Science.gov

Sample records for medical center technical

  1. Johnson Space Center Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2010-01-01

    1.HMTA responsibilities: a) Assure program/project compliance with Agency health and medical requirements at identified key decision points. b) Certify that programs/projects comply with Agency health and medical requirements prior to spaceflight missions. c) Assure technical excellence. 2. Designation of applicable NASA Centers for HMTA implementation and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) appointment. 3. Center CMO responsible for HMTA implementation for programs and projects at the center. JSC HMTA captured in "JSC HMTA Implementation Plan". 4. Establishes specifics of dissenting opinion process consistent with NASA procedural requirements.

  2. Characterizing complexity in socio-technical systems: a case study of a SAMU Medical Regulation Center.

    PubMed

    Righi, Angela Weber; Wachs, Priscila; Saurin, Tarcísio Abreu

    2012-01-01

    Complexity theory has been adopted by a number of studies as a benchmark to investigate the performance of socio-technical systems, especially those that are characterized by relevant cognitive work. However, there is little guidance on how to assess, systematically, the extent to which a system is complex. The main objective of this study is to carry out a systematic analysis of a SAMU (Mobile Emergency Medical Service) Medical Regulation Center in Brazil, based on the core characteristics of complex systems presented by previous studies. The assessment was based on direct observations and nine interviews: three of them with regulator of emergencies medical doctor, three with radio operators and three with telephone attendants. The results indicated that, to a great extent, the core characteristics of complexity are magnified) due to basic shortcomings in the design of the work system. Thus, some recommendations are put forward with a view to reducing unnecessary complexity that hinders the performance of the socio-technical system.

  3. The Path to Quality in Outpatient Practice: Meaningful Use, Patient-Centered Medical Homes, Financial Incentives, and Technical Assistance.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Thomas P; Meehan, Thomas P; Kelvey-Albert, Michele; Van Hoof, Thomas J; Ruth, Steve; Petrillo, Marcia K

    2014-01-01

    Adoption and meaningful use of electronic health records is considered an essential step to improve the quality of health care. The authors assessed whether a series of Connecticut primary care providers who achieved Stage I Meaningful Use of electronic health records used quality improvement strategies that are associated with improvements in care. Practice structural characteristics, quality improvement-related electronic health record processes, outcomes, and barriers were assessed in 14 primary care practices. Implementation of quality improvement-related electronic health record processes was variable and barriers were common. Only 4 practices used data consistently to assess their performance, and only 3 reported improvements in care. Practices that were patient-centered medical homes scored higher on all quality improvement domains and received financial rewards more commonly. These findings suggest that primary care quality may be improved by formal alignment of Meaningful Use and Patient-Centered Medical Home criteria and by ongoing technical assistance to practices. © 2013 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  4. A journey through meaningful use at a large academic medical center: lessons of leadership, administration, and technical implementation.

    PubMed

    Unger, Melissa D; Aldrich, Alison M; Hefner, Jennifer L; Rizer, Milisa K

    2014-01-01

    Successfully reporting meaningful use of electronic health records to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services can be a challenging process, particularly for healthcare organizations with large numbers of eligible professionals. This case report describes a successful meaningful use attestation process undertaken at a major academic medical center. It identifies best practices in the areas of leadership, administration, communication, ongoing support, and technological implementation.

  5. Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ETSC is EPA’s technical support and resource centers responsible for providing specialized scientific and engineering support to decision-makers in the Agency’s ten regional offices, states, communities, and local businesses.

  6. A Journey through Meaningful Use at a Large Academic Medical Center: Lessons of Leadership, Administration, and Technical Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Melissa D.; Aldrich, Alison M.; Hefner, Jennifer L.; Rizer, Milisa K.

    2014-01-01

    Successfully reporting meaningful use of electronic health records to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services can be a challenging process, particularly for healthcare organizations with large numbers of eligible professionals. This case report describes a successful meaningful use attestation process undertaken at a major academic medical center. It identifies best practices in the areas of leadership, administration, communication, ongoing support, and technological implementation. PMID:25593572

  7. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  8. GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development operates a Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC). The Center provides support on issues regarding subsurface contamination, contaminant fluxes to other media (e.g., surface water or air), and ecosystem restoration. The GWTSC creat...

  9. Technical Report on Processing Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carl A.

    The main instrument of data collection in this survey of library technical processing centers was a questionnaire sent to 16 network coordinators. Following a review of current literature, results of the questionnaire are discussed with regard to five areas: (1) each network's means of identification (definition) of processing centers, (2) types…

  10. Reader-Centered Technical Writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Technical writing is an essential part of professional communication and in recent years it has shifted from a genre-based approach. Formerly, technical writing primarily focused on generating templates of documents and sometimes it was creating or reproducing traditional forms with minor modifications and updates. Now, technical writing looks at the situations surrounding the need to write. This involves deep thinking about the goals and objectives of the project on hand. Furthermore, one observes that it is very important for any participatory process to have the full support of management. This support needs to be well understood and believed by employees. Professional writing may be very persuasive in some cases. When presented in the appropriate context, technical writing can persuade a company to improve work conditions ensuring employee safety and timely production. However, one must recognize that lot of professional writing still continues to make use of reports and instruction manuals. Normally, technical and professional writing addresses four aspects. Objective: The need for generating a given professionally written technical document and the goals the document is expected to achieve and accomplish. Clientele: The clientele who will utilize the technical document. This may include the people in the organization. This may also include "unintended readers." Customers: The population that may be affected by the content of the technical document generated. This includes the stakeholders who will be influenced. Environment: The background in which the document is created. Also, the nature of the situation that warranted the generation of the document. Swiss Psychologist Jean Piaget's view of Learning focuses on three aspects. The author likes to extend Jean Piaget's ideas to students, who are asked to prepare and submit Reader-Centered Technical Writing reports and exercises. Assimilation: Writers may benefit specifically, by assimilating a new object into

  11. Exploration Medical System Technical Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, K.; Middour, C.; Cerro, J.; Burba, T.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Mindock, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element systems engineering goals include defining the technical system needed to implement exploration medical capabilities for Mars. This past year, scenarios captured in the medical system concept of operations laid the foundation for systems engineering technical development work. The systems engineering team analyzed scenario content to identify interactions between the medical system, crewmembers, the exploration vehicle, and the ground system. This enabled the definition of functions the medical system must provide and interfaces to crewmembers and other systems. These analyses additionally lead to the development of a conceptual medical system architecture. The work supports the ExMC community-wide understanding of the functional exploration needs to be met by the medical system, the subsequent development of medical system requirements, and the system verification and validation approach utilizing terrestrial analogs and precursor exploration missions.

  12. The Biomedical Engineer in the Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furst, Emanuel

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the roles of engineers in medical centers, including technical support, instrument control and safety for the hospital, and teaching and research tasks. Indicates that engineering education should take responsibilities to prepare them to understand the human relations and organizational characteristics of their environment through course…

  13. The Biomedical Engineer in the Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furst, Emanuel

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the roles of engineers in medical centers, including technical support, instrument control and safety for the hospital, and teaching and research tasks. Indicates that engineering education should take responsibilities to prepare them to understand the human relations and organizational characteristics of their environment through course…

  14. Satellite medical centers project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  15. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University's College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor's assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  16. Defense Technical Information Center thesaurus

    SciTech Connect

    Dickert, J.H.

    1996-10-01

    This DTIC Thesaurus provides a basic multidisciplinary subject term vocabulary used by DTIC to index and retrieve scientific and technical information from its various data bases and to aid DTIC`s users in their information storage and retrieval operations. It includes an alphabetical posting term display, a hierarchy display, and a Keywork Out of Context (KWOC) display.

  17. EPA'S GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose and the services provided by EPA's Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) will be presented. In 1987 the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Regional Waste Management Offices, and ORD established the Technical Support Project (TSP)

    The purpos...

  18. The National Geospatial Technical Operations Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craun, Kari J.; Constance, Eric W.; Donnelly, Jay; Newell, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Technical Operations Center (NGTOC) provides geospatial technical expertise in support of the National Geospatial Program in its development of The National Map, National Atlas of the United States, and implementation of key components of the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI).

  19. EPA'S GROUND WATER TECHNICAL SUPPORT CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose and the services provided by EPA's Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) will be presented. In 1987 the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Regional Waste Management Offices, and ORD established the Technical Support Project (TSP)

    The purpos...

  20. 75 FR 16351 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ..., and 1050 Medical Devices; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule; technical amendment. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain medical.... 360hh- 360ss). The Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA) (Public Law 101- 629), transferred the...

  1. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL). The GWTSC is one of an interlinked group of specialized Technical Support Centersthat were established under the Technical Support Project (TSP). The GWTSC provides technical support on issues related to groundwater. Specifically, the GWTSC provides technical support to U.S. EPA and State regulators for issues and problems related to:1. subsurface contamination (contaminants in ground water, soils and sediments),2. cross-media transfer (movement of contaminants from the subsurface to other media such as surface water or air), and3. restoration of impacted ecosystems.The GWTSC works with Remedial Project Managers (RPMs) and other decision makers to solve specific problems at Superfund, RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act), Brownfields sites, and ecosystem restoration sites. The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA’s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL). The GWTSC is one of an interlinked group of specialized Technical Suppo

  2. The academic medical center today.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D E; Blendon, R J

    1984-05-01

    Some recent circumstances, including the nation's economic difficulties, a probable physician surplus, a declining need for acute-care medical beds, and an overwhelming public perception that medical care is too expensive, are creating serious problems for academic medical centers today. To survive, many academic medical centers probably will make certain short-term adaptations that will be viewed as undesirable by many. We suggest four initiatives that may help academic centers maintain their vital national role. These initiatives include becoming major public advocates for the medical care needs of the least fortunate; a sharp reduction in the training of subspecialists; the commitment of more of their faculty practice income to academic research, teaching, and support of low-income students; and refocusing attention on the training of young persons to be the physicians of tomorrow.

  3. An Effective Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Governance model directed the formation of three Technical Authorities, Engineering; Safety and Mission Assurance; and Health and Medical, to ensure that risks are identified and adjudicated efficiently and transparently in concert with the spaceflight programs and projects. The Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) has been implemented at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) and consists of the Chief Medical Office (CMO), the Deputy CMO, and HMTA Delegates. The JSC HMTA achieves the goals of risk identification and adjudication through the discharge of the appropriate technical expertise to human space flight programs and projects and the escalation of issues within program and technical authority boards. The JSC HMTA relies on subject matter experts (SMEs) in the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC as well as experts from other Centers to work crew health and performance issues at the technical level, develop requirements, oversee implementation and validation of requirements, and identify risks and non-compliances. Once a risk or potential noncompliance has been identified and reported to the programs or projects, the JSC HMTA begins to track it and closely monitor the program's or project's response. As a risk is developed or a non-compliance negotiated, positions from various levels of decision makers are sought at the program and project control boards. The HMTA may support a program or project position if it is satisfied with the decision making and vetting processes (ex. the subject matter expert voiced his/her concerns and all dissenting opinions were documented) and finds that the position both acknowledges the risk and cost of the mitigation and resolves the issue without changing NASA risk posture. The HMTA may disagree with a program or project position if the NASA risk posture has been elevated or obfuscated. If the HMTA does disagree with the program or project position, it will appeal to successively higher levels of authority so that

  4. An Effective Health and Medical Technical Authority

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Governance model directed the formation of three Technical Authorities, Engineering; Safety and Mission Assurance; and Health and Medical, to ensure that risks are identified and adjudicated efficiently and transparently in concert with the spaceflight programs and projects. The Health and Medical Technical Authority (HMTA) has been implemented at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) and consists of the Chief Medical Office (CMO), the Deputy CMO, and HMTA Delegates. The JSC HMTA achieves the goals of risk identification and adjudication through the discharge of the appropriate technical expertise to human space flight programs and projects and the escalation of issues within program and technical authority boards. The JSC HMTA relies on subject matter experts (SMEs) in the Space Life Sciences Directorate at JSC as well as experts from other Centers to work crew health and performance issues at the technical level, develop requirements, oversee implementation and validation of requirements, and identify risks and non-compliances. Once a risk or potential noncompliance has been identified and reported to the programs or projects, the JSC HMTA begins to track it and closely monitor the program's or project's response. As a risk is developed or a non-compliance negotiated, positions from various levels of decision makers are sought at the program and project control boards. The HMTA may support a program or project position if it is satisfied with the decision making and vetting processes (ex. the subject matter expert voiced his/her concerns and all dissenting opinions were documented) and finds that the position both acknowledges the risk and cost of the mitigation and resolves the issue without changing NASA risk posture. The HMTA may disagree with a program or project position if the NASA risk posture has been elevated or obfuscated. If the HMTA does disagree with the program or project position, it will appeal to successively higher levels of authority so that

  5. 78 FR 18233 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... procedure, Confidential business information, Medical devices, Medical research, Reporting and recordkeeping..., 876, 878, 880, 882, 884, 886, 888, 890, and 892 Medical Devices; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Food and... Administration (FDA) is amending certain medical device regulations to correct minor errors in the Code...

  6. Technical activities 1986, Center for Basic Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydemann, P. L. M.

    1986-10-01

    The report summarizes the research and technical activities of the Center for Basic Standards during the Fiscal Year 1986. These activities include work in the areas of electricity, temperature and pressure, mass and length, time and frequency, quantum metrology, and quantum physics.

  7. Electronics Principles Inventory, Sheppard Technical Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-01

    AD-A219 935 ( ) UNITED STATES AIR FORCE DTC. E 1- EE -, ... , S MAR 3 0 1990 01% ELECTRONICS PRINCIPLES INVENTORY SHEPPARD TECHNICAL TRAINING CENTER...studies provide valuable informa- tion for curriculum development or validation in terms of percent members requiring a range of electronics principles knowledge

  8. Advertising by academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Larson, Robin J; Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven; Welch, H Gilbert

    2005-03-28

    Many academic medical centers have increased their use of advertising to attract patients. While the content of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertisements (ads) has been studied, to our knowledge, advertising by academic medical centers has not. We aimed to characterize advertising by the nation's top academic medical centers. We contacted all 17 medical centers named to the US News & World Report 2002 honor roll of "America's Best Hospitals" for a semistructured interview regarding their advertising practices. In addition, we obtained and systematically analyzed all non-research-related print ads placed by these institutions in their 5 most widely circulating local newspapers during 2002. Of the 17 institutions, 16 reported advertising to attract patients; 1 stated, "We're just word of mouth." While all 17 centers confirmed the presence of an institutional review board process for approving advertising to attract research subjects, none reported a comparable process for advertising to attract patients. We identified 127 unique non-research-related print ads for the 17 institutions during 2002 (mean, 7.5; range, 0-39). Three ads promoted community events with institution sponsorship, 2 announced genuine public services, and 122 were aimed at attracting patients. Of the latter group, 36 ads (29.5%) promoted the medical center as a whole, while 65 (53.3%) promoted specific clinical departments and 21 (17.2%) promoted single therapeutic interventions or diagnostic tests. The most commonly used marketing strategies included appealing to emotions (61.5%), highlighting institution prestige (60.7%), mentioning a symptom or disease (53.3%), and promoting introductory lectures or special offers likely to lead to further business (47.5%). Of the 21 ads for single interventions, most were for unproved (38.1%) or cosmetic (28.6%) procedures. While more than half of these ads presented benefits, none quantified their positive claims and just 1 mentioned potential harms

  9. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C. A.; Foley, J. T.

    1980-10-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel. The purpose of the Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center is to collect, analyze, store, and make available descriptions of the environment of transportation expressed in engineering terms. The data stored in the Center are expected to be useful in a variety of transportation related analyses. Formulations of environmental criteria for shipment of cargo, risk assessments, and detailed structural analyses of shipping containers are examples where these data have been applied. For purposes of indexing and data retrieval, the data are catalogued under two major headings: Normal and Abnormal Environments.

  10. Patient Workload Profile: National Naval Medical Center (NNMC), Bethesda, MD.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    HLBLOOD Commander Technical Director ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION This Technical Document reports on work performed under NOSC Work Unit TA37 between 1...823- TA37 San Diego, CA 92152 1I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS - Naval Medical Data Services Center, I JunJ’j0 Code 04 is 1

  11. Engineering Technical Support Center Annual Report Fiscal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Office of Research and Development (ORD) created the Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC) in 1987, one of several technical support centers created as part of the Technical Support Project (TSP). ETSC provides engineering expertise to Agency program and regional offices and remediation teams working at contaminated sites across the country. The ETSC is operated within ORD’s Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) in Cincinnati, Ohio. The ETSC’s mission is to provide site-specific scientific and engineering technical support to Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, and other remediation personnel at contaminated sites. This allows local, regional, or national authorities to work more quickly, efficiently, and cost effectively, while also increasing the technical experience of the remediation team. Since its inception, the ETSC has supported countless projects across all EPA Regions in almost all states and territories. This report highlights significant projects the ETSC supported in fiscal year 2015 (FY15). These projects addressed an array of environmental scenarios, such as remote mining contamination, expansive landfill waste, cumulative impacts from multiple contamination sources, and persistent threats from abandoned industrial sites. Constructing and testing new and innovative treatment technol

  12. Engineering Technical Support Center Annual Report Fiscal ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Office of Research and Development (ORD) created the Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC) in 1987, one of several technical support centers created as part of the Technical Support Project (TSP). ETSC provides engineering expertise to Agency program and regional offices and remediation teams working at contaminated sites across the country. The ETSC is operated within ORD’s Land Remediation and Pollution Control Division (LRPCD) of the National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) in Cincinnati, Ohio. The ETSC’s mission is to provide site-specific scientific and engineering technical support to Remedial Project Managers, On-Scene Coordinators, and other remediation personnel at contaminated sites. This allows local, regional, or national authorities to work more quickly, efficiently, and cost effectively, while also increasing the technical experience of the remediation team. Since its inception, the ETSC has supported countless projects across all EPA Regions in almost all states and territories. This report highlights significant projects the ETSC supported in fiscal year 2015 (FY15). These projects addressed an array of environmental scenarios, such as remote mining contamination, expansive landfill waste, cumulative impacts from multiple contamination sources, and persistent threats from abandoned industrial sites. Constructing and testing new and innovative treatment technol

  13. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel.

  14. Electronic Principles Inventory, Lowry Technical Training Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    y/ UNITED STATES AIR FORCE DTIC oAR 19 0D N N ELECTRONIC PRINCIPLES INVENTORY LOWRY TECHNICAL TRAINING CENTER AFPT 90-EPI-825 MARCH 1990 OCCUPATIONAL...PREFACE This report presents the results of an Air Force Electronic Principles survey of 37 selected Air Force specialties. Authority for conducting...Electronic Principles (EP) surveys is contained in AFR 35-2. Results presented in this report are part of an EP survey of 81 Air Force specialties. This

  15. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  16. Handling Technical Reports in the Medical Library *

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charles W.

    1969-01-01

    One of the most widely neglected sources of information in the medical library is the technical report. Often this bibliographic form is ignored because there is a general lack of information on the part of the librarian concerning its mysteries. In many cases the technical report provides the most recent and current information on a given subject, and to ignore it or wait for its appearance in the published literature could prove costly to a research project. Technical reports have reached flood proportions since World War II, and are issued from many diverse sources. Means of acquiring, processing, and using the tools which abstract and index this literature are discussed. PMID:5782263

  17. Kennedy Space Center Medical Operations and Medical Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpa, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the emergency medical operations at Kennedy Space center, the KSC launch and landing contingency modes, the triage site, the medical kit, and the medications available.

  18. Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Adams

    2009-01-07

    The following is a synopsis of the major achievements attributed to the operation of the Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center (WAPTAC) by the National Association for State Community Services Programs (NASCSP). During the past five years, the WAPTAC has developed into the premier source for information related to operating the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) at the state and local levels. The services provide through WAPTAC include both virtual technical support as well as hands-on training and instruction in classroom and in the field. The WAPTAC achieved several important milestones during its operation including the establishment of a national Weatherization Day now celebrated in most states, the implementation of a comprehensive Public Information Campaign (PIC) to raise the awareness of the Program among policy makers and the public, the training of more than 150 new state managers and staff as they assume their duties in state offices around the country, and the creation and support of a major virtual information source on the Internet being accessed by thousands of staff each month. The Weatherization Assistance Program Technical Assistance Center serves the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program as a valuable training and technical assistance resource for the network of 54 direct state grantees (50 states, District of Columbia and three Native American tribes) and the network of 900 local subgrantees (comprised of community action agencies, units of local government, and other non-profit organizations). The services provided through WAPTAC focus on standardizing and improving the daily management of the WAP. Staff continually identify policies changes and best practices to help the network improve its effectiveness and enhance the benefits of the Program for the customers who receive service and the federal and private investors. The operations of WAPTAC are separated into six

  19. Naval Training Device Center Index of Technical Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lemuel E.

    Published Naval Training Device Center technical reports and some technical notes (those available through the Defense Documentation Center-DDC) which have resulted from basic research, exploratory development, and advanced development type projects are listed. The reports are indexed by technical note number, by title, and by contractor code. The…

  20. Engineering Technical Support Center Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Office of Research and Development (ORD) created the Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC) in 1987, one of several technical support centers created as part of the Technical Support Project (TSP). ETSC provid...

  1. Engineering Technical Support Center Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA or Agency) Office of Research and Development (ORD) created the Engineering Technical Support Center (ETSC) in 1987, one of several technical support centers created as part of the Technical Support Project (TSP). ETSC provid...

  2. Technical activities 1980: Center for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachtman, J. B., Jr.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1980-10-01

    Part of the National Measurement Laboratory, one of the principal laboratories comprising the National Bureau of Standards, the Materials Science Center is organized in six divisions, each having responsibility in different areas of materials science appropriate to the major classes of materials metals, polymers, and ceramics and glass. These Divisions vary in their balance between theory and experiments, between direct standards work and research, and in their orientation toward industrial and Government needs and the needs of other components of the scientific and technical community. Achievements reported relate to signal processing and imaging; fracture theory; conformational changes in polymers; chemical stability and corrosion; fracture deformation; polymer science and standards; metallurgy and alloys; ceramics, glass, and solid state; and reactor radiation.

  3. Electronics principles inventory, Sheppard Technical Training Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-02-01

    Data are provided on the electronic principles (EP) used by airmen in 13 Air Force Specialties (AFSs) with initial training at Sheppard Technical Training Center (TTC). The USAF Electronic Principles Inventory (AFPT 90-EPI-825) was administered to random samples of fully qualified job incumbents representing the 13 AFSs in this report. The data were collected from March 1987 to September 1988. Although there is no specific regulatory guidance on the use of EPO data, the survey data lends itself to the use of cutoff scores for deciding which EPI items to include in centralized training for each AFSC. Once the training needs of the individual AFSCs have been determined, the possibility for consolidated EP training can be considered.

  4. Business Industry Technical Assistance Center, Hazard Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marrow, Alvin J.

    The Business Industry and Technical Assistance Center (BITAC) was established in 1986 at Hazard Community College, in Kentucky, to serve as an information and technical assistance center for small business. As the local area began to face layoffs in the coal mining industry, however, the center extended its services in four principal areas:…

  5. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology. 1993 Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents. The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents.

  6. Establishing cost centers within libraries of medical centers.

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, C K

    1983-01-01

    Medical centers that educate students, treat patients, and perform medical research usually adopt accounting methods for separating those functions financially--designating each function as a cost center. Faculty members who participate in more than one of the separately charged activities have their salaries apportioned accordingly. Cost-shared services, such as a computer facility or a power plant, may also be apportioned among the cost centers. Given this approach to accounting, the shared services of the medical center's library should be included in such an apportionment. Whether such is the case, why the matter is of concern, and how such accounting can be performed were recently studied. PMID:6860398

  7. Medical Service Plans in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Bernard

    1978-01-01

    The control of clinical practice and the disposition of income from this practice have complicated the governance of medical schools for many years. The problem has been magnified recently by a decrease in income from other sources, reduction in the number of service patients, expansion of private services, and federal legislation. Implications…

  8. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1983 is compiled. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  9. Malpractice Issues in the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ben A.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of legal issues in the academic medical center focuses on standards of care applicable to practitioners, special problems of patient care delivery, and the special status of public academic medical centers. Informed consent to care, relations with affiliated institutions, and private/non-private patient status are also considered.…

  10. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  11. The Defense Technical Information Center: Acquiring Information and Imparting Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molholm, Kurt N.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    This overview of the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) discusses how DTIC fits into the Department of Defense Scientific and Technical Information Program; its history, organization, users, and operations; types of information handled; subject classification; cataloging standards; Information Analysis Centers (IACs); and research and…

  12. Exploration Medical System Technical Architecture Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerro, J.; Rubin, D.; Mindock, J.; Middour, C.; McGuire, K.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Burba, T.; Urbina, M.

    2018-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element Systems Engineering (SE) goals include defining the technical system needed to support medical capabilities for a Mars exploration mission. A draft medical system architecture was developed based on stakeholder needs, system goals, and system behaviors, as captured in an ExMC concept of operations document and a system model. This talk will discuss a high-level view of the medical system, as part of a larger crew health and performance system, both of which will support crew during Deep Space Transport missions. Other mission components, such as the flight system, ground system, caregiver, and patient, will be discussed as aspects of the context because the medical system will have important interactions with each. Additionally, important interactions with other aspects of the crew health and performance system are anticipated, such as health & wellness, mission task performance support, and environmental protection. This talk will highlight areas in which we are working with other disciplines to understand these interactions.

  13. EPA Technical Support Centers (TSC): FY14 Lessons ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA’s Technical Support Centers (TSC) included in ORD’s Safe and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Action Plan fill the need for supplying subject-matter experts to continually assess state-of-the-art research and practices and channel this information to users in both direct applications (i.e., site-specific technical support) and general applications (i.e., technical transfer activities such as technical guidance documents, conferences, or workshops) . The TSCs are charged with providing solutions by: 1) linking EPA research to Agency decision-makers; 2) applying best practices to real world field applications; and 3) channeling feedback from field application to research communities. The TSP goal is to provide Regional Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), Corrective Action Staff, and On-Scene Coordinators (OSCs) with a diverse set of readily-accessible resources for technical assistance. This research summary provides six case studies – two from each of the three TSCs (Ground Water Technical Support Center, Engineering Technical Support Center, and Site Characterization Technical Support Center) – to exemplify and summarize the variety of TSC approaches that contribute to fulfilling the TSP mission. EPA’s Technical Support Centers (TSC) included in ORD’s Safe and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Action Plan fill the need for supplying subject-matter experts to continually assess state-of-the-art research and practices and channel this informati

  14. Inventors Center of Michigan Technical Assessment Program. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The Technical Assessment Program at the Inventors Center of Michigan is designed to provide independent inventors with a reliable assessment of the technical merits of their proposed inventions. Using faculty from within Ferris State University`s College of Technology an assessment process examines the inventor`s assumptions, documentation, and prototypes, as well as, reviewing patent search results and technical literature to provide the inventor with a written report on the technical aspects of the proposed invention. The forms for applying for a technical assessment of an invention are included.

  15. Medical center staff attitudes about spanking.

    PubMed

    Gershoff, Elizabeth T; Font, Sarah A; Taylor, Catherine A; Foster, Rebecca H; Garza, Ann Budzak; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Terreros, Amy; Nielsen-Parker, Monica; Spector, Lisa

    2016-11-01

    Several medical professional organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, recommend that parents avoid hitting children for disciplinary purposes (e.g., spanking) and that medical professionals advise parents to use alternative methods. The extent to which medical professionals continue to endorse spanking is unknown. This study is the first to examine attitudes about spanking among staff throughout medical settings, including non-direct care staff. A total of 2580 staff at a large general medical center and 733 staff at a children's hospital completed an online survey; respondents were roughly divided between staff who provide direct care to patients (e.g., physicians, nurses) and staff who do not (e.g., receptionists, lab technicians). Less than half (44% and 46%) of staff at each medical center agreed that spanking is harmful to children, although almost all (85% and 88%) acknowledged that spanking can lead to injury. Men, staff who report being religious, and staff who held non-direct care positions at the medical center reported stronger endorsement of spanking and perceived their co-workers to be more strongly in favor of spanking. Non-direct care staff were more supportive of spanking compared with direct care staff on every item assessed. All staff underestimated the extent to which their co-workers held negative views of spanking. If medical centers and other medical settings are to lead the charge in informing the community about the harms of spanking, comprehensive staff education about spanking is indicated.

  16. Characterizing customers at medical center farmers' markets.

    PubMed

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Monroe, Diana L; Fiordalis, Elizabeth; Bates, Erica

    2014-08-01

    Approximately 100 farmers' markets operate on medical center campuses. Although these venues can uniquely serve community health needs, little is known about customer characteristics and outreach efforts. Intercept survey of markets and market customers between August 2010 and October 2011 at three medical centers in different geographic regions of the US (Duke University Medical Center, Cleveland Clinic, and Penn State Hershey Medical Center) were conducted. Markets reported serving 180-2,000 customers per week and conducting preventive medicine education sessions and community health programs. Customers (n = 585) across markets were similar in sociodemographic characteristics--most were middle-aged, white, and female, who were employees of their respective medical center. Health behaviors of customers were similar to national data. The surveyed medical center farmers' markets currently serve mostly employees; however, markets have significant potential for community outreach efforts in preventive medicine. If farmers' markets can broaden their reach to more diverse populations, they may play an important role in contributing to community health.

  17. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1981

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1981 are indexed and abstracted. All the publications were announced in the 1981 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patent applications, and theses. A total of 384 technical publications is listed.

  18. Center for Advanced Space Propulsion Second Annual Technical Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The proceedings for the Center for Advanced Space Propulsion Second Annual Technical Symposium are divided as follows: Chemical Propulsion, CFD; Space Propulsion; Electric Propulsion; Artificial Intelligence; Low-G Fluid Management; and Rocket Engine Materials.

  19. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1982 is described. All the publications were announced in the 1982 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  20. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1991. All the publications were announced in the 1991 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 800 technical publications that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1983. Announced in the 1983 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts), the documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Evaluation of the ECIA Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Centers (TACs).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reisner, Elizabeth; And Others

    This study evaluated the national network of Technical Assistance Centers (TACs), which provides technical assistance in evaluation and program improvement to state and local educational agencies responsible for implementing programs under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA). The U.S. Department of Education…

  3. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author describes Stafford Technical Center's Engineering Technology Academy (ETA), in which students pursue a variety of educational and career options for anything connected to construction technologies--including drafting and design, architecture, and even work in historic preservation. In addition to technical skills,…

  4. Evaluation of the Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panton, Karen L. M.; And Others

    Six Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers (IETACs) provide technical assistance to American Indian and Alaska Native education programs funded by Title V grants from the Office of Indian Education (OIE). This study examines the services provided by the IETACs and identifies factors that influence their effectiveness. Data were collected…

  5. Utton Center Scientific and Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marilyn C. O’Leary

    2006-07-01

    Final Report of DOE grant to the Utton Transboundary Resources Center at University of New Mexico School of Law supporting prevention and management of transboundary water conflicts. Describes work of Utton Center and refers to three other documents reported separately. Includes brief description of multidisciplinary collaborative process, understanding cultural values of water and a model water compact.

  6. Skylab Medical Data Center and Archives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spross, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The founding of the Skylab medical data center and archives as a central area to house medical data from space flights is described. Skylab program strip charts, various daily reports and summaries, experiment reports and logs, status report on Skylab data quality, raw data digital tapes, processed data microfilm, and other Skylab documents are housed in the data center. In addition, this memorandum describes how the data center acted as a central point for the coordination of preflight and postflight baseline data and how it served as coordinator for all data processing through computation and analysis. Also described is a catalog identifying Skylab medical experiments and all related data currently archived in the data center.

  7. 75 FR 49526 - Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, AZ; Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Woburn, MA; Amended Certification Regarding... Semiconductor, Inc., Technical Information Center, Tempe, Arizona. The notice was published in the Federal...

  8. Medical center farmers markets: a strategic partner in the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Rovniak, Liza S; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Morrison, Kathy J; Dillon, Judith F; Bates, Beth Y

    2013-08-01

    The number of medical center-based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution's commitment to the medical home. We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market's Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance's report on the medical home. During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care.

  9. Focus on: New England Medical Center Medical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Harrington, D P

    1988-01-01

    The New England Medical Center can be traced back to 1796 when the Boston Dispensary opened the first HMO. Now, the center complex covers four city blocks, offers 47 medical residency programs, has over $20 million in funded research, and includes a medical school, dental school, and the Human Nutrition Research Center. The Medical Engineering Department began in 1971 as a joint venture between the center and Tufts University. Operated on a "fee-for-service" basis, the department consists of nine people in medical engineering and an additional four in radiology engineering. The department performs quality assurance and preventive maintenance work, along with as-needed repairs, throughout the center on an equipment roster that includes over 1,200 computer terminals and printers, 58 intensive care beds, and 200+ I.V. pumps. Specialized equipment allows the department to perform audiology repairs. Future goals include integrating the radiology repair staff into the medical engineering group, improving the group's productivity, and eliminating some of the existing service contracts.

