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Sample records for medical grid application

  1. Service-oriented architecture for grid-enabling medical applications.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; Kootstra, René; van Leeuwen, Jasper; Obbink, Henk

    2006-01-01

    Grid technologies have the potential to enable healthcare organizations to efficiently use powerful tools, applications and resources, many of which were so far inaccessible to them. This paper introduces a service-oriented architecture meant to Grid-enable several classes of computationally intensive medical applications for improved performance and cost-effective access to resources. We apply this architecture to fiber tracking [1,2], a computationally intensive medical application suited for parallelization through decomposition, and carry out experiments with various sets of parameters, in realistic environments and with standard network solutions. Furthermore, we deploy and assess our solution in a hospital environment, at the Amsterdam Medical Center, as part of our cooperation in the Dutch VL-e project. Our results show that parallelization and Grid execution may bring significant performance improvements and that the overhead introduced by making use of remote, distributed resources is relatively small.

  2. Grid-based medical image workflow and archiving for research and enterprise PACS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erberich, Stephan G.; Dixit, Manasee; Chen, Vincent; Chervenak, Ann; Nelson, Marvin D.; Kesselmann, Carl

    2006-03-01

    PACS provides a consistent model to communicate and to store images with recent additions to fault tolerance and disaster reliability. However PACS still lacks fine granulated user based authentication and authorization, flexible data distribution, and semantic associations between images and their embedded information. These are critical components for future Enterprise operations in dynamic medical research and health care environments. Here we introduce a flexible Grid based model of a PACS in order to add these methods and to describe its implementation in the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Grid. The combination of existing standards for medical images, DICOM, and the abstraction to files and meta catalog information in the Grid domain provides new flexibility beyond traditional PACS design. We conclude that Grid technology demonstrates a reliable and efficient distributed informatics infrastructure which is well applicable to medical informatics as described in this work. Grid technology will provide new opportunities for PACS deployment and subsequently new medical image applications.

  3. Medical image registration algorithms assesment: Bronze Standard application enactment on grids using the MOTEUR workflow engine.

    PubMed

    Glatard, Tristan; Montagnat, Johan; Pennec, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Medical image registration is pre-processing needed for many medical image analysis procedures. A very large number of registration algorithms are available today, but their performance is often not known and very difficult to assess due to the lack of gold standard. The Bronze Standard algorithm is a very data and compute intensive statistical approach for quantifying registration algorithms accuracy. In this paper, we describe the Bronze Standard application and we discuss the need for grids to tackle such computations on medical image databases. We demonstrate MOTEUR, a service-based workflow engine optimized for dealing with data intensive applications. MOTEUR eases the enactment of the Bronze Standard and similar applications on the EGEE production grid infrastructure. It is a generic workflow engine, based on current standards and freely available, that can be used to instrument legacy application code at low cost.

  4. Validation of elastic registration algorithms based on adaptive irregular grids for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Astrid; Carlsen, Ingwer C.; Renisch, Steffen; Wischmann, Hans-Aloys

    2006-03-01

    Elastic registration of medical images is an active field of current research. Registration algorithms have to be validated in order to show that they fulfill the requirements of a particular clinical application. Furthermore, validation strategies compare the performance of different registration algorithms and can hence judge which algorithm is best suited for a target application. In the literature, validation strategies for rigid registration algorithms have been analyzed. For a known ground truth they assess the displacement error at a few landmarks, which is not sufficient for elastic transformations described by a huge number of parameters. Hence we consider the displacement error averaged over all pixels in the whole image or in a region-of-interest of clinical relevance. Using artificially, but realistically deformed images of the application domain, we use this quality measure to analyze an elastic registration based on transformations defined on adaptive irregular grids for the following clinical applications: Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of freely moving joints for orthopedic investigations, thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) images for the detection of pulmonary embolisms, and transmission images as used for the attenuation correction and registration of independently acquired Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and CT images. The definition of a region-of-interest allows to restrict the analysis of the registration accuracy to clinically relevant image areas. The behaviour of the displacement error as a function of the number of transformation control points and their placement can be used for identifying the best strategy for the initial placement of the control points.

  5. Medical applications for high-performance computers in SKIF-GRID network.

    PubMed

    Zhuchkov, Alexey; Tverdokhlebov, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a set of software services for massive mammography image processing by using high-performance parallel computers of SKIF-family which are linked into a service-oriented grid-network. An experience of a prototype system implementation in two medical institutions is also described.

  6. Distributed geant4 simulation in medical and space science applications using DIANE framework and the GRID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościcki, Jakub T.; Guatelli, Susanna; Mantero, Alfonso; Pia, M. G.

    2003-09-01

    Distributed computing is one of the most important trends in IT which has recently gained significance for large-scale scientific applications. Distributed Analysis Environment (DIANE) [1] is a R&D study, focusing on semi-interactive parallel and remote data analysis and simulation, which has been conducted at CERN. DIANE provides necessary software infrastructure for parallel scientific applications in the master-worker model. Advanced error recovery policies, automatic book-keeping of distributed jobs and on-line monitoring and control tools are provided. DIANE makes a transparent use of a number of different middleware implementations such as load balancing service (LSF, PBS, GRID Resource Broker, Condor) and security service (GSI, Kerberos, openssh). A number of distributed Geant 4 simulations have been deployed and tested, ranging from interactive radiotherapy treatment planning using dedicated clusters in hospitals, to globally-distributed simulations of astrophysics experiments using the European Data Grid middleware. This paper describes the general concepts behind the DIANE framework and results of the first tests with distributed Geant 4 simulations.

