. A major primarily role of this AKT signaling pathway also emerges in membrane recruitment of NOX2 components p47phox, p67phox, and ERK, which may contribute to assembly and activation of the RB motor system, NADPH oxidase. PMID:20693286

  11. Targeting Neutrophilic Inflammation Using Polymersome-Mediated Cellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, James D.; Ward, Jon R.; Avila-Olias, Milagros

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are key effector cells in inflammation and play an important role in neutralizing invading pathogens. During inflammation resolution, neutrophils undergo apoptosis before they are removed by macrophages, but if apoptosis is delayed, neutrophils can cause extensive tissue damage and chronic disease. Promotion of neutrophil apoptosis is a potential therapeutic approach for treating persistent inflammation, yet neutrophils have proven difficult cells to manipulate experimentally. In this study, we deliver therapeutic compounds to neutrophils using biocompatible, nanometer-sized synthetic vesicles, or polymersomes, which are internalized by binding to scavenger receptors and subsequently escape the early endosome through a pH-triggered disassembly mechanism. This allows polymersomes to deliver molecules into the cell cytosol of neutrophils without causing cellular activation. After optimizing polymersome size, we show that polymersomes can deliver the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (R)-roscovitine into human neutrophils to promote apoptosis in vitro. Finally, using a transgenic zebrafish model, we show that encapsulated (R)-roscovitine can speed up inflammation resolution in vivo more efficiently than the free drug. These results show that polymersomes are effective intracellular carriers for drug delivery into neutrophils. This has important consequences for the study of neutrophil biology and the development of neutrophil-targeted therapeutics. PMID:28289157

  12. Recombinant gamma interferon causes neutrophil migration mediated by the release of a macrophage neutrophil chemotactic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, R. A.; Cunha, F. Q.; Ferreira, S. H.

    1990-01-01

    A dose-dependent neutrophil migration was observed following the injection of purified (Hu IFN-gamma) or recombinant (rIFN-gamma) human gamma interferon into rat peritoneal cavities. This finding contrasts with their inability to cause chemotaxis in vitro in the Boyden chamber. Neutrophil migration into peritoneal cavities and subcutaneous air pouches induced by both preparations of interferon was abolished by pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone. IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration was enhanced when the macrophage population of the peritoneal cavities was increased by previous injection of thioglycollate and reduced by peritoneal lavage. Macrophage monolayers pretreated either with rIFN-gamma or with lipopolysaccharide from E. coli release into the supernatant a factor that stimulates neutrophil recruitment in animals treated with dexamethasone. Dexamethasone blocked this release but did not affect the neutrophil recruitment induced by this factor. These results suggest that IFN-gamma-induced neutrophil migration in vivo may be mediated by the release from resident macrophages of a neutrophil chemotactic factor and that dexamethasone blockade of neutrophil recruitment by IFN-gamma is due to inhibition of the release of this factor. PMID:2119790

  13. Chemerin15 inhibits neutrophil-mediated vascular inflammation and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury through ChemR23

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Jenna L; Bena, Stefania; Headland, Sarah E; McArthur, Simon; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Perretti, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophil activation and adhesion must be tightly controlled to prevent complications associated with excessive inflammatory responses. The role of the anti-inflammatory peptide chemerin15 (C15) and the receptor ChemR23 in neutrophil physiology is unknown. Here, we report that ChemR23 is expressed in neutrophil granules and rapidly upregulated upon neutrophil activation. C15 inhibits integrin activation and clustering, reducing neutrophil adhesion and chemotaxis in vitro. In the inflamed microvasculature, C15 rapidly modulates neutrophil physiology inducing adherent cell detachment from the inflamed endothelium, while reducing neutrophil recruitment and heart damage in a murine myocardial infarction model. These effects are mediated through ChemR23. We identify the C15/ChemR23 pathway as a new regulator and thus therapeutic target in neutrophil-driven pathologies. PMID:23999103

  14. Mediators of neutrophil function in children with protracted bacterial bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Baines, Katherine J; Upham, John W; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Chang, Anne B; Marchant, Julie M; Carroll, Melanie; Simpson, Jodie L; Gibson, Peter G

    2014-10-01

    Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) is a common and treatable cause of chronic wet cough in children in which the mechanisms are not understood. This study investigates the IL-1 pathway and a neutrophil gene expression signature in PBB. BAL was collected from children in an experimental cohort (n = 21, PBB; n = 33, control subjects), and a second validation cohort (n = 36, PBB; n = 11, control subjects). IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and α-defensins 1-3 were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, together with selected IL-1 pathway members and neutrophil-related molecules. In the experimental cohort, children with symptomatic PBB had significantly higher levels of IL-1β and α-defensin gene and protein expression. Expression of the neutrophil chemokine receptor C-X-C motif receptor 2 was also higher in PBB. IL-1RA protein was higher, however, the IL-1RA:IL-1β ratio was lower in children with PBB than control subjects. In the validation cohort, protein and gene expression of IL-1β and α-defensins 1-3 were confirmed higher, as was gene expression of IL-1 pathway members and C-X-C motif receptor 2. IL-1β and α-defensin 1-3 levels lowered when PBB was treated and resolved. In children with recurrent PBB, gene expression of the IL-1β signaling molecules pellino-1 and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 2 was significantly higher. IL-1β protein levels correlated with BAL neutrophilia and the duration and severity of cough symptoms. IL-1β and α-defensin 1-3 levels were highly correlated. PBB is characterized by increased IL-1β pathway activation. IL-1β and related mediators were associated with BAL neutrophils, cough symptoms, and disease recurrence, providing insight into PBB pathogenesis.

  15. A novel immunomodulatory function of neutrophils on rhinovirus-activated monocytes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Francesca S M; Hansbro, Philip M; Burgess, Janette K; Ammit, Alaina J; Baines, Katherine J; Oliver, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Background Rhinovirus (RV) infections are the major precipitant of asthma exacerbations. While neutrophilic lung inflammation occurs during such infections, its role remains unclear. Neutrophilic inflammation is associated with increased asthma severity and steroid refractory disease. Neutrophils are vital for controlling infections but also have immunomodulatory functions. Previously, we found that neutrophils respond to viral mimetics but not replication competent RV. We aimed to investigate if neutrophils are activated and/or modulate immune responses of monocytes during RV16 infection. Methods Primary human monocytes and autologous neutrophils were cocultured with or without RV16, in direct contact or separated by transwells. RV16-stimulated monocytes were also exposed to lysed neutrophils, neutrophil membrane components or soluble neutrophil intracellular components. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-X-C motif (CXC)L8 mRNA and proteins were measured by quantitative PCR and ELISA at 24 hours. Results RV16 induced IL-6 and CXCL8 in monocytes, but not neutrophils. RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 from monocytes was reduced in the presence of live neutrophils. Transwell separation abolished the inhibitory effects. Lysed neutrophils inhibited RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 from monocytes. Neutrophil intracellular components alone effectively inhibited RV16-induced monocyte-derived IL-6 and CXCL8. Neutrophil intracellular components reduced RV16-induced IL-6 and CXCL8 mRNA in monocytes. Conclusions Cell contact between monocytes and neutrophils is required, and preformed neutrophil mediator(s) are likely to be involved in the suppression of cytokine mRNA and protein production. This study demonstrates a novel regulatory function of neutrophils on RV-activated monocytes in vitro, challenging the paradigm that neutrophils are predominantly proinflammatory. PMID:27287090

  16. IL-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis is mediated by Janus kinase 3 (JAK3).

    PubMed

    Henkels, Karen M; Frondorf, Kathleen; Gonzalez-Mejia, M Elba; Doseff, Andrea L; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2011-01-03

    Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase vital to the regulation of T-cells. We report that JAK3 is a mediator of interleukin-8 (IL-8) stimulation of a different class of hematopoietic relevant cells: human neutrophils. IL-8 induced a time- and concentration-dependent activation of JAK3 activity in neutrophils and differentiated HL-60 leukemic cells. JAK3 was more robustly activated by IL-8 than other kinases: p70S6K, mTOR, MAPK or PKC. JAK3 silencing severely inhibited IL-8-mediated chemotaxis. Thus, IL-8 stimulates chemotaxis through a mechanism mediated by JAK3. Further, JAK3 activity and chemotaxis were inhibited by the flavonoid apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone) at ∼5nM IC(50). These new findings lay the basis for understanding the molecular mechanism of cell migration as it relates to neutrophil-mediated chronic inflammatory processes.

  17. Activation of the neutrophil bactericidal activity for nontypable Haemophilus influenzae by tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed

    Tan, A M; Ferrante, A; Goh, D H; Roberton, D M; Cripps, A W

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have suggested that, in vivo, activated T lymphocytes and neutrophils are important in immunity to nontypable Haemophilus influenzae. We now extend this work by showing that neutrophils pretreated with products of activated T lymphocytes or activated macrophages show significantly enhanced killing of nontypable H. influenzae. Lymphotoxin, a product of activated T lymphocytes, significantly enhanced the neutrophil-mediated killing of nontypable H. influenzae, and tumor necrosis factor, produced by activated T lymphocytes as well as macrophages stimulated by activated T lymphocytes, also significantly increased the bactericidal activity of neutrophils. These cytokine-induced effects were seen with short pretreatment times of neutrophils and were maximal by 30 min. The killing of H. influenzae by neutrophils required the presence of heat-labile opsonins. In the absence of these opsonins, both tumor necrosis factor and lymphotoxin were unable to promote the killing of the bacteria by neutrophils. Furthermore, the results showed that tumor necrosis factor-primed neutrophils displayed significantly increased expression of CR3 and CR4 that was associated with increased phagocytosis of complement-opsonized nontypable H. influenzae. These cytokines may play an important role in immunity toward nontypable H. influenzae by stimulating neutrophil bactericidal activity.

  18. Interleukin-8: an expanding universe beyond neutrophil chemotaxis and activation.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, N

    2000-12-01

    Since the discovery 13 years ago of interleukin (IL)-8 as a potent neutrophil chemotactic factor, accumulating evidence has established it as a crucial mediator in neutrophil-dependent acute inflammation. Numerous observations have demonstrated that various types of cells can produce a large amount of IL-8, either in response to various stimuli or constitutively, after malignant transformation. Recent studies of IL-8-mediated signaling have revealed that IL-8 activates a wide range of signaling molecules in a coordinate manner. IL-8 has been proven to have diverse actions on various types of leukocytic and nonleukocytic cells besides neutrophils. The author reviews recent progress in IL-8 signal transduction and biological actions on nonneutrophilic leukocytes, including T lymphocytes, monocytes, and hematopoietic progenitor cells. Potential involvement of IL-8 in viral infections and tumor progression is also discussed.

  19. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesive dynamics simulation of neutrophil arrest with deterministic activation.

    PubMed

    Krasik, Ellen F; Yee, Ka Lai; Hammer, Daniel A

    2006-08-15

    The transition from rolling to firm adhesion is a key element of neutrophil activation and essential to the inflammatory response. Although the molecular mediators of rolling and firm adhesion are known to be selectins and beta2 -integrins, respectively, the precise dynamic mechanism by which these ligands facilitate neutrophil arrest remains unknown. Recently, it has been shown that ligation of E-selectin can stimulate the firm adhesion of neutrophils via a MAP-kinase cascade. To study the possible mechanism by which neutrophil arrest could occur, we created an integrated model by combining two methodologies from computational biology: a mechanics-based modeling of leukocyte adhesion (adhesive dynamics) and signal transduction pathway modeling. Within adhesive dynamics, a computational method our group has shown to accurately recreate rolling dynamics, we include a generic, tunable integrin activation module that links selectin engagement to integrin and activity. This model allows us to relate properties of the activation function to the dynamics of rolling and the time and distance rolled before arrest. This integrated model allows us to understand how intracellular signaling activity can set the timescale of neutrophil activation, adhesion, and diapedesis.

  1. Leishmania amazonensis Amastigotes Trigger Neutrophil Activation but Resist Neutrophil Microbicidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Carlsen, Eric D.; Hay, Christie; Henard, Calvin A.; Popov, Vsevolod; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first cells to infiltrate to the site of Leishmania promastigote infection, and these cells help to reduce parasite burden shortly after infection is initiated. Several clinical reports indicate that neutrophil recruitment is sustained over the course of leishmaniasis, and amastigote-laden neutrophils have been isolated from chronically infected patients and experimentally infected animals. The goal of this study was to compare how thioglycolate-elicited murine neutrophils respond to L. amazonensis metacyclic promastigotes and amastigotes derived from axenic cultures or from the lesions of infected mice. Neutrophils efficiently internalized both amastigote and promastigote forms of the parasite, and phagocytosis was enhanced in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated neutrophils or when parasites were opsonized in serum from infected mice. Parasite uptake resulted in neutrophil activation, oxidative burst, and accelerated neutrophil death. While promastigotes triggered the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), uptake of amastigotes preferentially resulted in the secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) from neutrophils. Finally, the majority of promastigotes were killed by neutrophils, while axenic culture- and lesion-derived amastigotes were highly resistant to neutrophil microbicidal mechanisms. This study indicates that neutrophils exhibit distinct responses to promastigote and amastigote infection. Our findings have important implications for determining the impact of sustained neutrophil recruitment and amastigote-neutrophil interactions during the late phase of cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:23918780

  2. Neutrophil-mediated lung permeability and host defense proteins.

    PubMed

    Kantrow, Stephen P; Shen, Zhiwei; Jagneaux, Tonya; Zhang, Ping; Nelson, Steve

    2009-10-01

    Neutrophil recruitment to the alveolar space is associated with increased epithelial permeability. The present study investigated in mice whether neutrophil recruitment to the lung leads to accumulation of plasma-derived host defense proteins in the alveolar space and whether respiratory burst contributes to this increase in permeability. Albumin, complement C1q, and IgM were increased in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid 6 h after intratracheal LPS challenge. Neutrophil depletion before LPS treatment completely prevented this increase in BAL fluid protein concentration. Respiratory burst was not detected in neutrophils isolated from BAL fluid, and BAL proteins were increased in mice deficient in a key subunit of the respiratory burst apparatus, gp91(phox), similar to wild-type mice. Neutrophil recruitment elicited by intratracheal instillation of the chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine was also accompanied by accumulation of albumin, C1q, and IgM. During neutrophil recruitment to the alveolar space, epithelial permeability facilitates delivery of host defense proteins. The observed increase in epithelial permeability requires recruitment of neutrophils, but not activation of the respiratory burst, and occurs with chemokine-induced neutrophil migration independent of LPS exposure.

  3. ExoS and ExoT ADP-ribosyltransferase activities mediate Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis by promoting neutrophil apoptosis and bacterial survival‡

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Karmakar, Mausita; Taylor, Patricia R.; Rietsch, Arne; Pearlman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    P. aeruginosa is a leading cause of blinding corneal ulcers worldwide. To determine the role of type III secretion in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa keratitis, corneas of C57BL/6 mice were infected with P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 or PAK, which express ExoS, ExoT and ExoY, but not ExoU. PAO1 and PAK infected corneas developed severe disease with pronounced opacification and rapid bacterial growth. In contrast, corneas infected with ΔpscD or ΔpscJ mutants that cannot assemble a Type III secretion system, or with mutants lacking the translocator proteins, do not develop clinical disease, and are rapidly killed by infiltrating neutrophils. Further, survival of PAO1 and PAK strains in the cornea and development of corneal disease was impaired in ΔexoS, ΔexoT and ΔexoST mutants of both strains, but not in a ΔexoY mutant. ΔexoST mutants were also rapidly killed in neutrophils in vitro and were impaired in their ability to promote neutrophil apoptosis in vivo compared with PAO1. Point mutations in the ADP ribosyltransferase (ADPR) regions of ExoS or ExoT also impaired pro-apoptotic activity in infected neutrophils, and exoST(ADPR-) mutants replicated the ΔexoST phenotype in vitro and in vivo, whereas mutations in rho-GAP showed the same phenotype as PAO1. Together, these findings demonstrate that the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa keratitis in ExoS and ExoT producing strains is almost entirely due to their ADPR activities, which subvert the host response by targeting the anti-bacterial activity of infiltrating neutrophils. PMID:22250085

  4. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches.

  5. Treatment with Rutin - A Therapeutic Strategy for Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Bahareh Abd; Adineh, Mohtaram; Hajiali, Farid

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Neutrophils represent the front line of human defense against infections. Immediately after stimulation, neutrophilic enzymes are activated and produce toxic mediators such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide (NO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO). These mediators can be toxic not only to infectious agents but also to host tissues. Because flavonoids exhibit antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, they are subjects of interest for pharmacological modulation of inflammation. In the present study, the effects of rutin on stimulus-induced NO and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α productions and MPO activity in human neutrophils were investigated. Methods: Human peripheral blood neutrophils were isolated using Ficoll-Hypaque density gradient centrifugation coupled with dextran T500 sedimentation. The cell preparations containing > 98% granulocytes were determined by morphological examination through Giemsa staining. Neutrophils were cultured in complete Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium, pre-incubated with or without rutin (25 μM) for 45 minutes, and stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Then, the TNF-α, NO and MPO productions were analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Griess Reagent, and MPO assay kits, respectively. Also, the viability of human neutrophils was assessed using tetrazolium salt 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and neutrophils were treated with various concentrations of rutin (1 - 100 μM), after which MTT was appended and incubated at 37ºC for 4 hour. Results: Rutin at concentrations up to 100 μM did not affect neutrophil viability during the 4-hour incubation period. Rutin significantly decreased the NO and TNF-α productions in human peripheral blood neutrophils compared to PMA-control cells (P < 0.001). Also, MPO activity was significantly reduced by rutin (P < 0.001). Conclusion: In this in vitro study, rutin had an anti-inflammatory effect due to

  6. CXCL5 Drives Neutrophil Recruitment in TH17-Mediated GN

    PubMed Central

    Disteldorf, Erik M.; Krebs, Christian F.; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Turner, Jan-Eric; Nouailles, Geraldine; Tittel, André; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke; Velden, Joachim; Wiech, Thorsten; Helmchen, Udo; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Peters, Anett; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Kaffke, Anna; Llanto, Chrystel; Lira, Sergio A.; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Kurts, Christian; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil trafficking to sites of inflammation is essential for the defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but also contributes to tissue damage in TH17-mediated autoimmunity. This process is regulated by chemokines, which often show an overlapping expression pattern and function in pathogen- and autoimmune-induced inflammatory reactions. Using a murine model of crescentic GN, we show that the pathogenic TH17/IL-17 immune response induces chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 5 (CXCL5) expression in kidney tubular cells, which recruits destructive neutrophils that contribute to renal tissue injury. By contrast, CXCL5 was dispensable for neutrophil recruitment and effective bacterial clearance in a murine model of acute bacterial pyelonephritis. In line with these findings, CXCL5 expression was highly upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN as opposed to patients with acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Our data therefore identify CXCL5 as a potential therapeutic target for the restriction of pathogenic neutrophil infiltration in TH17-mediated autoimmune diseases while leaving intact the neutrophil function in protective immunity against invading pathogens. PMID:24904089

  7. Resistance to P. brasiliensis Experimental Infection of Inbred Mice Is Associated with an Efficient Neutrophil Mobilization and Activation by Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe Fornias; Fernandes, Gisele Pesquero; Mendes, Ana Carolina Silvério Cerqueira; Bani, Giulia Maria de Alencar Castro; Calich, Vera Lucia Garcia; Burger, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic fungal infection, endemic in Brazil, that leads to severe morbidity and even mortality if not correctly treated. Patients may respond differently to PCM depending on the pattern of the acquired immune response developed. The onset of protective immune response is notably mediated by neutrophils (PMN) that play an important role through directly killing the fungi and also by interacting with other cell types to modulate the acquired protective immune response that may follow. In that way, this study aimed to present and compare different experimental models of PCM (intraperitoneal and subcutaneous) regarding PMN production and maturation inside femoral bone marrow and also PMN infiltration in peritoneal and subcutaneous exudates of resistant and susceptible mice. We also assessed the fungal colony forming units and the levels of soluble inflammatory mediators (LTB4, KC, IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-10) inside subcutaneous air-pouches to compare the efficiency of the PMN present at this site in relation to the two main neutrophil functions: initial lysis of the invading pathogen and modulation of the acquired immune response. P. brasiliensis inoculated intraperitoneally was able to disseminate to the bone marrow of susceptible mice, causing a more marked alteration of PMN production and maturation than that observed after resistant mice infection by the same route. Subcutaneous air-pouch inoculation of P. brasiliensis elicited a controlled and limited infection that produced a PMN-rich exudate, thus favoring the study of the interaction between the fungus and the neutrophils. Susceptible mice produced higher numbers of PMN; however, these cells were less effective in killing the fungi. Inflammatory cytokines were more pronounced in resistant mice, which supports their PCM raised resistance. PMID:26819497

  8. Low molecular weight heparins prevent the induction of autophagy of activated neutrophils and the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Angelo A; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; D'Angelo, Armando; Maugeri, Norma

    2017-02-01

    The protection exerted by neutrophils against invading microbes is partially mediated via the generation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In sterile conditions NETs are damaging species, enriched in autoantigens and endowed with the ability to damage the vessel wall and bystander tissues, to promote thrombogenesis, and to impair wound healing. To identify and reposition agents that can be used to modulate the formation of NETs is a priority in the research agenda. Low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) are currently used, mostly on an empirical basis, in conditions in which NETs play a critical role, such as pregnancy complications associated to autoimmune disease. Here we report that LMWHs induce a profound change in the ability of human neutrophils to generate NETs and to mobilize the content of the primary granules in response to unrelated inflammatory stimuli, such as IL-8, PMA and HMGB1. Autophagy consistently accompanies NET generation in our system and autophagy inhibitors, 3-MA and wortmannin, prevent NET generation. Pretreatment with LMWH in vitro critically jeopardizes neutrophil ability to activate autophagy, a mechanism that might contribute to neutrophil unresponsiveness. Finally, we verified that treatment of healthy volunteers with a single prophylactic dose of parnaparin abrogated the ability of neutrophils to activate autophagy and to generate NETs. Together, these results support the contention that neutrophils, and NET generation in particular, might represent a preferential target of the anti-inflammatory action of LMWH.

  9. Herpes virus entry mediator synergizes with Toll-like receptor mediated neutrophil inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Haselmayer, Philipp; Tenzer, Stefan; Kwon, Byoung S; Jung, Gundram; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P

    2006-01-01

    In microbial infections polymorphnuclear neutrophils (PMN) constitute a major part of the innate host defence, based upon their ability to rapidly accumulate in inflamed tissues and clear the site of infection from microbial pathogens by their potent effector mechanisms. The recently described transmembrane receptor herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor super family and is expressed on many haematopoietic cells, including T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, monocytes and PMN. Interaction of HVEM with the natural ligand LIGHT on T cells has a costimulatory effect, and increases the bactericidal activity of PMN. To further characterize the function of HVEM on PMN, we evaluated the effect of receptor ligation on human PMN effector functions using an agonistic monoclonal antibody. Here we demonstrate that activation of HVEM causes activation of neutrophil effector functions, including respiratory burst, degranulation and release of interleukin-8 in synergy with ligands for Toll-like receptors or GM-CSF. In addition, stimulation via HVEM enhanced neutrophil phagocytic activity of complement opsonized, but not of non-opsonized, particles. In conclusion, these results indicate a new, as yet unknown, participation of HVEM in the innate immune response and points to a new link between innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:17067315

  10. Vanadium promotes hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Fickl, Heidi; Theron, Annette J; Grimmer, Heidi; Oommen, Joyce; Ramafi, Grace J; Steel, Helen C; Visser, Susanna S; Anderson, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of vanadium in the +2, +3, +4, and +5 valence states on superoxide generation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and hydroxyl radical formation by activated human neutrophils in vitro, using lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (LECL), autoiodination, and electron spin resonance with 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide as the spin trap, respectively. At concentrations of up to 25 microM, vanadium, in the four different valence states used, did not affect the LECL responses of neutrophils activated with either the chemoattractant, N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine (1 microM), or the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate 12-acetate (25 ng/ml). However, exposure to vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4, but not the +5, valence states was accompanied by significant augmentation of hydroxyl radical formation by activated neutrophils and attenuation of MPO-mediated iodination. With respect to hydroxyl radical formation, similar effects were observed using cell-free systems containing either hydrogen peroxide (100 microM) or xanthine/xanthine oxidase together with vanadium (+2, +3, +4), while the activity of purified MPO was inhibited by the metal in these valence states. These results demonstrate that vanadium in the +2, +3, and +4 valence states interacts prooxidatively with human neutrophils, competing effectively with MPO for hydrogen peroxide to promote formation of the highly toxic hydroxyl radical.

  11. CCR2 dependent neutrophil activation and mobilization rely on TLR4-p38 axis during liver ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Junbin; Wang, Hui; Wang, Guoliang; Wang, Cong-Yi; Zhang, Jinxiang

    2017-01-01

    Liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a common clinical problem in which neutrophil recruitment is an essential event. Our previous study revealed the important role of C-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) in neutrophils during liver IRI. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the underlying mechanisms mediating the changes in CCR2 expression in neutrophils during this pathophysiological process. Herein, we found that TLR4 ablation reduced neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and the subsequent infiltration into the liver during liver IRI; neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression was also repressed. In addition, neutrophil mobilization was dependent on CCR2 expression in neutrophils, which in turn relied on activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. In conclusion, neutrophil-derived CCR2 expression regulates neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow and infiltration into the liver, which requires activation of the TLR4-p38 axis during liver IRI. PMID:28670376

  12. Role of inflammatory cells, cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases in neutrophil-mediated skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marzano, A V; Cugno, M; Trevisan, V; Fanoni, D; Venegoni, L; Berti, E; Crosti, C

    2010-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is a rare, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease presenting with painful ulcers having undermined edges. Less commonly, bullous and vegetative variants exist. Histology consists of a neutrophil-rich dermal infiltrate. We characterized immunohistochemically the infiltrate in different variants of PG and in another neutrophilic dermatosis as Sweet's syndrome. We studied 21 patients with PG, eight with Sweet's syndrome and 20 controls, evaluating skin immunoreactivity for inflammatory cell markers (CD3, CD163 and myeloperoxidase), cytokines [tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-17], metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Immunoreactivities of CD3, CD163, myeloperoxidase, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-17, MMP-2, MMP-9 and VEGF were significantly higher in both PG and Sweet's syndrome than in controls (P = 0·0001). Myeloperoxidase (neutrophil marker), IL-8 (cytokine chemotactic for neutrophils) and MMP-9 (proteinase-mediating tissue damage) were expressed more significantly in both ulcerative and bullous PG than in vegetative PG as well as in Sweet's syndrome (P = 0·008–P = 0·0001). In ulcerative PG, the expression of CD3 (panT cell marker) and CD163 (macrophage marker) were significantly higher in wound edge than wound bed (P = 0·0001). In contrast, the neutrophil marker myeloperoxidase was expressed more significantly in wound bed than wound edge (P = 0·0001). Our study identifies PG as a paradigm of neutrophil-mediated inflammation, with proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and MMPs acting as important effectors for the tissue damage, particularly in ulcerative and bullous PG where damage is stronger. In ulcerative PG, the wound bed is the site of neutrophil-recruitment, whereas in the wound edge activated T lymphocytes and macrophages pave the way to ulcer formation. PMID:20636397

  13. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  14. The role of CD69 in acute neutrophil-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Lamana, Amalia; Sancho, David; Cruz-Adalia, Aránzazu; del Hoyo, Gloria Martínez; Herrera, Ada María; Feria, Manuel; Díaz-González, Federico; Gómez, Manuel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2006-10-01

    The leukocyte activation marker CD69 functions as a negative regulator of the immune response, both in NK-dependent tumor rejection and in the inflammation associated with lymphocyte-dependent collagen-induced arthritis. In contrast, it has been reported that CD69-deficient mice are refractory to the neutrophil-dependent acute inflammatory response associated with anti-type II collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA), suggesting a positive regulatory role for CD69 in neutrophil function during arthritis induction. To clarify this discrepancy, the CAIA response was independently analyzed in our CD69-deficient mice. In these experiments, the inflammatory response was unaffected by CD69 deficiency. Additionally, the in vivo down-regulation of CD69 expression by treatment of wild-type mice with the anti-CD69 mAb 2.2, which mimics the CD69-deficient phenotype, did not affect the course of arthritis in this model. Moreover, down-regulation of CD69 expression increased expression in arthritic joints of key inflammatory mediators, including IL-1beta, IL-6 and the chemokine MCP-1. Neutrophil accumulation in zymosan-treated air pouches and in thioglycolate-treated peritoneal cavities was also unaffected in CD69-deficient mice. In addition, CD69 expression was absent in activated neutrophils. Taken together, these results rule out a significant stimulatory role for CD69 in acute inflammatory responses mediated by neutrophils.

  15. Neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (NAM).

    PubMed

    Rollo, Ellen E; Hymowitz, Michelle; Schmidt, Cathleen E; Montana, Steve; Foda, Hussein; Zucker, Stanley

    2006-01-01

    We have isolated a novel soluble factor(s), neutrophil activator of matrix metalloproteinases (NAM), secreted by unstimulated normal human peripheral blood neutrophils that causes the activation of cell secreted promatrix metalloproteinase-2 (proMMP-2). Partially purified preparations of NAM have been isolated from the conditioned media of neutrophils employing gelatin-Sepharose chromatography and differential membrane filter centrifugation. NAM activity, as assessed by exposing primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or HT1080 cells to NAM followed by gelatin zymography, was seen within one hour. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and hydroxamic acid derived inhibitors of MMPs (CT1746 and BB94) abrogated the activation of proMMP-2 by NAM, while inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases showed no effect. NAM also produced an increase in TIMP-2 binding to HUVEC and HT1080 cell surfaces that was inhibited by TIMP-2, CT1746, and BB94. Time-dependent increases in MT1-MMP protein and mRNA were seen following the addition of NAM to cells. These data support a role for NAM in cancer dissemination.

  16. Swimming Motility Mediates the Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Induced by Flagellated Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Sil, Payel; Chassaing, Benoit; Yoo, Dae-goon; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Goldberg, Joanna B.; McCarter, Linda L.; Rada, Balázs

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing severe infections often characterized by robust neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophils provide the first line of defense against P. aeruginosa. Aside from their defense conferred by phagocytic activity, neutrophils also release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to immobilize bacteria. Although NET formation is an important antimicrobial process, the details of its mechanism are largely unknown. The identity of the main components of P. aeruginosa responsible for triggering NET formation is unclear. In this study, our focus was to identify the main bacterial factors mediating NET formation and to gain insight into the underlying mechanism. We found that P. aeruginosa in its exponential growth phase promoted strong NET formation in human neutrophils while its NET-inducing ability dramatically decreased at later stages of bacterial growth. We identified the flagellum as the primary component of P. aeruginosa responsible for inducing NET extrusion as flagellum-deficient bacteria remained seriously impaired in triggering NET formation. Purified P. aeruginosa flagellin, the monomeric component of the flagellum, does not stimulate NET formation in human neutrophils. P. aeruginosa-induced NET formation is independent of the flagellum-sensing receptors TLR5 and NLRC4 in both human and mouse neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that flagellar motility, not flagellum binding to neutrophils per se, mediates NET release induced by flagellated bacteria. Immotile, flagellar motor-deficient bacterial strains producing paralyzed flagella did not induce NET formation. Forced contact between immotile P. aeruginosa and neutrophils restored their NET-inducing ability. Both the motAB and motCD genetic loci encoding flagellar motor genes contribute to maximal NET release; however the motCD genes play a more important role. Phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa and superoxide production by neutrophils were also largely dependent upon

  17. Directed transport of neutrophil-derived extracellular vesicles enables platelet-mediated innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Rossaint, Jan; Kühne, Katharina; Skupski, Jennifer; Van Aken, Hugo; Looney, Mark R.; Hidalgo, Andres; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune response to bacterial infections requires the interaction of neutrophils and platelets. Here, we show that a multistep reciprocal crosstalk exists between these two cell types, ultimately facilitating neutrophil influx into the lung to eliminate infections. Activated platelets adhere to intravascular neutrophils through P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)-mediated binding, a primary interaction that allows platelets glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα)-induced generation of neutrophil-derived extracellular vesicles (EV). EV production is directed by exocytosis and allows shuttling of arachidonic acid into platelets. EVs are then specifically internalized into platelets in a Mac1-dependent fashion, and relocated into intracellular compartments enriched in cyclooxygenase1 (Cox1), an enzyme processing arachidonic acid to synthesize thromboxane A2 (TxA2). Finally, platelet-derived-TxA2 elicits a full neutrophil response by inducing the endothelial expression of ICAM-1, intravascular crawling, and extravasation. We conclude that critical substrate–enzyme pairs are compartmentalized in neutrophils and platelets during steady state limiting non-specific inflammation, but bacterial infection triggers regulated EV shuttling resulting in robust inflammation and pathogen clearance. PMID:27845343

  18. Involvement of ROCK-mediated endothelial tension development in neutrophil-stimulated microvascular leakage

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Jerome W.; Sun, Hengrui; Xu, Wenjuan; Rodarte, Charles; Moy, Alan B.; Wu, Mack H.; Yuan, Sarah Y.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil-induced coronary microvascular barrier dysfunction is an important pathophysiological event in heart disease. Currently, the precise cellular and molecular mechanisms of neutrophil-induced microvascular leakage are not clear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that rho kinase (ROCK) increases coronary venular permeability in association with elevated endothelial tension. We assessed permeability to albumin (Pa) in isolated porcine coronary venules and in coronary venular endothelial cell (CVEC) monolayers. Endothelial barrier function was also evaluated by measuring transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) of CVEC monolayers. In parallel, we measured isometric tension of CVECs grown on collagen gels. Transference of constitutively active (ca)-ROCK protein into isolated coronary venules or CVEC monolayers caused a significant increase in Pa and decreased TER in CVECs. The ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 blocked the ca-ROCK-induced changes. C5a-activated neutrophils (106/ml) also significantly elevated venular Pa, which was dose-dependently inhibited by Y-27632 and a structurally distinct ROCK inhibitor, H-1152. In CVEC monolayers, activated neutrophils increased permeability with a concomitant elevation in isometric tension, both of which were inhibited by Y-27632 or H-1152. Treatment with ca-ROCK also significantly increased CVEC monolayer permeability and isometric tension, coupled with actin polymerization and elevated phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain on Thr18/Ser19. The data suggest that during neutrophil activation, ROCK promotes microvascular leakage in association with actin-myosin-mediated tension development in endothelial cells. PMID:16172166

  19. Nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis of neutrophils through caspase-8 and caspase-3-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Awasthi, Deepika; Singh, Abhishek K; Chandra, Tulika; Kumaravelu, J; Barthwal, Manoj K; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an indispensable role in killing of invading pathogens by enhancing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NO generation, and subsequently undergoing apoptosis. Unlike ROS/NOX2, role of NO/NOS still remains undefined in the apoptosis of neutrophils (PMNs) and the present study attempts to decipher the importance of NO/NOS in the neutrophil apoptosis. Prolonged treatment of human PMNs or mice bone marrow derived neutrophils (BMDN) with NO led to enhanced ROS generation, caspase-8/caspase-3 cleavage, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and finally cellular apoptosis. NO-induced ROS generation led to caspase-8 deglutathionylation and activation, which subsequently activated mitochondrial death pathway via BID (Bcl-2 family protein) cleavage. NO-mediated augmentation of caspase-8 and BID cleavage was significantly prevented in BMDN from neutrophil cytosolic factor-1 (NCF-1) knockout (KO) mice, implying the involvement of NOX2 in NO-induced apoptosis of PMNs. Furthermore, ROS, NO generation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression were enhanced in a time-dependent manner in human PMNs and mice BMDN undergoing spontaneous apoptosis. Pharmacological and genetic ablation of iNOS in human PMNs and mice BMDN significantly reduced the levels of apoptosis. Impaired apoptosis of BMDN from iNOS KO mice was due to reduced caspase-8 activity which subsequently prevented caspase-3 and -9 activation. Altogether, our results suggest a crucial role of NO/iNOS in neutrophil apoptosis via enhanced ROS generation and caspase-8 mediated activation of mitochondrial death pathway. PMID:27584786

  20. Honokiol suppresses formyl peptide-induced human neutrophil activation by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Syu, Yu-Ting; Fang, Jia-You; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Shih-Hsin; Lee, Yen-Tung; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2017-07-27

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) mediates bacterial and mitochondrial N-formyl peptides-induced neutrophil activation. Therefore, FPR1 is an important therapeutic target for drugs to treat septic or sterile inflammatory diseases. Honokiol, a major bioactive compound of Magnoliaceae plants, possesses several anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we show that honokiol exhibits an inhibitory effect on FPR1 binding in human neutrophils. Honokiol inhibited superoxide anion generation, reactive oxygen species formation, and elastase release in bacterial or mitochondrial N-formyl peptides (FPR1 agonists)-activated human neutrophils. Adhesion of FPR1-induced human neutrophils to cerebral endothelial cells was also reduced by honokiol. The receptor-binding results revealed that honokiol repressed FPR1-specific ligand N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein binding to FPR1 in human neutrophils, neutrophil-like THP-1 cells, and hFPR1-transfected HEK293 cells. However, honokiol did not inhibit FPR2-specific ligand binding to FPR2 in human neutrophils. Furthermore, honokiol inhibited FPR1 agonist-induced calcium mobilization as well as phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, and JNK in human neutrophils. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that honokiol may have therapeutic potential for treating FPR1-mediated inflammatory diseases.

  1. Patrolling monocytes promote intravascular neutrophil activation and glomerular injury in the acutely inflamed glomerulus

    PubMed Central

    Finsterbusch, Michaela; Hall, Pam; Li, Anqi; Devi, Sapna; Westhorpe, Clare L. V.; Kitching, A. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical monocytes undergo intravascular patrolling in blood vessels, positioning them ideally to coordinate responses to inflammatory stimuli. Under some circumstances, the actions of monocytes have been shown to involve promotion of neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanisms whereby patrolling monocytes control the actions of neutrophils in the circulation are unclear. Here, we examined the contributions of monocytes to antibody- and neutrophil-dependent inflammation in a model of in situ immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Multiphoton and spinning disk confocal intravital microscopy revealed that monocytes patrol both uninflamed and inflamed glomeruli using β2 and α4 integrins and CX3CR1. Monocyte depletion reduced glomerular injury, demonstrating that these cells promote inappropriate inflammation in this setting. Monocyte depletion also resulted in reductions in neutrophil recruitment and dwell time in glomerular capillaries and in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation by neutrophils, suggesting a role for cross-talk between monocytes and neutrophils in induction of glomerulonephritis. Consistent with this hypothesis, patrolling monocytes and neutrophils underwent prolonged interactions in glomerular capillaries, with the duration of these interactions increasing during inflammation. Moreover, neutrophils that interacted with monocytes showed increased retention and a greater propensity for ROS generation in the glomerulus. Also, renal patrolling monocytes, but not neutrophils, produced TNF during inflammation, and TNF inhibition reduced neutrophil dwell time and ROS production, as well as renal injury. These findings show that monocytes and neutrophils undergo interactions within the glomerular microvasculature. Moreover, evidence indicates that, in response to an inflammatory stimulus, these interactions allow monocytes to promote neutrophil recruitment and activation within the glomerular microvasculature, leading to neutrophil

  2. Yersinia enterocolitica-mediated degradation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Möllerherm, Helene; Neumann, Ariane; Schilcher, Katrin; Blodkamp, Stefanie; Zeitouni, Nathalie E; Dersch, Petra; Lüthje, Petra; Naim, Hassan Y; Zinkernagel, Annelies S; von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation is described as a tool of the innate host defence to fight against invading pathogens. Fibre-like DNA structures associated with proteins such as histones, cell-specific enzymes and antimicrobial peptides are released, thereby entrapping invading pathogens. It has been reported that several bacteria are able to degrade NETs by nucleases and thus evade the NET-mediated entrapment. Here we studied the ability of three different Yersinia serotypes to induce and degrade NETs. We found that the common Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8 and O:9 were able to induce NETs in human blood-derived neutrophils during the first hour of co-incubation. At later time points, the NET amount was reduced, suggesting that degradation of NETs has occurred. This was confirmed by NET degradation assays with phorbol-myristate-acetate-pre-stimulated neutrophils. In addition, we found that the Yersinia supernatants were able to degrade purified plasmid DNA. The absence of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions, but not that of a protease inhibitor cocktail, completely abolished NET degradation. We therefore postulate that Y. enterocolitica produces Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-dependent NET-degrading nucleases as shown for some Gram-positive pathogens.

  3. Neutrophil maturation rate determines the effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 1 inhibition on neutrophil serine protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Wikell, C; Clifton, S; Shearer, J; Benjamin, A; Peters, S A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) are activated by dipeptidyl peptidase 1 (DPP1) during neutrophil maturation. The effects of neutrophil turnover rate on NSP activity following DPP1 inhibition was studied in a rat pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model. Experimental Approach Rats were treated with a DPP1 inhibitor twice daily for up to 14 days; NSP activity was measured in onset or recovery studies, and an indirect response model was fitted to the data to estimate the turnover rate of the response. Key Results Maximum NSP inhibition was achieved after 8 days of treatment and a reduction of around 75% NSP activity was achieved at 75% in vitro DPP1 inhibition. Both the rate of inhibition and recovery of NSP activity were consistent with a neutrophil turnover rate of between 4–6 days. Using human neutrophil turnover rate, it is predicted that maximum NSP inhibition following DPP1 inhibition takes around 20 days in human. Conclusions and Implications Following inhibition of DPP1 in the rat, the NSP activity was determined by the amount of DPP1 inhibition and the turnover of neutrophils and is thus supportive of the role of neutrophil maturation in the activation of NSPs. Clinical trials to monitor the effect of a DPP1 inhibitor on NSPs should take into account the delay in maximal response on the one hand as well as the potential delay in a return to baseline NSP levels following cessation of treatment. PMID:27186823

  4. Neutrophil elastase processing of Gelatinase A is mediated by extracellular matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, A.; Banda, M.J.

    1995-07-18

    Gelatinase A (72-kDa type IV collagenase) is a metalloproteinase that is expressed by many cells in culture and is overexpressed by some tumor cells. It has been suggested that the serine proteinase neutrophil elastase might play a role iii the posttranslational processing of gelatinase A and that noncatalytic interactions between gelatinase A and components of the extracellular matrix might alter potential processing pathways. These questions were addressed with the use of gelatin substrate zymography, gelatinolytic activity assays, and amino acid sequence analysis. We found that neutrophil elastase does proteolytically modify gelatinase A by cleaving at a number of sites within gelatinase A. Sequential treatment of gelatinase A with 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate (APMA) and neutrophil elastase yielded an active gelatinase with a 4-fold increase in gelatinolytic activity. The increased gelatinolytic activity correlated with that of a 40-kDa fragment of gelatinase A. Matrix components altered the proteolytic modifications in gelatinase A that were mediated by neutrophil elastase. In the absence of gelatin, neutrophil elastase destructively degraded gelatinase A by hydrolyzing at least two bonds within the fibronectin-like gelatin-binding domain of gelatinase A. In the presence of gelatin, these two inactivating cleavage sites were protected, and cleavage at a site within the hemopexin-like carboxyl-terminal domain resulted in a truncated yet active gelatinase. The results suggest a regulatory role for extracellular matrix molecules in stabilizing gelatinase A fragments and in altering the availability of sites susceptible to destructive proteolysis by neutrophil elastase. 32 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Modulation of γδ T-cell activation by neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Towstyka, Nadia Yasmín; Shiromizu, Carolina Maiumi; Keitelman, Irene; Sabbione, Florencia; Salamone, Gabriela Verónica; Geffner, Jorge Raúl; Trevani, Analía Silvina; Jancic, Carolina Cristina

    2017-09-09

    γδ T cells are non-conventional, innate-like T cells, characterized by a restricted T-cell receptor repertoire. They participate in protective immunity responses against extracellular and intracellular pathogens, tumour surveillance, modulation of innate and adaptive immune responses, tissue healing, epithelial cell maintenance and regulation of physiological organ function. In this study, we investigated the role of neutrophils during the activation of human blood γδ T cells through CD3 molecules. We found that the up-regulation of CD69 expression, and the production of interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α induced by anti-CD3 antibodies was potentiated by neutrophils. We found that inhibition of caspase-1 and neutralization of interleukin-18 did not affect neutrophil-mediated modulation. By contrast, the treatment with serine protease inhibitors prevented the potentiation of γδ T-cell activation induced by neutrophils. Moreover, the addition of elastase to γδ T-cell culture increased their stimulation, and the treatment of neutrophils with elastase inhibitor prevented the effect of neutrophils on γδ T-cell activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the effect of elastase on γδ T cells was mediated through the protease-activated receptor, PAR1, because the inhibition of this receptor with a specific antagonist, RWJ56110, abrogated the effect of neutrophils on γδ T-cell activation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Biologically active neutrophil chemokine pattern in tonsillitis

    PubMed Central

    RUDACK, C; JÖRG, S; SACHSE, F

    2004-01-01

    To gain an insight into the mechanisms of chronic and acute inflammation, the production of neutrophil chemokines in different types of tonsillitis – hyperplastic tonsillitis (HT), recurrent tonsillitis (RT) and peritonsillar abscesses (PA) – was investigated. The chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8), growth-related oncogene-α (GRO-α), epithelial cell-derived neutrophil attractant-78 (ENA-78) and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2) were detected and shown to have different biological activities. With respect to the biological properties of CXC chemokines, the biological activity of the chemokines was identified using a three-step high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique, a bioassay involving measurement of neutrophil chemotaxis in a single Boyden chamber in tissue of HT, RT and PA. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the chemokine concentrations were determined in the different tonsillitis entities. The chemokine pattern was dominated in PA by IL-8 and GRO-α and in RT by GRO-α. Hyperplastic tonsils of patients without a history of infection generated about five times lower IL-8 than PA. A protein concentration of GCP-2 was induced in PA and RT, whereas ENA-78 remained the same in all entities. In conclusion, it would appear that IL-8 was up-regulated in acute inflammation, whereas GRO-α dominated in chronic inflammation. ENA-78 seems not to play a pivotal role in inflammatory processes in tonsils. GCP-2 may serve as a substitute chemokine in certain inflammatory conditions as its quantity of mRNA and protein was higher in RT and PA than in HT. PMID:15008987

  7. Soluble CD40 ligand stimulates CD40-dependent activation of the β2 integrin Mac-1 and protein kinase C zeda (PKCζ) in neutrophils: implications for neutrophil-platelet interactions and neutrophil oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rong; Yu, Shiyong; Song, Zifang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Jinchuan; Wu, Fusheng; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has revealed an essential involvement of soluble CD40L (sCD40L) in inflammation and vascular disease. Activated platelets are the major source of sCD40L, which has been implicated in platelet and leukocyte activation, although its exact functional impact on leukocyte-platelet interactions and the underlying mechanisms remain undefined. We aimed to determine the impact and the mechanisms of sCD40L on neutrophils. We studied neutrophil interactions with activated, surface-adherent platelets as a model for leukocyte recruitment to the sites of injury. Our data show that CD40L contributes to neutrophil firm adhesion to and transmigration across activated surface-adherent platelets, possibly through two potential mechanisms. One involves the direct interaction of ligand-receptor (CD40L-CD40), i.e., platelet surface CD40L interaction with neutrophil CD40; another involves an indirect mechanism, i.e. soluble CD40L stimulates activation of the leukocyte-specific β2 integrin Mac-1 in neutrophils and thereby further promotes neutrophil adhesion and migration. Activation of the integrin Mac-1 is known to be critical for mediating neutrophil adhesion and migration. sCD40L activated Mac-1 in neutrophils and enhanced neutrophil-platelet interactions in wild-type neutrophils, but failed to elicit such responses in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Furthermore, our data show that the protein kinase C zeta (PKCζ) is critically required for sCD40L-induced Mac-1 activation and neutrophil adhesive function. sCD40L strongly stimulated the focal clustering of Mac-1 (CD11b) and the colocalization of Mac-1 with PKCζ in wild-type neutrophils, but had minimal effect in CD40-deficient neutrophils. Blocking PKCζ completely inhibited sCD40L-induced neutrophil firm adhesion. Moreover, sCD40L strongly stimulates neutrophil oxidative burst via CD40-dependent activation of PI3K/NF-KB, but independent of Mac-1 and PKCζ. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the

  8. S100A8/A9 Proteins Mediate Neutrophilic Inflammation and Lung Pathology during Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Torres, Diana; Slight, Samantha; Mehra, Smriti; McKenna, Kyle C.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Tessier, Phillipe; Roth, Johannes; Selman, Moisés; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Cumming, Bridgette; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.; Babu, Subash; Kaushal, Deepak; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Vogl, Thomas; Rangel-Moreno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas. However, the immune factors that drive the formation of a protective granuloma during latent TB, and the factors that drive the formation of inflammatory granulomas during active TB, are not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the underlying immune mechanisms involved in formation of inflammatory granulomas seen during active TB. Methods: The immune mediators involved in inflammatory granuloma formation during TB were assessed using human samples and experimental models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, using molecular and immunologic techniques. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that in human patients with active TB and in nonhuman primate models of M. tuberculosis infection, neutrophils producing S100 proteins are dominant within the inflammatory lung granulomas seen during active TB. Using the mouse model of TB, we demonstrate that the exacerbated lung inflammation seen as a result of neutrophilic accumulation is dependent on S100A8/A9 proteins. S100A8/A9 proteins promote neutrophil accumulation by inducing production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and influencing leukocyte trafficking. Importantly, serum levels of S100A8/A9 proteins along with neutrophil-associated chemokines, such as keratinocyte chemoattractant, can be used as potential surrogate biomarkers to assess lung inflammation and disease severity in human TB. Conclusions: Our results thus show a major pathologic role for S100A8/A9 proteins in mediating neutrophil accumulation and inflammation associated with TB. Thus, targeting specific molecules, such as S100A8/A9 proteins, has the potential to decrease lung tissue damage without impacting protective immunity against TB. PMID:24047412

  9. Activation of the human neutrophil respiratory burst with zymosan-activated serum.

    PubMed

    Smith, R J; Iden, S S; Bowman, B J

    1984-06-15

    Zymosan-activated serum ( ZAS ) stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent generation of superoxide anion (O-2) by human neutrophils. O-2 production was rapid with maximum generation occurring 2 minutes after cell exposure to ZAS . O-2 generation is markedly reduced if cells are not preincubated with cytochalasin B prior to contact with ZAS . The amount of O-2 produced by ZAS stimulated neutrophils was enhanced in the presence of extra-cellular calcium. However, the intracellular calcium antagonist, 8-(N,N-diethylamino)-octyl-(3,4,5-trimethoxy) benzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), caused a dose-related inhibition of ZAS -elicited O-2 production. Neutrophils pretreated with ZAS were desensitized to the subsequent exposure to this stimulus. The fact that pretreatment of neutrophils with ZAS did not diminish the capacity of these cells to generate O-2 in response to 1-O-hexadecyl/octadecyl-2-O-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (AGEPC),N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP) or 5(5),12(R)-dihydroxy-6,14-cis-8,10-trans-eicosatetraenoic acid (LTB4), demonstrates the stimulus specific nature of ZAS -induced desensitization. Thus, ZAS , which contains the complement-derived neutrophil activator, C5a, a naturally occurring phlogistic mediator, represents a relevant probe for investigating neutrophil function.

  10. A Potential Role for Acrolein in Neutrophil-Mediated Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Noerager, Brett D; Xu, Xin; Davis, Virginia A; Jones, Caleb W; Okafor, Svetlana; Whitehead, Alicia; Blalock, J Edwin; Jackson, Patricia L

    2015-12-01

    Neutrophils (PMNs) are key mediators of inflammatory processes throughout the body. In this study, we investigated the role of acrolein, a highly reactive aldehyde that is ubiquitously present in the environment and produced endogenously at sites of inflammation, in mediating PMN-mediated degradation of collagen facilitating proline-glycine-proline (PGP) production. We treated peripheral blood neutrophils with acrolein and analyzed cell supernatants and lysates for matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and prolyl endopeptidase (PE), assessed their ability to break down collagen and release PGP, and assayed for the presence of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) and its ability to degrade PGP. Acrolein treatment induced elevated production and functionality of collagen-degrading enzymes and generation of PGP fragments. Meanwhile, LTA4H levels and triaminopeptidase activity declined with increasing concentrations of acrolein thereby sparing PGP from enzymatic destruction. These findings suggest that acrolein exacerbates the acute inflammatory response mediated by neutrophils and sets the stage for chronic pulmonary and systemic inflammation.

  11. β2 integrin-mediated crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Gorina, Roser; Lyck, Ruth; Vestweber, Dietmar; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-01-01

    In acute neuroinflammatory states such as meningitis, neutrophils cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and contribute to pathological alterations of cerebral function. The mechanisms that govern neutrophil migration across the BBB are ill defined. Using live-cell imaging, we show that LPS-stimulated BBB endothelium supports neutrophil arrest, crawling, and diapedesis under physiological flow in vitro. Investigating the interactions of neutrophils from wild-type, CD11a(-/-), CD11b(-/-), and CD18(null) mice with wild-type, junctional adhesion molecule-A(-/-), ICAM-1(null), ICAM-2(-/-), or ICAM-1(null)/ICAM-2(-/-) primary mouse brain microvascular endothelial cells, we demonstrate that neutrophil arrest, polarization, and crawling required G-protein-coupled receptor-dependent activation of β2 integrins and binding to endothelial ICAM-1. LFA-1 was the prevailing ligand for endothelial ICAM-1 in mediating neutrophil shear resistant arrest, whereas Mac-1 was dominant over LFA-1 in mediating neutrophil polarization on the BBB in vitro. Neutrophil crawling was mediated by endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and neutrophil LFA-1 and Mac-1. In the absence of crawling, few neutrophils maintained adhesive interactions with the BBB endothelium by remaining either stationary on endothelial junctions or displaying transient adhesive interactions characterized by a fast displacement on the endothelium along the direction of flow. Diapedesis of stationary neutrophils was unchanged by the lack of endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 and occurred exclusively via the paracellular pathway. Crawling neutrophils, although preferentially crossing the BBB through the endothelial junctions, could additionally breach the BBB via the transcellular route. Thus, β2 integrin-mediated neutrophil crawling on endothelial ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 is a prerequisite for transcellular neutrophil diapedesis across the inflamed BBB.

  12. Human neutrophil leukocyte elastase activity is inhibited by Phenol Red

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity in urine, sputum and nasal mucous is used as an indicator of inflammation due to viral or bacterial infection. However, bovine nasal mucous neutrophils collected, lysed and stored in Dulbecco's minimal medium containing Phenol Red, showed no NE activity with methox...

  13. Inhibition by FK506 of formyl peptide-induced neutrophil activation and associated protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Burnett, D; Adams, D H; Martin, T J; Liu, Q; Grant, R A; Stockley, R A; Lord, J M

    1994-09-15

    The macrolide FK506 inhibited, by up to 50%, neutrophil migration and the production of the superoxide radical in response to the formyl peptide, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). The production of the superoxide radical in response to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was unaffected by FK506. The inhibition of neutrophil functions was accompanied by a partial reversal of FMLP-induced synthesis of cellular proteins, despite a rise in intracellular Ca2+. Neutrophils treated with FK506 demonstrated a small (average 23%) though significant decrease in formyl-peptide receptor numbers but receptor binding affinity was unaffected. The effects of FK506 on neutrophil activation appear to be analogous to those in T-lymphocytes. The incomplete inhibition, by FK506, of neutrophil responses suggests further that activation by FMLP is mediated via distinct multiple signalling pathways, including protein kinase activation and protein synthesis. The inability of FK506 to reduce FMLP-induced rises in cellular Ca2+ or PMA-induced activation of neutrophils suggests that its action is distal to Ca2+ mobilization and distinct from pathways relying on PKC activation. Thus the immunosuppressive effects of FK506 in vivo might be mediated through the inhibition of inflammatory cells other than lymphocytes and the drug therefore has therapeutic potential in a variety of inflammatory conditions. The drug also has potential in vitro for the characterization of signalling pathways from the plasma membrane to the nucleus.