  10. Early experiences with big data at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Halamka, John D

    2014-07-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), an academic health care institution affiliated with Harvard University, has been an early adopter of electronic applications since the 1970s. Various departments of the medical center and the physician practice groups affiliated with it have implemented electronic health records, filmless imaging, and networked medical devices to such an extent that data storage at BIDMC now amounts to three petabytes and continues to grow at a rate of 25 percent a year. Initially, the greatest technical challenge was the cost and complexity of data storage. However, today the major focus is on transforming raw data into information, knowledge, and wisdom. This article discusses the data growth, increasing importance of analytics, and changing user requirements that have shaped the management of big data at BIDMC. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  11. Academic Medical Centers as digital health catalysts.

    PubMed

    DePasse, Jacqueline W; Chen, Connie E; Sawyer, Aenor; Jethwani, Kamal; Sim, Ida

    2014-09-01

    Emerging digital technologies offer enormous potential to improve quality, reduce cost, and increase patient-centeredness in healthcare. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) play a key role in advancing medical care through cutting-edge medical research, yet traditional models for invention, validation and commercialization at AMCs have been designed around biomedical initiatives, and are less well suited for new digital health technologies. Recently, two large bi-coastal Academic Medical Centers, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) through the Center for Digital Health Innovation (CDHI) and Partners Healthcare through the Center for Connected Health (CCH) have launched centers focused on digital health innovation. These centers show great promise but are also subject to significant financial, organizational, and visionary challenges. We explore these AMC initiatives, which share the following characteristics: a focus on academic research methodology; integration of digital technology in educational programming; evolving models to support "clinician innovators"; strategic academic-industry collaboration and emergence of novel revenue models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Keystone Center final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1998-01-22

    The Keystone Center began its work with the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) in May, 1996, when The Center agreed to design, organize, and facilitate stakeholder meetings at two DOE sites: Savannah River and Hanford. These meetings were held June 24--25, 1996 for the purpose of discussing the role of EMSP in constructing a site-specific basic research agenda that maps site cleanup needs to basic science areas. Summaries of the discussions from these meetings as well as lists of the stakeholders who were invited are included as Attachment 1. In August/September 1996, the Keystone Center was asked to convene two additional site meetings using funds that remained in their contract. These meetings were held in October 1996 at Oak Ridge and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Summaries from these meetings and participant lists are included as Attachment 2.

  13. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  14. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  15. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1986. All the publications were announced in the 1986 issues of Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports (STAR) and/or International Aerospace Abstracts (IAA). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  16. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1985. All the publications were announced in the 1985 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  17. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1989. All the publications were announced in the 1989 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  18. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1990. All the publications were announced in the 1990 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  19. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This bibliography contains abstracts of the technical reports that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1988. Subject, author, and corporate source indexes are also included. All the publications were announced in the 1988 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  20. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1993. All the publications were announced in the 1993 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  1. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1984. All the publications were announced in the 1984 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  2. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    This compilation of over 1100 abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1979. All the publications were announced in the 1979 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses are included. Subject, author, corporate source, contract number, and report number indexes are provided.

  3. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1987. All the publications were announced in the 1987 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  4. Total Quality Management Implementation at the Defense Technical Information Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    improvement programs. -- 7- 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES TOM ( Total Quality Management ), Continuous Process Improvement, ________ Collection and...TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER September 1989 Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. I8 . 22 ~89 9 29 0 22 TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION...technical information support, services, and products to the DoD research and development community. The DTIC Total Quality Management (TQM

  5. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 technical reports resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1977. All the publications were announced in the 1977 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Documents cited include research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  6. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes the technical reporting that resulted from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1992. All the publications were announced in the 1992 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  7. Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) - Its role in the USAF Scientific and Technical Information Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Allan D.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), the central repository for DOD scientific and technical information concerning studies and research and engineering efforts, is discussed. The present makeup of DTIC is described and its functions in producing technical reports and technical report bibliographies are examined. DTIC's outreach services are reviewed, as are its DTIC information and technology transfer programs. DTIC's plans for the year 2000 and its relation to the mission of the U.S. Air Force, including the Air Force's STINFO program, are addressed.

  8. Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) - Its role in the USAF Scientific and Technical Information Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Allan D.

    1991-01-01

    The Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC), the central repository for DOD scientific and technical information concerning studies and research and engineering efforts, is discussed. The present makeup of DTIC is described and its functions in producing technical reports and technical report bibliographies are examined. DTIC's outreach services are reviewed, as are its DTIC information and technology transfer programs. DTIC's plans for the year 2000 and its relation to the mission of the U.S. Air Force, including the Air Force's STINFO program, are addressed.

  9. Television documentaries lifting hospital, medical center profiles.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    The nation's hospitals and medical centers are enjoying the legacy of TV audiences' addiction to medical dramas. Cable television has met the challenge with documentary coverage of real live hospitals. The medium offers many benefits and few disadvantages for those marketing managers with the courage to welcome camera crews. Lynn Hopkins Cantwell is director of public relations and marketing for Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C., which was covered in a seven-instrument "Lifeline" documentary for the Discovery Channel. James G. Gosky is director of communications for The MetroHealth System, Cleveland, which was the subject of two installments of "Trauma: Life in th ER," produced for the Learning Channel. These marketing pros describe the myriad details they faced when their respective hospitals went "on camera." Among the key factors were good communications with all constituents, attention to detail, and follow-up.

  10. Research imaging in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Armato, Samuel G; Gruszauskas, Nicholas P; Macmahon, Heber; Torno, Michael D; Li, Feng; Engelmann, Roger M; Starkey, Adam; Pudela, Caileigh L; Marino, Jonathan S; Santiago, Faustino; Chang, Paul J; Giger, Maryellen L

    2012-06-01

    Managing and supervising the complex imaging examinations performed for clinical research in an academic medical center can be a daunting task. Coordinating with both radiology and research staff to ensure that the necessary imaging is performed, analyzed, and delivered in accordance with the research protocol is nontrivial. The purpose of this communication is to report on the establishment of a new Human Imaging Research Office (HIRO) at our institution that provides a dedicated infrastructure to assist with these issues and improve collaborations between radiology and research staff. The HIRO was created with three primary responsibilities: 1) coordinate the acquisition of images for clinical research per the study protocol, 2) facilitate reliable and consistent assessment of disease response for clinical research, and 3) manage and distribute clinical research images in a compliant manner. The HIRO currently provides assistance for 191 clinical research studies from 14 sections and departments within our medical center and performs quality assessment of image-based measurements for six clinical research studies. The HIRO has fulfilled 1806 requests for medical images, delivering 81,712 imaging examinations (more than 44.1 million images) and related reports to investigators for research purposes. The ultimate goal of the HIRO is to increase the level of satisfaction and interaction among investigators, research subjects, radiologists, and other imaging professionals. Clinical research studies that use the HIRO benefit from a more efficient and accurate imaging process. The HIRO model could be adopted by other academic medical centers to support their clinical research activities; the details of implementation may differ among institutions, but the need to support imaging in clinical research through a dedicated, centralized initiative should apply to most academic medical centers. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical Center Farmers Markets: A Strategic Partner in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Morrison, Kathy J.; Dillon, Judith F.; Bates, Beth Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of medical center–based farmers markets has increased in the past decade, but little is known about how such organizations contribute to the preventive health goals of the patient-centered medical home. Community Context In 2010, we started a seasonal farmers market at Penn State Hershey Medical Center to help support the institution’s commitment to the medical home. Methods We obtained descriptive data on the farmers market from hospital and market records and tracking information on the market’s Facebook and Twitter sites. We computed summary measures to characterize how the market has begun to meet the 6 standards of the 2011 National Committee for Quality Assurance’s report on the medical home. Outcome During the 2010 and 2011 seasons, 146 medical center volunteers from 40 departments formed 23 interprofessional teams that spent an average of 551 volunteer hours per season at the market, providing health screenings (n = 695) and speaking to customers (n = 636) about preventive health. Fifty-five nonmedical community health partners provided 208 hours of service at the market alongside medical center staff. Market programming contributed to 5 regional preventive health partnerships and created opportunities for interprofessional mentoring, student leadership, data management, development of social media skills, and grant-writing experience. The market contributed to all 6 medical home standards outlined by the National Committee for Quality Assurance. Interpretation Medical center markets can support medical home standards. With systematic tracking of the health effects and integration with electronic medical health records, markets hold potential to contribute to comprehensive patient-centered care. PMID:23906327

  12. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical publications announced in 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This compilation of abstracts describes and indexes over 780 research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses resulting from the scientific and engineering work performed and managed by the Lewis Research Center in 1980. All the publications were announced in Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports and/or International Aerospace Abstracts.

  13. Case Study: Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, W. Va.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Randolph County Vocational Technical Center, Elkins, West Virginia, received a grant in 1997 for a project that was part of the High Schools That Work (HSTW) initiative to improve academic skills of career-bound students. The superintendent and faculty knew that improving achievement meant reaching out to the three home high schools to bring them…

  14. CCC CAMP WICKIUP – OFFICE BUILDING, CENTER; TECHNICAL SERVICE QUARTERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CCC CAMP WICKIUP – OFFICE BUILDING, CENTER; TECHNICAL SERVICE QUARTERS, RIGHT; EDUCATIONAL BUILDING, LEFT. Photocopy of historic photographs (original photograph on file at National Archives, Rocky Mountain Region, Denver, CO). Unknown USBR Photographer, December 9, 1938 - Wickiup Dam, Deschutes River, La Pine, Deschutes County, OR

  15. EPA Technical Support Centers (TSC): FY14 Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Technical Support Centers (TSC) included in ORD’s Safe and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Action Plan fill the need for supplying subject-matter experts to continually assess state-of-the-art research and practices and channel this information to users in bo...

  16. EPA Technical Support Centers (TSC): FY14 Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Technical Support Centers (TSC) included in ORD’s Safe and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Action Plan fill the need for supplying subject-matter experts to continually assess state-of-the-art research and practices and channel this information to users in both direct ap...

  17. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  18. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  19. Stafford Technical Center: Designing a Future for Architects and Builders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucci, William, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The Engineering Technology Academy (ETA) program at Stafford Technical Center in Rutland, Vermont, offers benefits beyond the conventional high school learning experience. In September, at the beginning of the program, students learn the traditional skills of using tools, line weights and lettering. Once they develop these basic skills, students…

  20. EPA Technical Support Centers (TSC): FY14 Lessons Learned

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA’s Technical Support Centers (TSC) included in ORD’s Safe and Healthy Communities (SHC) Research Action Plan fill the need for supplying subject-matter experts to continually assess state-of-the-art research and practices and channel this information to users in both direct ap...

  1. [Medical education centers: strategies and purpose].

    PubMed

    Binetti, P

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of new didactic guidelines, for the graduate degrees in medicine and allied disciplines, is secondary to the new needs of the National Health Care System, and in part to the significant developments of science. It is not easy to meet this challenge. It is likewise not easy to channel coherently the required changes, with respect to the scientific, clinical and didactic goals. Paradoxically the same institutions that are in such great need of transformation, are also a significant part of the existing problem. In many countries, schools of medicine have developed centers for medical education that are geared toward the development and growth of students, teachers-tutors, and patients alike. Medical education has become more global, in an attempt to meet much needed communication needs, from both ends, teachers and students, as well as the recipients of care, patients. One major goal of such centers is the introduction of innovative didactic activities. There is indeed a new tendency toward the development of methodological tracks aiming at the acquisition and consolidation of a deeper and broader cultural knowledge. Amongst these initiatives there is the introduction of an evaluation of the teaching delivered, as well as the development of a multidisciplinary approach to didactics. The latter, is a prerequisite of an effective training directed toward the development of the concept of "team approach", whose ultimate goal is patient care. In Italy, at the Università Campus Biomedico, in Rome, one of the first of such centers of medical education has been developed. Its goal is to be both a learning organization, as well as a center for both research and clinical services.

  2. Stubbs v. North Memorial Medical Center.

    PubMed

    1989-11-14

    Bonnie Stubbs had cosmetic surgery performed as an outpatient at North Memorial Medical Center. The doctor took "before" and "after" photographs of the surgery which were then used in promotional material without Stubbs' consent. Stubbs alleged that the use of the photographs invaded her privacy, caused her emotional distress, and violated her rights under Minnesota's Patients' Bill of Rights. The trial court found no right to relief. The Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled that Stubbs may have a right to relief on the principle that an implied contract was breached between Stubbs and the physician. The Court of Appeals remanded the case for further proceedings in that light.

  3. Collaborative practice model: Madigan Army Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Peter E; Munroe, Michelle; Foglia, Lisa; Piecek, Roxanne I; Backman, Mary Paul; Cypher, Rebecca; Smith, Denise C

    2012-09-01

    In 2007, Madigan Army Medical Center implemented a new maternity care delivery model, integrating obstetricians and certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) in a collaborative practice. The change was driven by multiple factors, including patient preference, changes in the resident workweek, and low provider satisfaction. This article describes the elements of successful collaboration, including the structure, effective teamwork principles, role of the CNM in resident education, and preliminary data on mode of delivery, the number of CNM-supervised resident births, and procedures, such as episiotomy and epidural use.

  4. ENTRANCE TO CEMETERY FROM VA MEDICAL CENTER CAMPUS, WITH ADMINISTRATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ENTRANCE TO CEMETERY FROM VA MEDICAL CENTER CAMPUS, WITH ADMINISTRATION BUILDING IN BACKGROUND. VIEW TO NORTH. - Bath National Cemetery, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Juan Avenue, Bath, Steuben County, NY

  5. 4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NE. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  6. 3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 2 & BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING NW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  7. 2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. OVERALL VIEW OF THE MEDICAL CENTER (ESPECIALLY BUILDING 1) FROM THE 'CAMPUS' GROUNDS; LOOKING SW. (Harms) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  8. Cast Study: National Naval Medical Center, A Graduate Management Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    of Health Sciences), the Naval Medical Research Institute (now the Naval Medical Research Center), and the Naval Dental School (now the National...Naval Dental Center) (History, 2000). The NNMC mission became regional on January 1, 1973 with the establishment of the National Naval Medical Center...General Surgery Material Management Inpatient Surgery Postal Operations Ophthalmology Oerations Service Oral & Maxillo- Bahelor Housing facial/ Dental

  9. Reliability centered maintenance (RCM) technical reference for substations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwan, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The document is a technical reference for individuals performing Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) evaluations of substation systems and equipment. It contains helpful hints and insights for the RCM analyst to use in completing a study. The bulk of the guidance contained herein is centered around the use of a function-based approach to RCM, since this is akin to the original approach to RCM that was developed in the air transport industry. An alternate approach to completing RCM studies is also suggested. Regardless of te technical approach employed, the data and guidance of this reference can be successfully applied to support efficiency in completing RCM studies and consistency of study results. To ensure successful application, the technical reference explains how to use the information and contains a technical example. The technical example encompasses a complete, yet abbreviated, RCM study of a small system. This provides the user with an understanding of the RCM process and how the reference materials can be used to support completion of the process. In the guidance on usage of the information, frequent references are made to more detailed information in the document. In addition, a summary of key information is provided at the end of each section as a review of the most important information for the user. The reference materials of this document establish standards in terminology and provide expert data regarding equipment types, failure modes, failure causes and preventive maintenance actions. The information is intended to be useful for RCM activities conducted with or without the aid of a software program. A guide to better understanding of maintenance technologies is also provided.

  10. 76 FR 50201 - National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center; Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center; Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver AGENCY... Childhood Technical Assistance Center. SUMMARY: The Secretary issues this notice to waive the requirements... Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center to receive funding from October 1, 2011 through September 30...

  11. A task and technical support sensitive Security Operations Center

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R.A.; Sena, P.A.; Salazar, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Modern security control and display systems for protected facilities have improved the effectiveness of Security Operations Center (SOC) personnel. The most effective of these utilize sophisticated computerized systems to primarily provide quick and accurate control and display of alarm associated and routine access funcitions. Protected facilities with limited fiscal resources require some type of security control and display system but often cannot justify the cost of equipment and technical support associated with sophisticated systems. This paper describes a disign approach, consisting of four independent building blocks, that provides functionality and complexity commensurate with facility-specific requirements and technical support capabilities. The versatility of the design is demonstrated by showing how the less complex blocks satsify the needs of fiscally limited facilities or the blocks can be intergrated to satisfy the needs of the largest security installations. also, the independent blocks can be intergrated into existing installations to provide needed additional functionality with minimal impact on operations and exisiting equipment. 7 figs.

  12. NASA Johnson Space Center Medical Licensing Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    This presentation reviews patented medical items that are available for licensing in the areas of Laboratory Technologies, Medical Devices, Medical Equipment and other technologies that are of interest to the medical community.

  13. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further

  14. Ohio Medical Office Management. Technical Competency Profile (TCP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Gayl M.; Wilson, Nick; Mangini, Rick

    This document provides a framework for a broad-based secondary and postsecondary curriculum to prepare students for employment in medical office management. The first part of the technical competency profile (TCP) contains the following items: an explanation of the purpose and scope of Ohio's TCPs; college tech prep program standards; an overview…

  15. The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Mitchell H

    2012-09-01

    The University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville hosts the University Health Services and the University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine. Founded in 1956, the center along with the Department of Surgery has grown in size and in academic stature to become an outstanding tertiary clinical, medical education, and research center.

  16. [Medical and technical compensation of disabilities].

    PubMed

    Didier, J P; Gras, P; Cassillas, J M

    1994-10-01

    Thanks to technological advances handicaps can be treated in a better way by physicians. This real Metrology of Handicap constitutes a preliminary stage to medical decision. Functional repercussions of a lesion can thus be accurately assessed before the well adapted compensatory means are conceived, prescribed and applied. A better understanding of physiopathological mechanisms involving lesion, deficit and handicap and of compensatory procedures used by disabled people depends from this assessment. Some examples will be reported such as energy expenditure, 3-dimensional biomechanical analysis of daily activities and the correlation between both approaches. Likewise, efficiency of therapeutics can be assessed such as the analysis of gait with appliances with different types of prosthetic feet or effects on muscle of various training programs. Besides, sophisticated orthesis, prosthesis and living aids can be developed with the help of data processing, robotics and electrostimulation. This new type of devices will be added to the range of standard devices developed at little cost by occupational therapists. As for the future, caution is imperative. "Repaired" man turning "robotised" is an image provided by media that might bring disillusions. On one hand, numerous social, economic and personal factors intervene in the determination of the plan for life by the individual and his family. Thereby, all the possibilities offered by technological advances might not be studied in the choice of plan of life. On the other hand, priorities in aims of an increasingly demanding individual economy will be dictated by collective economy focused on cost management. However, the concept of increase in life expectancy without disability will be relevant in the determination of health policy and the role of rehabilitation physicians will be all the more important because they are the only one to be able to coordinate a team qualified to choose and apply the best therapeutics. Times

  17. [Medical controlling as medical economical service center. Successful concept for orthopedics and trauma surgery centers?].

    PubMed

    Auhuber, T C; Hoffmann, R

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients from administrative admission through the orthopedic-surgical treatment to completion of the billing is complex. Additional challenges originate from the necessity to treat patients in both outpatient and inpatient departments and in more than one medical sector. A superior coordination is essential for a successful cooperation of the various procedures of controlling. The model of a medical controlling department as a service center with effective competence in the management of service and cost, functions as a successful solution to the problem. Central elements of a successful medical economical case management are a well-defined assignment of tasks and definitions of intersections, the integration of health professionals and administrative employees, the utilization of software for process control and the implementation of inlier controlling.

  18. Deaths in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; Kunkle, Chad; LeGrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2006-12-01

    The number of inpatient deaths in a calendar year in an academic medical center was reviewed from a computerized database. The total number was 1222. The median length of hospital stay for those who died was 7 days (range, 1-190); 404 (33%) were 75 years or older. There were 678 (55%) males and 544 (45%) females. The pulmonary medicine service had the most deaths with 290 (24%) followed by hematology/oncology 230 (18%). The most common primary diagnoses in the decedents were subendocardial infarction 58 (5%), congestive heart failure 57 (5%), and pneumonia 45 (4%). The most common diagnostic-related groups (DRGs) were respiratory system disorders (475), 98 (8%); tracheostomy (483), 75 (6%); and heart surgery (110), 65 (5%). Frequent procedures done prior to death were mechanical ventilation (<96 hours) 101 (8%), and mechanical ventilation (>96 hours) 55 (5%), and tracheostomy 54 (4%). Invasive procedures were common. Forty-five percent of the predeath patient days were spent in intensive care units. Palliative medicine was involved in the care of 20% of all the decedents.

  19. A sustainable medical center in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.L.; Miller, B.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how one can successfully integrate many sustainable features into the construction and operation of a mid-sized medical clinic located in the hot/humid piney woods of east Texas for a moderate increase over normal construction costs. The subject project, known as The Texas Specialist Center, has enjoyed the predicted energy and green building results. It is a 6,300 square foot stand alone clinic located in Lufkin, Texas for a client with multiple chemical sensitivities. Green features include passive solar design for heating and cooling, enhanced natural ventilation (including the use of natural thermal siphons within the building), cool communities site planning (to reduce the urban heat island effect), extensive use of daylighting and energy-efficient artificial lighting, photovoltaics to provide security system and computer operations back-up, careful attention to material selections for low toxicity and high indoor air quality, use of regionally appropriate building materials and systems, an extensive rainwater collection system, and xeriscape landscaping principals. It was constructed in 1996 and has been under full operation for two years. Actual energy consumption data will be presented and the above Green design strategies will be elaborated upon.

  20. Clinical career ladders: Hamot Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J D; Chrymko, M M; Kelly, W N

    1989-11-01

    The clinical career ladder program for pharmacists at Hamot Medical Center (HMC), a 500-bed not-for-profit community teaching hospital, is described. Between 1980 and 1989 a career ladder at HMC evolved from an idea to an established program with parallel administrative, business, and clinical tracks. The development of the career ladder mirrored the growth of clinical programs and the diversification of pharmaceutical services. A formal plan for a clinical ladder was developed when the first satellite pharmacy opened in 1984. An entry-level pharmacist at HMC starts with a six-month period during which he or she learns the drug distribution system and prepares for several certification tests. The employee is then promoted to staff pharmacist. Staff pharmacists are promoted to clinical pharmacist II (CP II) upon meeting requirements for competence in a broad range of clinical skills and knowledge. Candidates for the position of clinical pharmacist specialist (CP I) must have either a minimum of three years of experience as a CP II or a Pharm.D. degree and have established an area of clinical expertise. A CP I can progress to assistant and associate director positions as vacancies occur. The clinical ladder has enhanced job satisfaction and encouraged the development of clinical practitioners who provide improved care. Problems have included time constraints, competition for positions, and management of incentives. A parallel career ladder program with a clinical track has enhanced the growth of pharmacy practice at HMC and improved the quality of pharmaceutical care.

  1. Is There a Need for Federal Technical Assistance Centers under Chapter 1?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Judith I.

    This paper reviews the role played by the Title I (now Chapter 1) Evaluation Technical Assistance Centers in providing technical assistance to state and local agencies. It presents (1) a legistative history; (2) the Technical Assistance Center (TAC) activities under Title I; (3) an evaluation of the TACs; (4) the legislative changes enacted by the…

  2. 1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. AERIAL VIEW, LOOKING WEST OF 'THE BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER,' WITH HILLMAN HOSPITAL, THE FIVE-STORY BUILDING (CENTER RIGHT AT 20TH STREET AND SIXTH AVENUE SOUTH), JEFFERSON TOWER (CENTER LEFT AT 20TH STREET AND SEVENTH AVENUE SOUTH, AND THE MANY HOSPITALS AND TEACHING FACILITIES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA AT BIRMINGHAM MEDICAL CENTER. - Hillman Hospital, 600 Block Westside Twentieth Street South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  3. A task and technical support sensitive security operations center

    SciTech Connect

    Newell, R.A.; Sena, P.A.; Salazar, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Modern security control and display systems for protected facilities have improved the effectiveness of Security Operations Center (SOC) personnel. The most effective of these utilize sophisticated computerized systems to primarily provide quick and accurate control and display of alarm associated and routine access functions. This paper describes a design approach, consisting of four independent building blocks, that provides functionality and complexity commensurate with facility-specific requirements and technical support capabilities. The versatility of the design is demonstrated by showing how the less complex blocks satisfy the needs of fiscally limited facilities or the blocks can be integrated to satisfy the needs of the largest security installations. Also, the independent blocks can be integrated into existing installations to provide needed additional functionality with minimal impact on operations and existing equipment.

  4. Technical aspects of the Naval Dosimetry Center quality assurance programme.

    PubMed

    St John, T J; Cassata, J R; Blake, P K; Wallace, W H; Minniti, R

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the technical aspects of the Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) quality programme. The Navy has been formally monitoring personnel for occupational exposure to ionising radiation since at least 1946. The current system, the DT-702/PD, is the Harshaw 8840 holder and 8841 card. New card and holder checks are performed to verify that the correct LiF elements and holder filters are in the correct location and are of the correct composition. Element correction coefficient (ECC) magnitude and repeatability are also verified. Several quality assurance parameters are checked by a specially designed shipping machine. Calibration cards are used to calibrate each reader and quality control cards are inserted throughout a group of field cards to verify reader operation during the read process. The success of the programme is measured by annual proficiency tests administered by the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Programme and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories.

  5. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Interim Report. NCEE 2010-4033

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek; Sipe, Cynthia L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2010-01-01

    This first of two reports presents early findings from the National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers (Comprehensive Centers), a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. The law authorizing the Comprehensive Centers, the…

  6. Implementation of a pharmacy technician-centered medication reconciliation program at an urban teaching medical center.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sanchita; Siemianowski, Laura; Murphy, Michelle; McAllister, Susan Coutinho

    2014-01-01

    An inpatient medication reconciliation (MR) program emphasizing pharmacy technicians' role in the MR process is described. As part of quality-improvement (QI) efforts focused on MR-related adverse drug events, an urban academic medical center in New Jersey implemented a pharmacy technician-centered MR (PTMR) program targeting patients on its internal medicine, oncology, and clinical decision units. The program is staffed by five full- or part-time technicians who are trained in MR methods and work under direct pharmacist supervision, interviewing newly admitted patients and using other information sources (e.g., community pharmacies, physician offices, nursing facilities) to compile an accurate and complete medication list. About 30% of all patients admitted to the hospital are served by the PTMR program, which averages more than 500 cases each month. During one three-month period, 1748 discrepancies on preadmission medication lists were identified, most of which involved the omission of drugs (65.7% of cases) and incorrect information on dose and frequency of use (14.4%). Efforts to overcome resource constraints and other program challenges (e.g., privacy concerns, delays in community pharmacy transmittal of prescription refill lists) are ongoing. To date, most research on PTMR has been conducted in emergency departments or perioperative settings; experience with the PTMR program suggests that this approach can be applied in other hospital areas to improve MR processes and, ultimately, enhance pharmacotherapy safety and effectiveness across transitions of care. Based on experience, providers' perspectives, and QI data, the PTMR program is an effective method to obtain, document, and communicate accurate MR data for patients at this institution.

  7. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  8. An Artist in the University Medical Center. Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, A. Everette, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "An Artist in the University Medical Center" (M. Lesser, New Orleans: Tulane University Press, 1989), in which the artist captures the human side of the complex Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans (Louisiana). The interplay of drawings, etchings, watercolors, and prose conveys traditions of nurturing in the hospital. (SLD)

  9. The Stanford University Medical Center and the Federal Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenzweig, Robert M.; And Others

    The Stanford University Medical Center consists of three main units: a medical school, a set of outpatient clinics, and a hospital. Financing of the center's functions cannot be carried out without federal support, and a network of relationships with government agencies has emerged. The impact of these relationships was discussed with key…

  10. An Artist in the University Medical Center. Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, A. Everette, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews "An Artist in the University Medical Center" (M. Lesser, New Orleans: Tulane University Press, 1989), in which the artist captures the human side of the complex Tulane Medical Center in New Orleans (Louisiana). The interplay of drawings, etchings, watercolors, and prose conveys traditions of nurturing in the hospital. (SLD)

  11. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-28

    L 2 8 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-079 Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management...Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight Visit us at www.dodig.mil April 28, 2016 Objective Our...objective was to determine whether Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) effectively managed accounts delinquent over 120 days by properly

  12. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  13. Scientific and technical photography at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidhazy, Andrew

    1994-12-01

    As part of my assignment connected with the Scientific and Technical Photography & Lab (STPL) at the NASA Langley Research Center I conducted a series of interviews and observed the day to day operations of the STPL with the ultimate objective of becoming exposed first hand to a scientific and technical photo/imaging department for which my school prepares its graduates. I was also asked to share my observations with the staff in order that these comments and observations might assist the STPL to better serve its customers. Meetings with several individuals responsible for various wind tunnels and with a group that provides photo-optical instrumentation services at the Center gave me an overview of the services provided by the Lab and possible areas for development. In summary form these are some of the observations that resulted from the interviews and daily contact with the STPL facility. (1) The STPL is perceived as a valuable and almost indispensable service group within the organization. This comment was invariably made by everyone. Everyone also seemed to support the idea that the STPL continue to provide its current level of service and quality. (2) The STPL generally is not perceived to be a highly technically oriented group but rather as a provider of high quality photographic illustration and documentation services. In spite of the importance and high marks assigned to the STPL there are several observations that merit consideration and evaluation for possible inclusion into the STPL's scope of expertise and future operating practices. (1) While the care and concern for artistic rendition of subjects is seen as laudable and sometimes valuable, the time that this often requires is seen as interfering with keeping the tunnels operating at maximum productivity. Tunnel managers would like to shorten down-time due to photography, have services available during evening hours and on short notice. It may be of interest to the STPL that tunnel managers are

  14. Unique strategies for technical information management at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Vijay

    1994-01-01

    In addition to the current NASA manned programs, the maturation of Space Station and the introduction of the Space Exploration programs are anticipated to add substantially to the number and variety of data and documentation at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). This growth in the next decade has been estimated at five to ten fold compared to the current numbers. There will be an increased requirement for the tracking and currency of space program data and documents with National pressures to realize economic benefits from the research and technological developments of space programs. From a global perspective the demand for NASA's technical data and documentation is anticipated to increase at local, national, and international levels. The primary users will be government, industry, and academia. In our present national strategy, NASA's research and technology will assume a great role in the revitalization of the economy and gaining international competitiveness. Thus, greater demand will be placed on NASA's data and documentation resources. In this paper the strategies and procedures developed by DDMS, Inc., to accommodate the present and future information utilization needs are presented. The DDMS, Inc., strategies and procedures rely on understanding user requirements, library management issues, and technological applications for acquiring, searching, storing, and retrieving specific information accurately and quickly. The proposed approach responds to changing customer requirements and product deliveries. The unique features of the proposed strategy include: (1) To establish customer driven data and documentation management through an innovative and unique methods to identify needs and requirements. (2) To implement a structured process which responds to user needs, aimed at minimizing costs and maximizing services, resulting in increased productivity. (3) To provide a process of standardization of services and procedures. This standardization is the central

  15. Research support in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Fern M

    2010-01-01

    In 2003, the Prior Health Sciences Library (Prior Library) at The Ohio State University (OSU) explored the possibility of providing specialized support to biomedical, nursing, and allied health researchers by adding a research librarian position. The decision came about after the Medical Library Association (MLA) investigated how libraries could provide enhanced support to medical researchers. This article describes how the research librarian position was developed and how it continues to evolve.

  16. University of Maryland component of the Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dorland, William

    2014-11-18

    The Center for Multiscale Plasma Dynamics (CMPD) was a five-year Fusion Science Center. The University of Maryland (UMD) and UCLA were the host universities. This final technical report describes the physics results from the UMD CMPD.

  17. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs.

  18. Final Scientific Technical Report Crowder College MARET Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boyt, Art; Eberle, Dan; Hudson, Pam; Hopper, Russ

    2013-06-30

    Following decades of success in solar energy projects, the Missouri Legislature designated Crowder College in 1992 as the State's renewable energy education center. The resulting Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center is recognized internationally for its contributions to the energy field. The mission of the MARET Center is to expand renewable energy throughout the region with education, applied research, and economic development. Educational programs include certification and transfer degrees encompassing green construction, solar thermal energy, solar electricity, and wind. The MARET Center also assists in new product development and other business support services in renewable energy. The Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center at Crowder College hopes to eventually develop a 27,500 ft2 facility as a living laboratory to support solar and other renewable and sustainable energy development through professional degrees, new product development and commercialization, renewable energy business incubation, and consumer education. The primary objective of the current project was to complete Stage One of this building, with solar, wind, and geothermal technologies installed to power its 9,216 ft2 office, classroom, and research spaces. This MARET Center includes a modular roof structure that permits both solar module mounting and daylighting, PV/thermal hybrid modules pioneered in Crowder Solar Decathlon homes, modular electrical management subsystems; and modular delivery systems for heating and cooling the structure. The MARET Facility will operate as a Net Positive energy building, consistently producing surplus energy for distributed generation on the utility grid. The modular design of the energy systems within the building is to serve as a scalable and repeatable model for a wide variety of building applications and climate zones. As a living laboratory of renewable energy, exploring

  19. Behavioral anchors: building a medical center on solid foundations.

    PubMed

    Doordan, Martin L; Stupak, Ronald J

    2005-01-01

    Construction of new facilities in the healthcare arena is an ongoing, almost daily, occurrence. The desire to build wisely and effectively is evidenced at the Anne Arundel Medical Center which has attracted healthcare executives from all over the country who come to view, analyze, and experience the beauty, utility and interdependencies of the buildings and facilities that constitute "the AAMC campus." However, too often these executive visitors and benchmarking experts tend to focus on the technical, architectural, engineering, concrete aspects of the hospital, while naively overlooking and/or giving short shrift to the more critical behavioral dynamics of the construction process. The ultimate success of any building project requires a clear understanding by the leadership of "where people are coming from," so that both the design and the development of the final product can be brought under the synthesizing umbrella of patient care, clinical excellence, individual safety, and community responsibility. Not only must the leadership determine and drive the strategic thrust toward the final outcome; in addition, they must make sure that they allow significant colleagues to be actively, operationally, and symbolically engaged in a process that ends up in a structural outcome that everyone is proud to own, to see, and to inhabit.