  7. Telemedical applications and grid technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graschew, Georgi; Roelofs, Theo A.; Rakowsky, Stefan; Schlag, Peter M.; Kaiser, Silvan; Albayrak, Sahin

    2005-11-01

    Due to the experience in the exploitation of previous European telemedicine projects an open Euro-Mediterranean consortium proposes the Virtual Euro-Mediterranean Hospital (VEMH) initiative. The provision of the same advanced technologies to the European and Mediterranean Countries should contribute to their better dialogue for integration. VEMH aims to facilitate the interconnection of various services through real integration which must take into account the social, human and cultural dimensions. VEMH will provide a platform consisting of a satellite and terrestrial link for the application of medical e-learning, real-time telemedicine and medical assistance. The methodologies for the VEMH are medical-needs-driven instead of technology-driven. They supply new management tools for virtual medical communities and allow management of clinical outcomes for implementation of evidence-based medicine. Due to the distributed character of the VEMH Grid technology becomes inevitable for successful deployment of the services. Existing Grid Engines provide basic computing power needed by today's medical analysis tasks but lack other capabilities needed for communication and knowledge sharing services envisioned. When it comes to heterogeneous systems to be shared by different institutions especially the high level system management areas are still unsupported. Therefore a Metagrid Engine is needed that provides a superset of functionalities across different Grid Engines and manages strong privacy and Quality of Service constraints at this comprehensive level.

  8. Experiences of engineering Grid-based medical software.

    PubMed

    Estrella, F; Hauer, T; McClatchey, R; Odeh, M; Rogulin, D; Solomonides, T

    2007-08-01

    Grid-based technologies are emerging as potential solutions for managing and collaborating distributed resources in the biomedical domain. Few examples exist, however, of successful implementations of Grid-enabled medical systems and even fewer have been deployed for evaluation in practice. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the use in clinical practice of a Grid-based imaging prototype and to establish directions for engineering future medical Grid developments and their subsequent deployment. The MammoGrid project has deployed a prototype system for clinicians using the Grid as its information infrastructure. To assist in the specification of the system requirements (and for the first time in healthgrid applications), use-case modelling has been carried out in close collaboration with clinicians and radiologists who had no prior experience of this modelling technique. A critical qualitative and, where possible, quantitative analysis of the MammoGrid prototype is presented leading to a set of recommendations from the delivery of the first deployed Grid-based medical imaging application. We report critically on the application of software engineering techniques in the specification and implementation of the MammoGrid project and show that use-case modelling is a suitable vehicle for representing medical requirements and for communicating effectively with the clinical community. This paper also discusses the practical advantages and limitations of applying the Grid to real-life clinical applications and presents the consequent lessons learned. The work presented in this paper demonstrates that given suitable commitment from collaborating radiologists it is practical to deploy in practice medical imaging analysis applications using the Grid but that standardization in and stability of the Grid software is a necessary pre-requisite for successful healthgrids. The MammoGrid prototype has therefore paved the way for further advanced Grid-based deployments in the

  9. Applications of algebraic grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.; Smith, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques and applications of algebraic grid generation are described. The techniques are univariate interpolations and transfinite assemblies of univariate interpolations. Because algebraic grid generation is computationally efficient, the use of interactive graphics in conjunction with the techniques is advocated. A flexible approach, which works extremely well in an interactive environment, called the control point form of algebraic grid generation is described. The applications discussed are three-dimensional grids constructed about airplane and submarine configurations.

  10. Running medical image analysis on GridFactory desktop grid.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Frederik; Niinimaki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; Rosendahl, Peter; Müller, Henning; Waananen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    At the Geneva University Hospitals work is in progress to establish a computing facility for medical image analysis, potentially using several hundreds of desktop computers. Typically, hospitals do not have a computer infrastructure dedicated to research, nor can the data leave the hospital network for the reasons of privacy. For this purpose, a novel batch system called GridFactory has been tested along-side with the well-known batch system Condor. GridFactory's main benefits, compared to other batch systems, lie in its virtualization support and firewall friendliness. The tests involved running visual feature extraction from 50,000 anonymized medical images on a small local grid of 20 desktop computers. A comparisons with a Condor based batch system in the same computers is then presented. The performance of GridFactory is found satisfactory.

  11. Using Grid Benchmarks for Dynamic Scheduling of Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Navigation or dynamic scheduling of applications on computational grids can be improved through the use of an application-specific characterization of grid resources. Current grid information systems provide a description of the resources, but do not contain any application-specific information. We define a GridScape as dynamic state of the grid resources. We measure the dynamic performance of these resources using the grid benchmarks. Then we use the GridScape for automatic assignment of the tasks of a grid application to grid resources. The scalability of the system is achieved by limiting the navigation overhead to a few percent of the application resource requirements. Our task submission and assignment protocol guarantees that the navigation system does not cause grid congestion. On a synthetic data mining application we demonstrate that Gridscape-based task assignment reduces the application tunaround time.

  12. GEMSS: grid-infrastructure for medical service provision.

    PubMed

    Benkner, S; Berti, G; Engelbrecht, G; Fingberg, J; Kohring, G; Middleton, S E; Schmidt, R

    2005-01-01

    The European GEMSS Project is concerned with the creation of medical Grid service prototypes and their evaluation in a secure service-oriented infrastructure for distributed on demand/supercomputing. Key aspects of the GEMSS Grid middleware include negotiable QoS support for time-critical service provision, flexible support for business models, and security at all levels in order to ensure privacy of patient data as well as compliance to EU law. The GEMSS Grid infrastructure is based on a service-oriented architecture and is being built on top of existing standard Grid and Web technologies. The GEMSS infrastructure offers a generic Grid service provision framework that hides the complexity of transforming existing applications into Grid services. For the development of client-side applications or portals, a pluggable component framework has been developed, providing developers with full control over business processes, service discovery, QoS negotiation, and workflow, while keeping their underlying implementation hidden from view. A first version of the GEMSS Grid infrastructure is operational and has been used for the set-up of a Grid test-bed deploying six medical Grid service prototypes including maxillo-facial surgery simulation, neuro-surgery support, radio-surgery planning, inhaled drug-delivery simulation, cardiovascular simulation and advanced image reconstruction. The GEMSS Grid infrastructure is based on standard Web Services technology with an anticipated future transition path towards the OGSA standard proposed by the Global Grid Forum. GEMSS demonstrates that the Grid can be used to provide medical practitioners and researchers with access to advanced simulation and image processing services for improved preoperative planning and near real-time surgical support.