  14. Neutrophil elastase induces inflammation and pain in mouse knee joints via activation of proteinase-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Muley, Milind M; Reid, Allison R; Botz, Bálint; Bölcskei, Kata; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; McDougall, Jason J

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophil elastase plays a crucial role in arthritis. Here, its potential in triggering joint inflammation and pain was assessed, and whether these effects were mediated by proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Neutrophil elastase (5 μg) was injected into the knee joints of mice and changes in blood perfusion, leukocyte kinetics and paw withdrawal threshold were assessed. Similar experiments were performed in animals pretreated with the neutrophil elastase inhibitor sivelestat, the PAR2 antagonist GB83, the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor U0126 and in PAR2 receptor knockout (KO) mice. Neutrophil elastase activity was also evaluated in arthritic joints by fluorescent imaging and sivelestat was assessed for anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Intra-articular injection of neutrophil elastase caused an increase in blood perfusion, leukocyte kinetics and a decrease in paw withdrawal threshold. Sivelestat treatment suppressed this effect. The PAR2 antagonist GB83 reversed neutrophil elastase-induced synovitis and pain and these responses were also attenuated in PAR2 KO mice. The MAPK inhibitor U0126 also blocked neutrophil elastase-induced inflammation and pain. Active neutrophil elastase was increased in acutely inflamed knees as shown by an activatable fluorescent probe. Sivelestat appeared to reduce neutrophil elastase activity, but had only a moderate anti-inflammatory effect in this model. Neutrophil elastase induced acute inflammation and pain in knee joints of mice. These changes are PAR2-dependent and appear to involve activation of a p44/42 MAPK pathway. Blocking neutrophil elastase, PAR2 and p44/42 MAPK activity can reduce inflammation and pain, suggesting their utility as therapeutic targets. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins

    PubMed Central

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P.; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections. PMID:27363812

  16. Neutrophils mediate Salmonella Typhimurium clearance through the GBP4 inflammasome-dependent production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Tyrkalska, Sylwia D; Candel, Sergio; Angosto, Diego; Gómez-Abellán, Victoria; Martín-Sánchez, Fátima; García-Moreno, Diana; Zapata-Pérez, Rubén; Sánchez-Ferrer, Álvaro; Sepulcre, María P; Pelegrín, Pablo; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-07-01

    Inflammasomes are cytosolic molecular platforms that alert the immune system about the presence of infection. Here we report that zebrafish guanylate-binding protein 4 (Gbp4), an IFNγ-inducible GTPase protein harbouring a C-terminal CARD domain, is required for the inflammasome-dependent clearance of Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) by neutrophils in vivo. Despite the presence of the CARD domain, Gbp4 requires the universal inflammasome adaptor Asc for mediating its antibacterial function. In addition, the GTPase activity of Gbp4 is indispensable for inflammasome activation and ST clearance. Mechanistically, neutrophils are recruited to the infection site through the inflammasome-independent production of the chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 8 and leukotriene B4, and then mediate bacterial clearance through the Gbp4 inflammasome-dependent biosynthesis of prostaglandin D2. Our results point to GBPs as key inflammasome adaptors required for prostaglandin biosynthesis and bacterial clearance by neutrophils and suggest that transient activation of the inflammasome may be used to treat bacterial infections.

  17. Nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in sickle cell disease painful crisis.

    PubMed

    Schimmel, Marein; Nur, Erfan; Biemond, Bart J; van Mierlo, Gerard J; Solati, Shabnam; Brandjes, Dees P; Otten, Hans-Martin; Schnog, John-John; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2013-11-01

    Activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils play an important role in the pathogenesis of vaso-occlusive painful sickle cell crisis. Upon activation, polymorphonuclear neutrophils can form neutrophil extracellular traps. Neutrophil extracellular traps consist of a meshwork of extracellular DNA, nucleosomes, histones and neutrophil proteases. Neutrophil extracellular traps have been demonstrated to be toxic to endothelial and parenchymal cells. This prospective cohort study was conducted to determine neutrophil extracellular trap formation in sickle cell patients during steady state and painful crisis. As a measure of neutrophil extracellular traps, plasma nucleosomes levels were determined and polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation was assessed measuring plasma levels of elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes in 74 patients in steady state, 70 patients during painful crisis, and 24 race-matched controls using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay. Nucleosome levels in steady state sickle cell patients were significantly higher than levels in controls. During painful crisis levels of both nucleosomes and elastase-α1-antitrypsin complexes increased significantly. Levels of nucleosomes correlated significantly to elastase-α1-antitrypsin complex levels during painful crisis, (Sr = 0.654, P<0.001). This was seen in both HbSS/HbSβ(0)-thalassemia (Sr=0.55, P<0.001) and HbSC/HbSβ(+-)thalassemia patients (Sr=0.90, P<0.001) during painful crisis. Levels of nucleosomes showed a correlation with length of hospital stay and were highest in patients with acute chest syndrome. These data support the concept that neutrophil extracellular trap formation and neutrophil activation may play a role in the pathogenesis of painful sickle cell crisis and acute chest syndrome.

  18. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced neutrophil ectosomes decrease macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Tonya Azevedo; Noronha-Dutra, Alberto Augusto; Nery, Joilda Silva; Ribeiro, Samantha Brum; Pitanga, Thassila Nogueira; Lapa E Silva, José R; Arruda, Sérgio; Boéchat, Neio

    2012-05-01

    The existence of ectosome-like microvesicles released by neutrophils was proposed a few decades ago. Other studies revealed that the innate immune response during mycobacterial infection is accompanied by an intense migration of neutrophils to the site of infection, which may be important during the acute phase of tuberculosis. We found that the ectosomes derived from infected neutrophils are biologically active and can influence the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within macrophages. Mycobacteria were cultured on supplemented Middlebrook-7H9 broth. All strains were grown to the exponential phase and quantitated by serial dilution. Human neutrophils and macrophages were infected with mycobacteria. Ectosomes from neutrophils were isolated post-infection and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To determine whether these microvesicles influenced mycobactericidal activity, mycobacteria-infected macrophages were treated with isolated ectosomes. Ectosomes were released from neutrophils infected with mycobacteria. These ectosomes were derived from neutrophil plasma membrane and a small proportion stained with PKH26. These microvesicles, when incubated with infected macrophages, influenced antimycobacterial activity. This is the first study to demonstrate that ectosomes that are shed from infected neutrophils influence mycobactericidal activity in macrophages in vitro, suggesting that these microvesicles have biological significance. Nevertheless, major gaps in our knowledge of microvesicle biology remain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Circulating platelet-neutrophil complexes are important for subsequent neutrophil activation and migration.

    PubMed

    Kornerup, Kristin N; Salmon, Gary P; Pitchford, Simon C; Liu, Wai L; Page, Clive P

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that platelets are essential for the migration of eosinophils into the lungs of allergic mice, and that this is dependent on the functional expression of platelet P-selectin. We sought to investigate whether the same is true for nonallergic, acute inflammatory stimuli administered to distinct anatomic compartments. Neutrophil trafficking was induced in two models, namely zymosan-induced peritonitis and LPS-induced lung inflammation, and the platelet dependence of these responses investigated utilizing mice rendered thrombocytopenic. The relative contribution of selectins was also investigated. The results presented herein clearly show that platelet depletion (>90%) significantly inhibits neutrophil recruitment in both models. In addition, we show that P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, but not P-selectin, is essential for neutrophil recruitment in mice in vivo, thus suggesting the existence of different regulatory mechanisms for the recruitment of leukocyte subsets in response to allergic and nonallergic stimuli. Further studies in human blood demonstrate that low-dose prothrombotic and pro-inflammatory stimuli (CCL17 or CCL22) synergize to induce platelet and neutrophil activation, as well as the formation of platelet-neutrophil conjugates. We conclude that adhesion between platelets and neutrophils in vivo is an important event in acute inflammatory responses. Targeting this interaction may be a successful strategy for inflammatory conditions where current therapy fails to provide adequate treatment.

  20. Luminol chemiluminescence and active oxygen generation by activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, R; Edashige, K; Sato, E F; Inoue, M; Matsuno, T; Utsumi, K

    1991-03-01

    Upon stimulation by various ligands and membrane perturbers, neutrophils produce various active oxygen species. Since luminol chemiluminescence (LCL) in neutrophils can be blocked by azide, an inhibitor of myeloperoxidase, LCL has been believed to reflect mainly the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed reaction. When cells were stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine, LCL was strongly inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD) and uric acid, a scavenger for hydroxy radical (.OH) and singlet oxygen, whereas it was stimulated by azide. LCL was also inhibited by .OH scavengers, such as mannitol, ethanol, and dimethylsulfoxide. However, when stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate or opsonized zymosan, LCL was strongly inhibited by azide but not by uric acid, and the inhibitory action of SOD was low. Thus, the qualitative and quantitative aspects of reactive oxygen generation by activated neutrophils differ significantly from one ligand to another. These results suggest that the metabolic fate of active oxygens in neutrophils and, hence, their effect on microorganisms and the surrounding tissues might differ depending on the stimulus.

  1. Activated protein C inhibits neutrophil extracellular trap formation in vitro and activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Healy, Laura D; Puy, Cristina; Fernández, José A; Mitrugno, Annachiara; Keshari, Ravi S; Taku, Nyiawung A; Chu, Tiffany T; Xu, Xiao; Gruber, András; Lupu, Florea; Griffin, John H; McCarty, Owen J T

    2017-04-13

    Activated protein C (APC) is a multi-functional serine protease with anticoagulant, cytoprotective, and anti-inflammatory activities. In addition to the cytoprotective effects of APC on endothelial cells, podocytes, and neurons, APC cleaves and detoxifies extracellular histones, a major component of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs promote pathogen clearance but also can lead to thrombosis; the pathways that negatively regulate NETosis are largely unknown. Thus, we studied whether APC is capable of directly inhibiting NETosis via receptor-mediated cell signaling mechanisms. Here, by quantifying extracellular DNA or myeloperoxidase, we demonstrate that APC binds human leukocytes and prevents activated platelet supernatant or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) from inducing NETosis. Of note, APC proteolytic activity was required for inhibiting NETosis. Moreover, antibodies against the neutrophil receptors endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), protease activated receptor 3 (PAR3), and macrophage-1 antigen (Mac-1) blocked APC inhibition of NETosis. Select mutations in the Gla and protease domains of recombinant APC caused a loss of NETosis. Interestingly, pretreatment of neutrophils with APC prior to induction of NETosis inhibited platelet adhesion to NETs. Lastly, in a non-human primate model of E. coli-induced sepsis, pre-treatment of animals with APC abrogated release of myeloperoxidase from neutrophils, a marker of neutrophil activation. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory function of APC at therapeutic concentrations may include the inhibition of NETosis in an EPCR-, PAR3-, and Mac-1-dependent manner, providing additional mechanistic insight into the diverse functions of neutrophils and APC in disease states including sepsis.

  2. Chloride transport in functionally active phagosomes isolated from Human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Martha L.; Painter, Richard G.; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Guoshun

    2012-01-01

    Chloride anion is critical for hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and microbial killing in neutrophil phagosomes. However, the molecular mechanism by which this anion is transported to the organelle is poorly understood. In this report, membrane-enclosed and functionally active phagosomes were isolated from human neutrophils by using opsonized paramagnetic latex microspheres and a rapid magnetic separation method. The phagosomes recovered were highly enriched for specific protein markers associated with this organelle such as lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1, myeloperoxidase (MPO), lactoferrin, and NADPH oxidase. When FITC–dextran was included in the phagocytosis medium, the majority of the isolated phagosomes retained the fluorescent label after isolation, indicative of intact membrane structure. Flow cytometric measurement of acridine orange, a fluorescent pH indicator, in the purified phagosomes demonstrated that the organelle in its isolated state was capable of transporting protons to the phagosomal lumen via the vacuolar-type ATPase proton pump (V-ATPase). When NADPH was supplied, the isolated phagosomes constitutively oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123, indicating their ability to produce hydrogen peroxide. The preparations also showed a robust production of HOCl within the phagosomal lumen when assayed with the HOCl-specific fluorescent probe R19-S by flow cytometry. MPO-mediated iodination of the proteins covalently conjugated to the phagocytosed beads was quantitatively measured. Phagosomal uptake of iodide and protein iodination were significantly blocked by chloride channel inhibitors, including CFTRinh-172 and NPPB. Further experiments determined that the V-ATPase-driving proton flux into the isolated phagosomes required chloride cotransport, and the cAMP-activated CFTR chloride channel was a major contributor to the chloride transport. Taken together, the data suggest that the phagosomal preparation described herein retains ion transport

  3. Swell activated chloride channel function in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Salmon, Michael D.; Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2009-04-17

    Non-excitable cells such as neutrophil granulocytes are the archetypal inflammatory immune cell involved in critical functions of the innate immune system. The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential. For continuous function of the NADPH oxidase, I{sub e} has to be balanced to preserve electroneutrality, if not; sufficient depolarisation would prevent electrons from leaving the cell and neutrophil function would be abrogated. Subsequently, the depolarisation generated by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase I{sub e} must be counteracted by ion transport. The finding that depolarisation required counter-ions to compensate electron transport was followed by the observation that chloride channels activated by swell can counteract the NADPH oxidase membrane depolarisation. In this mini review, we discuss the research findings that revealed the essential role of swell activated chloride channels in human neutrophil function.

  4. Involvement of BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in leukotriene B4-induced neutrophil degranulation.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Thompson, Charles; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-03-15

    One of the important biological activities of human neutrophils is degranulation, which can be induced by leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we investigated the intracellular signaling events involved in neutrophil degranulation mediated by the high affinity LTB4 receptor, BLT1. Peripheral blood neutrophils as well as the promyeloid PLB-985 cell line, stably transfected with BLT1 cDNA and differentiated into a neutrophil-like cell phenotype, were used throughout this study. LTB4-induced enzyme release was inhibited by 50-80% when cells were pretreated with the pharmacological inhibitors of endocytosis sucrose, Con A and NH4Cl. In addition, transient transfection with a dominant negative form of dynamin (K44A) resulted in approximately 70% inhibition of ligand-induced degranulation. Pretreating neutrophils or BLT1-expressing PLB-985 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 resulted in a 30-60% inhibition in BLT1-mediated degranulation. Yes kinase, but not c-Src, Fgr, Hck, or Lyn, was found to exhibit up-regulated kinase activity after LTB4 stimulation. Moreover, BLT1 endocytosis was found to be necessary for Yes kinase activation in neutrophils. LTB4-induced degranulation was also sensitive to inhibition of PI3K. In contrast, it was not affected by inhibition of the mitogen-activated protein kinase MEK kinase, the Janus kinases, or the receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Taken together, our results suggest an essential role for BLT1 endocytosis and Yes kinase activation in LTB4-mediated degranulation of human neutrophils.

  5. Structural divergence of GPI-80 in activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Takeda, Yuji; Yoshitake, Hiroshi; Sendo, Fujiro; Araki, Yoshihiko

    2007-07-27

    GPI-80 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein that is mainly expressed in human neutrophils. Previous studies using 3H9, a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against GPI-80, suggested that GPI-80 regulates leukocyte adherence and migration through Mac-1. GPI-80, which is anchored at the plasma membrane in resting neutrophils, moves into the pseudopodia and is released from activated human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophil activation affects GPI-80 dynamics using a new anti-GPI-80 mAb, designated 4D4, which is directed against the form of GPI-80 found on resting human neutrophils. Similar to 3H9, 4D4 influences Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion. Treatment of purified GPI-80 with periodic acid and trypsin indicated that 3H9 and 4D4 recognize peptide and carbohydrate moieties, respectively. Stimulation with fMLP decreased the binding of 4D4 to GPI-80 on the neutrophil surface but increased the overall expression of GPI-80, as visualized by the 3H9 signal. Confocal laser microscopy revealed the 4D4 signal mainly on cell bodies and at a low level on pseudopodia during migration toward increasing concentrations of fMLP, whereas the 3H9 signal was observed in both areas. In addition, soluble GPI-80 released from activated neutrophils did not bind 4D4. These results suggest that there are two populations of GPI-80 that differ in the ability to bind 4D4. The 4D4-recognized form may regulate Mac-1-dependent neutrophil adhesion, and may subsequently be converted to a 4D4-unrecognized form during neutrophil activation.

  6. A Lipid Mediator Hepoxilin A3 Is a Natural Inducer of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Douda, David N.; Grasemann, Hartmut; Pace-Asciak, Cecil

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis airways are accompanied by inflammation, neutrophilia, and mucous thickening. Cystic fibrosis sputum contains a large amount of uncleared DNA contributed by neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation from neutrophils. The exact mechanisms of the induction of NETosis in cystic fibrosis airways remain unclear, especially in uninfected lungs of patients with early cystic fibrosis lung disease. Here we show that Hepoxilin A3, a proinflammatory eicosanoid, and the synthetic analog of Hepoxilin B3, PBT-3, directly induce NETosis in human neutrophils. Furthermore, we show that Hepoxilin A3-mediated NETosis is NADPH-oxidase-dependent at lower doses of Hepoxilin A3, while it is NADPH-oxidase-independent at higher doses. Together, these results demonstrate that Hepoxilin A3 is a previously unrecognized inducer of NETosis in cystic fibrosis lungs and may represent a new therapeutic target for treating cystic fibrosis and other inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:25784781

  7. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection

    PubMed Central

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J.; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J.; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Hickey, Michael J.; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in post-capillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we show that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor alpha-hemolysin lyses perivascular macrophages leading to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin, and indicate that Staphylococcus aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy. PMID:24270515

  8. Perivascular macrophages mediate neutrophil recruitment during bacterial skin infection.

    PubMed

    Abtin, Arby; Jain, Rohit; Mitchell, Andrew J; Roediger, Ben; Brzoska, Anthony J; Tikoo, Shweta; Cheng, Qiang; Ng, Lai Guan; Cavanagh, Lois L; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Hickey, Michael J; Firth, Neville; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of neutrophils in postcapillary venules is a key event in the inflammatory response against pathogens and tissue damage. The precise regulation of this process is incompletely understood. We report that perivascular macrophages are critical for neutrophil migration into skin infected with the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Using multiphoton intravital microscopy we showed that neutrophils extravasate from inflamed dermal venules in close proximity to perivascular macrophages, which are a major source of neutrophil chemoattractants. The virulence factor α-hemolysin produced by S. aureus lyses perivascular macrophages, which leads to decreased neutrophil transmigration. Our data illustrate a previously unrecognized role for perivascular macrophages in neutrophil recruitment to inflamed skin and indicate that S. aureus uses hemolysin-dependent killing of these cells as an immune evasion strategy.

  9. miR-21-mediated decreased neutrophil apoptosis is a determinant of impaired coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, Rebecca; Terry, Russell; Hutcheson, Brenda; Jadhav, Rashmi; Chaplin, Jennifer; Smith, Erika; Barrington, Robert; Proctor, Spencer D.

    2015-01-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome. microRNA-21 (miR-21) is a proproliferative and antiapoptotic miR, which we showed to be elevated in metabolic syndrome. Here we investigate whether impaired CCG in metabolic syndrome involved miR-21-mediated aberrant apoptosis. Normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) and metabolic syndrome [J. C. Russel (JCR)] rats underwent transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion [repetitive ischemia (RI)]. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2, phospho-Bad, and Bcl-2/Bax dimers were increased on days 6 and 9 RI, and proapoptotic Bax and Bax/Bax dimers and cytochrome-c release concurrently decreased in JCR versus SD rats. Active caspases were decreased in JCR versus SD rats (∼50%). Neutrophils increased transiently on day 3 RI in the collateral-dependent zone of SD rats but remained elevated in JCR rats, paralleling miR-21 expression. miR-21 downregulation by anti-miR-21 induced neutrophil apoptosis and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax dimers (∼75%) while increasing Bax/Bax dimers, cytochrome-c release, and caspase activation (∼70, 400, and 400%). Anti-miR-21 also improved CCG in JCR rats (∼60%). Preventing neutrophil infiltration with blocking antibodies resulted in equivalent CCG recovery, confirming a major role for deregulated neutrophil apoptosis in CCG impairment. Neutrophil and miR-21-dependent CCG inhibition was in significant part mediated by increased oxidative stress. We conclude that neutrophil apoptosis is integral to normal CCG and that inappropriate prolonged miR-21-mediated survival of neutrophils plays a major role in impaired CCG, in part via oxidative stress generation. PMID:25840830

  10. miR-21-mediated decreased neutrophil apoptosis is a determinant of impaired coronary collateral growth in metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, Rebecca; Terry, Russell; Hutcheson, Brenda; Jadhav, Rashmi; Chaplin, Jennifer; Smith, Erika; Barrington, Robert; Proctor, Spencer D; Rocic, Petra

    2015-06-01

    Coronary collateral growth (CCG) is impaired in metabolic syndrome. microRNA-21 (miR-21) is a proproliferative and antiapoptotic miR, which we showed to be elevated in metabolic syndrome. Here we investigate whether impaired CCG in metabolic syndrome involved miR-21-mediated aberrant apoptosis. Normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) and metabolic syndrome [J. C. Russel (JCR)] rats underwent transient, repetitive coronary artery occlusion [repetitive ischemia (RI)]. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2, phospho-Bad, and Bcl-2/Bax dimers were increased on days 6 and 9 RI, and proapoptotic Bax and Bax/Bax dimers and cytochrome-c release concurrently decreased in JCR versus SD rats. Active caspases were decreased in JCR versus SD rats (~50%). Neutrophils increased transiently on day 3 RI in the collateral-dependent zone of SD rats but remained elevated in JCR rats, paralleling miR-21 expression. miR-21 downregulation by anti-miR-21 induced neutrophil apoptosis and decreased Bcl-2 and Bcl-2/Bax dimers (~75%) while increasing Bax/Bax dimers, cytochrome-c release, and caspase activation (~70, 400, and 400%). Anti-miR-21 also improved CCG in JCR rats (~60%). Preventing neutrophil infiltration with blocking antibodies resulted in equivalent CCG recovery, confirming a major role for deregulated neutrophil apoptosis in CCG impairment. Neutrophil and miR-21-dependent CCG inhibition was in significant part mediated by increased oxidative stress. We conclude that neutrophil apoptosis is integral to normal CCG and that inappropriate prolonged miR-21-mediated survival of neutrophils plays a major role in impaired CCG, in part via oxidative stress generation.

  11. P-selectin must extend a sufficient length from the plasma membrane to mediate rolling of neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Under physiological shear stress, neutrophils roll on P-selectin on activated endothelial cells or platelets through interactions with P- selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1). Both P-selectin and PSGL-1 are extended molecules. Human P-selectin contains an NH2-terminal lectin domain, an EGF domain, nine consensus repeats (CRs), a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tail. To determine whether the length of P- selectin affected its interactions with PSGL-1, we examined the adhesion of neutrophils to CHO cells expressing membrane-anchored P- selectin constructs in which various numbers of CRs were deleted. Under static conditions, neutrophils attached equivalently to wild-type P- selectin and to constructs containing from 2-6 CRs. Under shear stress, neutrophils attached equivalently to wild-type and 6 CR P-selectin and nearly as well to 5 CR P-selectin. However, fewer neutrophils attached to the 4 CR construct, and those that did attach rolled faster and were more readily detached by increasing shear stress. Flowing neutrophils failed to attach to the 3 CR and 2 CR constructs. Neutrophils attached and rolled more efficiently on 4 CR P-selectin expressed on glycosylation-defective Lec8 CHO cells, which have less glycocalyx. We conclude that P-selectin must project its lectin domain well above the membrane to mediate optimal attachment of neutrophils under shear forces. The length of P-selectin may: (a) facilitate interactions with PSGL-1 on flowing neutrophils, and (b) increase the intermembrane distance where specific bonds form, minimizing contacts between the glycocalyces that result in cell-cell repulsion. PMID:8557755

  12. Stress-induced adaptation of neutrophilic granulocyte activity in K and R3 carp lines.

    PubMed

    Pijanowski, L; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M L; Irnazarow, I; Chadzinska, M

    2015-12-01

    Both in mammals and fish, stress induces remarkable changes in the immune response. We focused on stress-induced changes in the activity of neutrophilic granulocytes in the R3 and K lines of common carp, which showed differential stress responses. Our study clearly demonstrates that a prolonged restraint stress differentially affects the activity of K and R3 carp neutrophils. In the K line, stress decreased the respiratory burst, while in the R3 line it reduced the release of extracellular DNA. Surprisingly, the stress-induced changes in ROS production and NET formation did not correlate with changes in gene expression of the inflammatory mediators and GR receptors. In neutrophilic granulocytes from K carp, gene expression of the stress-sensitive cortisol GR1 receptor was significantly higher than in neutrophils from R3 fish, which will make these cells more sensitive to high levels of cortisol. Moreover, upon stress, neutrophilic granulocytes of K carp up-regulated gene expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 while this was not observed in neutrophilic granulocytes of R3 carp. Therefore, we can hypothesize that, in contrast to R3 neutrophils, the more cortisol sensitive neutrophils from K carp respond to stress with up-regulation of IL-10 and consequently reduction of ROS production. Most probably the ROS-independent NET formation in K carp is not regulated by this anti-inflammatory cytokine. These data may indicate a predominantly ROS-independent formation of NETs by carp neutrophilic granulocytes. Moreover, they underline the important role of IL-10 in stress-induced immunoregulation.

  13. GPCR-mediated PLCβγ/PKCβ/PKD signaling pathway regulates the cofilin phosphatase slingshot 2 in neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Gera, Nidhi; Li, Hongyan; Yun, Michelle; Zhang, Liyong; Wang, Youhong; Wang, Q. Jane; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis requires precisely coordinated polymerization and depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton at leading fronts of migrating cells. However, GPCR activation-controlled F-actin depolymerization remains largely elusive. Here, we reveal a novel signaling pathway, including Gαi, PLC, PKCβ, protein kinase D (PKD), and SSH2, in control of cofilin phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal reorganization, which is essential for neutrophil chemotaxis. We show that PKD is essential for neutrophil chemotaxis and that GPCR-mediated PKD activation depends on PLC/PKC signaling. More importantly, we discover that GPCR activation recruits/activates PLCγ2 in a PI3K-dependent manner. We further verify that PKCβ specifically interacts with PKD1 and is required for chemotaxis. Finally, we identify slingshot 2 (SSH2), a phosphatase of cofilin (actin depolymerization factor), as a target of PKD1 that regulates cofilin phosphorylation and remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton during neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:25568344

  14. LFA-1 is sufficient in mediating neutrophil emigration in Mac-1-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, H; Smith, C W; Perrard, J; Bullard, D; Tang, L; Shappell, S B; Entman, M L; Beaudet, A L; Ballantyne, C M

    1997-01-01

    To better define the specific function of Mac-1 (CD11b) versus LFA-1 (CD11a) and the other CD11 integrins in vivo, we have disrupted murine CD11b by targeted homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells and generated mice which are homozygous for a mutation in CD11b. A null mutation was confirmed by Southern blotting, RNase protection assay, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry. Neutrophils isolated from mice deficient in Mac-1 were defective in adherence to keyhole limpet hemocyanin-coated glass, iC3b-mediated phagocytosis, and homotypic aggregation. When challenged by thioglycollate intraperitoneally, Mac-1-deficient mice had similar levels of neutrophil accumulation in the peritoneal cavity at 1, 2, and 4 h. Treatment with mAb to LFA-1 blocked 78% of neutrophil accumulation in Mac-1-deficient mice and 58% in wild-type mice. Neutrophil emigration into the peritoneal cavity 16 h after the implantation of fibrinogen-coated disks was not reduced in Mac-1-deficient mice whereas neutrophil adhesion to the fibrinogen-coated disks was reduced by > 90%. Neutrophils from Mac-1-deficient mice also showed reduced degranulation. Our results demonstrate that Mac-1 plays a critical role in mediating binding of neutrophils to fibrinogen and neutrophil degranulation, but is not necessary for effective neutrophil emigration, which is more dependent upon LFA-1. PMID:9077544

  15. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis 19-kDa lipoprotein promotes neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Neufert, C; Pai, R K; Noss, E H; Berger, M; Boom, W H; Harding, C V

    2001-08-01

    Certain microbial substances, e.g., LPS, can activate neutrophils or prime them to enhance their response to other activating agents, e.g., fMLP. We investigated the role of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) 19-kDa lipoprotein in activation of human neutrophils. MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein initiated phenotypic changes characteristic of neutrophil activation, including down-regulation of CD62 ligand (L-selectin) and up-regulation of CD35 (CR1) and CD11b/CD18 (CR3, Mac-1). In addition, exposure of neutrophils to MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein enhanced the subsequent oxidative burst in response to fMLP as assessed by oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (determined by flow cytometry). LPS also produced these effects with similar kinetics, but an oligodeoxynucleotide containing a CpG motif failed to induce any priming or activation response. Although the effects of LPS required the presence of serum, neutrophil activation by MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein occurred independently of serum factors, suggesting the involvement of different receptors and signaling mechanisms for LPS and MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein. Thus, MTB 19-kDa lipoprotein serves as a pathogen-associated molecular pattern that promotes neutrophil priming and activation.

  17. The Novel Functions of the PLC/PKC/PKD Signaling Axis in G Protein-Coupled Receptor-Mediated Chemotaxis of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xuehua; Jin, Tian

    2015-01-01

    Chemotaxis, a directional cell migration guided by extracellular chemoattractant gradients, plays an essential role in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation. Chemotaxis is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Extracellular stimuli trigger activation of the PLC/PKC/PKD signaling axis, which controls several signaling pathways. Here, we concentrate on the novel functions of PLC/PKC/PKD signaling in GPCR-mediated chemotaxis of neutrophils. PMID:26605346

  18. Involvement of nitric oxide donor compounds in the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klink, Magdalena; Cedzyński, Maciej; St Swierzko, Anna; Tchórzewski, Henryk; Sulowska, Zofia

    2003-04-01

    The bactericidal activity of human neutrophils against extracellular and facultatively intracellular bacteria was studied in the presence of the nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1), a molsidomine metabolite. SNP and molsidomine are drugs commonly used as nitrovasodilators in coronary heart disease. It is demonstrated here that the NO donor compounds themselves did not affect the viability and survival of the bacterial strains tested. Neither SNP nor SIN-1 had any effect on the process of bacteria ingestion. In contrast, NO donors enhanced the ability of neutrophils to kill Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Salmonella Anatum. However, strains differed in their susceptibility to SNP- and SIN-1-mediated killing by neutrophils. Removal of the superoxide anion reduced the bactericidal activity of SNP- and SIN-1-treated neutrophils against E. coli and S. Anatum. This suggests that the NO derivatives formed in the reaction of NO generated from donors with the reactive oxygen species released by phagocytosed neutrophils potentiate the bactericidal activity of human neutrophils in vitro. The above original observation discussed here suggests clinical significance for the treatment of patients with nitrovasodilators in the course of coronary heart disease therapy.

  19. Resistance of Enterococcus faecium to neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Arduino, R C; Jacques-Palaz, K; Murray, B E; Rakita, R M

    1994-01-01

    During a previous study of the opsonic requirements for neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte [PMN])-mediated killing of enterococci, we identified two strains of Enterococcus faecium (TX0015 and TX0016) that were resistant to PMN-mediated killing. To better define the mechanism of this resistance, we examined phagocytosis with a fluorescence assay and found that TX0016 was completely resistant to phagocytosis by PMNs; this finding was confirmed by electron microscopy. Examination of multiple strains of enterococci revealed that all 20 strains of Enterococcus faecalis tested were readily phagocytosed (mean, 18 intracellular organisms per PMN; range, 7 to 28). In contrast, only 13 (50%) of 26 strains of E. faecium tested were susceptible to phagocytosis (> or = 7 organisms per PMN); the other 13 strains showed < or = 3 organisms per PMN. Enterococcus casseliflavus ATCC 25788 and one strain of Enterococcus hirae were also resistant to phagocytosis, while two strains of Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus mundtii ATCC 43186, and one strain each of Enterococcus raffinosus and Enterococcus solitarius were readily phagocytosed. Exposure of E. faecium TX0016 to sodium periodate, but not to the protease trypsin or pronase or to phospholipase C, eliminated resistance to phagocytosis. Sialic acid, a common periodate-sensitive structure used by microorganisms to resist opsonization, could not be demonstrated in E. faecium TX0016 by the thiobarbituric acid method, nor was phagocytosis of TX0016 altered by neuraminidase treatment. This study suggests that there is a difference in susceptibility to phagocytosis by PMNs between different species of enterococci and that a carbohydrate-containing moiety which is not sialic acid may be involved in the resistance of E. faecium TX0016 to phagocytosis. Images PMID:7960141

  20. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  1. Participation of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) in neutrophil transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Pliyev, Boris K; Antonova, Olga A; Menshikov, Mikhail

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying migration of neutrophils across endothelium are not completely understood. The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) plays a key role in neutrophil adhesion and migration. In the present study, we addressed whether uPAR regulates neutrophil transendothelial migration. We first showed that siRNA-mediated knockdown of uPAR in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) did not affect neutrophil migration across HUVEC monolayers indicating that endothelial uPAR does not regulate neutrophil transmigration. In contrast, the transmigration was significantly inhibited by Fab' fragment of anti-uPAR monoclonal antibody and proteolytically inactive urokinase (uPA), whereas inhibition of proteolytical activity of endogenous uPA (with amiloride or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1) did not affect the transmigration. Both the anti-uPAR Fab' fragment and proteolytically inactive uPA did not exert significant effects upon the transmigration conducted in the presence of F(ab')(2) fragment of blocking antibody to integrin Mac-1 indicating that uPAR regulates Mac-1-dependent transmigration. Mac-1-dependent, but not Mac-1-independent, transmigration was significantly reduced in the presence of N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and d-mannose, the saccharides that disrupt uPAR/Mac-1 association, but was unaffected in the presence of control saccharides (d-sorbitol and sucrose). We conclude that physical association of uPAR with Mac-1 mediates the regulatory effect of uPAR over the transmigration. Finally, we provide evidence that the functional cooperation between uPAR and Mac-1 is essential at both adhesion and diapedesis steps of neutrophil migration across endothelium. Thus, uPAR expressed on neutrophil plasma membrane regulates transendothelial migration independently of uPA proteolytical activity and acting as a cofactor for integrin Mac-1.

  2. TLR2 Elicits IL-17-Mediated RANKL Expression, IL-17, and OPG Production in Neutrophils from Arthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milanova, Viktoriya; Ivanovska, Nina

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the ability of neutrophils to express receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), to secrete osteoprotegerin (OPG), and to produce IL-17. Arthritis was induced by intra-articular injection of zymosan, a ligand for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Frequencies of neutrophils in bone marrow (BM), blood and synovial fluid (SF), receptor expression, and cytokine production were evaluated by flow cytometry. 1A8 antibody (1A8 Ab) was used to deplete neutrophils in zymosan-injected SCID mice. IL-17, RANKL, and OPG amounts in SF, serum, or cell cultures were determined by ELISA. The development of arthritis was associated with increased secretion of IL-17, RANKL, and OPG in serum and SF, elevated frequencies of Ly6G+CD11b+ cells in BM, blood, and SF and upregulated RANKL expression. Both IL-17 and OPG were absent in serum and SF after neutrophil depletion; therefore we assume that they were released by neutrophils. In vitro blood Ly6G+CD11b+ cells from arthritic mice produced spontaneously IL-17, IFN-γ, and OPG and expressed RANKL. This phenotype was sustained by IL-17. TLR2 engagement increased IL-17 and IFN-γ production, potentiated IL-17-mediated RANKL expression, and inhibited OPG secretion. We conclude that TLR2 regulates the destructive potential of neutrophils and its targeting might limit joint alterations in arthritis. PMID:24757287

  3. Interleukin-6 stimulates neutrophil production of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Moore, F A; Barnett, C C; Silliman, C C; Peterson, V M

    1996-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an integral mediator of the acute phase response to injury and infection; an exaggerated IL-6 response has been associated with adverse clinical events. The precise role of IL-6 is unclear, but it appears capable of modulating the functional repertoire of mature neutrophils (PMNs). Our previous work demonstrated that IL-6 -stimulated PMNs are primed by lower concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF) than nonstimulated PMNs. Recently, we have found that IL-6 suppresses PMN apoptosis via a PAF-like mechanism. We hypothesized that IL-6 stimulates PMNs to produce PAF. PMNs isolated from healthy human donors were incubated with IL-6 (0.1-100 ng/ml) at 37 degrees C. Lipid production was measured by use of thin-layer chromatography, and PAF quantitated with a scintillation proximity assay. IL-6 (1 and 10 ng/ml) stimulated PMNs to produce increase quantities of PAF. PAF production was associated with an increase in PMN cytosolic calcium. These data may provide mechanistic insight into IL-6 regulation of PMN-mediated cytotoxicity and the role of PAF in mediating IL-6 effects on PMNs.

  4. Local Generation of Kynurenines Mediates Inhibition of Neutrophil Chemotaxis by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A.; Yarbrough, Melanie L.; Tiemann, Kristin M.

    2016-01-01

    During epithelial infections, pathogenic bacteria employ an array of strategies to attenuate and evade host immune responses, including the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; neutrophils). Among the most common bacterial infections in humans are those of the urinary tract, caused chiefly by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). During the establishment of bacterial cystitis, UPEC suppresses innate responses via multiple independent strategies. We recently described UPEC attenuation of PMN trafficking to the urinary bladder through pathogen-specific local induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolic enzyme previously shown to have regulatory activity only in adaptive immunity. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which IDO induction attenuates PMN migration. Local tryptophan limitation, by which IDO is known to influence T cell longevity and proliferation, was not involved in its effect on PMN trafficking. Instead, metabolites in the IDO pathway, particularly l-kynurenine, directly suppressed PMN transepithelial migration and induced an attached, spread morphology in PMN both at rest and in the presence of chemotactic stimuli. Finally, kynurenines represent known ligands of the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and UPEC infection of Ahr−/− mice recapitulated the derepressed PMN recruitment observed previously in Ido1−/− mice. UPEC therefore suppresses neutrophil migration early in bacterial cystitis by eliciting an IDO-mediated increase in local production of kynurenines, which act through the AHR to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:26857571

  5. Local Generation of Kynurenines Mediates Inhibition of Neutrophil Chemotaxis by Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Loughman, Jennifer A; Yarbrough, Melanie L; Tiemann, Kristin M; Hunstad, David A

    2016-04-01

    During epithelial infections, pathogenic bacteria employ an array of strategies to attenuate and evade host immune responses, including the influx of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN; neutrophils). Among the most common bacterial infections in humans are those of the urinary tract, caused chiefly by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). During the establishment of bacterial cystitis, UPEC suppresses innate responses via multiple independent strategies. We recently described UPEC attenuation of PMN trafficking to the urinary bladder through pathogen-specific local induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolic enzyme previously shown to have regulatory activity only in adaptive immunity. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which IDO induction attenuates PMN migration. Local tryptophan limitation, by which IDO is known to influence T cell longevity and proliferation, was not involved in its effect on PMN trafficking. Instead, metabolites in the IDO pathway, particularly L-kynurenine, directly suppressed PMN transepithelial migration and induced an attached, spread morphology in PMN both at rest and in the presence of chemotactic stimuli. Finally, kynurenines represent known ligands of the mammalian aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), and UPEC infection of Ahr(-/-)mice recapitulated the derepressed PMN recruitment observed previously in Ido1(-/-)mice. UPEC therefore suppresses neutrophil migration early in bacterial cystitis by eliciting an IDO-mediated increase in local production of kynurenines, which act through the AHR to impair neutrophil chemotaxis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. FOXO1 Regulates Bacteria-Induced Neutrophil Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Guangyu; Song, Liang; Tian, Chen; Wang, Yu; Miao, Fang; Zheng, Jiabao; Lu, Chanyi; Alsadun, Sarah; Graves, Dana T.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the innate immune response to microbial infection and are particularly important in clearing bacterial infection. We investigated the role of the transcription factor FOXO1 in the response of neutrophils to bacterial challenge with Porphyromonas gingivalis in vivo and in vitro. In these experiments, the effect of lineage-specific FOXO1 deletion in LyzM.Cre+FOXO1L/L mice was compared with matched littermate controls. FOXO1 deletion negatively affected several critical aspects of neutrophil function in vivo including mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow (BM) to the vasculature, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of bacterial inoculation, and clearance of bacteria. In vitro FOXO1 regulated neutrophil chemotaxis and bacterial killing. Moreover, bacteria-induced expression of CXCR2 and CD11b, which are essential for several aspects of neutrophil function, was dependent on FOXO1 in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, FOXO1 directly interacted with the promoter regions of CXCR2 and CD11b. Bacteria-induced nuclear localization of FOXO1 was dependent upon toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and/or TLR4 and was significantly reduced by inhibitors of reactive oxygen species (ROS and nitric oxide synthase) and deacetylases (Sirt1 and histone deacetylases). These studies show for the first time that FOXO1 activation by bacterial challenge is needed to mobilize neutrophils to transit from the BM to peripheral tissues in response to infection as well as for bacterial clearance in vivo. Moreover, FOXO1 regulates neutrophil function that facilitates chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bacterial killing. PMID:28928749

  7. 4-Methylcoumarin Derivatives Inhibit Human Neutrophil Oxidative Metabolism and Elastase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fuzissaki, Carolina N.; Andrade, Micássio F.; Azzolini, Ana Elisa C.S.; Taleb-Contini, Silvia H.; Vermelho, Roberta B.; Lopes, João Luis C.; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Increased neutrophil activation significantly contributes to the tissue damage in inflammatory illnesses; this phenomenon has motivated the search for new compounds to modulate their effector functions. Coumarins are natural products that are widely consumed in the human diet. We have evaluated the antioxidant and immunomodulator potential of five 4-methylcoumarin derivatives. We found that the 4-methylcoumarin derivatives inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species by human neutrophils triggered by serum-opsonized zymosan or phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate; this inhibition occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, as revealed by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assays. Cytotoxicity did not mediate this inhibitory effect. The 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin suppressed the neutrophil oxidative metabolism more effectively than the 6,7- and 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins, but the 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins were less effective than their hydroxylated counterparts. An analysis of the biochemical pathways suggested that the 6,7- and 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarins inhibit the protein kinase C-mediated signaling pathway, but 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, as well as 5,7- and 7,8-diacetoxy-4-methylcoumarins do not significantly interfere in this pathway of the activation of the human neutrophil oxidative metabolism. The 4-methylcoumarin derivatives bearing the catechol group suppressed the elastase and myeloperoxidase activity and reduced the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical the most strongly. Interestingly, the 5,7-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin scavenged hypochlorous acid more effectively than the o-dihydroxy-substituted 4-methylcoumarin derivatives, and the diacetoxylated 4-methylcoumarin derivatives scavenged hypochlorous acid as effectively as the 7,8-dihydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The significant influence of small structural modifications in the inhibitory potential of 4-methylcoumarin derivatives on the

  8. Endocytosis is required for exocytosis and priming of respiratory burst activity in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Creed, T Michael; Tandon, Shweta; Ward, Richard A; McLeish, Kenneth R

    2017-06-21

    Neutrophil generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is enhanced by exposure to pro-inflammatory agents in a process termed priming. Priming is depending on exocytosis of neutrophil granules and p47(phox) phosphorylation-dependent translocation of cytosolic NADPH oxidase components. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis was recently reported to be necessary for priming, but the mechanism linking endocytosis to priming was not identified. The present study examined the hypothesis that endocytosis regulates neutrophil priming by controlling granule exocytosis. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis by isolated human neutrophils was inhibited by chlorpromazine, monodansylcadaverine, and sucrose. Exocytosis of granule subsets was measured as release of granule components by ELISA or chemiluminescence. ROS generation was measured as extracellular release of superoxide as reduction of ferrocytochrome c. p38 MAPK activation and p47(phox) phosphorylation were measured by immunoblot analysis. Statistical analysis was performed using a one-way ANOVA with the Tukey-Kramer multiple-comparison test. Inhibition of endocytosis prevented priming of superoxide release by TNFα and inhibited TNFα stimulation and priming of exocytosis of all four granule subsets. Inhibition of endocytosis did not reduce TNFα-stimulated p38 MAPK activation or p47(phox) phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity blocked TNFα stimulation of secretory vesicle and gelatinase granule exocytosis. Endocytosis is linked to priming of respiratory burst activity through ROS-mediated control of granule exocytosis.

  9. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  10. Guinea Pig Neutrophils Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis Produce Cytokines Which Activate Alveolar Macrophages in Noncontact Cultures▿

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Kirti V.; McMurray, David N.

    2007-01-01

    The early influx of neutrophils to the site of infection may be an important step in host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of M. tuberculosis infection on the ability of guinea pig neutrophils to produce interleukin-8 (IL-8; CXCL8) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and to activate alveolar macrophages. Neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were isolated from naïve guinea pigs, cultured together or alone, and infected with virulent M. tuberculosis for 3, 12, and 24 h. IL-8 protein production in cocultures, as measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was found to be additive at 24 h and significantly greater in M. tuberculosis-infected cocultures than in uninfected cocultures and in cultures of the infected neutrophils or macrophages alone. The IL-8 mRNA levels, determined by real-time reverse transcription-PCR, were elevated at 24 h in infected cocultures and infected cells cultured alone. In order to elucidate the contributions of neutrophils and their soluble mediators to the activation of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils and alveolar macrophages were cultured in a contact-independent manner by using a Transwell insert system. Neutrophils were infected with virulent M. tuberculosis in the upper wells, and alveolar macrophages were cultured in the lower wells. The release of hydrogen peroxide from alveolar macrophages exposed to soluble products from infected neutrophils was significantly increased compared to that from unexposed alveolar macrophages. Significant up-regulation of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA levels in alveolar macrophages was observed at 24 and 30 h, respectively, compared to those in cells not exposed to soluble neutrophil products. Treatment with anti-guinea pig TNF-α polyclonal antibody completely abolished the response of alveolar macrophages to neutrophil products. This finding suggests that TNF-α produced by infected neutrophils may be involved in the activation of

  11. Very-late-antigen-4 (VLA-4)-mediated brain invasion by neutrophils leads to interactions with microglia, increased ischemic injury and impaired behavior in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Jens; Riek-Burchardt, Monika; Herz, Josephine; Doeppner, Thorsten R; König, Rebecca; Hütten, Heiko; Etemire, Eloho; Männ, Linda; Klingberg, Anika; Fischer, Thomas; Görtler, Michael W; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Reichardt, Peter; Schraven, Burkhart; Hermann, Dirk M; Reymann, Klaus G; Gunzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal injury from ischemic stroke is aggravated by invading peripheral immune cells. Early infiltrates of neutrophil granulocytes and T-cells influence the outcome of stroke. So far, however, neither the timing nor the cellular dynamics of neutrophil entry, its consequences for the invaded brain area, or the relative importance of T-cells has been extensively studied in an intravital setting. Here, we have used intravital two-photon microscopy to document neutrophils and brain-resident microglia in mice after induction of experimental stroke. We demonstrated that neutrophils immediately rolled, firmly adhered, and transmigrated at sites of endothelial activation in stroke-affected brain areas. The ensuing neutrophil invasion was associated with local blood-brain barrier breakdown and infarct formation. Brain-resident microglia recognized both endothelial damage and neutrophil invasion. In a cooperative manner, they formed cytoplasmic processes to physically shield activated endothelia and trap infiltrating neutrophils. Interestingly, the systemic blockade of very-late-antigen-4 immediately and very effectively inhibited the endothelial interaction and brain entry of neutrophils. This treatment thereby strongly reduced the ischemic tissue injury and effectively protected the mice from stroke-associated behavioral impairment. Behavioral preservation was also equally well achieved with the antibody-mediated depletion of myeloid cells or specifically neutrophils. In contrast, T-cell depletion more effectively reduced the infarct volume without improving the behavioral performance. Thus, neutrophil invasion of the ischemic brain is rapid, massive, and a key mediator of functional impairment, while peripheral T-cells promote brain damage. Acutely depleting T-cells and inhibiting brain infiltration of neutrophils might, therefore, be a powerful early stroke treatment.

  12. Neutrophils as effector cells of T-cell-mediated, acquired immunity in murine listeriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Appelberg, R; Castro, A G; Silva, M T

    1994-01-01

    The control of the infections caused by Listeria monocytogenes, considered an example of an intracellular parasite, is thought to involve co-operation between antigen-specific T cells and activated macrophages. Here we investigated the participation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the mechanisms of resistance during the immune phase of the antimicrobial response to L. monocytogenes infection. We found that BALB/c mice were unable to express T-cell-mediated (acquired) immunity to this pathogen in the absence of granulocytes. We propose that neutrophils should be included in the concept of cell-mediated immunity and that their antimicrobial role is not exclusively expressed during the early phases of a primary infection. PMID:7835951

  13. Impact of neutrophil apoptosis on haemostatic activation in chronic liver disease patients.

    PubMed

    Essawy, Faiza M; Bekheet, Iman W; Saleh, Abeya F; Madkour, Mona E; Bayoumi, Emad El-Din A

    2008-09-01

    Recent studies suggest the impact of apoptosis on the mechanisms leading to hypercoagulability. We aimed to clarify the potential role of neutrophil apoptosis in neutropenia and hypercoagulable state encountered in chronic liver disease patients. This study was conducted on 15 normal controls and 45 patients with chronic liver disease classified according to modified Child Pugh classification into, Child A, B and C groups (15 cases each). Haemostatic parameters studied include, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, tissue factor, protein C antigen, protein S antigen, and markers of haemostatic activation [prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2), thrombus precursor protein (TpP) and D-dimer]. Flowcytometric study was done for quantitative assay of neutrophil apoptotic subpopulations to detect the percentage of early and late apoptotic, and necrotic neutrophils using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide dye. Semiquantitative assay of apoptotic neutrophils showing DNA fragmentation was performed on neutrophil culture using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labelling test. In addition to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for soluble Fas (APO-1/CD95) in culture supernatant. The results revealed a rise in the neutrophil apoptotic and necrotic markers with progression of the disease, and they were inversely correlated with the absolute neutrophil count. The apoptotic neutrophil cells showed a significant positive correlation with several haemostatic parameters (tissue factor, prothrombin fragment 1+2, thrombus precursor protein and D-dimer). Regression analysis proved that apoptotic parameters are independent determinants of prothrombotic markers, which further incriminate the apoptotic mechanisms in the hypercoagulable state encountered in this clinical setting.

  14. HS1 deficiency impairs neutrophil recruitment in vivo and activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and Rap1.

    PubMed

    Latasiewicz, Joanna; Artz, Annette; Jing, Ding; Blanco, Mariana Pacheco; Currie, Silke M; Avila, Martha Velázquez; Schnoor, Michael; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2017-01-25

    Neutrophil extravasation is a critical step of the innate immune system's response to inflammation. This multistep process is tightly regulated by adhesion and signaling molecules in the endothelium and neutrophils. Activation of the β2 integrin LFA-1 is critical for adhesion of leukocytes to postcapillary venules. This step requires coordinated activation of signaling pathways in chemokine-stimulated neutrophils, including GTPase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling, leading to conformational changes in LFA-1. Hematopoietic cell-specific lyn substrate 1 (HS1) is a cortactin-related and leukocyte-specific actin-binding protein (ABP) that regulates several processes in various immune cells. It has been shown in vitro that HS1 is important for neutrophil chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of NK cells, but its role in neutrophil extravasation in vivo has not been investigated yet. Intravital microscopy of CXCL1-stimulated cremaster venules revealed an increased rolling velocity and reduced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration in HS1 knockout (KO) mice. CXCL1-induced rapid neutrophil arrest in vivo and adhesion under flow conditions in vitro were also reduced significantly. Whereas random motility of neutrophils was unaffected, chemotaxis toward a CXCL1 gradient was reduced in the absence of HS1. Further analysis of the underlying mechanisms demonstrated that HS1 controls CXCL1-induced activation of the small GTPases Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), thus supporting LFA-1-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Importantly, with the use of Rac1 KO neutrophils, we could show that Rac1 acts upstream of Rap1. Our results establish HS1 as an important regulator of proper Rac1 and Rap1 activation and neutrophil extravasation.

  15. Opioids suppress chemokine-mediated migration of monkey neutrophils and monocytes - an instant response.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, T; Chuang, L F; Lam, K M; Kung, H; Wang, J M; Osburn, B I; Chuang, R Y

    2000-04-01

    Opioid users having acquired human immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at a greater risk than non-users of contracting opportunistic infections. Opioid-administered and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys have been an excellent model for studying AIDS and drug abuse in humans. In this study, chemotaxis of monkey leukocytes was evaluated using the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed (RANTES) as the chemoattractants, and the effects of various opioid agonists and antagonists on the efficiency of chemotaxis were examined. Opioids were either incubated with monkey leukocytes or added directly to chemokines, and the number of cells migrating toward IL-8 (for neutrophils) or RANTES (for monocytes) was scored. Inhibition of chemotaxis was seen with both assay conditions, and the inhibition was mediated by opioids binding to mu or kappa receptors. Binding to delta opiod receptors was rarely, if ever, observed. Although opioids themselves may act as weak chemoattractants for monkey leukocytes, addition of opioid agonists to chemokines would reduce the chemoattractant ability of the chemokines. Opioids did not cause the same inhibitory effect on the chemotactic migration of neutrophils when the complement component C5a or the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-MET-LEU-PHE (fMLP) was used as chemoattractant. These studies suggest that the presence of opioids during SIV infection immediately alters chemokine-mediated immune functions.

  16. Redundant contribution of myeloperoxidase-dependent systems to neutrophil-mediated killing of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, H; Michel, B R

    1997-01-01

    Neutrophil microbicidal activity is a consequence of overlapping antimicrobial systems that vary in prominence according to the conditions of the neutrophil-microbe interaction, the nature of the microbe, and its metabolic state. In this study, normal, myeloperoxidase-deficient, and respiratory burst-deficient (chronic granulomatous disease [CGD]) neutrophils killed Escherichia coli with equivalent, high efficiencies. Killing by CGD and myeloperoxidase-deficient neutrophils was not augmented by supplements, such as exogenous H2O2 and myeloperoxidase, directed at ameliorating their metabolic defects, suggesting that nonoxidative microbicidal systems were sufficient for a full microbicidal effect. Neutrophils with an intact myeloperoxidase antimicrobial system (normal or appropriately supplemented deficient cells) were capable of rapidly suppressing E. coli DNA synthesis, while unsupplemented CGD or myeloperoxidase-deficient cells were far less effective, indicating that the myeloperoxidase system was active in normal neutrophils. The degree of DNA synthesis inhibition by myeloperoxidase-sufficient neutrophils could account, in a cell-free system, for most of the observed microbicidal activity. While the myeloperoxidase system was active and probably bactericidal, it was not rate limiting for microbicidal activity and appears to have been redundant with other microbicidal systems in the cell. Rapid and extensive inhibition of bacterial DNA synthesis appears to be an indicator of myeloperoxidase activity in neutrophils. PMID:9317024

  17. Neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated by complement and leukotriene B4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Donglei; Shi, Meiqing

    2016-09-02

    Swarming behavior of neutrophils has been noticed in both sterile injury and infection models and the mechanisms are being unveiled. So far, no in vitro model has been established to study neutrophil swarming to microbes. In the current study, using live-cell imaging, we observed in vitro neutrophil swarming toward Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen causing human meningoencephalitis. Complement C3 and CD11b expression are essential for neutrophils to form cell swarms surrounding C. neoformans. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) was quickly released by neutrophils during their interactions with C. neoformans. Blockade of LTB4 synthesis inhibited the swarming response to C. neoformans. Importantly, blockade of LTB4 synthesis also significantly reduced neutrophil recruitment in the lung vasculature of mice infected intravenously with C. neoformans, demonstrating a critical role of LTB4 in intravascular neutrophil swarming during infection. Together, this is the first report of neutrophil dynamics of swarming toward a microorganism in vitro, mediated by complement and LTB4.