  20. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for Calendar Year 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1985 is presented. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Technical Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  1. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center produced during the calendar year 1984 is compiled. Approximately 1650 citations are included comprising formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles and other publications, meeting presentations, technical talks, computer programs, tech briefs, and patents.

  2. 75 FR 34249 - Centers for Independent Living Program-Training and Technical Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Education Centers for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance; Notices #0;#0;Federal... for Independent Living Program--Training and Technical Assistance Catalog of Federal Domestic...--Training and Technical Assistance. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in...

  3. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  4. Medical Informatics in Academic Health Science Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the state of medical informatics, the application of computer and information technology to biomedicine, looks at trends and concerns, including integration of traditionally distinct enterprises (clinical information systems, financial information, scholarly support activities, infrastructures); informatics career choice and…

  5. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  6. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2015

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  7. The Fact Book: Report for the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers, 2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The principal purpose of the report for the "Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers" is to provide timely, accurate, and comparative information about the Florida School District Adult and Technical Centers System. This report is intended for use by people who are interested in data relevant to education in the School…

  8. 75 FR 11936 - Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of Termination of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard; Technical Support Call Center; Boise, ID; Notice of... Packard, Technical Support Call Center, Boise, Idaho. The petitioner has requested that the petition...

  9. A Technical Assistance Framework to Facilitate the Delivery of Integrated Behavioral Health Services in Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs).

    PubMed

    Chaple, Michael; Sacks, Stanley; Randell, Joan; Kang, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    An implementation approach, featuring direct, onsite technical assistance is described, and findings from a pilot study assessing the capability of Federally Qualified Health Centers to provide integrated behavioral health services are presented. Investigators used the Behavioral Health Integration in Medical Care (BHIMC) index to measure integration at baseline and follow-up at four FQHCs in New Jersey. Results indicate that the average baseline capability score of 1.95 increased to 2.44 at follow-up, almost one-half point on the five-point BHIMC index. This pilot project demonstrates that co-occurring capability can be assessed, and system-wide technical assistance can be delivered to assist FQHCs in integrating behavioral health services. Future research should test technical assistance as an implementation strategy to promote the integration of medical care and behavioral health treatment on a wider scale. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research.

  11. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), looking east. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tennis Courts, Northeast Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Artesian Well, East McCloskey Avenue, East of Building No. 231, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover) - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster Store House, Northwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Greenhouse, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 139, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Turbercular Ward, Northwest Corner of Charlie Kelly Boulevard & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing southwest corner of building 732. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tool House, West Pennington Avenue, North of Building No. 140, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouse, East Harlow Avenue, immediately South of Building 201, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ambulent Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Semi-Infirmary Tubercular Ward, Southeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Ice Plant, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Pharmacy & Prophylactic Station, Northwest Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Fire Equipment House, North Page Street, North of Building No. 228, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), west and north sides of the southern wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laundry, Southeast corner of East Harlow Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Post Exchange Garage, North Eighth Street, North of Building No. 143, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 216, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Recreation Building, West Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building 118, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Workshop Building, East Harlow Avenue, immediately East of Building No. 529, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing east side and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Transformer House, North Page Street, immediately North of Building No. 217, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Tubercular Ward, Southwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  12. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses Quarters No. 3, Northwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Salvage Building, Northeast Corner of East I Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storage Sheds, Northeast Corner of West Pennington Avenue & North Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Wagon Shed with Office, Southeast Corner of East J Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably southwest side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Operating Pavilion, West McAfee Avenue, East of Building No. 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Infirmary, Northwest Corner of East Bushnell Avenue & South Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Administration Building, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Utilities Storeroom, West Pennington Avenue, East of Building No. 145, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover) south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Garage, East of Building No. 121, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Office Building, Northwest Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of print in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Female Dormitory, Southeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), probably south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers' Garage, West Pennington Avenue, West of Building 129, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Laboratory Annex, Northwest Corner of East McCloskey Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  6. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Power House, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  7. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth clover), west side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Dispatcher's Office, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Gymnasium, Northeast Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Page Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  9. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), east side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Shops Building, Northwest Corner of West Pennington Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and east sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Quarters, Southwest Corner of West Harlow Avenue, & South Eighth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. Krauel v. Iowa Methodist Medical Center.

    PubMed

    1996-09-11

    The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit held that an employer-provided health insurance plan policy of denying coverage for infertility treatments does not violate the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), or Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Krauel underwent artificial insemination and GIFT (gamete intrafallopian tube transfer) prior to pregnancy and birth. She unsuccessfully sought reimbursement for those costs from her medical insurer. The court held that infertility does not substantially affect what are "major life activities" within the meaning of the ADA. The infertility exclusion applies equally to all insured employees, male of female, disabled or not, and thus does not thwart the purpose of the ADA, nor does it constitute a discriminatory sex-based classification under Title VII. Furthermore, infertility is not a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth, and so falls outside the scope of the PDA.

  12. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, William; Vasquez, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  13. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  14. Research Plan for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This research plan describes a framework for defining and developing the field of rehabilitation sciences and research opportunities for the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research (NCMRR) and other agencies funding medical rehabilitation research. The plan addresses the needs of both persons who are involved in habilitation and in…

  15. Connecticut Children's Medical Center multi-year branding campaign.

    PubMed

    Botvin, J

    2000-01-01

    As the only children's hospital in the state, Connecticut Children's Medical Center was challenged by the inherent complacency of parents. It met the challenge through a multi-level marketing effort which included television and radio, community outreach and strong media relations. By emphasizing the unique nature of children, the campaign affirms the need for a specialized children's health center.

  16. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  17. Radiofrequency interference with medical devices. A technical information statement.

    PubMed

    1998-01-01

    The past few years have seen increased reports that medical devices, such as pacemakers, apnea monitors, electrically powered wheelchairs, etc., have failed to operate correctly because of interference from various emitters of radiofrequency energy. This condition is called radiofrequency interference (RFI). The consequences of these failures range from inconvenience to serious injuries and death. Reasons for this problem are twofold: 1) increasing numbers of electronically controlled medical devices with inadequate electronic protection against RFI, and 2) a significant increase in the number of RF sources in the environment. Medical devices are widely used outside the hospital and may be attached to, or implanted in, patients. Portable wireless communications equipment, including cellular phones, handheld transceivers, and vehicle-mounted transceivers, comprise one of the largest sources of RFI. Some medical devices are especially sensitive to the type of digital modulation that some of the wireless communications devices utilize. The prevailing international standard for the RF immunity of medical devices is the 1993 revision of the International Electro-technical Commission (IEC) Standard IEC 60601-1-2. This standard sets a minimum immunity level of 3 volts per meter (V/m) in the 26-1000 MHz frequency range. For non-life supporting devices, testing is required only at the specific frequencies of 27.12, 40.68, and 915 MHz. Technology exists to protect, or "harden," most medical devices from RF fields that are much more intense than the 3 V/m level specified in present RFI standards. Most of these techniques, including shielding, grounding, and filtering, are not costly if they are incorporated into the initial design of the electronics system. COMAR recommends that the various parties involved in the manufacture and use of RFI-prone medical devices take steps to avoid serious RFI problems that may lead to safety hazards. Medical device manufacturers should

  18. Medical Monitor | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Establish, implement and maintain standardized processes and assess performance to make recommendations for improvement Develop and maintain progress tracking systems for action items and follow up to ensure timely reply or action Prepare technical reports, abstracts, presentations and program correspondence concerning assigned projects through research and analysis of information relevant to government policy, regulations and other relevant data and monitor all assigned programs for compliance Provide project management support with planning and development of project schedules and deliverables, tracking project milestones, managing timelines, preparing status reports and monitoring progress ensuring adherence to deadlines Recommend corrective plans to alleviate significant deviations from research priorities, protocols, staffing, budgets and schedules Communicate with protocol regulatory bodies including the IRB and facilitate communication among the collaborating groups Facilitate communication through all levels of staff by functioning as a liaison between internal departments, senior management, and the customer Serve as a leader/mentor to administrative staff and prepare employee performance evaluations Serve as the central contact with users for all questions and problems related to program administration and collaborations as they relate to clinical research projects related to the ongoing work scope Develop and implement procedures/programs to ensure effective and efficient business and operational processes Identify potential bottlenecks in the upcoming development process and work with all team members and senior management to resolve them Analyze and track initiatives and contracts Manage clinical research activities including those pertaining to laboratory and clinical activities, regulatory compliance and clinical trials management (domestic, international, DoD), international collaborations, biostatistician support and biodefense initiatives

  19. Medical Monitor | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    •        Establish, implement and maintain standardized processes and assess performance to make recommendations for improvement •        Develop and maintain progress tracking systems for action items and follow up to ensure timely reply or action •        Prepare technical reports, abstracts, presentations and program correspondence concerning assigned projects through research and analysis of information relevant to government policy, regulations and other relevant data and monitor all assigned programs for compliance •        Provide project management support with planning and development of project schedules and deliverables, tracking project milestones, managing timelines, preparing status reports and monitoring progress ensuring adherence to deadlines •        Recommend corrective plans to alleviate significant deviations from research priorities, protocols, staffing, budgets and schedules •        Communicate with protocol regulatory bodies including the IRB and facilitate communication among the collaborating groups •        Facilitate communication through all levels of staff by functioning as a liaison between internal departments, senior management, and the customer •        Serve as a leader/mentor to administrative staff and prepare employee performance evaluations •        Serve as the central contact with users for all questions and problems related to program administration and collaborations as they relate to clinical research projects related to the ongoing work scope •        Develop and implement procedures/programs to ensure effective and efficient business and operational processes •        Identify potential bottlenecks in the upcoming development process and work with all team members and senior management to resolve them •        Analyze and track initiatives and contracts •        Manage clinical research activities

  20. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center Technical Publications announced in 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    All the publications were announced in the 1978 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and/or IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts). Included are research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and theses.

  1. An Overview of Assessment Centers. Technical Report l.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKinnon, Donald W.

    This overview examines the historical growth of industrial assessment centers; describes the techniques involved in assessment; discusses the role of management in staff development; and suggests new uses for assessment centers. (CKJ)

  2. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  3. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  4. Training and technical assistance to enhance capacity building between prevention research centers and their partners.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Antonia J; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Dawkins, Nicola U; Wright, Demia S; Rubel, Stephanie K; Green, Diane C; Simoes, Eduardo J

    2011-05-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has administered the Prevention Research Centers Program since 1986. We quantified the number and reach of training programs across all centers, determined whether the centers' outcomes varied by characteristics of the academic institution, and explored potential benefits of training and technical assistance for academic researchers and community partners. We characterized how these activities enhanced capacity building within Prevention Research Centers and the community. The program office collected quantitative information on training across all 33 centers via its Internet-based system from April through December 2007. Qualitative data were collected from April through May 2007. We selected 9 centers each for 2 separate, semistructured, telephone interviews, 1 on training and 1 on technical assistance. Across 24 centers, 4,777 people were trained in 99 training programs in fiscal year 2007 (October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007). Nearly 30% of people trained were community members or agency representatives. Training and technical assistance activities provided opportunities to enhance community partners' capacity in areas such as conducting needs assessments and writing grants and to improve the centers' capacity for cultural competency. Both qualitative and quantitative data demonstrated that training and technical assistance activities can foster capacity building and provide a reciprocal venue to support researchers' and the community's research interests. Future evaluation could assess community and public health partners' perception of centers' training programs and technical assistance.

  5. The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, T N; Kemby, K M

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions. PMID:25089192

  6. 76 FR 27648 - World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program... establishment of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee. The WTC... WTC Program Administrator. For information, contact Larry Elliott, Designated Federal Officer, World...

  7. 78 FR 38983 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP-STAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific... name of the Committee should read World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory...

  8. Benefits of Student-Centered Tandem Teaching in Medical English.

    PubMed

    Antić, Zorica

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses some of the key notions about English for special purposes with special regard to English for medical purposes. The content was determined by observations and based on authors' professional experience. The starting point of a medical English course is a thorough analysis of students' needs, which is then used in course design and definition of appropriate learning goals. The student is at the center of learning and it is necessary to establish a positive cooperation between students and teachers. As medical English course is highly context-based, the inclusion of medical teachers can offer many opportunities for a successful learning process.

  9. Can academic medical centers compete in a managed care system?

    PubMed

    Kralewski, J E; Hart, G; Perlmutter, C; Chou, S N

    1995-10-01

    The authors review characteristics of successful group practices, health maintenance organizations, and integrated service networks and then identify the critical actions that academic medical centers must take in order to compete with such service-oriented community providers. Centers must (1) form the clinical faculty into a competitive medical group that offers more price-competitive and user-friendly services; (2) restructure clinical training to be more relevant to the emerging practice situation; and (3) clearly delineate funding streams and identify the cross-subsidies taking place in the teaching, research, and patient care enterprises. These changes have the potential to strengthen clinical training and improve the financial positions of both the faculty and the university hospitals. The authors maintain that centers can make these and other necessary changes while still providing high-quality care and maintaining their educational and research functions; they cite organizations that have succeeded in these ways. However, as with all complex, large-scale organizations, public and private alike, the major factor limiting centers' ability to make the organizational changes required to successfully compete in the new health care environment is the lack of political will. It will be very difficult for academic medical centers to unite their powerful internal interest groups and take action without first experiencing a rather severe external jolt. The challenge for the leaders of academic medical centers is to prepare for the managed care jolt so that they can then guide their institutions to a new, more competitive position.

  10. Association Between Patient-Centered Medical Homes and Adherence to Chronic Disease Medications: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Shrank, William H; Bitton, Asaf; Franklin, Jessica M; Glynn, Robert J; Krumme, Alexis A; Matlin, Olga S; Pezalla, Edmund J; Spettell, Claire M; Brill, Gregory; Choudhry, Niteesh K

    2017-01-17

    Despite the widespread adoption of patient-centered medical homes into primary care practice, the evidence supporting their effect on health care outcomes has come primarily from geographically localized and well-integrated health systems. To assess the association between medication adherence and medical homes in a national patient and provider population, given the strong ties between adherence to chronic disease medications and health care quality and spending. Retrospective cohort study. Claims from a large national health insurer. Patients initiating therapy with common medications for chronic diseases (diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia) between 2011 and 2013. Medication adherence in the 12 months after treatment initiation was compared among patients cared for by providers practicing in National Committee for Quality Assurance-recognized patient-centered medical homes and propensity score-matched control practices in the same Primary Care Service Areas. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association between medical homes and adherence. Of 313 765 patients meeting study criteria, 18 611 (5.9%) received care in patient-centered medical homes. Mean rates of adherence were 64% among medical home patients and 59% among control patients. Among 4660 matched control and medical home practices, medication adherence was significantly higher in medical homes (2.2% [95% CI, 1.5% to 2.9%]). The association between medical homes and better adherence did not differ significantly by disease state (diabetes, 3.0% [CI, 1.5% to 4.6%]; hypertension, 3.2% [CI, 2.2% to 4.2%]; hyperlipidemia, 1.5% [CI, 0.6% to 2.5%]). Clinical outcomes related to medication adherence were not assessed. Receipt of care in a patient-centered medical home is associated with better adherence, a vital measure of health care quality, among patients initiating treatment with medications for common high-cost chronic diseases. CVS Health.

  11. 78 FR 57264 - Final Waiver and Extension of the Project Period for the Technical Assistance Coordination Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Coordination Center AGENCY: Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Office of Special Education and... enables the currently funded Technical Assistance Coordination Center (Center) to receive funding from... applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2008 for a Technical Assistance Coordination Center (Center...

  12. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  13. [Promoting research in a medical center--the management narrative].

    PubMed

    Halevy, Jonathan; Turner, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Promoting research within a medical institute is a delicate balance between the importance of facilitating academia and maximizing resources towards the primary goal of a hospital--healing sick people. Shaare Zedek Medical Center have successfully adopted a "niche" approach to research in which the hospital invests in selected talented clinicians-scientists rather than futile expectation that all clinicians would be engaged in high impact research. Moreover, these research excellence centers are developing into a driving force to also foster research endeavors of other clinicians and residents in the hospital. In this special issue of Harefuah honoring Shaare Zedek investigators, 18 manuscripts included reflect the diversity of research projects performed in the medical center. We believe that this project will assist and encourage clinicians to be engaged in research, at all levels and disciplines.

  14. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    and Surgery CAC Common Access Card CRS Centralized Receivables Service DoD FMR DoD Financial Management Regulation MSA Medical Service Account MTF...H 4 , 2 0 1 5 Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight Report No. DODIG-2015...04 MAR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval

  15. ESEA Chapter I: Region C Technical Assistance Center. Annual Report: July 1, 1992 through June 30, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Testing Service, Atlanta, GA.

    Region C Technical Assistance Center (TAC) and Region 3 Rural Technical Assistance Center (R-TAC) provide Chapter I support and technical assistance to state and local education agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. Region C encompasses a mix of urban centers and rural…

  16. Developing a user-centered voluntary medical incident reporting system.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Gong, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors are one of leading causes of death among adults in the United States. According to the Institute of Medicine, reporting of medical incidents could be a cornerstone to learn from errors and to improve patient safety, if incident data are collected in a properly structured format which is useful for the detection of patterns, discovery of underlying factors, and generation of solutions. Globally, a number of medical incident reporting systems were deployed for collecting observable incident data in care delivery organizations (CDO) over the past several years. However, few researches delved into design of user-centered reporting system for improving completeness and accuracy of medical incident collection, let alone design models created for other institutes to follow. In this paper, we introduce the problems identified in a current using voluntary reporting system and our effort is being made towards complete, accurate and useful user-centered new reporting system through a usability engineering process.

  17. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-15

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  18. Equipment for nuclear medical centers, production capabilities of Rosatom enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrish, Yu. N.; Koloskov, S. A.; Smirnov, V. P.; Strokach, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the capabilities of the State Corporation Rosatom enterprises on the development and production of diagnostic and therapeutic equipment for nuclear medicine centers is presented. Prospects of the development of accelerator equipment for the production of a wide range of radioisotope products are shown, and the trends of its development are determined. A comparative analysis of the technical parameters of domestic tomographs and devices for brachytherapy with foreign counterparts is given.

  19. Government acronyms and alphabetic organizational designations used in DTIC (Defense Technical Information Center)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, L.M.

    1984-05-01

    A guide to acronyms as assigned by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC) is given. The listing contains entries from the Department of Defense, Federal Government and foreign military organizations. The acronyms reflect reports processed into the DTIC collections.

  20. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance center...

  1. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance center...

  2. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance center...

  3. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.3 Information and technical assistance center...

  4. The Evolution of the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.; Danaher, Joan C.; Clifford, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    This review traces the evolution from 1971 to the present of a national technical assistance (TA) program to support the creation, expansion, and improvement of services for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with special needs. From its beginning as a TA resource for demonstration projects, to linking outreach projects' expertise with state…

  5. Regional Resource Center Program (RRCP) Technical Assistance and ESEA Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Elementary and Secondary Education (ESEA) flexibility program initiated in September 2011 holds several implications for special education accountability and, by extension, state education agencies and the technical assistance providers who support them. The U.S. Department of Education has approved ESEA waiver applications for a majority of…

  6. The Evolution of the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, James J.; Danaher, Joan C.; Clifford, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    This review traces the evolution from 1971 to the present of a national technical assistance (TA) program to support the creation, expansion, and improvement of services for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with special needs. From its beginning as a TA resource for demonstration projects, to linking outreach projects' expertise with state…

  7. Naval Training Device Center 25th Anniversary Commemorative Technical Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amico, G. Vincent; Regan, James J.

    Both the technical history of training devices and the issues which currently confront their design and use are discussed by a group of distinguished scientists and engineers. A blend of human factors and engineering paper reflects the twin thrusts that make up the educational tools that are training device systems. (Author)

  8. Student perceptions of a patient- centered medical training curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Gallentine, Ashley; Salinas-Miranda, Abraham A.; Shaffer-Hudkins, Emily; Hinojosa, Sara; Monroe, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate a patient-centered medical training curriculum, the SELECT program, through perceptions of the inaugural student cohort. Methods Data were collected from two focus groups conducted in the university setting, comprised of fifteen first-year medical students who participated in the SELECT program during its inaugural year. A questioning protocol was used to guide the focus group discussion, which was transcribed and hand-coded through thematic analyses. Results Various themes related to patient-centered care were identified. Students noted changes in their attitudes towards interacting with patients in an empowering and educative manner as a result of communication and motivational interviewing exercises. Additionally, they recognized certain external, structural barriers as well as internal conflict between pragmatism and emotional intelligence that could potentially hinder patient-centered care. The impact of family dynamics and social support on quality of life and health outcomes was acknowledged. Students also emphasized the value of collaborating with multiple health professionals. Lastly, students provided suggestions for program improvement, namely additional simulations, more education regarding other healthcare professionals’ roles, more standardized experiences, and application of principles to acute and primary care. Conclusions Upon completion of the first year of the SELECT program, students gained an appreciation for patient-centered care and various factors and skills that facilitate such care. Additionally, they experienced a dissonance between didactic concepts from the curriculum and observed medical practices. This study highlights the educational benefits of a patient-centered medical curriculum and provides suggestions for future improvement. PMID:25341218

  9. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1980. Approximately 1400 citations are given. Formal reports, quick-release technical memorandums, contractor reports, journal articles, meeting/conference papers, computer programs, tech briefs, patents, and unpublished research are included.

  10. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. Executive Summary. NCEE 2011-4032

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  11. The National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center Model for Long-Term Systems Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Lynne; Hurth, Joicey; Kasprzak, Christina M.; Diefendorf, Martha J.; Goode, Susan E.; Ringwalt, Sharon S.

    2009-01-01

    The National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center was charged by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education Programs from October 2001 through September 2006 to develop, implement, and evaluate an approach to technical assistance (TA) that would result in sustainable systems change in state early intervention and…

  12. National Evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers. Final Report. NCEE 2011-4031

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, Brenda J.; White, Richard N.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Riley, Derek L.; Pistorino, Carol

    2011-01-01

    This final report presents findings from a multi-year evaluation of the Comprehensive Technical Assistance Centers, a federally funded program that provides technical assistance to states in connection with the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, as reauthorized by the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. With the redesign of the Center…

  13. Scientific and technical information output of the Langley Research Center for calendar year 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the scientific and technical information that the Langley Research Center has produced during the calendar year 1986. Included are citations for Formal Reports, Quick-Release Technical Memorandums, Contractor Reports, Journal Articles and Other Publications, Meeting Presentations, Techncial Talks, Computer Programs, Tech Briefs, and Patents.

  14. Region 1 Rural Technical Assistance Center Annual Report July 1, 1991 - June 30, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Portsmouth, NH.

    This report evaluates program activities of the Region 1 Rural Technical Assistance Center (R-TAC). Region 1 R-TAC serves the Chapter 1 programs of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The program provides consultation, training and other technical assistance to state educational…

  15. The Use and Value of Defense Technical Information Center Products and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roderer, Nancy K.; And Others

    This study describes the use and value of the major information products and services provided by the Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC). These products and services include technical report distribution on an on-demand basis and through the Automatic Document Distribution (ADD) program; secondary information dissemination through online…

  16. 32 CFR 37.1030 - What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... forward copies of technical reports to the DTIC, as described at §§ 37.890 and 37.895. The reporting... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.1030 Section 37.1030 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...

  17. 32 CFR 37.1030 - What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... forward copies of technical reports to the DTIC, as described at §§ 37.890 and 37.895. The reporting... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.1030 Section 37.1030 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...

  18. 32 CFR 37.1030 - What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... forward copies of technical reports to the DTIC, as described at §§ 37.890 and 37.895. The reporting... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.1030 Section 37.1030 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...

  19. 32 CFR 37.1030 - What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... forward copies of technical reports to the DTIC, as described at §§ 37.890 and 37.895. The reporting... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.1030 Section 37.1030 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...

  20. 32 CFR 37.1030 - What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... forward copies of technical reports to the DTIC, as described at §§ 37.890 and 37.895. The reporting... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What information must I report to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.1030 Section 37.1030 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF...

  1. Directory of Federal Libraries and Information Centers: 1994. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Martha

    This Directory is based on a survey of 1,234 federal libraries and information centers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia conducted in 1994. The survey was developed and funded by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) with the advice and guidance of a survey working group of the Federal Library and Information Center…

  2. Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf. Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepp, Robert E., Jr.; And Others

    From September 1966 through August 1972, the Midwest Regional Media Center for the Deaf was under contract to Media Services and Captioned Films, Bureau of Education for the Handicapped, and from September 1972 through August 1974, the center had a grant with the same federal agency to provide media services to 12 states--North Dakota, South…

  3. Directory of Federal Libraries and Information Centers: 1994. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollins, Martha

    This Directory is based on a survey of 1,234 federal libraries and information centers in the 50 states and the District of Columbia conducted in 1994. The survey was developed and funded by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) with the advice and guidance of a survey working group of the Federal Library and Information Center…

  4. Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research Fifth Annual Technical Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This Fifth Annual Technical Symposium, sponsored by the UT-Calspan Center for Space Transportation and Applied Research (CSTAR), is organized to provide an overview of the technical accomplishments of the Center's five Research and Technology focus areas during the past year. These areas include chemical propulsion, electric propulsion, commerical space transportation, computational methods, and laser materials processing. Papers in the area of artificial intelligence/expert systems are also presented.

  5. The Determination of a Technical Core Curriculum for a Two Year Technical Program in Bio-Medical Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, William G., Sr.

    The major concerns of this study were to determine the extent of need for bio-medical electronic technicians and to determine what would constitute a functional technical core curriculum for training to fill that need. Following a review of medical and electronic literature, a survey instrument was developed and sent to hospitals, manufacturers,…

  6. Crowder College MARET Center Facility Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Amy

    2013-08-20

    This project was a research facility construction project and did not include actual research. The new facility will benefit the public by providing training opportunities for students, as well as incubator and laboratory space for entrepreneurs in the areas of alternative and renewable energies. The 9,216 -square-foot Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center was completed in late 2011. Classes in the MARET Center began in the spring 2012 semester. Crowder College takes pride in the MARET Center, a focal point of the campus, as the cutting edge in education, applied research and commercial development in the growing field of green technology.

  7. Responding to disasters: academic medical centers' responsibilities and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sklar, David P; Richards, Michael; Shah, Mark; Roth, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Disaster preparedness and disaster response should be a capability of all academic health centers. The authors explore the potential role and impact of academic medical centers (AMC)s in disaster response. The National Disaster Medical System and the evolution of disaster medical assistance teams (DMAT) are described, and the experience at one AMC with DMAT is reviewed. The recent deployment of a DMAT sponsored by an AMC to the Hurricane Katrina disaster is described, and the experience is used to illustrate the opportunities and challenges of future disaster medical training, research, and practice at AMCs. AMCs are encouraged to identify an appropriate academic unit to house and nurture disaster-preparedness activities, participate in education programs for health professionals and the public, and perform research on disaster epidemiology and response. Networks of AMCs offer the potential of acting as a critical resource for those AMCs stricken by a disaster and for communities needing the infusion of highly trained and motivated health care providers. The Association of American Medical Colleges can play a critical role in assisting and coordinating AMC networks through its relationship with all AMCs and the federal government and by increasing the awareness of medical educators and researchers about this important, emerging area of medical knowledge.

  8. Resuscitation center designation: recommendations for emergency medical services practices.

    PubMed

    Mechem, C Crawford; Goodloe, Jeffrey M; Richmond, Neal J; Kaufman, Bradley J; Pepe, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Regionalization of medical resources by designating specialty receiving centers, such as trauma and stroke centers, within emergency medical services (EMS) systems is intended to ensure the highest-quality patient care in the most efficient and fiscally responsible fashion. Significant advances in the past decade such as induction of therapeutic hypothermia following resuscitation from cardiac arrest and a time-driven, algorithmic approach to management of septic patients have created compelling arguments for similar designation for specialized resuscitative interventions. Resuscitation of critically ill patients is both labor- and resource-intensive. It can significantly interrupt emergency department (ED) patient throughput. In addition, clinical progress in developing resuscitation techniques is often dependent on the presence of a strong research infrastructure to generate and validate new therapies. It is not feasible for many hospitals to make the commitment to care for large numbers of critically ill patients and the accompanying investigational activities, whether in the prehospital, ED, or inpatient arena. Because of this, the question of whether EMS systems should designate specific hospitals as "resuscitation centers" has now come center stage. Just as EMS systems currently delineate criteria and monitor compliance for trauma, ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and stroke centers, strong logic now exists to develop similar standards for resuscitation facilities. Accordingly, this discussion reviews the current applicable trends in resuscitation science and presents a rationale for resuscitation center designation within EMS systems. Potential barriers to the establishment of such centers are discussed and strategies to overcome them are proposed.

  9. Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of post card from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Public Affairs Office, building 120. Photograph by Rocky Mountain photo. CO was no copyrighted and is , therefore, in the public domain. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Memorial Tablet, West McAfee, South of Building No. 524, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  10. The 'Adventist advantage'. Glendale Adventist Medical Center distinguishes itself.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2002-01-01

    Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, Calif., adopted an image-building campaign to differentiate the 450-bed hospital from its neighbors. This included the headline "Adventist Advantage," used in a series of sophisticated ads, printed in gold. In all their efforts, marketers consider the sensibilities of the sizable Armenian, Korean, Hispanic and Chinese populations.

  11. Vocational Rehabilitation within a V.A. Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quick, Matthew; And Others

    Many military veterans struggle with substance abuse, homelessness, physical and emotional disabilities, disappointing work histories, and low income. A vocational rehabilitation program at a Veterans' Administration medical center, designed to help veterans with some of these struggles, is described here. Personnel work within the context of each…

  12. Marketing physician services in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Eudes, J A; Divis, K L; Vaughan, D G; Fottler, M D

    1987-01-01

    As a result of recent environmental changes in the health care industry, marketing has become a vital necessity for the survival of most hospitals. Kotler's conceptual framework is used to study and evaluate an innovative program for marketing physician services in a large urban medical center. This program was quite successful in increasing admissions and referrals and won a national award in 1984.

  13. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph of south side before perpendicular wing added. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Carpenter Shop Building, Southwest Corner of West I Avenue, & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  15. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), north and east sides of the east/west wing. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, General Mess & Kitchen, Southwest Corner of East McAfee Avenue & South Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  16. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 257 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 257, North side of East O'Neill Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  17. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south and west sides of buildings no. 719, now the north wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  18. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), south side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Red Cross Building, South Eighth Street Bounded by West McAfee Avenue on South & West Harlow Avenue on North, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  19. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property book (green cloth cover), showing east and most of south sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Assembly Hall School, Northeast Corner of West McCloskey Avenue & North Tenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  20. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), probably west and north sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officer Patient's Mess & Kitchen, Northeast Corner of West McAfee Avenue & South Hickey Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept. 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 256 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 256, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover). Photograph taken before Sept 29, 1934 when the revised Real Property form on building 255 was completed. - Fitzsimons General Hopital, Building 255, North side of East O'Niell Avenue, between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing part of east side and most of north side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Quartermaster's Storehouse, Southwest Corner of East I Avenue & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  4. Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in the Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), east and south sides of building no. 715, now the south wing of building no. 508. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Nurses' Mess & Kitchen, Nurses' Recreation, West McAfee Avenue, North of Building 507, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  5. Claretian Medical Center Task Analysis. Worker Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees.

    This task analysis for positions at the Claretian Medical Center in southeast Chicago was developed to improve communication and customer service in the workplace. The task analysis was prepared through clinic tours, employee interviews, and supervisor questionnaires. It is used for the purpose of curriculum development for onsite instruction in…

  6. Teaching health centers: a new paradigm in graduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Candice; Chen, Frederick; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2012-12-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 created the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program to provide graduate medical education (GME) funding directly to community-based health centers that expand or establish new primary care residency programs. The THCGME program was the legislation's only new investment in GME, and it represents a significant departure from the Medicare GME funding system. It provides payments to ambulatory care centers for both direct and indirect GME expenses, and mandates a level of reporting from recipients that is not required for Medicare GME support. This initial look at the 11 inaugural teaching health centers (THCs) shows that they are training primary care residents in relevant delivery models (e.g., interprofessional teams, patient-centered medical homes), developing educational initiatives that address primary care practice in underserved areas, and transforming organizational and funding structures to support community-based training. The THCs plan to evaluate and report resident performance, patient quality of care, and graduate outcomes. The work of the first THCs has implications for primary care training, the GME system, and future policies and legislation aimed at strengthening the health care workforce.