  13. Grid for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, Monique; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    The civil society at large has addressed to the Earth Science community many strong requirements related in particular to natural and industrial risks, climate changes, new energies. The main critical point is that on one hand the civil society and all public ask for certainties i.e. precise values with small error range as it concerns prediction at short, medium and long term in all domains; on the other hand Science can mainly answer only in terms of probability of occurrence. To improve the answer or/and decrease the uncertainties, (1) new observational networks have been deployed in order to have a better geographical coverage and more accurate measurements have been carried out in key locations and aboard satellites. Following the OECD recommendations on the openness of research and public sector data, more and more data are available for Academic organisation and SMEs; (2) New algorithms and methodologies have been developed to face the huge data processing and assimilation into simulations using new technologies and compute resources. Finally, our total knowledge about the complex Earth system is contained in models and measurements, how we put them together has to be managed cleverly. The technical challenge is to put together databases and computing resources to answer the ES challenges. However all the applications are very intensive computing. Different compute solutions are available and depend on the characteristics of the applications. One of them is Grid especially efficient for independent or embarrassingly parallel jobs related to statistical and parametric studies. Numerous applications in atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, seismology, hydrology, pollution, climate and biodiversity have been deployed successfully on Grid. In order to fulfill requirements of risk management, several prototype applications have been deployed using OGC (Open geospatial Consortium) components with Grid middleware. The Grid has permitted via a huge number of runs to

  14. A grid overlay framework for analysis of medical images and its application to the measurement of stroke lesions.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Paul A; Rivers, C S; Karaszewski, B; Thomas, R G R; Lymer, G K; Morris, Z; Wardlaw, J M

    2012-03-01

    To create and evaluate an interactive software tool for measuring imaging data in situations where hand-drawn region-of-interest measurements are unfeasible, for example, when the structure of interest is patchy with ill-defined boundaries. An interactive grid overlay software tool was implemented that enabled coding of voxels dependent on their imaging appearance with a series of user-defined classes. The Grid Analysis Tool (GAT) was designed to automatically extract quantitative imaging data, grouping the results by tissue class. Inter- and intra-observer reproducibility was evaluated by six observers of various backgrounds in a study of acute stroke patients. The software tool enabled a more detailed classification of the stroke lesion than would be possible with a region-of-interest approach. However, inter-observer coefficients of variation (CVs) were relatively high, reaching 70% in "possibly abnormal" tissue and around 15-20% in normal appearing tissues, while intra-observer CVs were no more than 13% in "possibly abnormal" tissue and generally less than 1% in normal-appearing tissues. The grid-overlay method overcomes some of the limitations of conventional Region Of Interest (ROI) approaches, providing a viable alternative for segmenting patchy lesions with ill-defined boundaries, but care is required to ensure acceptable reproducibility if the method is applied by multiple observers. Computer software developed to overcome limitations of conventional regions of interest measurements • This software is suitable for patchy lesions with ill-defined borders • Allows a more detailed assessment of imaging data.

  15. Partitioning medical image databases for content-based queries on a Grid.

    PubMed

    Montagnat, J; Breton, V; E Magnin, I

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of executing a medical image database query application on the grid. For lowering the total computation time, the image database is partitioned into subsets to be processed on different grid nodes. A theoretical model of the application complexity and estimates of the grid execution overhead are used to efficiently partition the database. We show results demonstrating that smart partitioning of the database can lead to significant improvements in terms of total computation time. Grids are promising for content-based image retrieval in medical databases.

  16. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccara, A. Claude; Mordon, Serge

    2015-10-01

    In re-listening to the lectures of Charles Townes shortly after the invention of the laser (e.g., in the Boston Science Museum), one can already have a realistic vision of the potentialities of this new tool in the field of medical therapy, as evidenced by the use of the laser in ophthalmology to cure retinal detachment in the 1960's. Since then, applications have flourished in the domain of therapy. We will thus illustrate here only some of the main fields of application of medical lasers. On the opposite, the use of lasers in medical imaging is, with one exception in ophthalmology, still at the development level. It is becoming a diagnostic tool in addition to high performance imaging facilities that are often very expensive (such as CT scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear imaging). Even if progress is sometimes slow, one can now image with light inside the human body, in spite of the strong scattering of light by tissues, in the same way as a pathologist sees surgical specimens.

  17. Application Note: Power Grid Modeling With Xyce.

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, Peter E.

    2015-06-01

    This application note describes how to model steady-state power flows and transient events in electric power grids with the SPICE-compatible Xyce TM Parallel Electronic Simulator developed at Sandia National Labs. This application notes provides a brief tutorial on the basic devices (branches, bus shunts, transformers and generators) found in power grids. The focus is on the features supported and assumptions made by the Xyce models for power grid elements. It then provides a detailed explanation, including working Xyce netlists, for simulating some simple power grid examples such as the IEEE 14-bus test case.

  18. A Debugger for Computational Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Robert; Jost, Gabriele; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of a debugger for computational grid applications. Details are given on NAS parallel tools groups (including parallelization support tools, evaluation of various parallelization strategies, and distributed and aggregated computing), debugger dependencies, scalability, initial implementation, the process grid, and information on Globus.