  18. The Neutrophil Btk Signalosome Regulates Integrin Activation during Sterile Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Volmering, Stephanie; Block, Helena; Boras, Mark; Lowell, Clifford A.; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Neutrophils are recruited from the blood to sites of sterile inflammation, where they are involved in wound healing but can also cause tissue damage. During sterile inflammation, necrotic cells release pro-inflammatory molecules including formylated peptides. However, the signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides to integrin activation and leukocyte recruitment is unknown. By using spinning-disk confocal intravital microscopy, we examined the molecular mechanisms of leukocyte recruitment to sites of focal hepatic necrosis in vivo. We demonstrated that the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) was required for multiple Mac-1 activation events involved in neutrophil recruitment and functions during sterile inflammation triggered by fMLF. The Src family kinase Hck, Wiskott-Aldrich-syndrome protein, and phospholipase Cγ2 were also involved in this pathway required for fMLF-triggered Mac-1 activation and neutrophil recruitment. Thus, we have identified a neutrophil Btk signalosome that is involved in a signaling pathway triggered by formylated peptides leading to the selective activation of Mac-1 and neutrophil recruitment during sterile inflammation. PMID:26777396

  19. The impact of cationic solid lipid nanoparticles on human neutrophil activation and formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs).

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Hung, Chi-Feng; Chen, Chun-Han; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-06-25

    Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (cSLNs) are extensively employed as the nanocarriers for drug/gene targeting to tumors and the brain. Investigation into the possible immune response of cSLNs is still lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of cSLNs upon the activation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil cells (PMNs). The cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory mediators, Ca(2+) mobilization, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) as the indicators of PMN stimulation were examined in this work. The cSLNs presented a diameter of 195 nm with a zeta potential of 44 mV. The cSLNs could interact with the cell membrane to produce a direct membrane lysis and the subsequent cytotoxicity according to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) elevation. The interaction of cSLNs with the membrane also triggered a Ca(2+) influx, followed by the induction of oxidative stress and degranulation. The cationic nanoparticles elevated the levels of superoxide anion and elastase by 24- and 9-fold, respectively. The PMN activation by cSLNs promoted the phosphorylation of p38 and Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). The imaging of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunofluorescence demonstrated the production of NETs by cSLNs. This phenomenon was not significant for the neutral SLNs (nSLNs), although histones in NETs also increased after treatment of nSLNs. Our results suggest an important role of cSLNs in governing the activation of human neutrophils.

  20. CFTR-mediated halide transport in phagosomes of human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Richard G.; Marrero, Luis; Lombard, Gisele A.; Valentine, Vincent G.; Nauseef, William M.; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Chloride serves as a critical component of innate host defense against infection, providing the substrate for MPO-catalyzed production of HOCl in the phagosome of human neutrophils. Here, we used halide-specific fluorescent sensors covalently coupled to zymosan particles to investigate the kinetics of chloride and iodide transport in phagosomes of human neutrophils. Using the self-ratioable fluorescent probe specific for chloride anion, we measured chloride dynamics within phagosomes in response to extracellular chloride changes by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Under the experimental conditions used, normal neutrophils showed rapid phagosomal chloride uptake with an initial influx rate of 0.31 ± 0.04 mM/s (n=5). GlyH-101, a CFTRinh, decreased the rate of uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Neutrophils isolated from CF patients showed a significantly slower rate of chloride uptake by phagosomes, having an initial influx rate of 0.043 ± 0.012 mM/s (n=5). Interestingly, the steady-state level of chloride in CF phagosomes was ∼26 mM, significantly lower than that of the control (∼68 mM). As CFTR transports chloride as well as other halides, we conjugated an iodide-sensitive probe as an independent approach to confirm the results. The dynamics of iodide uptake by neutrophil phagosomes were monitored by flow cytometry. CFTRinh172 blocked 40–50% of the overall iodide uptake by phagosomes in normal neutrophils. In a parallel manner, the level of iodide uptake by CF phagosomes was only 20–30% of that of the control. Taken together, these results implicate CFTR in transporting halides into the phagosomal lumen. PMID:20089668

  1. Proteomic analysis of secretagogue-stimulated neutrophils implicates a role for actin and actin-interacting proteins in Rac2-mediated granule exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are abundant leukocytes that play a primary role in defence against pathogens. Neutrophils enter sites of infection where they eliminate pathogens via phagocytosis and the release of antimicrobial mediators via degranulation. Rho GTPases, particularly Rac2, play a key role in neutrophil degranulation. The purpose of this study was to identify Rac2-dependent changes in protein abundance in stimulated neutrophils. Methods We performed a proteomic analysis on secretagogue-stimulated bone marrow neutrophils that were isolated from wild-type and Rac2-/- mice. Protein abundance was analyzed by 2-dimensional SDS-PAGE of fluorescently labelled samples which allowed the detection ~3500 proteins. Results We identified 22 proteins that showed significant changes in abundance after secretagogue-stimulation of wild-type neutrophils, which did not occur in neutrophils isolated from Rac2-/- mice. As expected, the abundance of several granule proteins was reduced in wild-type cells; this did not occur in Rac2-/- neutrophils which confirms the requirement for Rac2 in degranulation. We also found changes in abundance of many actin remodelling proteins including coronin-1A, β-actin and the F-actin capping protein, (CapZ-β). Coronin-1A showed elevated levels of several isoforms after stimulation of neutrophils from wild-type, but not from Rac2-/- mice. These isoforms were immunoreactive with anti-phospho-threonine antibodies, suggesting that neutrophil stimulation triggers a Rac2-dependent kinase cascade that results in the phosphorylation of coronin-1A. Conclusion The control of Rac2-mediated degranulation in neutrophils likely functions through actin remodelling via activation of several actin-binding proteins. We found coronin-1A to be a novel downstream effector protein of this pathway that is threonine phosphorylated in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:22081935

  2. Effect of temperature on phagocytic activity of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Tapas; Thapa, Manoj; Saikia, Tolan Chandra

    2004-06-01

    The effect of temperature on phagocytic activity of neutrophils has been evaluated. Freshly collected heparinised blood samples from young healthy volunteers were incubated with heat killed Staphylococcus aureus at 37 degrees C, 38 degrees C, 39 degrees C and 40 degrees C for 20 minutes. Some of the neutrophils engulfed some heat killed bacteria. Then the blood smears were prepared and stained by Leishman's stain. Engulfed bacteria within the neutrophils stained intensely were observed and counted to find out the phagocytic index and avidity index of the neutrophils. It was found that phagocytic index increased significantly at 38 degrees C and 39 degrees C in comparison to that of at 37 degrees C but did not show significant increase when incubated at 40 degrees C. It seems that contractile elements responsible for the movement of the neutrophils through the formation of pseudopod is more activated at higher temperature (38 degrees C and 39 degrees C) in comparison to that of at normal body temperature (37 degrees C). Temperature higher than 39 degrees C may cause impairment in enzyme function responsible for assembly and disassembly of actin and myosin filaments in the cell causing decreased movement and decreased rate of formation of psudopod resulting in decreased phagocytic activity.

  3. The small GTPase Rap1b negatively regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and transcellular diapedesis by inhibiting Akt activation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Xu, Juying; Kumar, Rupali Sani; Lakshmikanthan, Sribalaji; Kapur, Reuben; Kofron, Matthew; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; Filippi, Marie-Dominique

    2014-08-25

    Neutrophils are the first line of cellular defense in response to infections and inflammatory injuries. However, neutrophil activation and accumulation into tissues trigger tissue damage due to release of a plethora of toxic oxidants and proteases, a cause of acute lung injury (ALI). Despite its clinical importance, the molecular regulation of neutrophil migration is poorly understood. The small GTPase Rap1b is generally viewed as a positive regulator of immune cell functions by controlling bidirectional integrin signaling. However, we found that Rap1b-deficient mice exhibited enhanced neutrophil recruitment to inflamed lungs and enhanced susceptibility to endotoxin shock. Unexpectedly, Rap1b deficiency promoted the transcellular route of diapedesis through endothelial cell. Increased transcellular migration of Rap1b-deficient neutrophils in vitro was selectively mediated by enhanced PI3K-Akt activation and invadopodia-like protrusions. Akt inhibition in vivo suppressed excessive Rap1b-deficient neutrophil migration and associated endotoxin shock. The inhibitory action of Rap1b on PI3K signaling may be mediated by activation of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, this study reveals an unexpected role for Rap1b as a key suppressor of neutrophil migration and lung inflammation.

  4. Glia maturation factor-γ mediates neutrophil chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Aerbajinai, Wulin; Liu, Lunhua; Chin, Kyung; Zhu, Jianqiong; Parent, Carole A.; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2011-01-01

    Chemotaxis is fundamental to the directional migration of neutrophils toward endogenous and exogenous chemoattractants. Recent studies have demonstrated that ADF/cofilin superfamily members play important roles in reorganizing the actin cytoskeleton by disassembling actin filaments. GMFG, a novel ADF/cofilin superfamily protein that is expressed in inflammatory cells, has been implicated in regulating actin reorganization in microendothelial cells, but its function in neutrophils remains unclear. Here, we show that GMFG is an important regulator for cell migration and polarity in neutrophils. Knockdown of endogenous GMFG impaired fMLF- and IL-8 (CXCL8)-induced chemotaxis in dHL-60 cells. GMFG knockdown attenuated the formation of lamellipodia at the leading edge of cells exposed to fMLF or CXCL8, as well as the phosphorylation of p38 and PAK1/2 in response to fMLF or CXCL8. Live cell imaging revealed that GMFG was recruited to the leading edge of cells in response to fMLF, as well as CXCL8. Overexpression of GMFG enhanced phosphorylation of p38 but not of PAK1/2 in dHL-60 cells. In addition, we found that GMFG is associated with WAVE2. Taken together, our findings suggest that GMFG is a novel factor in regulating neutrophil chemotaxis by modulating actin cytoskeleton reorganization. PMID:21653232

  5. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  6. Neutrophil oxidative burst activates ATM to regulate cytokine production and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Harbort, C J; Soeiro-Pereira, Paulo Vitor; von Bernuth, Horst; Kaindl, Angela M; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz Tavares; Condino-Neto, Antonio; Reichenbach, Janine; Roesler, Joachim; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Amulic, Borko

    2015-12-24

    Neutrophils play an essential role in the initial stages of inflammation by balancing pro- and antiinflammatory signals. Among these signals are the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the timely initiation of antiinflammatory cell death via constitutive apoptosis. Here we identify ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase as a modulator of these neutrophil functions. Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is a pleiotropic multisystem disorder caused by mutations in the gene-encoding ATM, a master regulator of the DNA damage response. In addition to progressive neurodegeneration and high rates of cancer, AT patients have numerous symptoms that can be linked to chronic inflammation. We report that neutrophils isolated from patients with AT overproduce proinflammatory cytokines and have a prolonged lifespan compared with healthy controls. This effect is partly mediated by increases in activation of p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, we show that the oxidative burst, catalyzed by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, can activate ATM in neutrophils. Finally, activation of ATM and DNA damage signaling suppress cytokine production and can abrogate the overproduction of IL-8 in ROS-deficient cells. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of cytokine production and apoptosis, establishing DNA damage as a downstream mediator of immune regulation by reactive oxygen species. We propose that deficiencies in the DNA damage response, like deficiencies in the oxidative burst seen in chronic granulomatous disease, could lead to pathologic inflammation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  7. The Natural Stilbenoid Piceatannol Decreases Activity and Accelerates Apoptosis of Human Neutrophils: Involvement of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Nosal, Radomir; Svitekova, Klara; Drabikova, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are able to release cytotoxic substances and inflammatory mediators, which, along with their delayed apoptosis, have a potential to maintain permanent inflammation. Therefore, treatment of diseases associated with chronic inflammation should be focused on neutrophils; formation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of these cells represent two promising targets for pharmacological intervention. Piceatannol, a naturally occurring stilbenoid, has the ability to reduce the toxic action of neutrophils. This substance decreased the amount of oxidants produced by neutrophils both extra- and intracellularly. Radicals formed within neutrophils (fulfilling a regulatory role) were reduced to a lesser extent than extracellular oxidants, potentially dangerous for host tissues. Moreover, piceatannol did not affect the phosphorylation of p40phox—a component of NADPH oxidase, responsible for the assembly of functional oxidase in intracellular (granular) membranes. The stilbenoid tested elevated the percentage of early apoptotic neutrophils, inhibited the activity of protein kinase C (PKC)—the main regulatory enzyme in neutrophils, and reduced phosphorylation of PKC isoforms α, βII, and δ on their catalytic region. The results indicated that piceatannol may be useful as a complementary medicine in states associated with persisting neutrophil activation and with oxidative damage of tissues. PMID:24288583

  8. IFNα enhances the production of IL-6 by human neutrophils activated via TLR8

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Maili; Arruda-Silva, Fabio; Bianchetto-Aguilera, Francisco; Finotti, Giulia; Calzetti, Federica; Scapini, Patrizia; Lunardi, Claudio; Cassatella, Marco A.; Tamassia, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported that human neutrophils produce biologically active amounts of IL-6 when incubated with agonists activating TLR8, a receptor recognizing viral single strand RNA. In this study, we demonstrate that IFNα, a cytokine that modulates the early innate immune responses toward viral and bacterial infections, potently enhances the production of IL-6 in neutrophils stimulated with R848, a TLR8 agonist. We also show that such an effect is not caused by an IFNα-dependent induction of TLR7 and its consequent co-activation with TLR8 in response to R848, but, rather, it is substantially mediated by an increased production and release of endogenous TNFα. The latter cytokine, in an autocrine manner, leads to an augmented synthesis of the IkBζ co-activator and an enhanced recruitment of the C/EBPβ transcription factor to the IL-6 promoter. Moreover, we show that neutrophils from SLE patients with active disease state, hence displaying an IFN-induced gene expression signature, produce increased amounts of both IL-6 and TNFα in response to R848 as compared to healthy donors. Altogether, data uncover novel effects that type I IFN exerts in TLR8-activated neutrophils, which therefore enlarge our knowledge on the various biological actions which type I IFN orchestrates during infectious and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26790609

  9. Neutrophil-derived microparticles induce myeloperoxidase-mediated damage of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upon activation neutrophil releases microparticles - small plasma membrane vesicles that contain cell surface proteins and cytoplasmic matter, with biological activities. In this study we investigated the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the endothelial cell injury caused by neutrophil-derived microparticles. Results Microparticles were produced by activating human neutrophils with a calcium ionophore and characterized by flow cytometry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Myeloperoxidase activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Neutrophil microparticles-induced injuries and morphological alterations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Neutrophil microparticles were characterized as structures bounded by lipid bilayers and were less than 1 μm in diameter. The microparticles also expressed CD66b, CD62L and myeloperoxidase, which are all commonly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, as well as exposition of phosphatidylserine. The activity of the myeloperoxidase present on the microparticles was confirmed by hypochlorous acid detection. This compound is only catalyzed by myeloperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. The addition of sodium azide or taurine inhibited and reduced enzymatic activity, respectively. Exposure of HUVEC to neutrophil microparticles induced a loss of cell membrane integrity and morphological changes. The addition of sodium azide or myeloperoxidase-specific inhibitor-I consistently reduced the injury to the endothelial cells. Taurine addition reduced HUVEC morphological changes. Conclusions We have demonstrated the presence of active myeloperoxidase in neutrophil microparticles and that the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase cause injury to endothelial cells. Hence, the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system may contribute to widespread endothelial cell damage

  10. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Binet, Francois; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2{alpha} are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  11. Evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase-4 activation occur in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Chiasson, Sonia; Girard, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Apoptosis can result from activation of three major pathways: the extrinsic, the intrinsic, and the most recently identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated pathway. While the two former pathways are known to be operational in human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs), the existence of the ER stress-mediated pathway, generally involving caspase-4, has never been reported in these cells. Recently, we have documented that arsenic trioxide (ATO) induced apoptosis in human PMNs by a mechanism that needs to be further investigated. In this study, using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we present evidence of ER alterations in PMNs activated by the ER stress inducer arsenic trioxide (ATO). Several key players of the unfolded protein response, including GRP78, GADD153, ATF6, XBP1 and eIF2alpha are expressed and activated in PMNs treated with ATO or other ER stress inducers. Although caspase-4 is expressed and activated in neutrophils, treatment with a caspase-4 inhibitor did not attenuate the pro-apoptotic effect of ATO at a concentration that reverses caspase-4 processing and activation. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway operates in human neutrophils.

  12. NADPH oxidase derived reactive oxygen species are involved in human neutrophil IL-1β secretion but not in inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gabelloni, María Laura; Sabbione, Florencia; Jancic, Carolina; Fuxman Bass, Juan; Keitelman, Irene; Iula, Leonardo; Oleastro, Matías; Geffner, Jorge R; Trevani, Analía S

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential players in acute inflammatory responses. Upon stimulation, neutrophils activate NADPH oxidase, generating an array of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a major proinflammatory cytokine synthesized as a precursor that has to be proteolytically processed to become biologically active. The role of ROS in IL-1β processing is still controversial and has not been previously studied in neutrophils. We report here that IL-1β processing in human neutrophils is dependent on caspase-1 and on the serine proteases elastase and/or proteinase 3. NADPH oxidase deficient neutrophils activated caspase-1 and did not exhibit differences in NALP3 expression, indicating that ROS are neither required for inflammasome activation nor for its priming, as has been reported for macrophages. Strikingly, ROS exerted opposite effects on the processing and secretion of IL-1β; whereas ROS negatively controlled caspase-1 activity, as reported in mononuclear phagocytes, ROS were found to be necessary for the exportation of mature IL-1β out of the cell, a role never previously described. The complex ROS-mediated regulation of neutrophil IL-1β secretion might constitute a physiological mechanism to control IL-1β-dependent inflammatory processes where neutrophils play a crucial role.

  13. Neutrophil Dysfunction in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Liu, An-Lei; Gao, Shuang; Ma, Shui; Guo, Shu-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction due to a dysregulated host response to infection. In this article, we reviewed the correlation between neutrophil dysfunction and sepsis. Data Sources: Articles published up to May 31, 2016, were selected from the PubMed databases, with the keywords of “neutrophil function”, “neutrophil dysfunction”, and “sepsis”. Study Selection: Articles were obtained and reviewed to analyze the neutrophil function in infection and neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Results: We emphasized the diagnosis of sepsis and its limitations. Pathophysiological mechanisms involve a generalized circulatory, immune, coagulopathic, and/or neuroendocrine response to infection. Many studies focused on neutrophil burst or cytokines. Complement activation, impairment of neutrophil migration, and endothelial lesions are involved in this progress. Alterations of cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators contribute to neutrophil dysfunction in sepsis. Conclusions: Sepsis represents a severe derangement of the immune response to infection, resulting in neutrophil dysfunction. Neutrophil dysfunction promotes sepsis and even leads to organ failure. Mechanism studies, clinical practice, and strategies to interrupt dysregulated neutrophil function in sepsis are desperately needed. PMID:27824008

  14. P2Y6 Receptor Antagonist MRS2578 Inhibits Neutrophil Activation and Aggregated Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation Induced by Gout-Associated Monosodium Urate Crystals.

    PubMed

    Sil, Payel; Hayes, Craig P; Reaves, Barbara J; Breen, Patrick; Quinn, Shannon; Sokolove, Jeremy; Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]) generate inflammatory responses within the joints of gout patients upon encountering monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are found abundantly in the synovial fluid of gout patients. The detailed mechanism of MSU crystal-induced NET formation remains unknown. Our goal was to shed light on possible roles of purinergic signaling and neutrophil migration in mediating NET formation induced by MSU crystals. Interaction of human neutrophils with MSU crystals was evaluated by high-throughput live imaging using confocal microscopy. We quantitated NET levels in gout synovial fluid supernatants and detected enzymatically active neutrophil primary granule enzymes, myeloperoxidase, and human neutrophil elastase. Suramin and PPADS, general P2Y receptor blockers, and MRS2578, an inhibitor of the purinergic P2Y6 receptor, blocked NET formation triggered by MSU crystals. AR-C25118925XX (P2Y2 antagonist) did not inhibit MSU crystal-stimulated NET release. Live imaging of PMNs showed that MRS2578 represses neutrophil migration and blocked characteristic formation of MSU crystal-NET aggregates called aggregated NETs. Interestingly, the store-operated calcium entry channel inhibitor (SK&F96365) also reduced MSU crystal-induced NET release. Our results indicate that the P2Y6/store-operated calcium entry/IL-8 axis is involved in MSU crystal-induced aggregated NET formation, but MRS2578 could have additional effects affecting PMN migration. The work presented in the present study could lead to a better understanding of gouty joint inflammation and help improve the treatment and care of gout patients.

  15. Influence of dietary antioxidants and fatty acids on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing and gene expression in healthy Beagles.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jean A; Chinn, Rachel M; Vorachek, William R; Gorman, M Elena; Greitl, Joe L; Joshi, Dinesh K; Jewell, Dennis E

    2011-02-15

    Dietary (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil have been used to modulate immune function in many mammalian species. Together, dietary antioxidants and behavioral enrichment have been shown to enhance neutrophil phagocytosis in geriatric Beagle dogs. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the effects of vitamins E and C, in combination with dietary fish oil, on neutrophil mediated bacterial killing, and on transcript levels of selected neutrophil mRNA. Fifty adult Beagle dogs were randomized into five dietary treatment groups for 60 days. All foods were complete and balanced and met the nutrient profiles of AAFCO for adult dogs. For 60 days before study initiation, dogs consumed a pretrial food that contained 74 IU/kg vitamin E and 0 mg/kg vitamin C. The five experimental foods were confirmed by analytical methods to contain ≥640 IU/kg vitamin E and 130 mg/kg vitamin C (as fed). Experimental foods ranged from low levels of EPA and DHA (pretrial food and lowest experimental food had 0.01% EPA and no detectable DHA) to the highest experimental food with 0.25% EPA and 0.17% DHA. Ex vivo bactericidal activity of activated, peripheral-blood neutrophils against Lactococcus lactis was determined after 1 h incubation. Bactericidal activity was calculated as a percentage of control values (bacteria incubated in media without neutrophils). Transcript levels of genes involved in neutrophil-mediated immune functions were determined by real-time qPCR. Dogs in all treatment groups had increased serum vitamin E concentration (P<0.01). After consuming experimental food for 60 days, neutrophils from dogs in all 5 treatment groups also had increased bactericidal activity (P<0.01). Dietary fish oil however, had no effect on bactericidal activity. Stepwise multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the change in neutrophil mediated bacterial killing was significantly correlated to changes in gene expression of interleukin-8 receptor (IL-8R), interleukin converting enzyme

  16. Shielding of a lipooligosaccharide IgM epitope allows evasion of neutrophil-mediated killing of an invasive strain of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Langereis, Jeroen D; Weiser, Jeffrey N

    2014-07-22

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is a frequent cause of noninvasive mucosal inflammatory diseases but may also cause invasive diseases, such as sepsis and meningitis, especially in children and the elderly. Infection by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is characterized by recruitment of neutrophilic granulocytes. Despite the presence of a large number of neutrophils, infections with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae are often not cleared effectively by the antimicrobial activity of these immune cells. Herein, we examined how nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae evades neutrophil-mediated killing. Transposon sequencing (Tn-seq) was used on an isolate resistant to neutrophil-mediated killing to identify genes required for its survival in the presence of human neutrophils and serum, which provided a source of complement and antibodies. Results show that nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae prevents complement-dependent neutrophil-mediated killing by expression of surface galactose-containing oligosaccharide structures. These outer-core structures block recognition of an inner-core lipooligosaccharide epitope containing glucose attached to heptose HepIII-β1,2-Glc by replacement with galactose attached to HepIII or through shielding HepIII-β1,2-Glc by phase-variable attachment of oligosaccharide chain extensions. When the HepIII-β1,2-Glc-containing epitope is expressed and exposed, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae is opsonized by naturally acquired IgM generally present in human serum and subsequently phagocytosed and killed by human neutrophils. Clinical nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae isolates containing galactose attached to HepIII that are not recognized by this IgM are more often found to cause invasive infections. Importance: Neutrophils are white blood cells that specialize in killing pathogens and are recruited to sites of inflammation. However, despite the presence of large numbers of neutrophils in the middle ear cavity and lungs of patients with

  17. DAP12 expression in lung macrophages mediates ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Jessica H.; Li, Wenjun; Bribriesco, Alejandro C.; Liu, Jie; Shen, Hua; Ibricevic, Aida; Pan, Jiehong; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H.; Brody, Steven L.; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Miller, Mark J.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical mediators of innate immune responses and contribute to tissue injury. However, immune pathways that regulate neutrophil recruitment to injured tissues during noninfectious inflammation remain poorly understood. DAP12 is a cell-membrane associated protein that is expressed in myeloid cells and can either augment or dampen innate inflammatory responses during infections. To elucidate the role of DAP12 in pulmonary ischemia-reperfusion injury, we took advantage of a clinically relevant mouse model of transplant-mediated lung ischemia reperfusion injury. This technique allowed us to dissect the importance of DAP12 in tissue-resident cells and those that infiltrate injured tissue from the periphery during noninfectious inflammation. Macrophages in both mouse and human lungs that have been subjected to cold ischemic storage express DAP12. We found that donor, but not recipient deficiency in DAP12 protected against pulmonary ischemia reperfusion injury. Analysis of the immune response showed that DAP12 promotes the survival of tissue-resident alveolar macrophages and contributes to local production of neutrophil chemoattractants. Intravital imaging demonstrated a transendothelial migration defect into DAP12-deficient lungs, which can be rescued by local administration of the neutrophil chemokine CXCL2. We have uncovered a previously unrecognized role for DAP12 expression in tissue-resident alveolar macrophages in mediating acute noninfectious tissue injury through regulation of neutrophil trafficking. PMID:25762783

  18. Production of interleukin-1 like activity by neutrophils derived from rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Kusaka, Y; Donaldson, K

    1990-01-01

    Interleukin-1 like activity was produced by neutrophils obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage from experimentally inflamed rat lung. Activity was released spontaneously from neutrophils at high levels but it was enhanced by stimulation with endotoxin in vitro. PMID:2141440

  19. NETosing Neutrophils Activate Complement Both on Their Own NETs and Bacteria via Alternative and Non-alternative Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Joshua; Pluthero, Fred G.; Douda, David N.; Riedl, Magdalena; Cherry, Ahmed; Ulanova, Marina; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils deposit antimicrobial proteins, such as myeloperoxidase and proteases on chromatin, which they release as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Neutrophils also carry key components of the complement alternative pathway (AP) such as properdin or complement factor P (CFP), complement factor B (CFB), and C3. However, the contribution of these complement components and complement activation during NET formation in the presence and absence of bacteria is poorly understood. We studied complement activation on NETs and a Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01, PAKwt, and PAKgfp). Here, we show that anaphylatoxin C5a, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), which activates NADPH oxidase, induce the release of CFP, CFB, and C3 from neutrophils. In response to PMA or P. aeruginosa, neutrophils secrete CFP, deposit it on NETs and bacteria, and induce the formation of terminal complement complexes (C5b–9). A blocking anti-CFP antibody inhibited AP-mediated but not non-AP-mediated complement activation on NETs and P. aeruginosa. Therefore, NET-mediated complement activation occurs via both AP- and non AP-based mechanisms, and AP-mediated complement activation during NETosis is dependent on CFP. These findings suggest that neutrophils could use their “AP tool kit” to readily activate complement on NETs and Gram-negative bacteria, such as P. aeruginosa, whereas additional components present in the serum help to fix non-AP-mediated complement both on NETs and bacteria. This unique mechanism may play important roles in host defense and help to explain specific roles of complement activation in NET-related diseases. PMID:27148258

  20. Protein kinase C-beta contributes to NADPH oxidase activation in neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, L V; Leitges, M; Altschuler, G; Mistry, N; McDermott, A; Roes, J; Segal, A W

    2000-01-01

    We have analysed the involvement of the beta isotype of the protein kinase C (PKC) family in the activation of NADPH oxidase in primary neutrophils. Using immunofluorescence and cell fractionation, PKC-beta is shown to be recruited to the plasma membrane upon stimulation with phorbol ester and to the phagosomal membrane upon phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles (Fcgamma-receptor stimulus). The time course of recruitment is similar to that of NADPH oxidase activation by these stimuli. The PKC-beta specific inhibitor 379196 inhibits the response to PMA as well as to IgG-coated bacteria. Partial inhibition occurs between 10 and 100 nM of inhibitor, the concentration at which PKC-beta, but not other PKC isotypes, is targeted. Neutrophils isolated from a mouse that lacks PKC-beta also showed an inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by PMA and IgG-coated particles. The level of inhibition is comparable to that achieved with 379196 in human neutrophils. Thus the PKC-beta isotype mediates activation of NADPH oxidase by PMA and by stimulation of Fcgamma receptors in neutrophils. PMID:10727429

  1. Proteinase 3 and Serpin B1: a novel pathway in the regulation of caspase-3 activation, neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Loison, Fabien; Xu, Yuanfu; Luo, Hongbo R

    Neutrophils are the first responders of the inflammatory response. They are characterized by their potent cytotoxic content but also by their limited lifetime. This short half-life is thought to be a self-protecting mechanism for the host, as highlighted by the numerous pathologies associated with imbalanced neutrophil survival. Neutrophil spontaneous death is the prototype of programmed cell death, harboring all the phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis and dependent on the activation of the effector caspase-3. However, the pathways regulating neutrophil spontaneous death remain ill-defined. In a recent publication, we determined that in aging neutrophils, the cleavage and activation of caspase-3 was mediated by the serine protease Proteinase 3 (PR3), and was independent of the canonical extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. In mature neutrophils, PR3 was stored in granules and progressively released to the cytosol during neutrophil aging. The release of PR3 was dependent on lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). Once in the cytosol, PR3 cleaved procaspase-3 at a site upstream of the caspase-9 cleavage site, leading to caspase-3 activation. Inhibition, knockdown or knockout of PR3 delayed neutrophil apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The adoptive transfer of both WT and PR3-deficient neutrophils to WT mice revealed that the delayed death of neutrophils lacking PR3 in vivo was due to an altered intrinsic apoptosis/survival pathway and not to difference in the inflammatory microenvironment. The cytosolic inhibitor of serine proteases serpin b1 counterbalanced the activity of PR3 in the cytosol of neutrophils, and the deletion of serpinb1 in neutrophils accelerated their spontaneous death. In summary, our results reveal that PR3 and serpinB1 are part of a newly characterized apoptosis pathway, regulating caspase-3 activation and neutrophil spontaneous death and the survival of neutrophils during inflammation.

  2. Proteinase 3 and Serpin B1: a novel pathway in the regulation of caspase-3 activation, neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yuanfu; Luo, Hongbo R

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first responders of the inflammatory response. They are characterized by their potent cytotoxic content but also by their limited lifetime. This short half-life is thought to be a self-protecting mechanism for the host, as highlighted by the numerous pathologies associated with imbalanced neutrophil survival. Neutrophil spontaneous death is the prototype of programmed cell death, harboring all the phenotypic hallmarks of apoptosis and dependent on the activation of the effector caspase-3. However, the pathways regulating neutrophil spontaneous death remain ill-defined. In a recent publication, we determined that in aging neutrophils, the cleavage and activation of caspase-3 was mediated by the serine protease Proteinase 3 (PR3), and was independent of the canonical extrinsic and intrinsic apoptosis pathways. In mature neutrophils, PR3 was stored in granules and progressively released to the cytosol during neutrophil aging. The release of PR3 was dependent on lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). Once in the cytosol, PR3 cleaved procaspase-3 at a site upstream of the caspase-9 cleavage site, leading to caspase-3 activation. Inhibition, knockdown or knockout of PR3 delayed neutrophil apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. The adoptive transfer of both WT and PR3-deficient neutrophils to WT mice revealed that the delayed death of neutrophils lacking PR3 in vivo was due to an altered intrinsic apoptosis/survival pathway and not to difference in the inflammatory microenvironment. The cytosolic inhibitor of serine proteases serpin b1 counterbalanced the activity of PR3 in the cytosol of neutrophils, and the deletion of serpinb1 in neutrophils accelerated their spontaneous death. In summary, our results reveal that PR3 and serpinB1 are part of a newly characterized apoptosis pathway, regulating caspase-3 activation and neutrophil spontaneous death and the survival of neutrophils during inflammation. PMID:26029732

  3. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos.

    PubMed

    Paris, Daniel H; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N; Day, Nicholas P J; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  4. Increased Nucleosomes and Neutrophil Activation Link to Disease Progression in Patients with Scrub Typhus but Not Murine Typhus in Laos

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel H.; Stephan, Femke; Bulder, Ingrid; Wouters, Diana; van der Poll, Tom; Newton, Paul N.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is essential in protection against rickettsial illnesses, but the role of neutrophils in these intracellular vasculotropic infections remains unclear. This study analyzed the plasma levels of nucleosomes, FSAP-activation (nucleosome-releasing factor), and neutrophil activation, as evidenced by neutrophil-elastase (ELA) complexes, in sympatric Lao patients with scrub typhus and murine typhus. In acute scrub typhus elevated nucleosome levels correlated with lower GCS scores, raised respiratory rate, jaundice and impaired liver function, whereas neutrophil activation correlated with fibrinolysis and high IL-8 plasma levels, a recently identified predictor of severe disease and mortality. Nucleosome and ELA complex levels were associated with a 4.8-fold and 4-fold increased risk of developing severe scrub typhus, beyond cut off values of 1,040 U/ml for nucleosomes and 275 U/ml for ELA complexes respectively. In murine typhus, nucleosome levels associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and the duration of illness, while ELA complexes correlated strongly with inflammation markers, jaundice and increased respiratory rates. This study found strong correlations between circulating nucleosomes and neutrophil activation in patients with scrub typhus, but not murine typhus, providing indirect evidence that nucleosomes could originate from neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation. High circulating plasma nucleosomes and ELA complexes represent independent risk factors for developing severe complications in scrub typhus. As nucleosomes and histones exposed on NETs are highly cytotoxic to endothelial cells and are strongly pro-coagulant, neutrophil-derived nucleosomes could contribute to vascular damage, the pro-coagulant state and exacerbation of disease in scrub typhus, thus indicating a detrimental role of neutrophil activation. The data suggest that increased neutrophil activation relates to disease progression and severe complications, and

  5. Inhibition of Myeloperoxidase- and Neutrophil-Mediated Hypochlorous Acid Formation in Vitro and Endothelial Cell Injury by (-)-Epigallocatechin Gallate.

    PubMed

    Tian, Rong; Ding, Yun; Peng, Yi-Yuan; Lu, Naihao

    2017-04-10

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) plays important roles in various diseases through its unique chlorinating activity to catalyze excess hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formation. Epidemiological studies indicate an inverse correlation between plant polyphenol consumption and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Here we showed that (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the main flavonoid present in green tea, dose-dependently inhibited MPO-mediated HOCl formation in vitro (chlorinating activities of MPO: 50.2 ± 5.7% for 20 μM EGCG versus 100 ± 5.6% for control, P < 0.01). UV-vis spectral and docking studies indicated that EGCG bound to the active site (heme) of MPO and resulted in the accumulation of compound II, which was unable to produce HOCl. This flavonoid also effectively inhibited HOCl generation in activated neutrophils (HOCl formation: 65.0 ± 5.6% for 20 μM EGCG versus 100 ± 6.2% for control, P < 0.01) without influencing MPO and Nox2 release and superoxide formation, suggesting that EGCG specifically inhibited MPO but not NADPH oxidase activity in activated neutrophils. Moreover, EGCG inhibited MPO (or neutrophil)-mediated HOCl formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) culture and accordingly protected HUVEC from MPO (or neutrophil)-induced injury (P < 0.05, all cases), although it did not induce cytotoxicity to HUVEC (P > 0.05, all cases). Our results indicate that dietary EGCG is an effective and specific inhibitor of MPO activity and may participate in the regulation of immune responses at inflammatory sites.

  6. The Pig: A Relevant Model for Evaluating the Neutrophil Serine Protease Activities during Acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bréa, Déborah; Vandebrouck, Clarisse; Barc, Céline; Pezant, Jérémy; Melo, Sandrine; Olivier, Michel; Delaunay, Rémy; Boulesteix, Olivier; Berthon, Patricia; Rossignol, Christelle; Burlaud Gaillard, Julien; Becq, Frédéric; Gauthier, Francis; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Meurens, François; Berri, Mustapha; Caballero-Posadas, Ignacio; Attucci, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The main features of lung infection and inflammation are a massive recruitment of neutrophils and the subsequent release of neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs). Anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory treatments must be tested on a suitable animal model. Mice models do not replicate several aspects of human lung disease. This is particularly true for cystic fibrosis (CF), which has led the scientific community to a search for new animal models. We have shown that mice are not appropriate for characterizing drugs targeting neutrophil-dependent inflammation and that pig neutrophils and their NSPs are similar to their human homologues. We induced acute neutrophilic inflammatory responses in pig lungs using Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen. Blood samples, nasal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected at 0, 3, 6 and 24 h post-insfection (p.i.) and biochemical parameters, serum and BAL cytokines, bacterial cultures and neutrophil activity were evaluated. The release of proinflammatory mediators, biochemical and hematological blood parameters, cell recruitment and bronchial reactivity, peaked at 6h p.i.. We also used synthetic substrates specific for human neutrophil proteases to show that the activity of pig NSPs in BALFs increased. These proteases were also detected at the surface of lung neutrophils using anti-human NSP antibodies. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung infection in pigs results in a neutrophilic response similar to that described for cystic fibrosis and ventilator-associated pneumonia in humans. Altogether, this indicates that the pig is an appropriate model for testing anti-infectious and/or anti-inflammatory drugs to combat adverse proteolytic effects of neutrophil in human lung diseases. PMID:27992534

  7. Depletion of tissue plasminogen activator attenuates lung ischemia-reperfusion injury via inhibition of neutrophil extravasation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunge; Sharma, Ashish K.; LaPar, Damien J.; Kron, Irving L.; Ailawadi, Gorav; Liu, Yuan; Jones, David R.; Laubach, Victor E.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury following lung transplantation remains a major source of early morbidity and mortality. Histologically, this inflammatory process is characterized by neutrophil infiltration and activation. We previously reported that lung IR injury was significantly attenuated in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1-deficient mice. In this study, we explored the potential role of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in a mouse lung IR injury model. As a result, tPA knockout (KO) mice were significantly protected from lung IR injury through several mechanisms. At the cellular level, tPA KO specifically blocked neutrophil extravasation into the interstitium, and abundant homotypic neutrophil aggregation (HNA) was detected in the lung microvasculature of tPA KO mice after IR. At the molecular level, inhibition of neutrophil extravasation was associated with reduced expression of platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 mediated through the tPA/ LDL receptor-related protein/NF-κB signaling pathway, whereas increased P-selectin triggered HNA. At the functional level, tPA KO mice incurred significantly decreased vascular permeability and improved lung function following IR. Protection from lung IR injury in tPA KO mice occurs through a fibrinolysis-independent mechanism. These results suggest that tPA could serve as an important therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of acute IR injury after lung transplantation. PMID:21378024

  8. Innate immune activation in neutrophilic asthma and bronchiectasis

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Jodie L; Grissell, Terry V; Douwes, Jeroen; Scott, Rodney J; Boyle, Michael J; Gibson, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of asthma is unclear. Activation of innate immune receptors in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, viral infection and particulate matter triggers a pre‐programmed inflammatory response, which involves interleukin (IL)8 and neutrophil influx. The inflammatory response in asthma is heterogeneous. Aim To test the hypothesis that innate immune activation may be a relevant inflammatory mechanism in neutrophilic asthma where IL8 levels are increased. Methods Induced sputum was obtained from non‐smoking adults with asthma (n = 49), healthy controls (n = 13) and a positive reference group with bronchiectasis (n = 9). Subjects with asthma were classified into inflammatory subtypes using induced sputum cell counts. Sputum was examined for mRNA expression of the innate immune receptors toll‐like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4 and CD14, and inflammatory cytokines. A separate sputum portion was dispersed and the supernatant assayed for surfactant protein A, IL8, soluble CD14 and endotoxin. Results Expression of innate immune receptors was increased in subjects with bronchiectasis and neutrophilic asthma compared with other asthma subtypes and controls. Increased expression of the receptors TLR2, TLR4 and CD14, as well as the pro‐inflammatory cytokines IL8 and IL1β, was observed. Subjects with neutrophilic asthma had higher airway levels of endotoxin than the other groups studied. Conclusion There is evidence of activation of the innate immune system in asthma which results in the production of pro‐inflammatory cytokines and may contribute to the pathogenesis of neutrophilic asthma. PMID:16844729

  9. Neutrophil-mediated tumor cell cytotoxicity: role of the peroxidase system

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    A cytotoxic effect of human neutrophils on mammalian tumor cells is demonstrated. Cytotoxicity depends on the presence of intact neutrophils, phagocytosable particles, and a halide cofactor and is inhibited by azide, cyanide, and catalase. Neutrophils from patients with myeloperoxidase (MPO) deficiency or defective H1O2 production are not cytotoxic, but activity is resotred by addition of purified MPO or H2O2 respectively. The findings support a mechanism involving the phagocytosis-induced extracellular release of MPO and H2O2 and their reation with a halide cofactor to damage the target cells. PMID:165258

  10. The HMGB1/RAGE axis triggers neutrophil-mediated injury amplification following necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Huebener, Peter; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Hernandez, Celine; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Caviglia, Jorge Matias; Mu, Xueru; Loike, John D.; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to microbially triggered inflammation, mechanisms promoting sterile inflammation remain poorly understood. Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are considered key inducers of sterile inflammation following cell death, but the relative contribution of specific DAMPs, including high–mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is ill defined. Due to the postnatal lethality of Hmgb1-knockout mice, the role of HMGB1 in sterile inflammation and disease processes in vivo remains controversial. Here, using conditional ablation strategies, we have demonstrated that epithelial, but not bone marrow–derived, HMGB1 is required for sterile inflammation following injury. Epithelial HMGB1, through its receptor RAGE, triggered recruitment of neutrophils, but not macrophages, toward necrosis. In clinically relevant models of necrosis, HMGB1/RAGE-induced neutrophil recruitment mediated subsequent amplification of injury, depending on the presence of neutrophil elastase. Notably, hepatocyte-specific HMGB1 ablation resulted in 100% survival following lethal acetaminophen intoxication. In contrast to necrosis, HMGB1 ablation did not alter inflammation or mortality in response to TNF- or FAS-mediated apoptosis. In LPS-induced shock, in which HMGB1 was considered a key mediator, HMGB1 ablation did not ameliorate inflammation or lethality, despite efficient reduction of HMGB1 serum levels. Our study establishes HMGB1 as a bona fide and targetable DAMP that selectively triggers a neutrophil-mediated injury amplification loop in the setting of necrosis. PMID:25562324

  11. IL-17-mediated antifungal defense in the oral mucosa is independent of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Trautwein-Weidner, K; Gladiator, A; Nur, S; Diethelm, P; LeibundGut-Landmann, S

    2015-03-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17)-mediated immunity has emerged as a crucial host defense mechanism against Candida albicans infections in mucosal tissues and the skin. The precise mechanism by which the IL-17 pathway prevents fungal outgrowth has not been clarified. Neutrophils are critical for limiting fungal dissemination and IL-17 is generally thought to act by regulating neutrophil mobilization and trafficking to the site of infection. Using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), we found that strikingly the IL-17 pathway is not required for the neutrophil response to C. albicans. Mice deficient for the IL-17 receptor subunits IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) or IL-17RC or mice depleted of IL-17A and IL-17F exhibited a normal granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and CXC-chemokine response and displayed no defect in neutrophil recruitment or function. Instead, the inability of these mice to clear the fungus was associated with a selective defect in the induction of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in the epithelium that resulted in persistent fungal colonization. Importantly, this antifungal mechanism of IL-17A and IL-17F did not extend to the closely related family member IL-17C. Together, these data uncouple IL-17-dependent effector mechanisms from the neutrophil response and reveal a compartmentalization of the antifungal defense in the oral mucosa providing a new understanding of IL-17-mediated mucosal immunity against C. albicans.

  12. Inhibition of kinases impairs neutrophil activation and killing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, B; Meunier, P C; Car, B D

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular phosphorylations polymorphonuclear neutrophils are mediated by kinases, including mitogen activated-protein (MAP) kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. In the present study we demonstrate their effector functions upon both ligation of cell-surface seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors by bacterial peptide formylmethionyl-leucylphenylalanine as well as in the process of destruction of Staphylococcus aureus. To regulate neutrophil MAP kinases p38 and p44/42, specifically, we made use of their specific inhibitors 10 microM SK&F 86002 (for p38) and PD 098059 (for activating kinase of p44/42). SK&F 86002 was a potent inhibitor (by 70%) of induced antimicrobial oxygen-radical generation compared with PD 098059 (by 20%). SK&F 86002 and PD 098059 inhibited mobilization of a dominant neutrophil adhesion molecule, beta2 integrin, from cytoplasmic granules to the plasma membrane by 40 and 10% respectively, and the combination of the two drugs resulted in a 90% effect. The combined effect of both drugs was moderate inhibition of bacterial destruction, despite the fact that neither compound had detectable effect on bactericidal activity if applied individually. Bacterial destruction was also inhibited by wortmannin (0.1 microM), the specific inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, which had previously been described to target various other activations of the neutrophil, including oxygen-radical generation. Although the relative contribution of p38 and p44/42 MAP kinases varied, the marked effects of the combined inhibition of the kinases revealed their concerted actions to be critical for normal neutrophil function. PMID:9531489

  13. Dipeptidyl peptidase I activates neutrophil-derived serine proteases and regulates the development of acute experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Adkison, April M.; Raptis, Sofia Z.; Kelley, Diane G.; Pham, Christine T.N.

    2002-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment in inflammation is critical for host defense, but excessive accumulation of inflammatory cells can lead to tissue damage. Neutrophil-derived serine proteases (cathepsin G [CG], neutrophil elastase [NE], and proteinase 3 [PR3]) are expressed specifically in mature neutrophils and are thought to play an important role in inflammation. To investigate the role of these proteases in inflammation, we generated a mouse deficient in dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI) and established that DPPI is required for the full activation of CG, NE, and PR3. Although DPPI–/– mice have normal in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis and in vivo neutrophil accumulation during sterile peritonitis, they are protected against acute arthritis induced by passive transfer of monoclonal antibodies against type II collagen. Specifically, there is no accumulation of neutrophils in the joints of DPPI–/– mice. This protective effect correlates with the inactivation of neutrophil-derived serine proteases, since NE–/– × CG–/– mice are equally resistant to arthritis induction by anti-collagen antibodies. In addition, protease-deficient mice have decreased response to zymosan- and immune complex–mediated inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch. This defect is accompanied by a decrease in local production of TNF-α and IL-1β. These results implicate DPPI and polymorphonuclear neutrophil–derived serine proteases in the regulation of cytokine production at sites of inflammation. PMID:11827996

  14. Tamoxifen does not inhibit the swell activated chloride channel in human neutrophils during the respiratory burst

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, Jatinder

    2008-10-31

    Effective functioning of neutrophils relies upon electron translocation through the NADPH oxidase (NOX). The electron current generated (I{sub e}) by the neutrophil NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and rapidly depolarises the membrane potential in activated human neutrophils. Swelling activated chloride channels have been demonstrated in part to counteract the depolarisation generated by the NADPH oxidase I{sub e}. In the present study, the effects of inhibitors of swell activated chloride channels on ROS production and on the swelling activated chloride conductance was investigated in activated human neutrophils. Tamoxifen (10 {mu}M), a specific inhibitor for swell activated chloride channels in neutrophils, completely inhibited both the PMA and FMLP stimulated respiratory burst. This inhibition of the neutrophil respiratory burst was not due to the blocking effect of tamoxifen on the swelling activated chloride conductance in these cells. These results demonstrate that a tamoxifen insensitive swell activated chloride channel has important significance during the neutrophil respiratory burst.

  15. Serum amyloid A induces NLRP-3-mediated IL-1β secretion in neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Izumi, Yasumori; Jiuchi, Yuka; Kozuru, Hideko; Kawahara, Chieko; Nakamura, Minoru; Nakamura, Tadashi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Masumoto, Junya; Yasunami, Michio; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant with significant immunological activities, including effects on cytokine synthesis and neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils can also release cytokines with proinflammatory properties. IL-1β is a key proinflammatory cytokine, the secretion of which is controlled by inflammasome. We investigated the proinflammatory effects of SAA in vitro in relation to the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophils. Human neutrophils isolated form healthy subjects were stimulated with serum amyloid A (SAA). The cellular supernatants were analyzed by western blot using anti-IL-1β or anti-caspase-1 antibodies. IL-1β or Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) mRNA expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR or reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) method. SAA stimulation induced pro-IL-1β mRNA expression in neutrophils. Furthermore, SAA engaged the caspase-1-activating inflammasome, resulting in the production of active IL-1β. SAA-induced pro-IL-1β expression was marginally suppressed by the Syk specific inhibitor, R406, and SAA-induced pro-IL-1β processing in neutrophils was prevented by R406. Furthermore, SAA-induced NLRP3 mRNA expression was completely blocked by R406. Analysis of intracellular signaling revealed that SAA stimulation activated the tyrosine kinase Syk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). These results demonstrate that the innate neutrophil immune response against SAA involves a two-step activation process: an initial signal promoting expression of pro-IL-1β and a second signal involving Syk-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1, allowing processing of pro-IL-1β and secretion of mature IL-1β.

  16. Serum Amyloid A Induces NLRP-3-Mediated IL-1β Secretion in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Migita, Kiyoshi; Izumi, Yasumori; Jiuchi, Yuka; Kozuru, Hideko; Kawahara, Chieko; Nakamura, Minoru; Nakamura, Tadashi; Agematsu, Kazunaga; Masumoto, Junya; Yasunami, Michio; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Serum amyloid A (SAA) is an acute phase reactant with significant immunological activities, including effects on cytokine synthesis and neutrophil chemotaxis. Neutrophils can also release cytokines with proinflammatory properties. IL-1β is a key proinflammatory cytokine, the secretion of which is controlled by inflammasome. We investigated the proinflammatory effects of SAA in vitro in relation to the NLRP3 inflammasome in neutrophils. Methodology/Principal Findings Human neutrophils isolated form healthy subjects were stimulated with serum amyloid A (SAA). The cellular supernatants were analyzed by western blot using anti-IL-1β or anti-caspase-1 antibodies. IL-1β or Nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) mRNA expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR or reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) method. SAA stimulation induced pro-IL-1β mRNA expression in neutrophils. Furthermore, SAA engaged the caspase-1-activating inflammasome, resulting in the production of active IL-1β. SAA-induced pro-IL-1β expression was marginally suppressed by the Syk specific inhibitor, R406, and SAA-induced pro-IL-1β processing in neutrophils was prevented by R406. Furthermore, SAA-induced NLRP3 mRNA expression was completely blocked by R406. Analysis of intracellular signaling revealed that SAA stimulation activated the tyrosine kinase Syk and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Conclusions/Significance These results demonstrate that the innate neutrophil immune response against SAA involves a two-step activation process: an initial signal promoting expression of pro-IL-1β and a second signal involving Syk-dependent activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and caspase-1, allowing processing of pro-IL-1β and secretion of mature IL-1β. PMID:24846290

  17. [Metronidazole effect on active oxygen production by human blood neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Shchepetkin, I A

    1997-01-01

    The in vitro effect of metronidazole on production of active oxygen by neutrophila and in the enzymatic system of glucose-glucose oxidase-peroxidase was studied by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. An increase in the spontaneous and zymozan-stimulated chemiluminescence and a decrease in the phorbolmyristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated chemiluminescence after 2-hour preincubation of the neutrophils with 8.5 mM of metronidazole were observed. In concentrations of 0.9 to 8.7 mM metronidazole (without washing) dose-dependently lowered the neutrophil chemiluminescence in response to the effect of PMA and ionophore A23187 and to a lesser degree to that of zymozan. In doses of 20 to 100 mM the drug had an insignificant effect on production of active oxygen by the neutrophils in response to the cell stimulation by PMA, ionophore A23187 and zymozan. The data are in conformity with the scavenger effect of metronidazole on active oxygen radicals generating in the cell-free enzymatic system both in the presence and in the absence of superoxide dismutase.

  18. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by group A Streptococcus protects against C3b-mediated neutrophil killing.

    PubMed

    Ly, Diane; Taylor, Jude M; Tsatsaronis, James A; Monteleone, Mercedes M; Skora, Amanda S; Donald, Cortny A; Maddocks, Tracy; Nizet, Victor; West, Nicholas P; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J; McArthur, Jason D; Sanderson-Smith, Martina L

    2014-01-01

    The globally significant human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) sequesters the host protease plasmin to the cell surface during invasive disease initiation. Recent evidence has shown that localized plasmin activity prevents opsonization of several bacterial species by key components of the innate immune system in vitro. Here we demonstrate that plasmin at the GAS cell surface resulted in degradation of complement factor C3b, and that plasminogen acquisition is associated with a decrease in C3b opsonization and neutrophil-mediated killing in vitro. Furthermore, the ability to acquire cell surface plasmin(ogen) correlates directly with a decrease in C3b opsonization, neutrophil phagocytosis, and increased bacterial survival in a humanized plasminogen mouse model of infection. These findings demonstrate that localized plasmin(ogen) plays an important role in facilitating GAS escape from the host innate immune response and increases bacterial virulence in the early stages of infection.

  19. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2-adrenergic receptor-mediated upregulation of IL-6.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L; Byrne, Barbara A; Soulika, Athena M; Simon, Scott I; Rivkah Isseroff, R

    2014-03-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury; however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN))-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using noninvasive real-time imaging of genetically tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6-mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of proinflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs.

  20. Association of microparticles and neutrophil activation with decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Bennett, Michael; Banham, Neil D; Chin, Walter; Blake, Denise F; Rosen, Anders; Pollock, Neal W; Madden, Dennis; Barak, Otto; Marroni, Alessandro; Balestra, Costantino; Germonpre, Peter; Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie; Logue, Christopher; Lambert, David; Hardy, Kevin R; Sward, Douglas; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena B; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder, assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles (MPs)--vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm--have been implicated, but data in human divers have been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne, Annexin V-positive MPs and neutrophil activation, assessed as surface MPO staining, would differ between self-contained underwater breathing-apparatus divers suffering from DCS vs. asymptomatic divers. Blood was analyzed from 280 divers who had been exposed to maximum depths from 7 to 105 meters; 185 were control/asymptomatic divers, and 90 were diagnosed with DCS. Elevations of MPs and neutrophil activation occurred in all divers but normalized within 24 h in those who were asymptomatic. MPs, bearing the following proteins: CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142, CD235, and von Willebrand factor, were between 2.4- and 11.7-fold higher in blood from divers with DCS vs. asymptomatic divers, matched for time of sample acquisition, maximum diving depth, and breathing gas. Multiple logistic regression analysis documented significant associations (P < 0.001) between DCS and MPs and for neutrophil MPO staining. Effect estimates were not altered by gender, body mass index, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or emergency oxygen treatment and were modestly influenced by divers' age, choice of breathing gas during diving, maximum diving depth, and whether repetitive diving had been performed. There were no significant associations between DCS and number of MPs without surface proteins listed above. We conclude that MP production and neutrophil activation exhibit strong associations with DCS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Comparison of respiratory burst activity of inflammatory neutrophils in ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) and carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Serada, Ken; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Teshirogi, Kyosuke; Itou, Takuya; Shibashi, Takashi; Inoue, Yuuki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2005-10-01

    Neutrophils of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) were previously shown to have unusually high respiratory burst activity (RBA). To understand this unique character of ayu neutrophils, the RBAs of resting and inflammatory neutrophils of ayu and carp (Cyprinus carpio) were compared. Inflammation was induced in the peritoneal cavity by injecting killed-bacteria. The RBA of peritoneal-exudate (inflammatory) neutrophils was measured after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Resting neutrophils were obtained from kidney and blood of non-injected fish. In carp, the RBA of inflammatory neutrophils was much higher than that of resting neutrophils. On the other hand, in ayu no significant difference was observed. The RBA of neutrophils was already high in the kidney stock. The process of inflammation did not further enhance RBA. In addition to PMA, other stimulants (zymosan, opsonized-zymosan, and zymosan-treated serum) were used to measure RBA. Even with these stimulants, the RBA of inflammatory neutrophils was always higher than that of kidney neutrophils in carp. On the other hand in ayu, the RBA of kidney neutrophils was already high in the kidney stock, and no significant difference was observed between peritoneal and kidney neutrophils in ayu. These results indicate ayu neutrophils have spontaneously activated characteristics with the respect to the ROS generation in the kidney hematopoietic-stock.