  7. [On meeting sanitary legal requirements in technical regulation of medical equipment safety].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, O K; Prokopenko, L V

    2007-01-01

    The article covered observance of sanitary legal requirements in special technical regulations "On requirements to medical equipment and medical products safety". The authors discussed problems of applied terminology, classification of medical products, occupational risk, control over observance of safety requirements on all stages of medical products circulation--design, production, usage.

  8. Managing information technology in academic medical centers: a "multicultural" experience.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C P; Corn, M; Krumrey, A J; Perry, D R; Stevens, R H

    1998-09-01

    Based on a session at the 1997 conference on Information Resources and Academic Medicine sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges, this article illustrates how the beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect the management of information technology. Two scenarios--one dealing with the standardization of desktop PCs, the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet--form the basis of this exercise. Four prototypical members of a hypothetical medical center community--the chairman of surgery, a senior basic scientist, the chief information officer of an affiliated hospital, and the chief administrative officer--offer their perspectives on each scenario. Their statements illustrate many of the challenges of planning, deploying, and maintaining effective information technology in the "multicultural" environment of academic medical centers.

  9. Pioneers in trauma care at Harborview Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Whalen, Eileen; Hecker, Cynthia J; Butler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Harborview Medical Center in Seattle has been home to the pioneering work of University of Washington (UW) Medicine physicians and staff who have led innovations to improve trauma care for more than 40 years. As the only level I adult and pediatric trauma center and regional burn center for Washington, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho, Harborview provides cares for more than 6500 critically injured trauma and burn patients per year. Our physicians, researchers and staff are recognized as national experts and as collaborative partners with nursing in the delivery of outstanding clinical care, research, and education. Beginning with the establishment of Seattle Medic One in the late 1960s, a groundbreaking program to train firefighters as paramedics, Harborview and the work of UW Medicine has been recognized locally and globally as a leader in every component of the ideal trauma system, as defined by the American College of Surgeons: prevention, access, acute hospital care, rehabilitation, education, and research activities.

  10. State-Wide System of Area Vocational-Technical Training Centers for Oklahoma. Research Report Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Charles Oliver

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop a linear programing model for statewide planning of area vocational-technical training centers, (2) to determine the district boundaries for future centers, (3) to establish boundaries for existing area vocational-technical training centers, (4) to make such a center available to every student and…

  11. The checklist: BEST medical center employment requirements 2015.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Philip R; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Ida Lystic, a newly minted gastroenterologist, has accepted a job at the Byron Edwards & Samuel Thompson (BEST) Medical Center. On her first day, after six months of preliminary paper work, she completes multiple checklists mandated by the center: dress code, employee health, and class checklists. Her open-toe pumps have been replaced by disposable paper booties and her polished fingernails have been covered with blue latex-free gloves. Nicotine screening (the use of which is prohibited not only while at work at the BEST Medical Center, but also while at home) was performed, and she had a mask fitting for tuberculosis. Her next two weeks were to be occupied with over 70 hours of required classes; however, after receiving a mandatory flu shot, she became sick and missed the first week of classes, and so her start date for seeing patients is delayed by two months. Although she was hired because she received the outstanding fellow award at the place where she trained (the OTHER--Owen T. Henry and Eugene Rutherford--Medical Center), her competence needs to be documented by a junior faculty member who is assigned to do this for all incoming physicians, including the world-renowned, new center director. The human resources manager smirks as she indicates that no one meets their relative value unit (RVU) work targets at BEST, and so Dr. Lystic must prepay for all the paperwork/tests. While Dr. Ida Lystic and "the BEST Medical Center" are creations of the authors' imagination, most of the items on her checklists are real. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Bibliography of Lewis Research Center technical contributions announced in 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of Lewis authored publications and publications resulting from Lewis managed contracts which were announced in the 1976 issues of STAR (Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports) and IAA (International Aerospace Abstracts) are presented. Research reports, journal articles, conference presentations, patents and patent applications, and these are included. The arrangement is by NASA subject category. Citations indicate report literature (identified by their N-numbers) and the journal and conference presentations (identified by their A-numbers). A grouping of indexes helps locate specific publications by author (including contractor authors), contractor organization, contract number, and report number.

  13. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA’s National Risk Management ...

  14. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report FY 2012: October 2011 – September 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  15. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA’s National Risk Manag...

  16. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  17. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  18. Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) Annual Report FY 2012: October 2011 – September 2012

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ground Water Technical Support Center (GWTSC) is part of the Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD), which is based in the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Center in Ada, Oklahoma. The GWERD is a research division of U.S. EPA's National Risk Management...

  19. Supply chain optimization at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Labuhn, Jonathan; Almeter, Philip; McLaughlin, Christopher; Fields, Philip; Turner, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    A successful supply chain optimization project that leveraged technology, engineering principles, and a technician workflow redesign in the setting of a growing health system is described. With continued rises in medication costs, medication inventory management is increasingly important. Proper management of central pharmacy inventory and floor-stock inventory in automated dispensing cabinets (ADCs) can be challenging. In an effort to improve control of inventory costs in the central pharmacy of a large academic medical center, the pharmacy department implemented a supply chain optimization project in collaboration with the medical center's inhouse team of experts on process improvement and industrial engineering. The project had 2 main components: (1) upgrading and reconfiguring carousel technology within an expanded central pharmacy footprint to generate accurate floor-stock inventory replenishment reports, which resulted in efficiencies within the medication-use system, and (2) implementing a technician workflow redesign and algorithm to right-size the ADC inventory, which decreased inventory stockouts (i.e., incidents of depletion of medication stock) and improved ADC user satisfaction. Through a multifaceted approach to inventory management, the number of stockouts per month was decreased and ADC inventory was optimized, resulting in a one-time inventory cost savings of $220,500. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... of the Secretary David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel... States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project. This... MTF, and sustain readiness-related medical skills activities for the military providers....

  1. Medical implications of technical accuracy in genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Goldfeder, Rachel L; Priest, James R; Zook, Justin M; Grove, Megan E; Waggott, Daryl; Wheeler, Matthew T; Salit, Marc; Ashley, Euan A

    2016-03-02

    As whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) transition from research tools to clinical diagnostic tests, it is increasingly critical for sequencing methods and analysis pipelines to be technically accurate. The Genome in a Bottle Consortium has recently published a set of benchmark SNV, indel, and homozygous reference genotypes for the pilot whole genome NIST Reference Material based on the NA12878 genome. We examine the relationship between human genome complexity and genes/variants reported to be associated with human disease. Specifically, we map regions of medical relevance to benchmark regions of high or low confidence. We use benchmark data to assess the sensitivity and positive predictive value of two representative sequencing pipelines for specific classes of variation. We observe that the accuracy of a variant call depends on the genomic region, variant type, and read depth, and varies by analytical pipeline. We find that most false negative WGS calls result from filtering while most false negative WES variants relate to poor coverage. We find that only 74.6% of the exonic bases in ClinVar and OMIM genes and 82.1% of the exonic bases in ACMG-reportable genes are found in high-confidence regions. Only 990 genes in the genome are found entirely within high-confidence regions while 593 of 3,300 ClinVar/OMIM genes have less than 50% of their total exonic base pairs in high-confidence regions. We find greater than 77 % of the pathogenic or likely pathogenic SNVs currently in ClinVar fall within high-confidence regions. We identify sites that are prone to sequencing errors, including thousands present in publicly available variant databases. Finally, we examine the clinical impact of mandatory reporting of secondary findings, highlighting a false positive variant found in BRCA2. Together, these data illustrate the importance of appropriate use and continued improvement of technical benchmarks to ensure accurate and judicious interpretation

  2. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2012-01-14

    The Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) project was a multi-institutional research effort funded jointly by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The effort was led by our Principal Investigator, CS Chang, at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at New York University. The Center included participants from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Rutgers University, University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, University of California at Irvine, North Carolina State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology. This report concerns the work performed by Dr. Julian C. Cummings, who was the institutional Principal Investigator for the CPES project at Caltech.

  3. Final Technical Report for University of Michigan Industrial Assessment Center

    SciTech Connect

    Atreya, Arvind

    2007-04-17

    The UM Industrial Assessment Center assisted 119 primary metals, automotive parts, metal casting, chemicals, forest products, agricultural, and glass manufacturers in Michigan, Ohio and Indiana to become more productive and profitable by identifying and recommending specific measures to improve energy efficiency, reduce waste and increase productivity. This directly benefits the environment by saving a total of 309,194 MMBtu of energy resulting in reduction of 0.004 metric tons of carbon emissions. The $4,618,740 implemented cost savings generated also saves jobs that are evaporating from the manufacturing industries in the US. Most importantly, the UM Industrial Assessment Center provided extremely valuable energy education to forty one UM graduate and undergraduate students. The practical experience complements their classroom education. This also has a large multiplier effect because the students take the knowledge and training with them.

  4. Center of Excellence: Microlaser microscope. Annual progress technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: Development of an imaging, system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In year 2 we have dealt with the slow delivery of new microlaser array approach to the idea of all-solid-state confocal microscopy. One solution was moderately successful, and another has produced the first microscope that is electronically switchable from confocal to non-confocal. We think this may be a useful alternative to the final design. This report thus discloses patentable material. We describe first the central Microlaser Microscope project, then we will tough briefly on the other projects of the Center. Publications are primarily those of the smaller projects, though no longer exclusively so. The appendix includes some of the publications.

  5. Educational assessment center techniques for entrance selection in medical school.

    PubMed

    ten Cate, Olle; Smal, Ko

    2002-07-01

    Dutch higher education is freely accessible for those who have proper high school qualifications. However, admission to medical schools has been limited by government to regulate manpower planning. Selection has been carried out by a national lottery approach since 1972, but in 2000, the Dutch government asked medical schools to experiment with qualitative selection procedures at their own institutions. The University Medical Center Utrecht School of Medical Sciences has used a technique derived from assessment-center approaches to assist in the medical school admission process. Dutch assessment centers use observation procedures in which candidates act in simulated activities that are characteristic of the vacant position. In April 2001, 61 candidates for 23 places were invited for selection days. After a selection interview, candidates were asked to perform activities that are characteristic of course requirements: (1) studying a three-to-five page text about diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of disease A during one hour; (2) explaining the studied procedures to another candidate and receiving information about disease B, studied by this other candidate, during one hour; (3) answering the questions of a standardized patient about disease A in 15 minutes; and (4) answering the questions of a standardized patient about disease B in 15 minutes. A three-person selection committee behind a one-way screen observed the two 15-minute interviews with the standardized patients. The selection committee independently scored content quality of the information that was given to the standardized patients as well as the quality of attitude towards and communication with both patients. The average scores for these three criteria were weighted equally to arrive at a total score. In addition, each candidate received a score resulting from the interview with the other candidate who explained disease B. This score was combined with the other three to a final score. The Utrecht

  6. An Architecture for Continuous Data Quality Monitoring in Medical Centers.

    PubMed

    Endler, Gregor; Schwab, Peter K; Wahl, Andreas M; Tenschert, Johannes; Lenz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In the medical domain, data quality is very important. Since requirements and data change frequently, continuous and sustainable monitoring and improvement of data quality is necessary. Working together with managers of medical centers, we developed an architecture for a data quality monitoring system. The architecture enables domain experts to adapt the system during runtime to match their specifications using a built-in rule system. It also allows arbitrarily complex analyses to be integrated into the monitoring cycle. We evaluate our architecture by matching its components to the well-known data quality methodology TDQM.

  7. The impact of the IRB on medical centers.

    PubMed

    Lee, A S; Thompson, J H

    1981-01-01

    The role of the IRB in a Medical Center is presented with respect to investigations of medical device safety and effectiveness involving human subjects. The prime points presented and discussed are: the reasons (governmental, social, economic, legal-liability, scientific and moral) for the existence of an IRB; the analytical and descriptive documentation which should always precede experimentation; the concepts governing an application to a "typical" IRB; a practical, detailed outline of some special facts and circumstances typically most important to an IRB; and, the question of confidentiality of trade secrets.

  8. [E-learning in ENT: Usage in University Medical Centers in Germany].

    PubMed

    Freiherr von Saß, Peter; Klenzner, Thomas; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; Chaker, Adam

    2017-01-18

    E-learning is an essential part of innovative medical teaching concepts. The challenging anatomy and physiology in ENT is considered particularly suitable for self-assessed and adaptive e-learning. Usage and data on daily experience with e-learning in German ENT-university hospitals are currently unavailable and the degree of implementation of blended learning including feed-back from medical students are currently not known. We investigated the current need and usage of e-learning in academic ENT medical centers in Germany. We surveyed students and chairs for Otorhinolaryngology electronically and paperbased during the summer semester 2015. Our investigation revealed an overall heterogenous picture on quality and quantity of offered e-learning applications. While the overall amount of e-learning in academic ENT in Germany is rather low, at least half of the ENT-hospitals in medical faculties reported that e-learning had improved their own teaching activities. More collaboration among medical faculties and academic ENT-centers may help to explore new potentials, overcome technical difficulties and help to realize more ambitious projects.

  9. Physician assistant and nurse practitioner utilization in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Moote, Marc; Krsek, Cathleen; Kleinpell, Ruth; Todd, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect information on the utilization of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in academic health centers. Data were gathered from a national sample of University HealthSystem Consortium member academic medical centers (AMCs). PAs and NPs have been integrated into most services of respondent AMCs, where they are positively rated for the value they bring to these organizations. The primary reason cited by most AMCs for employing PAs and NPs was Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education resident duty hour restrictions (26.9%). Secondary reasons for employing PAs and NPs include increasing patient throughput (88%), increasing patient access (77%), improving patient safety/quality (77%), reducing length of stay (73%), and improving continuity of care (73%). However, 69% of AMCs report they have not successfully documented the financial impact of PA/NP practice or outcomes associated with individual PA or NP care.

  10. Academic Medical Centers and Community Hospitals Integration: Trends and Strategies.

    PubMed

    Fleishon, Howard B; Itri, Jason N; Boland, Giles W; Duszak, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Academic medical centers are widely recognized as vital components of the American health care system, generally differentiated from their community hospital peers by their tripartite mission of clinical care, education, and research. Community hospitals fill a critical and complementary role, serving as the primary sites for health care in most communities. Health care reform initiatives and economic pressures have created incentives for hospitals and health systems to integrate, resulting in a nationwide trend toward consolidation with academic medical centers leveraging their substantial assets to merge, acquire, or establish partnerships with their community peers. As these alliances accelerate, they have and will continue to affect the radiology groups providing services at these institutions. A deeper understanding of these new marketplace dynamics, changing relationships and potential strategies will help both academic and private practice radiologists adapt to this ongoing change. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. "On the scene": Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Hoying, Cheryl; Lecher, William T; Mosko, Dee Dee; Roberto, Nancy; Mason, Char; Murphy, Susan Wade; Taylor, Janalee; Cortina, Sandra; Mathison, Elizabeth; Dick, Leaann; Schoettker, Pamela J; Britto, Maria T

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center is transforming the way it cares for its patients by building a sophisticated model that focuses on accountable care across the continuum. As nurses from different parts of the organization, we act as change agents to develop an integrated structure built around the patient's needs, from prevention to self-management. We demonstrate how organizational structure, fluid staffing, professional practice, and healthy behaviors operationally catalyze the continuum of care, and how we utilize self-management, community-based programs, and care integration to change the outcome for our patients and families. While care coordination is taking on many forms in medical centers around the world, Cincinnati Children's is proud and passionate about sharing its best practices along the way.

  12. Extending Medical Center Computer Application to Rural Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Gottfredson, Douglas K.

    1983-01-01

    A paper entitled “A COMPUTER DATA BASE FOR CLINICIANS, MANAGERS AND RESEARCHERS,” presented during the 1981 SCAMC, described the Salt Lake VA Medical Center computer system. Since that time, two Rural Health Clinics each about 150 miles from Salt Lake City were established by the SL VAMC to reduce traveling distances and improve services for Veterans. Although many existing computer applications were available with no modifications, additional software was needed to support unique needs of the clinics. The Rural Health package of software was designed to gather and store demographic and clinical information on each Veteran, determine the types of services provided, track services over time, monitor services provided by local hospitals and clinical laboratories which are paid for by the VA, determine total clinic costs, etc. These computer applications may be of interest to Medical Centers with separate clinics or outreach programs and individuals or groups in private practice with programs similar to the VA Rural Health Clinics.

  13. School-Based Health Centers and the Patient-Centered Medical Home. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an innovative care delivery model designed to provide comprehensive primary care services to people of all ages by fostering partnerships between patients, families, health care providers and the community. National Assembly on School-Based Health Care (NASBHC) recommends practices and policies that…

  14. [NEURO-ONCOLOGY A NEW FIELD IN DAVIDOFF CANCER CENTER AT RABIN MEDICAL CENTER].

    PubMed

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Abu-Shkara, Ramez; Siegal, Tali

    2017-08-01

    Neuro-oncology is a subspecialty attracting physicians from medical disciplines such as neurology, neurosurgery, pediatrics, oncology, and radiotherapy. It deals with diagnosis and management of primary brain tumors, as well as metastatic and non-metastatic neurological manifestations that frequently affect cancer patients including brain metastases, paraneoplastic syndromes and neurological complications of cancer treatment. A neuro-oncology unit was established in Davidoff Cancer Center at Rabin Medical Center. It provides a multidisciplinary team approach for management of brain tumors and services, such as expert outpatient clinics and inpatient consultations for the departments of oncology, hematology, bone marrow transplantation and other departments in the Rabin Medical Center. In addition, expert consultation is frequently provided to other hospitals that treat cancer patients with neurological manifestations. The medical disciplines that closely collaborate for the daily management of neuro-oncology patients include radiotherapy, hematology, oncology, neuro-surgery, neuro-radiology and neuro-pathology. The neuro-oncology center is also involved in clinical and laboratory research conducted in collaboration with researchers in Israel and abroad. The new service contributes substantially to the improved care of cancer patients and to the advance of research topics in the field of neuro-oncology.

  15. Alternative Energy Center, Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Howard D.; Marshall, JaNice C.

    2007-09-07

    The Lansing Community College Alternative Energy Center was created with several purposes in mind. The first purpose was the development of educational curricula designed to meet the growing needs of advanced energy companies that would allow students to articulate to other educational institutions or enter this growing workforce. A second purpose was the professional development of faculty and teachers to prepare them to train tomorrow's workforce and scholars. Still another purpose was to design, construct, and equip an alternative energy laboratory that could be used for education, demonstration, and public outreach. Last, the Center was to engage in community outreach and education to enhance industry partnerships, inform decision makers, and increase awareness and general knowledge of hydrogen and other alternative energy technologies and their beneficial impacts on society. This project has enabled us to accomplish all of our goals, including greater faculty understanding of advanced energy concepts, who are now able to convey this knowledge to students through a comprehensive alternative energy curriculum, in a facility well-equipped with advanced technologies, which is also being used to better educate the public on the advantages to society of exploring alternative energy technologies.

  16. Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center--Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Theodore A. Kozman

    2007-10-17

    This is the Final Report for the Louisiana Industrial Assessment Center for the period of 9/1/2002 through 11/30/2006, although we were still gathering data through 02/16/2007. During this period, our Industrial Assessment Center completed 109 energy assessments for manufacturing firms in our area, offered 3 Save Energy Workshops, taught 26 students (9 graduate and 17 undergraduate) energy management savings techniques and offered an Energy Management Graduate class three times. These 109 energy assessments made a total of 738 energy savings recommendations, 33 waste reduction recommendations, and 108 productivity improvement recommendations. These combined recommendations would save client companies more than $87,741,221.16, annually at the then current energy costs. If all of these recommendations were implemented separately, the implementation cost would have been $34,113,482.10 or a Simple Payback Period, SPP=4.7 months. Between 9 months and 12 months after the assessment, we surveyed the manufacturing firms to find out what they implemented. They had implemented approximately 50 percent of our recommendations at an annual saving of $25,867,613.18. The three Save Energy Workshops had an average attendance of twelve individuals. The three graduate Energy Management courses had an average attendance of eleven students.

  17. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  18. Best practice in unbilled account management: one medical center's story.

    PubMed

    Menaker, Debra; Miller, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    After implementing its new electronic health record, a large metropolitan academic medical center (AMC) decided to optimize its supporting business systems, beginning with billing. By identifying problems and taking the following corrective actions immediately, the AMC significantly reduced the number and average age of its unbilled accounts: Realigning system automation to improve routing efficiency. Facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration to better identify and correct the root causes of issues. Ensuring transparent data reporting by setting up different ways of viewing the underlying information.

  19. The patient-centered medical home and health information technology.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Teri; Taliaferro, J Peyton; Wong, Kenneth; Hughes, Cortney; Mun, Seong

    2012-03-01

    To demonstrate that concepts of patient-centeredness and technology-centeredness must work together within the context of the transformation to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), a primary care model that emphasizes coordinated, comprehensive, accessible, and cost-effective care. Information in this article was gathered from a workshop on the Medical Home in Alexandria, VA in June 2010 that brought together civilian and military medical providers, researchers, and other stakeholders in PCMH to discuss their experiences in transitioning from traditional primary care to PCMH in addition to a literature review of articles from medical journals. Patient-centeredness is often only vaguely defined as being in opposition to provider-centered or technology-centered. Our analysis shows that focusing on either technological improvements or enhancing patient-centered care will not improve the fragmented healthcare system in the United States. We argue that these two concepts are not incompatible as sometimes believed, but rather it is critical that we recognize they must work together in routine practices in order to truly improve the state of healthcare. Health information technology (HIT) supports many of the core principles of PCMH, but there are still several challenges as not all technologies have functionalities yet that facilitate the model. We suggest patient-centeredness be one of the main concepts that drives the redesign and implementation of new health technologies in primary care. It is no longer about just implementing new technologies; these technologies must enhance patient-provider relationships, communication, access, and patients' engagement in their own care.

  20. Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph from Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), showing building 225's west and a north sides. This photograph is included because it shows how the west side of building 221 looked before the corridor between buildings 220 and 221 was added and because building 225 was built to the same plan as building 221. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Hospital Corps Barracks, East Harlow Street, East of Building No. 220, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  1. A New Methodology to Design Distributed Medical Diagnostic Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    METHODOLOGY TO DESIGN DISTRIBUTED MEDICAL DIAGNOSTIC CENTERS P. A. Baziana,. E. I. Karavatselou, D. K. Lymberopoulos, D. N. Serpanos Department of...Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Patras, Patras, Hellas This paper introduces a new methodology for DDC design by controlling the above...TSPs) to design and support cooperative schemes among RUs and DUs in form of DDCs [2]. This paper introduces a global methodology for such a DDC’s

  2. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover), apparently showing west side of building 732. In 1921, buildings 732 and 733 were combined and it is assumed that this photograph, which was taken after 1921, shows the section added to make buildings 732 and 733 once continuous building. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Storehouses, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue & North Thirteenth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  4. The value of a writing center at a medical university.

    PubMed

    Ariail, Jennie; Thomas, Suzanne; Smith, Tom; Kerr, Lisa; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Shaw, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Students often enter graduate healthcare/biomedical schools with insufficient undergraduate instruction in effective writing, yet the ability to write well affects their career opportunities in health care and in scientific research. The present study was conducted to determine the value and effectiveness of instruction by faculty with expertise in teaching writing at a writing center at an academic health science center. Two separate sources of data were collected and analyzed. First, an anonymous campus-wide survey assessed students' satisfaction and utilization of the university's Writing Center. Second, a nonexperimental objective study was conducted comparing a subsample of students who used versus those who did not receive instruction at the Writing Center on quality of writing, as determined by an evaluator who was blind to students' utilization status. From the campus-wide survey, more than 90% of respondents who used the center (which was 26% of the student body) agreed that it was a valuable and effective resource. From the objective study of writing quality, students who used the Writing Center were twice as likely as students who did not to receive an A grade on the written assignment, and the blinded evaluator accurately estimated which students used the Writing Center based on the clarity of writing. The instruction at the Writing Center at our university is highly valued by students, and its value is further supported by objective evidence of efficacy. Such a center offers the opportunity to provide instruction that medical and other healthcare students increasingly need without requiring additions to existing curricula. By developing competency in writing, students prepare for scholarly pursuits, and through the process of writing, they engage critical thinking skills that can make them more attuned to narrative and more reflective and empathetic in the clinical setting.

  5. Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.

    PubMed

    Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning.

  6. Medication wrong route administration: a poisons center-based study.

    PubMed

    Bloch-Teitelbaum, Alexandra; Lüde, Saskia; Rauber-Lüthy, Christine; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Russmann, Stefan; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2013-03-01

    To describe clinical effects, circumstances of occurrence, management and outcomes of cases of inadvertent administration of medications by an incorrect parenteral route. Retrospective single-center consecutive review of parenteral route errors of medications, reported to our center between January 2006 and June 2010. We collected demographic data and information on medications, route and time of administration, severity of symptoms/signs, treatment, and outcome. Seventy-eight cases (68 adults, 10 children) were available for analysis. The following wrong administration routes were recorded: paravenous (51%), intravenous (33%), subcutaneous (8%), and others (8%). Medications most frequently involved were iodinated x-ray contrast media (11%) and iron infusions (9%). Twenty-eight percent of the patients were asymptomatic and 54% showed mild symptoms; moderate and severe symptoms were observed in 9% and 7.7%, respectively, and were mostly due to intravenous administration errors. There was no fatal outcome. In most symptomatic cases local nonspecific treatment was performed. Enquiries concerning administration of medicines by an incorrect parenteral route were rare, and mainly involved iodinated x-ray contrast media and iron infusions. Most events occurred in adults and showed a benign clinical course. Although the majority of exposures concerned the paravenous route, the occasional severe cases were observed mainly after inadvertent intravenous administration.

  7. Funding, technical assistance, and other resources for school-based health centers.

    PubMed

    Washington, Deidre M; Brey, Laura C

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the successful implementation of school-based health centers (SBHCs), funding streams and technical assistance are needed from various resources. The core funding models for service delivery include federal grants, state grants, local funding, community partnerships, foundations, and patient revenue. Technical assistance opportunities are available through professional organizations, SBHC associations, state health departments, and primary care associations at the national and state levels. This article explores the various federal, state, and local funding sources, and the technical assistance resources and opportunities available to SBHCs and their staff.

  8. 76 FR 50202 - National Technical Assistance and Dissemination Center for Children Who Are Deaf-Blind; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... National Technical Assistance and Dissemination Center for Children Who Are Deaf-Blind; Final Extension of... for the National Technical Assistance and Dissemination Center for Children Who Are Deaf-Blind... Who Are Deaf-Blind (Center) to receive funding from October 1, 2011, through September 30, 2013....

  9. Final priority; Technical Assistance on State Data Collection--IDEA Data Management Center. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-08-05

    The Assistant Secretary for the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) announces a priority under the Technical Assistance on State Data Collection program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to fund a cooperative agreement to establish and operate an IDEA Data Management Center (Center) that will provide technical assistance (TA) to improve the capacity of States to meet the data collection requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

  10. Interpersonal Communications Curriculum. Claretian Medical Center for the Worker Education Program of Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago Teacher's Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estes, Florence S.

    This teaching guide contains the materials required to teach a 6-week course in interpersonal communications that was developed for the workers of a Chicago medical center through a partnership involving the medical center, its employees, their union, and Northeastern Illinois University. Based on the student-centered philosophy of teaching, the…

  11. Medical waste management in Jordan: A study at the King Hussein Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    Oweis, Rami . E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo; Al-Widyan, Mohamad . E-mail: widyan@just.edu.jo; Al-Limoon, Ohood . E-mail: oweis@just.edu.jo

    2005-07-01

    As in many other developing countries, the generation of regulated medical waste (RMW) in Jordan has increased significantly over the last few decades. Despite the serious impacts of RMW on humans and the environment, only minor attention has been directed to its proper handling and disposal. This study was conducted in the form of a case study at one of Jordan's leading medical centers, namely, the King Hussein Medical Center (KHMC). Its purpose was to report on the current status of medical waste management at KHMC and propose possible measures to improve it. In general, it was found that the center's administration was reasonably aware of the importance of medical waste management and practiced some of the measures to adequately handle waste generated at the center. However, it was also found that significant voids were present that need to be addressed in the future including efficient segregation, the use of coded and colored bags, better handling and transfer means, and better monitoring and tracking techniques, as well as the need for training and awareness programs for the personnel.

  12. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Brooke Army Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    collection. This is the first in a series of reports concerning medical service accounts ( MSAs ). This report provides the results of our review...performed at U.S. Army Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC). We reviewed the 25 highest dollar delinquent MSAs valued at $11.0 million. Finding BAMC...Uniform Business Office (UBO) management did not effectively manage delinquent MSAs . As of May 29, 2013, BAMC UBO management had 15,106 outstanding

  13. Decline of clinical research in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2015-09-29

    Marked changes in US medical school funding began in the 1960s with progressively increasing revenues from clinical services. The growth of clinical revenues slowed in the mid-1990s, creating a funding crisis for US academic health care centers, who responded by having their faculty increase their clinical duties at the expense of research activities. Surveys document the resultant stresses on the academic clinician researcher. The NIH provides greater funding for basic and translational research than for clinical research, and the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is inadequately funded to address the scope of needed clinical research. An increasing portion of clinical research is funded by industry, which leaves many important clinical issues unaddressed. There is an inadequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a lack of external support for clinical research. The impact on the academic environment in university medical centers is especially severe on young faculty, who have a shrinking potential to achieve successful academic careers. National health care research funding policies should encourage the right balance of life-science investigations. Medical universities need to improve and highlight education on clinical research for students, residents, fellows, and young faculty. Medical universities also need to provide appropriate incentives for clinical research. Without training to ensure an adequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a method to adequately fund clinical research, discoveries from basic and translational research cannot be clinically tested and affect patient care. Thus, many clinical problems will continue to be evaluated and treated with inadequate or even absent evidence-based knowledge.

  14. The Iowa Flood Center's River Stage Sensors—Technical Details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.; Ceynar, D.; Fahim Rezaei, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Iowa Flood Center (IFC), along with support from the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have developed a bridge-mounted river stage sensor. Each sensor consists of an ultrasonic distance measuring module, cellular modem, a GPS unit that provides accurate time and an embedded controller that orchestrates the sensors' operation. A sensor is powered by a battery and solar panel along with a solar charge controller. All the components are housed in/on a sturdy metal box that is then mounted on the side of a bridge. Additionally, each sensor incorporates a water-intrusion sensor and an internal temperature sensor. In operation, the microcontroller wakes, and turns on the electronics every 15 minutes and then measures the distance between the ultrasonic sensor and the water surface. Several measurements are averaged and transmitted along with system health information (battery voltage, state of water intrusion sensor, and internal temperature) via cellular modem to remote servers on the internet. The microcontroller then powers the electronics down and enters a sleep/power savings mode. The sensor's firmware allows the remote server to adjust the measurement rate to 5, 15, and 60 minutes. Further, sensors maintain a 24-day buffer of previous measurements. If a sensor could not successfully transmit its data because of cellular network connection problems, it will transmit the backlog on subsequent transmissions. We paid meticulous attention to all engineering aspects and sensors are very robust and have operated essentially continuously through two Iowa winters and summers, including the 2012 record-breaking warm summer.

  15. The Absent Interpreter in Administrative Detention Center Medical Units.

    PubMed

    Rondeau-Lutz, Murielle; Weber, Jean-Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The particular situation of the French administrative detention center (ADC) medical units appears to be an exemplary case to study the difficulties facing medical practice. Indeed, the starting point of our inquiry was an amazing observation that needed to be addressed and understood: why are professional interpreters so seldom requested in ADC medical units, where one would expect that they would be "naturally" present? Aiming to fully explore the meanings of the "absent interpreter", this article takes into account the possible meanings of this situation: the recourse to professional interpreters in France is far from expected given cumulative evidence of its benefits; perceptions of illegal immigrants and medical habitus itself may both hamper the use of a third party; the ADCs are a very stressful place for healthcare professionals, with conflicting missions, political issues enmeshed with medical goals, and heavy affective burden that may lead to self-protection. Silencing voices of suffering others might be seen as the hidden indecent truth of the "absent interpreter". These reflections open a window to a larger issue with regard to the full range of medicine: what are the place, the role and the function of patient's words and narratives in contemporary medicine? The highly invested somatic perspective and its political corollary giving primacy to bare life harbor potential risks of obscuring speeches and undervaluing narratives.