  19. Proposal for grid computing for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Faridah Mohamad; Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Ali, Mohd Adli bin Md; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz; Ismail, Roslan; Ahmad, Abdul Rahim; Ismail, Saaidi; Haris, Mohd Fauzi B.; Sulaiman, Mohamad Safuan B.; Aslan, Mohd Dzul Aiman Bin.; Samsudin, Nursuliza Bt.; Ibrahim, Maizura Bt.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Rahman, Anwar B. Abdul; Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal B. Mamat @; Muhamad, Shalina Bt. Sheik; Hassan, Hasni; Sjaugi, Farhan

    2014-02-01

    The use of computer clusters for computational sciences including computational physics is vital as it provides computing power to crunch big numbers at a faster rate. In compute intensive applications that requires high resolution such as Monte Carlo simulation, the use of computer clusters in a grid form that supplies computational power to any nodes within the grid that needs computing power, has now become a necessity. In this paper, we described how the clusters running on a specific application could use resources within the grid, to run the applications to speed up the computing process.

  20. Proposal for grid computing for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, Faridah Mohamad; Ismail, Saaidi; Haris, Mohd Fauzi B.; Sulaiman, Mohamad Safuan B.; Aslan, Mohd Dzul Aiman Bin.; Samsudin, Nursuliza Bt.; Ibrahim, Maizura Bt.; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid B. Megat; Yazid, Hafizal B.; Jamro, Rafhayudi B.; Azman, Azraf B.; Rahman, Anwar B. Abdul; Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal B. Mamat; Muhamad, Shalina Bt. Sheik; Hassan, Hasni; Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin Wan; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; and others

    2014-02-12

    The use of computer clusters for computational sciences including computational physics is vital as it provides computing power to crunch big numbers at a faster rate. In compute intensive applications that requires high resolution such as Monte Carlo simulation, the use of computer clusters in a grid form that supplies computational power to any nodes within the grid that needs computing power, has now become a necessity. In this paper, we described how the clusters running on a specific application could use resources within the grid, to run the applications to speed up the computing process.

  1. DICOM image communication in globus-based medical grids.

    PubMed

    Vossberg, Michal; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Krefting, Dagmar

    2008-03-01

    Grid computing, the collaboration of distributed resources across institutional borders, is an emerging technology to meet the rising demand on computing power and storage capacity in fields such as high-energy physics, climate modeling, or more recently, life sciences. A secure, reliable, and highly efficient data transport plays an integral role in such grid environments and even more so in medical grids. Unfortunately, many grid middleware distributions, such as the well-known Globus Toolkit, lack the integration of the world-wide medical image communication standard Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM). Currently, the DICOM protocol first needs to be converted to the file transfer protocol (FTP) that is offered by the grid middleware. This effectively reduces most of the advantages and security an integrated network of DICOM devices offers. In this paper, a solution is proposed that adapts the DICOM protocol to the Globus grid security infrastructure and utilizes routers to transparently route traffic to and from DICOM systems. Thus, all legacy DICOM devices can be seamlessly integrated into the grid without modifications. A prototype of the grid routers with the most important DICOM functionality has been developed and successfully tested in the MediGRID test bed, the German grid project for life sciences.

  2. Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieck, Hans Paetz Gen.

    The recent progress in medical imaging techniques such as magnetic-resonance imaging (nmr or mri), computer tomography (CT with X-rays), and positron-emission tomography (PET scanning using short-lived radioactive nuclei) has been impressive. Two areas where diagnostic tools lacked behind have been tomography of the blood vessels of the brain and of the bronchi.

  3. Bridging clinical information systems and grid middleware: a Medical Data Manager.

    PubMed

    Montagnat, Johan; Jouvenot, Daniel; Pera, Christophe; Frohner, Akos; Kunszt, Peter; Koblitz, Birger; Santos, Nuno; Loomis, Cal

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the effort to deploy a Medical Data Management service on top of the EGEE grid infrastructure. The most widely accepted medical image standard, DICOM, was developed for fulfilling clinical practice. It is implemented in most medical image acquisition and analysis devices. The EGEE middleware is using the SRM standard for handling grid files. Our prototype is exposing an SRM compliant interface to the grid middleware, transforming on the fly SRM requests into DICOM transactions. The prototype ensures user identification, strict file access control and data protection through the use of relevant grid services. This Medical Data Manager is easing the access to medical databases needed for many medical data analysis applications deployed today. It offers a high level data management service, compatible with clinical practices, which encourages the migration of medical applications towards grid infrastructures. A limited scale testbed has been deployed as a proof of concept of this new service. The service is expected to be put into production with the next EGEE middleware generation.

  4. SAGA: A Simple API for Grid Applications -- High-Level ApplicationProgramming on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Tom; Jha, Shantenu; Kaiser, Hartmut; Kielmann, Thilo; Kleijer, Pascal; von Laszewski, Gregor; Lee, Craig; Merzky, Andre; Rajic,Hrabri; Shalf, John

    2006-05-31

    Grid technology has matured considerably over the past fewyears. Progress in both implementation and standardization is reaching alevel of robustness that enables production quality deployments of gridservices in the academic research community with heightened interest andearly adoption in the industrial community. Despite this progress, gridapplications are far from ubiquitous, and new applications require anenormous amount of programming effort just to see first light. A keyimpediment to accelerated deployment of grid applications is the scarcityof high-level application programming abstractions that bridge the gapbetween existing grid middle-ware and application-level needs. The SimpleAPI for Grid Applications (SAGA [1]) is a GGF standardization effort thataddresses this particular gap by providing a simple, stable, and uniformprogramming interface that integrates the most common grid programmingabstractions. These most common abstractions were identified through theanalysis of several existing and emerging Grid applications. In thisarticle, we present the SAGA effort, describe its relationship to otherGrid API efforts within the GGF community, and introduce the first draftof the API using some application programming examples.