  2. Human Platelets Utilize Cycloxygenase-1 to Generate Dioxolane A3, a Neutrophil-activating Eicosanoid*

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Christine; Aldrovandi, Maceler; Uhlson, Charis; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Longhurst, Hilary J.; Warner, Timothy D.; Alam, Saydul; Slatter, David A.; Lauder, Sarah N.; Allen-Redpath, Keith; Collins, Peter W.; Murphy, Robert C.; Thomas, Christopher P.; O'Donnell, Valerie B.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important mediators of fever, pain, and inflammation that modulate cell signaling during acute and chronic disease. We show by using lipidomics that thrombin-activated human platelets generate a new type of eicosanoid that both stimulates and primes human neutrophil integrin (Mac-1) expression, in response to formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine. Detailed characterization proposes a dioxolane structure, 8-hydroxy-9,11-dioxolane eicosatetraenoic acid (dioxolane A3, DXA3). The lipid is generated in nanogram amounts by platelets from endogenous arachidonate during physiological activation, with inhibition by aspirin in vitro or in vivo, implicating cyclooxygenase-1 (COX). Pharmacological and genetic studies on human/murine platelets revealed that DXA3 formation requires protease-activated receptors 1 and 4, cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), Src tyrosine kinases, p38 MAPK, phospholipase C, and intracellular calcium. From data generated by purified COX isoforms and chemical oxidation, we propose that DXA3 is generated by release of an intermediate from the active site followed by oxygenation at C8. In summary, a new neutrophil-activating platelet-derived lipid generated by COX-1 is presented that can activate or prime human neutrophils, suggesting a role in innate immunity and acute inflammation. PMID:27129261

  3. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael; Moriarty, Tara J

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted.

  4. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Ashkan; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Pětrošová, Helena; Tang, Tian Tian; Zhang, Yang; Bansal, Anil K.; Ebady, Rhodaba; Parikh, Maitry; Ahmed, Mijhgan; Sun, Chunxiang; Newbigging, Susan; Kim, Yae Ram; Santana Sosa, Marianna; Glogauer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted. PMID:27340827

  5. Adherence of neutrophils to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation by chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators and dependence upon the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family.

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, M G; Anderson, D C; Springer, T A; Knedler, A; Avdi, N; Henson, P M

    1989-01-01

    The process of neutrophil adhesion to and migration through the microvascular endothelium, an early event in the induction of the acute inflammatory response, has been attributed to the generation of extravascular chemoattractants. Although both chemotactic peptides and lipid mediators enhance neutrophil adherence in vitro and in vivo, the mechanism(s) involved in the interaction between circulating neutrophils and microvascular endothelial cells is still not completely understood. In a microtiter well adherence assay, the chemotactic peptides, FMLP and C5a, and the lipid mediators, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and platelet activating factor (PAF), enhanced human neutrophil adherence to cultured human microvascular endothelial cells as well as to human umbilical vein endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner with a rapid time course. This stimulated adhesive interaction between neutrophils and cultured human endothelial cells was dependent on the expression of the Mac-1, LFA-1, p150,95 glycoprotein family on the neutrophil surface since neutrophils from patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency, lacking surface expression of the adhesive glycoproteins, exhibited markedly diminished adherence to human endothelial cells in response to stimulation with chemotactic factors compared to normal control neutrophils. All four mediators enhanced expression of the glycoprotein family on the surface of normal neutrophils as determined by flow cytofluorimetry using a monoclonal antibody (TS1/18) to the glycoprotein common beta subunit. In addition, TS1/18 inhibited up to 100% the adherence of normal neutrophils to endothelial cells stimulated by maximal concentrations of FMLP, C5a, LTB4, or PAF. Moreover, HL-60 cells, human promyelocytic leukemia cells, neither increased glycoprotein surface expression nor adherence in response to stimulation. Thus, peptide and lipid mediators of the acute inflammatory response appear to enhance adherence of circulating neutrophils to the

  6. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 mediates rolling of human neutrophils on P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Neutrophils roll on P-selectin expressed by activated platelets or endothelial cells under the shear stresses in the microcirculation. P- selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is a high affinity ligand for P- selectin on myeloid cells. However, it has not been demonstrated that PSGL-1 contributes to the rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin. We developed two IgG mAbs, PL1 and PL2, that appear to recognize protein- dependent epitopes on human PSGL-1. The mAbs bound to PSGL-1 on all leukocytes as well as on heterologous cells transfected with PSGL-1 cDNA. PL1, but not PL2, blocked binding of 125-I-PSGL-1 to immobilized P-selectin, binding of fluid-phase P-selectin to myeloid and lymphoid leukocytes, adhesion of neutrophils to immobilized P-selectin under static conditions, and rolling of neutrophils on P-selectin-expressing CHO cells under a range of shear stresses. PSGL-1 was localized to microvilli on neutrophils, a topography that may facilitate its adhesive function. These data indicate that (a) PSGL-1 accounts for the high affinity binding sites for P-selectin on leukocytes, and (b) PSGL- 1 must interact with P-selectin in order for neutrophils to roll on P- selectin at physiological shear stresses. PMID:7532174

  7. Role of oxygen in antibody-dependent cytotoxicity mediated by monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Borregaard, N; Kragballe, K

    1980-01-01

    The antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytoxicity (ADCC) by human monocytes and neutrophils was investigated by measuring the release of 51chromate from prelabeled erythrocytes coated with immunoglobulin G. ADCC was found to be positively correlated to phagocytosis of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes and to the postphagocytic events of the effector cells, activation of the hexose monophosphate shunt, and degranulation. Exclusion of oxygen from the incubation media halved the ADCC by both cell types without affectijg phagocytosis or degranulation. Likewise, ADCC by cells from patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) was only half the intensity of ADCC by cells from normals. Inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration were without depressing effect of ADCC. Azide, which in addition to its blocking action on oxydative phosphorylation also inhibits catalase and myeloperoxidase, resulted in a approximately equal to 40% stimulation of ADCC by cells from normals but was without effect of ADCC by cells from CGD patients. The hydroxyl radical scavenger, mannitol, significantly depressed ADCC by cells from normals (P < 0.01) but was without effect on cells from CGD patients. Azide and mannitol also were without effect on ADCC by normal cells when oxygen was excluded. In a xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, erythrocytes were effectively lysed. This lysis was inhibited by catalase, superoxide dismutase, and mannitol. When comparable concentrations of glucose oxidase were used no lysis was observed. H2O2 either alone or in combination with azide did not lyse erythrocytes. It is suggested that ADCC by both monocytes and neutrophils is partly dependent on the generation of hydroxyl radicals by the effector cells. PMID:6252248

  8. Adipose triglyceride lipase acts on neutrophil lipid droplets to regulate substrate availability for lipid mediator synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Schlager, Stefanie; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Jandl, Katharina; Frei, Robert; Vujic, Nemanja; Kolb, Dagmar; Strohmaier, Heimo; Dorow, Juliane; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Rosenberger, Angelika; Wölfler, Albert; Lass, Achim; Kershaw, Erin E.; Ceglarek, Uta; Dichlberger, Andrea; Heinemann, Akos; Kratky, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    In humans, mutations in ATGL lead to TG accumulation in LDs of most tissues and cells, including peripheral blood leukocytes. This pathologic condition is called Jordans’ anomaly, in which functional consequences have not been investigated. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ATGL plays a role in leukocyte LD metabolism and immune cell function. Similar to humans with loss-of-function mutations in ATGL, we found that global and myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice exhibit Jordans’ anomaly with increased abundance of intracellular TG-rich LDs in neutrophil granulocytes. In a model of inflammatory peritonitis, lipid accumulation was also observed in monocytes and macrophages but not in eosinophils or lymphocytes. Neutrophils from Atgl−/− mice showed enhanced immune responses in vitro, which were more prominent in cells from global compared with myeloid-specific Atgl−/− mice. Mechanistically, ATGL−/− as well as pharmacological inhibition of ATGL led to an impaired release of lipid mediators from neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that the release of lipid mediators is dependent on the liberation of precursor molecules from the TG-rich pool of LDs by ATGL. Our data provide mechanistic insights into Jordans’ anomaly in neutrophils and suggest that ATGL is a potent regulator of immune cell function and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26109679

  9. Galectin-3 and soluble fibrinogen act in concert to modulate neutrophil activation and survival: involvement of alternative MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gabriela C; Ilarregui, Juan M; Rubel, Carolina J; Toscano, Marta A; Gómez, Sonia A; Beigier Bompadre, Macarena; Isturiz, Martín A; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Palermo, Marina S

    2005-05-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a member of a family of highly conserved carbohydrate-binding proteins, has recently emerged as a novel cellular modulator at inflammatory foci. Here we investigated the effects of Gal-3 on central effector functions of human neutrophils, including phagocytosis, exocytosis of secretory granules, and survival. We examined the effects of Gal-3 alone or in combination with soluble fibrinogen (sFbg), an extracellular mediator that plays a key role during the early phase of the inflammatory response through binding to integrin receptors. In addition we evaluated the intracellular signals triggered by these mediators in human neutrophils. Human neutrophils incubated with recombinant Gal-3 alone increased their phagocytic activity and CD66 surface expression. In contrast to the known antiapoptotic effect of Gal-3 on many cellular types, Gal-3 enhanced PMN apoptotic rate. Preincubation with Gal-3 primed neutrophils to the effects of sFbg, resulting in a synergistic action on degranulation. On the other hand, Gal-3 and sFbg had opposite effects on PMN survival, and the simultaneous action of both agonists partially counteracted the proapoptotic effects of Gal-3. In addition, although sFbg induced its effects through the activation of the ERKs, Gal-3 led to p38 phosphorylation. Disruption of this signaling pathway abrogated Gal-3-mediated modulation of neutrophil degranulation, phagocytosis, and apoptosis. Together, our results support the notion that Gal-3 and sFbg are two physiological mediators present at inflammatory sites that activate different components of the MAPK pathway and could be acting in concert to modulate the functionality and life span of neutrophils.

  10. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Prevents Murine Antibody-Mediated Acute Lung Injury at the Level of Neutrophil Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Production

    PubMed Central

    Semple, John W.; Kim, Michael; Hou, Jing; McVey, Mark; Lee, Young Jin; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Chai, Zhong-Wei; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a leading cause of transfusion-associated mortality that can occur with any type of transfusion and is thought to be primarily due to donor antibodies activating pulmonary neutrophils in recipients. Recently, a large prospective case controlled clinical study of cardiac surgery patients demonstrated that despite implementation of male donors, a high incidence of TRALI still occurred and suggested a need for additional interventions in susceptible patient populations. To examine if intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) may be effective, a murine model of antibody-mediated acute lung injury that approximates human TRALI was examined. When BALB/c mice were injected with the anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody 34-1-2s, mild shock (reduced rectal temperature) and respiratory distress (dyspnea) were observed and pre-treatment of the mice with 2 g/kg IVIg completely prevented these symptoms. To determine IVIg's usefulness to affect severe lung damage, SCID mice, previously shown to be hypersensitive to 34-1-2s were used. SCID mice treated with 34-1-2s underwent severe shock, lung damage (increased wet/dry ratios) and 40% mortality within 2 hours. Treatment with 2 g/kg IVIg 18 hours before 34-1-2s administration completely protected the mice from all adverse events. Treatment with IVIg after symptoms began also reduced lung damage and mortality. While the prophylactic IVIg administration did not affect 34-1-2s-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation, bone marrow-derived neutrophils from the IVIg-treated mice displayed no spontaneous ROS production nor could they be stimulated in vitro with fMLP or 34-1-2s. These results suggest that IVIg prevents murine antibody-mediated acute lung injury at the level of neutrophil ROS production and thus, alleviating tissue damage. PMID:22363629

  11. Various Molecular Species of Diacylglycerol Hydroperoxide Activate Human Neutrophils via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Takekoshi, Susumu; Tanino, Yutaka; Watanabe, Keiichi; Nakano, Minoru; Hitomi, Yoshiaki; Takigawa, Tomoko; Ogino, Keiki; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2007-01-01

    We have proposed that diacylglycerol hydroperoxide-induced unregulated signal transduction causes oxidative stress-related diseases. In this study, we investigated which molecular species of diacylglycerol hydroperoxide activated human peripheral neutrophils. All diacylglycerol hydroperoxides, diacylglycerol hydroxides, and diacyglycerols tested in the present study induced superoxide production by neutrophils. The ability to activate neutrophils among molecular species containing the same fatty acid composition was as follows; diacylglycerol hydroperoxide>diacylglycerol hydroxide≥diacylglycerol. The diacylglycerol hydroperoxide composed of linoleate was a stronger activator for neutrophils than that composed of arachidonate. 1-Palmitoyl-2-linoleoylglycerol hydroperoxide (PLG-OOH) was the strongest stimulator for neutrophils. We reconfirmed that PLG-OOH activated protein kinase C (PKC) in neutrophils. PLG-OOH induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, a substrate of PKC and a cytosolic component of NADPH oxidase, in neutrophils, as did N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine or 4β-phorbol-12β-myristate-13α-acetate. Moreover, the time course of p47phox phosphorylation was comparable to that of superoxide production. These results suggest that PLG-OOH activated intracellular protein kinase C. PLG-OOH, produced via an uncontrolled process, can act as a biological second messenger to cause inflammatory disease from oxidative stress. PMID:18392102

  12. Cyclic AMP-Mediated Suppression of Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation and Apoptosis by the Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Mary C.; Hewlett, Erik L.

    2014-01-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) of Bordetella pertussis intoxicates target cells by generating supraphysiologic levels of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). Since ACT kills macrophages rapidly and potently, we asked whether ACT would also kill neutrophils. In fact, ACT prolongs the neutrophil life span by inhibiting constitutive apoptosis and preventing apoptosis induced by exposure to live B. pertussis. Imaging of B. pertussis-exposed neutrophils revealed that B. pertussis lacking ACT induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), whereas wild-type B. pertussis does not, suggesting that ACT suppresses NET formation. Indeed, ACT inhibits formation of NETs by generating cAMP and consequently inhibiting the oxidative burst. Convalescent-phase serum from humans following clinical pertussis blocks the ACT-mediated suppression of NET formation. These studies provide novel insight into the phagocyte impotence caused by ACT, which not only impairs neutrophil function but also inhibits death of neutrophils by apoptosis and NETosis. PMID:25287922

  13. Specific depletion reveals a novel role for neutrophil-mediated protection in the liver during Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Karen D.; Sieve, Amy N.; Indramohan, Mohanalaxmi; Break, Timothy J.; Lee, Suhueng; Berg, Rance E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Previous studies have suggested that neutrophils are required for resistance during infection with multiple pathogenic microorganisms. However, the depleting antibody used in those studies binds to both Ly6G and Ly6C (anti-Gr-1; clone RB6-8C5). This antibody has been shown to not only deplete neutrophils, but also monocytes, and a subset of CD8 T cells. Recently, an antibody against Ly6G has been characterized which specifically depletes neutrophils. In the present study, neutrophils are depleted using the antibody against Ly6G during infection with the intracellular bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Our data show that neutrophil depleted mice are much less susceptible to infection than mice depleted with anti-Gr-1. Although neutrophils are required for clearance of LM, their importance is more pronounced in the liver and during a high-dose bacterial challenge. Furthermore, we demonstrate that protection mediated by neutrophils is due to production of TNF-α, but not IFN-γ. Additionally, neutrophils are not required for the recruitment of monocytes or the generation of adaptive T cell responses during LM infection. These studies highlight the importance of neutrophils during LM infection, and also indicate that depletion of neutrophils is less detrimental to the host than depletion of all Gr-1 expressing cell populations. PMID:21660934

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-01-01

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton’s tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca2+]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. PMID:26659126

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of Perilla frutescens in activated human neutrophils through two independent pathways: Src family kinases and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Yu; Leu, Yann-Lii; Fang, Yu; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Sung, Wei-Che; Tsai, Yung-Fong; Chung, Pei-Jen; Lee, Ming-Chung; Kuo, Yu-Ting; Yang, Hsuan-Wu; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2015-12-14

    The leaves of Perilla frutescens (L.) Britt. have been traditionally used as an herbal medicine in East Asian countries to treat a variety diseases. In this present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of P. frutescens extract (PFE) on N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-stimulated human neutrophils and the underlying mechanisms. PFE (1, 3, and 10 μg/ml) inhibited superoxide anion production, elastase release, reactive oxygen species formation, CD11b expression, and cell migration in fMLF-activated human neutrophils in dose-dependent manners. PFE inhibited fMLF-induced phosphorylation of the Src family kinases (SFKs), Src (Tyr416) and Lyn (Tyr396), and reduced their enzymatic activities. Both PFE and PP2 (a selective inhibitor of SFKs) reduced the phosphorylation of Burton's tyrosine kinases (Tyr223) and Vav (Tyr174) in fMLF-activated human neutrophils. Additionally, PFE decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i), whereas PP2 prolonged the time required for [Ca(2+)]i to return to its basal level. Our findings indicated that PFE effectively regulated the inflammatory activities of fMLF-activated human neutrophils. The anti-inflammatory effects of PFE on activated human neutrophils were mediated through two independent signaling pathways involving SFKs (Src and Lyn) and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+).

  16. Protective effect of Cissus quadrangularis on neutrophil mediated tissue injury induced by aspirin in rats.

    PubMed

    Jainu, Mallika; Mohan, K Vijai; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2006-04-06

    Cissus quadrangularis (family: Vitaceae) is well known for the treatment of gastric disorders in traditional medicine, owing to its rich source of carotenoids, triterpenoids and ascorbic acid, and has received considerable attention regarding its role in human nutrition. In the search of new potential antiulcer agents, the present study evaluated the ethanol extract of Cissus quadrangularis (CQE) against the gastric toxicity induced by aspirin in rats. The optimum protective dose of 500 mg/kg of extract was selected by the pretreatment of gastric ulcers with different doses of CQE (250, 500 and 750 mg/kg) for 7 days which showed ulcer protection by 40, 71.2 and 72.6%, respectively, as compared to ranitidine (RTD) (30 mg/kg) by 71.9% in the aspirin model. In addition, results have shown that administration of aspirin increases lipid peroxidation status, xanthine oxidase (XO), myeloperoxidase and decrease in selenium-glutathione peroxidase activities in the gastric mucosa, resulting in mucosal damage at both cellular and subcellular level. Pretreatment with CQE ameliorated the observed effect significantly in the gastric mucosa of ulcerated rats. These findings suggest that the gastroprotective activity of CQE could be mediated possibly through its antioxidant effect as well as by the attenuation of the oxidative mechanism and neutrophil infiltration.

  17. AKT-mediated regulation of polarization in differentiated human neutrophil-like HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenying; Chu, Xinwei; Cai, Chunqing; Zou, Mengchen; Meng, Xiaojing; Chen, Haiyang; Zou, Fei

    2012-08-01

    Neutrophil polarization is critical for the inflammatory response. AKT is a serine/threonine protein kinase and has been implicated in cell migration. However, it is not completely clear whether AKT affects neutrophil polarization. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that AKT regulates the polarization of neutrophil-like differentiated HL-60 cells (dHL-60) in response to fMLP. HL-60 cells were differentiated into dHL-60 by incubation in medium containing 1.3 % DMSO for up to 6 days. Polarization of dHL-60 cells and primary human neutrophils were measured by Zigmond chamber. Phospho-Akt was analyzed by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. F-actin polymerization was detected by Rhodamine-Phalloidine staining. Rac2 activation was evaluated using GST Pull-down assay. We found that changes in the rate of cell polarization were consistent with the changes in AKT phosphorylation levels during HL-60 cell differentiation in response to fMLP. Moreover, cell polarization and AKT phosphorylation were reduced in fMLP-stimulated dHL-60 cells pretreated with the PI3 kinase inhibitors or the AKT inhibitors, which was confirmed in the primary human neutrophils. The AKT inhibitors altered fMLP-induced F-actin polymerization. Rac2 GTPases was also decreased by the AKT inhibitors in fMLP-stimulated dHL-60 cells. This study demonstrates that AKT activation plays a crucial role in dHL-60 cell polarization.

  18. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: from molecular pathogenesis to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Wen

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) was originally identified as a virulence factor of H. pylori for its ability to activate neutrophils to generate respiratory burst by releasing reactive oxygen species. Later on, HP-NAP was also found to be involved in the protection of H. pylori from DNA damage, supporting the survival of H. pylori under oxidative stress. This protein is highly conserved and expressed by virtually all clinical isolates of H. pylori. The majority of patients infected with H. pylori produced antibodies specific for HP-NAP, suggesting its important role in immunity. In addition to acting as a pathogenic factor by activating the innate immunity through a wide range of human leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, and mast cells, HP-NAP also mediates adaptive immunity through the induction of T helper cell type I responses. The pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of HP-NAP not only make it play an important role in disease pathogenesis but also make it a potential candidate for clinical use. Even though there is no convincing evidence to link HP-NAP to a disease outcome, recent findings supporting the pathogenic role of HP-NAP will be reviewed. In addition, the potential clinical applications of HP-NAP in vaccine development, clinical diagnosis, and drug development will be discussed.

  19. Diminished adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils with CD47 functionalized blood contacting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Finley, Matthew J; Rauova, Lubica; Alferiev, Ivan S; Weisel, John W; Levy, Robert J; Stachelek, Stanley J

    2012-08-01

    CD47 is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that, through signaling mechanisms mediated by signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα1), functions as a biological marker of 'self-recognition'. We showed previously that inflammatory cell attachment to polymeric surfaces is inhibited by the attachment of biotinylated recombinant CD47 (CD47B). We test herein the hypothesis that CD47 modified blood conduits can reduce platelet and neutrophil activation under clinically relevant conditions. We appended a poly-lysine tag to the C-terminus of recombinant CD47 (CD47L) allowing for covalent linkage to the polymer. SIRPα1 expression was confirmed in isolated platelets. We then compared biocompatibility between CD47B and CD47L functionalized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) surfaces and unmodified control PVC surfaces. Quantitative and Qualitative analysis of blood cell attachment to CD47B and CD47L surfaces, via scanning electron microscopy, showed strikingly fewer platelets attached to CD47 modified surfaces compared to control. Flow cytometry analysis showed that activation markers for neutrophils (CD62L) and platelets (CD62P) exposed to CD47 modified PVC were equivalent to freshly acquired control blood, while significantly elevated in the unmodified PVC tubing. In addition, ethylene oxide gas sterilization did not inhibit the efficacy of the CD47 modification. In conclusion, CD47 modified PVC inhibits both the adhesion and activation of platelets and neutrophils.

  20. Inhibition of Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Reduces Neutrophil-Mediated Injury in Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Inga; Braunersreuther, Vincent; Bruzzone, Santina; Akhmedov, Alexander; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Speer, Timo; Poggi, Alessandro; Mannino, Elena; Pelli, Graziano; Galan, Katia; Bertolotto, Maria; Lenglet, Sébastien; Garuti, Anna; Montessuit, Christophe; Lerch, René; Pellieux, Corinne; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Dallegri, Franco; Mage, Jacqueline; Sebastian, Carlos; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Patrone, Franco; Mach, François; Nencioni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) is a key enzyme for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis, and recent evidence indicates its role in inflammatory processes. Here, we investigated the potential effects of pharmacological Nampt inhibition with FK866 in a mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion model. In vivo and ex vivo mouse myocardial ischemia/reperfusion procedures were performed. Results: Treatment with FK866 reduced myocardial infarct size, neutrophil infiltration, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation within infarcted hearts in vivo in a mouse model of ischemia and reperfusion. The benefit of FK866 was not shown in the Langendorff model (ex vivo model of working heart without circulating leukocytes), suggesting a direct involvement of these cells in cardiac injury. Sera from FK866-treated mice showed reduced circulating levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL2 and impaired capacity to prime migration of these cells in vitro. The release of CXCL8 (human homolog of murine chemokine CXCL2) by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and Jurkat cells was also reduced by FK866, as well as by sirtuin (SIRT) inhibitors and SIRT6 silencing, implying a pivotal role for this NAD+-dependent deacetylase in the production of this chemokine. Innovation: The pharmacological inhibition of Nampt might represent an effective approach to reduce neutrophilic inflammation- and oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage in early phases of reperfusion after a myocardial infarction. Conclusions: Nampt inhibition appears as a new strategy to dampen CXCL2-induced neutrophil recruitment and thereby reduce neutrophil-mediated tissue injury in mice. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 630–641. PMID:22452634

  1. Gene Expression during the Generation and Activation of Mouse Neutrophils: Implication of Novel Functional and Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Jeffrey A.; Duffau, Pierre; Yasuda, Kei; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Rothamel, Katherine; Rifkin, Ian R.; Monach, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen), gene expression was determined in unstimulated (circulating) mouse neutrophils and three populations of neutrophils activated in vivo, with comparison among these populations and to other leukocytes. Activation conditions included serum-transfer arthritis (mediated by immune complexes), thioglycollate-induced peritonitis, and uric acid-induced peritonitis. Neutrophils expressed fewer genes than any other leukocyte population studied in ImmGen, and down-regulation of genes related to translation was particularly striking. However, genes with expression relatively specific to neutrophils were also identified, particularly three genes of unknown function: Stfa2l1, Mrgpr2a and Mrgpr2b. Comparison of genes up-regulated in activated neutrophils led to several novel findings: increased expression of genes related to synthesis and use of glutathione and of genes related to uptake and metabolism of modified lipoproteins, particularly in neutrophils elicited by thioglycollate; increased expression of genes for transcription factors in the Nr4a family, only in neutrophils elicited by serum-transfer arthritis; and increased expression of genes important in synthesis of prostaglandins and response to leukotrienes, particularly in neutrophils elicited by uric acid. Up-regulation of genes related to apoptosis, response to microbial products, NFkB family members and their regulators, and MHC class II expression was also seen, in agreement with previous studies. A regulatory model developed from the ImmGen data was used to infer regulatory genes involved in the changes in gene expression during neutrophil activation. Among 64, mostly novel, regulatory genes predicted to influence these changes in gene expression, Irf5 was shown to be important for optimal secretion of IL-10, IP-10, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNF-α by mouse neutrophils in vitro after stimulation through TLR9. This data-set and its analysis using the ImmGen regulatory

  2. Epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78: a novel chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils in arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A E; Kunkel, S L; Harlow, L A; Mazarakis, D D; Haines, G K; Burdick, M D; Pope, R M; Walz, A; Strieter, R M

    1994-01-01

    We and others have shown that cells obtained from inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients produce interleukin-8, a potent chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils (PMNs). However, IL-8 accounted for only 40% of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in these synovial fluids. Currently, we have examined the production of the novel PMN chemotactic cytokine, epithelial neutrophil activating peptide-78 (ENA-78), using peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue from 70 arthritic patients. RA ENA-78 levels were greater in RA synovial fluid (239 +/- 63 ng/ml) compared with synovial fluid from other forms of arthritis (130 +/- 118 ng/ml) or osteoarthritis (2.6 +/- 1.8 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). RA peripheral blood ENA-78 levels (70 +/- 26 ng/ml) were greater than normal peripheral blood levels (0.12 +/- 0.04 ng/ml) (P < 0.05). Anti-ENA-78 antibodies neutralized 42 +/- 9% (mean +/- SE) of the chemotactic activity for PMNs found in RA synovial fluids. Isolated RA synovial tissue fibroblasts in vitro constitutively produced significant levels of ENA-78, and this production was further augmented when stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). In addition RA and osteoarthritis synovial tissue fibroblasts as well as RA synovial tissue macrophages were found to constitutively produce ENA-78. RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells spontaneously produced ENA-78, which was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Immunohistochemical localization of ENA-78 from the synovial tissue of patients with arthritis or normal subjects showed that the predominant cellular source of this chemokine was synovial lining cells, followed by macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts. Synovial tissue macrophages and fibroblasts were more ENA-78 immunopositive in RA than in normal synovial tissue (P < 0.05). These results, which are the first demonstration of ENA-78 in a human disease state, suggest that ENA-78 may play an important role in the recruitment of PMNs

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals activate MAP kinase in human neutrophils: inhibition of MAP kinase, oxidase activation and degranulation responses of neutrophils by taxol.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J K; Tudan, C; Sahl, B; Pelech, S L; Burt, H M

    1997-01-01

    The activation of MAP kinase in human neutrophils stimulated by both uncoated and plasma-opsonized crystals of triclinic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) was investigated. The effect of taxol on MAP kinase activation and on the responses of neutrophils stimulated by plasma-opsonized crystals was determined. MAP kinase activation was identified and quantified in Mono Q chromatography separated fractions of neutrophils that had been incubated with CPPD crystals by measuring [gamma-32P]adenosine triphosphate (ATP) phosphorylation of myelin basic protein and using immunoblotting techniques. Human neutrophils were incubated with taxol (0-50 microM), added to plasma-opsonized CPPD (50 mg/ml) and MAP kinase activation, chemiluminescence, superoxide anion generation, lysozyme and myeloperoxidase release were monitored. Both uncoated and plasma coated CPPD crystals induced a large increase in MAP kinase activity in neutrophils over control levels within 1 min of incubation. Pretreatment of neutrophils with taxol was able to suppress this activation of MAP kinase. Taxol produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of opsonized CPPD-induced neutrophil chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxide release. Taxol at 28 microM also significantly inhibited chemiluminescence, superoxide anion production and myeloperoxidase release from neutrophils stimulated by opsonized zymosan. This is the first report of crystal-induced activation of MAP kinase in neutrophils. Microtubule-associated processes, such as signal transduction, secretion and phagocytosis are involved in particulate-induced neutrophil responses. We have suggested that the inhibitory effect of taxol observed in this work is due to its stabilizing effect on microtubules and disruption of MAP kinase activation associated with microtubules. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:9176102

  4. Neutrophil proteolytic activation cascades: a possible mechanistic link between chronic periodontitis and coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Alfakry, Hatem; Malle, Ernst; Koyani, Chintan N; Pussinen, Pirkko J; Sorsa, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that affect a large segment of society. Coronary heart disease (CHD), the most common cardiovascular disease, progresses over several years and affects millions of people worldwide. Chronic infections may contribute to the systemic inflammation and enhance the risk for CHD. Periodontitis is one of the most common chronic infections that affects up to 50% of the adult population. Under inflammatory conditions the activation of endogenous degradation pathways mediated by immune responses leads to the release of destructive cellular molecules from both resident and immigrant cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their regulators can activate each other and play an important role in immune response via degrading extracellular matrix components and modulating cytokines and chemokines. The action of MMPs is required for immigrant cell recruitment at the site of inflammation. Stimulated neutrophils represent the major pathogen-fighting immune cells that upregulate expression of several proteinases and oxidative enzymes, which can degrade extracellular matrix components (e.g. MMP-8, MMP-9 and neutrophil elastase). The activity of MMPs is regulated by endogenous inhibitors and/or candidate MMPs (e.g. MMP-7). The balance between MMPs and their inhibitors is thought to mirror the proteolytic burden. Thus, neutrophil-derived biomarkers, including myeloperoxidase, may activate proteolytic destructive cascades that are involved in subsequent immune-pathological events associated with both periodontitis and CHD. Here, we review the existing studies on the contribution of MMPs and their regulators to the infection-related pathology. Also, we discuss the possible proteolytic involvement and role of neutrophil-derived enzymes as an etiological link between chronic periodontitis and CHD.

  5. Cigarette smoke-induced damage-associated molecular pattern release from necrotic neutrophils triggers proinflammatory mediator release.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Irene H; Pouwels, Simon D; Leijendekker, Carin; de Bruin, Harold G; Zijlstra, G Jan; van der Vaart, Hester; ten Hacken, Nick H T; van Oosterhout, Antoon J M; Nawijn, Martijn C; van der Toorn, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Cigarette smoking, the major causative factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is associated with neutrophilic airway inflammation. Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure can induce a switch from apoptotic to necrotic cell death in airway epithelium. Therefore, we hypothesized that CS promotes neutrophil necrosis with subsequent release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), including high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), alarming the innate immune system. We studied the effect of smoking two cigarettes on sputum neutrophils in healthy individuals and of 5-day CS or air exposure on neutrophil counts, myeloperoxidase, and HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of BALB/c mice. In human peripheral blood neutrophils, mitochondrial membrane potential, apoptosis/necrosis markers, caspase activity, and DAMP release were studied after CS exposure. Finally, we assessed the effect of neutrophil-derived supernatants on the release of chemoattractant CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Cigarette smoking caused a significant decrease in sputum neutrophil numbers after 3 hours. In mice, neutrophil counts were significantly increased 16 hours after repeated CS exposure but reduced 2 hours after an additional exposure. In vitro, CS induced necrotic neutrophil cell death, as indicated by mitochondrial dysfunction, inhibition of apoptosis, and DAMP release. Supernatants from CS-treated neutrophils significantly increased the release of CXCL8 in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Together, these observations show, for the first time, that CS exposure induces neutrophil necrosis, leading to DAMP release, which may amplify CS-induced airway inflammation by promoting airway epithelial proinflammatory responses.

  6. c-ANCA-induced neutrophil-mediated lung injury: a model of acute Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Hattar, K; Oppermann, S; Ankele, C; Weissmann, N; Schermuly, R T; Bohle, R M; Moritz, R; Krögel, B; Seeger, W; Grimminger, F; Sibelius, U; Grandel, U

    2010-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (c-ANCA) targeting proteinase 3 (PR3) are implicated in the pathogenesis of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). Fulminant disease can present as acute lung injury (ALI). In this study, a model of ALI in WG was developed using isolated rat lungs. Isolated human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were primed with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) to induce surface expression of PR3. Co-perfusion of TNF-primed neutrophils and monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies induced a massive weight gain in isolated lungs. This effect was not observed when control immunoglobulin G was co-perfused with TNF-primed PMNs. The c-ANCA-induced oedema formation was paralleled by an increase in the capillary filtration coefficient as a marker of increased pulmonary endothelial permeability. In contrast, pulmonary artery pressure was not affected. In the presence of the oxygen radical scavenger superoxide dismutase and a NADPH oxidase inhibitor, c-ANCA-induced lung oedema could be prevented. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase was equally effective in preventing c-ANCA-induced lung injury. In conclusion, anti-PR3 antibodies induced neutrophil mediated, elastase- and oxygen radical-dependent ALI in the isolated lung. This experimental model supports the hypothesis of a pathogenic role for c-ANCA in WG and offers the possibility of the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lung injury in fulminant WG.

  7. Neutrophil-mediated cytotoxicity triggered by immune complexes: the role of reactive oxygen metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Geffner, J R; Giordano, M; Palermo, M S; Prat, A; Serebrinsky, G P; Isturiz, M A

    1987-01-01

    Normal human neutrophils triggered by precipitating immune complexes (IC), soluble IC (sIC) or heat-aggregated IgG (HAIgG) displayed low levels of cytotoxicity towards nonsensitized target cells. Catalase, but not heated catalase, completely impaired this nonspecific cytotoxicity (NSC), suggesting a key role for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the lysis of target cells. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and certain HO. and 1O2 scavengers were unable to exert significant effects. Three haem-enzyme inhibitors, sodium azide, sodium cyanide and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole did not decrease neutrophil NSC, but markedly enhanced it. This data suggest that the mechanism involved was not dependent upon myeloperoxidase (MPO). The analysis of neutrophil-mediated ADCC indicates that oxygen-dependent but MPO-independent mechanisms appeared to be operative in this system. It was also found that the microfilament disrupting agents, cytochalasin B (CB) and dihydrocytochalasin B (dhCB), as well as the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), significantly enhanced NSC. In contrast, these compounds partially inhibited ADCC. This cytotoxic system provides a suitable model to study events that may occur during the course of immune complex diseases and also permits the evaluation of alternative lytic mechanisms triggered through neutrophil Fc gamma receptors. PMID:2822303

  8. Human resistin promotes neutrophil pro-inflammatory activation, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and increases severity of acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Gregoire, Murielle; Deshane, Jessy; Pittet, Jean Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.

    2014-01-01

    Although resistin was recently found to modulate insulin resistance in preclinical models of type II diabetes and obesity, recent studies have also suggested that resistin has proinflammatory properties. In these studies, we examined if the human specific variant of resistin affects neutrophil activation as well as the severity of LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI). Because human and mouse resistin have distinct patterns of tissue distribution, experiments were performed using resistin humanized mice that exclusively express human resistin (hRTN+/−/−), but are deficient in mouse resistin. Enhanced production of TNF-α or MIP-2 was found in LPS-treated hRtn+/−/−, compared to control Rtn−/−/− neutrophils. Expression of human resistin inhibited the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major sensor and regulator of cellular bioenergetics that is also implicated in inhibiting inflammatory activity of neutrophils and macrophages. In addition to the ability of resistin to sensitize neutrophils to LPS stimulation, human resistin also enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap formation. In LPS-induced ALI, humanized resistin mice demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, more severe pulmonary edema, increased NET formation, and elevated concentration of the alarmins HMGB1 and histone 3 in the lungs. Our results suggest that human resistin may play an important contributory role in enhancing TLR4 induced inflammatory responses, and may be a target for future therapies aimed at diminishing the severity of acute lung injury and other inflammatory situations where neutrophils play a major role. PMID:24719460

  9. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-09-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  10. Neutrophil extracellular traps can activate alternative complement pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Wang, C; Zhao, M-H; Chen, M

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between neutrophils and activation of alternative complement pathway plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). ANCAs activate primed neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which have recently gathered increasing attention in the development of AAV. The relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway has not been elucidated. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between NETs and alternative complement pathway. Detection of components of alternative complement pathway on NETs in vitro was assessed by immunostain and confocal microscopy. Complement deposition on NETs were detected after incubation with magnesium salt ethyleneglycol tetraacetic acid (Mg-EGTA)-treated human serum. After incubation of serum with supernatants enriched in ANCA-induced NETs, levels of complement components in supernatants were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Complement factor B (Bb) and properdin deposited on NETs in vitro. The deposition of C3b and C5b-9 on NETs incubated with heat-inactivated normal human serum (Hi-NHS) or EGTA-treated Hi-NHS (Mg-EGTA-Hi-NHS) were significantly less than that on NETs incubated with NHS or EGTA-treated NHS (Mg-EGTA-NHS). NETs induced by ANCA could activate the alternative complement cascade in the serum. In the presence of EGTA, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 concentration decreased from 800·42 ± 244·81 ng/ml, 7·68 ± 1·50 ng/ml, 382·15 ± 159·75 ng/ml in the supernatants enriched in ANCA induced NETs to 479·07 ± 156·2 ng/ml, 4·86 ± 1·26 ng/ml, 212·65 ± 44·40 ng/ml in the supernatants of DNase I-degraded NETs (P < 0·001, P = 0·008, P < 0·001, respectively). NETs could activate the alternative complement pathway, and might thus participate in the pathogenesis of AAV PMID:25963026

  11. Alveolar Macrophages and Neutrophils Are the Primary Reservoirs for Legionella pneumophila and Mediate Cytosolic Surveillance of Type IV Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Copenhaver, Alan M.; Casson, Cierra N.; Nguyen, Hieu T.; Fung, Thomas C.; Duda, Matthew M.; Roy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease, uses its dot/icm-encoded type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate effector proteins that promote its survival and replication into the host cell cytosol. However, by introducing bacterial products into the host cytosol, L. pneumophila also activates cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways, thereby triggering robust proinflammatory responses that mediate the control of infection. Thus, the pulmonary cell types that L. pneumophila infects not only may act as an intracellular niche that facilitates its pathogenesis but also may contribute to the immune response against L. pneumophila. The identity of these host cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a strain of L. pneumophila producing a fusion protein consisting of β-lactamase fused to the T4SS-translocated effector RalF, which allowed us to track cells injected by the T4SS. Our data reveal that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils both are the primary recipients of T4SS-translocated effectors and harbor viable L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection of mice. Moreover, both alveolar macrophages and neutrophils from infected mice produced tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1α in response to T4SS-sufficient, but not T4SS-deficient, L. pneumophila. Collectively, our data suggest that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are both an intracellular reservoir for L. pneumophila and a source of proinflammatory cytokines that contribute to the host immune response against L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection. PMID:25092908

  12. Volume-dependent regulation of the respiratory burst of activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kuchkina, N V; Orlov, S N; Pokudin, N I; Chuchalin, A G

    1993-11-15

    The effect of incubation medium osmolality on the respiratory burst of human neutrophils was studied using luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) as an indicator of burst activity. Neutrophils were stimulated with N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), the calcium ionophore A23187, thermoaggregated IgG (IgGn), and opsonized zymosan (OZ). It was shown that increasing the osmolality of the incubation medium from 320 up to 420 mosM decreased the A23187- and OZ-induced CL responses by 90%. Under the same conditions PMA-, FMLP- and IgGn-induced CL responses were decreased by 40-60%. A decrease of osmolality to 200 mosM resulted in a 2-3 fold decrease of the A23187-, PMA- and FMLP-induced CL and in a 60-80% increase of OZ- and IgGn-induced CL. It is suggested that osmolality-mediated alteration of cell volume is an important mechanism for regulating neutrophil activity.

  13. Quantitative in vitro assay to measure neutrophil adhesion to activated primary human microvascular endothelial cells under static conditions.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsen, Kevin; Farrar, Katherine; Hellman, Judith

    2013-08-23

    The vascular endothelium plays an integral part in the inflammatory response. During the acute phase of inflammation, endothelial cells (ECs) are activated by host mediators or directly by conserved microbial components or host-derived danger molecules. Activated ECs express cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules that mobilize, activate and retain leukocytes at the site of infection or injury. Neutrophils are the first leukocytes to arrive, and adhere to the endothelium through a variety of adhesion molecules present on the surfaces of both cells. The main functions of neutrophils are to directly eliminate microbial threats, promote the recruitment of other leukocytes through the release of additional factors, and initiate wound repair. Therefore, their recruitment and attachment to the endothelium is a critical step in the initiation of the inflammatory response. In this report, we describe an in vitro neutrophil adhesion assay using calcein AM-labeled primary human neutrophils to quantitate the extent of microvascular endothelial cell activation under static conditions. This method has the additional advantage that the same samples quantitated by fluorescence spectrophotometry can also be visualized directly using fluorescence microscopy for a more qualitative assessment of neutrophil binding.

  14. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  15. Enterococcus faecalis Bearing Aggregation Substance Is Resistant to Killing by Human Neutrophils despite Phagocytosis and Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rakita, Robert M.; Vanek, Natalie N.; Jacques-Palaz, Karen; Mee, Mee; Mariscalco, M. Michele; Dunny, Gary M.; Snuggs, Mark; Van Winkle, W. Barry; Simon, Scott I.

    1999-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance (AS) mediates efficient bacterium-bacterium contact to facilitate plasmid exchange as part of a bacterial sex pheromone system. We have previously determined that AS promotes direct, opsonin-independent binding of E. faecalis to human neutrophils (PMNs) via complement receptor type 3 and other receptors on the PMN surface. We have now examined the functional consequences of this bacterium-host cell interaction. AS-bearing E. faecalis was phagocytosed and internalized by PMNs, as determined by deconvolution fluorescence microscopy. However, these bacteria were not killed by PMNs, and internalized bacteria excluded propidium iodide, indicating intact bacterial membranes. Resistance to killing occurred despite activation of PMNs, as indicated by an increase in both functional and total surface Mac-1 expression, shedding of l-selectin, and an increase in PMN extracellular superoxide and phagosomal oxidant production. Deconvolution fluorescence microscopy also revealed that phagosomes containing AS-bearing bacteria were markedly larger than phagosomes containing opsonized E. faecalis, suggesting that some modification of phagosomal maturation may be involved in AS-induced resistance to killing. PMN phagosomal pH was significantly higher after ingestion of nonopsonized AS-bearing E. faecalis than after that of opsonized bacteria. The novel ability of AS to promote intracellular survival of E. faecalis inside PMNs suggests that AS may be a virulence factor used by strains of E. faecalis. PMID:10531268

  16. Isolation, antimicrobial activities, and primary structures of hamster neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Mak, P; Wójcik, K; Thogersen, I B; Dubin, A

    1996-01-01

    Hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) neutrophil granules contain at least four microbicidal peptides belonging to the defensin family. These compounds were purified from granule acid extracts by reverse-phase chromatography and termed HaNP-1 to -4 (hamster neutrophil peptide). HaNP-1 and HaNP-3 revealed the most bactericidal activity, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.3 to 0.8 microg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes strains. The HaNP-4 was always isolated in concentrations exceeding about 10 times the concentrations of other hamster peptides, but its antibacterial activity as well as that of HaNP-2 was relatively lower, probably as a result of conserved Arg residue substitutions. Other microorganisms were also tested, and generally, hamster defensins exhibited less potency against gram-negative bacteria. The amino acid sequence of hamster defensins showed a high percentage of identity to the sequence of mouse enteric defensins, reaching about 60% identical residues in the case of HaNP-3 and cryptdin 3. PMID:8890190

  17. Activation of the A3 Adenosine Receptor Suppresses Superoxide Production and Chemotaxis of Mouse Bone Marrow Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoeven, Dharini; Wan, Tina C.; Auchampach, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is formed in injured/ischemic tissues where it suppresses the actions of essentially all cells of the immune system. Most of the anti-inflammatory actions of adenosine have been attributed to signaling through the Gs protein-coupled A2A adenosine receptor (AR). Here, we report that the A3AR is highly expressed in murine neutrophils isolated from bone marrow. Selective activation of the A3AR with CP-532,903 potently inhibited mouse bone marrow neutrophil superoxide generation and chemotaxis induced by various activating agents. The selectivity of CP-532,903 was confirmed in assays using neutrophils obtained from A2AAR and A3AR gene “knock-out” mice. In a model of thioglycollate-induced inflammation, treating mice with CP-532,903 inhibited recruitment of leukocytes into the peritoneum by specifically activating the A3AR. Collectively, our findings support the theory that the A3AR contributes to the anti-inflammatory actions of adenosine on neutrophils, and provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the efficacy of A3AR agonists in animal models of inflammation, i.e., inhibition of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury. PMID:18583455

  18. Invariant natural killer T cells contribute to chronic-plus-binge ethanol-mediated liver injury by promoting hepatic neutrophil infiltration.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Stephanie; Feng, Dechun; Maricic, Igor; Ju, Cynthia; Kumar, Vipin; Gao, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Neutrophil infiltration is a hallmark of alcoholic steatohepatitis; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We previously reported that chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding synergistically induces hepatic recruitment of neutrophils, which contributes to liver injury. In this paper, we investigated the roles of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells in chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding-induced hepatic neutrophil infiltration and liver injury. Wild-type and two strains of iNKT cell-deficient mice (CD1d- and Jα18-deficient mice) were subjected to chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding. Liver injury and inflammation were examined. Chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding synergistically increased the number of hepatic iNKT cells and induced their activation, compared with chronic feeding or binge alone. iNKT cell-deficient mice were protected from chronic-plus-binge ethanol-induced hepatic neutrophil infiltration and liver injury. Moreover, chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding markedly upregulated the hepatic expression of several genes associated with inflammation and neutrophil recruitment in wild-type mice, but induction of these genes was abrogated in iNKT cell-deficient mice. Importantly, several cytokines and chemokines (e.g., MIP-2, MIP-1, IL-4, IL-6 and osteopontin) involved in neutrophil infiltration were upregulated in hepatic NKT cells isolated from chronic-plus-binge ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed mice. Finally, treatment with CD1d blocking antibody, which blocks iNKT cell activation, partially prevented chronic-plus-binge ethanol-induced liver injury and inflammation. Chronic-plus-binge ethanol feeding activates hepatic iNKT cells, which play a critical role in the development of early alcoholic liver injury, in part by releasing mediators that recruit neutrophils to the liver, and thus, iNKT cells represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of alcoholic liver disease.

  19. In vitro activation of coagulation by human neutrophil DNA and histone proteins but not neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Noubouossie, Denis F; Whelihan, Matthew F; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Sparkenbaugh, Erica; Pawlinski, Rafal; Monroe, Dougald M; Key, Nigel S

    2017-02-23

    NETosis is a physiologic process in which neutrophils release their nuclear material in the form of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). NETs have been reported to directly promote thrombosis in animal models. Although the effects of purified NET components including DNA, histone proteins, and neutrophil enzymes on coagulation have been characterized, the mechanism by which intact NETs promote thrombosis is largely unknown. In this study, human neutrophils were stimulated to produce NETs in platelet-free plasma (PFP) or in buffer using phorbol myristate actetate or calcium ionophore. DNA and histone proteins were also separately purified from normal human neutrophils and used to reconstitute chromatin using a salt-gradient dialysis method. Neutrophil stimulation resulted in robust NET release. In recalcified PFP, purified DNA triggered contact-dependent thrombin generation (TG) and amplified TG initiated by low concentrations of tissue factor. Similarly, in a buffer milieu, DNA initiated the contact pathway and amplified thrombin-dependent factor XI activation. Recombinant human histones H3 and H4 triggered TG in recalcified human plasma in a platelet-dependent manner. In contrast, neither intact NETs, reconstituted chromatin, individual nucleosome particles, nor octameric core histones reproduced any of these procoagulant effects. We conclude that unlike DNA or individual histone proteins, human intact NETs do not directly initiate or amplify coagulation in vitro. This difference is likely explained by the complex histone-histone and histone-DNA interactions within the nucleosome unit and higher-order supercoiled chromatin leading to neutralization of the negative charges on polyanionic DNA and modification of the binding properties of individual histone proteins. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Aberrant methylation of PSD disturbs Rac1-mediated immune responses governing neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis in ulcerative colitis-associated carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takaharu; Suzuki, Koichi; Okada, Shinichiro; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Maeda, Takafumi; Saito, Masaaki; Koizumi, Kei; Miyaki, Yuichiro; Konishi, Fumio

    2012-04-01

    We previously reported that the Pleckstrin and Sec7 domain-containing (PSD) gene is preferentially methylated in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) who developed colorectal cancer (CRC), and is implicated in UC-associated carcinogenesis through its inhibition of apoptosis. This study aimed to determine the potential effect of PSD methylation on its downstream molecule, Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), which governs neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis signaling. PSD was knocked down in a normal human fibroblast cell line (HNDF) and a neutrophil-like cell line (HL-60). Both NHDF and HL-60 cells exhibited numerous filamentous-actin (F-actin) rich membrane extensions, resulting in the activation of Rac1; this activation was hampered by PSD silencing. Lipopolysaccharide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) inducer, stimulated NHDF cells to release ROS and activated caspase‑3/7 in the presence of neutrophils, which was inhibited by PSD knockdown. Migration assays demonstrated that chemotaxis of HL-60 cells was affected by PSD silencing in NHDF cells. Tissue sections from 6 UC patients with CRC and 15 UC patients without CRC were examined. To verify Rac1-mediated chemotaxis in tissue sections, we evaluated the grade of neutrophil infiltration by histological assessment and assessed F-actin and PSD expression by immunohistochemistry. Neutrophil infiltration, F-actin and PSD expression were significantly decreased in specimens from UC patients with PSD methylation compared with those without. Decreased levels of F-actin expression were observed in colorectal mucosa, as well as in infiltrating cells with PSD methylation. PSD expression was preferentially inhibited in colorectal mucosa by PSD methylation, whereas PSD expression was rarely observed in infiltrating cells, regardless of PSD methylation status. These data indicate that aberrant methylation of PSD occurs in UC-associated colorectal mucosa, enabling circumvention of Rac1-mediated immune responses

  1. Vibrio cholerae evades neutrophil extracellular traps by the activity of two extracellular nucleases.

    PubMed

    Seper, Andrea; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R; Röhm, Marc; Grutsch, Andreas; Reidl, Joachim; Urban, Constantin F; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation.

  2. Vibrio cholerae Evades Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by the Activity of Two Extracellular Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Seper, Andrea; Hosseinzadeh, Ava; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Roier, Sandro; Leitner, Deborah R.; Röhm, Marc; Grutsch, Andreas; Reidl, Joachim; Urban, Constantin F.; Schild, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The Gram negative bacterium Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the secretory diarrheal disease cholera, which has traditionally been classified as a noninflammatory disease. However, several recent reports suggest that a V. cholerae infection induces an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract indicated by recruitment of innate immune cells and increase of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we describe a colonization defect of a double extracellular nuclease V. cholerae mutant in immunocompetent mice, which is not evident in neutropenic mice. Intrigued by this observation, we investigated the impact of neutrophils, as a central part of the innate immune system, on the pathogen V. cholerae in more detail. Our results demonstrate that V. cholerae induces formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) upon contact with neutrophils, while V. cholerae in return induces the two extracellular nucleases upon presence of NETs. We show that the V. cholerae wild type rapidly degrades the DNA component of the NETs by the combined activity of the two extracellular nucleases Dns and Xds. In contrast, NETs exhibit prolonged stability in presence of the double nuclease mutant. Finally, we demonstrate that Dns and Xds mediate evasion of V. cholerae from NETs and lower the susceptibility for extracellular killing in the presence of NETs. This report provides a first comprehensive characterization of the interplay between neutrophils and V. cholerae along with new evidence that the innate immune response impacts the colonization of V. cholerae in vivo. A limitation of this study is an inability for technical and physiological reasons to visualize intact NETs in the intestinal lumen of infected mice, but we can hypothesize that extracellular nuclease production by V. cholerae may enhance survival fitness of the pathogen through NET degradation. PMID:24039581

  3. A chemical biology approach demonstrates G protein βγ subunits are sufficient to mediate directional neutrophil chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Surve, Chinmay R; Lehmann, David; Smrcka, Alan V

    2014-06-20

    Our laboratory has identified a number of small molecules that bind to G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) by competing for peptide binding to the Gβγ "hot spot." M119/Gallein were identified as inhibitors of Gβγ subunit signaling. Here we examine the activity of another molecule identified in this screen, 12155, which we show that in contrast to M119/Gallein had no effect on Gβγ-mediated phospholipase C or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) γ activation in vitro. Also in direct contrast to M119/Gallein, 12155 caused receptor-independent Ca(2+) release, and activated other downstream targets of Gβγ including extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase B (Akt) in HL60 cells differentiated to neutrophils. We show that 12155 releases Gβγ in vitro from Gαi1β1γ2 heterotrimers by causing its dissociation from GαGDP without inducing nucleotide exchange in the Gα subunit. We used this novel probe to examine the hypothesis that Gβγ release is sufficient to direct chemotaxis of neutrophils in the absence of receptor or G protein α subunit activation. 12155 directed chemotaxis of HL60 cells and primary neutrophils in a transwell migration assay with responses similar to those seen for the natural chemotactic peptide n-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe. These data indicate that release of free Gβγ is sufficient to drive directional chemotaxis in a G protein-coupled receptor signaling-independent manner.