  16. Study of Residential Vocational Technical Center(s) in Maryland: Part II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McManis Associates, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Part 1 of the project aimed at determining unmet vocational-technical education needs in the State of Maryland which might be met through residential education; Part 2 was designed to study the possible alternatives for meeting the needs discovered and to make recommendations regarding how these could best be met. A summary of Part 1 of the…

  17. Center for Extended Magnetohydrodynamics Modeling - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Scott

    2016-02-14

    This project funding supported approximately 74 percent of a Ph.D. graduate student, not including costs of travel and supplies. We had a highly successful research project including the development of a second-order implicit electromagnetic kinetic ion hybrid model [Cheng 2013, Sturdevant 2016], direct comparisons with the extended MHD NIMROD code and kinetic simulation [Schnack 2013], modeling of slab tearing modes using the fully kinetic ion hybrid model and finally, modeling global tearing modes in cylindrical geometry using gyrokinetic simulation [Chen 2015, Chen 2016]. We developed an electromagnetic second-order implicit kinetic ion fluid electron hybrid model [Cheng 2013]. As a first step, we assumed isothermal electrons, but have included drift-kinetic electrons in similar models [Chen 2011]. We used this simulation to study the nonlinear evolution of the tearing mode in slab geometry, including nonlinear evolution and saturation [Cheng 2013]. Later, we compared this model directly to extended MHD calculations using the NIMROD code [Schnack 2013]. In this study, we investigated the ion-temperature-gradient instability with an extended MHD code for the first time and got reasonable agreement with the kinetic calculation in terms of linear frequency, growth rate and mode structure. We then extended this model to include orbit averaging and sub-cycling of the ions and compared directly to gyrokinetic theory [Sturdevant 2016]. This work was highlighted in an Invited Talk at the International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas in 2015. The orbit averaging sub-cycling multi-scale algorithm is amenable to hybrid architectures with GPUS or math co-processors. Additionally, our participation in the Center for Extend Magnetohydrodynamics motivated our research on developing the capability for gyrokinetic simulation to model a global tearing mode. We did this in cylindrical geometry where the results could be benchmarked with existing eigenmode

  18. An academic medical center under prolonged rocket attack--organizational, medical, and financial considerations.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Yaron; Michaelson, Moshe; Hyames, Gila; Skorecki, Karl; Reisner, Shimon A; Beyar, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    The Rambam Medical Center, the major academic health center in northern Israel, serving a population of two million and providing specialized tertiary care, was exposed to an unprecedented experience during the Second Lebanon War in the summer of 2006. For more than one month, it was subjected to continuous rocket attacks, but it continued to provide emergency and routine medical services to the civilian population and also served the military personnel who were evacuated from the battlefront. To accomplish the goals of serving the population while itself being under fire, the Rambam Medical Center had to undertake major organizational decisions, which included maximizing safety within the hospital by shifting patients and departments, ensuring that the hospital was properly fortified, managing the health professional teams' work schedules, and providing needed services for the families of employees. The Rambam Medical Center's Level I trauma center expertise included multidisciplinary teams and extensive collaborations; modern imaging modalities usually reserved for peacetime medical practice were frequently used. The function of the hospital teams during the war was efficient and smooth, based on the long-term actions taken to prepare for disasters and wartime conditions. Routine hospital services continued, although at 60% of normal occupancy. Financial losses incurred were primarily due to the decrease in revenue-generating activity. The two most important components of managing the hospital under these conditions are (1) the ability to arrive at prompt and meaningful decisions with respect to the organizational and medical hospital operations and (2) the leadership and management of the professional staff and teams.

  19. [Cardiac MRI: report on preliminary experience in Sheba Medical Center and review of main indications].

    PubMed

    Konen, Eli; Frand, Mira; Friemark, Dov; Eshet, Yael; Hirsch, Rafael; Feinberg, Michael; Glikson, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The rapid technical development of cardiac MR imaging in the last decade enables us today to evaluate cardiac morphology, function and viability in a reliable and very good spatial and temporal resolution. The advanced technology allows us to conduct those examinations in an acceptable time for clinical daily use and thus, the number of indications for cardiac MR imaging is steadily increasing. Since the beginning of 2004, a dedicated cardiac MR scanner has been employed in the Department of Medical Imaging in the Sheba Medical Center. We hereby conclude our preliminary experience with 58 sequential cases that were referred for cardiac MR imaging. Indications for the examination included 17 patients with congenital cardiac and great vessels anomalies, 14 patients with a suspected cardiac mass, 12 patients with suspected right ventricular dysplasia, and 4 patients with suspected constrictive pericarditis. This article also includes a review of the main indications for obtaining cardiac MR imaging.

  20. Patient-Centered Tools for Medication Information Search

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Lauren; Feiner, Steven; Elhadad, Noémie; Vawdrey, David; Tran, Tran H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research focused on online health information seeking highlights a heavy reliance on general-purpose search engines. However, current general-purpose search interfaces do not necessarily provide adequate support for non-experts in identifying suitable sources of health information. Popular search engines have recently introduced search tools in their user interfaces for a range of topics. In this work, we explore how such tools can support non-expert, patient-centered health information search. Scoping the current work to medication-related search, we report on findings from a formative study focused on the design of patient-centered, medication-information search tools. Our study included qualitative interviews with patients, family members, and domain experts, as well as observations of their use of Remedy, a technology probe embodying a set of search tools. Post-operative cardiothoracic surgery patients and their visiting family members used the tools to find information about their hospital medications and were interviewed before and after their use. Domain experts conducted similar search tasks and provided qualitative feedback on their preferences and recommendations for designing these tools. Findings from our study suggest the importance of four valuation principles underlying our tools: credibility, readability, consumer perspective, and topical relevance. PMID:28163972

  1. Patient-Centered Tools for Medication Information Search.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Lauren; Feiner, Steven; Elhadad, Noémie; Vawdrey, David; Tran, Tran H

    2014-05-20

    Recent research focused on online health information seeking highlights a heavy reliance on general-purpose search engines. However, current general-purpose search interfaces do not necessarily provide adequate support for non-experts in identifying suitable sources of health information. Popular search engines have recently introduced search tools in their user interfaces for a range of topics. In this work, we explore how such tools can support non-expert, patient-centered health information search. Scoping the current work to medication-related search, we report on findings from a formative study focused on the design of patient-centered, medication-information search tools. Our study included qualitative interviews with patients, family members, and domain experts, as well as observations of their use of Remedy, a technology probe embodying a set of search tools. Post-operative cardiothoracic surgery patients and their visiting family members used the tools to find information about their hospital medications and were interviewed before and after their use. Domain experts conducted similar search tasks and provided qualitative feedback on their preferences and recommendations for designing these tools. Findings from our study suggest the importance of four valuation principles underlying our tools: credibility, readability, consumer perspective, and topical relevance.

  2. Toward a human-centered voluntary medical incident reporting system.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Voluntary medical incident reports are a valuable source for studying adverse events and near misses. Underreporting and low quality of reports in local organizations, however, have become the impediments in identifying trends and patterns relating at the local, regional and national level. Human factors on usefulness and ease of use have shown their important role in acceptance of voluntary reporting systems. To understand and identify the obstacles of quality reporting, we employed a set of human-centered analysis methods to examine one-year voluntary medical incident reports of a University Hospital. We found about 30% of the reports labeled as "miscellaneous" and "other", and their real incident types or error descriptions were identified through an in-depth recoding. Human-centered analyses show that the pre-defined reporting categories could serve well for the voluntary reporting need if reporters' tasks were better represented on user-friendly interfaces. We suggest that a human-centered, ontology based system design for voluntary reporting is feasible which could help improve completeness, accuracy, and interoperability among national and international standards.

  3. Evaluating Community Engagement in an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Shone, Laura P.; Dozier, Ann M.; Newton, Gail L.; Green, Theresa; Bennett, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    From the perspective of academic medical centers (AMCs), community engagement is a collaborative process of working toward mutually defined goals to improve the community’s health, and involves partnerships between AMCs, individuals, and entities representing the surrounding community. AMCs increasingly recognize the importance of community engagement, and recent programs such as Prevention Research Centers and Clinical and Translational Science Awards have highlighted community engagement activities. However, there is no standard or accepted metric for evaluating AMCs’ performance and impact of community engagement activities. In this article, the authors present a framework for evaluating AMCs’ community engagement activities. The framework includes broad goals and specific activities within each goal, wherein goals and activities are evaluated using a health services research framework consisting of structure, process, and outcome criteria. To illustrate how to use this community engagement evaluation framework, the authors present specific community engagement goals and activities of the University of Rochester Medical Center to (1) improve the health of the community served by the AMC; (2) increase the AMC’s capacity for community engagement; and (3) increase generalizable knowledge and practices in community engagement and public health. Using a structure-process-outcomes framework, a multidisciplinary team should regularly evaluate an AMC’s community engagement program with the purpose of measurably improving the performance of the AMC and the health of its surrounding community. PMID:24556768

  4. Hospitalizations of adults with intellectual disability in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah H; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R

    2014-06-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however, no research was found on the common reasons for which this population is hospitalized. Academic medical centers often treat the most complex patients, and data from these centers can provide insight into the needs of patient populations with complex needs. The purpose of this study was to analyze descriptive data from the UHC (formerly known as the University Healthsystem Consortium; an alliance of 115 U.S. academic medical centers and 300 of their affiliated hospitals) regarding common reasons for hospitalization, need for intensive care, and common hospitalization outcome measures of length of stay and complications for adult (age ≥ 18) patients with ID. Findings indicate the need for specific attention to the needs of hospitalized patients with ID.

  5. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  6. Design for Medical Education. The Development and Planning of a Medical College and Care Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peery, Thomas M.; Green, Alan C.

    Planning and design procedures which one medical education center employed in translating its educational objectives, philosophy and techniques into laboratory, classroom and clinic facilities are described. Basic planning considerations included--(1) determination of the curriculum, (2) facility utilization rate, (3) housing of research…

  7. The Prescribed Pediatric Center: A Medical Day Treatment Program for Children with Complex Medical Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppert, Elizabeth S.; Karst, Thomas O.; Brogan, Mark G.

    1998-01-01

    The Prescribed Pediatric Center (Toledo, Ohio) is a community-based, multidisciplinary program for infants and children with chronic, complex medical conditions. This article describes program beginnings; the planning process; and the program's growth, development, and components. Initial program evaluation indicates positive effects on some…

  8. Medical economics of PM&R. V. Surviving the complexities of academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Melvin, J L; Pate, C M

    1993-02-01

    The mission statements of academic medical centers call on them to accomplish many goals. This often leads to conflicting choices when selecting activities and establishing policies. When individual faculty members are expected to divide work time to meet research, teaching and clinical needs, careful planning and disciplined decisions of action are necessary to avoid a sense of ambiguity and frustration.

  9. A Study to Determine a Methodology for Establishing a Center of Excellence Program at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-10

    69 D. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN CARDIOLOGY ............................ 74 E...FITZSIMONS ARMY MEDICAL CENTER GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION PROGRAM IN CARDIOLOGY ................... 76 1 A Study to Determine a Methodology for...prioritized according to average government cost for 27 different diagnostic medical specialties to include adverse reaction, allergy, cardiology

  10. 45 CFR 1370.3 - Information and technical assistance center grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information and technical assistance center grants. 1370.3 Section 1370.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES...

  11. Great Lakes Area Resource Center. Final Technical Report. June 1, 1974-May 31, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    The final technical report of the Great Lakes Regional Resource Center summarizes special education activities in five major areas: state program development, educational appraisal, educational programing, sharing resources, and project accountability and administration. Explained are project goals of enhancing development, demonstration,…

  12. Southwest Regional Resource Center. Final Technical Report. June 1, 1974 Through September 30, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Regional Resource Center, Salt Lake City, UT.

    The document presents the Southwest Regional Resource Center's (SRRC) final technical report on its major activities, products, and services for handicapped children from June 1, 1974, to September 30, 1977. The element summaries, which comprise the main text of the report, contain information on model development, regional task force work, direct…

  13. Measuring the Impact of ESEA Title I Evaluation Technical Assistance Centers--One View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arter, Judith A.

    The ESEA Title I evaluation Technical Assistance Centers (TACs) assist state and local education agencies to implement the Title I Evaluation and Reporting System (TIERS), to improve the quality of evaluation information, and to use evaluation results for local decision making. This paper reports on the results of one method of assessing the…

  14. A System for Evaluating the Performance of ESEA Title I Technical Assistance Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetler, Mark E.; Estes, Gary D.

    The results of the experience of a Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for three months with a system for classifying and recording actual and planned tasks and activities are described and discussed. The area covered by this report includes 15 states in 3 geographic regions. Staff days planned and actually spent and trips planned and spent are…

  15. Region A Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Center. Annual Report: July 1, 1991-June 30, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Center, Hampton, NH. Region A.

    This publication reports on progress made regarding seven tasks of the Chapter 1 Technical Assistance Center (TAC) for Region A (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, and Vermont). Chapter 1 is a federal program sponsoring remedial education projects nationwide. The TAC offers services…

  16. Briefing Paper regarding the Establishment of a Regional Technical and Industrial Skills Training Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Roger Baden

    In spring 1997, Oregon's Regional Workforce Committee commissioned a study to investigate the feasibility of creating a technical and industrial skills training center in Region 12 of the state. Interviews were conducted with 40 individuals from area companies, social service agencies, and training organizations regarding the need for such a…

  17. Development Trends in Federal Library and Information Center Automation. Guides for Administrative and Technical Interviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Information Dynamics Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    These two guides for interviews on trends in library automation in federal libraries and information centers cover administrative and technical interviews. The guide for administrative interviews is divided into five steps: (1) determining the details of the agency's mission and organizational structure, (2) establishing the administrative…

  18. Scientific and Technical Translation and the All-Union Translation Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchuk, Yuri Nikolaevich

    1984-01-01

    The investigation and use of machine translation as an adjunct to human translation at the Soviet Union's All-Union Translation Center, a centralized scientific and technical translation facility, is examined. The issues of error correction, the variety of translation types needed, and special lexical considerations are discussed. (MSE)

  19. Teaching Technology with Technology. An Off-the-Shelf Robotics Course Builds Technical Center Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannemann, Jim; Rice, Thomas R.

    1991-01-01

    At the Oakland Technical Center, which provides vocational programs for nine Michigan high schools, a one-semester course in Foundations of Technology Systems uses a computer-simulated manufacturing environment to teach applied math, science, language arts, communication skills, problem solving, and teamwork in the context of technology education.…

  20. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  1. A cryptologic based trust center for medical images.

    PubMed Central

    Wong, S T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate practical solutions that can integrate cryptographic techniques and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to improve the security of medical images. DESIGN: The PACS at the University of California San Francisco Medical Center consolidate images and associated data from various scanners into a centralized data archive and transmit them to remote display stations for review and consultation purposes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the model of a digital trust center that integrates cryptographic algorithms and protocols seamlessly into such a digital radiology environment to improve the security of medical images. MEASUREMENTS: The timing performance of encryption, decryption, and transmission of the cryptographic protocols over 81 volumetric PACS datasets has been measured. Lossless data compression is also applied before the encryption. The transmission performance is measured against three types of networks of different bandwidths: narrow-band Integrated Services Digital Network, Ethernet, and OC-3c Asynchronous Transfer Mode. RESULTS: The proposed digital trust center provides a cryptosystem solution to protect the confidentiality and to determine the authenticity of digital images in hospitals. The results of this study indicate that diagnostic images such as x-rays and magnetic resonance images could be routinely encrypted in PACS. However, applying encryption in teleradiology and PACS is a tradeoff between communications performance and security measures. CONCLUSION: Many people are uncertain about how to integrate cryptographic algorithms coherently into existing operations of the clinical enterprise. This paper describes a centralized cryptosystem architecture to ensure image data authenticity in a digital radiology department. The system performance has been evaluated in a hospital-integrated PACS environment. PMID:8930857

  2. California Diploma Project Technical Report II: Alignment Study--Alignment Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Draft Standards and California's Exit Level Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaughy, Charis; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education is in the process of revising the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards. The Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) conducted an investigation of the draft version of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards (Health Science). The purpose of the study is to…

  3. Implementing the patient-centered medical home in residency education.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Benjamin R; Tobin, Daniel; Genao, Inginia; Ellman, Matthew; Ruser, Christopher; Brienza, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, physician groups, government agencies and third party payers in the United States of America have promoted a Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) model that fosters a team-based approach to primary care. Advocates highlight the model's collaborative approach where physicians, mid-level providers, nurses and other health care personnel coordinate their efforts with an aim for high-quality, efficient care. Early studies show improvement in quality measures, reduction in emergency room visits and cost savings. However, implementing the PCMH presents particular challenges to physician training programs, including institutional commitment, infrastructure expenditures and faculty training. Teaching programs must consider how the objectives of the PCMH model align with recent innovations in resident evaluation now required by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) in the US. This article addresses these challenges, assesses the preliminary success of a pilot project, and proposes a viable, realistic model for implementation at other institutions.

  4. Cancer Research Institute, Loma Linda University Medical Center

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) DOE/EA-0975, evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the Cancer Research Institute (CRI) at the Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) on its campus in Loma Linda, California. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This document describes alternatives, the affected environment and environmental consequences of the proposed action.

  5. Residency Surgical Training at an Independent Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremiah; Sidwell, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Independent academic medical centers have been training surgeons for more than a century; this environment is distinct from university or military programs. There are several advantages to training at a community program, including a supportive learning environment with camaraderie between residents and faculty, early and broad operative experience, and improved graduate confidence. Community programs also face challenges, such as resident recruitment and faculty engagement. With the workforce needs for general surgeons, independent training programs will continue to play an integral role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Case study: a data warehouse for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, J S; Scully, K W; Pates, R D; Schubart, J R; Reynolds, R E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical data repository (CDR) is a frequently updated relational data warehouse that provides users with direct access to detailed, flexible, and rapid retrospective views of clinical, administrative, and financial patient data for the University of Virginia Health System. This article presents a case study of the CDR, detailing its five-year history and focusing on the unique role of data warehousing in an academic medical center. Specifically, the CDR must support multiple missions, including research and education, in addition to administration and management. Users include not only analysts and administrators but clinicians, researchers, and students.

  7. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medical Center real property book (green cloth cover). In that book, this photograph appears for building 706 was renumbered 353 and subsequently 202. The building in the photograph resembles building 204 more than it does building 202, but all Fitzsimons Real Property records indicate that the building in the photograph, showing west side, is early photograph of building 202. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Motor Transport Garage, Northwest Corner of East Harlow Avenue, & North Twelfth Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    PubMed

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  9. International accreditation of ambulatory surgical centers and medical tourism.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    The two forces that have driven the increase in accreditation of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers (ASC's) in the United States are reimbursement of facility fees by Medicare and commercial insurance companies, which requires either accreditation, Medicare certification, or state licensure, and state laws which mandate one of these three options. Accreditation of ASC's internationally has been driven by national requirements and by the competitive forces of "medical tourism." The three American accrediting organizations have all developed international programs to meet this increasing demand outside of the United States.

  10. 78 FR 74163 - Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System Bremerton, Washington; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Harrison Medical Center, a Subsidiary of Franciscan Health System... Adjustment Assistance (TAA), applicable to workers and former workers of Harrison Medical Center,...

  11. Evaluation of pegfilgrastim use at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kathy; Duffy, Alison; Gilmore, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pegfilgrastim is indicated to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia. As a cost-savings initiative, Pegfilgrastim Process Guidelines were developed and implemented at a large, academic teaching institution to improve appropriate use of pegfilgrastim and to decrease costs of outpatient infusion center administration by deferring doses to home self-administration for eligible patients. Methods A retrospective medical record review was conducted post-implementation of the Pegfilgrastim Process Guideline to evaluate the use of pegfilgrastim and to assess the safety and efficacy of transferring pegfilgrastim orders from outpatient infusion center to home administration for eligible patients. Results Fifty-nine patients were included in the study, with 35 patients receiving pegfilgrastim in the outpatient infusion center, 13 patients self-injecting at home, and 11 patients receiving doses in both settings. The total wholesale cost avoidance for pegfilgrastim orders transferred to self-administration at home during this time period totaled $205,163. The revenue from outpatient prescriptions of pegfilgrastim totaled $291,111.93. The percentage of febrile neutropenia admissions was 11.4%, 0%, and 9.1% in the outpatient infusion, home, and outpatient/home group, respectively. Conclusion Implementation of the Pegfilgrastim Process Guidelines demonstrated decreased total pegfilgrastim orders to be dispensed by the infusion center and a cost avoidance of $205,163 in four months without any perceivable changes in patient outcomes. This represents a significant cost-savings opportunity.

  12. Promoting cancer screening within the patient centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Mona; Wender, Richard; Smith, Robert

    2011-01-01

    While consensus has grown that primary care is the essential access point in a high-performing health care system, the current model of primary care underperforms in both chronic disease management and prevention. The Patient Centered Medical Home model (PCMH) is at the center of efforts to reinvent primary care practice, and is regarded as the most promising approach to addressing the burden of chronic disease, improving health outcomes, and reducing health spending. However, the potential for the medical home to improve the delivery of cancer screening (and preventive services in general) has received limited attention in both conceptualization and practice. Medical home demonstrations to date have included few evidence-based preventive services in their outcome measures, and few have evaluated the effect of different payment models. Decreasing use of hospitals and emergency rooms and an emphasis on improving chronic care represent improvements in effective delivery of healthcare, but leave opportunities for reducing the burden of cancer untouched. Data confirm that what does or does not happen in the primary care setting has a substantial impact on cancer outcomes. Insofar as cancer is the leading cause of death before age 80, the PCMH model must prioritize adherence to cancer screening according to recommended guidelines, and systems, financial incentives, and reimbursements must be aligned to achieve that goal. This article explores capacities that are needed in the medical home model to facilitate the integration of cancer screening and other preventive services. These capacities include improved patient access and communication, health risk assessments, periodic preventive health exams, use of registries that store cancer risk information and screening history, ability to track and follow up on tests and referrals, feedback on performance, and payment models that reward cancer screening.

  13. Association Between Patient-Centered Medical Home Rating and Operating Cost at Federally Funded Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Nocon, Robert S.; Sharma, Ravi; Birnberg, Jonathan M.; Ngo-Metzger, Quyen; Lee, Sang Mee; Chin, Marshall H.

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the cost associated with a health center’s rating as a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Objective To determine whether PCMH rating is associated with operating cost among health centers funded by the US Health Resources and Services Administration. Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study of PCMH rating and operating cost in 2009. PCMH rating was assessed through surveys of health center administrators conducted by Harris Interactive of all 1009 Health Resources and Services Administration–funded community health centers. The survey provided scores from 0 (worst) to 100 (best) for total PCMH score and 6 subscales: access/communication, care management, external coordination, patient tracking, test/referral tracking, and quality improvement. Costs were obtained from the Uniform Data System reports submitted to the Health Resources and Services Administration. We used generalized linear models to determine the relationship between PCMH rating and operating cost. Main Outcome Measures Operating cost per physician full-time equivalent, operating cost per patient per month, and medical cost per visit. Results Six hundred sixty-nine health centers (66%) were included in the study sample, with 340 excluded because of nonresponse or incomplete data. Mean total PCMH score was 60 (SD,12; range, 21–90). For the average health center, a 10-point higher total PCMH score was associated with a $2.26 (4.6%) higher operating cost per patient per month (95% CI, $0.86–$4.12). Among PCMH subscales, a 10-point higher score for patient tracking was associated with higher operating cost per physician full-time equivalent ($27 300; 95% CI,$3047–$57 804) and higher operating cost per patient per month ($1.06;95%CI,$0.29–$1.98). A 10-point higher score for quality improvement was also associated with higher operating cost per physician full-time equivalent ($32 731; 95% CI, $1571–$73 670) and higher operating cost per patient

  14. Photodynamic research at Baylor University Medical Center Dallas, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Aronoff, Billie L.; Judy, Millard M.

    1993-03-01

    We received our first CO2 laser at Baylor University Medical Center in December 1974, following a trip to Israel in January of that year. Discussion with the customs office of the propriety of charging an 18% import tax lasted for nine months. We lost that argument. Baylor has been using lasers of many types for many procedures since that time. About ten years ago, through the kindness of Tom Dougherty and Roswell Park, we started working with photodynamic therapy, first with hematoporphyrin I and later with dihematoporphyrin ether (II). In February 1984, we were invited to a conference at Los Alamos, New Mexico, U.S.A. on medical applications of the free electron laser as part of the Star Wars Program. A grant application from Baylor was approved that November, but funding did not start for many months. This funding contributed to the development of a new research center as part of Baylor Research Institute. Many of the projects investigated at Baylor dealt with applications of the free electron laser (FEL), after it became available. A staff was assembled and many projects are still ongoing. I would like to outline those which are in some way related to photodynamic therapy.

  15. Patient opinion regarding patient-centered medical home fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Randell K; King, Dana E; Andrews, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Although conceptually there is agreement on how the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) should be organized, there is little information regarding which PCMH components are the most important to patients. An anonymous, voluntary survey was administered to patients at three US academic medical centers. Questions sought opinions regarding the National Committee for Quality Assurance's key components and essential elements of the PCMH. Analysis of the survey responses was conducted using SAS version 9.1. A total of 780 surveys were returned. Patients expressed believing strongly that the ability to coordinate care, help patients to manage their own disease, and track laboratory results were the most important aspects of a PCMH office. There were no differences in response to the survey according to age, sex, race, or site. Patients listed care coordination, patient self-management, and improved access to care as the top priority attributes of a PCMH. Patients were consistent in their opinions that care coordination, access, and patient self-management were the most important elements of a PCMH.

  16. IAIMS at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center: accomplishments and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Roderer, N K; Clayton, P D

    1992-01-01

    The concept of "one-stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. Our goal is to provide access from a single workstation to clinical, research, and library resources; university and hospital administrative systems; and utility functions such as word processing and mail. We have created new organizational units and installed a network of workstations that can access a variety of resources and systems on any of seventy-two different host computers/servers. In November 1991, 2,600 different individuals used the clinical information system, 700 different individuals used the library resources, and 900 different individuals used hospital administrative systems via the network. Over the past four years, our efforts have cost the equivalent of $23 million or approximately 0.5% of the total medical center budget. Even small improvements in productivity and in the quality of work of individuals who use the system could justify these expenditures. The challenges we still face include the provision of additional easy-to-use applications and development of equitable methods for financial support. PMID:1326368

  17. First things first: foundational requirements for a medical home in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Forman, Jane; Harrod, Molly; Robinson, Claire; Annis-Emeott, Ann; Ott, Jessica; Saffar, Darcy; Krein, Sarah L; Greenstone, Clinton L

    2014-07-01

    In 2010, the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began implementation of its medical home, Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT), in 900 primary care clinics nationwide, with 120 located in academically affiliated medical centers. The literature on Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) implementation has focused mainly on small, nonacademic practices. To understand the experiences of primary care leadership, physicians and staff during early PACT implementation in a VHA academically affiliated primary care clinic and provide insights to guide future PCMH implementation. We conducted a qualitative case study during early PACT implementation. Primary care clinical leadership, primary care providers, residents, and staff. Between February 2011 and March 2012, we conducted 22 semi-structured interviews, purposively sampling participants by clinic role, and convenience sampling within role. We also conducted observations of 30 nurse case manager staff meetings, and collected data on growth in the number of patients, staff, and physicians. We used a template organizing approach to data analysis, using select constructs from the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Establishing foundational requirements was an essential first step in implementing the PACT model, with teamlets able to do practice redesign work. Short-staffing undermined development of teamlet working relationships. Lack of co-location of teamlet members in clinic and difficulty communicating with residents when they were off-site hampered communication. Opportunities to educate and reinforce PACT principles were constrained by the limited clinic hours of part-time primary care providers and residents, and delays in teamlet formation. Large academic medical centers face special challenges in implementing the medical home model. In an era of increasing emphasis on patient-centered care, our findings will inform efforts to both improve patient care and train clinicians to move from physician

  18. [The Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senior at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time s o h a r e applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community. In the 7000 Directorate I work directly in the 7611 organization. This organization is known as the Aviation Environments Technical Branch. My mentor is Vincent Satterwhite who is also the Branch Chief of the Aviation Environments Technical Branch. In this branch, I serve as the Assistant program manager of the Engineering Technology Program. The Engineering Technology Program (ETP) is one of three components of the High School L.E.R.C.I.P. This is an Agency-sponsored, eight-week research-based apprenticeship program designed to attract traditionally underrepresented high school students that demonstrate an aptitude for and interest in mathematics, science, engineering, and technology.

  19. Focus on: SUNY Health Center at Brooklyn Scientific & Medical Instrumentation Center.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, S

    1988-01-01

    The Scientific and Medical Instrumentation Center (SMIC) is the clinical engineering program serving the State University of New York's Health Science Center at Brooklyn. SMIC is a separate department within the center's 354-bed University Hospital, and provides many instrumentation support services for the hospital and the center's Basic Sciences Division. Now in its 24th year, SMIC developed the nation's first mandatory initial checkout program for patient care equipment, and in 1973 published the results of a funded pilot preventive maintenance program; this served as a model for the start-up of other PM programs in hospitals across the country and overseas. Today, this 35-person department is primarily responsible for some 7,000 units used in over 60 University Hospital departments and clinics. With its interdisciplinary expertise, SMIC also provides the hospital with many other instrumentation services, including prepurchase evaluation and review, and on-site emergency instrumentation service. SMIC also develops unique devices and instruments for the center's researchers, from the prototype stage through to final construction, and may modify instruments for increased safety and efficacy.

  20. Evaluation of Patient Centered Medical Home Practice Transformation Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Chase, Sabrina M.; Wise, Christopher G.; Schiff, Gordon D.; Schmidt, Laura A.; Goyzueta, Jeanette R.; Malouin, Rebecca A.; Payne, Susan M. C.; Quinn, Michael T.; Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Jaén, Carlos Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Background The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has become a widely cited solution to the deficiencies in primary care delivery in the United States. To achieve the magnitude of change being called for in primary care, quality improvement interventions must focus on whole-system redesign, and not just isolated parts of medical practices. Methods Investigators participating in 9 different evaluations of Patient Centered Medical Home implementation shared experiences, methodological strategies, and evaluation challenges for evaluating primary care practice redesign. Results A year-long iterative process of sharing and reflecting on experiences produced consensus on 7 recommendations for future PCMH evaluations: (1) look critically at models being implemented and identify aspects requiring modification; (2) include embedded qualitative and quantitative data collection to detail the implementation process; (3) capture details concerning how different PCMH components interact with one another over time; (4) understand and describe how and why physician and staff roles do, or do not evolve; (5) identify the effectiveness of individual PCMH components and how they are used; (6) capture how primary care practices interface with other entities such as specialists, hospitals, and referral services; and (7) measure resources required for initiating and sustaining innovations. Conclusions Broad-based longitudinal, mixed-methods designs that provide for shared learning among practice participants, program implementers, and evaluators are necessary to evaluate the novelty and promise of the PCMH model. All PCMH evaluations should as comprehensive as possible, and at a minimum should include a combination of brief observations and targeted qualitative interviews along with quantitative measures. PMID:21079525

  1. Origins, Chronology, and Current Status of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education: 1963-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.; Stone, James R., III

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) had a unique status among federally funded research and development center in education. Its funding was authorized by the federal legislation for career and technical and administered by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, not the Institute for Education Sciences.…

  2. 32 CFR 37.895 - How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? (a... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.895 Section 37.895 National Defense Department...

  3. 32 CFR 37.895 - How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? (a... 32 National Defense 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.895 Section 37.895 National Defense Department...

  4. 32 CFR 37.895 - How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? (a... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.895 Section 37.895 National Defense Department...

  5. 32 CFR 37.895 - How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? (a... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.895 Section 37.895 National Defense Department...

  6. 32 CFR 37.895 - How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? (a... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is the final performance report to be sent to the Defense Technical Information Center? 37.895 Section 37.895 National Defense Department...

  7. Origins, Chronology, and Current Status of the National Research Center for Career and Technical Education: 1963-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.; Stone, James R., III

    2013-01-01

    The National Research Center for Career and Technical Education (NRCCTE) had a unique status among federally funded research and development center in education. Its funding was authorized by the federal legislation for career and technical and administered by the Office of Vocational and Adult Education, not the Institute for Education Sciences.…

  8. Measuring physicians' productivity in a Veterans' Affairs Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Coleman, David L; Moran, Eileen; Serfilippi, Delchi; Mulinski, Paul; Rosenthal, Ronnie; Gordon, Bruce; Mogielnicki, R Peter

    2003-07-01

    The mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs includes patient care, education, research, and backup to the Department of Defense. Because the measurement of physicians' productivity must reflect both institutional goals and market forces, the authors designed a productivity model that uses measures of clinical workload and academic activities commensurate with the VA's investments in these activities. The productivity model evaluates four domains of physicians' activity: clinical work, education, research, and administration. Examples of the application of the productivity model in the evaluation of VA-paid physician-staff and in the composition of contracts for clinical services are provided. The proposed model is a relatively simple strategy for measuring a broad range of the work of academic physicians in VA medical centers. The model provides incentives for documentation of resident supervision and participation in administrative activities required for effective and efficient clinical care. In addition, the model can aid in determining resource distribution among clinical services and permits comparison with non-VA health care systems. A strategy for modifying the model to incorporate measures of quality of clinical care, research, education, and administration is proposed. The model has been a useful part of the process to ensure the optimum use of resources and to meet clinical and academic institutional goals. The activities and accomplishments used to define physician productivity will have a substantial influence on the character of the medical profession, the vitality of medical education and research, and the cost and quality of health care.