  5. HOPE, an open platform for medical data management on the grid.

    PubMed

    Diarena, M; Nowak, S; Boire, J Y; Bloch, V; Donnarieix, D; Fessy, A; Grenier, B; Irrthum, B; Legré, Y; Maigne, L; Salzemann, J; Thiam, C; Spalinger, N; Verhaeghe, N; de Vlieger, P; Breton, V

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes a platform developed for the secure management and analysis of medical data and images in a grid environment. Designed for telemedicine and built upon the EGEE gLite middleware and particularly the metadata catalogue AMGA as well as the GridSphere web portal, the platform provides to healthcare professionals the capacity to upload and query medical information stored over distributed servers. A job submission environment is also available for data analysis. Security features include authentication and authorization by grid certificates, anonymization of medical data and image encryption. The platform is currently deployed on several sites in Europe and Asia and is being customized for applications in the field of telemedicine and medical physics.

  6. Globus MEDICUS - federation of DICOM medical imaging devices into healthcare Grids.

    PubMed

    Erberich, Stephan G; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Chervenak, Ann; Schuler, Robert; Nelson, Marvin D; Kesselman, Carl

    2007-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard defines Radiology medical device interoperability and image data exchange between modalities, image databases - Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) - and image review end-points. However the scope of DICOM and PACS technology is currently limited to the trusted and static environment of the hospital. In order to meet the demand for ad-hoc tele-radiology and image guided medical procedures within the global healthcare enterprise, a new technology must provide mobility, security, flexible scale of operations, and rapid responsiveness for DICOM medical devices and subsequently medical image data. Grid technology, an informatics approach to securely federate independently operated computing, storage, and data management resources at the global scale over public networks, meets these core requirements. Here we present an approach to federate DICOM and PACS devices for large-scale medical image workflows within a global healthcare enterprise. The Globus MEDICUS (Medical Imaging and Computing for Unified Information Sharing) project uses the standards-based Globus Toolkit Grid infrastructure to vertically integrate a new service for DICOM devices - the DICOM Grid Interface Service (DGIS). This new service translates between DICOM and Grid operations and thus transparently extends DICOM to Globus based Grid infrastructure. This Grid image workflow paradigm has been designed to provide not only solutions for global image communication, but fault-tolerance and disaster recovery using Grid data replication technology. Actual use-case of 40 MEDICUS Grid connected international hospitals of the Childerns Oncology Group and the Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation and further clinical applications are discussed. The open-source Globus MEDICU http://dev.globus.org/wiki/Incubator/MEDICUS.

  7. Grid computing technology for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecca, G.; Petitdidier, M.; Hluchy, L.; Ivanovic, M.; Kussul, N.; Ray, N.; Thieron, V.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryAdvances in e-Infrastructure promise to revolutionize sensing systems and the way in which data are collected and assimilated, and complex water systems are simulated and visualized. According to the EU Infrastructure 2010 work-programme, data and compute infrastructures and their underlying technologies, either oriented to tackle scientific challenges or complex problem solving in engineering, are expected to converge together into the so-called knowledge infrastructures, leading to a more effective research, education and innovation in the next decade and beyond. Grid technology is recognized as a fundamental component of e-Infrastructures. Nevertheless, this emerging paradigm highlights several topics, including data management, algorithm optimization, security, performance (speed, throughput, bandwidth, etc.), and scientific cooperation and collaboration issues that require further examination to fully exploit it and to better inform future research policies. The paper illustrates the results of six different surface and subsurface hydrology applications that have been deployed on the Grid. All the applications aim to answer to strong requirements from the Civil Society at large, relatively to natural and anthropogenic risks. Grid technology has been successfully tested to improve flood prediction, groundwater resources management and Black Sea hydrological survey, by providing large computing resources. It is also shown that Grid technology facilitates e-cooperation among partners by means of services for authentication and authorization, seamless access to distributed data sources, data protection and access right, and standardization.

  8. GridMol: a grid application for molecular modeling and visualization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanhua; Shen, Bin; Lu, Zhonghua; Jin, Zhong; Chi, Xuebin

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we present GridMol, an extensible tool for building a high performance computational chemistry platform in the grid environment. GridMol provides computational chemists one-stop service for molecular modeling, scientific computing and molecular information visualization. GridMol is not only a visualization and modeling tool but also simplifies control of remote Grid software that can access high performance computing resources. GridMol has been successfully integrated into China National Grid, the most powerful Chinese Grid Computing platform. In Section "Grid computing" of this paper, a computing example is given to show the availability and efficiency of GridMol. GridMol is coded using Java and Java3D for portability and cross-platform compatibility (Windows, Linux, MacOS X and UNIX). GridMol can run not only as a stand-alone application, but also as an applet through web browsers. In this paper, we will present the techniques for molecular visualization, molecular modeling and grid computing. GridMol is available free of charge under the GNU Public License (GPL) from our website: http://www.sccas.cn/~syh/GridMol/index.html.

  9. GridMol: a grid application for molecular modeling and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanhua; Shen, Bin; Lu, Zhonghua; Jin, Zhong; Chi, Xuebin

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we present GridMol, an extensible tool for building a high performance computational chemistry platform in the grid environment. GridMol provides computational chemists one-stop service for molecular modeling, scientific computing and molecular information visualization. GridMol is not only a visualization and modeling tool but also simplifies control of remote Grid software that can access high performance computing resources. GridMol has been successfully integrated into China National Grid, the most powerful Chinese Grid Computing platform. In Section "Grid computing" of this paper, a computing example is given to show the availability and efficiency of GridMol. GridMol is coded using Java and Java3D for portability and cross-platform compatibility (Windows, Linux, MacOS X and UNIX). GridMol can run not only as a stand-alone application, but also as an applet through web browsers. In this paper, we will present the techniques for molecular visualization, molecular modeling and grid computing. GridMol is available free of charge under the GNU Public License (GPL) from our website: http://www.sccas.cn/ syh/GridMol/index.html.