  4. p21-activated kinase (Pak) regulates NADPH oxidase activation in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Martyn, Kendra D.; Kim, Moon-Ju; Quinn, Mark T.; Dinauer, Mary C.; Knaus, Ulla G.

    2005-01-01

    The phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase plays an instrumental role in host defense and contributes to microbicial killing by releasing highly reactive oxygen species. This multicomponent enzyme is composed of membrane and cytosolic components that assemble in the plasma membrane or phagolysosome. While the guanosine S′-triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac2 has been shown to be a critical regulator of NADPH oxidase activity and assembly, the role of its effector, p21-activated kinase (Pak), in oxidase function has not been well defined. Using HIV-1 Tat-mediated protein transduction of Pak inhibitory domain, we show here that Pak activity is indeed required for efficient superoxide generation in intact neutrophils. Furthermore, we show that Pak translocates to the plasma membrane upon N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) stimulation and colocalizes with translocated p47phox and with p22phox, a subunit of flavocytochrome b558. Although activated Pak phosphorylated several essential serine residues in the C-terminus of p47phox, direct binding to p47phox was not observed. In contrast, active Pak bound directly to p22phox, suggesting flavocytochrome b was the oxidase-associated membrane target of this kinase and this association may facilitate further phosphorylation of p47phox in the assembling NADPH oxidase complex. PMID:16099876

  5. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Unique role for ATG5 in neutrophil-mediated immunopathology during M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Huynh, Jeremy P; Weiss, Leslie A; Park, Sunmin; Kambal, Amal; Debnath, Jayanta; Virgin, Herbert W; Stallings, Christina L

    2015-12-24

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a major global health threat, replicates in macrophages in part by inhibiting phagosome-lysosome fusion, until interferon-γ (IFNγ) activates the macrophage to traffic M. tuberculosis to the lysosome. How IFNγ elicits this effect is unknown, but many studies suggest a role for macroautophagy (herein termed autophagy), a process by which cytoplasmic contents are targeted for lysosomal degradation. The involvement of autophagy has been defined based on studies in cultured cells where M. tuberculosis co-localizes with autophagy factors ATG5, ATG12, ATG16L1, p62, NDP52, BECN1 and LC3 (refs 2-6), stimulation of autophagy increases bacterial killing, and inhibition of autophagy increases bacterial survival. Notably, these studies reveal modest (~1.5-3-fold change) effects on M. tuberculosis replication. By contrast, mice lacking ATG5 in monocyte-derived cells and neutrophils (polymorponuclear cells, PMNs) succumb to M. tuberculosis within 30 days, an extremely severe phenotype similar to mice lacking IFNγ signalling. Importantly, ATG5 is the only autophagy factor that has been studied during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo and autophagy-independent functions of ATG5 have been described. For this reason, we used a genetic approach to elucidate the role for multiple autophagy-related genes and the requirement for autophagy in resistance to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, autophagic capacity does not correlate with the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Instead, ATG5 plays a unique role in protection against M. tuberculosis by preventing PMN-mediated immunopathology. Furthermore, while Atg5 is dispensable in alveolar macrophages during M. tuberculosis infection, loss of Atg5 in PMNs can sensitize mice to M. tuberculosis. These findings shift our understanding of the role of ATG5 during M. tuberculosis infection, reveal new outcomes of ATG5 activity, and shed light on early events in innate

  7. Transient increase in phosphatidylinositol 3,4-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate during activation of human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Traynor-Kaplan, A.E.; Thompson, B.L.; Harris, A.L.; Taylor, P.; Omann, G.M.; Sklar, L.A. )

    1989-09-15

    We recently showed that phosphatidylinositol trisphosphate (PIP3) was present in a unique lipid fraction generated in neutrophils during activation. Here, we demonstrate that the band containing this fraction isolated from thin layer chromatography consists primarily of PIP3 and that only small amounts of radiolabeled PIP3 exist prior to activation. In addition, high performance liquid chromatography of deacylated phospholipids from stimulated cells reveals an increase in a fraction eluting ahead of glycerophosphoinositol 4,5-P2. After removal of the glycerol we found that it coeluted with inositol 1,3,4-P3 when resubjected to high performance liquid chromatography. Thus, we have detected a second, novel form of phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate in activated neutrophils, PI-(3,4)P2. The elevation of PIP3 through the formyl peptide receptor is blocked by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, implicating mediation of the increase in PIP3 by a guanosine triphosphate-binding (G) protein. The rise in PIP3 is not secondary to calcium elevation. Buffering the rise in intracellular calcium did not diminish the increase in PIP3. The elevation of PIP3 appears to occur during activation with physiological agonists, its level varying with the degree of activation. Leukotriene B4, which elicits many of the same responses as stimulation of the formyl peptide receptor but with minimal oxidant production, stimulates a much attenuated rise in PIP3. Isoproterenol, which inhibits oxidant production also reduces the rise in PIP3. Hence formation of PI(3,4)P2 and PIP3 (presumed to be PI(3,4,5)P3) correlates closely with the early events of neutrophil activation.

  8. Synergy between RU 28965 (roxithromycin) and human neutrophils for bactericidal activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Labro, M T; Amit, N; Babin-Chevaye, C; Hakim, J

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro effects of RU 28965 (roxithromycin), a new semisynthetic macrolide, on human neutrophil activity were compared with those of erythromycin. RU 28965, at a concentration as low as 0.1 microgram/ml, significantly enhanced the phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by neutrophils. Erythromycin displayed a less stimulating effect in a dose-dependent manner. Phagocytosis of Klebsiella pneumoniae was also increased after incubation of neutrophils with RU 28965, but killing was not altered. Neutrophil chemotaxis, myeloperoxidase activity, and O2 consumption were unchanged in the presence of RU 28965. PMID:3019233

  9. Neutrophil- and myeloperoxidase-mediated metabolism of reduced nimesulide: evidence for bioactivation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Chordia, Mahendra D; Li, Fengping; Huang, Tao; Linden, Joel; Macdonald, Timothy L

    2010-11-15

    Nimesulide, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), has been associated with rare idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. The chemical mechanisms underlying the liver injury remain unknown. We have undertaken the detailed study of the metabolic pathways of nimesulide in an effort to identify potential reactive metabolites. A previous report from this laboratory has demonstrated that one of the known nimesulide metabolites, termed reduced nimesulide (M1), is further bioactivated by human liver microsomes (HLMs) to form a reactive diiminoquinone species M2. The formation of M2 was confirmed indirectly by trapping with N-acetylcysteine (NAC). The aim of this study was to explore the fate of M1 in an inflammatory environment created by the recruitment of leukocytes. Leukocytes upon activation produce hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and other myeloperoxidase (MPO) products, such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), that are capable of metabolite oxidation. We demonstrate here that the reduced nimesulide, M1, undergoes a facile oxidation with activated neutrophils or with MPO in the presence of H(2)O(2) or HOCl to produce a variety of reactive as well as stable metabolites. One major metabolite, M3, was also produced by HLM as determined by trapping with NAC. Other metabolites, for example, M6, M8, and M9, were unique to the myeloperoxidase, because of their mode of formation from activation of the amino group of reduced nimesulide. The structures of some of these reactive metabolites were proposed on the basis of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses and established by their comparison with synthetic standards. Metabolite M6 is interesting because it provides clear evidence of amine activation and indicates the potential of the reactive intermediate of M1 to conjugate with protein nucleophiles. In summary, our results demonstrate that a known nimesulide metabolite could be bioactivated by MPO through a pathway distinct from HLM-mediated pathways and that

  10. β2 integrin mediates hantavirus-induced release of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Raftery, Martin J; Lalwani, Pritesh; Krautkrӓmer, Ellen; Peters, Thorsten; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Krüger, Renate; Hofmann, Jörg; Seeger, Karl; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2014-06-30

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses are emerging human pathogens that cause severe human disease. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood, as hantaviruses replicate in endothelial and epithelial cells without causing any cytopathic effect. We demonstrate that hantaviruses strongly stimulated neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Hantavirus infection induced high systemic levels of circulating NETs in patients and this systemic NET overflow was accompanied by production of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens. Analysis of the responsible mechanism using neutrophils from β2 null mice identified β2 integrin receptors as a master switch for NET induction. Further experiments suggested that β2 integrin receptors such as complement receptor 3 (CR3) and 4 (CR4) may act as novel hantavirus entry receptors. Using adenoviruses, we confirmed that viral interaction with β2 integrin induced strong NET formation. Collectively, β2 integrin-mediated systemic NET overflow is a novel viral mechanism of immunopathology that may be responsible for characteristic aspects of hantavirus-associated disease such as kidney and lung damage.

  11. β2 integrin mediates hantavirus-induced release of neutrophil extracellular traps

    PubMed Central

    Raftery, Martin J.; Lalwani, Pritesh; Krautkrӓmer, Ellen; Peters, Thorsten; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Krüger, Renate; Hofmann, Jörg; Seeger, Karl; Krüger, Detlev H.

    2014-01-01

    Rodent-borne hantaviruses are emerging human pathogens that cause severe human disease. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood, as hantaviruses replicate in endothelial and epithelial cells without causing any cytopathic effect. We demonstrate that hantaviruses strongly stimulated neutrophils to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). Hantavirus infection induced high systemic levels of circulating NETs in patients and this systemic NET overflow was accompanied by production of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens. Analysis of the responsible mechanism using neutrophils from β2 null mice identified β2 integrin receptors as a master switch for NET induction. Further experiments suggested that β2 integrin receptors such as complement receptor 3 (CR3) and 4 (CR4) may act as novel hantavirus entry receptors. Using adenoviruses, we confirmed that viral interaction with β2 integrin induced strong NET formation. Collectively, β2 integrin–mediated systemic NET overflow is a novel viral mechanism of immunopathology that may be responsible for characteristic aspects of hantavirus-associated disease such as kidney and lung damage. PMID:24889201

  12. Corneal stromal stem cells reduce corneal scarring by mediating neutrophil infiltration after wounding.

    PubMed

    Hertsenberg, Andrew J; Shojaati, Golnar; Funderburgh, Martha L; Mann, Mary M; Du, Yiqin; Funderburgh, James L

    2017-01-01

    Corneal scarring limits vision for millions of individuals worldwide. Corneal transplantation (keratoplasty) is the standard of care for corneal opacity; however, it bears the risk of graft rejection and infection and is not universally available. Stem cell therapy holds promise as an alternative to keratoplasty. Stem cells from human corneal stroma (CSSC) induce regeneration of transparent corneal tissue in a mouse wound-healing model. In this study we investigated the mechanism by which CSSC prevent deposition of fibrotic tissue. Infiltration by CD11b+/Ly6G+ neutrophils and myeloperoxidase expression were increased in corneas 24 hr after corneal wounding but were reduced in CSSC-treated wounds. Secretion of TSG-6, a protein known to regulate neutrophil migration, was up-regulated in CSSC in response to TNFα and as CSSC differentiate to keratocytes. In vivo, wounded mouse corneas treated with CSSC contained human TSG-6. Inhibition of neutrophil infiltration into cornea by CSSC was reversed when TSG-6 expression was knocked down using siRNA. Silencing of TSG-6 expression in CSSC reduced their ability to block scarring and the expression of mRNA for fibrosis-associated proteins collagen III, tenascin C, and smooth muscle actin in wounded corneas. Neutropenic mice exhibited a significant reduction in corneal scarring and fibrotic mRNA expression 2 weeks after wounding. These results support the conclusion that neutrophil infiltration is an essential event in the fibrotic response to corneal damage and that prevention of scarring by CSSC is mediated by secretion of TSG-6 by these cells.

  13. Corneal stromal stem cells reduce corneal scarring by mediating neutrophil infiltration after wounding

    PubMed Central

    Funderburgh, Martha L.; Mann, Mary M.; Du, Yiqin

    2017-01-01

    Corneal scarring limits vision for millions of individuals worldwide. Corneal transplantation (keratoplasty) is the standard of care for corneal opacity; however, it bears the risk of graft rejection and infection and is not universally available. Stem cell therapy holds promise as an alternative to keratoplasty. Stem cells from human corneal stroma (CSSC) induce regeneration of transparent corneal tissue in a mouse wound-healing model. In this study we investigated the mechanism by which CSSC prevent deposition of fibrotic tissue. Infiltration by CD11b+/Ly6G+ neutrophils and myeloperoxidase expression were increased in corneas 24 hr after corneal wounding but were reduced in CSSC-treated wounds. Secretion of TSG-6, a protein known to regulate neutrophil migration, was up-regulated in CSSC in response to TNFα and as CSSC differentiate to keratocytes. In vivo, wounded mouse corneas treated with CSSC contained human TSG-6. Inhibition of neutrophil infiltration into cornea by CSSC was reversed when TSG-6 expression was knocked down using siRNA. Silencing of TSG-6 expression in CSSC reduced their ability to block scarring and the expression of mRNA for fibrosis-associated proteins collagen III, tenascin C, and smooth muscle actin in wounded corneas. Neutropenic mice exhibited a significant reduction in corneal scarring and fibrotic mRNA expression 2 weeks after wounding. These results support the conclusion that neutrophil infiltration is an essential event in the fibrotic response to corneal damage and that prevention of scarring by CSSC is mediated by secretion of TSG-6 by these cells. PMID:28257425

  14. Microbiome-mediated neutrophil recruitment via CXCR2 and protection from amebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koji; Gilchrist, Carol A; Uddin, Md Jashim; Burgess, Stacey L; Abhyankar, Mayuresh M; Moonah, Shannon N; Noor, Zannatun; Donowitz, Jeffrey R; Schneider, Brittany N; Arju, Tuhinur; Ahmed, Emtiaz; Kabir, Mamun; Alam, Masud; Haque, Rashidul; Pramoonjago, Patcharin; Mehrad, Borna; Petri, William A

    2017-08-01

    The disease severity of Entamoeba histolytica infection ranges from asymptomatic to life-threatening. Recent human and animal data implicate the gut microbiome as a modifier of E. histolytica virulence. Here we have explored the association of the microbiome with susceptibility to amebiasis in infants and in the mouse model of amebic colitis. Dysbiosis occurred symptomatic E. histolytica infection in children, as evidenced by a lower Shannon diversity index of the gut microbiota. To test if dysbiosis was a cause of susceptibility, wild type C57BL/6 mice (which are innately resistant to E. histiolytica infection) were treated with antibiotics prior to cecal challenge with E. histolytica. Compared with untreated mice, antibiotic pre-treated mice had more severe colitis and delayed clearance of E. histolytica. Gut IL-25 and mucus protein Muc2, both shown to provide innate immunity in the mouse model of amebic colitis, were lower in antibiotic pre-treated mice. Moreover, dysbiotic mice had fewer cecal neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity. Paradoxically, the neutrophil chemoattractant chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL2, as well as IL-1β, were higher in the colon of mice with antibiotic-induced dysbiosis. Neutrophils from antibiotic pre-treated mice had diminished surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2, potentially explaining their inability to migrate to the site of infection. Blockade of CXCR2 increased susceptibility of control non-antibiotic treated mice to amebiasis. In conclusion, dysbiosis increased the severity of amebic colitis due to decreased neutrophil recruitment to the gut, which was due in part to decreased surface expression on neutrophils of CXCR2.

  15. Neutrophils are Essential in Short Hairpin RNA of Indoleamine 2,3- Dioxygenase Mediated-antitumor Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Yao-Hua; Liu, Hsin-Liang; Chong, Inn-Wen; Yen, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a rate limiting enzyme in tryptophan-degrading pathways and IDO activity results in immune suppression. Targeting IDO is a strategy of cancer immunotherapies. Our previous studies demonstrate that delivery of short hairpin against IDO (IDO shRNA) suppresses tumor growth and increases neutrophils infiltration into tumor. Neutrophils reveal antitumorigenic “N1” or protumorigenic “N2” phenotype in tumor microenvironment. However, the function of IDO shRNA-induced neutrophils is not clear. The LLC1 lung cancer model was used to investigate the role of these neutrophils. Intramuscular injection of IDO shRNA or IDO inhibitor treatment delayed tumor growth and both treatments increased neutrophil infiltration in tumor. Enriched tumor-infiltrating neutrophils expressed both high level of tumor necrosis factor-α and tumor necrosis factor-β (N1 and N2 associated molecules, respectively). In addition, IDO shRNA treatment induced interferon-γ and tryptophan transfer RNA expression in splenocytes. Systematic depletion of neutrophils abolished the IDO shRNA-induced therapeutic effect but did not affect the effect of IDO inhibitor. The levels of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α were suppressed in IDO shRNA treatment splenocytes after neutrophils depletion. In conclusion, these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils show antitumorigenic phenotype in spleen after IDO shRNA treatment in a murine lung cancer model. PMID:27922590

  16. Science review: Cell membrane expression (connectivity) regulates neutrophil delivery, function and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Seely, Andrew JE; Pascual, José L; Christou, Nicolas V

    2003-01-01

    As the principal cellular component of the inflammatory host defense and contributor to host injury after severe physiologic insult, the neutrophil is inherently coupled to patient outcome in both health and disease. Extensive research has focused on the mechanisms that regulate neutrophil delivery, function, and clearance from the inflammatory microenvironment. The neutrophil cell membrane mediates the interaction of the neutrophil with the extracellular environment; it expresses a complex array of adhesion molecules and receptors for various ligands, including mediators, cytokines, immunoglobulins, and membrane molecules on other cells. This article presents a review and analysis of the evidence that the neutrophil membrane plays a central role in regulating neutrophil delivery (production, rolling, adhesion, diapedesis, and chemotaxis), function (priming and activation, microbicidal activity, and neutrophil-mediated host injury), and clearance (apoptosis and necrosis). In addition, we review how change in neutrophil membrane expression is synonymous with change in neutrophil function in vivo. Employing a complementary analysis of the neutrophil as a complex system, neutrophil membrane expression may be regarded as a measure of neutrophil connectivity, with altered patterns of connectivity representing functionally distinct neutrophil states. Thus, not only does the neutrophil membrane mediate the processes that characterize the neutrophil lifecycle, but characterization of neutrophil membrane expression represents a technology with which to evaluate neutrophil function. PMID:12930553

  17. Synthesis of chlorinated flavonoids with anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic activities in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Marisa; Ribeiro, Daniela; Tomé, Sara M; Silva, Artur M S; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-10-30

    Neutrophils are considered the central cells of acute inflammation. Flavonoids have been suggested as therapeutic agents to avoid damages induced by inflammatory processes. It is well known the reactivity of flavonoids with hypochlorous acid produced by neutrophils, to form stable mono and dichlorinated products. In this study, we synthesized novel chlorinated flavonoids and investigated their effect in neutrophils' oxidative burst and in its lifespan, in comparison with the parent non-chlorinated flavonoids. The obtained results demonstrate that chlorinated flavonoids were more efficient than their parent compounds in modulating neutrophils' oxidative burst in phorbol myristate acetate-activated neutrophils. Some of the tested flavonoids drive neutrophil apoptosis in a caspase 3-dependent fashion. The present data showed that 8-chloro-3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone (4a) constitute an alternative anti-inflammatory therapy, due to the proven ability to suppress mechanisms engaged at the onset and progression of inflammation.

  18. Application of Intracellular Alkaline Phosphatase Activity Measurement in Detection of Neutrophil Adherence In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bednarska, Katarzyna; Klink, Magdalena; Sulowska, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    We have proposed the use of the fluorimetric method with 4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate (4-MUP) specific substrate for the alkaline phosphatase determination in the neutrophil adhesion assay. We provide evidence that the endogenous neutrophil alkaline phosphatase (NAP) activity evaluation is reliable to quantify neutrophil adhesion at a wide range of cell numbers (104−106). The results obtained by fluorimetric NAP activity test correlate to the results of adherence evaluated using the MTT reduction assay. The fluorimetric NAP activity test may be applied for resting as well as activated neutrophils without the risk of the activators interferences into the test. The alkaline phosphatase survey with the use of 4-MUP substrate is recommended herein as a sensitive, repeatable, simple, and reliable method of the neutrophil adherence determination in vitro. PMID:17047286

  19. Exacerbation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in ceramide synthase 6 knockout mice is associated with enhanced activation/migration of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Max; Ebel, Philipp; Mayer, Christoph A; Barthelmes, Julia; Tafferner, Nadja; Ferreiros, Nerea; Ulshöfer, Thomas; Henke, Marina; Foerch, Christian; de Bazo, Anika Männer; Grösch, Sabine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Willecke, Klaus; Schiffmann, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    Ceramides are mediators of inflammatory processes. In experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we observed that CerS6 mRNA expression was upregulated 15-fold in peripheral blood leukocytes before the onset of EAE symptoms. In peripheral blood leukocytes from MS patients, a 3.9-fold upregulation was found. Total genetic deletion of CerS6 and the selective deletion of CerS6 in peripheral blood leucocytes exacerbated the progression of clinical symptoms in EAE mice. This was associated with enhanced leukocyte, predominantly neutrophil infiltration and enhanced demyelination in the lumbar spinal cord of EAE mice. Interferon-gamma/tumor necrosis factor alpha (IFN-γ/TNF-α) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) both drive EAE development and induce expression of the integrin CD11b and the chemokine receptor C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), and we found they also induce CerS6 expression. In vivo, the genetic deletion of CerS6 enhanced the activation/migration of neutrophils, as reflected by an enhanced upregulation of CD11b and CXCR2. In vitro, the genetic deletion of CerS6 enhanced the activation status of IFN-γ/TNF-α-stimulated neutrophils, as shown by increased expression of nitric oxide and CD11b and an increased adhesion capacity. In G-CSF-stimulated neutrophils, the migration status was enhanced, as reflected by an elevated level of CXCR2 and an increased migration capacity. These data suggest that CerS6/C16-Cer mediates feedback regulation by inhibiting the formation of CD11b and CXCR2, which are induced either by IFN-γ/TNF-α or by G-CSF, respectively. We conclude that CerS6/C16-Cer mediates anti-inflammatory effects during the development of EAE and MS possibly by suppressing the migration and deactivation of neutrophils.

  20. Diosgenin inhibits superoxide generation in FMLP-activated mouse neutrophils via multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Jia, R; Liu, Y; Gao, Y; Zeng, X; Kou, J; Yu, B

    2014-12-01

    Diosgenin possesses anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. Activated neutrophils produce high concentrations of the superoxide anion which is involved in the pathophysiology of inflammation-related diseases and cancer. In the present study, the inhibitory effect and possible mechanisms of diosgenin on superoxide generation were investigated in mouse bone marrow neutrophils. Diosgenin potently and concentration-dependently inhibited the extracellular and intracellular superoxide anion generation in Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)- activated neutrophils, with IC50 values of 0.50 ± 0.08 μM and 0.66 ± 0.13 μM, respectively. Such inhibition was not mediated by scavenging the superoxide anion or by a cytotoxic effect. Diosgenin inhibited the phosphorylation of p47phox and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, and thus blocking the assembly of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase. Moreover, cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and protein kinase A (PKA) expression were also effectively increased by diosgenin. It attenuated FMLP-induced increase of phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A (cPLA2), p21-activated kinase (PAK), Akt, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Our data indicate that diosgenin exhibits inhibitory effects on superoxide anion production through the blockade of cAMP, PKA, cPLA2, PAK, Akt and MAPKs signaling pathways. The results may explain the clinical implications of diosgenin in the treatment of inflammation-related disorders.

  1. Elevated fecal calprotectin levels during necrotizing enterocolitis are associated with activated neutrophils extruding neutrophil extracellular traps

    PubMed Central

    MacQueen, BC; Christensen, RD; Yost, CC; Lambert, DK; Baer, VL; Sheffield, MJ; Gordon, PV; Cody, MJ; Gerday, E; Schlaberg, R; Lowe, J; Shepherd, JG

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neonates with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) have higher calprotectin levels in stool than do healthy neonates. However, it is not known whether high stool calprotectin at the onset of bowel symptoms identifies neonates who truly have NEC vs. other bowel disorders. STUDY DESIGN Neonates were eligible for this study when an x-ray was ordered to “rule-out NEC”. Stool calprotectin was quantified at that time and in a follow-up stool. Each episode was later categorized as NEC or not NEC. The location of calprotectin in the bowel was determined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS Neonates with NEC had higher initial and follow-up stool calprotectin levels than did neonates without NEC. Calprotectin in bowel from neonates with NEC was within neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). CONCLUSION At the onset of signs concerning for NEC, fecal calprotectin is likely to be higher in neonates with NEC. Calprotectin in their stools is exported from neutrophils via NETs. PMID:27388941

  2. Mincle activation enhances neutrophil migration and resistance to polymicrobial septic peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wook-Bin; Yan, Ji-Jing; Kang, Ji-Seon; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Young-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to bacterial infection. The therapeutic options for treating sepsis are limited. Impaired neutrophil recruitment into the infection site is directly associated with severe sepsis, but the precise mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Mincle plays a key role in neutrophil migration and resistance during polymicrobial sepsis. Mincle-deficient mice exhibited lower survival rates in experimental sepsis from cecal ligation and puncture and Escherichia coli–induced peritonitis. Mincle deficiency led to higher serum inflammatory cytokine levels and reduced bacterial clearance and neutrophil recruitment. Transcriptome analyses revealed that trehalose dimycolate, a Mincle ligand, reduced the expression of G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in neutrophils. Indeed, GRK2 expression was upregulated, but surface expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 was downregulated in blood neutrophils from Mincle-deficient mice with septic injury. Moreover, CXCL2-mediated adhesion, chemotactic responses, and F-actin polymerization were reduced in Mincle-deficient neutrophils. Finally, we found that fewer Mincle-deficient neutrophils infiltrated from the blood circulation into the peritoneal fluid in bacterial septic peritonitis compared with wild-type cells. Thus, our results indicate that Mincle plays an important role in neutrophil infiltration and suggest that Mincle signaling may provide a therapeutic target for treating sepsis. PMID:28112221

  3. Priming of Human Neutrophils Is Necessary for Their Activation by Extracellular DNA.

    PubMed

    Prikhodko, A S; Vitushkina, M V; Zinovkina, L A; Popova, E N; Zinovkin, R A

    2016-06-01

    Extracellular plasma DNA is thought to act as a damage-associated molecular pattern causing activation of immune cells. However, purified preparations of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA were unable to induce neutrophil activation in vitro. Thus, we examined whether granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) acting as a neutrophil priming agent can promote the activation of neutrophils by different types of extracellular DNA. GM-CSF pretreatment greatly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and promoted CD11b/CD66b expression in human neutrophils treated with mitochondrial and, to a lesser extent, with nuclear DNA. Our experiments clearly indicate that GM-CSF-induced priming of human neutrophils is necessary for their subsequent activation by extracellular DNA.

  4. Involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases in neutrophil activation and the development of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yum, H K; Arcaroli, J; Kupfner, J; Shenkar, R; Penninger, J M; Sasaki, T; Yang, K Y; Park, J S; Abraham, E

    2001-12-01

    Activated neutrophils contribute to the development and severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3-K) and the downstream serine/threonine kinase Akt/protein kinase B have a central role in modulating neutrophil function, including respiratory burst, chemotaxis, and apoptosis. In the present study, we found that exposure of neutrophils to endotoxin resulted in phosphorylation of Akt, activation of NF-kappaB, and expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha through PI3-K-dependent pathways. In vivo, endotoxin administration to mice resulted in activation of PI3-K and Akt in neutrophils that accumulated in the lungs. The severity of endotoxemia-induced ALI was significantly diminished in mice lacking the p110gamma catalytic subunit of PI3-K. In PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice, lung edema, neutrophil recruitment, nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB, and pulmonary levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were significantly lower after endotoxemia as compared with PI3-Kgamma(+/+) controls. Among neutrophils that did accumulate in the lungs of the PI3-Kgamma(-/-) mice after endotoxin administration, activation of NF-kappaB and expression of proinflammatory cytokines was diminished compared with levels present in lung neutrophils from PI3-Kgamma(+/+) mice. These results show that PI3-K, and particularly PI3-Kgamma, occupies a central position in regulating endotoxin-induced neutrophil activation, including that involved in ALI.

  5. In vitro sensitivity of oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria to the bactericidal activity of human neutrophil defensins.

    PubMed Central

    Miyasaki, K T; Bodeau, A L; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E; Lehrer, R I

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils play a major role in defending the periodontium against infection by oral, gram-negative, facultative bacteria, such as Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. We examined the sensitivity of these bacteria to a mixture of low-molecular-weight peptides and highly purified individual defensin peptides (HNP-1, HNP-2, and HNP-3) isolated from human neutrophils. Whereas the Capnocytophaga spp. strains were killed significantly by the mixed human neutrophil peptides, the A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. corrodens strains were resistant. Killing was attributable to the defensins. The bactericidal activities of purified defensins HNP-1 and HNP-2 were equal, and both of these activities were greater than HNP-3 activity against strains of Capnocytophaga sputigena and Capnocytophaga gingivalis. The strain of Capnocytophaga ochracea was more sensitive to defensin-mediated bactericidal activity than either C. sputigena or C. gingivalis was. The three human defensins were equipotent in killing C. ochracea. C. ochracea was killed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions and over a broad pH range. Killing was most effective under hypotonic conditions but also occurred at physiologic salt concentrations. We concluded that Capnocytophaga spp. are sensitive to oxygen-independent killing by human defensins. Additional studies will be required to identify other components that may equip human neutrophils to kill A. actinomycetemcomitans, E. corrodens, and other oral gram-negative bacteria. Images PMID:2254020

  6. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2(•-), and intracellular Ca(2+) were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170-225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca(2+) influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity.

  7. Cationic additives in nanosystems activate cytotoxicity and inflammatory response of human neutrophils: lipid nanoparticles versus polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Lin, Chwan-Fwu; Chang, Yuan-Ting; Fang, Jia-You

    2015-01-01

    This report compares the effect of lipid and polymeric nanoparticles upon human neutrophils in the presence of cationic surfactants. Nanostructured lipid carriers and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanoparticles were manufactured as lipid and polymeric systems, respectively. Some cytotoxic and proinflammatory mediators such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), elastase, O2•−, and intracellular Ca2+ were examined. The nanoparticles showed a size of 170–225 nm. Incorporation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide or soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate, the cationic surfactant, converted zeta potential from a negative to a positive charge. Nanoparticles without cationic surfactants revealed a negligible change on immune and inflammatory responses. Cationic surfactants in both nanoparticulate and free forms induced cell death and the release of mediators. Lipid nanoparticles generally demonstrated a greater response compared to polymeric nanoparticles. The neutrophil morphology observed by electron microscopy confirmed this trend. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as the coating material showed more significant activation of neutrophils than soyaethyl morpholinium ethosulfate. Confocal microscope imaging displayed a limited internalization of nanoparticles into neutrophils. It is proposed that cationic nanoparticles interact with the cell membrane, triggering membrane disruption and the following Ca2+ influx. The elevation of intracellular Ca2+ induces degranulation and oxidative stress. The consequence of these effects is cytotoxicity and cell death. Caution should be taken when selecting feasible nanoparticulate formulations and cationic additives for consideration of applicability and toxicity. PMID:25609950

  8. Propensity of crocin to offset Vipera russelli venom induced oxidative stress mediated neutrophil apoptosis: a biochemical insight.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Sundaram, M Shanmuga; Sunitha, K; Jnaneshwari, S; Devaraja, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2016-01-01

    Viper envenomation results in inflammation at the bitten site as well as target organs. Neutrophils and other polymorphonuclear leukocytes execute inflammation resolving mechanism and will undergo apoptosis after completing the task. However, the target specific toxins induce neutrophil apoptosis at the bitten site and in circulation prior to their function, thus reducing their number. Circulating activated neutrophils are major source of inflammatory cytokines and leakage of reactive oxygen species (ROS)/other toxic intermediates resulting in aggravation of inflammatory response at the bitten/target site. Therefore, neutralization of venom induced neutrophil apoptosis reduces inflammation besides increasing the functional neutrophil population. Therefore, the present study investigates the venom induced perturbances in isolated human neutrophils and its neutralization by crocin (Crocus sativus) a potent antioxidant carotenoid. Human neutrophils on treatment with venom resulted in altered ROS generation, intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cyt-c translocation, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine externalization and DNA damage. On the other hand significant protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis were evidenced in crocin pre-treated groups. In conclusion the viper venom induces neutrophil apoptosis and results in aggravation of inflammation and tissue damage. The present study demands the necessity of an auxiliary therapy in addition to antivenin therapy to treat secondary/overlooked complications of envenomation.

  9. Neutrophil-mediated anticancer drug delivery for suppression of postoperative malignant glioma recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jingwei; Zhao, Zekai; Zhang, Lei; Xue, Lingjing; Shen, Shiyang; Wen, Yajing; Wei, Zhuoyuan; Wang, Lu; Kong, Lingyi; Sun, Hongbin; Ping, Qineng; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2017-07-01

    Cell-mediated drug-delivery systems have received considerable attention for their enhanced therapeutic specificity and efficacy in cancer treatment. Neutrophils (NEs), the most abundant type of immune cells, are known to penetrate inflamed brain tumours. Here we show that NEs carrying liposomes that contain paclitaxel (PTX) can penetrate the brain and suppress the recurrence of glioma in mice whose tumour has been resected surgically. Inflammatory factors released after tumour resection guide the movement of the NEs into the inflamed brain. The highly concentrated inflammatory signals in the brain trigger the release of liposomal PTX from the NEs, which allows delivery of PTX into the remaining invading tumour cells. We show that this NE-mediated delivery of drugs efficiently slows the recurrent growth of tumours, with significantly improved survival rates, but does not completely inhibit the regrowth of tumours.

  10. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity.

    PubMed

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T; Lin, Ann E; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C; Kumar, Geetha B; Nair, Bipin G; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nizet, Victor

    2016-07-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound.

  11. Natural Product Anacardic Acid from Cashew Nut Shells Stimulates Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Production and Bactericidal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Hollands, Andrew; Corriden, Ross; Gysler, Gabriela; Dahesh, Samira; Olson, Joshua; Raza Ali, Syed; Kunkel, Maya T.; Lin, Ann E.; Forli, Stefano; Newton, Alexandra C.; Kumar, Geetha B.; Nair, Bipin G.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Nizet, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Emerging antibiotic resistance among pathogenic bacteria is an issue of great clinical importance, and new approaches to therapy are urgently needed. Anacardic acid, the primary active component of cashew nut shell extract, is a natural product used in the treatment of a variety of medical conditions, including infectious abscesses. Here, we investigate the effects of this natural product on the function of human neutrophils. We find that anacardic acid stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil extracellular traps, two mechanisms utilized by neutrophils to kill invading bacteria. Molecular modeling and pharmacological inhibitor studies suggest anacardic acid stimulation of neutrophils occurs in a PI3K-dependent manner through activation of surface-expressed G protein-coupled sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. Neutrophil extracellular traps produced in response to anacardic acid are bactericidal and complement select direct antimicrobial activities of the compound. PMID:27226531

  12. Alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are the primary reservoirs for Legionella pneumophila and mediate cytosolic surveillance of type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Alan M; Casson, Cierra N; Nguyen, Hieu T; Fung, Thomas C; Duda, Matthew M; Roy, Craig R; Shin, Sunny

    2014-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila, an intracellular pathogen responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease, uses its dot/icm-encoded type IV secretion system (T4SS) to translocate effector proteins that promote its survival and replication into the host cell cytosol. However, by introducing bacterial products into the host cytosol, L. pneumophila also activates cytosolic immunosurveillance pathways, thereby triggering robust proinflammatory responses that mediate the control of infection. Thus, the pulmonary cell types that L. pneumophila infects not only may act as an intracellular niche that facilitates its pathogenesis but also may contribute to the immune response against L. pneumophila. The identity of these host cells remains poorly understood. Here, we developed a strain of L. pneumophila producing a fusion protein consisting of β-lactamase fused to the T4SS-translocated effector RalF, which allowed us to track cells injected by the T4SS. Our data reveal that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils both are the primary recipients of T4SS-translocated effectors and harbor viable L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection of mice. Moreover, both alveolar macrophages and neutrophils from infected mice produced tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1α in response to T4SS-sufficient, but not T4SS-deficient, L. pneumophila. Collectively, our data suggest that alveolar macrophages and neutrophils are both an intracellular reservoir for L. pneumophila and a source of proinflammatory cytokines that contribute to the host immune response against L. pneumophila during pulmonary infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS

    PubMed Central

    Ziltener, Pascal; Reinheckel, Thomas; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires’ disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM) rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs), as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection. PMID:27105352

  14. Catecholamine stress alters neutrophil trafficking and impairs wound healing by β2 adrenergic receptor mediated upregulation of IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ho; Gorouhi, Farzam; Ramirez, Sandra; Granick, Jennifer L.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Soulika, Athena M.; Simon, Scott I.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah.

    2013-01-01

    Stress-induced hormones can alter the inflammatory response to tissue injury, however, the precise mechanism by which epinephrine influences inflammatory response and wound healing is not well defined. Here we demonstrate that epinephrine alters the neutrophil (PMN)-dependent inflammatory response to a cutaneous wound. Using non-invasive real-time imaging of genetically-tagged PMNs in a murine skin wound, chronic, epinephrine-mediated stress was modeled by sustained delivery of epinephrine. Prolonged systemic exposure of epinephrine resulted in persistent PMN trafficking to the wound site via an IL-6 mediated mechanism, and this in turn impaired wound repair. Further, we demonstrate that β2 adrenergic receptor-dependent activation of pro-inflammatory macrophages is critical for epinephrine-mediated IL-6 production. This study expands our current understanding of stress hormone-mediated impairment of wound healing and provides an important mechanistic link to explain how epinephrine stress exacerbates inflammation via increased number and lifetime of PMNs. PMID:24121404

  15. The receptor for complement component C3a mediates protection from intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by inhibiting neutrophil mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Mike C. L.; Brennan, Faith H.; Lynch, Jason P. L.; Mantovani, Susanna; Phipps, Simon; Wetsel, Rick A.; Ruitenberg, Marc J.; Taylor, Stephen M.; Woodruff, Trent M.

    2013-01-01

    C3a is a key complement activation fragment, yet its neutrophil-expressed receptor (C3aR) still has no clearly defined role. In this study, we used a neutrophil-dependent mouse model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to explore the role of C3aR in acute tissue injuries. C3aR deficiency worsened intestinal injury, which corresponded with increased numbers of tissue-infiltrating neutrophils. Circulating neutrophils were significantly increased in C3aR−/− mice after intestinal ischemia, and C3aR−/− mice also mobilized more circulating neutrophils after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor infusion compared with WT mice, indicating a specific role for C3aR in constraining neutrophil mobilization in response to intestinal injury. In support of this role, C3aR−/− mice reconstituted with WT bone marrow reversed IR pathology back to WT levels. Complement C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonism in C3aR−/− mice also rectified the worsened pathology after intestinal IR injury but had no effect on circulating neutrophils, highlighting the opposing roles of C3a and C5a in disease pathogenesis. Finally, we found that using a potent C3a agonist to activate C3aR in vivo reduced neutrophil mobilization and ameliorated intestinal IR pathology in WT, but not C3aR−/−, mice. This study identifies a role for C3aR in regulating neutrophil mobilization after acute intestinal injury and highlights C3aR agonism as a potential treatment option for acute, neutrophil-driven pathologies. PMID:23696668

  16. The receptor for complement component C3a mediates protection from intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injuries by inhibiting neutrophil mobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mike C L; Brennan, Faith H; Lynch, Jason P L; Mantovani, Susanna; Phipps, Simon; Wetsel, Rick A; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Taylor, Stephen M; Woodruff, Trent M

    2013-06-04

    C3a is a key complement activation fragment, yet its neutrophil-expressed receptor (C3aR) still has no clearly defined role. In this study, we used a neutrophil-dependent mouse model of intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to explore the role of C3aR in acute tissue injuries. C3aR deficiency worsened intestinal injury, which corresponded with increased numbers of tissue-infiltrating neutrophils. Circulating neutrophils were significantly increased in C3aR(-/-) mice after intestinal ischemia, and C3aR(-/-) mice also mobilized more circulating neutrophils after granulocyte colony-stimulating factor infusion compared with WT mice, indicating a specific role for C3aR in constraining neutrophil mobilization in response to intestinal injury. In support of this role, C3aR(-/-) mice reconstituted with WT bone marrow reversed IR pathology back to WT levels. Complement C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonism in C3aR(-/-) mice also rectified the worsened pathology after intestinal IR injury but had no effect on circulating neutrophils, highlighting the opposing roles of C3a and C5a in disease pathogenesis. Finally, we found that using a potent C3a agonist to activate C3aR in vivo reduced neutrophil mobilization and ameliorated intestinal IR pathology in WT, but not C3aR(-/-), mice. This study identifies a role for C3aR in regulating neutrophil mobilization after acute intestinal injury and highlights C3aR agonism as a potential treatment option for acute, neutrophil-driven pathologies.

  17. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  18. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A; Landoni, Verónica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  19. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A.; Landoni, Verónica I.; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M. Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C.

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  20. Mechanism of neutrophil activation and toxicity elicited by engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Helinor; Brown, David M; Kanase, Nilesh; Euston, Matthew; Gaiser, Birgit K; Robb, Calum T; Dyrynda, Elisabeth; Rossi, Adriano G; Brown, Euan R; Stone, Vicki

    2015-08-01

    The effects of nanomaterials (NMs) on biological systems, especially their ability to stimulate inflammatory responses requires urgent investigation. We evaluated the response of the human differentiated HL60 neutrophil-like cell line to NMs. It was hypothesised that NM physico-chemical characteristics would influence cell responsiveness by altering intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i and reactive oxygen species production. Cells were exposed (1.95-125 μg/ml, 24 h) to silver (Ag), zinc oxide (ZnO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or ultrafine carbon black (ufCB) and cytotoxicity assessed (alamar blue assay). Relatively low (TiO2, MWCNTs, ufCB) or high (Ag, ZnO) cytotoxicity NMs were identified. Sub-lethal impacts of NMs on cell function were investigated for selected NMs only, namely TiO2, Ag and ufCB. Only Ag stimulated cell activation. Within minutes, Ag stimulated an increase in [Ca2+]i (in Fura-2 loaded cells), and a prominent inward ion current (assessed by electrophysiology). Within 2-4 h, Ag increased superoxide anion release and stimulated cytokine production (MCP-1, IL-8) that was diminished by Ca2+ inhibitors or trolox. Light microscopy demonstrated that cells had an activated phenotype. In conclusion NM toxicity was ranked; Ag>ufCB>TiO2, and the battery of tests used provided insight into the mechanism of action of NM toxicity to guide future testing strategies.

  1. Ischemia Induced Neutrophil Activation and Diapedesis is Lipoxygenase Dependent.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    activity in mediating PMN activation and diapedesis . Anesthetized rabbits (n = 8) underwent 3 h of bilateral hindlimb ischemia. At 10 min of reperfusion...enhanced response of 337% to PMA stimulation. To study diapedesis , plasma collected at 10 min of reperfusion was introduced into plastic chambers taped...abolished PMN activation (51 +/- 12 fM DCF/cell) and ischemic plasma induced diapedesis into the plastic chamber (38 +/- 18 PMN/mm(exp 3)).

  2. Leishmania donovani promastigotes evade the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Christelle; McMaster, W Robert; Girard, Denis; Descoteaux, Albert

    2010-10-01

    Upon their recruitment to a site of infection and their subsequent activation, neutrophils release DNA and a subset of their granule content to form filamentous structures, known as neutrophil extracellular traps, which capture and kill microorganisms. In this study, we show that Leishmania promastigotes induced the rapid release of neutrophil extracellular traps from human neutrophils and were trapped by these structures. The use of Leishmania mutants defective in the biosynthesis of either lipophosphoglycan or GP63 revealed that these two major surface promastigote virulence determinants were not responsible for inducing the release of the surface protease neutrophil extracellular traps. We also demonstrate that this induction was independent of superoxide production by neutrophils. Finally, in contrast to wild-type Leishmania donovani promastigotes, mutants defective in lipophosphoglycan biosynthesis were highly susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of neutrophil extracellular traps. Altogether, our data suggest that neutrophil extracellular traps may contribute to the containment of L. donovani promastigotes at the site of inoculation, thereby facilitating their uptake by mononuclear phagocytes.

  3. Alarmins Link Neutrophils and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, De; de la Rosa, Gonzalo; Tewary, Poonam; Oppenheim, Joost J.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first major population of leukocyte to infiltrate infected or injured tissues and are crucial for initiating host innate defense and adaptive immunity. Although the contribution of neutrophils to innate immune defense is mediated predominantly by phagocytosis and killing of microorganisms, neutrophils also participate in the induction of adaptive immune responses. At sites of infection and/or injury, neutrophils release numerous mediators upon degranulation or death, among these are alarmins which have a characteristic dual capacity to mobilize and activate antigen-presenting cells. We describe here how alarmins released by neutrophil degranulation and/or death can link neutrophils to dendritic cells by promoting their recruitment and activation, resulting in the augmentation of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:19699678

  4. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525].

  5. Promotion of formyl peptide receptor 1-mediated neutrophil chemotactic migration by antimicrobial peptides isolated from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Sung Kyun; Jung, Young Su; Lee, Mingyu; Lee, Ha Young; Lee, Ha Young; Park, Joon Seong; Koo, JaeHyung; Koo, JaeHyung; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effects of two antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) isolated from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans on neutrophil activity. Stimulation of mouse neutrophils with the two AMPs elicited chemotactic migration of the cells in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The two AMPs also stimulated activation of ERK and Akt, which contribute to chemotactic migration of neutrophils. We found that AMP-stimulated neutrophil chemotaxis was blocked by a formyl peptide receptor (FPR) 1 antagonist (cyclosporin H); moreover the two AMPs stimulated the chemotactic migration of FPR1-expressing RBL-2H3 cells but not of vector-expressing RBL-2H3 cells. We also found that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophil migration in vivo, and that this effect is blocked in FPR1-deficient mice. Taken together, our results suggest that the two AMPs stimulate neutrophils, leading to chemotactic migration through FPR1, and the two AMPs will be useful for the study of FPR1 signaling and neutrophil activation. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 520-525] PMID:27502013

  6. Increased metabolic activity of neutrophils in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ashwin; Damodar, Komaladevi Sampath

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the metabolic activity of peripheral neutrophils in patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with that of healthy, nonsmoking volunteers. Materials and Methods: Venous blood samples were taken from patients diagnosed with COPD as well as from healthy nonsmokers. Each sample was subjected to the nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) test in which neutrophils exhibiting elevated metabolic activity were detected by light microscopy. The test was repeated after stimulation with Escherichia coli (E. coli) endotoxin with fresh samples. Neutrophils showing dye uptake were then counted in each case. Results: We found that the mean numbers of activated neutrophils without and with the addition of endotoxin were 19% and 23%, respectively, in the control group and 56% and 62%, respectively, in the test group. Two-sample t-test statistic revealed that there was a significant (P < 0.01) increase in neutrophilic metabolic activity in patients with COPD as compared to that in healthy volunteers. This significance remained even after stimulation using E. coli endotoxin. Conclusion: The results hint at a potentially relevant pathogenic mechanism in COPD related to the metabolic activity of neutrophils. By exhibiting enhanced metabolic activity, neutrophils in the COPD patients are more likely to be involved in damaging lung tissues. PMID:26664165

  7. TLR8, but not TLR7, induces the priming of the NADPH oxidase activation in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Makni-Maalej, Karama; Marzaioli, Viviana; Boussetta, Tarek; Belambri, Sahra Amel; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Dang, Pham My-Chan; El-Benna, Jamel

    2015-06-01

    Neutrophils play a key role in host defense against invading pathogens by releasing toxic agents, such as ROS and antimicrobial peptides. Human neutrophils express several TLRs that recognize a variety of microbial motifs. The interaction between TLR and their agonists is believed to help neutrophils to recognize and to kill pathogens efficiently by increasing their activation, a process called priming. However, excessive activation can induce tissue injury and thereby, contribute to inflammatory disorders. Agonists that activate TLR7 and TLR8 induce priming of neutrophil ROS production; however, which receptor is involved in this process has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that the selective TLR8 agonist, CL075 (3M002), induced a dramatic increase of fMLF-stimulated NOX2 activation, whereas the selective TLR7 agonist, loxoribine, failed to induce any priming effect. Interestingly, CL075, but not loxoribine, induced the phosphorylation of the NOX2 cytosolic component p47phox on several serines and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK and ERK1/2. The inhibitor of p38MAPK completely blocked CL075-induced phosphorylation of p47phox Ser345. Moreover, CL075, but not loxoribine, induced the activation of the proline isomerase Pin1, and juglone, a Pin1 inhibitor, prevented CL075-mediated priming of fMLF-induced superoxide production. These results indicate that TLR8, but not TLR7, is involved in priming of human neutrophil ROS production by inducing the phosphorylation of p47phox and p38MAPK and that Pin1 is also involved in this process. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  8. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K.; Kim, Ryung S.; Frenette, Paul S.; Taylor, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor

  9. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  10. Modulatory activities of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (Loranthaceae) extracts on stimulated equine neutrophils and myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boly, Raïnatou; Dessy, Stéphanie; Kohnen, Stephan; Kini, Félix; Lompo, Marius; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Deby-Dupont, Ginette; Serteyn, Didier; Franck, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Agelanthus dodoneifolius DC Danser (Loranthaceae) is used for the treatment of various diseases including asthma. The aqueous and hydroalcoholic extracts have been reported to have anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic and bronchorelaxant activities. The present study investigates the effects of the aqueous decoction and the diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and butanolic fractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius DC Danser (Loranthaceae) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and myeloperoxidase (MPO) release by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated equine neutrophils and on purified equine MPO activity. ROS production and MPO release by the PMA-stimulated neutrophils were measured by the lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence and ELISA assays, respectively. Specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection (SIEFED) was used to specifically measure the equine MPO activity. Identification and quantification of the individual and total phenolic and flavonoid compounds were performed using UPLC-MS/MS equipment and colorimetric methods involving Folin-Ciocalteu and AlCl₃, respectively. All the tested extracts displayed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on the oxidant activities of neutrophils; a stronger effect was observed with the organic fractions than the aqueous decoction. These findings could be correlated with a high content of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The results confirm the previously shown anti-inflammatory effect of Agelanthus dodoneifolius and its potential use for the treatment of neutrophil-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  11. Early membrane rupture events during neutrophil-mediated antibody-dependent tumor cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Kindzelskii, A L; Petty, H R

    1999-03-15

    Although cell-mediated cytolysis is a fundamental immune effector response, its mechanism remains poorly understood at the cellular level. In this report, we image for the first time transient ruptures, as inferred by cytoplasmic marker release, in tumor cell membranes during Ab-dependent cellular cytolysis. The cytosol of IgG-opsonized YAC tumor cells was labeled with tetra-methylrhodamine diacetate followed by the formation of tumor cell-neutrophil conjugates. We hypothesized that tumor cell cytolysis proceeds via a series of discrete membrane rupture/resealing events that contribute to marker release. To test this hypothesis, we occluded the fluorescence image of the labeled tumor cells by passing an opaque disk into a field-conjugated plane between the light source and the sample. Multiple small bursts of fluorescent label release from tumor cells could be detected using a photomultiplier tube. Similarly, multiple fluorescent plumes were observed at various sites around the perimeter of a target. These findings support a multihit model of target cytolysis and suggest that cytolytic release is not focused at specific sites. Cytolytic bursts were generally observed at 20-s intervals, which match the previously described reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and superoxide release oscillation periods for neutrophils; we speculate that metabolic oscillations of the effector cell drive the membrane damage of the target.

  12. Opa+ Neisseria gonorrhoeae Exhibits Reduced Survival in Human Neutrophils Via Src Family Kinase-Mediated Bacterial Trafficking Into Mature Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. Brittany; Ball, Louise M.; Daily, Kylene P.; Martin, Jennifer N.; Columbus, Linda; Criss, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary During gonorrheal infection, there is a heterogeneous population of Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) varied in their expression of opacity-associated (Opa) proteins. While Opa proteins are important for bacterial attachment and invasion of epithelial cells, Opa+ Gc has a survival defect after exposure to neutrophils. Here, we use constitutively Opa- and OpaD+ Gc in strain background FA1090 to show that Opa+ Gc is more sensitive to killing inside adherent, chemokine-treated primary human neutrophils due to increased bacterial residence in mature, degradative phagolysosomes that contain primary and secondary granule antimicrobial content. Although Opa+ Gc stimulates a potent oxidative burst, neutrophil killing of Opa+ Gc was instead attributable to non-oxidative components, particularly neutrophil proteases and the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein. Blocking interaction of Opa+ Gc with carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) or inhibiting Src family kinase signaling, which is downstream of CEACAM activation, enhanced the survival of Opa+ Gc in neutrophils. Src family kinase signaling was required for fusion of Gc phagosomes with primary granules to generate mature phagolysosomes. Conversely, ectopic activation of Src family kinases or coinfection with Opa+ Gc resulted in decreased survival of Opa- Gc in neutrophils. From these results, we conclude that Opa protein expression is an important modulator of Gc survival characteristics in neutrophils by influencing phagosome dynamics and thus bacterial exposure to neutrophils’ full antimicrobial arsenal. PMID:25346239

  13. A Simple and Efficient Method to Detect Nuclear Factor Activation in Human Neutrophils by Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Erick; Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in peripheral blood. These cells are the first to appear at sites of inflammation and infection, thus becoming the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils possess important antimicrobial functions such as phagocytosis, release of lytic enzymes, and production of reactive oxygen species. In addition to these important defense functions, neutrophils perform other tasks in response to infection such as production of proinflammatory cytokines and inhibition of apoptosis. Cytokines recruit other leukocytes that help clear the infection, and inhibition of apoptosis allows the neutrophil to live longer at the site of infection. These functions are regulated at the level of transcription. However, because neutrophils are short-lived cells, the study of transcriptionally regulated responses in these cells cannot be performed with conventional reporter gene methods since there are no efficient techniques for neutrophil transfection. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that allows detection and quantification of nuclear factors in isolated and immunolabeled nuclei by flow cytometry. We describe techniques to isolate pure neutrophils from human peripheral blood, stimulate these cells with anti-receptor antibodies, isolate and immunolabel nuclei, and analyze nuclei by flow cytometry. The method has been successfully used to detect NF-κB and Elk-1 nuclear factors in nuclei from neutrophils and other cell types. Thus, this method represents an option for analyzing activation of transcription factors in isolated nuclei from a variety of cell types. PMID:23603868

  14. Enhancement of human eosinophil- and neutrophil-mediated killing of schistosomula of schistosoma mansoni by reversed type (IgE-mediated) anaphylaxis, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Moqbel, R.; Macdonald, A. J.; Kay, A. B.