  9. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  10. An analytics approach to designing patient centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Ajorlou, Saeede; Shams, Issac; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Recently the patient centered medical home (PCMH) model has become a popular team based approach focused on delivering more streamlined care to patients. In current practices of medical homes, a clinical based prediction frame is recommended because it can help match the portfolio capacity of PCMH teams with the actual load generated by a set of patients. Without such balances in clinical supply and demand, issues such as excessive under and over utilization of physicians, long waiting time for receiving the appropriate treatment, and non-continuity of care will eliminate many advantages of the medical home strategy. In this paper, by using the hierarchical generalized linear model with multivariate responses, we develop a clinical workload prediction model for care portfolio demands in a Bayesian framework. The model allows for heterogeneous variances and unstructured covariance matrices for nested random effects that arise through complex hierarchical care systems. We show that using a multivariate approach substantially enhances the precision of workload predictions at both primary and non primary care levels. We also demonstrate that care demands depend not only on patient demographics but also on other utilization factors, such as length of stay. Our analyses of a recent data from Veteran Health Administration further indicate that risk adjustment for patient health conditions can considerably improve the prediction power of the model.

  11. 78 FR 46860 - Proposed Waiver and Extension of the Project Period for the Technical Assistance Coordination Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... Coordination Center AGENCY: Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Office of Special Education and... Coordination Center to receive funding from October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2014. DATES: We must receive... applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2008 for a Technical Assistance Coordination Center (Center...

  12. A Review and Evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of Phase VI-The Technical Report: A Survey and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Robert A.; And Others

    This report presents the results of a review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's scientific and technical information program, which examined technical reports from various institutions and organizations to determine the organization of reports, the language used to convey information, and the methods used to present information.…

  13. A Review and Evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of Phase VI-The Technical Report: A Survey and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, Robert A.; And Others

    This report presents the results of a review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's scientific and technical information program, which examined technical reports from various institutions and organizations to determine the organization of reports, the language used to convey information, and the methods used to present information.…

  14. Center for electronics and electrical engineering. Technical progress bulletin covering center programs, July to September 1990, with 1991 CEEE events calendar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    The report is the thirty-second issue of a quarterly publication providing information on the technical work of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (formerly the National Bureau of Standards) Center for Electronics and Electrical Engineering (CEEE). The issue of the CEEE Technical Progress Bulletin covers the third quarter of calendar year 1990. Abstracts are provided by technical area for both published papers and papers approved by NIST for publication. General topics discussed include the following: Semiconductor Technology Program; Signals and Systems Metrology Program; Additional Information; 1991 CEEE Calendar; Sponsor List; and Key Contacts in Center, Center Organization.

  15. The Oak Ridge Technical Information Center: A trailblazer in federal documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This softbound book attempts to record the history of US AEC's Technical Information Center, from its conception (1947) to 1977. This organization centralizes and manages the issues related to control and dissemination of technical information, to fulfill the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946. TIC tried to search out and install efficient and economical systems for servicing the various technical information programs. It coordinated a direct organization-to-organization information exchange program, and it also participated in official bilateral exchange programs and in developing information systems for IAEA and Euratom. The work, planning, and strategies employed to achieve goals are chronicled in this book, whose 18 chapters are arranged into four sections according to different presidential administrations.

  16. The Oak Ridge Technical Information Center: A trailblazer in federal documentation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, W.M.

    1992-01-01

    This document attempts to record the history of US AEC`s Technical Information Center, from its conception (1947) to 1977. This organization centralizes and manages the issues related to control and dissemination of technical information, to fulfill the provisions of the Atomic Energy Act of 1946. TIC tried to search out and install efficient and economical systems for servicing the various technical information programs. It coordinated a direct organization-to-organization information exchange program, and it also participated in official bilateral exchange programs and in developing information systems for IAEA and Euratom. The work, planning, and strategies employed to achieve goals are chronicled in this document, with 18 chapters arranged into four sections according to different presidential administrations.

  17. Medical humanities as tools for the teaching of patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Nazario, Rubén J

    2009-10-01

    The Institute of Medicine, in its 2001 report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, highlighted patient-centered care as an area for the development of quality measures. Since then, medical centers across the country have incorporated patient-centered modalities in their healthcare delivery systems. In academic medical centers, interest in patient-centered care has raised the awareness of the interactions between the humanities and medicine. This work aims to define the roles of patient-centered medicine and the medical humanities in the academic medical environment, to establish the shared values between the medical humanities and patient-centered care, and to demonstrate how the medical humanities can be a tool for the teaching of patient-centered care. Copyright 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine

  18. US Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    jytotoxic Reactions Produced by MUST-Water Constituents • — ^ &,-FT—Bahr, M.D. J. A. Boccia , Ljet MC, USA R. K. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA...Bahr, M.D. Joseph A. Boccia , LTC, MC, USA Robert H. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA Report Control Symbol: RCS-MEDDH-288(R1) Security Classification...Performing 90 Gunter F. Bahr, M.D., Chairman; Joseph A. Boccia , M.D., LTC, MC, USA: Robert H. Shoe- maker, Ph.D., CPT, MSC, USA I Technical

  19. An academic medical center's response to widespread computer failure.

    PubMed

    Genes, Nicholas; Chary, Michael; Chason, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    As hospitals incorporate information technology (IT), their operations become increasingly vulnerable to technological breakdowns and attacks. Proper emergency management and business continuity planning require an approach to identify, mitigate, and work through IT downtime. Hospitals can prepare for these disasters by reviewing case studies. This case study details the disruption of computer operations at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC), an urban academic teaching hospital. The events, and MSMC's response, are narrated and the impact on hospital operations is analyzed. MSMC's disaster management strategy prevented computer failure from compromising patient care, although walkouts and time-to-disposition in the emergency department (ED) notably increased. This incident highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and mitigation. It also demonstrates the value of using operational data to evaluate hospital responses to disasters. Quantifying normal hospital functions, just as with a patient's vital signs, may help quantitatively evaluate and improve disaster management and business continuity planning.

  20. Definitive treatment of combat casualties at military medical centers.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Romney C; Frisch, H Michael; Farber, Gerald L; Hayda, Roman A

    2006-01-01

    More than 9,000 casualties have been evacuated during the current conflict, and more than 40,000 orthopaedic surgical procedures have been performed. The most severely injured patients are treated in the United States at military medical centers. Individualized reconstructive plans are developed, and patients are treated with state-of-the-art techniques. Rehabilitation includes the assistance of the physical medicine and rehabilitation, physical therapy, and occupational therapy services, as well as, when necessary, psychiatric or other services. The extreme challenges of treating war-related soft-tissue defects include neurovascular injuries, burns, heterotopic ossification, infection, prolonged recovery, and persistent pain. Such injuries do not allow full restoration of function. Because of such devastating injuries, and despite use of up-to-date methods, outcomes can be less than optimal.

  1. The Logistics Of Installing Pacs In An Existing Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarinen, Allan O.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Loop, John W.

    1989-05-01

    A largely overlooked issue in the Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) area is the tremendous amount of site planning activity required to install such a system in an existing medical center. Present PACS equipment requires significant hospital real estate, specialized electrical power, cabling, and environmental controls to operate properly. Marshaling the hospital resources necessary to install PACS equipment requires many different players. The site preparation costs are nontrivial and usually include a number of hidden expenses. This paper summarizes the experience of the University of Washington Department of Radiology in installing an extensive digital imaging network (DIN) and PACS throughout the Department and several clinics in the hospital. The major logistical problems encountered at the University are discussed, a few recommendations are made, and the installation costs are documented. Overall, the University's site preparation costs equalled about seven percent (7%) of the total PACS equipment expenditure at the site.

  2. A special issue on the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Blount, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    This special issue on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) reflects its times. At the present time, the PCMH is an aspirational model with a few pilots functioning well around the country. How long the current period of idealism, fueled by the energy of early adopters, the consensus of diverse stakeholders, and the dollars of the Affordable Care Act will continue is anybody's guess. Representing the thinking of some of the best minds in the field, the articles in this issue have an aspirational and idealistic tone as much as a descriptive and analytic one. A year ago the balance would have been tipped more toward idealism and model building and a year from now it would, in all likelihood, tip more toward model description and analysis. The authors in this volume have been personally responsible for helping to move behavioral health to a more central position in the PCMH model.

  3. Medical practice in the peripheral health centers in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Sitaula, S; Magar, A

    2011-10-01

    The Ministry of Health and Population has implemented a compulsory two year service contract in government health facilities for all the scholarship holders of the Ministry of Education. Doctors are now being deployed to all hospitals and primary health centers of the country. Prior to 2005 it was very difficult to send doctors to the peripheral part, and now they wish to go more remote area due to the privilege given to the National Academy of Medical Sciences Post Graduate Entrance Examination, which help them get MD/MS seat. However, there are more challenges due to weak health system and failure to implement established rule and regulation. This paper highlights the outcry of a doctor working in the remote part of the country.

  4. Medical decision support: experience with implementing the Arden Syntax at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Jenders, R. A.; Hripcsak, G.; Sideli, R. V.; DuMouchel, W.; Zhang, H.; Cimino, J. J.; Johnson, S. B.; Sherman, E. H.; Clayton, P. D.

    1995-01-01

    We began implementation of a medical decision support system (MDSS) at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC) using the Arden Syntax in 1992. The Clinical Event Monitor which executes the Medical Logic Modules (MLMs) runs on a mainframe computer. Data are stored in a relational database and accessed via PL/I programs known as Data Access Modules (DAMs). Currently we have 18 clinical, 12 research and 10 administrative MLMs. On average, the clinical MLMs generate 50357 simple interpretations of laboratory data and 1080 alerts each month. The number of alerts actually read varies by subject of the MLM from 32.4% to 73.5%. Most simple interpretations are not read at all. A significant problem of MLMs is maintenance, and changes in laboratory testing and message output can impair MLM execution significantly. We are now using relational database technology and coded MLM output to study the process outcome of our MDSS. PMID:8563259

  5. The place of simulation in the surgical resident curriculum. The pedagogic program of the Nice Medical School Simulation Center.

    PubMed

    Bréaud, J; Chevallier, D; Benizri, E; Fournier, J-P; Carles, M; Delotte, J; Venissac, N; Myx, A; Ianelli, A; Levraut, J; Jones, D; Benchimol, D

    2012-02-01

    Surgical training relies on medical school lectures, practical training in patient care and in the operating room including instruction in anatomy and experimental surgery. Training with different techniques of simulators can complete this. Simulator-based training, widely used in North America, can be applied to several aspects of surgical training without any risk for patients: technical skills in both open and laparoscopic surgery, the notion of teamwork and the multidisciplinary management of acute medicosurgical situations. We present the curriculum developed in the Simulation Center of the Medical School of Nice Sophia-Antipolis. All residents in training at the Medical School participate in this curriculum. Each medical student is required to pursue theoretical training (familiarization with the operating room check-list), training in patient management using a high fidelity mannequin for various medical and surgical scenarios and training in technical gestures in open and laparoscopic surgery over a 2-year period, followed by an examination to validate all technical aptitudes. This curriculum has been approved and accredited by the prestigious American College of Surgeons, making this the first of its kind in France. As such, it should be considered as a model and, in accordance to the wishes of the French Surgical Academy, the first step toward the creation of true schools of surgery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Scientific and Technical Publishing at Goddard Space Flight Center in Fiscal Year 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of scientific and technical material that was researched, written, prepared, and disseminated by the Center's scientists and engineers during FY94. It is presented in numerical order of the GSFC author's sponsoring technical directorate; i.e., Code 300 is the Office of Flight Assurance, Code 400 is the Flight Projects Directorate, Code 500 is the Mission Operations and Data Systems Directorate, Code 600 is the Space Sciences Directorate, Code 700 is the Engineering Directorate, Code 800 is the Suborbital Projects and Operations Directorate, and Code 900 is the Earth Sciences Directorate. The publication database contains publication or presentation title, author(s), document type, sponsor, and organizational code. This is the second annual compilation for the Center.

  7. Defining and Measuring the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Nutting, Paul A.; Miller, William L.; Jaén, Carlos R.; Crabtree, Benjamin F.; Flocke, Susan A.; Gill, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is four things: 1) the fundamental tenets of primary care: first contact access, comprehensiveness, integration/coordination, and relationships involving sustained partnership; 2) new ways of organizing practice; 3) development of practices’ internal capabilities, and 4) related health care system and reimbursement changes. All of these are focused on improving the health of whole people, families, communities and populations, and on increasing the value of healthcare. The value of the fundamental tenets of primary care is well established. This value includes higher health care quality, better whole-person and population health, lower cost and reduced inequalities compared to healthcare systems not based on primary care. The needed practice organizational and health care system change aspects of the PCMH are still evolving in highly related ways. The PCMH will continue to evolve as evidence comes in from hundreds of demonstrations and experiments ongoing around the country, and as the local and larger healthcare systems change. Measuring the PCMH involves the following:Giving primacy to the core tenets of primary careAssessing practice and system changes that are hypothesized to provide added valueAssessing development of practices’ core processes and adaptive reserveAssessing integration with more functional healthcare system and community resourcesEvaluating the potential for unintended negative consequences from valuing the more easily measured instrumental features of the PCMH over the fundamental relationship and whole system aspectsRecognizing that since a fundamental benefit of primary care is its adaptability to diverse people, populations and systems, functional PCMHs will look different in different settings.Efforts to transform practice to patient-centered medical homes must recognize, assess and value the fundamental features of primary care that provide personalized, equitable health care and foster

  8. Defining and measuring the patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Stange, Kurt C; Nutting, Paul A; Miller, William L; Jaén, Carlos R; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Flocke, Susan A; Gill, James M

    2010-06-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is four things: 1) the fundamental tenets of primary care: first contact access, comprehensiveness, integration/coordination, and relationships involving sustained partnership; 2) new ways of organizing practice; 3) development of practices' internal capabilities, and 4) related health care system and reimbursement changes. All of these are focused on improving the health of whole people, families, communities and populations, and on increasing the value of healthcare. The value of the fundamental tenets of primary care is well established. This value includes higher health care quality, better whole-person and population health, lower cost and reduced inequalities compared to healthcare systems not based on primary care. The needed practice organizational and health care system change aspects of the PCMH are still evolving in highly related ways. The PCMH will continue to evolve as evidence comes in from hundreds of demonstrations and experiments ongoing around the country, and as the local and larger healthcare systems change. Measuring the PCMH involves the following: Giving primacy to the core tenets of primary care. Assessing practice and system changes that are hypothesized to provide added value Assessing development of practices' core processes and adaptive reserve. Assessing integration with more functional healthcare system and community resources. Evaluating the potential for unintended negative consequences from valuing the more easily measured instrumental features of the PCMH over the fundamental relationship and whole system aspects. Recognizing that since a fundamental benefit of primary care is its adaptability to diverse people, populations and systems, functional PCMHs will look different in different settings. Efforts to transform practice to patient-centered medical homes must recognize, assess and value the fundamental features of primary care that provide personalized, equitable health care and foster

  9. Decision making in acquiring medical technologies in Israeli medical centers: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Dan; Pliskin, Joseph S; Peterburg, Yitzhak

    2003-01-01

    This preliminary study had two objectives: a) charting the considerations relevant to decisions about acquisition of new medical technology at the hospital level; and b) creating a basis for the development of a research tool that will examine the function of the Israeli health system in assessment of new medical technologies. A comprehensive literature review and in-depth interviews with decision makers at different levels allowed formulation of criteria considered by decision makers when they decide to purchase and use (or disallow the use) of new medical technology. The resulting questionnaire was sent to medical center directors, along with a letter explaining the goals of the study. The questionnaire included 31 possible considerations for decision making concerning the acquisition of new medical technology by medical centers. The interviewees were asked to indicate the relevance of each consideration in the decision-making process. The most relevant criteria for the adoption of new technologies related to the need for a large capital investment, clinical efficacy of the technology as well as its influence on side effects and complication rates, and a formal approval by the Ministry of Health. Most interviewees stated that pressures exerted by the industry, by patients, or by senior physicians in the hospital are less relevant to decision making. Very small and usually not statistically significant differences in the ranking of hospital directors were found according to the hospitals' ownership, size, or location. The present study is a basis for a future study that will map and describe the function of hospital decision makers within the area of new technology assessment and the decision-making process in the adoption of new healthcare technologies.

  10. The 1990 Johnson Space Center bibliography of scientific and technical papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts are presented of scientific and technical papers written and/or presented by L. B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) authors, including civil servants, contractors, and grantees, during the calendar year of 1990. Citations include conference and symposium presentations, papers published in proceedings or other collective works, seminars, and workshop results, NASA formal report series (including contractually required final reports), and articles published in professional journals.

  11. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  12. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  13. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  14. Career Directions in Technical Writing: Becoming a Medical Journalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Anne

    2000-01-01

    Looks at medical writing as a career. Provides information about types of jobs available such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, textbooks, trader journals, indexing and abstracting, hospital publications, and online editing; salaries; job growth rate; and education needed. Offers job search tips. (JOW)

  15. Establishing a Geriatric Psychiatric Consultation in a VA Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Baker, F M; Chrismer, Brady

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the establishment of a Geriatric Psychiatry Consultation-Liaison Team (GPCLT) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center (VAMC) that previously had no organized geriatric psychiatric service. Geriatric psychiatric consultation was required by three intermediate-care units treating older, chronically medically ill veterans with psychiatric symptoms or disorders. The GPCLT comprised a black, female geriatric psychiatrist and a white, male social worker. This combination of disciplines maximized skills, and the ethnic-gender differences of team members addressed questions of racial tension and gender issues between patients and VAMC staff members. The compliance with recommendations of the GPCLT, ranging from 89% to 98% across the three units, its selection as a clinical site for a university-affiliated Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship Program, and the increase in the total hours of social work time assigned to the GPCLT documented the positive perception of the team by both the VAMC and the affiliated university. Specific recommendations are presented for consideration by other, similar settings. Copyright © 1995 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Centers of excellence: a medical measurement or marketing myth?

    PubMed

    Meyer, L C

    1996-01-01

    Managed care organizations, physician groups and hospital systems are all increasingly pressured to identify new modes of treatment that produce verifiable outcomes while reducing the revolving door pattern of health care for the chronically ill. Providers are also faced with creating systems of care to differentiate themselves from the competition in the marketplace. Disease-specific health management programs are being used to address both issues. When used properly, they can be promising tools in the battle to maintain health care quality while containing costs. Skillful balancing of these two important factors can ensure maximum value for both patients and payers. Are centers of excellence the critical pathway of the future? Or are they merely a marketing ploy to generate incremental growth and profitability for savvy business executives and medical group management entrepreneurs? This article provides an overview of the center of excellence concept, addresses its misuse in the industry and discusses the strategic and marketing implications for organizations considering this approach as a tool to demonstrate full accountability and meritorious outcomes.

  17. Patient-centered communication in digital medical encounters.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Jordan M; Dyer, Karen E; Lafata, Jennifer Elston

    2017-10-01

    Patients are increasingly using the secure messaging function available through online patient portals to communicate with their health care providers, yet little is known about the characteristics of conversations that occur. The goal of this study is to describe the types of messages initiated by patients communicating via patient portals and to assess whether providers employ patient-centered strategies in their electronic responses. A total of 193 messages from 58 message threads between patients and providers were collected during a one-week period in a large health care system. Content analysis of patient messages was conducted and deductive analysis of provider responses was employed for two types of patient-centered communication, provider use of supportive talk and partnership building. Patients sent nearly double the number of messages compared to providers (65% versus 35%). Patient messages expressed concern, sought medical solutions and requested assistance with administrative tasks. Over half (53.4%) of provider replies did not contain language reflective of either partnership building or supportive talk. Partnership building language and supportive talk occurred at lower rates than documented in the literature on in-person encounters. This may represent a lost opportunity to strengthen the patient-provider relationship. As secure messaging is increasingly utilized as a form of patient-provider communication, it is important to understand how aspects of this communication channel, including the patient-centeredness of the language used by providers, impact patient-provider relationships and patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Health IT–Enabled Care Coordination: A National Survey of Patient-Centered Medical Home Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Suzanne; Shih, Sarah C.; Winther, Chloe H.; Tinoco, Aldo; Kessler, Rodger S.; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Health information technology (IT) offers promising tools for improving care coordination. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of 6 proposed care coordination objectives for stage 3 of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services electronic health record incentive program (Meaningful Use) related to referrals, notification of care from other facilities, patient clinical summaries, and patient dashboards. METHODS We surveyed physician-owned and hospital/health system–affiliated primary care practices that achieved patient-centered medical home recognition and participated in the Meaningful Use program, and community health clinics with patient-centered medical home recognition (most with certified electronic health record systems). The response rate was 35.1%. We ascertained whether practices had implemented proposed objectives and perceptions of their importance. We analyzed the association of organizational and contextual factors with self-reported use of health IT to support care coordination activities. RESULTS Although 78% of the 350 respondents viewed timely notification of hospital discharges as very important, only 48.7% used health IT systems to accomplish this task. The activity most frequently supported by health IT was providing clinical summaries to patients, in 76.6% of practices; however, merely 47.7% considered this activity very important. Greater use of health IT to support care coordination activities was positively associated with the presence of a nonclinician responsible for care coordination and the practice’s capacity for systematic change. CONCLUSIONS Even among practices having a strong commitment to the medical home model, the use of health IT to support care coordination objectives is not consistent. Health IT capabilities are not currently aligned with clinicians’ priorities. Many practices will need financial and technical assistance for health IT to enhance care coordination. PMID:25964403

  19. Health IT-Enabled Care Coordination: A National Survey of Patient-Centered Medical Home Clinicians.

    PubMed

    Morton, Suzanne; Shih, Sarah C; Winther, Chloe H; Tinoco, Aldo; Kessler, Rodger S; Scholle, Sarah Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) offers promising tools for improving care coordination. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of 6 proposed care coordination objectives for stage 3 of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services electronic health record incentive program (Meaningful Use) related to referrals, notification of care from other facilities, patient clinical summaries, and patient dashboards. We surveyed physician-owned and hospital/health system-affiliated primary care practices that achieved patient-centered medical home recognition and participated in the Meaningful Use program, and community health clinics with patient-centered medical home recognition (most with certified electronic health record systems). The response rate was 35.1%. We ascertained whether practices had implemented proposed objectives and perceptions of their importance. We analyzed the association of organizational and contextual factors with self-reported use of health IT to support care coordination activities. Although 78% of the 350 respondents viewed timely notification of hospital discharges as very important, only 48.7% used health IT systems to accomplish this task. The activity most frequently supported by health IT was providing clinical summaries to patients, in 76.6% of practices; however, merely 47.7% considered this activity very important. Greater use of health IT to support care coordination activities was positively associated with the presence of a nonclinician responsible for care coordination and the practice's capacity for systematic change. Even among practices having a strong commitment to the medical home model, the use of health IT to support care coordination objectives is not consistent. Health IT capabilities are not currently aligned with clinicians' priorities. Many practices will need financial and technical assistance for health IT to enhance care coordination. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Does teaching non-technical skills to medical students improve those skills and simulated patient outcome?

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Vera; Herbstreit, Frank; Kehren, Clemens; Chittamadathil, Jilson; Wolfertz, Sandra; Dirkmann, Daniel; Kluge, Annette; Peters, Jürgen

    2017-03-29

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a tailor-made, non-technical skills seminar on medical student's behaviour, attitudes, and performance during simulated patient treatment. Seventy-seven students were randomized to either a non-technical skills seminar (NTS group, n=43) or a medical seminar (control group, n=34). The human patient simulation was used as an evaluation tool. Before the seminars, all students performed the same simulated emergency scenario to provide baseline measurements. After the seminars, all students were exposed to a second scenario, and behavioural markers for evaluating their non-technical skills were rated. Furthermore, teamwork-relevant attitudes were measured before and after the scenarios, and perceived stress was measured following each simulation. All simulations were also evaluated for various medical endpoints. Non-technical skills concerning situation awareness (p<.01, r=0.5) and teamwork (p<.01, r=0.45) improved from simulation I to II in the NTS group. Decision making improved in both groups (NTS: p<.01, r=0.39; control: p<.01, r=0.46). The attitude 'handling errors' improved significantly in the NTS group (p<.05, r=0.34). Perceived stress decreased from simulation I to II in both groups. Medical endpoints and patients´ outcome did not differ significantly between the groups in simulation II. This study highlights the effectiveness of a single brief seminar on non-technical skills to improve student's non-technical skills. In a next step, to improve student's handling of emergencies and patient outcomes, non-technical skills seminars should be accompanied by exercises and more broadly embedded in the medical school curriculum.

  1. Does teaching non-technical skills to medical students improve those skills and simulated patient outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Herbstreit, Frank; Kehren, Clemens; Chittamadathil, Jilson; Wolfertz, Sandra; Dirkmann, Daniel; Kluge, Annette; Peters, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of a tailor-made, non-technical skills seminar on medical student’s behaviour, attitudes, and performance during simulated patient treatment. Methods Seventy-seven students were randomized to either a non-technical skills seminar (NTS group, n=43) or a medical seminar (control group, n=34). The human patient simulation was used as an evaluation tool. Before the seminars, all students performed the same simulated emergency scenario to provide baseline measurements. After the seminars, all students were exposed to a second scenario, and behavioural markers for evaluating their non-technical skills were rated. Furthermore, teamwork-relevant attitudes were measured before and after the scenarios, and perceived stress was measured following each simulation. All simulations were also evaluated for various medical endpoints. Results Non-technical skills concerning situation awareness (p<.01, r=0.5) and teamwork (p<.01, r=0.45) improved from simulation I to II in the NTS group. Decision making improved in both groups (NTS: p<.01, r=0.39; control: p<.01, r=0.46). The attitude ‘handling errors’ improved significantly in the NTS group (p<.05, r=0.34). Perceived stress decreased from simulation I to II in both groups. Medical endpoints and patients´ outcome did not differ significantly between the groups in simulation II. Conclusions This study highlights the effectiveness of a single brief seminar on non-technical skills to improve student’s non-technical skills. In a next step, to improve student’s handling of emergencies and patient outcomes, non-technical skills seminars should be accompanied by exercises and more broadly embedded in the medical school curriculum. PMID:28355594

  2. Implementation of Single Source Based Hospital Information System for the Catholic Medical Center Affiliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inyoung; Choi, Ran; Lee, Jonghyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this research is to introduce the unique approach of the Catholic Medical Center (CMC) integrate network hospitals with organizational and technical methodologies adopted for seamless implementation. Methods The Catholic Medical Center has developed a new hospital information system to connect network hospitals and adopted new information technology architecture which uses single source for multiple distributed hospital systems. Results The hospital information system of the CMC was developed to integrate network hospitals adopting new system development principles; one source, one route and one management. This information architecture has reduced the cost for system development and operation, and has enhanced the efficiency of the management process. Conclusions Integrating network hospital through information system was not simple; it was much more complicated than single organization implementation. We are still looking for more efficient communication channel and decision making process, and also believe that our new system architecture will be able to improve CMC health care system and provide much better quality of health care service to patients and customers. PMID:21818432

  3. Medical Waste Technical Assistance Survey, Keesler AFB, Mississippi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    responsibilities in the medical waste program: Col -Heading, Environmental Health Officer Lt HilLman, Facility Manager Margaret Dennis , Infection Control Officer...wastes from the production of biologicals; discarded live and attenuated vaccines ; and culture dishes and devices used to transfer, inoculate, and mix...gives 100 immunizations a week. During flu season this number increases to 150 a day. The only infectious waste generated is needles and vials. All of

  4. Development and implementation of a comprehensive strategic plan for medical education at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Schwartzstein, Richard M; Huang, Grace C; Coughlin, Christine M

    2008-06-01

    Despite their vital contributions to the training of future physicians, many academic teaching hospitals have grown operationally and financially distinct from affiliated medical schools because of divergent missions, contributing to the erosion of clinical training. Some institutions have responded by building hybrid organizations; others by creating large health care networks with variable relationships with the affiliated medical school. In this case, the authors wished to establish the future educational mission of their medical center as a core element of the institution by creating data-driven recommendations for reorganization, programs, and financing. They conducted a self-study of all constituents, the results of which confirmed the importance of education at their institution but also revealed the insufficiency of incentives for teaching. They underwent an external review by a committee of prominent educators, and they involved administrators at the hospital and the medical school. Together, these inputs composed an informed assessment of medical education at their teaching hospital, from which they developed and actualized an institution-wide strategic plan for education. Over the course of three years, they centralized the administrative structure for education, implemented programs that cross departments and reinforce the UME-GME continuum, and created transparency in the financing of medical education. The plan was purposefully aligned with the clinical and research strategic plans by supporting patient safety in programs and the professional development of faculty. The application of a rigorous strategic planning process to medical education at an academic teaching hospital can focus the mission, invigorate faculty, and lead to innovative programs.

  5. Patient-Centered Medical Home Recognition and Clinical Performance in U.S. Community Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Leiyu; Lee, De-Chih; Chung, Michelle; Liang, Hailun; Lock, Diana; Sripipatana, Alek

    2017-06-01

    America's community health centers (HCs) are uniquely poised to implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model, as they are effective in providing comprehensive, accessible, and continuous primary care. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between PCMH recognition in HCs and clinical performance. Data for this study came from the 2012 Uniform Data System (UDS) as well as a survey of HCs' PCMH recognition achievement. The dependent variables included all 16 measures of clinical performance collected through UDS. Control measures included HC patient, provider, and practice characteristics. Bivariate analyses and multiple logistic regressions were conducted to compare clinical performance between HCs with and without PCMH recognition. Health centers that receive PCMH recognition generally performed better on clinical measures than HCs without PCMH recognition. After controlling for HC patient, provider, and practice characteristics, HCs with PCMH recognition reported significantly better performance on asthma-related pharmacologic therapy, diabetes control, pap testing, prenatal care, and tobacco cessation intervention. This study establishes a positive association between PCMH recognition and clinical performance in HCs. If borne out in future longitudinal studies, policy makers and practices should advance the PCMH model as a strategy to further enhance the quality of primary care. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Patient-centered Medical Home Capability and Clinical Performance in HRSA-supported Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Leiyu; Lock, Diana C.; Lee, De-Chih; Lebrun-Harris, Lydie A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Chidambaran, Preeta; Nocon, Robert S.; Zhu, Jinsheng; Sripipatana, Alek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the relationship between Patient-centered Medical Home (PCMH) model adoption in health centers (HCs) and clinical performance measures and to determine if adoption of PCMH characteristics is associated with better clinical performance. Research Design Data came from the Health Resources and Services Administration’s 2009 Uniform Data System and the 2009 Commonwealth Fund National Survey of Federally Qualified Health Centers. Clinical performance measures included 2 process measures (childhood immunization and cervical cancer screening) and 2 outcome measures (hypertension control and diabetes control). Total and subscale PCMH scores were regressed on the clinical performance measures, adjusting for patient, provider, financial, and institutional characteristics. Results The findings showed different directional relationships, with some PCMH domains (care management, test/referral tracking, quality improvement, and external coordination) showing little or no effect on outcome measures of interest, 1 domain (access/communication) associated with improved outcomes, and 1 domain (patient tracking/registry) associated with worse outcomes. Conclusions This study is among the first to examine the association between PCMH transformation and clinical performance in HCs, providing an understanding of the impact of PCMH adoption within safety-net settings. The mixed results highlight the importance of examining relationships between specific PCMH domains and specific clinical quality measures, in addition to analyzing overall PCMH scores which could yield distorted findings. PMID:25793267

  7. 76 FR 31340 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of St. Vincent's Medical Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... process for qualifying hospitals to apply to CMS to receive direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) FTE resident cap slots from the hospital that closed. The procedures we.... Vincent's Medical Center AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice...

  8. 78 FR 16679 - Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy Council; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Drug Evaluation and Research Medical Policy... interested organizations, on medical policy issues that may be considered by the CDER Medical Policy Council (Council) in FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). These comments will help the...