  10. Power grid simulation applications developed using the GridPACK™ high performance computing framework

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Chen, Yousu; Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Perkins, William; Palmer, Bruce

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the GridPACK™ software framework for developing power grid simulations that can run on high performance computing platforms, with several example applications (dynamic simulation, static contingency analysis, and dynamic contingency analysis) that have been developed using GridPACK.

  11. Grid-based Meteorological and Crisis Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hluchy, Ladislav; Bartok, Juraj; Tran, Viet; Lucny, Andrej; Gazak, Martin

    2010-05-01

    We present several applications from domain of meteorology and crisis management we developed and/or plan to develop. Particularly, we present IMS Model Suite - a complex software system designed to address the needs of accurate forecast of weather and hazardous weather phenomena, environmental pollution assessment, prediction of consequences of nuclear accident and radiological emergency. We discuss requirements on computational means and our experiences how to meet them by grid computing. The process of a pollution assessment and prediction of the consequences in case of radiological emergence results in complex data-flows and work-flows among databases, models and simulation tools (geographical databases, meteorological and dispersion models, etc.). A pollution assessment and prediction requires running of 3D meteorological model (4 nests with resolution from 50 km to 1.8 km centered on nuclear power plant site, 38 vertical levels) as well as running of the dispersion model performing the simulation of the release transport and deposition of the pollutant with respect to the numeric weather prediction data, released material description, topography, land use description and user defined simulation scenario. Several post-processing options can be selected according to particular situation (e.g. doses calculation). Another example is a forecasting of fog as one of the meteorological phenomena hazardous to the aviation as well as road traffic. It requires complicated physical model and high resolution meteorological modeling due to its dependence on local conditions (precise topography, shorelines and land use classes). An installed fog modeling system requires a 4 time nested parallelized 3D meteorological model with 1.8 km horizontal resolution and 42 levels vertically (approx. 1 million points in 3D space) to be run four times daily. The 3D model outputs and multitude of local measurements are utilized by SPMD-parallelized 1D fog model run every hour. The fog

  12. Grid portal architectures for scientific applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. P.; Burruss, J.; Cinquini, L.; Fox, G.; Gannon, D.; Gilbert, L.; von Laszewski, G.; Jackson, K.; Middleton, D.; Moore, R.; Pierce, M.; Plale, B.; Rajasekar, A.; Regno, R.; Roberts, E.; Schissel, D.; Seth, A.; Schroeder, W.

    2005-01-01

    Computational scientists often develop large models and codes intended to be used by larger user communities or for repetitive tasks such as parametric studies. Lowering the barrier of entry for access to these codes is often a technical and sociological challenge. Portals help bridge the gap because they are well known interfaces enabling access to a large variety of resources, services, applications, and tools for private, public, and commercial entities, while hiding the complexities of the underlying software systems to the user. This paper presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art in grid portals, based on a component approach that utilizes portlet frameworks and the most recent Grid standards, the Web Services Resource Framework and a summary of current DOE portal efforts.

  13. Distributed data mining on grids: services, tools, and applications.

    PubMed

    Cannataro, Mario; Congiusta, Antonio; Pugliese, Andrea; Talia, Domenico; Trunfio, Paolo

    2004-12-01

    Data mining algorithms are widely used today for the analysis of large corporate and scientific datasets stored in databases and data archives. Industry, science, and commerce fields often need to analyze very large datasets maintained over geographically distributed sites by using the computational power of distributed and parallel systems. The grid can play a significant role in providing an effective computational support for distributed knowledge discovery applications. For the development of data mining applications on grids we designed a system called Knowledge Grid. This paper describes the Knowledge Grid framework and presents the toolset provided by the Knowledge Grid for implementing distributed knowledge discovery. The paper discusses how to design and implement data mining applications by using the Knowledge Grid tools starting from searching grid resources, composing software and data components, and executing the resulting data mining process on a grid. Some performance results are also discussed.

  14. Encrypted storage of medical data on a grid.

    PubMed

    Seitz, L; Pierson, J-M; Brunie, L

    2005-01-01

    In this article we present grids as an architecture for medical image processing and health-care networks. We argue that confidential patient data should not be stored unprotected on a grid and explain why access control systems alone do not offer sufficient protection. The objective of our work is to propose a method that complements access control systems on a grid architecture and thus makes the storage of confidential data more secure. Effective protection can be achieved by storing confidential data in encrypted form. This raises the problem of how authorized users get access to the data, since they need to have the decryption keys. Our proposal details a key management architecture, that allows encrypted storage and still enables users to access decryption keys for data they are authorized to see. To achieve this functionality we use distributed keyservers storing redundant shares of the keys. The resulting architecture achieves our primary objective of making the storage of confidential data more secure without loosing the data sharing properties of the grid architecture. Furthermore our architecture is robust against breakdowns and denial of service attacks. It scales well with the number of users and does not introduce a single point of failure into the system.

  15. Analysis of grid performance using an optical flow algorithm for medical image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ramon A.; Cunha, Rita de Cássio Porfírio; Gutierrez, Marco A.

    2014-03-01

    The development of bigger and faster computers has not yet provided the computing power for medical image processing required nowadays. This is the result of several factors, including: i) the increasing number of qualified medical image users requiring sophisticated tools; ii) the demand for more performance and quality of results; iii) researchers are addressing problems that were previously considered extremely difficult to achieve; iv) medical images are produced with higher resolution and on a larger number. These factors lead to the need of exploring computing techniques that can boost the computational power of Healthcare Institutions while maintaining a relative low cost. Parallel computing is one of the approaches that can help solving this problem. Parallel computing can be achieved using multi-core processors, multiple processors, Graphical Processing Units (GPU), clusters or Grids. In order to gain the maximum benefit of parallel computing it is necessary to write specific programs for each environment or divide the data in smaller subsets. In this article we evaluate the performance of the two parallel computing tools when dealing with a medical image processing application. We compared the performance of the EELA-2 (E-science grid facility for Europe and Latin- America) grid infrastructure with a small Cluster (3 nodes x 8 cores = 24 cores) and a regular PC (Intel i3 - 2 cores). As expected the grid had a better performance for a large number of processes, the cluster for a small to medium number of processes and the PC for few processes.