    1985-01-01

    Using human peripheral blood leucocytes we have developed a model for studying the effect of in vitro anaphylaxis on granulocyte-mediated killing of helminthic larvae (schistosomula (Sch) of Schistosoma mansoni). Leucocytes were incubated with either an F(ab')2 rabbit anti-human IgE (αE) or a control F(ab')2 prepared from non-specific rabbit IgG (αEc). A time-dependent enhancement of eosinophil- and neutrophil-mediated complement (C) or antibody- (Ab) dependent killing of Sch was observed following incubation with αE, but not αEc. Optimal enhancement of granulocyte killing was dependent on the concentration of αE, pre-incubation of granulocytes with αE prior to addition to C coated Sch, as well as the granulocyte:Sch ratio. Baseline killing of Ab and/or C coated Sch by eosinophil rich cells was significantly greater than neutrophil rich suspensions and both were proportionally increased following incubation with αE. Enhanced eosinophil and neutrophil killing by αE required the presence of mononuclear cells containing basophils, whereas there was no difference in the killing of C or Ab coated Sch when eosinophils or neutrophils alone were incubated with αE or αEc. This IgE and leucocyte-dependent model might facilitate the isolation and identification of the pharmacological mediator(s) of hypersensitivity which enhance eosinophil or neutrophil killing of appropriately opsonized helminthic larvae. PMID:3987093

  15. Antiinflammatory Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W.; Lorne, Emmanuel; Zhao, Xia; Tsuruta, Yuko; Sha, Yonggang; Liu, Gang; Abraham, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Rationale: Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally considered to be proinflammatory and to contribute to cellular and organ dysfunction when present in excessive amounts, there is evidence that specific ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), may have antiinflammatory properties. Objectives: To address the role that increases in intracellular H2O2 may play in acute inflammatory processes, we examined the effects of catalase inhibition or the absence of catalase on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Methods: Neutrophils from control or acatalasemic mice, or control neutrophils incubated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, were treated with LPS, and levels of reactive oxygen species, proteasomal activity, NF-κB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine expression were measured. Acute lung injury (ALI) was produced by intratracheal injection of LPS into control, acatalasemic-, or aminotriazole-treated mice. Measurements and Main Results: Intracellular levels of H2O2 were increased in acatalasemic neutrophils and in neutrophils exposed to aminotriazole. Compared with LPS-stimulated neutrophils from control mice, neutrophils from acatalasemic mice or neutrophils treated with aminotriazole demonstrated reduced 20S and 26S proteasomal activity, IκB-α degradation, NF-κB nuclear accumulation, and production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-2. The severity of LPS-induced ALI was less in acatalasemic mice and in mice treated with aminotriazole as compared with that found in control mice. Conclusions: These results indicate that H2O2 has antiinflammatory effects on neutrophil activation and inflammatory processes, such as ALI, in which activated neutrophils play a major role. PMID:19151196

  16. Antiinflammatory effects of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophil activation and acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W; Lorne, Emmanuel; Zhao, Xia; Tsuruta, Yuko; Sha, Yonggang; Liu, Gang; Abraham, Edward

    2009-04-15

    Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally considered to be proinflammatory and to contribute to cellular and organ dysfunction when present in excessive amounts, there is evidence that specific ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), may have antiinflammatory properties. To address the role that increases in intracellular H(2)O(2) may play in acute inflammatory processes, we examined the effects of catalase inhibition or the absence of catalase on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. Neutrophils from control or acatalasemic mice, or control neutrophils incubated with the catalase inhibitor aminotriazole, were treated with LPS, and levels of reactive oxygen species, proteasomal activity, NF-kappaB activation, and proinflammatory cytokine expression were measured. Acute lung injury (ALI) was produced by intratracheal injection of LPS into control, acatalasemic-, or aminotriazole-treated mice. Intracellular levels of H(2)O(2) were increased in acatalasemic neutrophils and in neutrophils exposed to aminotriazole. Compared with LPS-stimulated neutrophils from control mice, neutrophils from acatalasemic mice or neutrophils treated with aminotriazole demonstrated reduced 20S and 26S proteasomal activity, IkappaB-alpha degradation, NF-kappaB nuclear accumulation, and production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-2. The severity of LPS-induced ALI was less in acatalasemic mice and in mice treated with aminotriazole as compared with that found in control mice. These results indicate that H(2)O(2) has antiinflammatory effects on neutrophil activation and inflammatory processes, such as ALI, in which activated neutrophils play a major role.

  17. Effects of inhibitors of inflammatory mediators and cytokines on eosinophil and neutrophil accumulation induced by Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin in mouse pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Menezes-de-Lima-Júnior, O; Werneck-Barroso, E; Cordeiro, R S; Henriques, M G

    1997-12-01

    In this work we characterize the Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) -induced pleurisy and investigate the role of chemical mediators and cytokines in BCG-induced granulocyte accumulation at 24 h. Intrathoracic injection of BCG in C57B1/6 mice induces a biphasic inflammatory reaction with intense leukocyte accumulation at 24 h and 15 days. Neutrophils were observed in the pleural cavity at 4-24 h, mononuclear cells and eosinophils after 24 h. A new wave of mononuclear cells and neutrophils were observed after 15 days. Pretreatments with dexamethasone, BW 755C, BW A4C, WEB 2170, L-NAME, and monoclonal antibody (mAb) anti-interleukin-5 (IL-5; TRFK-5) had inhibited the eosinophil accumulation. On the other hand, only the pretreatments with dexamethasone, L-NAME, or mAb anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha; MP6-XT3) had inhibited the neutrophil influx. These results suggest the involvement of leukotrienes, platelet-activating factor, nitric oxide, and IL-5 in the eosinophil accumulation, and a role for nitric oxide and TNF-alpha in the neutrophil influx induced by BCG.

  18. Microparticle production, neutrophil activation, and intravascular bubbles following open-water SCUBA diving.

    PubMed

    Thom, Stephen R; Milovanova, Tatyana N; Bogush, Marina; Bhopale, Veena M; Yang, Ming; Bushmann, Kim; Pollock, Neal W; Ljubkovic, Marko; Denoble, Petar; Dujic, Zeljko

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate annexin V-positive microparticles (MPs) and neutrophil activation in humans following decompression from open-water SCUBA diving with the hypothesis that changes are related to intravascular bubble formation. Sixteen male volunteer divers followed a uniform profile of four daily SCUBA dives to 18 m of sea water for 47 min. Blood was obtained prior to and at 80 min following the first and fourth dives to evaluate the impact of repetitive diving, and intravascular bubbles were quantified by trans-thoracic echocardiography carried out at 20-min intervals for 2 h after each dive. MPs increased by 3.4-fold after each dive, neutrophil activation occurred as assessed by surface expression of myeloperoxidase and the CD18 component of β(2)-integrins, and there was an increased presence of the platelet-derived CD41 protein on the neutrophil surface indicating interactions with platelet membranes. Intravascular bubbles were detected in all divers. Surprisingly, significant inverse correlations were found among postdiving bubble scores and MPs, most consistently at 80 min or more after the dive on the fourth day. There were significant positive correlations between MPs and platelet-neutrophil interactions after the first dive and between platelet-neutrophil interactions and neutrophil activation documented as an elevation in β(2)-integrin expression after the fourth dive. We conclude that MPs- and neutrophil-related events in humans are consistent with findings in an animal decompression model. Whether there are causal relationships among bubbles, MPs, platelet-neutrophil interactions, and neutrophil activation remains obscure and requires additional study.

  19. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Lyn controls neutrophil adhesion by recruiting the CrkL–C3G complex and activating Rap1 at the leading edge

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Kapoor, Ashish; Cook, Sara; Liu, Shubai; Xiang, Yang; Rao, Christopher V.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Wang, Fei

    2011-01-01

    Establishing new adhesions at the extended leading edges of motile cells is essential for stable polarity and persistent motility. Despite recent identification of signaling pathways that mediate polarity and chemotaxis in neutrophils, little is known about molecular mechanisms governing cell–extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesion in these highly polarized and rapidly migrating cells. Here, we describe a signaling pathway in neutrophils that is essential for localized integrin activation, leading edge attachment and persistent migration during chemotaxis. This pathway depends upon Gi-protein-mediated activation and leading edge recruitment of Lyn, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src kinase family. We identified the small GTPase Rap1 as a major downstream effector of Lyn to regulate neutrophil adhesion during chemotaxis. Depletion of Lyn in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells prevented chemoattractant-induced Rap1 activation at the leading edge of the cell, whereas ectopic expression of Rap1 largely rescued the defects induced by Lyn depletion. Furthermore, Lyn controls spatial activation of Rap1 by recruiting the CrkL–C3G protein complex to the leading edge. Together, these results provide novel mechanistic insights into the poorly understood signaling network that controls leading edge adhesion during chemotaxis of neutrophils, and possibly other amoeboid cells. PMID:21628423

  20. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Lyn controls neutrophil adhesion by recruiting the CrkL-C3G complex and activating Rap1 at the leading edge.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Kapoor, Ashish; Cook, Sara; Liu, Shubai; Xiang, Yang; Rao, Christopher V; Kenis, Paul J A; Wang, Fei

    2011-07-01

    Establishing new adhesions at the extended leading edges of motile cells is essential for stable polarity and persistent motility. Despite recent identification of signaling pathways that mediate polarity and chemotaxis in neutrophils, little is known about molecular mechanisms governing cell-extracellular-matrix (ECM) adhesion in these highly polarized and rapidly migrating cells. Here, we describe a signaling pathway in neutrophils that is essential for localized integrin activation, leading edge attachment and persistent migration during chemotaxis. This pathway depends upon G(i)-protein-mediated activation and leading edge recruitment of Lyn, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the Src kinase family. We identified the small GTPase Rap1 as a major downstream effector of Lyn to regulate neutrophil adhesion during chemotaxis. Depletion of Lyn in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells prevented chemoattractant-induced Rap1 activation at the leading edge of the cell, whereas ectopic expression of Rap1 largely rescued the defects induced by Lyn depletion. Furthermore, Lyn controls spatial activation of Rap1 by recruiting the CrkL-C3G protein complex to the leading edge. Together, these results provide novel mechanistic insights into the poorly understood signaling network that controls leading edge adhesion during chemotaxis of neutrophils, and possibly other amoeboid cells.

  1. The Effects of Pterostilbene on Neutrophil Activity in Experimental Model of Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drabikova, Katarina; Lojek, Antonin; Ciz, Milan; Ponist, Silvester; Bauerova, Katarina; Nosal, Radomir; Harmatha, Juraj; Jancinova, Viera

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that pterostilbene inhibits reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils in vitro. However, little is known about its effects on neutrophils during inflammation in vivo. In this study, the effect of pterostilbene on neutrophil activity was investigated in experimental arthritis model. Lewis rats were injected by a single intradermal injection of heat-killed Mycobacterium butyricum in Freund's adjuvant to develop arthritis. Another group of arthritic animals received pterostilbene 30 mg/kg, daily, p.o. The number and activity of neutrophils in blood were measured on a weekly basis during the whole experiment. Moreover, the total radical trapping potential in plasma was measured at the end of the experiment. In the pterostilbene treated arthritic group, the treatment significantly lowered the number of neutrophils in blood on days 14 and 21 without significant downregulation of neutrophil oxidative burst. Pterostilbene nonsignificantly increased total radical trapping potential in arthritic animals. These results indicate that the promising effects of pterostilbene on reactive oxygen species operate by different mechanisms in vitro and in the animal model of inflammation. In conclusion, the positive effects of pterostilbene in the model of arthritis may be attributed to regulation of neutrophil number. PMID:24195064

  2. Comparative Efficiency and Impact on the Activity of Blood Neutrophils Isolated by Percoll, Ficoll and Spontaneous Sedimentation Methods.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Tainá; Forte, Wilma C N

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the role of cells in physiological and pathological processes generally require isolation of some populations, such as neutrophils. In the literature, several methods used for isolating neutrophils are described; however, there is no consensus on the best technique to be used in cell functional studies. The present study compares the efficiency and impact on the chemotactic and phagocytic activity of neutrophils isolated from blood by three different methods: Percoll and Ficoll density centrifugation gradients and spontaneous sedimentation technique. The neutrophil chemotaxis, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), autologous serum or homologous serum, was determined by using Boyden chambers. The phagocytic capacity was assessed by ingestion of zimosan particles, and digestion phase was analyzed by nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). The results obtained from neutrophil isolation by Percoll and Ficoll density gradients, as compared to spontaneous sedimentation technique, showed similar degrees of cell yields and higher purity; however, these methods affected neutrophil responsiveness, accompanied by elevated chemotaxis and reduced chemotactic capacity to respond to subsequent stimulation. Neutrophil isolation by spontaneous sedimentation, in contrast, did not affect cellular activity and resulted in cell preparation with high number of neutrophils. Although neutrophil phagocytosis results were similar between the different methods, digestion phase of phagocytosis was significantly enhanced after LPS-stimulation, only in the neutrophils isolated by spontaneous sedimentation technique. In conclusion, the present study shows that isolation of blood neutrophils by the spontaneous sedimentation technique is appropriate for the assessment of cellular activity, since it neither primes or activates the neutrophils nor does it affect their functional responsiveness.

  3. Effects of endogenous and exogenous catecholamines on LPS-induced neutrophil trafficking and activation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, E; Kaneko, D J; Shenkar, R

    1999-01-01

    Endotoxemia produces elevations in catecholamine levels in the pulmonary and systemic circulation as well as rapid increases in neutrophil number and proinflammatory cytokine expression in the lungs. In the present experiments, we examined the effects of endogenous and exogenous adrenergic stimulation on endotoxin-induced lung neutrophil accumulation and activation. Levels of interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 mRNAs were increased in lung neutrophils from endotoxemic mice compared with those present in lung neutrophils from control mice or in peripheral blood neutrophils from endotoxemic or control mice. Treatment with the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol before endotoxin administration did not affect trafficking of neutrophils to the lungs or the expression of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, or MIP-2 by lung neutrophils. Administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine before endotoxemia did not alter lung neutrophil accumulation as measured by myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels but did result in significant increases in IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2 mRNA expression by lung neutrophils compared with endotoxemia alone. Administration of the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine before endotoxin did not affect trafficking of neutrophils to the lungs but was associated with significantly increased expression of TNF-alpha and MIP-2 mRNAs by lung neutrophils compared with that found after endotoxin alone. In contrast, treatment with the alpha2-adrenergic agonist UK-14304 prevented endotoxin-induced increases in lung MPO and lung neutrophil cytokine mRNA levels. The suppressive effects of UK-14304 on endotoxin-induced increases in lung MPO were not affected by administration of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. These data demonstrate that the initial accumulation and activation of neutrophils in the lungs after endotoxemia can be significantly diminished by alpha

  4. Neutrophil antimicrobial defense against Staphylococcus aureus is mediated by phagolysosomal but not extracellular trap-associated cathelicidin

    PubMed Central

    Jann, Naja J.; Schmaler, Mathias; Kristian, Sascha A.; Radek, Katherine A.; Gallo, Richard L.; Nizet, Victor; Peschel, Andreas; Landmann, Regine

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils kill invading pathogens by AMPs, including cathelicidins, ROS, and NETs. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exhibits enhanced resistance to neutrophil AMPs, including the murine cathelicidin CRAMP, in part, as a result of alanylation of teichoic acids by the dlt operon. In this study, we took advantage of the hypersusceptible phenotype of S. aureus ΔdltA against cationic AMPs to study the impact of the murine cathelicidin CRAMP on staphylococcal killing and to identify its key site of action in murine neutrophils. We demonstrate that CRAMP remained intracellular during PMN exudation from blood and was secreted upon PMA stimulation. We show first evidence that CRAMP was recruited to phagolysosomes in infected neutrophils and exhibited intracellular activity against S. aureus. Later in infection, neutrophils produced NETs, and immunofluorescence revealed association of CRAMP with S. aureus in NETs, which similarly killed S. aureus wt and ΔdltA, indicating that CRAMP activity was reduced when associated with NETs. Indeed, the presence of DNA reduced the antimicrobial activity of CRAMP, and CRAMP localization in response to S. aureus was independent of the NADPH oxidase, whereas killing was partially dependent on a functional NADPH oxidase. Our study indicates that neutrophils use CRAMP in a timed and locally coordinated manner in defense against S. aureus. PMID:19638500

  5. Factors Associated with Nitric Oxide-mediated β2 Integrin Inhibition of Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Veena M.; Yang, Ming; Yu, Kevin; Thom, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation explored the mechanism for inhibition of β2 integrin adhesion molecules when neutrophils are exposed to nitric oxide (•NO). Roles for specific proteins were elucidated using chemical inhibitors, depletion with small inhibitory RNA, and cells from knock-out mice. Optimal inhibition occurs with exposures to a •NO flux of ∼28 nmol/min for 2 min or more, which sets up an autocatalytic cascade triggered by activating type 2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and NADPH oxidase (NOX). Integrin inhibition does not occur with neutrophils exposed to a NOX inhibitor (Nox2ds), a NOS-2 inhibitor (1400W), or with cells from mice lacking NOS-2 or the gp91phox component of NOX. Reactive species cause S-nitrosylation of cytosolic actin that enhances actin polymerization. Protein cross-linking and actin filament formation assays indicate that increased polymerization occurs because of associations involving vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, and protein-disulfide isomerase in proximity to actin filaments. These effects were inhibited in cells exposed to ultraviolet light which photo-reverses S-nitrosylated cysteine residues and by co-incubations with cytochalasin D. The autocatalytic cycle can be arrested by protein kinase G activated with 8-bromo-cyclic GMP and by a high •NO flux (∼112 nmol/min) that inactivates NOX. PMID:26032418

  6. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  7. ACTIVATED NEUTROPHILS INHIBIT PHAGOCYTOSIS BY HUMAN MONOCYTE CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously reported the correlation of decreased phagocytosis of opsonized zymosan by sputum monocytic cells with the increase in sputum neutrophils in volunteers 6h after inhalation of endotoxin (20,000 EU) (Alexis, et al. JACI, 2003;112:353). To define whether an intrin...

  8. Cell Intrinsic Galectin-3 Attenuates Neutrophil ROS-Dependent Killing of Candida by Modulating CR3 Downstream Syk Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng-Yang; Huang, Juin-Hua; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chan, Yi-Chen; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Liu, Fu-Tong; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is a leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Neutrophils are the important effector cells in host resistance to candidiasis. To investigate the modulation of neutrophil fungicidal function will advance our knowledge on the control of candidiasis. While recombinant galectin-3 enhances neutrophil phagocytosis of Candida, we found that intracellular galectin-3 downregulates neutrophil fungicidal functions. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining reveal that cytosolic gal3 physically interacts with Syk in neutrophils after Candida stimulation. Gal3−/− neutrophils have higher level of Syk activation as well as greater abilities to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and kill Candida than gal3+/+ cells. While galectin-3 deficiency modulates neutrophil and macrophage activation and the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cells, the deficiency does not affect the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils or macrophages. Galectin-3 deficiency ameliorates systemic candidiasis by reducing fungal burden, renal pathology, and mortality. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrate that cell intrinsic galectin-3 negatively regulates neutrophil effector functions against candidiasis. Reducing galectin-3 expression or activity by siRNA or gal3 inhibitor TD139 enhances human neutrophil ROS production. Mice treated with TD139 have enhanced ability to clear the fungus. Our work unravels the mechanism by which galectin-3 regulates Syk-dependent neutrophil fungicidal functions and raises the possibility that blocking gal3 in neutrophils may be a promising therapeutic strategy for treating systemic candidiasis. PMID:28217127

  9. Neutrophils Activate Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells by Releasing Self-DNA–Peptide Complexes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lande, Roberto; Ganguly, Dipyaman; Facchinetti, Valeria; Frasca, Loredana; Conrad, Curdin; Gregorio, Josh; Meller, Stephan; Chamilos, Georgios; Sebasigari, Rosalie; Riccieri, Valeria; Bassett, Roland; Amuro, Hideki; Fukuhara, Shirou; Ito, Tomoki; Liu, Yong-Jun; Gilliet, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a severe and incurable autoimmune disease characterized by chronic activation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and production of autoantibodies against nuclear self-antigens by hyperreactive B cells. Neutrophils are also implicated in disease pathogenesis; however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here, we identified in the sera of SLE patients immunogenic complexes composed of neutrophil-derived antimicrobial peptides and self-DNA. These complexes were produced by activated neutrophils in the form of web-like structures known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) and efficiently triggered innate pDC activation via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9). SLE patients were found to develop autoantibodies to both the self-DNA and antimicrobial peptides in NETs, indicating that these complexes could also serve as autoantigens to trigger B cell activation. Circulating neutrophils from SLE patients released more NETs than those from healthy donors; this was further stimulated by the antimicrobial autoantibodies, suggesting a mechanism for the chronic release of immunogenic complexes in SLE. Our data establish a link between neutrophils, pDC activation, and autoimmunity in SLE, providing new potential targets for the treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:21389263

  10. Nanocrystal quantum dot-conjugated anti-myeloperoxidase antibody as the detector of activated neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Nagao, Tomokazu; Nakasuga, Akira; Ishida-Okawara, Akiko; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yasuhara, Masato; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-12-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have been applied to a wide range of biological studies by taking advantage of their fluorescence properties. Here we show that QDs conjugated with antibody against neutrophil peroxidase, myeloperoxidase (MPO). We designed a novel method to conjugate QDs to antibody without losing any antibody function including their antigen recognizing and Fc-receptor binding activities. When we applied anti-MPO antibody (Ab) with conventional organic probes in the case of immunostaining of living cells, the antibodies lost their fluorescence because of MPO enzymic activity to produce reactive oxygen species. Our QD-conjugated anti-MPO (alpha-MPO-QDs) can detect MPO on the surface of activated neutrophils. In addition, anti-MPO-QDs did not react to the inactivated neutrophils. In conclusion, we demonstrated that antibody visualized the expression of MPO on the neutrophil surface after stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these techniques have the possibility that QDs can reveal the activation of neutrophils by immunostaining and flow cytometric analysis as a powerful tool for diagnosis of the neutrophil activation in vitro.

  11. Fcγ and Complement Receptors and Complement Proteins in Neutrophil Activation in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Contribution to Pathogenesis and Progression and Modulation by Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Paoliello-Paschoalato, Adriana Balbina; Marchi, Larissa Fávaro; de Andrade, Micássio Fernandes; Kabeya, Luciana Mariko; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a highly disabling disease that affects all structures of the joint and significantly impacts on morbidity and mortality in RA patients. RA is characterized by persistent inflammation of the synovial membrane lining the joint associated with infiltration of immune cells. Eighty to 90% of the leukocytes infiltrating the synovia are neutrophils. The specific role that neutrophils play in the onset of RA is not clear, but recent studies have evidenced that they have an important participation in joint damage and disease progression through the release of proteolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytokines, and neutrophil extracellular traps, in particular during frustrated phagocytosis of immune complexes (ICs). In addition, the local and systemic activation of the complement system contributes to the pathogenesis of RA and other IC-mediated diseases. This review discusses (i) the participation of Fcγ and complement receptors in mediating the effector functions of neutrophils in RA; (ii) the contribution of the complement system and ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms to joint damage in RA; and (iii) the use of plant extracts, dietary compounds, and isolated natural compounds in the treatment of RA, focusing on modulation of the effector functions of neutrophils and the complement system activity and/or activation. PMID:26346244

  12. Leukotriene B(4) inhibits neutrophil apoptosis via NADPH oxidase activity: redox control of NF-κB pathway and mitochondrial stability.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-de-Souza, Pedro; Canetti, Cláudio; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Arruda, Maria Augusta

    2012-10-01

    Leukotriene B(4), an arachidonic acid-derived lipid mediator, is a known proinflammatory agent that has a direct effect upon neutrophil physiology, inducing reactive oxygen species generation by the NADPH oxidase complex and impairing neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis, which in turn may corroborate to the onset of chronic inflammation. Despite those facts, a direct link between inhibition of neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis and NADPH oxidase activation by leukotriene B(4) has not been addressed so far. In this study, we aim to elucidate the putative role of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in leukotriene B(4)-induced anti-apoptotic effect. Our results indicate that NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are critical to leukotriene B(4) pro-survival effect on neutrophils. This effect also relies on redox modulation of nuclear factor kappaB signaling pathway. We have also observed that LTB(4)-induced Bad degradation and mitochondrial stability require NADPH oxidase activity. All together, our results strongly suggest that LTB(4)-induced anti-apoptotic effect in neutrophils occurs in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. We do believe that a better knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis may contribute to the development of more successful strategies to control chronic inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Estrogen effect on post-exercise skeletal muscle neutrophil infiltration and calpain activity.

    PubMed

    Tiidus, P M; Holden, D; Bombardier, E; Zajchowski, S; Enns, D; Belcastro, A

    2001-05-01

    We hypothesized that estrogen administration would attenuate skeletal muscle neutrophil infiltration, indices of muscle membrane disruption, and muscle calpain activity shortly after the termination of exercise. Ovariectomized female rats were implanted with either an estogen pellet (25 mg beta-estradiol) or a placebo pellet. Two weeks postimplant, animals were killed either at rest or 1 h after running exercise (60 min at 21 m x min(-1), 12% grade). The 4 experimental groups (n = 12) used were: unexercised placebo (UP), unexercised estrogen (UE), exercised placebo (EP), and exercised estrogen (EE). Blood samples were analyzed for creatine kinase (CK) activity and estradiol content. Plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles were removed and histochemical determination of neutrophil content or biochemical determination of myeloperoxidase (MPO), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), and calpain-like activity determined. Estrogen supplemented animals had 10-20-fold higher circulating estradiol levels than placebo animals. EP animals had significantly higher (P < 0.05) circulating CK activities than EE or unexercised animals. Muscle neutrophil concentrations were significantly (P < 0.01) elevated in EP and EE groups compared with unexercised controls, with EP muscle neutrophil levels also being over 60% greater (P < 0.05) than in EE animals. EP animals also had higher (P < 0.05) muscle MPO activities than unexercised or EE animals. Muscle G6PD activities were not significantly different between any groups. Muscle caplain-like activities were 80% higher (P < 0.01) in EP animals than EE animals with calpain-like activities in EE animals similar to unexercised groups. These results indicate that estrogen supplementation in ovariectomized rats attenuated 1-h post-exercise serum CK activities, muscle neutrophil infiltration, MPO activities, and calpain-like activities when compared with exercised, unsupplemented animals. This supports the possibility of a relationship between

  14. Myeloperoxidase activity and the oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchanskiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Kolesnikova, Yevgeniya

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of our investigation was to study myeloperoxidase activity and concentration of oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with ambulant pneumonia and secondary pneumonia which has arisen on a background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients were divided into 2 groups. 17 patients with ambulant pneumonia moderate severity and respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 1-st group. 20 COPD patients with secondary pneumonia moderate severity and with respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 2-nd group. The control group consisted of 15 healthy subjects. The reactive protein carbonyl derivates, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and myeloperoxidase activity were detected in neutrophils. In neutrophils of 1-st group patients the augmentation of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the slight decrease of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones (by 17%). In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the significant increasing AOPP in comparison with healthy ones (p <0.01) and 1 group patients (p <0.05) was fixed. Myeloperoxidase activity was higher in neutrophils of 1-th group patients in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients myeloperoxidase activity was higher in comparison with the same of 1 group patients (by 67%, p <0.05). Our results showed the different direction of oxidized proteins formation neutrophils of patients with primary and secondary pneumonia. Besides that the varied degree of myeloperoxidase activity was fixed. Our results require more detailed understanding because they can reflect peculiar mechanisms of pneumonia development and determine the characteristics of their progression.

  15. Alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is contained in bovine neutrophil granules and released after activation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mizanur M D; Miranda-Ribera, Alba; Lecchi, Cristina; Bronzo, Valerio; Sartorelli, Paola; Franciosi, Federica; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2008-09-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the capability of bovine neutrophil granulocytes to produce the minor acute phase protein alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP, Orososmucoid). Bovine neutrophils contain a high MW (50-60kDa) AGP isoform (PMN-AGP), as determined by Western blotting and confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The presence of AGP in bovine neutrophils has been confirmed by fluorescence immunocytometry. In addition, bovine neutrophils contain also a 42-45kDa isoform, which has the same MW as plasma-, liver-delivered, AGP. cDNA sequence of plasma- and PMN-AGP revealed that (i) the two proteins are products of the same gene; (ii) the differences in molecular weight are due do different post-translational modifications. This result was confirmed by deglycosylation of the two glycoforms. Exocytosis studies showed that isolated neutrophils exposed to several challengers, including Zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), which mimic the inflammatory activation, released PMN-AGP as early as 15min. AGP's mRNA is physiologically expressed by mature resting neutrophils. Real-time PCR on LPS, ZAS and PMA challenged cells revealed that the level of expression apparently does not increase after inflammatory activation. Collectively, the findings reported in this paper proved that PMN-AGP: (i) is a hyperglycosylated glycoform of plasma AGP, (ii) is stored in granules, and (iii) is released by neutrophils in response to activation. Due to its anti-inflammatory activity, PMN-AGP may work as a fine tuning of the neutrophils functions in the inflammatory focus, i.e. it can reduce the damages caused by an excess of inflammatory response.

  16. Combined activity of post-exercise concentrations of NA and eHsp72 on human neutrophil function: role of cAMP.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, Esther; Hinchado, María D; Ortega, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    Extracellular heat shock proteins of 72 kDa (eHsp72) and noradrenaline (NA) can act as "danger signals" during exercise-induced stress by activating neutrophil function (chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and fungicidal capacity). In addition, post-exercise concentrations of NA increase the expression and release of Hsp72 by human neutrophils, and adrenoreceptors and cAMP are involved in the stimulation of neutrophils by eHsp72. This suggests an interaction between the two molecules in the modulation of neutrophils during exercise-induced stress. Given this context, the aim of the present investigation was to study the combined activity of post-exercise circulating concentrations of NA and eHsp72 on the neutrophil phagocytic process, and to evaluate the role of cAMP as intracellular signal in these effects. Results showed an accumulative stimulation of chemotaxis induced by NA and eHsp72. However, while NA and eHsp72, separately, stimulate the phagocytosis and fungicidal activity of neutrophils, when they act together they do not modify these capacities of neutrophils. Similarly, post-exercise concentrations of NA and eHsp72 separately increased the intracellular level of cAMP, but NA and eHsp72 acting together did not modify the intracellular concentration of cAMP. These results confirm that cAMP can be involved in the autocrine/paracrine physiological regulation of phagocytosis and fungicidal capacity of human neutrophils mediated by NA and eHsp72 in the context of exercise-induced stress. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Activation of Adenosine A2A Receptors Inhibits Neutrophil Transuroepithelial Migration ▿

    PubMed Central

    Säve, Susanne; Mohlin, Camilla; Vumma, Ravi; Persson, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine has been identified as a significant inhibitor of inflammation by acting on adenosine A2A receptors. In this study, we examined the role of adenosine and A2A receptors in the transmigration of human neutrophils across an in vitro model of the transitional bladder urothelium. Human uroepithelial cells (UROtsa) were grown on transwell inserts; uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and neutrophils were added to the transwell system; and the number of migrating neutrophils was evaluated. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the expression of adenosine receptors, the epithelial adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and the neutrophil integrin CD11b. Levels of proinflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) and phosphorylated IκBα were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Luminex assays, respectively. The neutrophils expressed all four adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors), but A3 receptors were not expressed by UROtsa cells. UPEC stimulated neutrophil transuroepithelial migration, which was significantly decreased in response to the specific A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680. The inhibitory effect of CGS 21680 on neutrophil migration was reversed by the A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261. The production of chemotactic IL-8 and the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1 or CD11b were not significantly affected by CGS 21680. However, a significant decrease in the level of phosporylated IκBα was revealed in response to CGS 21680. In conclusion, UPEC infection in vitro evoked neutrophil migration through a multilayered human uroepithelium. The UPEC-evoked neutrophil transmigration decreased in response to A2A receptor activation, possibly through inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21646447

  18. Shedding of tumor necrosis factor receptors by activated human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils (PMN) to bind tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was rapidly lost when the cells were incubated in suspension with agents that can stimulate their migratory and secretory responses. Both physiological (poly)peptides (FMLP, C5a, CSF-GM) and pharmacologic agonists (PMN, calcium ionophore A23187) induced the loss of TNF receptors (TNF-R) from the cell surface. Half-maximal loss in TNF-R ensued after only approximately 2 min with 10(-7) M FMLP at 37 degrees C, and required only 10(-9) M FMLP during a 30-min exposure. However, there were no such changes even with prolonged exposure of PMN to FMLP at 4 degrees or 16 degrees C. Scatchard analysis revealed loss of TNF- binding sites without change in their affinity (Kd approximately 0.4 nM) as measured at incompletely modulating concentrations of FMLP, C5a, PMA, or A23187. The binding of anti-TNF-R mAbs to PMN decreased in parallel, providing independent evidence for the loss of TNF-R from the cell surface. At the same time, soluble TNF-R appeared in the medium of stimulated PMN. This inference was based on the PMN- and FMLP-dependent generation of a nonsedimentable activity that could inhibit the binding of TNF to fresh human PMN or to mouse macrophages, and the ability of mAbs specific for human TNF-R to abolish inhibition by PMN-conditioned medium of binding of TNF to mouse macrophages. Soluble TNF-R activity was associated with a protein of Mr approximately 28,000 by ligand blot analysis of cell-free supernatants of FMLP-treated PMN. Thus, some portion of the FMLP-induced loss of TNF-R from human PMN is due to shedding of TNF-R. Shedding was unaffected by inhibitors of serine and thiol proteases and could not be induced with phosphatidylinositol- specific phospholipase C. Loss of TNF-R from PMN first stimulated by other agents may decrease their responsiveness to TNF. TNF-R shed by PMN may be one source of the TNF-binding proteins found in body fluids, and may blunt the actions of the

  19. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma ligand, 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2, reduces neutrophil migration via a nitric oxide pathway.

    PubMed

    Napimoga, Marcelo H; Vieira, Silvio M; Dal-Secco, Daniela; Freitas, Andressa; Souto, Fabrício O; Mestriner, Fabiola L; Alves-Filho, José C; Grespan, Renata; Kawai, Toshihisa; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Cunha, Fernando Q

    2008-01-01

    Ligands for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-gamma), such as 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) have been implicated as a new class of anti-inflammatory compounds with possible clinical applications. Based on this concept, this investigation was designed to determine the effect of 15d-PGJ2-mediated activation of PPAR-gamma ligand on neutrophil migration after an inflammatory stimulus and clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms using a mouse model of peritonitis. Our results demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 administration decreases leukocyte rolling and adhesion to the inflamed mesenteric tissues by a mechanism dependent on NO. Specifically, pharmacological inhibitors of NO synthase remarkably abrogated the 15d-PGJ2-mediated suppression of neutrophil migration to the inflammatory site. Moreover, inducible NOS-/- mice were not susceptible to 15d-PGJ2-mediated suppression of neutrophil migration to the inflammatory sites when compared with their wild type. In addition, 15d-PGJ2-mediated suppression of neutrophil migration appeared to be independent of the production of cytokines and chemokines, since their production were not significantly affected in the carrageenan-injected peritoneal cavities. Finally, up-regulation of carrageenan-triggered ICAM-1 expression in the mesenteric microcirculation vessels was abrogated by pretreatment of wild-type mice with 15d-PGJ2, whereas 15d-PGJ2 inhibited F-actin rearrangement process in neutrophils. Taken together these findings demonstrated that 15d-PGJ2 suppresses inflammation-initiated neutrophil migration in a mechanism dependent on NO production in mesenteric tissues.

  20. Distinct Fcγ receptors mediate the effect of Serum Amyloid P on neutrophil adhesion and fibrocyte differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Nehemiah; Pilling, Darrell; Gomer, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma protein Serum Amyloid P (SAP) reduces neutrophil adhesion, inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and promotes phagocytosis of cell debris by macrophages. Together, these effects of SAP reduce key aspects of inflammation and fibrosis, and SAP injections improve lung function in pulmonary fibrosis patients. SAP functions are mediated in part by Fcγ receptors, but the contribution of each Fcγ receptor is not fully understood. We found that amino acids Q55 and E126 in human SAP affect human fibrocyte differentiation and SAP binding to FcγRI. E126, K130 and Q128 affect neutrophil adhesion and SAP affinity for FcγRIIa. Q128 also affects phagocytosis by macrophages and SAP affinity for FcγRI. All the identified functionally significant amino acids in SAP form a binding site that is distinct from the previously described SAP-FcγRIIa binding site. Blocking FcγRI with an IgG blocking antibody reduces the SAP effect on fibrocyte differentiation, and ligating FcγRIIa with antibodies reduces neutrophil adhesion. Together, these results suggest that SAP binds to FcγRI on monocytes to inhibit fibrocyte differentiation, and binds to FcγRIIa on neutrophils to reduce neutrophil adhesion. PMID:25024390

  1. Sensitisation of TRPV4 by PAR2 is independent of intracellular calcium signalling and can be mediated by the biased agonist neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Sostegni, Silvia; Diakov, Alexei; McIntyre, Peter; Bunnett, Nigel; Korbmacher, Christoph; Haerteis, Silke

    2015-04-01

    Proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) may represent a major mechanism of regulating the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) non-selective cation channel in pathophysiological conditions associated with protease activation (e.g. during inflammation). To provide electrophysiological evidence for PAR2-mediated TRPV4 regulation, we characterised the properties of human TRPV4 heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes in the presence and absence of co-expressed human PAR2. In outside-out patches from TRPV4 expressing oocytes, we detected single-channel activity typical for TRPV4 with a single-channel conductance of about 100 pS for outward and 55 pS for inward currents. The synthetic TRPV4 activator GSK1016790A stimulated TRPV4 mainly by converting previously silent channels into active channels with an open probability of nearly one. In oocytes co-expressing TRPV4 and PAR2, PAR2 activation by trypsin or by specific PAR2 agonist SLIGRL-NH2 potentiated the GSK1016790A-stimulated TRPV4 whole-cell currents several fold, indicative of channel sensitisation. Pre-incubation of oocytes with the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)-AM did not reduce the stimulatory effect of PAR2 activation on TRPV4, which indicates that the effect is independent of intracellular calcium signalling. Neutrophil elastase, a biased agonist of PAR2 that does not induce intracellular calcium signalling, also caused a PAR2-dependent sensitisation of TRPV4. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y27362 abolished elastase-stimulated sensitisation of TRPV4, which indicates that Rho-kinase signalling plays a critical role in PAR2-mediated TRPV4 sensitisation by the biased agonist neutrophil elastase. During acute inflammation, neutrophil elastase may sensitise TRPV4 by a mechanism involving biased agonism of PAR2 and activation of Rho-kinase.

  2. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Evades Calprotectin-Mediated Nutritional Immunity and Survives Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Production of TdfH.

    PubMed

    Jean, Sophonie; Juneau, Richard A; Criss, Alison K; Cornelissen, Cynthia N

    2016-10-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae successfully overcomes host strategies to limit essential nutrients, termed nutritional immunity, by production of TonB-dependent transporters (TdTs)-outer membrane proteins that facilitate nutrient transport in an energy-dependent manner. Four gonococcal TdTs facilitate utilization of iron or iron chelates from host-derived proteins, including transferrin (TbpA), lactoferrin (LbpA), and hemoglobin (HpuB), in addition to xenosiderophores from other bacteria (FetA). The roles of the remaining four uncharacterized TdTs (TdfF, TdfG, TdfH, and TdfJ) remain elusive. Regulatory data demonstrating that production of gonococcal TdfH and TdfJ are unresponsive to or upregulated under iron-replete conditions led us to evaluate the role of these TdTs in the acquisition of nutrients other than iron. In this study, we found that production of gonococcal TdfH is both Zn and Zur repressed. We also found that TdfH confers resistance to calprotectin, an immune effector protein highly produced in neutrophils that has antimicrobial activity due to its ability to sequester Zn and Mn. We found that TdfH directly binds calprotectin, which enables gonococcal Zn accumulation in a TdfH-dependent manner and enhances bacterial survival after exposure to neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These studies highlight Zn sequestration by calprotectin as a key functional arm of NET-mediated killing of gonococci. We demonstrate for the first time that N. gonorrhoeae exploits this host strategy in a novel defense mechanism, in which TdfH production hijacks and directly utilizes the host protein calprotectin as a zinc source and thereby evades nutritional immunity. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Evades Calprotectin-Mediated Nutritional Immunity and Survives Neutrophil Extracellular Traps by Production of TdfH

    PubMed Central

    Jean, Sophonie; Juneau, Richard A.; Criss, Alison K.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae successfully overcomes host strategies to limit essential nutrients, termed nutritional immunity, by production of TonB-dependent transporters (TdTs)—outer membrane proteins that facilitate nutrient transport in an energy-dependent manner. Four gonococcal TdTs facilitate utilization of iron or iron chelates from host-derived proteins, including transferrin (TbpA), lactoferrin (LbpA), and hemoglobin (HpuB), in addition to xenosiderophores from other bacteria (FetA). The roles of the remaining four uncharacterized TdTs (TdfF, TdfG, TdfH, and TdfJ) remain elusive. Regulatory data demonstrating that production of gonococcal TdfH and TdfJ are unresponsive to or upregulated under iron-replete conditions led us to evaluate the role of these TdTs in the acquisition of nutrients other than iron. In this study, we found that production of gonococcal TdfH is both Zn and Zur repressed. We also found that TdfH confers resistance to calprotectin, an immune effector protein highly produced in neutrophils that has antimicrobial activity due to its ability to sequester Zn and Mn. We found that TdfH directly binds calprotectin, which enables gonococcal Zn accumulation in a TdfH-dependent manner and enhances bacterial survival after exposure to neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These studies highlight Zn sequestration by calprotectin as a key functional arm of NET-mediated killing of gonococci. We demonstrate for the first time that N. gonorrhoeae exploits this host strategy in a novel defense mechanism, in which TdfH production hijacks and directly utilizes the host protein calprotectin as a zinc source and thereby evades nutritional immunity. PMID:27481245

  4. Double dose plateletpheresis by continuous and intermittent flow devices increases platelet-neutrophil complex formation in healthy donors without noticeable neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Aynur Ugur; Karadogan, Ihsan; Yilmaz, Ferahnaz Gencay; Undar, Levent

    2007-02-01

    Several reports have demonstrated that during a single plateletpheresis procedure, platelets may form heterotypic aggregates which may predispose certain donors to thrombotic complications. In this study, changes in the expression of neutrophil adhesion molecules (CD11b/CD18, CD50/54, CD62L) and platelet-neutrophil complex (PNC) formation were investigated by a flow cytometric method in healthy donors following a double dose plateletpheresis (DDP) procedure. Our results show that DDP which are carried out by the Fresenius AS.TEC 204 and Haemonetics MCS+ cause a significant increase in PNC formation in donors. Additionally, the Fresenius AS.TEC 204 device caused a decrease in CD62L expression which is a sign of mild neutrophil activation. Although the clinical significance of these laboratory changes is not clear, the occurrence of neutrophil activation and increased PNC formation might predispose certain donors to thrombotic complications following DDP.

  5. Trace of antibody to myeloperoxidase with nanocrystal quantum dot labeled antibody recognizing activating neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Nagao, Tomokazu; Yamamoto, Kenji; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2006-02-01

    It is assumed that activated neutrophils contribute to the development of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic auto-antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis due to the association of myelopeoxidase(MPO)-ANCA with MPO expressed on the surface of activated neutrophils. FITC-labeled antibody (Ab) used widely are not suitable for neutrophil examination because of the labile fluorescence emission of FITC. Therefore, it is necessary to develop specific fluorescent probes for MPO detection in neutrophils in vivo. Recently, fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) have been used for biotechnological and medical applications because of their greater and far longer fluorescence in. QDs have several advantages over organic fluorophores: high luminescence, far longer stability against photobleaching, and a range of fluorescence wavelengths from blue to infrared, depending on particle size. Thus, we examined the role of MPO and the Ab to MPO in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis associated with MPO-ANCA in experimental glomerulonephritis mice using QDs. We demonstrated the QD-conjugated anti-MPO Ab visualized the expression of MPO on the neutrophil surface after stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines. In addition, QD immuno-conjugates with anti-recombinant murine MPO (rmMPO) Ab revealed the trafficking of MPO-ANCA in vivo. Deceleration of blood flow in kidney vessels occurred in model mice, in which serum proteins including anti-rmMPO Ab were leaked out from collapsed glomeruli into the proximal tubule. Thus, sustained MPO expression on the neutrophil surface was significantly related to glomerulonephritis. These results indicate that the expressed MPO on the activated neutrophils with anti-MPO Ab may coordinately play essential roles in the initial steps for the development of glomerulonephritis.

  6. Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2 Agonist Activates Anti-Influenza Mechanisms and Modulates IFNγ-Induced Antiviral Pathways in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Shpacovitch, Victoria; Ehrhardt, Christina; Fastrich, Michaela; Goerge, Tobias; Ludwig, Stephan; Steinhoff, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is expressed by human leukocytes and participates in the development of inflammatory diseases. Recent studies demonstrated an ability of PAR2 agonist to enhance IFNγ-induced antiviral responses of human leukocytes. However, the precise cellular antiviral defense mechanisms triggered in leukocytes after stimulation with IFNγ and/or PAR2 agonist remain elusive. Therefore, we aimed to identify neutrophil defense mechanisms involved in antiviral resistance. Here we demonstrated that PAR2 agonist enhanced IFNγ-related reduction of influenza A virus (IAV) replication in human neutrophils. PAR2-mediated decrease in IAV replication was associated with reduced NS-1 transcription. Moreover, PAR2-dependent neutrophil activation resulted in enhanced myeloperoxidase degranulation and extracellular myeloperoxidase disrupted IAV. The production of ROS was elevated in response to PAR2 activation. Interestingly, IFNγ did not influence both effects: PAR2 agonist-triggered myeloperoxidase (MPO) release and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, which are known to limit IAV infections. In contrast, orthomyxovirus resistance gene A (MxA) protein expression was synergistically elevated through PAR2 agonist and IFNγ in neutrophils. Altogether, these findings emphasize two PAR2-controlled antiviral mechanisms that are independent of or modulated by IFNγ. PMID:24171176

  7. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  8. Ischemia Activates Neutrophils But Inhibits Their Local and Remote Diapedesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    mediated polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) activation and diapedesis . Anesthetized rabbits were subjected to three hours of hindlimb ischemia (n = 8) or...introduced into an abraded skin chamber or intratracheally induced diapedesis in non-ischemic animals. PMN accumulations in the+skin chamber were...exp 4) PMN/mm(exp 3) compared to 5 +/- 1 X 10(exp 4) PMN/mm(exp 3) with sham plasma (n = 4, pɘ.05). Diapedesis was completely prevented (0-3 PMN/mm(exp

  9. Activated Human Valvular Interstitial Cells Sustain Interleukin-17 Production To Recruit Neutrophils in Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Shun, Chia-Tung; Kuo, Yu-Min; Jung, Chiau-Jing; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Jeng-Wei; Hsu, Ron-Bin; Yang, Chia-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that underlie valvular inflammation in streptococcus-induced infective endocarditis (IE) remain unclear. We previously demonstrated that streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) can activate human heart valvular interstitial cells (VIC) to secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6), a cytokine involved in T helper 17 (Th17) cell differentiation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that activated VIC can enhance neutrophil infiltration through sustained IL-17 production, leading to valvular damage. To monitor cytokine and chemokine production, leukocyte recruitment, and the induction or expansion of CD4+ CD45RA− CD25− CCR6+ Th17 cells, primary human VIC were cultured in vitro and activated by GTFs. Serum cytokine levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and neutrophils and Th17 cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in infected valves from patients with IE. The expression of IL-21, IL-23, IL-17, and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor C (Rorc) was upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which may enhance the proliferation of memory Th17 cells in an IL-6-dependent manner. Many chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), were upregulated in GTF-activated VIC, which might recruit neutrophils and CD4+ T cells. Moreover, CXCL1 production in VIC was induced in a dose-dependent manner by IL-17 to enhance neutrophil chemotaxis. CXCL1-expressing VIC and infiltrating neutrophils could be detected in infected valves, and serum concentrations of IL-17, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased in patients with IE compared to healthy donors. Furthermore, elevated serum IL-21 levels have been significantly associated with severe valvular damage, including rupture of chordae tendineae, in IE patients. Our findings suggest that VIC are activated by bacterial modulins to recruit neutrophils and that such activities might be further enhanced by the production of Th17-associated cytokines. Together, these factors can amplify the

  10. The reported clinical utility of taurine in ischemic disorders may reflect a down-regulation of neutrophil activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    The first publications regarding clinical use of taurine were Italian reports claiming therapeutic efficacy in angina, intermittent claudication and symptomatic cerebral arteriosclerosis. A down-regulation of neutrophil activation and endothelial adhesion might plausibly account for these observations. Endothelial platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a crucial stimulus to neutrophil adhesion and activation, whereas endothelial nitric oxide (NO) suppresses PAF production and acts in various other ways to antagonize binding and activation of neutrophils. Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a neutrophil product which avidly oxidizes many sulfhydryl-dependent proteins, can be expected to inhibit NO synthase while up-regulating PAF generation; thus, a vicious circle can be postulated whereby HOCl released by marginating neutrophils acts on capillary or venular endothelium to promote further neutrophil adhesion and activation. Taurine is the natural detoxicant of HOCl, and thus has the potential to intervene in this vicious circle, promoting a less adhesive endothelium and restraining excessive neutrophil activation. Agents which inhibit the action of PAF on neutrophils, such as ginkgolides and pentoxifylline, have documented utility in ischemic disorders and presumably would complement the efficacy of taurine in this regard. Fish oil, which inhibits endothelial expression of various adhesion factors and probably PAF as well, and which suppresses neutrophil leukotriene production, may likewise be useful in ischemia. These agents may additionally constitute a non-toxic strategy for treating inflammatory disorders in which activated neutrophils play a prominent pathogenic role. Double-blind studies to confirm the efficacy of taurine in symptomatic chronic ischemia are needed.

  11. Observational Study of the Genetic Architecture of Neutrophil-Mediated Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Other Specified Inflammatory Disorders of Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue; Pyoderma Gangrenosum; Erosive Pustular Dermatosis of the Scalp; Sweet's Syndrome; Behcet's Disease; Bowel-associated Dermatosis-arthritis Syndrome; Pustular Psoriasis; Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis; Keratoderma Blenorrhagicum; Sneddon-Wilkinson Disease; IgA Pemphigus; Amicrobial Pustulosis of the Folds; Infantile Acropustulosis; Transient Neonatal Pustulosis; Neutrophilic Eccrine Hidradenitis; Rheumatoid Neutrophilic Dermatitis; Neutrophilic Urticaria; Still's Disease; Erythema Marginatum; Unclassified Periodic Fever Syndromes / Autoinflammatory Syndromes; Dermatitis Herpetiformis; Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis; Bullous Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Inflammatory Epidermolysis Bullosa Aquisita; Neutrophilic Dermatosis of the Dorsal Hands (Pustular Vasculitis); Small Vessel Vasculitis Including Urticarial Vasculitis; Erythema Elevatum Diutinum; Medium Vessel Vasculitis

  12. Lung inflammation promotes metastasis through neutrophil protease-mediated degradation of Tsp-1

    PubMed Central

    El Rayes, Tina; Catena, Raúl; Lee, Sharrell; Stawowczyk, Marcin; Joshi, Natasha; Fischbach, Claudia; Powell, Charles A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Altorki, Nasser K.; Gao, Dingcheng; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is inextricably associated with primary tumor progression. However, the contribution of inflammation to tumor outgrowth in metastatic organs has remained underexplored. Here, we show that extrinsic inflammation in the lungs leads to the recruitment of bone marrow-derived neutrophils, which degranulate azurophilic granules to release the Ser proteases, elastase and cathepsin G, resulting in the proteolytic destruction of the antitumorigenic factor thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1). Genetic ablation of these neutrophil proteases protected Tsp-1 from degradation and suppressed lung metastasis. These results provide mechanistic insights into the contribution of inflammatory neutrophils to metastasis and highlight the unique neutrophil protease–Tsp-1 axis as a potential antimetastatic therapeutic target. PMID:26668367

  13. Solubilization of the O2(-)-forming activity responsible for the respiratory burst in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Gabig, T G; Kipnes, R S; Babior, B M

    1978-10-10

    On exposure to suitable activating agents, neutrophils sharply alter their oxygen metabolism, showing large increases in oxygen uptake, O2 and H2O2 production, and glucose consumption via the hexose monophosphate shunt. These metabolic alterations, which together are designated the "respiratory burst," are due to the activation of a system which catalyzes the reaction: 2O2 + NADPH leads to 2O2(-) + NADP. This O2(-)-forming system is found in a particulate fraction isolated from neutrophils which had been activated with opsonized zymosan. When these particles were treated with detergent under suitable conditions, the O2(-)-forming activity was released in a form which passed through a membrane filter capable of retaining species of Mr greater than 3000,000. Soluble O2(-)-forming activity was obtained from normal activated neutrophils, but not from normal resting neutrophils or from activated neutrophils obtained from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited condition in which the respiratory burst is defective. O2(-)production by the soluble system required a reduced pyridine nucleotide as electron donor, and showed a quadratic dependence on the concentration of the solubilized preparation.

  14. Activation of adherent vascular neutrophils in the lung during acute endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Vasanthi R; Connor, Agnieszka J; Zhou, Peihong; Gordon, Marion K; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2002-01-01

    Background Neutrophils constitute the first line of defense against invading microorganisms. Whereas these cells readily undergo apoptosis under homeostatic conditions, their survival is prolonged during inflammatory reactions and they become biochemically and functionally activated. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of acute endotoxemia on the response of a unique subpopulation of neutrophils tightly adhered to the lung vasculature. Methods Rats were treated with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (i.v.) to induce acute endotoxemia. Adherent neutrophils were isolated from the lung vasculature by collagenase digestion and sequential filtering. Agarose gel electrophoresis, RT-PCR, western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to evaluate neutrophil activity. Results Adherent vascular neutrophils isolated from endotoxemic animals exhibited decreased apoptosis when compared to cells from control animals. This was associated with a marked increase in expression of the anti-apoptotic protein, Mcl-1. Cells isolated 0.5–2 hours after endotoxin administration were more chemotactic than cells from control animals and expressed increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA and protein, demonstrating that they are functionally activated. Endotoxin treatment of the animals also induced p38 and p44/42 mitogen activated protein kinases in the adherent lung neutrophils, as well as nuclear binding activity of the transcription factors, NF-κB and cAMP response element binding protein. Conclusion These data demonstrate that adherent vascular lung neutrophils are highly responsive to endotoxin and that pathways regulating apoptosis and cellular activation are upregulated in these cells. PMID:12204102

  15. Interleukin-17 causes neutrophil mediated inflammation in ovalbumin-induced uveitis in DO11.10 mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zili; Zhong, Wenwei; Spencer, Doran; Chen, Hong; Lu, Huiying; Kawaguchi, Tatsushi; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2009-01-01

    T cell-mediated uveitis is strongly associated with many systemic inflammatory disorders. Th17 cells are a novel T cell subset characterized by production of interleukin (IL)-17. In this study, we used DO11.10 mice to investigate the role of IL-17 in the pathogenesis of uveitis. CD4+ T cells in DO11.10 mice are genetically engineered to react with ovalbumin (OVA). IL-17 expression was determined by real-time PCR and ELISPOT. Uveitis was induced by intravitreal injection of OVA, and ocular inflammation was evaluated by intravital microscopy. OVA challenge significantly induced IL-17 production by DO11.10 splenocytes in vitro. Next, we examined whether OVA challenge could elicit local inflammation and induce IL-17 in vivo. OVA elicited marked neutrophil-predominant inflammatory cell infiltration in the eyes. This leukocyte influx was mediated by CD4+ lymphocytes as evidenced by significant inhibition of the ocular inflammation by CD4+ depleting antibody. Compared to control mice, OVA treatment induced IL-17 expression. Moreover, anti-IL-17 antibody markedly reduced OVA-mediated ocular inflammation. Finally, the neutralization of IL-17 attenuated ocular expression of CXCL2 and CXCL5, two cytokines which are chemotactic for neutrophils. Our study suggests that IL-17 is implicated in the pathogenesis of this T cell-mediated model of uveitis in part through neutrophil chemotaxis as a downstream effect of IL-17. PMID:19254849

  16. TNFα-activated mesenchymal stromal cells promote breast cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR2(+) neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yu, P F; Huang, Y; Han, Y Y; Lin, L Y; Sun, W H; Rabson, A B; Wang, Y; Shi, Y F

    2017-01-26

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) tend to infiltrate into tumors and form a major component of the tumor microenvironment. Our previous work demonstrated that tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα)-activated MSCs significantly promoted tumor growth. However, the role of TNFα-treated MSCs in tumor metastasis remains elusive. Employing a lung metastasis model of murine breast cancer, we found that TNFα-activated MSCs strikingly enhanced tumor metastasis compared with normal MSCs. We analyzed the chemokine profiles and found that the expression of CCL5, CCR2 and CXCR2 ligands were enhanced in TNFα-activated MSCs. Using genetic or pharmacological strategies to inhibit CCL5 or CCR2, we demonstrated that CCL5 and CCR2 ligands were indispensable in supporting TNFα-activated MSCs to promote tumor metastasis. Analysis of immune cells revealed that CXCR2 ligands (CXCL1, CXCL 2 and CXCL5) expressed by TNFα-activated MSCs efficiently recruited CXCR2(+) neutrophils into tumor. These neutrophils were responsible for the pro-metastatic effect of MSCs since inhibition of this chemotaxis abolished increased neutrophil recruitment and tumor metastasis. The interaction between neutrophils and tumor cells resulted in markedly elevated metastasis-related genes by tumor cells, including CXCR4, CXCR7, MMP12, MMP13, IL-6 and TGFβ. Importantly, in IL8(high) human breast cancer samples, we also observed similar alterations of gene expression. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that TNFα-activated MSCs promote tumor metastasis via CXCR2(+) neutrophil recruitment.