  9. Use of technical skills and medical devices among new registered nurses: A questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Ewertsson, Mona; Gustafsson, Margareta; Blomberg, Karin; Holmström, Inger K; Allvin, Renée

    2015-12-01

    One comprehensive part of nursing practice is performing technical skills and handling of medical equipment. This might be challenging for new registered nurses (RNs) to do in patient-safe way. The aim of this study was to describe and compare the extent to which new RNs perform various technical skills and handle medical devices in different settings, and to investigate their possibility for continued learning in this respect. A further aim was to describe their perceptions of incident reporting related to technical skills and medical devices. A cross-sectional study with descriptive and comparative design. RNs who recently graduated from a nursing programme at three Swedish universities and had worked as a RN for up to 1 year were included in the study (n=113, response rate 57%). Data were collected by means of a postal questionnaire. Half of the RNs reported that they performed several of the listed tasks every day or every week, regardless of workplace. These tasks were most frequently performed in surgical departments. The majority of the participants (76%) stated a need of continued practical training. However, less than half of them (48%) had access to a training environment. Several participants (43%) had been involved in incidents related to technical skills or medical devices, which were not always reported. Nearly a third of the participants (31%) did not use the existing guidelines when performing technical skills, and reflection on performance was uncommon. This study highlights the importance of shared responsibilities between nurse educators and health care employers to provide learning opportunities for new RNs in technical skills, to maintain patient safety. To increase the safety culture where nursing students and new RNs understand the importance of using evidence-based guidelines and taking a reflective approach in the performance of technical tasks is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Technical challenges for the construction of a medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ring, Francis J.; Ammer, Kurt; Wiecek, Boguslaw; Plassmann, Peter; Jones, Carl D.; Jung, Anna; Murawski, Piotr

    2005-10-01

    Infrared thermal imaging was first made available to medicine in the early 1960's. Despite a large number of research publications on the clinical application of the technique, the images have been largely qualitative. This is in part due to the imaging technology itself, and the problem of data exchange between different medical users, with different hardware. An Anglo Polish collaborative study was set up in 2001 to identify and resolve the sources of error and problems in medical thermal imaging. Standardisation of the patient preparation, imaging hardware, image capture and analysis has been studied and developed by the group. A network of specialist centres in Europe is planned to work to establish the first digital reference atlas of quantifiable images of the normal healthy human body. Further processing techniques can then be used to classify abnormalities found in disease states. The follow up of drug treatment has been successfully monitored in clinical trials with quantitative thermal imaging. The collection of normal reference images is in progress. This paper specifies the areas found to be the source of unwanted variables, and the protocols to overcome them.

  11. Design strategy and implementation of the medical diagnostic image support system at two large military medical centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Donald V.; Smith, Stan M.; Sauls, F.; Cawthon, Michael A.; Telepak, Robert J.

    1992-07-01

    The Medical Diagnostic Imaging Support (MDIS) system contract for federal medical treatment facilities was awarded to Loral/Siemens in the Fall of 1991. This contract places ''filmless'' imaging in a variety of situations from small clients to large medical centers. The MDIS system approach is a ''turn-key'', performance based specification driven by clinical requirements.

  12. Coordination within medical neighborhoods: Insights from the early experiences of Colorado patient-centered medical homes.

    PubMed

    Alidina, Shehnaz; Rosenthal, Meredith; Schneider, Eric; Singer, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The term "medical neighborhood" refers to relationships that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) seek to establish with other providers to facilitate coordinated patient care. Yet, how PCMHs can accomplish this coordination is not well understood. Drawing upon organizational theory (; ; ), we explored how PCMHs use coordination mechanisms to build and optimize their medical neighborhoods. We used mixed methods, blending data collected via interviews and surveys with practice leaders and care coordinators at 30 months after a PCMH collaborative intervention in Colorado as well as surveys from all providers from 13 PCMHs before and 30 months after the intervention. We used thematic analysis to understand the role and use of coordination mechanisms by PCMHs and changes in the ability to coordinate and deliver care continuity. PCMHs drew on four coordination mechanisms to build relationships with their medical neighbors: interorganizational routines to improve reliability of information flow; information connectivity to facilitate continuity and safe care; boundary spanners to integrate care across silos; and communication, negotiation, and decision mechanisms to introduce shared accountability. When providers were fairly confident of the patient's diagnosis and management required sequential interactions (such as tests or procedures), PCMHs tended to coordinate care through interorganizational routines and information connectivity. When a diagnosis was less certain and required reciprocal interaction (i.e., consultation), PCMHs employed boundary spanners and communication, negotiation, and decision mechanisms. Use of coordination mechanisms by PCMHs can help to improve care coordination in medical neighborhoods. All four mechanisms appear to be useful. The optimal mix of coordination mechanisms requires attention to patient context. Successfully building medical neighborhoods also requires meta-leaders, collaboration competencies, and high-quality relationships

  13. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi; Markel Vaysman, Anna; Wilken, Lori

    2013-07-01

    To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM) clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting. This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32%) completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as 'excellent', 44% as 'good', 5% as 'fair', and 0% stated 'poor'. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise. In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  14. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation.

  15. [Forum: dermopigmentation or medical tattooing. Brief notes on technical aspects of dermopigmentation].

    PubMed

    Chavoin, J P; Oksman, B

    1992-08-01

    Tattooing is a very old procedure widespread throughout the world. Recently dermatologists and plastic surgeons have applied this procedure for medical dermography. Incarcerating a pigment in the depth of the dermis has caused no problems for professionals and aestheticiens performing tattoos. Medical ethics oblige us to specify the nature of the pigment used. The instrument used for injecting the pigment should be well adapted for safety, technically, ergonomically and for asepsis.

  16. Examining Invasive Bedside Procedure Performance at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kay, Cynthia; Wozniak, Erica M; Szabo, Aniko; Jackson, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Explore the performance patterns of invasive bedside procedures at an academic medical center, evaluate whether patient characteristics predict referral, and examine procedure outcomes. This was a prospective, observational, and retrospective chart review of adults admitted to a general medicine service who had a paracentesis, thoracentesis, or lumbar puncture between February 22, 2013 and February 21, 2014. Of a total of 399 procedures, 335 (84%) were referred to a service other than the primary team for completion. Patient characteristics did not predict referral status. Complication rates were low overall and did not differ, either by referral status or location of procedure. Model-based results showed a 41% increase in the average length of time until procedure completion for those referred to the hospital procedure service or radiology (7.9 vs 5.8 hours; P < 0.05) or done in radiology instead of at the bedside (9.0 vs 5.8 hours; P < 0.001). The average procedure cost increased 38% ($1489.70 vs $1023.30; P < 0.001) for referred procedures and 56% ($1625.77 vs $1150.98; P < 0.001) for radiology-performed procedures. Although referral often is the easier option, our study shows its shortcomings, specifically pertaining to cost and time until completion. Procedure performance remains an important skill for residents and hospitalists to learn and use as a part of patient care.

  17. Ten-year experience of phototherapy in Yonsei Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Hann, S K; Park, Y K

    1996-12-01

    Phototherapy with PUVA or UVB has been used to treat a wide variety of diseases such as psoriasis, vitiligo, atopic dermatitis and mycosis fungoides, etc. The present study was performed to investigate the pattern of phototherapy in the phototherapy clinic of Yonsei Medical Center. One thousand six hundred ninety two patients who received PUVA or UVB phototherapy were included in this study. We analyzed the protocols for phototherapy between 1985 and 1994. The number of phototherapy per year increased sharply until 1991 and thereafter it has remained relatively constant. The most common age group at the start of phototherapy was the third decade. The most common indications for PUVA and UVB phototherapy were vitiligo and psoriasis, respectively. Most patients had received less than 50 treatments of PUVA and less than 200 J/cm2 of cumulative UVA. Most patients had received less than 50 treatments with UVB and cumulative UVB doses were variable. We had not found any malignancy in the skin. Since the maximum safe cumulative doses of UVA or UVB have not yet been established, it is difficult to decide when phototherapy should be discontinued. The data presented in this study needs to be further analyzed in correlation with photoaging and cancer development for the safe usage of phototherapy.

  18. Cultural Awareness Among Nursing Staff at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Jennifer; Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Madigan, Catherine K; Li, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to identify areas for targeted improvement in regard to cultural awareness and competence among nursing staff and in the work environment. Many facilities have initiated programs to facilitate cultural competence development among nursing staff; however, there has been little examination of the effect of these initiatives, assessment of experienced nurses' cultural awareness, or investigation of nurse leader's role in promoting cultural competence in the literature. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a cultural awareness survey was modified and electronically distributed to all registered nurses and assistive personnel at an academic medical center. The modified survey instrument showed good reliability and validity among the study population. Most nursing staff exhibited a moderate to high level of cultural awareness and held positive opinions about nursing leadership and the work environment with regard to cultural issues. In increasingly diverse work environments, assessing the cultural awareness of nursing staff enables nurse leaders to evaluate efforts in promoting cultural competence and to identify specific areas in which to target staff development efforts and leadership training.

  19. Mental Health Recovery in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, Gregory A.; O’Connell, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Groessl, Erik J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of transitioning clients from a mental health clinic to a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) on mental health recovery. Methods. We drew data from a large US County Behavioral Health Services administrative data set. We used propensity score analysis and multilevel modeling to assess the impact of the PCMH on mental health recovery by comparing PCMH participants (n = 215) to clients receiving service as usual (SAU; n = 22 394) from 2011 to 2013 in San Diego County, California. We repeatedly assessed mental health recovery over time (days since baseline assessment range = 0–1639; mean = 186) with the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) scale and Recovery Markers Questionnaire. Results. For total IMR (log-likelihood ratio χ2[1] = 4696.97; P < .001) and IMR Factor 2 Management scores (log-likelihood ratio χ2[1] = 7.9; P = .005), increases in mental health recovery over time were greater for PCMH than SAU participants. Increases on all other measures over time were similar for PCMH and SAU participants. Conclusions. Greater increases in mental health recovery over time can be expected when patients with severe mental illness are provided treatment through the PCMH. Evaluative efforts should be taken to inform more widespread adoption of the PCMH. PMID:26180945

  20. Mental Health Recovery in the Patient-Centered Medical Home.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Marisa; Aarons, Gregory A; O'Connell, Maria; Davidson, Larry; Groessl, Erik J

    2015-09-01

    We examined the impact of transitioning clients from a mental health clinic to a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) on mental health recovery. We drew data from a large US County Behavioral Health Services administrative data set. We used propensity score analysis and multilevel modeling to assess the impact of the PCMH on mental health recovery by comparing PCMH participants (n = 215) to clients receiving service as usual (SAU; n = 22,394) from 2011 to 2013 in San Diego County, California. We repeatedly assessed mental health recovery over time (days since baseline assessment range = 0-1639; mean = 186) with the Illness Management and Recovery (IMR) scale and Recovery Markers Questionnaire. For total IMR (log-likelihood ratio χ(2)[1] = 4696.97; P < .001) and IMR Factor 2 Management scores (log-likelihood ratio χ(2)[1] = 7.9; P = .005), increases in mental health recovery over time were greater for PCMH than SAU participants. Increases on all other measures over time were similar for PCMH and SAU participants. Greater increases in mental health recovery over time can be expected when patients with severe mental illness are provided treatment through the PCMH. Evaluative efforts should be taken to inform more widespread adoption of the PCMH.

  1. The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Patient Experience

    PubMed Central

    Martsolf, Grant R; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shi, Yunfeng; Casalino, Lawrence P; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Scanlon, Dennis P; Shortell, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between practices' reported use of patient-centered medical home (PCMH) processes and patients' perceptions of their care experience. Data Source Primary survey data from 393 physician practices and 1,304 patients receiving care in those practices. Study Design This is an observational, cross-sectional study. Using standard ordinary least-squares and a sample selection model, we estimated the association between patients' care experience and the use of PCMH processes in the practices where they receive care. Data Collection We linked data from a nationally representative survey of individuals with chronic disease and two nationally representative surveys of physician practices. Principal Findings We found that practices' use of PCMH processes was not associated with patient experience after controlling for sample selection as well as practice and patient characteristics. Conclusions In our study, which was large, but somewhat limited in its measures of the PCMH and of patient experience, we found no association between PCMH processes and patient experience. The continued accumulation of evidence related to the possibilities of the PCMH, how PCMH is measured, and how the impact of PCMH is gauged provides important information for health care decision makers. PMID:22670806

  2. [Merkel cell carcinoma experience in a reference medical center.

    PubMed

    Roesch-Dietlen, Federico; Devezé-Bocardi, Raúl; Ruiz-Juárez, Isabel; Grube-Pagola, Peter; Romero-Sierra, Graciela; Remes-Troche, José María; Silva-Cañetas, Carmen Sofía; Lozoya-López Escalera, Hilda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor that occurs on areas exposed to ultraviolet light. It is usually asymptomatic and it is diagnosed late often. The treatment is surgical, associated with adjuvant radiotherapy. The objective was to present the experience in the management of Merkel cell carcinoma in a reference medical center. Methods: all patients with Merkel cell carcinoma treated at the Instituto de Investigaciones Médico-Biológicas of the Universidad Veracruzana during the period 2008 to 2011 were studied. Sex, age, evolution time, tumor localization, size, metastases and treatment were analyzed. Results: of 3217 patients treated, three cases were Merkel cell carcinoma (0.09 %), their age was 52.1 ± 14.17, male predominance of 66.67 %; the evolution time was of 29.66 ± 35.36 months; the tumour localization was on inguinal region, anterior chest and left arm; the noodle size was of 6.0 ± 5.19 cm; two patients had lymph node metastases. In two cases, resection and lymphadenectomy were performed. They all received radiation therapy and chemotherapy in one case. Histologically the medium variant predominated; immunohistochemistry was positive in the three cases. One patient died ten months after the study was done. Conclusions: our experience is similar with others authors, Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare tumor, usually diagnosed late, and it has poor survival.

  3. [Bronchial carcinoma at the Zadar Medical Center 1982-1986].

    PubMed

    Mazzi, A; Mazzi, M

    1989-01-01

    In the period between 1982-1986, 2132 neoplasms were registered in the Zadar Medical Center, out of them 164 (7.7%) were primary bronchial carcinomas of which 138 (84.1%) were morphologically verified. The difference between the number of the registered and verified bronchial carcinomas is due to the difference in the registration criteria. The annual average incidence rate of the verified carcinomas was about 30 which is lower than in the Zagreb area and Croatia as a whole. The average number of cases diagnosed in other institutions was about 20 percent. An analysis by sex revealed a prevalence among males aged 55-75. Morphologically, the most common type of carcinoma was planocellular, followed by anaplastic, small cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The greatest majority of the positive findings was obtained by bronchoscopy and sputum examination. The average number of sputa obtained per patient was 3.5; 63 percent of these were adequate and 40 percent of them were positive. In 86% of cases the diagnosis was established from the first three sputa. The most frequently used bronchoscopic method of material obtained was aspiration and the best diagnostic results were obtained by puncture biopsy and excision. The high percentage of positive results obtained by transtracheal biopsy justifies its use.

  4. Technical Evaluation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    NATO nations should decide, at a minimum, on bioethical boundaries before medical and materiel performance enhancement technology significantly...RTO-MP-HFM-181 T - 1 Technical Evaluation Report LTC James Ness, Ph.D. (USA) US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Telemedicine and...Advanced Technology Research Center Medical Research and Advanced Technology Liaison Gruppe Wehrpsychologie Streitkäfteamt Bonn, Germany

  5. The Changing Landscape of Molecular Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Heidi L.; Hynes, Elizabeth; Funke, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the field of molecular diagnostics has undergone tremendous transformation, catalyzed by the clinical implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS). As technical capabilities are enhanced and current limitations are addressed, NGS is increasingly capable of detecting most variant types and will therefore continue to consolidate and simplify diagnostic testing. It is likely that genome sequencing will eventually serve as a universal first line test for disorders with a suspected genetic origin. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), which have been at the forefront of this paradigm shift are now presented with challenges to keep up with increasing technical, bioinformatic and interpretive complexity of NGS-based tests in a highly competitive market. Additional complexity may arise from altered regulatory oversight, also triggered by the unprecedented scope of NGS-based testing, which requires new approaches. However, these challenges are balanced by unique opportunities, particularly at the interface between clinical and research operations, where AMCs can capitalize on access to cutting edge research environments and establish collaborations to facilitate rapid diagnostic innovation. This article reviews present and future challenges and opportunities for AMC associated molecular diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of the Partners HealthCare Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM). PMID:26828522

  6. Final priority. Rehabilitation Training: Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2014-08-19

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Rehabilitation Training program to establish a Job-Driven Vocational Rehabilitation Technical Assistance Center (JDVRTAC). The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2014 and later years. We take this action to focus on training in an area of national need. Specifically, this priority responds to the Presidential Memorandum to Federal agencies directing them to take action to address job-driven training for the Nation's workers. The JDVRTAC will provide technical assistance (TA) to State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies to help them develop for individuals with disabilities training and employment opportunities that meet the needs of today's employers.

  7. Family-centered maternity care for deaf refugees: the patient-centered medical home in action.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, Shirish K; Carroll, Jennifer K; Fogarty, Colleen T; Finigan, Elizabeth G

    2009-12-01

    The intersection of 2 underserved populations-refugees and deaf individuals-presents novel challenges to health care systems and has not been described previously. A patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is uniquely equipped to provide outstanding primary care to disadvantaged groups. As an illustrative case study, we present our experience applying principles of the PCMH to address an extremely challenging clinical situation: providing high-quality maternity care to a recently immigrated Vietnamese refugee couple lacking formal language skills. We describe how enhanced access, continuity, coordination, and cultural appropriateness can facilitate favorable outcomes in even daunting circumstances. By collaborating with multiple interpreters, the health center staff, and the extended family, we effectively mobilized an expanded system of care to ensure informed consent and shared decision making, ultimately culminating in a successful labor and vaginal delivery. Through organizational and individual commitment to the tenets of the PCMH, we demonstrate the particular strengths of family medicine training sites in caring for similar patients and families with complex cultural and linguistic barriers to care.

  8. A Needs Assessment of the Medical Laboratory Technology Students at New York City Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvadurai, Ranjani

    A study examined the needs of medical laboratory technology students at New York City Technical College. The nominal group technique (which involves silent generation of ideas in writing, round-robin feedback, and individual voting on priority ideas) was used to assess the academic and personal needs of 20 students. The following seven significant…

  9. Medical Laboratory Technician--Microbiology, 10-3. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, the second of three courses in the medical laboratory technician field adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, was designed as a refresher course for student self-study and evaluation. It is suitable for use by advanced students or beginning students participating in a supervised…

  10. A Needs Assessment of the Medical Laboratory Technology Students at New York City Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvadurai, Ranjani

    A study examined the needs of medical laboratory technology students at New York City Technical College. The nominal group technique (which involves silent generation of ideas in writing, round-robin feedback, and individual voting on priority ideas) was used to assess the academic and personal needs of 20 students. The following seven significant…

  11. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1982-06-01

    This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  12. Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, M.W.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes research during 1982 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Carcinogenesis address mechanisms of chemical and radiation carcinogenesis including the processes of tumor initiation and promotion. The studies employ rat liver and mouse skin models as well as human rodent cell culture systems. The use of liposomes for metal mobilization is also explored. Low Level Radiation studies include delineation of the hematopoietic and other responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiation. Molecular Biology research develops two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other diseases. Fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and other key proteins are included, as are studies of cell growth, and of molecular and cellular effects of solar uv light. Research in Toxicology uses cellular, physiological, whole animal, and chronobiological end points and chemical separations to elucidate mechanisms and evaluate hazards of coal conversion by-products, actinides, and toxic metals. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

  13. A Survey of Vocational Administrators and Teachers in Career and Technical Education Centers regarding Their Perception of Vocational Program Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Richard Lynn, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this statewide study is to assess the perceived improvements made to programs that are offered at Career and Technical Education Centers from the perspective of vocational administrators and teachers following the Bureau of Career and Technical Education conduction of an Approved Program Evaluation. The Pennsylvania Bureau of Career…

  14. A Survey of Vocational Administrators and Teachers in Career and Technical Education Centers regarding Their Perception of Vocational Program Improvements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Richard Lynn, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this statewide study is to assess the perceived improvements made to programs that are offered at Career and Technical Education Centers from the perspective of vocational administrators and teachers following the Bureau of Career and Technical Education conduction of an Approved Program Evaluation. The Pennsylvania Bureau of Career…

  15. Public health potential of farmers' markets on medical center campuses: a case study from Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L; Rovniak, Liza S

    2011-12-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers' markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces.

  16. Public Health Potential of Farmers’ Markets on Medical Center Campuses: A Case Study From Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Rovniak, Liza S.

    2011-01-01

    There are currently 7175 farmers’ markets in the United States, and these organizations are increasingly viewed as one facet of the solution to national health problems. There has been a recent trend toward establishing markets on medical center campuses, and such partnerships can augment a medical center's ability to serve community health. However, to our knowledge no studies have described the emergence of a market at a medical center, the barriers and challenges such an initiative has faced, or the nature of programming it may foster. We provide a qualitative description of the process of starting a seasonal, once-a-week, producers-only market at the Pennsylvania State Hershey Medical Center, and we call for greater public health attention to these emerging community spaces. PMID:22021298

  17. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. A midwifery-led in-hospital birth center within an academic medical center: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Perdion, Karen; Lesser, Rebecca; Hirsch, Jennifer; Barger, Mary; Kelly, Thomas F; Moore, Thomas R; Lacoursiere, D Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The University of California San Diego Community Women's Health Program (CWHP) has emerged as a successful and sustainable coexistence model of women's healthcare. The cornerstone of this midwifery practice is California's only in-hospital birth center. Located within the medical center, this unique and physically separate birth center has been the site for more than 4000 births. With 10% cesarean delivery and 98% breast-feeding rates, it is an exceptional example of low-intervention care. Integrating this previously freestanding birth center into an academic center has brought trials of mistrust and ineffectual communication. Education, consistent leadership, and development of multidisciplinary guidelines aided in overcoming these challenges. This collaborative model provides a structure in which residents learn to be respectful consultants and appreciate differences in medical practice. The CWHP and its Birth Center illustrates that through persistence and flexibility a collaborative model of maternity services can flourish and not only positively influence new families but also future generations of providers.

  19. Trends in the Use of Medical Imaging to Diagnose Appendicitis at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Repplinger, Michael D; Weber, Andrew C; Pickhardt, Perry J; Rajamanickam, Victoria P; Svenson, James E; Ehlenbach, William J; Westergaard, Ryan P; Reeder, Scott B; Jacobs, Elizabeth A

    2016-09-01

    To quantify the trends in imaging use for the diagnosis of appendicitis. A retrospective study covering a 22-year period was conducted at an academic medical center. Patients were identified by International Classification of Diseases-9 diagnosis code for appendicitis. Medical record data extraction of these patients included imaging test used (ultrasound, CT, or MRI), gender, age, and body mass index (BMI). The proportion of patients undergoing each scan was calculated by year. Regression analysis was performed to determine whether age, gender, or BMI affected imaging choice. The study included a total of 2,108 patients, including 967 (43.5%) females and 599 (27%) children (<18 years old). CT use increased over time for the entire cohort (2.9% to 82.4%, P < .0001), and each subgroup (males, females, adults, children; P < .0001 for each). CT use increased more in females and adults than in males and children, but differences in trends were not statistically significant (male versus female, P = .8; adult versus child, P = .1). The percentage of patients who had no imaging used for the diagnosis of appendicitis decreased over time (P < .0001 overall and for each subgroup), and no difference was found in trends between complementary subgroups (male versus female, P = .53; adult versus child, P = .66). No statistically significant changes were found in use of ultrasound or MRI over the study period. With increasing BMI, CT was more frequently used. Of those diagnosed with appendicitis at an academic medical center, CT use increased more than 20-fold. However, no statistically significant trend was found for increased use of ultrasound or MRI. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Scientometrics and publishing in Hungarian medical science. Ethical and technical issues].

    PubMed

    Fazekas, T; Varró, V

    2001-11-11

    The authors present an account of the main ethical and technical aspects relating to the measurement of medical publication activities and the compilation of publications lists. It is demonstrated that the Anglo-American scientometric system (Institute for Scientific Information, USA) is currently gaining stable ground in Hungary. At the same time, however, there continues to be a place for a national publication index used to assess Hungarian-language publication activity, for the two systems conveniently supplement one another. The criterion system of medical publishing established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) is described in detail, and is recommended for wide-ranging application in Hungary.

  1. Final priority; technical assistance to improve state data capacity--National Technical Assistance Center to improve state capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data. Final priority.

    PubMed

    2013-05-20

    The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services announces a priority under the Technical Assistance to Improve State Data Capacity program. The Assistant Secretary may use this priority for competitions in fiscal year (FY) 2013 and later years. We take this action to focus attention on an identified national need to provide technical assistance (TA) to States to improve their capacity to meet the data collection and reporting requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). We intend this priority to establish a TA center to improve State capacity to accurately collect and report IDEA data (Data Center).

  2. Enriching Patient-Centered Medical Homes Through Peer Support.

    PubMed

    Daaleman, Timothy P; Fisher, Edwin B

    2015-08-01

    Peer supporters are recognized by various designations-community health workers, promotores de salud, lay health advisers-and are community members who work for pay or as volunteers in association with health care systems or nonprofit community organizations and often share ethnicity, language, and socioeconomic status with the mentees that they serve. Although emerging evidence demonstrates the efficacy of peer support at the community level, the adoption and implementation of this resource into patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) is still under development. To accelerate that integration, this article addresses three major elements of peer support interventions: the functions and features of peer support, a framework and programmatic strategies for implementation, and fiscal models that would support the sustained viability of peer support programs within PCMHs. Key functions of peer support include assistance in daily management of health-related behaviors, social and emotional support, linkage to clinical care, and longitudinal or ongoing support. An organizational model of innovation implementation provides a useful framework for determining how to implement and evaluate peer support programs in PCMHs. Programmatic strategies that can be useful in developing peer support programs within PCMHs include peer coaching or mentoring, group self-management training, and programs designed around the telephone and information technology. Fiscal models for peer support programs include linkages with hospital or health care systems, service- or community-based nonprofit organizations, and partnerships between health care systems and community groups. Peer support promises to enrich PCMHs by activating patients in their self-care, providing culturally sensitive outreach, and opening the way for partnerships with community-based organizations.

  3. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  4. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas TH; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. METHODS: A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton’s Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. RESULTS: Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R2 = 0.59) and in collaboration (R2 = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. CONCLUSION: Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are

  5. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas Th; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-04-26

    To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton's Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R(2) = 0.59) and in collaboration (R(2) = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are operating in a setting conducive

  6. Deficits in allergy knowledge among physicians at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Stukus, David R; Green, Todd; Montandon, Shari V; Wada, Kara J

    2015-07-01

    Allergic conditions have high prevalence in the general population. Misconceptions regarding the diagnosis and management of allergic disease among physicians can lead to suboptimal clinical care. To determine the extent of allergy-related knowledge deficits among physicians. Pediatric and internal medicine resident and attending physicians from 2 separate academic medical centers were asked to answer an anonymous electronic survey. Survey questions addressed 7 different allergy content areas. Four hundred eight physicians completed surveys (23.9% response rate). Respondents had few correct answers (mean ± SD 1.91 ± 1.43). Pediatric respondents had a larger number of correct answers compared with medicine-trained physicians (P < .001). No individual answered every survey question correctly, and 50 respondents (12.3%) had no correct answer. Three hundred seventy-eight respondents (92.6%) were unable to provide correct answers for at least 50% of survey questions. Level of residency training and prior rotation through an allergy and immunology elective correlated with a larger number of correct responses (P < .01). Only 1 survey question had an overall correct response rate higher than 50% (n = 261, 64%). Correct response rate was lower than 30% for 7 of the 9 possible questions. There are significant knowledge deficits in many areas of allergy-related content among pediatric and internal medicine physicians and across all levels of training and specialty. Given the prevalence of allergic conditions, the potential implications of a negative impact on clinical care are staggering. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Manatí Medical Center Sepsis Management Epidemiological Study.

    PubMed

    Morales Serrano, Tamara; Ramos, Shirley; Lara Gonzalez, Yanira; Torres Colberg, Heileene; Vera Quiñones, Alexis; Miranda Santiago, Roberto; Amill, Samuel; Otero, Marielys; Cintron, Vielka; Villarreal Morales, Martha Lissete

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is the combination of infection and physiological changes known as the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There have been improvements in mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients based on "Surviving Sepsis Campaign" guidelines. Current management of sepsis at our Institution follows no specific mandatory protocols. This study aimed to verify the incidence and outcome of sepsis in Manati Medical Center, Puerto Rico. An observational retrospective study was conducted. All the Emergency Department admissions from May 1/ to October 31/ 2013 were screened for sepsis per ICD-9 code. For all included patients, demographic and clinical data at ED admission were collected. During this period 8931 patients were admitted and 148 met criteria for sepsis and related conditions. The overall mortality rate was 43.91%. Mortality increased with age, from 10.52% among ≤ 44 years old to 68.75% in those ≥ 85 years old. The main infection sources were respiratory (32.66%) and urinary tract (24.62%). Mean age among non-survivors was 10.8 years higher than the survivor group (95% Cl 5.2-1 6.5, p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed an increased fatality rate associated to severity of sepsis (HR 1.33; 95% Cl; 1.03-1.72, p = 0.02) and the APACHE2 score (HR 1.05; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.09 p = 0.03). Our data suggests that sepsis is an important problem to consider. We strongly encourage an institutional standardized protocol to diminish the mortality impact. Our results will allow adequate preventive strategies to improve early diagnosis, mortality rates and outcomes of septic patients.

  8. [Patient-centered care. Improvement of communication between university medical centers and general practitioners for patients in neuro-oncology].

    PubMed

    Renovanz, M; Keric, N; Richter, C; Gutenberg, A; Giese, A

    2015-12-01

    Communication between university medical centers and general practitioners (GP) is becoming increasingly more important in supportive patient care. A survey among GPs was performed with the primary objective to assess their opinion on current workflow and communication between GPs and the university medical center. The GPs were asked to score (grades 1-6) their opinion on the current interdisciplinary workflow in the care of patients with brain tumors, thereby rating communication between a university medical center in general and the neuro-oncology outpatient center in particular. Questionnaires were sent to1000 GPs and the response rate was 15 %. The mean scored evaluation of the university medical center in general was 2.62 and of the neuro-oncological outpatient clinic 2.28 (range 1-6). The most often mentioned issues to be improved were easier/early telephone information (44 %) and a constantly available contact person (49 %). Interestingly, > 60 % of the GPs indicated they would support web-based tumor boards for interdisciplinary and palliative neuro-oncological care. As interdisciplinary care for neuro-oncology patients is an essential part of therapy, improvement of communication between GPs and university medical centers is indispensable. Integrating currently available electronic platforms under data protection aspects into neuro-oncological palliative care could be an interesting tool in order to establish healthcare networks and could find acceptance with GPs.

  9. Implementation of computerized prescriber order entry in four academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Thomas W; May, Dianne; Alwan, Michael; Sue, Caron

    2012-12-15

    Lessons learned through the transition to computerized prescriber order entry (CPOE) at four academic medical centers are reviewed. CPOE is an important strategy in efforts to improve medication and patient safety and achieve compliance with federal health care information technology objectives. Pharmacy-led CPOE implementation teams at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Georgia Health Sciences Health System, UC Health University Hospital, and University of Utah Hospitals and Clinics were challenged to overcome different types of resource, staffing, and hardware-software constraints. Their collective experience points to a number of factors that are essential to successful CPOE implementation, including (1) involvement by all ancillary personnel in system planning, development, implementation, and refinement, (2) selection of CPOE equipment that offers a high level of interoperability with existing information systems and automated dispensing machines, (3) development of electronic order sets and clinical decision support (CDS) tools that are designed for ease of use and tailored to the hospital's clinical workflows, and (4) dedication of adequate resources and time for staff training, technical support, and system troubleshooting and maintenance. In particular, facilities transitioning to CPOE must secure initial and ongoing physician input and feedback to ensure patient safety and reduce CDS-related problems and other barriers to broad system acceptance. Before implementing CPOE, addressing institutional considerations pertaining to system selection, preimplementation preparation, staff training, necessary equipment, program rollout, and postimplementation maintenance can increase the likelihood of a smooth transition to CPOE and optimal system performance.

  10. Impact of Mobile Dose-Tracking Technology on Medication Distribution at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kelm, Matthew; Campbell, Udobi

    2016-05-01

    Medication dose-tracking technologies have the potential to improve efficiency and reduce costs associated with re-dispensing doses reported as missing. Data describing this technology and its impact on the medication use process are limited. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of dose-tracking technology on pharmacy workload and drug expense at an academic, acute care medical center. Dose-tracking technology was implemented in June 2014. Pre-implementation data were collected from February to April 2014. Post-implementation data were collected from July to September 2014. The primary endpoint was the percent of re-dispensed oral syringe and compounded sterile product (CSP) doses within the pre- and post-implementation periods per 1,000 discharges. Secondary endpoints included pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses, labor costs, and staff satisfaction with the medication distribution process. We observed an average 6% decrease in re-dispensing of oral syringe and CSP doses from pre- to post-implementation (15,440 vs 14,547 doses; p = .047). However, when values were adjusted per 1,000 discharges, this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = .074). Pharmaceutical expense generated from re-dispensing doses was significantly reduced from pre- to post-implementation ($834,830 vs $746,466 [savings of $88,364]; p = .047). We estimated that $2,563 worth of technician labor was avoided in re-dispensing missing doses. We also saw significant improvement in staff perception of technology assisting in reducing missing doses (p = .0003), as well as improvement in effectiveness of resolving or minimizing missing doses (p = .01). The use of mobile dose-tracking technology demonstrated meaningful reductions in both the number of doses re-dispensed and cost of pharmaceuticals dispensed.