  16. A grid-based model for integration of distributed medical databases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongxing; Jiang, Lijun; Zhuang, Tian-ge

    2009-12-01

    Grid has emerged recently as an integration infrastructure for sharing and coordinated use of diverse resources in dynamic, distributed environment. In this paper, we present a prototype system for integration of heterogeneous medical databases based on Grid technology, which can provide a uniform access interface and efficient query mechanism to different medical databases. After presenting the architecture of the prototype system that employs corresponding Grid services and middleware technologies, we make an analysis on its basic functional components including OGSA-DAI, metadata model, transaction management, and query processing in detail, which cooperate with each other to enable uniform accessing and seamless integration of the underlying heterogeneous medical databases. Then, we test effectiveness and performance of the system through a query instance, analyze the experiment result, and make a discussion on some issues relating to practical medical applications. Although the prototype system has been carried out and tested in a simulated hospital information environment at present, the underlying principles are applicable to practical applications.

  17. X3D moving grid methods for semiconductor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kuprat, A.; Cartwright, D.; Gammel, J.T.; George, D.; Kendrick, B.; Kilcrease, D.; Trease, H.; Walker, R.

    1997-11-01

    The Los Alamos 3D grid toolbox handles grid maintenance chores and provides access to a sophisticated set of optimization algorithms for unstructured grids. The application of these tools to semiconductor problems is illustrated in three examples: grain growth, topographic deposition and electrostatics. These examples demonstrate adaptive smoothing, front tracking, and automatic, adaptive refinement/derefinement.

  18. A grid computing framework for high-performance medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mañana Guichón, Gabriel; Romero Castro, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    Current medical image processing has become a complex mixture of many scienti c disciplines including mathematics, statistics, physics, and algorithmics, to perform tasks such as registration, segmentation, and visualization, with the ultimate purpose of helping clinicians in their daily routine. This requires high performance computing capabilities that can be achieved in several ways, usually una ordable for most medical institutions. This paper presents a space-based computational grid that uses the otherwise wasted CPU cycles of a set of personal computers, to provide high-performance medical imaging services over the Internet. By using an existing hardware infrastructure and software of free distribution, the proposed approach is apt for university hospitals and other low-budget institutions. This will be illustrated by the use of three real case studies of services where an important speedup factor has been obtained and whose performance has become suitable for use in real clinical scenarios.

  19. GridICE: monitoring the user/application activities on the grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Pra, S. D.; Andreozzi, S.; Fattibene, E.; Misurelli, G.; Cuscela, G.; Donvito, G.; Dudhalkar, V.; Maggi, G.; Pierro, A.; Fantinel, S.

    2008-07-01

    The monitoring of the grid user activity and application performance is extremely useful to plan resource usage strategies particularly in cases of complex applications. Large VOs, such as the LHC VOs, do their monitoring by means of dashboards. Other VOs or communities, like for example the BioinfoGRID one, are characterized by a greater diversification of the application types: so the effort to provide a dashboard like monitor is particularly heavy. The main theme of this paper is to show the improvements introduced in GridICE, a web tool built to provides an almost complete grid monitoring. These recent improvements allows GridICE to provide new reports on the resources usage with details of the VOMS groups, roles and users. By accessing the GridICE web pages, the grid user can get all information that is relevant to keep track of his activity on the grid. In the same way, the activity of a VOMS group can be distinguished from the activity of the entire VO. In this paper we briefly talk about the features and advantages of this approach and, after discussing the requirements, we describe the software solutions, middleware and prerequisite to manage and retrieve the user's credentials.

  20. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed and implemented in the NASA unstructured grid generation code VGRID. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  1. Flow Battery Solution for Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-30

    To address future grid requirements, a U.S. Department of Energy ARRA Storage Demonstration program was launched in 2009 to commercialize promising technologies needed for stronger and more renewables-intensive grids. Raytheon Ktech and EnerVault received a cost-share grant award from the U.S. Department of Energy to develop a grid-scale storage system based on EnerVault’s iron-chromium redox flow battery technology.

  2. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid models track sources through the physical and chemical processes important to the formation and transport of air pollutants. Photochemical model source apportionment has been used to track source impacts of specific sources, groups of sources (sectors), sources in specific geographic areas, and stratospheric and lateral boundary inflow on O3. The implementation and application of a source apportionment technique for O3 and its precursors, nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), for the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model are described here. The Integrated Source Apportionment Method (ISAM) O3 approach is a hybrid of source apportionment and source sensitivity in that O3 production is attributed to precursor sources based on O3 formation regime (e.g., for a NOx-sensitive regime, O3 is apportioned to participating NOx emissions). This implementation is illustrated by tracking multiple emissions source sectors and lateral boundary inflow. NOx, VOC, and O3 attribution to tracked sectors in the application are consistent with spatial and temporal patterns of precursor emissions. The O3 ISAM implementation is further evaluated through comparisons of apportioned am

  3. CZT Virtual Frisch-grid Detector: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cui,Y.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Hossain, A.; James, R. B.