  17. Enhanced neutrophil activity is associated with shorter time to tumor progression in glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Afsar; Cederarv, Madeleine; Wolmer-Solberg, Nina; Tammik, Charlotte; Stragliotto, Giuseppe; Peredo, Inti; Fornara, Olesja; Xu, Xinling; Dzabic, Mensur; Taher, Chato; Skarman, Petra; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant tumor with a poor outcome that is often positive for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). GBM patients often have excessive numbers of neutrophils and macrophages near and within the tumor. Here, we characterized the cytokine patterns in the blood of GBM patients with and without Valganciclovir treatment. Furthermore, we determined whether neutrophil activation is related to HCMV status and patient outcome. Blood samples for analyses of cytokines and growth factors were collected from 42 GBM patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 42) and at weeks 12 and 24 after surgery. Blood neutrophils of 28 GBM patients were examined for CD11b expression. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines—including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interferon-γ, interferon-α, tumor necrosis factor α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1were analyzed with a bead-based flow cytometry assay. During the first six months after surgery, neutrophil activity was increased in 12 patients and was unchanged or decreased in 16. Patients with increased neutrophil activity had enhanced IL-12p70, high grade HCMV and a shorter time to tumor progression (TTP) than patients without or decreased neutrophil activity (median TTP; 5.4 vs. 12 months, 95% confidence interval; 1.6–10 vs. 0.1–0.6, hazard ratio = 3 vs. 0.4, p = 0.004). The levels of IL-12p70 were significantly decreased in Valganciclovir treated patients (n = 22, T 12W vs. T 24W, p = 0.03). In conclusion, our findings suggest that neutrophil activation is an early sign of tumor progression in GBM patients. PMID:27057448

  18. Inhibition of Neutrophil Adhesion and Antimicrobial Activity by Diluted Hydrosol Prepared from Rosa damascena.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Naho; Tansho-Nagakawa, Shigeru; Miyazaki, Chizuru; Shimomura, Kazuyuki; Ono, Yasuo; Abe, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Hydrosol prepared from the flowers of Rosa damascena (rose water) has been traditionally used for various health-related issues, including skin troubles such as erythema, itchiness, swelling. For the care of these skin troubles caused by microbial infection, both antimicrobial and antiinflammatory effects are required. Here, we investigated the effects of rose water on the growth of Candida albicans and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which cause skin infections, and on the function of neutrophils, which play a major role in the regulation of inflammatory reactions. To assess its modulatory effects on neutrophils, the effects of rose water against neutrophil adhesion response were evaluated. Rose water inhibited mycelial growth of C. albicans at a concentration of ca. 2.2%, and reduced viability of MRSA within 1 h. Rose water suppressed neutrophil activation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) at 5-15%. It also reduced the LPS- and TNF-α-induced cell surface expression of the adhesion-related molecule, cluster of differentiation (CD) 11b, but did not affect the migratory capacity of neutrophils with or without chemoattractant. These results suggest that rose water may reduce the pathogenicity of microbes, and attenuate neutrophil stimulation, which is involved in inflammatory responses. These findings suggest that rose water has a potential effect to inhibit skin inflammation caused by microbes.

  19. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Torres, Javier; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    TLRs and NLRs participate in the immune system recognition of Helicobacter pylori. However, little is known about the mechanisms leading to inflammasome activation by H. pylori and if NLRs in neutrophils are involved in the process. We studied how NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome components are involved in IL-1β maturation in human neutrophils in response to the infection and if they are dependent on T4SS (type IV secretion system) and TLRs. Human neutrophils were cultured and infected with the 26695 or the VirD4- H. pylori strains; the IL-1β concentration was analyzed by ELISA, and we also evaluated the activation of TLRs 2 and 4. The infection of neutrophils with both strains of H. pylori induced production of IL-1β and expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome components such as apoptosis-associated speck-like protein with CARD domain and NLRP3 protein. The infection also increased the activity of caspase-1, which is required for the maturation of IL-1β. Our study shows, for the first time, that H. pylori infection induces the expression and activation of components of NLRP3 inflammasomes in human neutrophils and that the activation is independent of a functional T4SS and TLR2 and TLR4. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Increased expression of the C3b receptor by neutrophils and complement activation during haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J; Hakim, R M; Fearon, D T

    1984-01-01

    Activation of complement and the relative number of C3b receptors expressed by neutrophils was assessed in patients undergoing haemodialysis with new and reused cellulosic membranes, and with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) membranes. Activation of complement was assessed by radioimmunoassay of plasma C3adesArg, and neutrophil C3b receptors were measured by fluorescent flow cytometry of cells indirectly stained with F(ab')2 anti-C3b receptor. During first use of cellulosic dialysis membranes by four patients, the mean expression of C3b receptors by neutrophils in blood taken from the afferent line of the extra-corporeal system after 10, 20, 60 and 120 min of dialysis increased to 127, 189, 255 and 296%, respectively. The mean plasma C3adesArg concentrations in the corresponding samples of blood were 225, 320, 236 and 160% of the pre-dialysis levels. During third and fifth use of the same membranes by these patients, the mean C3b receptor expression by neutrophils did not exceed 150% of the predialysis determination, and correspondingly minimal increases in plasma C3adesArg were observed. Analysis of blood taken simultaneously from the afferent and efferent lines of the first use cellulosic dialysis system indicated that the increase in C3b receptor expression by neutrophils and generation of C3adesArg occurred when blood came in contact with the dialysis membrane. Haemodialysis of four additional patients with the non-complement activating PMMA membrane caused only modest or no increases in neutrophil C3b receptors. Thus, complement activation in vivo is associated with up-regulation of neutrophilic C3b receptors, indicating that this cellular response previously described only in model, in vitro systems, is a physiological mechanism by which this cell can augment its capacity for responding to C3b opsonized material. PMID:6232024

  1. Penetrating thorax injury leads to mild systemic activation of neutrophils without inflammatory complications.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, Kathelijne M; Hietbrink, Falco; Hardcastle, Timothy C; Warren, Brian L; Koenderman, Leo; Leenen, Luke P H

    2014-03-01

    Trauma is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thoracic injuries are associated with inflammatory complications such as ARDS. The pathogenesis of this complication after pulmonary injury is incompletely understood, but neutrophils are thought to play a pivotal role. The aim of this project was to gain more insight in the role of thoracic injuries in the pathophysiological processes that link systemic neutrophil activation with inflammatory complications after trauma. In this prospective cohort study fifty-five patients with isolated penetrating thoracic injury were included at a level one Trauma Unit. Blood samples were analysed for neutrophil phenotype with the use of flowcytometry within 3 h of trauma and repeated six and 24 h after injury. The presence of inflammatory complications (e.g. ARDS or sepsis/septic shock) was assessed during admission, and this was related to the neutrophil phenotpe. The clinical follow-up of fifty-three patients was uneventful. Only two patients developed an inflammatory complication. Within 3 h after trauma, neutrophils showed a decreased expression of FcγRII (p=0.007) and FcγRIII (p=0.001) compared to healthy individuals. After 6 h, expression of active FcγRII (p=0.017), C5aR (p=0.004) and CAECAM8 (p=0.043) increased, whereas L-selectin (p=0.002) decreased. After 24 h also CXCR-2 (CD182) expression increased compared to healthy individuals (p=0.001). Penetrating thoracic trauma leads to a distinct primed activation status of circulating neutrophils within hours. In addition to activation of cells, both young and reverse migrated neutrophils are released into the circulation. This degree of systemic inflammation does not exceed a threshold of inflammation that is needed for the development of inflammatory complications like ARDS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 in Neutrophil Activation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Michalick, Laura; Tang, Christine; Tabuchi, Arata; Goldenberg, Neil; Dan, Qinghong; Awwad, Khader; Wang, Liming; Erfinanda, Lasti; Nouailles, Geraldine; Witzenrath, Martin; Vogelzang, Alexis; Lv, Lu; Lee, Warren L; Zhang, Haibo; Rotstein, Ori; Kapus, Andras; Szaszi, Katalin; Fleming, Ingrid; Liedtke, Wolfgang B; Kuppe, Hermann; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2016-03-01

    The cation channel transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 4 is expressed in endothelial and immune cells; however, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. The functional relevance of TRPV4 was assessed in vivo, in isolated murine lungs, and in isolated neutrophils. Genetic deficiency of TRPV4 attenuated the functional, histological, and inflammatory hallmarks of acid-induced ALI. Similar protection was obtained with prophylactic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, GSK2193874; however, therapeutic administration of the TRPV4 inhibitor, HC-067047, after ALI induction had no beneficial effect. In isolated lungs, platelet-activating factor (PAF) increased vascular permeability in lungs perfused with trpv4(+/+) more than with trpv4(-/-) blood, independent of lung genotype, suggesting a contribution of TRPV4 on blood cells to lung vascular barrier failure. In neutrophils, TRPV4 inhibition or deficiency attenuated the PAF-induced increase in intracellular calcium. PAF induced formation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids by neutrophils, which, in turn, stimulated TRPV4-dependent Ca(2+) signaling, whereas inhibition of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid formation inhibited the Ca(2+) response to PAF. TRPV4 deficiency prevented neutrophil responses to proinflammatory stimuli, including the formation of reactive oxygen species, neutrophil adhesion, and chemotaxis, putatively due to reduced activation of Rac. In chimeric mice, however, the majority of protective effects in acid-induced ALI were attributable to genetic deficiency of TRPV4 in parenchymal tissue, whereas TRPV4 deficiency in circulating blood cells primarily reduced lung myeloperoxidase activity. Our findings identify TRPV4 as novel regulator of neutrophil activation and suggest contributions of both parenchymal and neutrophilic TRPV4 in the pathophysiology of ALI.

  3. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gagen, Debjani; Laubinger, Sara; Li, Zhijie; Petrescu, Matei S.; Brown, Evelyn S.; Smith, C. Wayne; Burns, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that PMN contact with stromal keratocytes is CD18-dependent, while contact with collagen is CD18-independent. In the present study, we wished to extend these observations and determine if ICAM-1, a known ligand for CD18, mediates PMN contact with keratocytes during corneal wound healing. Uninjured and injured right corneas from C57Bl/6 wild type (WT) mice and ICAM-1−/− mice were processed for transmission electron microscopy and imaged for morphometric analysis. PMN migration, stromal thickness, and ICAM-1 staining were evaluated using light microscopy. Twelve hours after epithelial abrasion, PMN surface contact with paralimbal keratocytes in ICAM-1−/− corneas was reduced to ~50% of that observed in WT corneas; PMN surface contact with collagen was not affected. Stromal thickness (edema), keratocyte network surface area and keratocyte shape were similar in ICAM-1−/− and WT corneas. WT keratocyte ICAM-1 expression was detected at baseline and ICAM-1 staining intensity increased following injury. Since ICAM-1 is readily detected on mouse keratocytes and PMN-keratocyte surface contact in ICAM-1−/− mice is markedly reduced, the data suggest PMN adhesive interactions with keratocyte stromal networks is in part regulated by keratocyte ICAM-1 expression. PMID:20713042

  4. Neuropilin-1 mediates neutrophil elastase uptake and cross-presentation in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kerros, Celine; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Zha, Dongxing; Mehrens, Jennifer M; Sergeeva, Anna; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Peters, Haley L; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Ruisaard, Kathryn E; Perakis, Alexander A; St John, Lisa S; Lu, Sijie; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Herrmann, Amanda C; Alatrash, Gheath; Toniatti, Carlo; Hanash, Samir M; Ma, Qing; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-06-16

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) can be rapidly taken up by tumor cells that lack endogenous NE expression, including breast cancer, which results in cross-presentation of PR1, an NE-derived HLA-A2-restricted peptide that is an immunotherapy target in hematological and solid tumor malignancies. The mechanism of NE uptake, however, remains unknown. Using the mass spectrometry-based approach, we identify neuropilin-1 (NRP1) as a NE receptor that mediates uptake and PR1 cross-presentation in breast cancer cells. We demonstrated that soluble NE is a specific, high-affinity ligand for NRP1 with a calculated Kd of 38.7 nm Furthermore, we showed that NRP1 binds to the RRXR motif in NE. Notably, NRP1 knockdown with interfering RNA or CRISPR-cas9 system and blocking using anti-NRP1 antibody decreased NE uptake and, subsequently, susceptibility to lysis by PR1-specific cytotoxic T cells. Expression of NRP1 in NRP1-deficient cells was sufficient to induce NE uptake. Altogether, because NRP1 is broadly expressed in tumors, our findings suggest a role for this receptor in immunotherapy strategies that target cross-presented antigens. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Curcumin increases gelatinase activity in human neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Francis; Girard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin has been found to possess anti-inflammatory activities and neutrophils, key players in inflammation, were previously found to be important targets to curcumin in a few studies. For example, curcumin was found to induce apoptosis in neutrophils by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanism. However, the role of curcumin on the biology of neutrophils is still poorly defined. To study the role of curcumin on neutrophil degranulation and to determine the role of p38 MAPK, human neutrophils were freshly isolated from healthy individuals and incubated in vitro with curcumin. Degranulation was studied at three levels: surface expression of granule markers by flow cytometry; release of matrix metallopeptidase-9 (MMP-9 or gelatinase B) enzyme into supernatants by Western blot; and gelatinase B activity by zymography. Activation of p38 MAPK was studied by monitoring its tyrosine phosphorylation levels by western blot and its role by the utilization of a pharmacological inhibitor. The results indicate that curcumin increased the cell surface expression of CD35 (secretory vesicle), CD63 (azurophilic granules), and CD66b (gelatinase granules) in neutrophils. Also, curcumin increased the release and enzymatic activity of gelatinase B in the extracellular milieu and activated p38 MAP kinase in these cells. However, in contrast to fMLP, curcumin-induced enzymatic activity and secretion of gelatinase B were not reversed by use of a p38 inhibitor. Finally, it was found that curcumin was able to enhance phagocytosis. Taken together, the results here demonstrate that curcumin induced degranulation in human neutrophils and that the increased gelatinase activity is not dependent on p38 MAPK activation. Therefore, degranulation is another human neutrophil function that could be modulated by curcumin, as well as phagocytosis.

  6. The effect of the bacterial product, succinic acid, on neutrophil bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majid, K B; Kenny, P A; Finlay-Jones, J J

    1997-02-01

    We investigated the effect of succinic acid on neutrophil bactericidal activity in a model of intra-abdominal abscess induced in mice by the peritoneal inoculation of 5 x 10(6) cfu ml-1 E. coli and 5 x 10(8) cfu ml-1 B. fragilis plus 1 mg of bran as faecal fibre analogue. The mean pH of the induced abscesses at week 1 was 6.7, higher than the pH associated with succinic acid inhibitory activity. We therefore determined the effect of succinic acid (0-100 mM) at pH 6.7 on the bactericidal activity of mouse bone marrow-derived neutrophils. Phagocytic killing of Proteus mirabilis by neutrophils was significantly inhibited by 30-100 mM succinic acid at pH 6.7 but there was no significant effect of succinic acid on engulfment of bacteria at this pH. However, significant inhibition of intracellular killing (assayed by adding succinic acid to suspensions of neutrophils which had engulfed bacteria in low serum concentrations but in the absence of succinic acid) was noted at 70 and 100 mM. These results indicate that succinic acid inhibits neutrophil bactericidal activity at a physiological pH, principally through inhibition of intracellular killing mechanisms and therefore contributing to bacterial persistence in this model of abscess formation.

  7. TLR9 and NF-κB Are Partially Involved in Activation of Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and Its Purified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils. PMID:24987851

  8. TLR9 and NF-κB are partially involved in activation of human neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori and its purified DNA.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Arellano, Lourdes; Cortés-Reynosa, Pedro; Sánchez-Zauco, Norma; Salazar, Eduardo; Torres, Javier; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection represents one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide. The inflammatory response to this bacterium involves a large influx of neutrophils to the lamina propria of the gastric mucosa. However, little is known about the receptors and molecular mechanisms involved in activation of these neutrophils. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in the response of human neutrophils to H. pylori and purified H. pylori DNA (Hp-DNA). Neutrophils were isolated from the blood of adult volunteers and challenged with either H. pylori or Hp-DNA. We found that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA induced increased expression and release of IL-8. Furthermore, we showed that TLR9 is involved in the induction of IL-8 production by H. pylori and Hp-DNA. IL-8 production induced by H. pylori but not by Hp-DNA was partially mediated by NF-κB. In conclusion, this study showed for first time that both, H. pylori and Hp-DNA activate TLR9 and induce a different inflammatory response that leads to activation of neutrophils.

  9. Impaired surface expression of PAF receptors on human neutrophils is dependent upon cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Javors, M A; Olson, M S

    1994-02-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils to bind PAF was rapidly diminished upon cell stimulation with both physiological agonists (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), leukotriene B4 (LTB4)) and pharmacologic agonists (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), A23187). As a consequence, PAF responses in neutrophils were blunted, as monitored by an inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Downregulation of the PAF receptor in neutrophils by diverse agonists was temperature-sensitive and required intact cells. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed that PAF binding sites were lost without an appreciable change in the affinity of the ligand for the receptor. The binding of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB2086 to neutrophils decreased in parallel with PAF binding. PMA-induced PAF receptor downregulation was staurosporine-sensitive while PAF receptor downregulation by A23187, FMLP, or LTB4 was staurosporine-resistant. Both neutrophil aggregation (a form of intercellular adhesion) and PAF receptor downregulation occurred only at high concentrations of agonists while other signaling processes such as the increase in [Ca2+]i, PKC activation, and PAF synthesis were stimulated at low concentrations of agonists. Furthermore, agonist-induced PAF receptor downregulation was observed only under conditions in which the activated neutrophils were stirred (or shaken) and were allowed to aggregate. Additionally, chelation of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA minimized cell aggregation and also inhibited PAF receptor downregulation. While the nature of the biochemical signal or the physical changes in the plasma membrane associated with aggregation or that follow aggregation remain to be elucidated it is clear that full expression of cell activation (i.e., neutrophil aggregation) is required for PAF receptor downregulation.

  10. L-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment in experimental rodent aneurysm formation.

    PubMed

    Hannawa, Kevin K; Eliason, Jonathan L; Woodrum, Derek T; Pearce, Charles G; Roelofs, Karen J; Grigoryants, Vladimir; Eagleton, Matthew J; Henke, Peter K; Wakefield, Thomas W; Myers, Daniel D; Stanley, James C; Upchurch, Gilbert R

    2005-07-12

    This investigation tested the hypothesis that L-selectin is important in experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) formation in rodents. Rat abdominal aortas were perfused with saline (control) or porcine pancreatic elastase and studied on postperfusion days 1, 2, 4, 7, and 14 (n=5 per treatment group per day). Neutrophil (polymorphonucleur leukocyte, PMN) and macrophage counts per high-powered field (HPF) were performed on fixed sections. L-selectin expression and protein levels in aortic tissue were determined by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Elastase-perfused aortic diameters were significantly increased compared with control aortas at all time points except day 1 (P<0.05). PMN counts significantly increased in elastase-perfused aortas compared with control aortas at days 1, 2, and 4, reaching maximum levels at day 7 (40.8 versus 0.3 PMNs/HPF, P=0.001). L-selectin mRNA expression in elastase-perfused aortas was 18 (P=0.018), 17 (P<0.001), and 8 times (P=0.02) times greater than control aortas at days 1, 2, and 4, respectively. Western blot demonstrated a significant 69% increase in L-selectin protein at day 7 in elastase- as compared with saline-perfused aortas (P=0.005). Subsequent experiments involved similar studies on postperfusion days 4, 7, and 14 of aortas from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice (n=21) and L-selectin-knockout (LKO) mice (n=19). LKO mice had significantly smaller aortic diameters at day 14 as compared with WT mice (88% versus 123%, P=0.02). PMN counts were significantly greater in elastase-perfused WT mouse aortas as compared with LKO mouse aortas at day 4 after perfusion (12.8 versus 4.8 PMNs/HPF, P=0.02). Macrophage counts were significantly greater at all time points after perfusion in elastase-perfused WT mouse aortas compared with elastase-perfused LKO mouse aortas, with a maximum difference at day 7 after perfusion (13.3 versus 0.5 macrophages/HPF, P<0.001). L-selectin-mediated neutrophil recruitment may be a

  11. Propofol inhibits superoxide production, elastase release, and chemotaxis in formyl peptide-activated human neutrophils by blocking formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-Chin; Chung, Pei-Jen; Ho, Chiu-Ming; Kuo, Chan-Yen; Hung, Min-Fa; Huang, Yin-Ting; Chang, Wen-Yi; Chang, Ya-Wen; Chan, Kwok-Hon; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-06-15

    Neutrophils play a critical role in acute and chronic inflammatory processes, including myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, sepsis, and adult respiratory distress syndrome. Binding of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) by N-formyl peptides can activate neutrophils and may represent a new therapeutic target in either sterile or septic inflammation. Propofol, a widely used i.v. anesthetic, has been shown to modulate immunoinflammatory responses. However, the mechanism of propofol remains to be established. In this study, we showed that propofol significantly reduced superoxide generation, elastase release, and chemotaxis in human neutrophils activated by fMLF. Propofol did not alter superoxide generation or elastase release in a cell-free system. Neither inhibitors of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors nor an inhibitor of protein kinase A reversed the inhibitory effects of propofol. In addition, propofol showed less inhibitory effects in non-FPR1-induced cell responses. The signaling pathways downstream from FPR1, involving calcium, AKT, and ERK1/2, were also competitively inhibited by propofol. These results show that propofol selectively and competitively inhibits the FPR1-induced human neutrophil activation. Consistent with the hypothesis, propofol inhibited the binding of N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-fluorescein, a fluorescent analog of fMLF, to FPR1 in human neutrophils, differentiated THP-1 cells, and FPR1-transfected human embryonic kidney-293 cells. To our knowledge, our results identify, for the first time, a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of propofol by competitively blocking FPR1 in human neutrophils. Considering the importance of N-formyl peptides in inflammatory processes, our data indicate that propofol may have therapeutic potential to attenuate neutrophil-mediated inflammatory diseases by blocking FPR1.

  12. Neutrophil elastase mediates acute pathogenesis and is a determinant of long-term behavioral recovery after traumatic injury to the immature brain

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D; Trivedi, Alpa; Gimlin, Kayleen; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    While neutrophil elastase (NE), released by activated neutrophils, is a key mediator of secondary pathogenesis in adult models of brain ischemia and spinal cord injury, no studies to date have examined this protease in the context of the injured immature brain, where there is notable vulnerability resulting from inadequate antioxidant reserves and prolonged exposure to infiltrating neutrophils. We thus reasoned that NE may be a key determinant of secondary pathogenesis, and as such, adversely influence long-term neurological recovery. To address this hypothesis, wild-type (WT) and NE knockout (KO) mice were subjected to a controlled cortical impact at post-natal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. To determine if NE is required for neutrophil infiltration into the injured brain, and whether this protease contributes to vasogenic edema, we quantified neutrophil numbers and measured water content in the brains of each of these genotypes. While leukocyte trafficking was indistinguishable between genotypes, vasogenic edema was markedly attenuated in the NE KO. To determine if early pathogenesis is dependent on NE, indices of cell death (TUNEL and activated caspase-3) were quantified across genotypes. NE KO mice showed a reduction in these markers of cell death in the injured hippocampus, which corresponded to greater preservation of neuronal integrity as well as reduced expression of heme oxygenase-1, a marker of oxidative stress. WT mice, treated with a competitive inhibitor of NE at 2, 6 and 12 h post-injury, likewise showed a reduction in cell death and oxidative stress compared to vehicle-treated controls. We next examined the long-term behavioral and structural consequences of NE deficiency. NE KO mice showed an improvement in long-term spatial memory retention and amelioration of injury-induced hyperactivity. However, volumetric and stereological analyses found comparable tissue loss in the injured cortex and hippocampus independent of genotype. Further

  13. Effects of Neutrophils on Cefazolin Activity and Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, David M.; Herndon, Betty L.; Fitch, Jeffrey; Florkowski, Aaron; Parkhurst, Vera

    2002-01-01

    Bacteria survive within abscesses despite antimicrobial therapy, usually necessitating drainage. Our previous work showed that bacterial killing is diminished within the neutrophils of animals with abscesses. To further assess the role of neutrophils in Staphylococcus aureus survival and the poor activities of β-lactams in abscesses, tissue cage abscess-bearing rats were given polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-depleting antibody prior to and several times following inoculation of the tissue cages with S. aureus. Cefazolin (300 mg/kg of body weight/day) was administered to all animals in appropriately divided doses. After 7 days of antimicrobial therapy, the 17 animals that received anti-PMN serum had significantly fewer abscess neutrophils than the 18 controls and fewer abscess bacteria (5.55 versus 3.79 log10 CFU/ml [P = 0.04]) than the 18 controls. The data were consistent with the premise that cefazolin is more effective in abscesses depleted of neutrophils. To investigate further, S. aureus was incubated with rat peritoneal neutrophils; and bacterial cell membrane proteins were isolated, labeled with biotinylated ampicillin, separated by electrophoresis, blotted onto nitrocellulose, and stained for biotin reactivity. PBP 2 expression was consistently and significantly decreased after a brief, nonkilling PMN exposure. These experiments showed that PMN depletion enhanced the activity of cefazolin in the abscess milieu. Furthermore, altered bacterial cell wall cefazolin targets may be the mechanism by which the PMN diminishes antimicrobial activity, suggesting the importance of the staphylococcus-PMN interaction in the outcome of established infections. PMID:12183241

  14. RNA-Seq Reveals Activation of Both Common and Cytokine-Specific Pathways following Neutrophil Priming

    PubMed Central

    Moots, Robert J.; Edwards, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils are central to the pathology of inflammatory diseases, where they can damage host tissue through release of reactive oxygen metabolites and proteases, and drive inflammation via secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Many cytokines, such as those generated during inflammation, can induce a similar “primed” phenotype in neutrophils, but it is unknown if different cytokines utilise common or cytokine-specific pathways to induce these functional changes. Here, we describe the transcriptomic changes induced in control human neutrophils during priming in vitro with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and GM-CSF) using RNA-seq. Priming led to the rapid expression of a common set of transcripts for cytokines, chemokines and cell surface receptors (CXCL1, CXCL2, IL1A, IL1B, IL1RA, ICAM1). However, 580 genes were differentially regulated by TNF-α and GM-CSF treatment, and of these 58 were directly implicated in the control of apoptosis. While these two cytokines both delayed apoptosis, they induced changes in expression of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that these genes were regulated via differential activation of transcription factors by TNF-α and GM-CSF and these predictions were confirmed using functional assays: inhibition of NF-κB signalling abrogated the protective effect of TNF-α (but not that of GM-CSF) on neutrophil apoptosis, whereas inhibition of JAK/STAT signalling abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF, but not that of TNF-α (p<0.05). These data provide the first characterisation of the human neutrophil transcriptome following GM-CSF and TNF-α priming, and demonstrate the utility of this approach to define functional changes in neutrophils following cytokine exposure. This may provide an important, new approach to define the molecular properties of neutrophils after in vivo activation during inflammation. PMID:23554905

  15. Activated Neutrophils Are Associated with Pediatric Cerebral Malaria Vasculopathy in Malawian Children.

    PubMed

    Feintuch, Catherine Manix; Saidi, Alex; Seydel, Karl; Chen, Grace; Goldman-Yassen, Adam; Mita-Mendoza, Neida K; Kim, Ryung S; Frenette, Paul S; Taylor, Terrie; Daily, Johanna P

    2016-02-16

    Most patients with cerebral malaria (CM) sustain cerebral microvascular sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs). Although many young children are infected with P. falciparum, CM remains a rare outcome; thus, we hypothesized that specific host conditions facilitate iRBC cerebral sequestration. To identify these host factors, we compared the peripheral whole-blood transcriptomes of Malawian children with iRBC cerebral sequestration, identified as malarial-retinopathy-positive CM (Ret+CM), to the transcriptomes of children with CM and no cerebral iRBC sequestration, defined as malarial-retinopathy-negative CM (Ret-CM). Ret+CM was associated with upregulation of 103 gene set pathways, including cytokine, blood coagulation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) pathways (P < 0.01; false-discovery rate [FDR] of <0.05). Neutrophil transcripts were the most highly upregulated individual transcripts in Ret+CM patients. Activated neutrophils can modulate diverse host processes, including the ECM, inflammation, and platelet biology to potentially facilitate parasite sequestration. Therefore, we compared plasma neutrophil proteins and neutrophil chemotaxis between Ret+CM and Ret-CM patients. Plasma levels of human neutrophil elastase, myeloperoxidase, and proteinase 3, but not lactoferrin or lipocalin, were elevated in Ret+CM patients, and neutrophil chemotaxis was impaired, possibly related to increased plasma heme. Neutrophils were rarely seen in CM brain microvasculature autopsy samples, and no neutrophil extracellular traps were found, suggesting that a putative neutrophil effect on endothelial cell biology results from neutrophil soluble factors rather than direct neutrophil cellular tissue effects. Meanwhile, children with Ret-CM had lower levels of inflammation, higher levels of alpha interferon, and upregulation of Toll-like receptor pathways and other host transcriptional pathways, which may represent responses that do not favor cerebral i

  16. The matricellular protein CCN1 mediates neutrophil efferocytosis in cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Jun, Joon-Il; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Lau, Lester F

    2015-06-16

    Neutrophil infiltration constitutes the first step in wound healing, although their timely clearance by macrophage engulfment, or efferocytosis, is critical for efficient tissue repair. However, the specific mechanism for neutrophil clearance in wound healing remains undefined. Here we uncover a key role for CCN1 in neutrophil efferocytosis by acting as a bridging molecule that binds phosphatidylserine, the 'eat-me' signal on apoptotic cells and integrins αvβ3/αvβ5 in macrophages to trigger efferocytosis. Both knockin mice expressing a mutant CCN1 that is unable to bind αvβ3/αvβ5 and mice with Ccn1 knockdown are defective in neutrophil efferocytosis, resulting in exuberant neutrophil accumulation and delayed healing. Treatment of wounds with CCN1 accelerates neutrophil clearance in both Ccn1 knockin mice and diabetic Lepr(db/db) mice, which suffer from neutrophil persistence and impaired healing. These findings establish CCN1 as a critical opsonin in skin injury and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCN1 in certain types of non-healing wounds.

  17. Bordetella parapertussis Circumvents Neutrophil Extracellular Bactericidal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Scharrig, Emilia; Gómez, Ricardo M.; Harvill, Eric T.; Rodríguez, Maria Eugenia

    2017-01-01

    B. parapertussis is a whooping cough etiological agent with the ability to evade the immune response induced by pertussis vaccines. We previously demonstrated that in the absence of opsonic antibodies B. parapertussis hampers phagocytosis by neutrophils and macrophages and, when phagocytosed, blocks intracellular killing by interfering with phagolysosomal fusion. But neutrophils can kill and/or immobilize extracellular bacteria through non-phagocytic mechanisms such as degranulation and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). In this study we demonstrated that B. parapertussis also has the ability to circumvent these two neutrophil extracellular bactericidal activities. The lack of neutrophil degranulation was found dependent on the O antigen that targets the bacteria to cell lipid rafts, eventually avoiding the fusion of nascent phagosomes with specific and azurophilic granules. IgG opsonization overcame this inhibition of neutrophil degranulation. We further observed that B. parapertussis did not induce NETs release in resting neutrophils and inhibited NETs formation in response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation by a mechanism dependent on adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA)-mediated inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Thus, B. parapertussis modulates neutrophil bactericidal activity through two different mechanisms, one related to the lack of proper NETs-inducer stimuli and the other one related to an active inhibitory mechanism. Together with previous results these data suggest that B. parapertussis has the ability to subvert the main neutrophil bactericidal functions, inhibiting efficient clearance in non-immune hosts. PMID:28095485

  18. Evaluation of endotoxin (LPS) activity in bovine blood using neutrophil dependent chemiluminescence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of a neutrophil chemiluminescence-based assay for the measurement of LPS stimulatory activity in bovine whole blood. The assay is based on the capacity for LPS to trigger the respiratory oxidative burst activity (RBA) of autologous neutroph...

  19. Bruton’s Tyrosine Kinase Mediates FcγRIIa/Toll-Like Receptor–4 Receptor Crosstalk in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Agnieszka; Fudala, Rafal; Florence, Jon M.; Tucker, Torry; Allen, Timothy C.; Standiford, Theodore J.; Luchowski, Rafal; Fol, Marek; Rahman, Moshiur; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-01-01

    Previous observations by our laboratory indicate that the presence of anti–IL-8 autoantibody:IL-8 immune complexes in lung fluids from patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS) comprises an important prognostic indicator in the development and ultimate outcome of ALI/ARDS. We also showed that these complexes display proinflammatory activity toward neutrophils through the engagement of FcγRIIa receptors. Because sepsis is one of the most common risk factors for ALI/ARDS, the initial goal of our present study involved investigating the effects of LPS on the expression of FcγRIIa receptors in neutrophils. Our results indicate that LPS triggers an increase in the expression of FcγRIIa on the neutrophil surface, which leads to shortening of the molecular distance between FcγRIIa and Toll-like receptor–4 (TLR4). When such neutrophils are stimulated with anti–IL-8:IL-8 complexes, the TLR4 cascade becomes activated via the engagement of FcγRIIa. The underlying molecular mechanism has been subsequently examined and involves Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk). In conclusion, our study reveals the existence of Btk-dependent molecular cooperation between FcγRIIa and TLR4 signaling cascades in LPS-“primed” human neutrophils. Furthermore, we used fluorescence lifetime imaging to study the interactions between TLR4 and FcγRIIa in human alveolar neutrophils from patients with ALI/ARDS. The results from these experiments confirm the existence of the molecular cooperation between TLR4 and FcγRIIa. PMID:23239500

  20. Virus-stimulated neutrophils in the tumor microenvironment enhance T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin Yang; Tai, Jiayu A.; Li, Sumin; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) fosters tumors by attenuating anti-tumor immunity, reinforcing tumor cell survival and increasing angiogenesis. Among the constituents of the TME, here, we focused on tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs). First, we found that the combination of poly I:C and inactivated Sendai virus particles (hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope; HVJ-E) synergistically suppressed tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma mouse model. In this model, poly I:C contributed to the recruitment of CD11b+Ly6G+ neutrophils to the TME, and co-injection of poly I:C and HVJ-E increased CD11b+Ly6G+FAS+ TAN in the TME. Depletion of neutrophils abolished the synergistic anti-tumor effect of HVJ-E and poly I:C in B16-F10 tumors. We revealed that C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 2 (CXCL2) is produced in the TME by poly I:C, but HVJ-E enhanced neutrophil infiltration of the TME does not occur. An anti-CXCL2 antibody inhibited the tumor suppression by HVJ-E+poly I:C. HVJ-E in combination with recombinant CXCL2 protein or CXCL2 pDNA suppressed mouse melanoma by increasing cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity against B16-F10 melanoma, which was abolished by an anti-Ly6G antibody. HVJ-E directly and indirectly increased FAS and ICAM-1 expression in cultured bone marrow-derived naïve neutrophils. Thus, HVJ-E activates anti-tumor immunity via anti-tumorigenic neutrophils in the TME. An HVJ-E vector containing the CXCL2 gene may be applicable as a novel cancer gene therapy strategy. PMID:27259252

  1. Automated quantitation of circulating neutrophil and eosinophil activation in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Leckie, M.; Bryan, S.; Khan, J.; Dewar, A.; Aikman, S.; McGrath, J.; Okrongly, D.; Burman, J.; Barnes, P.; Hansel, T.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Asthma has been associated with eosinophil activation, measured in serum, sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and urine. A whole blood automated method was developed to assess eosinophil and neutrophil activity in terms of peroxidase content and cell morphology using the Bayer haematology analyser. The method was applied to an in vitro stimulation model when fMLP was added to whole blood and the samples were then analysed for changes in granularity and shape. In addition, cells stimulated with interleukin (IL)-8 were examined by electron microscopy.
METHODS—A cross sectional analysis was performed on venous blood from non-atopic, non-asthmatic normal subjects (n = 37), mild (n= 46) and symptomatic (n = 22) asthmatic patients on inhaled β2 agonist only, and more severe asthmatic patients (n = 17) on inhaled and oral corticosteroid therapy. Samples were analysed by the haematology analyser and peroxidase leucograms gated using the WinMDI software program.
RESULTS—There were significant differences in the amount of light scatter by the neutrophil populations in the symptomatic (p = 0.007) and severe asthmatic (p = 0.0001) groups compared with the control group. However, abnormalities in eosinophil populations were not observed. In vitro activation of whole blood with fMLP caused similar changes in neutrophil light scatter, suggesting that neutrophil activation is present in peripheral blood of symptomatic asthmatic patients. IL-8 caused a change in shape of the neutrophils seen using transmission electron microscopy.
CONCLUSIONS—Evidence of neutrophil activation can be seen in whole blood from patients with asthma using a novel automated method. This may potentially be applied to other inflammatory diseases.

 PMID:10817795

  2. The role of activated neutrophils in the early stage of equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    de la Rebière de Pouyade, Geoffroy; Serteyn, Didier

    2011-07-01

    Despite ongoing research and a widening range of treatment options, laminitis remains a severely damaging condition with poorly understood pathophysiology. Results obtained from cytokine regulation studies during the last decade have highlighted the inflammatory nature of laminitis. This review will describe the role of systemic activation and local infiltration of neutrophils in laminar tissues in the induction of laminitis. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of neutrophil activation in subsequent vascular dysfunction and oxidative and proteolysis imbalances that are pathways previously implicated in laminitis. Neutrophils, by the way of their interdependent relationship with endothelial cells and keratinocytes, dramatically increase the inflammatory response culminating in the failure of the laminar dermal-epidermal interface.

  3. Nicotinamide Effects Oxidative Burst Activity of Neutrophils in Patients with Poorly Controlled Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Samanci, Tülay; Demirel, Gülderen Yanikkaya; Damci, Taner; Ilkova, Hasan

    2004-01-01

    Neutrophil functions are impaired in patients with diabetes mellitus. Bacterial phagocytosis and oxidative burst activity are reduced at high glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. Defects in neutrophil oxidative burst capacity are of multifactorial origin in diabetes mellitus and correlate with glucose levels. It has been reported that neutrophil NADPH oxidase activity is impaired and superoxide production is reduced in diabetic patients with or without any infections. Nicotinamide is a vitamin B3 derivative and a NAD precursor with immunomodulatory effects. In vitro studies demonstrated that nicotinamide increases NAD and NADH content of beta cells. The authors hypothesized that nicotinamide may restore the impaired oxidative burst capacity of neutrophils in diabetic patients by increasing the NADH content as an electron donor and possibly through NADPH oxidase activity of the cell. In order to test the hypothesis, this placebo-controlled and open study was designed to evaluate neutrophil functions in infection-free poorly controlled type 2 diabetic patients as compared to healthy subjects and assess the effects of nicotinamide on neutrophil phagocytosis as well as oxidative burst activity. Thirty patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the study. Sixteen were females and 14 were males, with a mean age 58 ± 10. All patients were on sulphonylurea treatment and their hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were above 7.5%. The control group consisted of 10 voluntary healthy subjects. Diabetic and control subjects were not significantly different in terms of age, body mass index (BMI), leucocyte and neutrophil counts, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), but HbA1c and fasting glucose levels were significantly higher in patients with diabetes mellitus. Phagocytic activity and respiratory burst indexes were measured by flow cytometric analyses as previously described by Rothe and Valet (Methods Enzyml., 233, 539–548

  4. Shock-induced neutrophil mediated priming for acute lung injury in mice: divergent effects of TLR-4 and TLR-4/FasL deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Alfred; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Lomas, Joanne L; Song, Grace Y; Doughty, Lesley A; Gregory, Stephen H; Cioffi, William G; LeBlanc, Brian W; Reichner, Jonathan; Simms, H Hank; Grutkoski, Patricia S

    2002-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) leading to respiratory distress is a common sequela of shock/trauma, however, modeling this process in mice with a single shock or septic event is inconsistent. One explanation is that hemorrhage is often just a "priming insult," thus, secondary stimuli may be required to "trigger" ALI. To test this we carried out studies in which we assessed the capacity of hemorrhage alone or hemorrhage followed by septic challenge (CLP) to induce ALI. Lung edema, bronchoalveolar lavage interleukin (IL)-6, alveolar congestion, as well as lung IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were all increased in mice subjected to CLP at 24 but not 72 hours following hemorrhage. This was associated with a marked increase in the susceptibility of these mice to septic mortality. Peripheral blood neutrophils derived from 24 hours post-hemorrhage, but not Sham animals, exhibited an ex vivo decrease in apoptotic frequency and an increase in respiratory burst capacity, consistent with in vivo "priming." Subsequently, we observed that adoptive transfer of neutrophils from hemorrhaged but not sham-hemorrhage animals to neutropenic recipients reproduce ALI when subsequently septically challenged, implying that this priming was mediated by neutrophils. We also found marked general increases in lung IL-6, MIP-2, and MPO in mice deficient for toll-like receptor (TLR-4) or the combined lack of TLR-4/FasL. However, the TLR-4 defect markedly attenuated neutrophil influx into the lung while not altering the change in local cytokine/chemokine expression. Alternatively, the combined loss of FasL and TLR-4 did not inhibit the increase in MPO and exacerbated lung IL-6/MIP-2 levels even further.

  5. Proteinase 3-dependent caspase-3 cleavage modulates neutrophil death and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Loison, Fabien; Zhu, Haiyan; Karatepe, Kutay; Kasorn, Anongnard; Liu, Peng; Ye, Keqiang; Zhou, Jiaxi; Cao, Shannan; Gong, Haiyan; Jenne, Dieter E; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Xu, Yuanfu; Luo, Hongbo R

    2014-10-01

    Caspase-3-mediated spontaneous death in neutrophils is a prototype of programmed cell death and is critical for modulating physiopathological inflammatory responses; however, the underlying regulatory pathways remain ill defined. Here we determined that in aging neutrophils, the cleavage and activation of caspase-3 is independent of the canonical caspase-8- or caspase-9-mediated pathway. Instead, caspase-3 activation was mediated by serine protease proteinase 3 (PR3), which is present in the cytosol of aging neutrophils. Specifically, PR3 cleaved procaspase-3 at a site upstream of the canonical caspase-9 cleavage site. In mature neutrophils, PR3 was sequestered in granules and released during aging via lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), leading to procaspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of PR3 delayed neutrophil death in vitro and consistently delayed neutrophil death and augmented neutrophil accumulation at sites of inflammation in a murine model of peritonitis. Adoptive transfer of both WT and PR3-deficient neutrophils revealed that the delayed death of neutrophils lacking PR3 is due to an altered intrinsic apoptosis/survival pathway, rather than the inflammatory microenvironment. The presence of the suicide protease inhibitor SERPINB1 counterbalanced the protease activity of PR3 in aging neutrophils, and deletion of Serpinb1 accelerated neutrophil death. Taken together, our results reveal that PR3-mediated caspase-3 activation controls neutrophil spontaneous death.

  6. Proteinase 3–dependent caspase-3 cleavage modulates neutrophil death and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Loison, Fabien; Zhu, Haiyan; Karatepe, Kutay; Kasorn, Anongnard; Liu, Peng; Ye, Keqiang; Zhou, Jiaxi; Cao, Shannan; Gong, Haiyan; Jenne, Dieter E.; Remold-O’Donnell, Eileen; Xu, Yuanfu; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2014-01-01

    Caspase-3–mediated spontaneous death in neutrophils is a prototype of programmed cell death and is critical for modulating physiopathological inflammatory responses; however, the underlying regulatory pathways remain ill defined. Here we determined that in aging neutrophils, the cleavage and activation of caspase-3 is independent of the canonical caspase-8– or caspase-9–mediated pathway. Instead, caspase-3 activation was mediated by serine protease proteinase 3 (PR3), which is present in the cytosol of aging neutrophils. Specifically, PR3 cleaved procaspase-3 at a site upstream of the canonical caspase-9 cleavage site. In mature neutrophils, PR3 was sequestered in granules and released during aging via lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), leading to procaspase-3 cleavage and apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of PR3 delayed neutrophil death in vitro and consistently delayed neutrophil death and augmented neutrophil accumulation at sites of inflammation in a murine model of peritonitis. Adoptive transfer of both WT and PR3-deficient neutrophils revealed that the delayed death of neutrophils lacking PR3 is due to an altered intrinsic apoptosis/survival pathway, rather than the inflammatory microenvironment. The presence of the suicide protease inhibitor SERPINB1 counterbalanced the protease activity of PR3 in aging neutrophils, and deletion of Serpinb1 accelerated neutrophil death. Taken together, our results reveal that PR3-mediated caspase-3 activation controls neutrophil spontaneous death. PMID:25180606

  7. Pertactin is required for Bordetella species to resist neutrophil-mediated clearance.

    PubMed

    Inatsuka, Carol S; Xu, Qian; Vujkovic-Cvijin, Ivan; Wong, Sandy; Stibitz, Scott; Miller, Jeff F; Cotter, Peggy A

    2010-07-01

    Pertactin (PRN) is an autotransporter protein produced by all members of the Bordetella bronchiseptica cluster, which includes B. pertussis, B. parapertussis, and B. bronchiseptica. It is a primary component of acellular pertussis vaccines, and anti-PRN antibody titers correlate with protection. In vitro studies have suggested that PRN functions as an adhesin and that an RGD motif located in the center of the passenger domain is important for this function. Two regions of PRN that contain sequence repeats (region 1 [R1] and R2) show polymorphisms among strains and have been implicated in vaccine-driven evolution. We investigated the role of PRN in pathogenesis using B. bronchiseptica and natural-host animal models. A Deltaprn mutant did not differ from wild-type B. bronchiseptica in its ability to adhere to epithelial and macrophage-like cells in vitro or to establish respiratory infection in rats but was cleared much faster than wild-type bacteria in a mouse lung inflammation model. Unlike wild-type B. bronchiseptica, the Deltaprn mutant was unable to cause a lethal infection in SCID-Bg mice, but, like wild-type bacteria, it was lethal for neutropenic mice. These results suggest that PRN plays a critical role in allowing Bordetella to resist neutrophil-mediated clearance. Mutants producing PRN proteins in which the RGD motif was replaced with RGE or in which R1 and R2 were deleted were indistinguishable from wild-type bacteria in all assays, suggesting that these sequences do not contribute to PRN function.

  8. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis.

  9. Role of Non-muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase in Neutrophil-mediated Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction During Thermal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mingzhang; Yuan, Sarah Y.; Sun, Chongxiu; Frederich, Bert J.; Shen, Qiang; McLean, Danielle L.; Wu, Mack H.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils and non-muscle myosin light chain kinase (nmMLCK) have been implicated in intestinal microvascular leakage and mucosal hyperpermeability in inflammation and trauma. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of nmMLCK in neutrophil-dependent gut barrier dysfunction following thermal injury, a common form of trauma that typically induces inflammation in multiple organs. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in mice after a full-thickness burn revealed morphological evidence of mucosa inflammation characterized by neutrophil infiltration into the lamina propria, epithelial contraction, and narrow villi with blunt brush borders and loss of goblet cells. Compared to their wild-type counterparts, nmMLCK-/- mice displayed diminished morphological abnormalities. Likewise, intravital microscopic studies showed significant leukocyte adhesion in intestinal microvessels post-burn, a response that was blunted in the absence of nmMLCK. Functionally, thermal injury significantly increased the gut lumen-to-blood transport of FITC-dextran (4 kD), and this hyperpermeability was attenuated by either neutrophil depletion or nmMLCK deficiency. Consistent with the in vivo observations, in vitro assays with Caco-2 epithelial cell monolayers revealed a decrease in transcellular electric resistance coupled with myosin light chain phosphorylation, actomyosin ring condensation, and claudin-1 internalization upon stimulation with fMLP-activated neutrophils. Pretreatment of the cells with the MLCK inhibitor ML-7 prevented the tight junction responses. Taken together, the results suggest that nmMLCK plays an important role in neutrophil-dependent intestinal barrier dysfunction during inflammatory injury. PMID:22814287

  10. Activation and regulation of arachidonic acid release in rabbit peritoneal neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid release in rabbit neutrophils can be enhanced by the addition of chemotactic fMet-Leu-Phe, platelet-activating factor, PAF, or the calcium ionophore A23187. Over 80% of the release ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid comes from phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. The release is dose-dependent and increases with increasing concentration of the stimulus. The A23187-induced release increases with increasing time of the stimulation. ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid release, but not the rise in the concentration of intracellular calcium, is inhibited in pertussis toxin-treated neutrophils stimulated with PAF. The ({sup 3}H)arachidonic acid released by A23187 is potentiated while that release by fMET-Leu-Phe or PAF is inhibited in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA, treated rabbit neutrophils. The protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine, H-7, has no effect on the potentiation by PMA of the A23187-induced release, it prevents the inhibition by PMA of the release produced by PAF or fMet-Leu-Phe. In addition, PMA increases arachidonic acid release in H-7-treated cells stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59022 increases the level of diacylglycerol in neutrophils stimulated with fMet-Leu-Phe. Furthermore, R59022 potentiates ({sup 3}H) arachidonic acid release produced by fMet-Leu-Phe. This potentiation is not inhibited by H-7, in fact, it is increased in H-7-treated neutrophils.

  11. Imaging G Protein-coupled Receptor-mediated Chemotaxis and its Signaling Events in Neutrophil-like HL60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xi; Jin, Tian; Xu, Xuehua

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells sense and move towards a chemoattractant gradient, a cellular process referred as chemotaxis. Chemotaxis plays critical roles in many physiological processes, such as embryogenesis, neuron patterning, metastasis of cancer cells, recruitment of neutrophils to sites of inflammation, and the development of the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum. Eukaryotic cells sense chemo-attractants using G protein-coupled receptors. Visual chemotaxis assays are essential for a better understanding of how eukaryotic cells control chemoattractant-mediated directional cell migration. Here, we describe detailed methods for: 1) real-time, high-resolution monitoring of multiple chemotaxis assays, and 2) simultaneously visualizing the chemoattractant gradient and the spatiotemporal dynamics of signaling events in neutrophil-like HL60 cells. PMID:27684322

  12. 20-HETE Mediates Ozone-Induced, Neutrophil-Independent Airway Hyper-Responsiveness in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Philip R.; Mesaros, A. Clementina; Zhang, Jie; Christmas, Peter; Stark, Christopher M.; Douaidy, Karim; Mittelman, Michael A.; Soberman, Roy J.; Blair, Ian A.; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Ozone, a pollutant known to induce airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), increases morbidity and mortality in patients with obstructive airway diseases and asthma. We postulate oxidized lipids mediate in vivo ozone-induced AHR in murine airways. Methodology/Principal Findings Male BALB/c mice were exposed to ozone (3 or 6 ppm) or filtered air (controls) for 2 h. Precision cut lung slices (PCLS; 250 µm thickness) containing an intrapulmonary airway (∼0.01 mm2 lumen area) were prepared immediately after exposure or 16 h later. After 24 h, airways were contracted to carbachol (CCh). Log EC50 and Emax values were then calculated by measuring the airway lumen area with respect to baseline. In parallel studies, dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg), or 1-aminobenzotriazol (ABT) (50 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneal injection to naïve mice 18 h prior to ozone exposure. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered 2 h prior. Cell counts, cytokine levels and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for lipid analysis were assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from ozone exposed and control mice. Ozone acutely induced AHR to CCh. Dexamethasone or indomethacin had little effect on the ozone-induced AHR; while, ABT, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, markedly attenuated airway sensitivity. BAL fluid from ozone exposed animals, which did not contain an increase in neutrophils or interleukin (IL)-6 levels, increased airway sensitivity following in vitro incubation with a naïve PCLS. In parallel, significant increases in oxidized lipids were also identified using LC-MS with increases of 20-HETE that were decreased following ABT treatment. Conclusions/Significance These data show that ozone acutely induces AHR to CCh independent of inflammation and is insensitive to steroid treatment or cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition. BAL fluid from ozone exposed mice mimicked the effects of in vivo ozone exposure that were associated with marked increases in oxidized lipids. 20-HETE plays

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Elaborates Leukocidin AB To Mediate Escape from within Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    DuMont, Ashley L.; Yoong, Pauline; Surewaard, Bas G. J.; Benson, Meredith A.; Nijland, Reindert; van Strijp, Jos A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains of the pulsed-field type USA300 are primarily responsible for the current community-associated epidemic of MRSA infections in the United States. The success of USA300 is partly attributed to the ability of the pathogen to avoid destruction by human neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes [PMNs]), which are crucial to the host immune response to S. aureus infection. In this work, we investigated the contribution of bicomponent pore-forming toxins to the ability of USA300 to withstand attack from primary human PMNs. We demonstrate that in vitro growth conditions influence the expression, production, and availability of leukotoxins by USA300, which in turn impact the cytotoxic potential of this clone toward PMNs. Interestingly, we also found that upon exposure to PMNs, USA300 preferentially activates the promoter of the lukAB operon, which encodes the recently identified leukocidin AB (LukAB). LukAB elaborated by extracellular S. aureus forms pores in the plasma membrane of PMNs, leading to PMN lysis, highlighting a contribution of LukAB to USA300 virulence. We now show that LukAB also facilitates the escape of bacteria engulfed within PMNs, in turn enabling the replication and outgrowth of S. aureus. Together, these results suggest that upon encountering PMNs S. aureus induces the production of LukAB, which serves as an extra- and intracellular weapon to protect the bacterium from destruction by human PMNs. PMID:23509138

  14. Solonamide B inhibits quorum sensing and reduces Staphylococcus aureus mediated killing of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S; Gram, Lone; Larsen, Thomas O; Novick, Richard P; Frees, Dorte; Frøkiær, Hanne; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor histidine kinase, AgrC, of the agr two-component system. The hypervirulence of USA300 has been linked to increased expression of central virulence factors like α-hemolysin and the phenol soluble modulins (PSMs). Importantly, in strain USA300 Solonamide B dramatically reduced the activity of α-hemolysin and the transcription of psma encoding PSMs with an 80% reduction in toxicity of supernatants towards human neutrophils and rabbit erythrocytes. To our knowledge this is the first report of a compound produced naturally by a Gram-negative marine bacterium that interferes with agr and affects both RNAIII and AgrA controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  15. Clearance of Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage Is T Cell Dependent and Mediated through Interleukin-17A Expression and Neutrophil Influx

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Nathan K.; Harro, Janette M.