  11. The Role of a Medical Education Center in Location Decisions of Practicing Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesching, Don; Glasser, Michael

    1983-01-01

    The factors involved in the decisions of physicians to locate in Rockford, IL were examined. Questions were asked concerning faculty status, factors influencing practice location decisions, and perceived advantages of association with a medical education center. The medical education center was an important secondary factor. (Author/MLW)

  12. 76 FR 55917 - Medicare Program; Notification of Closure of St. Vincent's Medical Center; Extension of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice of extension of the Deadline for Submission of... & Medicaid Services (CMS) to receive St. Vincent's Medical Center's full time equivalent (FTE) resident cap... apply to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to receive St. Vincent's Medical...

  13. 76 FR 59407 - Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... ``Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research Report of Scientific and Medical Literature and Information on Non-Standardized Allergenic Extracts in the...

  14. 77 FR 14017 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with...

  15. 76 FR 81947 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with...

  16. 76 FR 64088 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with...

  17. 77 FR 8877 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Correction This notice...

  18. 77 FR 4820 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) In accordance with...

  19. 77 FR 5258 - World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Trade Center Health Program Scientific/Technical Advisory Committee (WTCHP STAC or Advisory Committee), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Notice of Cancellation...

  20. Teaching in Medical Education | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Many postdoctoral fellows are considering an academic career at a medical school. In addition to conducting research, new faculty members must learn effective teaching methodologies. This course will focus on good teaching practices, including basic strategies for developing and organizing a course. The purpose of the "Teaching in Medical Education (TIME)" course is to increase the scientist's ability to teach in medical education. The course will provide basic knowledge in teaching methods, course planning, writing a syllabus and developing examinations.

  1. Technical guidelines for enhancing privacy and data protection in modern electronic medical environments.

    PubMed

    Gritzalis, Stefanos; Lambrinoudakis, Costas; Lekkas, Dimitrios; Deftereos, Spyros

    2005-09-01

    Raising awareness and providing guidance to on-line data protection is undoubtedly a crucial issue worldwide. Equally important is the issue of applying privacy-related legislation in a coherent and coordinated way. Both these topics gain extra attention when referring to medical environments and, thus, to the protection of patients' privacy and medical data. Electronic medical transactions require the transmission of personal and medical information over insecure communication channels like the Internet. It is, therefore, a rather straightforward task to capture the electronic medical behavior of a patient, thus constructing "patient profiles," or reveal sensitive information related to a patient's medical history. The consequence is clearly a potential violation of the patient's privacy. We performed a risk analysis study for a Greek shared care environment for the treatment of patients suffering from beta-thalassemia, an empirically embedded scenario that is representative of many other electronic medical environments; we capitalized on its results to provide an assessment of the associated risks, focusing on the description of countermeasures, in the form of technical guidelines that can be employed in such medical environments for protecting the privacy of personal and medical information.

  2. Well, you have hepatic metastases: Use of technical language by medical students in simulated patient interviews.

    PubMed

    Bourquin, Céline; Stiefel, Friedrich; Mast, Marianne Schmid; Bonvin, Raphael; Berney, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    This research explored medical students' use and perception of technical language in a practical training setting to enhance skills in breaking bad news in oncology. Terms potentially confusing to laypeople were selected from 108 videotaped interviews conducted in an undergraduate Communication Skills Training. A subset of these terms was included in a questionnaire completed by students (N=111) with the aim of gaining insight into their perceptions of different speech registers and of patient understanding. Excerpts of interviews were analyzed qualitatively to investigate students' communication strategies with respect to these technical terms. Fewer than half of the terms were clarified. Students checked for simulated patients' understanding of the terms palliative and metastasis/to metastasize in 22-23% of the interviews. The term ambulatory was spontaneously explained in 75% of the interviews, hepatic and metastasis/to metastasize in 22-24%. Most provided explanations were in plain language; metastasis/to metastasize and ganglion/ganglionic were among terms most frequently explained in technical language. A significant number of terms potentially unfamiliar and confusing to patients remained unclarified in training interviews conducted by senior medical students, even when they perceived the terms as technical. This exploration may offer important insights for improving future physicians' skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Simon; Endacott, Ruth; Cant, Robyn

    2010-01-01

    Aim To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care. Background Non-technical skills (NTS) include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures. Methods Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance. Results A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5), teamwork (n = 7), personality/behavior (n = 3) and situation awareness tools (n = 1). Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills. Conclusion A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care. PMID:27147832

  4. Identifying Head Start and Public Pre-K Participation in NSECE Data on Center-Based ECE Programs. NSECE Technical Report Supplement. OPRE Report 2015-92b

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goerge, Robert; Datta, A. Rupa; Xia, Kanru; Witte, Ann D.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Milesi, Carolina; Brandon, Richard; Guzman, Lina; Zanoni, Wladimir

    2015-01-01

    The analyses presented in the Technical Report, "Which Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten" characterize centers that have at least one child whose enrollment is funded through Head Start or Public Pre-K funds. This supplement to the technical report provides interested readers with technical details of the…

  5. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... using a resolution bandwidth of 1 MHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 960-1610 −65.3 1610-1990 −53.3... of no less than 1 kHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 1164-1240 −75.3 1559-1610 −75.3 (f) There is a... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical...

  6. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... using a resolution bandwidth of 1 MHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 960-1610 −65.3 1610-1990 −53.3... of no less than 1 kHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 1164-1240 −75.3 1559-1610 −75.3 (f) There is a... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical...

  7. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... using a resolution bandwidth of 1 MHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 960-1610 −65.3 1610-1990 −53.3... of no less than 1 kHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 1164-1240 −75.3 1559-1610 −75.3 (f) There is a... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical...

  8. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... using a resolution bandwidth of 1 MHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 960-1610 −65.3 1610-1990 −53.3... of no less than 1 kHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 1164-1240 −75.3 1559-1610 −75.3 (f) There is a... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical...

  9. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... using a resolution bandwidth of 1 MHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 960-1610 −65.3 1610-1990 −53.3... of no less than 1 kHz: Frequency in MHz EIRP in dBm 1164-1240 −75.3 1559-1610 −75.3 (f) There is a... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical...

  10. "Surgery interrupted": The effect of multitasking on cognitive and technical tasks in medical students.

    PubMed

    Evans, C H; Schneider, E; Shostrom, V; Schenarts, P J

    2017-02-01

    Today's medical learners are Millennials, and reportedly, multitasking pros. We aim to evaluate effect of multitasking on cognitive and technical skills. 16 medical students completed a mock page and laceration closure separately on day 1 and day 13, and in parallel on day 14. Suturing was graded using GRS and mock pages scored. Total time, suturing and loading times, and percent correct on mock page were compared. Percent correct on mock page improved from days 1-13 and 14 (p < 0.01 and 0.04). GRS improved from days 1-13 and 14 (p = 0.04 and <0.01). Total time suturing was similar on all days. However, time suturing during the mock page on day 14 was prolonged compared to before mock page (p = 0.01). Medical students can complete cognitive and technical tasks in parallel, without compromising acceptability. However, multitasking results in longer times to complete the complex component of the technical task. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Walking the tightrope: directing a student health center at a research institution with an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Christmas, William A

    2008-01-01

    Reporting lines for directors of student health centers (SHCs) at colleges and universities are a matter of continuing interest for those of us who must follow them. SHC directors at institutions with academic medical centers face a greater number of reporting choices that also have the potential of being more politically charged. The author describes his experience at 2 such institutions and offers some cautious advice.

  12. Tumor Registry Follow-Up at Army Medical Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Hospitals ; healthcare; medical information systems; tumor registry7 c 1 ,’ 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and... hospitals , the Army Medical Department has supported the accreditation of its tumor registries by the American College of Surgeons. While accreditati is...TELEPHONE (Include Area Code) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL Lawrence M. Leahy, MAJ, MS (512) 221-6345/2324 HSHA-IHC DD Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are

  13. Savannah River Site sample and analysis plan for Clemson Technical Center waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hagstrom, T.

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis plan is to determine the chemical, physical and radiological properties of the SRS radioactive Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB) liquid waste stream, to verify that it conforms to Waste Acceptance Criteria of the Department of Energy (DOE) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) Incineration Facility. Waste being sent to the ETTP TSCA Incinerator for treatment must be sufficiently characterized to ensure that the waste stream meets the waste acceptance criteria to ensure proper handling, classification, and processing of incoming waste to meet the Waste Storage and Treatment Facility`s Operating Permits. This sampling and analysis plan is limited to WSRC container(s) of homogeneous or multiphasic radioactive PCB contaminated liquids generated in association with a treatability study at Clemson Technical Center (CTC) and currently stored at the WSRC Solid Waste Division Mixed Waste Storage Facility (MWSF).

  14. Patients' medical knowledge and health counseling: what kind of information helps to make communication patient-centered?

    PubMed

    Jucks, Regina; Paus, Elisabeth; Bromme, Rainer

    2012-08-01

    To examine how physicians use information about a patient's background knowledge when both anticipating what a patient knows and producing actual answers in an email counseling setting. A fictitious patient used a (high vs. low) level of technical jargon in an email inquiry about diabetes and provided explicit information on prior knowledge (high vs. low) through self-report. Final-year medical students (semi-experts) were asked to gauge the patient's knowledge level (Experiment 1) and to produce an answer to the inquiry (Experiment 2). A total of N=150 participated in one of the two experiments. Information from word usage and self-reports was used differently in the two experiments. A patient self-reporting low knowledge was assumed to have less background knowledge than one reporting some knowledge about the domain. The technicality of the patient's word use influenced the answers: these were more technical when the inquiry used technical jargon instead of everyday language. Knowledge anticipation and communication behavior in email health care seem to be guided by different hints regarding the patient, suggesting the existence of two separate mechanisms. Beyond merely teaching physicians or health care providers to be aware of the patient's knowledge level when formulating a patient-centered response, on-task methods should support health care providers during the actual communication phase by providing, for instance, metacognitive prompts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The decade of the nineties at the UCLA Medical Center: responses to dramatic marketplace changes.

    PubMed

    Karpf, M; Schultze, R G; Levey, G

    2000-08-01

    The evolution of the health care marketplace in the nineties in Southern California is described, including the dominance of managed care at the decade's end. The marketplace, especially in Los Angeles, is now one of the most complex, competitive, and challenging medical marketplaces in the country. The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center and the academic health center of which it is a part have had to respond appropriately and vigorously to survive and to position themselves for the future. This article focuses on the responses of the medical center to these marketplace pressures. The center has recognized single-signature contracting, cost containment, and an emphasis on ambulatory care as fundamental success factors for survival in a complex, organized managed care environment. Data on the medical, financial, and educational performances of the medical center are presented in terms of its responses to the marketplace. Preliminary information about quality of care is presented for three patient-population groups that have been heavily affected by managed care. The need for emphasis on quality and service for future success and the attendant need for emphasis on information systems are discussed. The importance of fundamental understanding of markets is also reviewed. The concomitant approaches to securing the center's academic missions are described, including changes in institutional governance for the entire health sciences center of which the medical center is a part and the establishment of priorities in research, clinical care, and teaching programs, especially teaching programs in primary care.

  16. Medical trainees' formal and informal incident reporting across a five-hospital academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Logio, Lia S; Ramanujam, Rangaraj

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of incident reporting for promoting patient safety, the extent to which residents and fellows (trainees) in graduate medical education (GME) programs report incidents is not well understood. A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of and variations in incident reporting across hospitals in an academic medical center. Trainees enrolled in GME programs sponsored by the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) completed (1) the Behavior Index Survey (BIS), which asked respondents if they knew how to locate incident forms and if they ever submitted an incident form, and (2) the Safety Culture Survey (SCS), which asked about the frequencies of their formal and informal incident reporting behaviors. Some 443 of 992 invited trainees (45% response rate) participated in the study. Of the 305 BIS respondents who rotated through all five hospitals, varying proportions knew how to locate an incident form (22.3%-31.5%) and had completed an incident form (6.2%-20%) in each hospital. Incident report completion rates were higher (20.1%-81.3%) among trainees who knew how to locate an incident form. Higher proportions of the 443 SCS respondents had informally discussed an incident with other trainees (90%), faculty physicians (70%), and at resident meetings and conferences (73%). The study confirms that GME trainees formally report incidents rarely. The flow of communication to and from trainees about patient safety and incidents is low, despite an organizational focus on safety and quality. Discussion of safety issues among trainees occurs more informally among colleagues and peers than with faculty or through formal reporting mechanisms. The data suggest a number of strategies to increase the culture of safety among GME trainees.

  17. Microcomputer Integrated Library System (MILS). The Online Integrated Technical Information Center System at US Army Concepts Analysis Agency (CAA).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Integrated Library System (MILS) 1. Attached is "Microcomputer Integrated Library System (MILS), a technical paper on some recent work accomplished...8217 irectorate War"w~umIFT 77 MTT-ZF . - ~ ~ MILS: THE ONLINE INTEGRATED TECHNICAL STUDY CAA INFORMATION CENTER SYSTEM AT CAASMMR sm’ 0A CAA-TP-8610 THE...REASON FOR PERFORMING THE STUDY was to determine the most efficient and effective method of evolving from a two-system (manual and batch) environ- ment

  18. Technical skills acquisition in surgery-bound senior medical students: an evaluation of student assertiveness.

    PubMed

    Talbott, Vanessa A; Marks, Joshua A; Bodzin, Adam S; Comeau, Jason A; Maxwell, Pinckney J; Isenberg, Gerald A; Martin, Niels D

    2012-01-01

    To prepare students pursuing surgical careers, we devised a senior subinternship curriculum supplement that focused on the acquisition of technical skills required of surgical residents. We hypothesized that more assertive students, those that accomplished more of the curriculum, would perform better on a technical skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Senior medical students rotating on their first general surgery subinternship were administered a 6-station OSCE on the first day of their subinternship and again during the final week of the month-long rotation. A self-directed, 38-task "scavenger hunt" representing common intern level clinical skills, procedures, and patient care activities was provided to each student. The study was performed at Jefferson Medical College, a large, private medical school in Philadelphia, PA. Forty-nine senior students completed surgical subinternships between July 2009 and September 2010, and participated both in the pre-/post-OSCEs and the scavenger hunt. Students performed significantly better on the post-rotation OSCE than on the pre-rotation OSCE; 70.2% ± 8.1% vs. 60.4% ± 12.0%, p < 0.0001. Assertiveness scores from the "scavenger hunt" did not correlate with final OSCE scores (r = -0.328, p = 0.25), and were negatively correlated with the change between pre- and post-OSCE scores (r = -0.573, p < 0.04). Individual student assertiveness scores were determined by the number of tasks completed over the course of the rotation. As surgical education becomes more streamlined with evolving work hour restrictions, medical school education is playing an increasingly pivotal role in preparing students for internship. In our study, individual assertiveness in completing structured self-directed learning tasks did not directly predict the acquisition of proficiency in technical skills. We feel assertiveness is overshadowed by other factors that may carry more weight in terms of technical skills acquisition. Further

  19. [Analysis of the transfer of the world medical scientific center until modern times].

    PubMed

    Zuo, Han-bin

    2010-03-01

    Since the 16th century, the world medical scientific center has transferred from Italy, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France and Germany to the United States. The standards by which the above-mentioned countries became the medical scientific center during a certain historical period were not only the number of achievements of the scientific research and the talents, what was more important was their position and function in the leading disciplines. The background of the transfer of the medical scientific center was the economic, cultural and political rise of these countries, and the most important foundation was the innovation of personnel training systems.

  20. The Patient-Centered Medical Home and Meaningful Use: a challenge for better care.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Janis; Duffie, Carla; Furno, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses and illustrates the alignment between the National Committee for Quality Assurance's Patient-Centered Medical Home and Meaningful Use. In addition to the various overlaps, there is also significant discussion about Patient-Centered Medical Home and Meaningful Use as well as their distinct requirements. With impending deadlines for Meaningful Use and potential penalties being imposed, this article provides a layout of dates, stages, and incentive payments and penalties for Meaningful Use, and discusses how obtaining Patient-Centered Medical Home recognition could be beneficial to achieving Meaningful Use.

  1. Time-motion analysis of emergency radiologists and emergency physicians at an urban academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Perry, Warren M; Lee, Christoph I; Steers, W Neil; Post, Lori A; Forman, Howard P

    2013-10-01

    Our objective was to characterize the tasks of emergency radiologists and emergency physicians and quantify the proportion of time spent on these tasks to assess their roles in patient evaluation. Our study involved emergency radiologists and emergency physicians at an urban academic level I trauma medical center. Participants were observed for continuous 2-h periods during which all of their activities were timed and categorized into the following tasks: patient history, patient physical findings, assessment/plan, procedures, technical/administration, paperwork, and personal time. We performed multivariate analyses to compare the proportion of time spent on task categories between specialties. Twenty physicians (10 emergency medicine and 10 radiology) were observed for a total of 146,802 s (2,446.7 min). Radiologists spent a significantly larger combined proportion of time on determining physical findings and paperwork than emergency physicians (61.9 vs. 28.3 %, p<0.0001). Emergency physicians spent a significantly larger proportion of time than radiologists on determining patient history (17.5 vs. 2.5 %, p=0.0008) and assessment/plan (42.3 vs. 19.3 %, p<0.0001). Both specialties devoted minimal time toward personal tasks. Radiologists play a major role in the diagnostic evaluation of a subset of acute patients, spending significantly more of their time determining physical findings than their emergency physician counterparts.

  2. Frequency of and risk factors for medication errors by pharmacists during order verification in a tertiary care medical center.

    PubMed

    Gorbach, Christy; Blanton, Linda; Lukawski, Beverly A; Varkey, Alex C; Pitman, E Paige; Garey, Kevin W

    2015-09-01

    The frequency of and risk factors for medication errors by pharmacists during order verification in a tertiary care medical center were reviewed. This retrospective, secondary database study was conducted at a large tertiary care medical center in Houston, Texas. Inpatient and outpatient medication orders and medication errors recorded between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2012, were reviewed. Independent variables assessed as risk factors for medication errors included workload (mean number of orders verified per pharmacist per shift), work environment (type of day, type of shift, and mean number of pharmacists per shift), and nonmodifiable characteristics of the pharmacist (type of pharmacy degree obtained, age, number of years practicing, and number of years at the institution). A total of 1,887,751 medication orders, 92 medication error events, and 50 pharmacists were included in the study. The overall error rate was 4.87 errors per 100,000 verified orders. An increasing medication error rate was associated with an increased number of orders verified per pharmacist (p = 0.007), the type of shift (p = 0.021), the type of day (p = 0.002), and the mean number of pharmacists per shift (p = 0.001). Pharmacist demographic variables were not associated with risk of error. The number of orders per shift was identified as a significant independent risk factor for medication errors (p = 0.019). An increase in the number of orders verified per shift was associated with an increased rate of pharmacist errors during order verification in a tertiary care medical center. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A profile of women medical directors in community and migrant health centers.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M E; Cochran, C R; Shi, L

    2001-01-01

    This article looks at the nation's community and migrant health centers, where substantial numbers of female physicians are medical directors, the second highest executive position, in search of insights for managed care organizations for recruiting and retaining women medical directors. This paper provides the first comparative national profile of women and men community and migrant health center (C/MHC) medical directors in terms of their personal and work characteristics, as well as job satisfaction. The study findings indicate that, for the most part, female medical directors do not differ much from their male colleagues in issues of work characteristics or job satisfaction.

  4. A regional poison information center IVR medication identification system: does it accomplish its goal?

    PubMed

    Krenzelok, Edward P; Mrvos, Rita

    2011-11-01

    The 2009 AAPCC NPDS report identified 1,057,632 medication identification requests to poison information centers. This represents 24.7% of all calls to US poison information centers. To reduce the impact of medication identification requests on a poison information center, a regional poison information center developed and implemented an automated medication identification system that utilized an interactive voice response (IVR) system. The objective of this project was to describe how the IVR affected the regional poison information center medication identification request call volume and workload of the staff. All documented medication identification request inquiries from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011 were extracted from the RPIC Visual Dotlab electronic medical record system. Descriptive statistics, presented as means, were used to characterize the monthly call volume inquiries. Over the 18 months (January, 2007 to June, 2008) preceding the implementation of the IVR medication identification request system, a mean of 4,389.6 medication identification requests per month required manual electronic documentation by SPI. In the immediate 12 months (August, 2008 to July, 2009) following the IVR medication identification request system implementation, a mean of 2132.6 inquiries per month (54% reduction) were managed by the IVR. During the 12 month period of July, 2010 through June, 2011, the combined monthly mean of medication identification requests documented by SPI and the IVR decreased to a total of 686.7 compared to the mean pre-implementation monthly total of 4,389.6. The IVR medication identification request system was successful in reducing the number of medication identification requests that required manual electronic documentation by SPI and freed up a substantial amount of time for SPI to perform other critical patient care-related responsibilities. The enhanced technology that was implemented to improve efficiency came with the unintended

  5. Providing Total Quality Fundamentals: 1995 Workshops for the NASA Lewis Research Center's Technical Services Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antczak, Paul; Jacinto,Gilda; Simek, Jimmy

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) agency-wide movement to cultivate a quality workplace is the basis for Lewis Research Center to implement Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) initiatives. The Lewis Technical Services Directorate (TSD) introduced the Total Quality Fundamentals (TQF) workshops to its work force as an opportunity to introduce the concepts and principles of TQF. These workshops also provided the participants with the opportunity to dialogue with fellow TSD employees and managers. This report describes, through the perspective of the Lewis TSD TQF Coaches, how the TQF work- shop process was accomplished in TSD. It describes the structure for addressing the need, implementation process, input the TSD Coaches provided, common themes and concerns raised, conclusions, and recommendations. The Coaches concluded that these types of workshops could be the key to open the communication channels that are necessary to help everyone at Lewis understand where they fit in the organization. TQF workshops can strengthen the participant's connection with the Mission, Vision of the Center, and Vision of the Agency. Reconunendations are given based on these conclusions that can help the TSD Quality Board develop attainable measures towards a quality workplace.

  6. Final Technical Report - SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schnack, Dalton D.

    2012-07-01

    Final technical report for research performed by Dr. Thomas G. Jenkins in collaboration with Professor Dalton D. Schnack on SciDAC Cooperative Agreement: Center for Wave Interactions with Magnetohydrodyanics, DE-FC02-06ER54899, for the period of 8/15/06 - 8/14/11. This report centers on the Slow MHD physics campaign work performed by Dr. Jenkins while at UW-Madison and then at Tech-X Corporation. To make progress on the problem of RF induced currents affect magnetic island evolution in toroidal plasmas, a set of research approaches are outlined. Three approaches can be addressed in parallel. These are: (1) Analytically prescribed additional term in Ohm's law to model the effect of localized ECCD current drive; (2) Introduce an additional evolution equation for the Ohm's law source term. Establish a RF source 'box' where information from the RF code couples to the fluid evolution; and (3) Carry out a more rigorous analytic calculation treating the additional RF terms in a closure problem. These approaches rely on the necessity of reinvigorating the computation modeling efforts of resistive and neoclassical tearing modes with present day versions of the numerical tools. For the RF community, the relevant action item is - RF ray tracing codes need to be modified so that general three-dimensional spatial information can be obtained. Further, interface efforts between the two codes require work as well as an assessment as to the numerical stability properties of the procedures to be used.

  7. Roles of Medical Record and Statistic Staff on Research at the Tawanchai Center.

    PubMed

    Pattaranit, Rumpan; Chantachum, Vasana; Lekboonyasin, Orathai; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2015-08-01

    The medical record and statistic staffs play a crucial role behind the achievements of treatment and research of physicians, nurses and other health care professionals. The medical record and statistic staff are in charge of keeping patient medical records; creating databases; presenting information; sorting patient's information; providing patient medical records and related information for various medical teams and researchers; Besides, the medical record and statistic staff have collaboration with the Center of Cleft Lip-Palate, Khon Kaen University in association with the Tawanchai Project. The Tawanchai Center is an organization, involving multidisciplinary team which aims to continuing provide care for patients with cleft lip and palate and craniofacial deformities who need a long term of treatment since newborns until the age of 19 years. With support and encouragement from the Tawanchai team, the medical record and statistic staff have involved in research under the Tawanchai Centre since then and produced a number of publications locally and internationally.

  8. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  9. Development of a Patient-Centered Antipsychotic Medication Adherence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Fischer, Ellen P.; Gilmore, LaNissa; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Mittal, Dinesh; Bost, James E.; Valenstein, Marcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A substantial gap exists between patients and their mental health providers about patient's perceived barriers, facilitators, and motivators (BFMs) for taking antipsychotic medications. This article describes how we used an intervention mapping (IM) framework coupled with qualitative and quantitative item-selection methods to…

  10. National Imperative to Establish a Domestic Medical Intelligence Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Quality Reports Human and Veterinarian Health Surveillance Indicators Coordination with other TEW Cells Exploring Medical and Public Health...and territorial governments, animal shelters, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, veterinarians , and other sources...General medicine/family practice 63 • Hematology • Infectious disease • Internal medicine • Nephrology • Nuclear medicine o In-vivo

  11. Emergency department discharge prescription errors in an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, April; Devine, Lauren T.; Lane, Aaron; Condren, Michelle E.

    2017-01-01

    This study described discharge prescription medication errors written for emergency department patients. This study used content analysis in a cross-sectional design to systematically categorize prescription errors found in a report of 1000 discharge prescriptions submitted in the electronic medical record in February 2015. Two pharmacy team members reviewed the discharge prescription list for errors. Open-ended data were coded by an additional rater for agreement on coding categories. Coding was based upon majority rule. Descriptive statistics were used to address the study objective. Categories evaluated were patient age, provider type, drug class, and type and time of error. The discharge prescription error rate out of 1000 prescriptions was 13.4%, with “incomplete or inadequate prescription” being the most commonly detected error (58.2%). The adult and pediatric error rates were 11.7% and 22.7%, respectively. The antibiotics reviewed had the highest number of errors. The highest within-class error rates were with antianginal medications, antiparasitic medications, antacids, appetite stimulants, and probiotics. Emergency medicine residents wrote the highest percentage of prescriptions (46.7%) and had an error rate of 9.2%. Residents of other specialties wrote 340 prescriptions and had an error rate of 20.9%. Errors occurred most often between 10:00 am and 6:00 pm. PMID:28405061

  12. Crozer-Chester Medical Center Burn Research Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-18

    computer system designed to collect data from this equipment at the bedside. Study 2: “Evaluation of Xxx Dressing for Autogenous Skin Donor...Quarter 1) Study 2, Protocol Title: “Evaluation of Xxx for Autogenous Skin Donor Sites” Task 1: Enroll up to 30 patients in this multi-center

  13. Changing Economics of Health Care Are Devastating Academic Medical Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Werf, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Once a financially healthy part of American universities, many academic health centers are struggling to survive. Many are merging with for-profit chains or declaring bankruptcy. The advance of managed care and insurance companies focusing on reducing costs appears to be affecting teaching hospitals more than community hospitals. (MSE)

  14. Effect of obstetric team training on team performance and medical technical skills: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Fransen, A F; van de Ven, J; Merién, A E R; de Wit-Zuurendonk, L D; Houterman, S; Mol, B W; Oei, S G

    2012-10-01

    To determine whether obstetric team training in a medical simulation centre improves the team performance and utilisation of appropriate medical technical skills of healthcare professionals. Cluster randomised controlled trial. The Netherlands. The obstetric departments of 24 Dutch hospitals. The obstetric departments were randomly assigned to a 1-day session of multiprofessional team training in a medical simulation centre or to no such training. Team training was given with high-fidelity mannequins by an obstetrician and a communication expert. More than 6 months following training, two unannounced simulated scenarios were carried out in the delivery rooms of all 24 obstetric departments. The scenarios, comprising a case of shoulder dystocia and a case of amniotic fluid embolism, were videotaped. The team performance and utilisation of appropriate medical skills were evaluated by two independent experts. Team performance evaluated with the validated Clinical Teamwork Scale (CTS) and the employment of two specific obstetric procedures for the two clinical scenarios in the simulation (delivery of the baby with shoulder dystocia in the maternal all-fours position and conducting a perimortem caesarean section within 5 minutes for the scenario of amniotic fluid embolism). Seventy-four obstetric teams from 12 hospitals in the intervention group underwent teamwork training between November 2009 and July 2010. The teamwork performance in the training group was significantly better in comparison to the nontraining group (median CTS score: 7.5 versus 6.0, respectively; P = 0.014). The use of the predefined obstetric procedures for the two clinical scenarios was also significantly more frequent in the training group compared with the nontraining group (83 versus 46%, respectively; P = 0.009). Team performance and medical technical skills may be significantly improved after multiprofessional obstetric team training in a medical simulation centre. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An

  15. Human-centered risk management for medical devices - new methods and tools.

    PubMed

    Janß, Armin; Plogmann, Simon; Radermacher, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Studies regarding adverse events with technical devices in the medical context showed, that in most of the cases non-usable interfaces are the cause for use deficiencies and therefore a potential harm for the patient and third parties. This is partially due to the lack of suitable methods for interlinking usability engineering and human-centered risk management. Especially regarding the early identification of human-induced errors and the systematic control of these failures, medical device manufacturers and in particular the developers have to be supported in order to guarantee reliable design and error-tolerant human-machine interfaces (HMI). In this context, we developed the HiFEM methodology and a corresponding software tool (mAIXuse) for model-based human risk analysis. Based on a two-fold approach, HiFEM provides a task-type-sensitive modeling structure with integrated temporal relations in order to represent and analyze the use process in a detailed way. The approach can be used from early developmental stages up to the validation process. Results of a comparative study with the HiFEM method and a classical process-failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) depict, that the new modeling and analysis technique clearly outperforms the FMEA. Besides, we implemented a new method for systematic human risk control (mAIXcontrol). Accessing information from the method's knowledge base enables the operator to detect the most suitable countermeasures for a respective risk. Forty-one approved generic countermeasure principles have been indexed as a resulting combination of root causes and failures in a matrix. The methodology has been tested in comparison to a conventional approach as well. Evaluation of the matrix and the reassessment of the risk priority numbers by a blind expert demonstrate a substantial benefit of the new mAIXcontrol method.

  16. Joint marketing cites excellence: Fairview-University Medical Center advertises cooperatively with University of Minnesota Physicians.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2004-01-01

    Fairview-University Medical Center and University of Minnesota Physicians, both in Minneapolis, are enjoying the benefits of a co-branded advertising campaign. It includes print ads, brochures, and other marketing devices.

  17. Master's Level Graduate Training in Medical Physics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hendee, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Describes the master's degree program in medical physics developed at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Required courses for the program, and requirements for admission are included in the appendices. (HM)

  18. Nonpsychiatric medication interventions initiated by a postgraduate year 2 psychiatric pharmacy resident in a patient-centered medical home.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew M; Dopheide, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated the benefits of incorporating comprehensive medication management into primary care, but no study describes the types of nonpsychiatric medication-related interventions provided by a psychiatric pharmacist while providing comprehensive medication management. A chart review of Center for Community Health patients enrolled in the University of Southern California Psychiatric Pharmacy Clinic, Los Angeles, between July 1, 2013, and January 10, 2014, was conducted. Progress notes were reviewed to collect medication recommendations and interventions. The number and types of interventions were compared between groups based on substance abuse history, comorbid medical conditions, number of psychiatric diagnoses, and number of medications. An anonymous survey was distributed to primary care providers (PCPs) regarding perceptions and attitudes toward a postgraduate year 2 psychiatric pharmacy resident's interventions pertaining to nonpsychiatric medications. 177 nonpsychiatric medication interventions were documented. Fifty interventions required PCP approval, and 45% of those were accepted. Having a diagnosis of diabetes (P < .0001), hypertension (P < .0001), gastroesophageal reflux disease (P < .0001), ≥ 9 medications (P < .0001), or ≥ 5 medical diagnoses (P < .0001) were all associated with an increased mean number of interventions. Of the PCPs, 66% viewed the psychiatric pharmacist as a resource for addressing medical interventions by providing drug information. The PCPs were agreeable to having a psychiatric pharmacist provide drug information and monitor the patient but reported mixed opinions on whether a psychiatric pharmacist should comanage nonpsychiatric conditions. Psychiatric pharmacists can successfully collaborate with PCPs in primary care clinics to provide comprehensive medication management that optimizes pharmacotherapy for patients with medical and psychiatric conditions. Continued efforts are needed to promote

  19. Dealing with the flood crisis of 1993. A medical center's account.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, D S

    1994-01-01

    On Saturday, 10 July 1993, Iowans were assaulted by the greatest natural disaster in the state's history when virtually all rain-swollen rivers and creeks in the Midwest spilled over their banks. In Des Moines, the Iowa Methodist Medical Center was suddenly surrounded by flood waters and stripped of power, water, computer, and telephone communication. Striving to deliver quality patient care in the face of the crisis, medical staff, administrators, and employees at the center achieved recovery in record time.

  20. Crozer-Chester Medical Center Burn Research Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    exchange plasmids and transposons with other Gram-negative bacteria . Both PA and Enterobacter species accepted resistance genes from AB, but persistence...of resistant clones containing these genes was not evident. Plasmids and transposons have specific compatibility regions for which a bacteria may...Enterobacter species when compared to AB may explain the failure of these two Gram-negative bacteria to take residence in our burn center. CONCLUSIONS A