    2013-01-01

    The anterior nares of humans are the major reservoir for Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Approximately 20% of the healthy human population is persistently and 80% is intermittently colonized with S. aureus in the nasal cavity. Previous studies have shown a strong causal connection between S. aureus nasal carriage and increased risk of nosocomial infection, as well as increased carriage due to immune dysfunction. However, the immune responses that permit persistence or mediate clearance of S. aureus on the nasal mucosa are fundamentally undefined. In this study, we developed a carriage model in C57BL/6J mice and showed that clearance begins 14 days postinoculation. In contrast, SCID mice that have a deficient adaptive immune response are unable to eliminate S. aureus even after 28 days postinoculation. Furthermore, decolonization was found to be T cell mediated but B cell independent by evaluating carriage clearance in T-cell receptor β/δ (TCR-β/δ) knockout (KO) and IgH-μ KO mice, respectively. Upregulation of the cytokines interleukin 1β (IL-1β), KC (also termed CXC ligand 1 [CXCL1]), and IL-17A occurred following inoculation with intranasal S. aureus. IL-17A production was crucial for clearance, since IL-17A-deficient mice were unable to effectively eliminate S. aureus carriage. Subsequently, cell differential counts were evaluated from nasal lavage fluid obtained from wild-type and IL-17A-deficient colonized mice. These counts displayed IL-17A-dependent neutrophil migration. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in colonized mice caused reduced clearance compared to that in isotype-treated controls. Our data suggest that the Th17-associated immune response is required for nasal decolonization. This response is T cell dependent and mediated via IL-17A production and neutrophil influx. Th17-associated immune responses may be targeted for strategies to mitigate distal infections originating from persistent S. aureus carriage in humans. PMID:23529621

  16. Invariant NKT cells modulate the suppressive activity of Serum Amyloid A-differentiated IL-10-secreting neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    De Santo, Carmela; Arscott, Ramon; Booth, Sarah; Karydis, Ioannis; Jones, Margaret; Asher, Ruth; Salio, Mariolina; Middleton, Mark; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Neutrophils are the primary effector cells during inflammation, but can also control excessive inflammatory responses by secreting anti-inflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms modulating their plasticity remain unclear. We now show that systemic serum amyloid A-1 (SAA-1) controls the plasticity of neutrophil differentiation. SAA-1 not only induced anti-inflammatory IL-10-secreting neutrophils but also promoted invariant NKT (iNKT) cell interaction with these neutrophils, a process that limits their suppressive activity by reducing IL-10 and enhancing IL-12 production. Because SAA-1-producing melanomas promote differentiation of IL-10-secreting neutrophils, harnessing iNKT cells could be useful therapeutically by reducing the frequency of immunosuppressive neutrophils and restoring tumor specific immune responses. PMID:20890286

  17. Synergic production of neutrophil chemotactic activity by colonic epithelial cells and eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Dent, Gordon; Loweth, Sam C; Hasan, Anwar Matar; Leslie, Fiona M

    2014-10-01

    The presence of eosinophils in the lumen and mucosa of the intestine is characteristic of both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). There is evidence of eosinophil activation in the intestine during acute inflammatory episodes of these diseases; these episodes are also characterized by an influx of neutrophils, which have the potential to cause extensive tissue damage. We undertook a study to determine whether eosinophils in contact with colonic epithelial cells produce factors that may attract neutrophils in response to immunological stimulation. Neutrophil chemotactic activity (NCA) and concentrations of three neutrophil-attracting CXC chemokines - CXCL1 (Groα), CXCL5 (Ena78) and CXCL8 (IL8) - were measured in supernatants of T84 colonic epithelial cells and blood eosinophils or eosinophil-like myeloid leukaemia cells (AML14.3D10), alone or in combination. Cells were stimulated with serum-opsonized zymosan (OZ) particles. NCA (P<0.005) and CXCL5 levels (P<0.05) in the supernatants of OZ-stimulated epithelial/eosinophil co-cultures were significantly higher than in the supernatants of either cell type alone. Release of CXCL1 (P<0.05) and CXCL8 (P<0.01) from OZ-stimulated co-culture supernatants was significantly higher than from OZ-stimulated eosinophils but not higher than from OZ-stimulated epithelial cells. Eosinophils and colonic epithelial cells exhibit synergy in production of neutrophil chemoattractants in response to immunological stimulation. This may represent a mechanism for exaggerated recruitment of neutrophils to the intestine in response to acute infection in conditions that are characterized by the presence of eosinophils in the bowel.

  18. Similar activation state of neutrophils in sputum of asthma patients irrespective of sputum eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Tak, T; Hilvering, B; Tesselaar, K; Koenderman, L

    2015-11-01

    Inflammatory phenotypes of asthma are associated with differences in disease characteristics. It is unknown whether these inflammatory phenotypes are reflected by the activation status of neutrophils in blood and sputum. We obtained peripheral blood and induced sputum from 21 asthma patients and stratified our samples based on sputum eosinophilia resulting in two groups (>3% eosinophils: n = 13, <3%: n = 8). Eosinophils and neutrophils from blood and sputum were analysed for expression of activation and degranulation markers by flow cytometry. Data were analysed by both classical, non-parametric statistics and a multi-dimensional approach, using principal component analysis (PCA). Patients with sputum eosinophilia were characterized by increased asthma control questionnaire (ACQ) scores and blood eosinophil counts. Both sputum neutrophils and eosinophils displayed an activated and degranulated phenotype compared to cells obtained from blood. Specifically, degranulation of all granule types was detected in sputum cells, combined with an increased expression of the activation markers (activated) Mac-1 (CD11b), programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) (CD274) and a decreased expression of CD62L. CD69 expression was only increased on sputum eosinophils. Surface marker expression of neutrophils was similar in the presence or absence of eosinophilia, either by single or multi-dimensional analysis. Sputum neutrophils were highly activated and degranulated irrespective of sputum eosinophilia. Therefore, we conclude that differences in granulocyte activation in sputum and/or blood are not associated with clinical differences in the two groups of asthma patients. The finding of PD-L1 expression on sputum granulocytes suggests an immunomodulatory role of these cells in the tissue. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  19. Neutrophil activity in chronic venous leg ulcers—A target for therapy?

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, Jodi C.; Roy, Sashwati; Wilgus, Traci A.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLUs) affect approximately 600,000 people annually in the United States and accrue yearly treatment costs of US$2.5–5 billion. As the population ages, demands on health care resources for CVLU treatments are predicted to drastically increase because the incidence of CVLUs is highest in those ≥65 years of age. Furthermore, regardless of current standards of care, healing complications and high recurrence rates prevail. Thus, it is critical that factors leading to or exacerbating CVLUs be discerned and more effective, adjuvant, evidence-based treatment strategies be utilized. Previous studies have suggested that CVLUs’ pathogenesis is related to the prolonged presence of high numbers of activated neutrophils secreting proteases in the wound bed that destroy growth factors, receptors, and the extracellular matrix that are essential for healing. These events are believed to contribute to a chronically inflamed wound that fails to heal. Therefore, the purpose of this project was to review studies from the past 15 years (1996–2011) that characterized neutrophil activity in the microenvironment of human CVLUs for new evidence that could explicate the proposed relationship between excessive, sustained neutrophil activity and CVLUs. We also appraised the strength of evidence for current and potential therapeutics that target excessive neutrophil activity. PMID:23551462

  20. Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Lacks Pro-Inflammatory Activity, Contrasting the Two Recombinant Variants That Activate Human Neutrophils through Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Karin; Björkman, Lena; Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA), levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2) that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1) both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein. PMID:23626589

  1. Neutrophil mobilization via plerixafor-mediated CXCR4 inhibition arises from lung demargination and blockade of neutrophil homing to the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Sapna; Wang, Yilin; Chew, Weng Keong; Lima, Ronald; A-González, Noelia; Mattar, Citra N.Z.; Chong, Shu Zhen; Schlitzer, Andreas; Bakocevic, Nadja; Chew, Samantha; Keeble, Jo L.; Goh, Chi Ching; Li, Jackson L.Y.; Evrard, Maximilien; Malleret, Benoit; Larbi, Anis; Renia, Laurent; Haniffa, Muzlifah; Tan, Suet Mien; Chan, Jerry K.Y.; Balabanian, Karl; Nagasawa, Takashi; Bachelerie, Françoise; Hidalgo, Andrés; Ginhoux, Florent; Kubes, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Blood neutrophil homeostasis is essential for successful host defense against invading pathogens. Circulating neutrophil counts are positively regulated by CXCR2 signaling and negatively regulated by the CXCR4–CXCL12 axis. In particular, G-CSF, a known CXCR2 signaler, and plerixafor, a CXCR4 antagonist, have both been shown to correct neutropenia in human patients. G-CSF directly induces neutrophil mobilization from the bone marrow (BM) into the blood, but the mechanisms underlying plerixafor-induced neutrophilia remain poorly defined. Using a combination of intravital multiphoton microscopy, genetically modified mice and novel in vivo homing assays, we demonstrate that G-CSF and plerixafor work through distinct mechanisms. In contrast to G-CSF, CXCR4 inhibition via plerixafor does not result in neutrophil mobilization from the BM. Instead, plerixafor augments the frequency of circulating neutrophils through their release from the marginated pool present in the lung, while simultaneously preventing neutrophil return to the BM. Our study demonstrates for the first time that drastic changes in blood neutrophils can originate from alternative reservoirs other than the BM, while implicating a role for CXCR4–CXCL12 interactions in regulating lung neutrophil margination. Collectively, our data provides valuable insights into the fundamental regulation of neutrophil homeostasis, which may lead to the development of improved treatment regimens for neutropenic patients. PMID:24081949

  2. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  3. IL-17A-mediated neutrophil recruitment limits expansion of segmented filamentous bacteria.

    PubMed

    Flannigan, K L; Ngo, V L; Geem, D; Harusato, A; Hirota, S A; Parkos, C A; Lukacs, N W; Nusrat, A; Gaboriau-Routhiau, V; Cerf-Bensussan, N; Gewirtz, A T; Denning, T L

    2016-09-14

    Specific components of the intestinal microbiota are capable of influencing immune responses such that a mutualistic relationship is established. In mice, colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) induces T-helper-17 (Th17) cell differentiation in the intestine, yet the effector functions of interleukin (IL)-17A in response to SFB remain incompletely understood. Here we report that colonization of mice with SFB-containing microbiota induced IL-17A- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the ileum. This response required adaptive immunity, as Rag-deficient mice colonized with SFB-containing microbiota failed to induce IL-17A, CXCL1 and CXCL2, and displayed defective neutrophil recruitment to the ileum. Interestingly, neutrophil depletion in wild-type mice resulted in significantly augmented Th17 responses and SFB expansion, which correlated with impaired expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides. These data provide novel insight into a dynamic IL-17A-CXCR2-neutrophil axis during acute SFB colonization and demonstrate a central role for neutrophils in limiting SFB expansion.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 14 September 2016. doi:10.1038/mi.2016.80.

  4. IL-17A-mediated neutrophil recruitment limits expansion of segmented filamentous bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Flannigan, Kyle L.; Ngo, Vu L.; Geem, Duke; Harusato, Akihito; Hirota, Simon A.; Parkos, Charles A.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Nusrat, Asma; Gaboriau-Routhiau, Valérie; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Denning, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Specific components of the intestinal microbiota are capable of influencing immune responses such that a mutualistic relationship is established. In mice, colonization with segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) induces Th17 cell differentiation in the intestine, yet the effector functions of IL-17A in response to SFB remain incompletely understood. Here, we report that colonization of mice with SFB-containing microbiota induced IL-17A- and CXCR2-dependent recruitment of neutrophils to the ileum. This response required adaptive immunity as Rag-deficient mice colonized with SFB-containing microbiota failed to induce IL-17A, CXCL1 and CXCL2, and displayed defective neutrophil recruitment to the ileum. Interestingly, neutrophil depletion in wild-type mice resulted in significantly augmented Th17 responses and SFB expansion, which correlated with impaired expression of IL-22 and antimicrobial peptides. These data provide novel insight into a dynamic IL-17A-CXCR2-neutrophil axis during acute SFB colonization and demonstrate a central role for neutrophils in limiting SFB expansion. PMID:27624780

  5. Lung vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease mediated by arteriolar neutrophil-platelet microemboli

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Jimenez, Maritza A.; Vats, Ravi; Tutuncuoglu, Egemen; Jonassaint, Jude; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the polymerization of intraerythrocytic hemoglobin S promotes downstream vaso-occlusive events in the microvasculature. While vaso-occlusion is known to occur in the lung, often in the context of systemic vaso-occlusive crisis and the acute chest syndrome, the pathophysiological mechanisms that incite lung injury are unknown. We used intravital microscopy of the lung in transgenic humanized SCD mice to monitor acute vaso-occlusive events following an acute dose of systemic lipopolysaccharide sufficient to trigger events in SCD but not control mice. We observed cellular microembolism of precapillary pulmonary arteriolar bottlenecks by neutrophil-platelet aggregates. Blood from SCD patients was next studied under flow in an in vitro microfluidic system. Similar to the pulmonary circulation, circulating platelets nucleated around arrested neutrophils, translating to a greater number and duration of neutrophil-platelet interactions compared with normal human blood. Inhibition of platelet P-selectin with function-blocking antibody attenuated the neutrophil-platelet interactions in SCD patient blood in vitro and resolved pulmonary arteriole microembolism in SCD mice in vivo. These results establish the relevance of neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in lung arterioles in promoting lung vaso-occlusion in SCD and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting platelet adhesion molecules to prevent acute chest syndrome. PMID:28097236

  6. Neutrophil secretion products regulate anti-bacterial activity in monocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soehnlein, O; Kenne, E; Rotzius, P; Eriksson, E E; Lindbom, L

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages represent a multi-functional cell type in innate immunity that contributes to bacterial clearance by recognition, phagocytosis and killing. In acute inflammation, infiltrating neutrophils release a wide array of preformed granule proteins which interfere functionally with their environment. Here, we present a novel role for neutrophil-derived granule proteins in the anti-microbial activity of macrophages. Neutrophil secretion obtained by antibody cross-linking of the integrin subunit CD18 (X-link secretion) or by treatment with N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP secretion) induced a several-fold increase in bacterial phagocytosis by monocytes and macrophages. This response was associated with a rapid activation of the monocytes and macrophages as depicted by an increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+). Interestingly, fMLP secretion had a more pronounced effect on monocytes than the X-link secretion, while the opposite was observed for macrophages. In addition, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) secretion caused a strong enhancement of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation compared to incubation with bacteria. Thus, secretion of neutrophil granule proteins activates macrophages to increase the phagocytosis of bacteria and to enhance intracellular ROS formation, indicating pronounced intracellular bacterial killing. Both mechanisms attribute novel microbicidal properties to PMN granule proteins, suggesting their potential use in anti-microbial therapy.

  7. Host and Pathogen Hyaluronan Signal Through Human Siglec-9 to Suppress Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Ismael; Lizcano, Anel; Roupé, K. Markus; Wang, Xiaoxia; Cole, Jason N.; Olson, Joshua; Ali, S. Raza; Dahesh, Samira; Amayreh, Lenah K.; Henningham, Anna; Varki, Ajit; Nizet, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory CD33-related Siglec receptors regulate immune cell activation upon engaging ubiquitous sialic acids (Sias) on host cell surface glycans. Through molecular mimicry, Sia-expressing pathogen group B Streptococcus binds inhibitory human Siglec-9 (hSiglec-9) to blunt neutrophil activation and promote bacterial survival. We unexpectedly discovered that hSiglec-9 also specifically binds high molecular weight hyaluronan (HMW-HA), another ubiquitous host glycan, through a region of its terminal Ig-like V-set domain distinct from the Sia-binding site. HMW-HA recognition by hSiglec-9 limited neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, oxidative burst, and apoptosis, defining HMW-HA as a regulator of neutrophil activation. However, the pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) expresses a HMW-HA capsule that engages hSiglec-9, blocking NET formation and oxidative burst, thereby promoting bacterial survival. Thus, a single inhibitory lectin receptor detects two distinct glycan “self-associated molecular patterns” to maintain neutrophil homeostasis, and two leading human bacterial pathogens have independently evolved molecular mimicry to exploit this immunoregulatory mechanism. PMID:26411873

  8. Improved recovery of functionally active eosinophils and neutrophils using novel immunomagnetic technology.

    PubMed

    Son, Kiho; Mukherjee, Manali; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Eguez, Jose C; Radford, Katherine; LaVigne, Nicola; Ethier, Caroline; Davoine, Francis; Janssen, Luke; Lacy, Paige; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-10-01

    Clinically relevant and reliable reports derived from in vitro research are dependent on the choice of cell isolation protocols adopted between different laboratories. Peripheral blood eosinophils are conventionally isolated using density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunomagnetic selection (positive/negative) while neutrophils follow a more simplified dextran-sedimentation methodology. With the increasing sophistication of molecular techniques, methods are now available that promise protocols with reduced user-manipulations, improved efficiency, and better yield without compromising the purity of enriched cell populations. These recent techniques utilize immunomagnetic particles with multiple specificities against differential cell surface markers to negatively select non-target cells from whole blood, greatly reducing the cost/time taken to isolate granulocytes. Herein, we compare the yield efficiencies, purity and baseline activation states of eosinophils/neutrophils isolated using one of these newer protocols that use immunomagnetic beads (MACSxpress isolation) vs. the standard isolation procedures. The study shows that the MACSxpress method consistently allowed higher yields per mL of peripheral blood compared to conventional methods (P<0.001, n=8, Wilcoxon paired test), with high isolation purities for both eosinophils (95.0±1.7%) and neutrophils (94.2±10.1%) assessed by two methods: Wright's staining and flow cytometry. In addition, enumeration of CD63(+) (marker for eosinophil activation) and CD66b(+) (marker for neutrophil activation) cells within freshly isolated granulocytes, respectively, confirmed that conventional protocols using density-gradient centrifugation caused cellular activation of the granulocytes at baseline compared to the MACSxpress method. In conclusion, MACSxpress isolation kits were found to be superior to conventional techniques for consistent purifications of eosinophils and neutrophils that were suitable for activation

  9. The hederagenin saponin SMG-1 is a natural FMLP receptor inhibitor that suppresses human neutrophil activation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Tsong-Long; Wang, Chien-Chiao; Kuo, Yao-Haur; Huang, Hui-Chi; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Liang-Mou; Wu, Yi-Hsiu

    2010-10-15

    The pericarp of Sapindus mukorossi Gaertn is traditionally used as an expectorant in Japan, China, and Taiwan. Activated neutrophils produce high concentrations of the superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and elastase known to be involved in airway mucus hypersecretion. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory functions of hederagenin 3-O-(3,4-O-di-acetyl-alpha-L-arabinopyranoside)-(1-->3)-alpha-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-alpha-l-arabinopyranoside (SMG-1), a saponin isolated from S. mukorossi, and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in human neutrophils. SMG-1 potently and concentration-dependently inhibited O(2)(*-) generation and elastase release in N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP)-activated human neutrophils. Furthermore, SMG-1 reduced membrane-associated p47(phox) expression in FMLP-induced intact neutrophils, but did not alter subcellular NADPH oxidase activity in reconstituted systems. SMG-1 attenuated FMLP-induced increase of cytosolic calcium concentration and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, and AKT. However, SMG-1 displayed no effect on cellular cAMP levels and activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase. Significantly, receptor-binding analysis showed that SMG-1 inhibited FMLP binding to its receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, neither phorbol myristate acetate-induced O(2)(*-) generation and MAPKs activation nor thapsigargin-caused calcium mobilization was altered by SMG-1. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SMG-1 is a natural inhibitor of the FMLP receptor, which may have the potential to be developed into a useful new therapeutic agent for treating neutrophilic inflammatory diseases.

  10. Potent inhibition of human neutrophil activations by bractelactone, a novel chalcone from Fissistigma bracteolatum

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yang-Chang; Sureshbabu, Munisamy; Fang, Yao-Ching; Wu, Yi-Hsiu; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Chang, Ya-Wen; Hwang, Tsong-Long

    2013-02-01

    Fissistigma bracteolatum is widely used in traditional medicine to treat inflammatory diseases. However, its active components and mechanisms of action remain unclear. In this study, (3Z)-6,7-dihydroxy-4-methoxy-3-(phenylmethylidene)-5-(3-phenylpropanoyl) -1-benzofuran-2(3H) (bractelactone), a novel chalcone from F. bracteolatum, showed potent inhibitory effects against superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup ·−}) production, elastase release, and CD11b expression in formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (FMLP)-induced human neutrophils. However, bractelactone showed only weak inhibition of phorbol myristate acetate-caused O{sub 2}{sup ·−} production. The peak cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was unaltered by bractelactone in FMLP-induced neutrophils, but the decay time of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was significantly shortened. In a calcium-free solution, changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} caused by the addition of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} were inhibited by bractelactone in FMLP-activated cells. In addition, bractelactone did not alter the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, JNK, or AKT or the concentration of cAMP. These results suggest that bractelactone selectively inhibits store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In agreement with this concept, bractelactone suppressed sustained [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} changes in thapsigargin-activated neutrophils. Furthermore, bractelactone did not alter FMLP-induced formation of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the anti-inflammatory effects of bractelactone, an active ingredient of F. bracteolatum, in human neutrophils are through the selective inhibition of SOCE. Highlights: ► Bractelactone isolated from Fissistigma bracteolatum. ► Bractelactone inhibited FMLP-induced human neutrophil activations. ► Bractelactone had no effect on IP3 formation. ► Bractelactone did not alter MAPKs, AKT, and cAMP pathways. ► Bractelactone inhibited store-operated calcium entry.

  11. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells Regulate Apoptosis of Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Ding, Gang; Xu, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) are promising cell resource for the cell-based therapy for periodontitis and regeneration of bio-root. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDLSCs on neutrophil, a critical constituent of innate immunity, and the underlying mechanisms. The effect of PDLSCs on the proliferation and apoptosis of resting neutrophils and IL-8 activated neutrophils was tested under cell-cell contact culture and Transwell culture, with or without anti-IL-6 neutralizing antibody. We found that PDLSCs could promote the proliferation and reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils whether under cell-cell contact or Transwell culture. Anti-IL-6 antibody reduced PDLSCs-mediated inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis. IL-6 at the concentration of 10ng/ml and 20ng/ml could inhibit neutrophil apoptosis statistically. Collectively, PDLSCs could reduce the apoptosis of neutrophils via IL-6.

  12. Platelet, monocyte and neutrophil activation and glucose tolerance in South African Mixed Ancestry individuals

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Glenda M.; Nkambule, Bongani B.; Mkandla, Zibusiso; Hon, Gloudina M.; Kengne, Andre P.; Erasmus, Rajiv T.; Matsha, Tandi E.

    2017-01-01

    Platelet activation has been described in patients with chronic inflammation, however in type 2 diabetes mellitus it remains controversial. We compared levels of platelet leucocyte aggregates, monocyte and granulocyte activation across glucose tolerance statuses in mixed ancestry South Africans. Individuals (206) were recruited from Bellville-South, Cape Town, and included 66% with normal glucose tolerance, 18.7% pre-diabetes, 8.7% screen-detected diabetes and 6.3% known diabetes. Monocyte and neutrophil activation were measured by calculating the percentage of cells expressing CD142 and CD69 while platelet monocyte aggregates were defined as CD14++ CD42b+ events and platelet neutrophil aggregates as CD16++ CD42b+ events. The percentage of monocytes and neutrophils expressing CD69 and CD142 was significantly higher in known diabetes and prediabetes, but, lowest in screen-detected diabetes (both p ≤ 0.016). The pattern was similar for platelet monocyte and neutrophil aggregates (both p ≤ 0.003). In robust linear regressions adjusted for age and gender, known diabetes was significantly and positively associated with the percentage of monocytes expressing CD69 [beta 11.06 (p = 0.016)] and CD42b (PMAs) [19.51 (0.003)] as well as the percentage of neutrophils expressing CD69 [14.19 (<0.0001)] and CD42b [17.7 (0.001)]. We conclude that monitoring platelet activation in diagnosed diabetic patients may have a role in the management and risk stratification. PMID:28091589

  13. Mammalian target of rapamycin and Rictor control neutrophil chemotaxis by regulating Rac/Cdc42 activity and the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Li, Dong; Cook, Sara L.; Yoon, Mee-Sup; Kapoor, Ashish; Rao, Christopher V.; Kenis, Paul J. A.; Chen, Jie; Wang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Chemotaxis allows neutrophils to seek out sites of infection and inflammation. The asymmetric accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) at the leading edge provides the driving force for protrusion and is essential for the development and maintenance of neutrophil polarity. The mechanism that governs actin cytoskeleton dynamics and assembly in neutrophils has been extensively explored and is still not fully understood. By using neutrophil-like HL-60 cells, we describe a pivotal role for Rictor, a component of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2), in regulating assembly of the actin cytoskeleton during neutrophil chemotaxis. Depletion of mTOR and Rictor, but not Raptor, impairs actin polymerization, leading-edge establishment, and directional migration in neutrophils stimulated with chemoattractants. Of interest, depletion of mSin1, an integral component of mTORC2, causes no detectable defects in neutrophil polarity and chemotaxis. In addition, experiments with chemical inhibition and kinase-dead mutants indicate that mTOR kinase activity and AKT phosphorylation are dispensable for chemotaxis. Instead, our results suggest that the small Rho GTPases Rac and Cdc42 serve as downstream effectors of Rictor to regulate actin assembly and organization in neutrophils. Together our findings reveal an mTORC2- and mTOR kinase–independent function and mechanism of Rictor in the regulation of neutrophil chemotaxis. PMID:24006489

  14. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  15. Alkalinity of Neutrophil Phagocytic Vacuoles Is Modulated by HVCN1 and Has Consequences for Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Adam P.; Duchen, Michael R.; de Villiers, Simon; Rich, Peter R.; Segal, Anthony W.

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, essential for innate immunity, passes electrons across the phagocytic membrane to form superoxide in the phagocytic vacuole. Activity of the oxidase requires that charge movements across the vacuolar membrane are balanced. Using the pH indicator SNARF, we measured changes in pH in the phagocytic vacuole and cytosol of neutrophils. In human cells, the vacuolar pH rose to ~9, and the cytosol acidified slightly. By contrast, in Hvcn1 knock out mouse neutrophils, the vacuolar pH rose above 11, vacuoles swelled, and the cytosol acidified excessively, demonstrating that ordinarily this channel plays an important role in charge compensation. Proton extrusion was not diminished in Hvcn1-/- mouse neutrophils arguing against its role in maintaining pH homeostasis across the plasma membrane. Conditions in the vacuole are optimal for bacterial killing by the neutral proteases, cathepsin G and elastase, and not by myeloperoxidase, activity of which was unphysiologically low at alkaline pH. PMID:25885273

  16. The activation of the neutrophil respiratory burst by anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibody (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis requires tyrosine kinases and protein kinase C activation

    PubMed Central

    Radford, D J; Lord, J M; Savage, C O S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of antineutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies (ANCA) from patients with systemic vasculitis to stimulate protein kinase C (PKC) and tyrosine kinases was examined in human neutrophils. Using the superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome C, the kinetics of ANCA-induced superoxide (O2−) production were characterized and subsequently manipulated by specific inhibitors of PKC and tyrosine kinases. With this approach, ANCA IgG, but not normal IgG or ANCA F(ab′)2 fragments caused a time and dose dependent release of O2− from TNF-α primed neutrophils. The kinetics of ANCA-induced O2− production showed an initial 10–15 min lag phase compared to the N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine response, suggesting differences in the signalling pathways recruited by these two stimuli. Inhibitor studies revealed that ANCA-activation involved members of both the Ca2+-dependent and -independent PKC isoforms and also tyrosine kinases. ANCA IgG resulted in the translocation of the βII isoform of PKC at a time corresponding to the end of the lag phase of O2− production, suggesting that PKC activity may be instrumental in processes regulating the activity of the NADPH oxidase in response to ANCA. Tyrosine phosphorylation of numerous proteins also peaked 10–15 min after stimulation with ANCA but not normal IgG. These data suggest that PKC and tyrosine kinases regulate O2− production from neutrophils stimulated with autoantibodies from patients with systemic vasculitis. PMID:10540175

  17. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ−/− leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ+/+ counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ−/− neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus–challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. PMID:26908736

  18. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Signaling in Regulating Neutrophil Antifungal Activity and the Oxidative Burst During Respiratory Fungal Challenge.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Shinji; Jhingran, Anupam; Dhingra, Sourabh; Salem, Anand; Cramer, Robert A; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-04-15

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that plays a critical role in regulating myeloid cell host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that GM-CSF signaling plays an essential role in antifungal defense against Aspergillus fumigatus. Mice that lack the GM-CSF receptor β chain (GM-CSFRβ) developed invasive hyphal growth and exhibited impaired survival after pulmonary challenge with A. fumigatus conidia. GM-CSFRβ signaling regulated the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to infected lungs, but not the recruitment of effector neutrophils. Cell-intrinsic GM-CSFRβ signaling mediated neutrophil and inflammatory monocyte antifungal activity, because lung GM-CSFRβ(-/-) leukocytes exhibited impaired conidial killing compared with GM-CSFRβ(+/+) counterparts in mixed bone marrow chimeric mice. GM-CSFRβ(-/-) neutrophils exhibited reduced (hydrogenated) nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity in vivo. Conversely, administration of recombinant GM-CSF enhanced neutrophil NADPH oxidase function, conidiacidal activity, and lung fungal clearance in A. fumigatus-challenged mice. Thus, our study illustrates the functional role of GM-CSFRβ signaling on lung myeloid cell responses against inhaled A. fumigatus conidia and demonstrates a benefit for systemic GM-CSF administration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. In vitro neutrophil migration requires protein kinase c-delta (δ-PKC) mediated MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine Rich C-Kinase Substrate) phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Eui Jae; Adler, Kenneth B.; Jones, Samuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated release of neutrophil reactive oxygen species and proteolytic enzymes contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, molecular regulators of these processes are potential targets for new anti-inflammatory therapies. We have shown previously that MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine Rich C-Kinase Substrate), a well-known PKC substrate protein, is a key regulator of neutrophil functions. In the current study we investigate the role of PKC-mediated MARCKS phosphorylation in neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. We report that treatment of human neutrophils with the δ-PKC inhibitor rottlerin significantly attenuates fMLF induced MARCKS phosphorylation (IC50 = 5.709 μM), adhesion (IC50 = 8.4 uM) and migration (IC50 = 6.7 uM); while α-, β- and ζ-PKC inhibitors had no significant effect. We conclude that δ-PKC mediated MARCKS phosphorylation is essential for human neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. These results implicate δ-PKC mediated MARCKS phosphorylation as a key step in the inflammatory response of neutrophils. PMID:25515270

  20. In Vitro Neutrophil Migration Requires Protein Kinase C-Delta (δ-PKC)-Mediated Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C-Kinase Substrate (MARCKS) Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sheats, Mary K; Sung, Eui Jae; Adler, Kenneth B; Jones, Samuel L

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated release of neutrophil reactive oxygen species and proteolytic enzymes contributes to both acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Therefore, molecular regulators of these processes are potential targets for new anti-inflammatory therapies. We have shown previously that myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), a well-known actin binding protein and protein kinase C (PKC) substrate, is a key regulator of neutrophil functions. In the current study, we investigate the role of PKC-mediated MARCKS phosphorylation in neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. We report that treatment of human neutrophils with the δ-PKC inhibitor rottlerin significantly attenuates f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF)-induced MARCKS phosphorylation (IC50=5.709 μM), adhesion (IC50=8.4 μM), and migration (IC50=6.7 μM), while α-, β-, and ζ-PKC inhibitors had no significant effect. We conclude that δ-PKC-mediated MARCKS phosphorylation is essential for human neutrophil migration and adhesion in vitro. These results implicate δ-PKC-mediated MARCKS phosphorylation as a key step in the inflammatory response of neutrophils.

  1. Do native and polymeric alpha1-antitrypsin activate human neutrophils in vitro?

    PubMed

    Persson, Caroline; Subramaniyam, Devipriya; Stevens, Tim; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2006-06-01

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT)-Z deficiency is a risk factor for the development of COPD. Compared to wild-type M, AAT-Z has an increased tendency to polymerize, rendering it inactive as a serine proteinase inhibitor. It has been demonstrated that wild-type M- and Z-deficiency AAT polymers are chemotactic for human neutrophils. However, our own studies dispute a proinflammatory role for polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z, suggesting rather that they are predominantly antiinflammatory, exhibiting inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte activation. The discrepancies between these observations prompted us to re-examine the effects of AAT. The effects of native and polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z with varying levels of endotoxin contamination (0.08 to 2.55 endotoxin units [EU]/mg protein) on human neutrophil chemotaxis and interleukin (IL)-8 release, in vitro, were evaluated. Neither native nor polymerized (M- or Z-deficient) AAT contaminated with low levels of endotoxin (neutrophil chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP), a positive control, increased chemotaxis fourfold. A small but nonsignificant increase in neutrophil chemotaxis, however, was observed with AAT preparations containing higher levels of endotoxin (>/= 0.88 EU/mg protein), and significant chemotaxis occurred when AAT was spiked with either endotoxin or zymosan. In support, native and polymeric AAT-M with low endotoxin contamination completely inhibited neutrophil IL-8 release triggered by the zymosan, while AATs with high endotoxin contamination strongly induced IL-8 release and did not inhibit zymosan-stimulated IL-8 release. The proinflammatory effects of native and polymeric AAT may be critically dependent on the presence of other cell activators, bacterial or otherwise, while pure preparations of AAT appear to exert predominantly antiinflammatory activity.

  2. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  3. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  4. The Association Between Neutrophil/Lymphocyte Ratio and Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Mercan, Ridvan; Bitik, Berivan; Tufan, Abdurrahman; Bozbulut, Utku Burak; Atas, Nuh; Ozturk, Mehmet Akif; Haznedaroglu, Seminur; Goker, Berna

    2016-09-01

    Elevated neutrophil count is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality in many conditions. Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) has emerged as a marker of inflammation in neoplastic and cardiovascular disorders. Herein, we investigated utility of this simple tool in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The study consisted of 136 RA and 140 AS patients, along with 117 healthy control subjects. RA and AS activities were determined with Disease Activity Score (DAS) and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity indices (BASDAI), respectively. The association between NLR and disease activity was analyzed. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and neutrophil counts were significantly higher in RA and AS patients compared to healthy controls. Similarly, NLR was higher compared to control subjects, both in RA (2.53 ± 1.4 vs. 2.16 ± 1.0, P = 0.019) and AS (2.43 ± 1.4 vs. 2.16 ± 1.0, P = 0.077). NLR correlated well with ESR and CRP, both in RA and AS. Moreover, NLR increased across worsening DAS28 activity groups (2.1 ± 1.0 in patients with remission, 2.5 ± 1.0 in low-moderate, 3.8 ± 2.5 in high disease activity). However, no association was found between NLR and BASDAI. NLR is a cheap and readily available marker for the assessment of disease activity in RA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Influence of FcγRIIIb polymorphism on its ability to cooperate with FcγRIIa and CR3 in mediating the oxidative burst of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Toller-Kawahisa, Juliana Escher; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos; Costa, Paulo Inácio; Faria, Carolina Maria Quinello Gomes; Azzolini, Ana Elisa Caleiro Seixas; Lucisano-Valim, Yara Maria; Marzocchi-Machado, Cleni Mara

    2014-08-01

    Considering that human neutrophil FcγRIIa and FcγRIIIb receptors interact synergistically with CR3 in triggering neutrophil functional responses, allelic polymorphisms in these receptors might influence such interactions. We assessed whether FcγRIIIb polymorphisms affect FcγR/CR cooperation in mediating the neutrophil oxidative burst (OB), in particular the FcγRIIIb/CR3 cooperation that occurs via lectin-saccharide-like interactions. The OB of human neutrophil antigen (HNA)-1a-, HNA-1b-, and HNA-1a/-1b-neutrophils stimulated with immune complexes, opsonized or not with serum complement, was measured by the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence assay. Compared with HNA-1a-neutrophils, HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited reduced FcγR-stimulated OB, but increased FcγR/CR-stimulated OB. It suggests that (i) FcγR and CR cooperate more effectively in HNA-1b-neutrophils, and (ii) the HNA-1b allotype influences the FcγRIIIb cooperation with FcγRIIa, but not with CR3. HNA-1a- and HNA-1b-neutrophils exhibited similar OB responses elicited via CR3 alone or via FcγR/CR-independent pathways. In addition, the level of FcγRIIIb, FcγRIIa, and CR3 expression did not differ significantly among the neutrophil groups studied. Together, these results demonstrate that the HNA-1b allotype influences the functional cooperation between FcγRIIIb and FcγRIIa, and suggest that the difference in the glycosylation pattern between HNA-1a and HNA-1b does not affect the FcγRIIIb cooperation with CR3.

  6. Purification, primary structure, and antimicrobial activities of a guinea pig neutrophil defensin.

    PubMed Central

    Selsted, M E; Harwig, S S

    1987-01-01

    A broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptide present in guinea pig neutrophils was isolated, characterized biochemically, and assessed for microbicidal range and potency in vitro. The guinea pig neutrophil peptide (GPNP) was purified to homogeneity from a granule-rich subcellular fraction of peritoneal exudate neutrophils by gel filtration and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. GPNP was microbicidal for selected bacterial, fungal, and viral test organisms at concentrations in the microgram per milliliter range. Composition and primary structure analyses revealed that GPNP was homologous to a recently characterized family of antimicrobial peptides, termed defensins, isolated from rabbit and human neutrophils. The entire amino acid sequence of GPNP was determined, revealing that 8 of 31 residues were among those invariant in six rabbit and three human defensin peptides. The conserved sequence included six disulfide-linked cysteine residues, a common structural feature of defensins. The sequence of GPNP also included three nonconservative substitutions in positions otherwise invariant in the human and rabbit peptides. Characterization of GPNP provides new insight into structural features which may be essential for the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities of defensins. Images PMID:3623703

  7. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Supplementation and In Vitro Vitamin C on the Oxidative and Inflammatory Neutrophil Response to Activation

    PubMed Central

    Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Sureda, Antoni; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We studied the effects of diet supplementation with docosahexaenoic (DHA) and in vitro vitamin C (VitC) at physiological concentrations on oxidative and inflammatory neutrophil response to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Fifteen male footballers ingested a beverage enriched with DHA or a placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized double-blind study. Neutrophils were isolated from blood samples collected in basal conditions at the end of nutritional intervention. Neutrophils were cultured for 2 hours at 37°C in (a) control media, (b) media with PMA, and (c) media with PMA + VitC. PMA induces neutrophil degranulation with increased extracellular myeloperoxidase and catalase activities, nitric oxide production, expression of the inflammatory genes cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor κβ, interleukin 8 and tumor necrosis factor α, and interleukin 6 production. DHA diet supplementation boosts the exit of CAT from neutrophils but moderates the degranulation of myeloperoxidase granules induced by PMA. VitC facilitates azurophilic degranulation of neutrophils and increases gene expression of myeloperoxidase induced by PMA. VitC and DHA diet supplementation prevent PMA effects on inflammatory gene expression, although together they do not produce additional effects. DHA diet supplementation enhances antioxidant defences and anti-inflammatory neutrophil response to in vitro PMA activation. VitC facilitates neutrophil degranulation but prevents an inflammatory response to PMA. PMID:25960826

  8. CD66 nonspecific cross-reacting antigens are involved in neutrophil adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Neutrophil adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cell (EC) monolayers depends on the expression of the endothelial leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1). The ligand for ELAM-1 is the sialylated Lewis-x antigen (SLe(x)) structure. The selectin LAM-1 (or LECAM-1) has been described as one of the SLe(x)-presenting glycoproteins involved in neutrophil binding to ELAM-1. Other presenter molecules have not yet been described. Our data demonstrate that the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-like surface molecules on neutrophils--known as the nonspecific cross-reacting antigens (NCAs)--are involved in neutrophil adherence to monolayers of IL-1-beta-activated EC. The NCAs are recognized by CD66 (NCA-160 and NCA-90) and CD67 (NCA-95). Because NCA-95 and NCA-90 have previously been found to be phosphatidylinositol (PI)-linked, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) neutrophils (which lack PI- linked surface proteins) were tested as well. PNH neutrophils showed a diminished binding to activated EC. CD66 (on PNH cells still recognizing the transmembrane NCA-160 form) still inhibited the adherence of PNH cells to IL-1-beta-activated EC, but to a limited extent. Soluble CEA(-related) antigens inhibited normal neutrophil adherence as well, whereas neutrophil transmigration was unaffected. Sialidase-treatment as well as CD66 preclearing abolished the inhibitory capacity of the CEA(-related) antigens. The binding of soluble CEA antigens to IL-1-beta-pretreated EC was blocked by anti- ELAM-1. These soluble antigens, as well as the neutrophil NCA-160 and NCA-90, both recognized by CD66 antibodies, presented the SLe(x) determinant. Together, these findings indicate that the CD66 antigens (i.e., NCA-160/NCA-90) function as presenter molecules of the SLe(x) oligosaccharide structures on neutrophils that bind to ELAM-1 on EC. PMID:1378450

  9. Adiponectin inhibits neutrophil apoptosis via activation of AMP kinase, PKB and ERK 1/2 MAP kinase.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Alessandra; Lord, Janet M

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are abundant, short-lived leukocytes that play a key role in the immune defense against microbial infections. These cells die by apoptosis following activation and uptake of microbes and will also enter apoptosis spontaneously at the end of their lifespan if they do not encounter a pathogen. Adiponectin exerts anti-inflammatory effects on neutrophil antimicrobial functions, but whether this abundant adipokine influences neutrophil apoptosis is unknown. Here we report that adiponectin in the physiological range (1-10 μg/ml) reduced apoptosis in resting neutrophils, decreasing caspase-3 cleavage and maintaining Mcl-1 expression by stabilizing this anti-apoptotic protein. We show that adiponectin induced phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), protein kinase B (PKB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). Pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, PKB and ERK 1/2 ablated the pro-survival effects of adiponectin and treatment of neutrophils with an AMPK specific activator (AICAR) and AMPK inhibitor (compound C) respectively decreased and increased apoptosis. Finally, activation of AMPK by AICAR or adiponectin also decreased ceramide accumulation in the neutrophil cell membrane, a process involved in the early stages of spontaneous apoptosis, giving another possible mechanism downstream of AMPK activation for the inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis.

  10. Platelet–neutrophil interactions under thromboinflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kim, Kyungho; Barazia, Andrew; Tseng, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Platelets primarily mediate hemostasis and thrombosis, whereas leukocytes are responsible for immune responses. Since platelets interact with leukocytes at the site of vascular injury, thrombosis and vascular inflammation are closely intertwined and occur consecutively. Recent studies using real-time imaging technology demonstrated that platelet–neutrophil interactions on the activated endothelium are an important determinant of microvascular occlusion during thromboinflammatory disease in which inflammation is coupled to thrombosis. Although the major receptors and counter receptors have been identified, it remains poorly understood how heterotypic platelet–neutrophil interactions are regulated under disease conditions. This review discusses our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of platelet– neutrophil interactions in thromboinflammatory disease. PMID:25650236

  11. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA--Ecstasy) decreases neutrophil activity through the glucocorticoid pathway and impairs host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-de-Paula, V; Ribeiro, A; Souza-Queiroz, J; Pinheiro, M L; Vecina, J F; Souza, D P M; Quinteiro-Filho, W M; Moreau, R L M; Queiroz, M L S; Palermo-Neto, J

    2014-12-01

    Ecstasy is the popular name of the abuse drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that decreases immunity in animals. The mechanisms that generate such alterations are still controversial. Seven independent pharmacological approaches were performed in mice to identify the possible mechanisms underlying the decrease of neutrophil activity induced by MDMA and the possible effects of MDMA on host resistance to Listeria monocytogenes. Our data showed that MDMA (10 mg kg(-1)) administration decreases NFκB expression in circulating neutrophils. Metyrapone or RU-486 administration prior to MDMA treatment abrogated MDMA effects on neutrophil activity and NFκB expression, while 6-OHDA or ICI-118,551 administration did not. As MDMA treatment increased the plasmatic levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline, propranolol pre-treatment effects were also evaluated. Propranolol suppressed both MDMA-induced increase in corticosterone serum levels and its effects on neutrophil activity. In a L. monocytogenes experimental infection context, we showed that MDMA: induced myelosuppression by decreasing granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitors (CFU-GM) in the bone marrow but increased CFU-GM in the spleen; decreased circulating leukocytes and bone marrow cellularity and increased spleen cellularity; decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-12p70, TNF, IFN-γ, IL-6) and chemokine (MCP-1) production 24 h after the infection; increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines 72 h after infection and decreased IL-10 levels at all time points analyzed. It was proposed that MDMA immunosuppressive effects on neutrophil activity and host resistance to L monocytogenes rely on NFκB signaling, being mediated by HPA axis activity and corticosterone.

  12. Human neutrophils in auto-immunity.

    PubMed

    Thieblemont, Nathalie; Wright, Helen L; Edwards, Steven W; Witko-Sarsat, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophils have great capacity to cause tissue damage in inflammatory diseases via their inappropriate activation to release reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteases and other tissue-damaging molecules. Furthermore, activated neutrophils can release a wide variety of cytokines and chemokines that can regulate almost every element of the immune system. In addition to these important immuno-regulatory processes, activated neutrophils can also release, expose or generate neoepitopes that have the potential to break immune tolerance and result in the generation of autoantibodies, that characterise a number of human auto-immune diseases. For example, in vasculitis, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) that are directed against proteinase 3 or myeloperoxidase are neutrophil-derived autoantigens and activated neutrophils are the main effector cells of vascular damage. In other auto-immune diseases, these neutrophil-derived neoepitopes may arise from a number of processes that include release of granule enzymes and ROS, changes in the properties of components of their plasma membrane as a result of activation or apoptosis, and via the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs are extracellular structures that contain chromatin that is decorated with granule enzymes (including citrullinated proteins) that can act as neo-epitopes to generate auto-immunity. This review therefore describes the processes that can result in neutrophil-mediated auto-immunity, and the role of neutrophils in the molecular pathologies of auto-immune diseases such as vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We discuss the potential role of NETs in these processes and some of the debate in the literature regarding the role of this phenomenon in microbial killing, cell death and auto-immunity.

  13. D-lactic acid interferes with the effects of platelet activating factor on bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, P; Conejeros, I; Carretta, M D; Concha, C; Jara, E; Tadich, N; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2011-11-15

    D-lactic acidosis occurs in ruminants, such as cattle, with acute ruminal acidosis caused by ingestion of excessive amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates. Affected animals show clinical signs similar to those of septic shock, as well as acute laminitis and liver abscesses. It has been proposed that the inflammatory response and susceptibility to infection could both be caused by the inhibition of phagocytic mechanisms. To determine the effects of d-lactic acid on bovine neutrophil functions, we pretreated cells with different concentrations of D-lactic acid and measured intracellular pH using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and calcium flux using FLUO-3 AM-loaded neutrophils. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using a luminol chemiluminescence assay, and MMP-9/gelatinase-B granule release was measured by zymography. CD11b and CD62L/l-selectin expression, changes in cell shape, superoxide anion production, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli-Texas red bioparticles, and apoptosis were all measured using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that D-lactic acid reduced ROS production, CD11b upregulation and MMP-9 release in bovine neutrophils treated with 100 nM platelet-activating factor (PAF). D-lactic acid induced MMP-9 release and, at higher concentrations, upregulated CD11b expression, decrease L-selectin expression, and induces late apoptosis. We concluded that D-lactic acid can interfere with neutrophil functions induced by PAF, leading to reduced innate immune responses during bacterial infections. Moreover, the increase of MMP-9 release and CD11b expression induced by 10mM D-lactic acid could promote an nonspecific neutrophil-dependent inflammatory reaction in cattle with acute ruminal acidosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An Intense and Short-Lasting Burst of Neutrophil Activation Differentiates Early Acute Myocardial Infarction from Systemic Inflammatory Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Maugeri, Norma; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Evangelista, Virgilio; Godino, Cosmo; Demetrio, Monica; Baldini, Mattia; Figini, Filippo; Coppi, Giovanni; Slavich, Massimo; Camera, Marina; Bartorelli, Antonio; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Campana, Lara; Baldissera, Elena; Sabbadini, Maria Grazia; Cianflone, Domenico; Tremoli, Elena; D’Angelo, Armando; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Maseri, Attilio

    2012-01-01

    Background Neutrophils are involved in thrombus formation. We investigated whether specific features of neutrophil activation characterize patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) compared to stable angina and to systemic inflammatory diseases. Methods and Findings The myeloperoxidase (MPO) content of circulating neutrophils was determined by flow cytometry in 330 subjects: 69 consecutive patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 69 with chronic stable angina (CSA), 50 with inflammation due to either non-infectious (acute bone fracture), infectious (sepsis) or autoimmune diseases (small and large vessel systemic vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis). Four patients have also been studied before and after sterile acute injury of the myocardium (septal alcoholization). One hundred thirty-eight healthy donors were studied in parallel. Neutrophils with normal MPO content were 96% in controls, >92% in patients undergoing septal alcoholization, 91% in CSA patients, but only 35 and 30% in unstable angina and AMI (STEMI and NSTEMI) patients, compared to 80%, 75% and 2% of patients with giant cell arteritis, acute bone fracture and severe sepsis. In addition, in 32/33 STEMI and 9/21 NSTEMI patients respectively, 20% and 12% of neutrophils had complete MPO depletion during the first 4 hours after the onset of symptoms, a feature not observed in any other group of patients. MPO depletion was associated with platelet activation, indicated by P-selectin expression, activation and transactivation of leukocyte β2-integrins and formation of platelet neutrophil and -monocyte aggregates. The injection of activated platelets in mice produced transient, P-selectin dependent, complete MPO depletion in about 50% of neutrophils. Conclusions ACS are characterized by intense neutrophil activation, like other systemic inflammatory syndromes. In the very early phase of acute myocardial infarction only a subpopulation of neutrophils is massively activated, possibly via platelet-P selectin

  15. Sulfite-Mediated Oxidation of Myeloperoxidase to a Free Radical: Immuno-Spin Trapping Detection in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Ranguelova, Kalina; Rice, Annette B.; Lardinois, Olivier M.; Triquigneaux, Mathilde; Steinckwich, Natacha; Deterding, Leesa J.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Mason, Ronald P.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies focused on catalyzed oxidation of (bi)sulfite, leading to the formation of reactive sulfur trioxide (•SO3−), peroxymonosulfate (−O3SOO•) and sulfate (SO4•−) anion radicals, which can damage target proteins and oxidize them to protein radicals. It is known that these very reactive sulfur- and oxygen-centered radicals can be formed by oxidation of (bi)sulfite by peroxidases. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated neutrophils that play a central role in host defense mechanisms, allergic reactions and asthma, is a likely candidate for initiating the respiratory damage caused by sulfur dioxide. The objective of the present study is to examine the oxidative damage caused by (bi)sulfite-derived free radicals in human neutrophils through formation of protein radicals. We used immuno-spin trapping and confocal microscopy to study the protein oxidations driven by sulfite-derived radicals. We found that the presence of sulfite can cause MPO-catalyzed oxidation of MPO to a protein radical in phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-activated human neutrophils. We trapped the MPO-derived radicals in situ using the nitrone spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) and detected them immunologically as nitrone adducts in cells. Our present study demonstrates that myeloperoxidase initiates (bi)sulfite oxidation leading to MPO radical damage possibly leading to (bi)sulfite-exacerbated allergic reactions. PMID:23376232

  16. Prevention of vascular inflammation by nanoparticle targeting of adherent neutrophils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenjia; Li, Jing; Cho, Jaehyung; Malik, Asrar B.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory diseases such as acute lung injury and ischaemic tissue injury are caused by the adhesion of a type of white blood cell--polymorphonuclear neutrophils--to the lining of the circulatory system or vascular endothelium and unchecked neutrophil transmigration. Nanoparticle-mediated targeting of activated neutrophils on vascular endothelial cells at the site of injury may be a useful means of directly inactivating neutrophil transmigration and hence mitigating vascular inflammation. Here, we report a method employing drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles, which efficiently deliver drugs into neutrophils adherent to the surface of the inflamed endothelium. Using intravital microscopy of tumour necrosis factor-α-challenged mouse cremaster post-capillary venules, we demonstrate that fluorescently tagged albumin nanoparticles are largely internalized by neutrophils adherent to the activated endothelium via cell surface Fcɣ receptors. Administration of albumin nanoparticles loaded with the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor, piceatannol, which blocks `outside-in' β2 integrin signalling in leukocytes, detached the adherent neutrophils and elicited their release into the circulation. Thus, internalization of drug-loaded albumin nanoparticles into neutrophils inactivates the pro-inflammatory function of activated neutrophils, thereby offering a promising approach for treating inflammatory diseases resulting from inappropriate neutrophil sequestration and activation.

  17. Abnormal neutrophil chemotactic activity in children with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA): the role of nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Beigelman, Avraham; Levy, Jacov; Hadad, Nurit; Pinsk, Vered; Haim, Alon; Fruchtman, Yariv; Levy, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    A 1926-ins-T mutation in the TrkA gene encoding the tyrosine kinase receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) was previously documented in patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA). These patients suffer from skin lacerations which often evolve into deep tissue infections. Abnormality in neutrophil functions may explain this high rate of severe infections. In this study we show that chemotaxis was significantly (P<0.001) suppressed in patients' neutrophils, compared to healthy controls. Although NGF alone did not exert a chemotactic effect, its presence enhanced both migration toward fMLP and phosphorylation of MAP kinases (ERK and JNK) in neutrophils from healthy controls, but not in neutrophils from CIPA patients. The significantly impaired chemotactic activity of neutrophils from a CIPA patient, which has been attributed to the molecular defect in the TrkA receptor, may contribute to the high rate of infection.

  18. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; Simon, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation were measured in real time by flow cytometry. P-selectin was upregulated to the platelet surface in response to shear and was the primary factor mediating neutrophil-platelet adhesion. The extent of neutrophil aggregation increased linearly with platelet adhesion to neutrophils. Blocking either P-selectin, its glycoprotein ligand PSGL-1, or both simultaneously by preincubation with a monoclonal antibody resulted in equivalent inhibition of neutrophil-platelet adhesion (approximately 30%) and neutrophil aggregation (approximately 70%). The residual amount of neutrophil adhesion was blocked with anti-CD11b/CD18. Treatment of blood with prostacyclin analogue ZK36374, which raises cAMP levels in platelets, blocked P-selectin upregulation and neutrophil aggregation to baseline. Complete abrogation of platelet-neutrophil adhesion required both ZK36374 and anti-CD18. Electron microscopic observations of fixed blood specimens revealed that platelets augmented neutrophil aggregation both by forming bridges between neutrophils and through contact-mediated activation. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with a model in which venous levels of shear support platelet adherence to neutrophils via P-selectin binding PSGL-1. This interaction alone is sufficient to mediate neutrophil aggregation. Abrogation of platelet adhesion and aggregation requires blocking Mac-1 in addition to PSGL-1 or P-selectin. The described mechanisms are likely of key importance in the pathogenesis and progression of thrombotic disorders that are exacerbated by leukocyte-platelet aggregation.

  19. Venous levels of shear support neutrophil-platelet adhesion and neutrophil aggregation in blood via P-selectin and beta2-integrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantopoulos, K.; Neelamegham, S.; Burns, A. R.; Hentzen, E.; Kansas, G. S.; Snapp, K. R.; Berg, E. L.; Hellums, J. D.; Smith, C. W.; McIntire, L. V.; hide

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After activation, platelets adhere to neutrophils via P-selectin and beta2-integrin. The molecular mechanisms and adhesion events in whole blood exposed to venous levels of hydrodynamic shear in the absence of exogenous activation remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Whole blood was sheared at approximately 100 s(-1). The kinetics of neutrophil-platelet