    2009-03-24

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) is a very attractive material for using as room-temperature semiconductor detectors, because it has a wide bandgap and a high atomic number. However, due to the material's poor hole mobility, several special techniques were developed to ensure its suitability for radiation detection. Among them, the virtual Frisch-grid CZT detector is an attractive option, having a simple configuration, yet delivering an outstanding spectral performance. The goal of our group in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is to improve the performance of Frisch-ring CZT detectors; most recently, that effort focused on the non-contacting Frisch-ring detector, allowing us to build an inexpensive, large-volume detector array with high energy-resolution and a large effective area. In this paper, the principles of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are described, especially BNL's innovative improvements. The potential applications of virtual Frisch-grid detectors are discussed, and as an example, a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer using a CZT virtual Frischgrid detector array is introduced, which is a self-contained device with a radiation detector, readout circuit, communication circuit, and high-voltage supply. It has good energy resolution of 1.4% (FWHM of 662-keV peak) with a total detection volume of {approx}20 cm{sup 3}. Such a portable inexpensive device can be used widely in nonproliferation applications, non-destructive detection, radiation imaging, and for homeland security. Extended systems based on the same technology have potential applications in industrial- and nuclear-medical-imaging.

  4. Advanced Unstructured Grid Generation for Complex Aerodynamic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for distribution of grid points on the surface and in the volume has been developed. In addition to the point and line sources of prior work, the new approach utilizes surface and volume sources for automatic curvature-based grid sizing and convenient point distribution in the volume. A new exponential growth function produces smoother and more efficient grids and provides superior control over distribution of grid points in the field. All types of sources support anisotropic grid stretching which not only improves the grid economy but also provides more accurate solutions for certain aerodynamic applications. The new approach does not require a three-dimensional background grid as in the previous methods. Instead, it makes use of an efficient bounding-box auxiliary medium for storing grid parameters defined by surface sources. The new approach is less memory-intensive and more efficient computationally. The grids generated with the new method either eliminate the need for adaptive grid refinement for certain class of problems or provide high quality initial grids that would enhance the performance of many adaptation methods.

  5. Hybrid Grid Techniques for Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koomullil, Roy P.; Soni, Bharat K.; Thornburg, Hugh J.

    1996-01-01

    During the past decade, computational simulation of fluid flow for propulsion activities has progressed significantly, and many notable successes have been reported in the literature. However, the generation of a high quality mesh for such problems has often been reported as a pacing item. Hence, much effort has been expended to speed this portion of the simulation process. Several approaches have evolved for grid generation. Two of the most common are structured multi-block, and unstructured based procedures. Structured grids tend to be computationally efficient, and have high aspect ratio cells necessary for efficently resolving viscous layers. Structured multi-block grids may or may not exhibit grid line continuity across the block interface. This relaxation of the continuity constraint at the interface is intended to ease the grid generation process, which is still time consuming. Flow solvers supporting non-contiguous interfaces require specialized interpolation procedures which may not ensure conservation at the interface. Unstructured or generalized indexing data structures offer greater flexibility, but require explicit connectivity information and are not easy to generate for three dimensional configurations. In addition, unstructured mesh based schemes tend to be less efficient and it is difficult to resolve viscous layers. Recently hybrid or generalized element solution and grid generation techniques have been developed with the objective of combining the attractive features of both structured and unstructured techniques. In the present work, recently developed procedures for hybrid grid generation and flow simulation are critically evaluated, and compared to existing structured and unstructured procedures in terms of accuracy and computational requirements.

  6. Semantic Information Modeling for Emerging Applications in Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qunzhi; Natarajan, Sreedhar; Simmhan, Yogesh; Prasanna, Viktor

    2012-04-16

    Smart Grid modernizes power grid by integrating digital and information technologies. Millions of smart meters, intelligent appliances and communication infrastructures are under deployment allowing advanced IT applications to be developed to secure and manage power grid operations. Demand response (DR) is one such emerging application to optimize electricity demand by curtailing/shifting power load when peak load occurs. Existing DR approaches are mostly based on static plans such as pricing policies and load shedding schedules. However, improvements to power management applications rely on data emanating from existing and new information sources with the growth of Smart Grid information space. In particular, dynamic DR algorithms depend on information from smart meters that report interval-based power consumption measurement, HVAC systems that monitor buildings heat and humidity, and even weather forecast services. In order for emerging Smart Grid applications to take advantage of the diverse data influx, extensible information integration is required. In this paper, we develop an integrated Smart Grid information model using Semantic Web techniques and present case studies of using semantic information for dynamic DR. We show the semantic model facilitates information integration and knowledge representation for developing the next generation Smart Grid applications.

  7. Twelve Principles for Green Energy Storage in Grid Applications.

    PubMed

    Arbabzadeh, Maryam; Johnson, Jeremiah X; Keoleian, Gregory A; Rasmussen, Paul G; Thompson, Levi T

    2016-01-19

    The introduction of energy storage technologies to the grid could enable greater integration of renewables, improve system resilience and reliability, and offer cost effective alternatives to transmission and distribution upgrades. The integration of energy storage systems into the electrical grid can lead to different environmental outcomes based on the grid application, the existing generation mix, and the demand. Given this complexity, a framework is needed to systematically inform design and technology selection about the environmental impacts that emerge when considering energy storage options to improve sustainability performance of the grid. To achieve this, 12 fundamental principles specific to the design and grid application of energy storage systems are developed to inform policy makers, designers, and operators. The principles are grouped into three categories: (1) system integration for grid applications, (2) the maintenance and operation of energy storage, and (3) the design of energy storage systems. We illustrate the application of each principle through examples published in the academic literature, illustrative calculations, and a case study with an off-grid application of vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs). In addition, trade-offs that can emerge between principles are highlighted.

  8. An Analysis of Performance Enhancement Techniques for Overset Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, J. J.; Biswas, R.; Potsdam, M.; Strawn, R. C.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The overset grid methodology has significantly reduced time-to-solution of high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process resolves the geometrical complexity of the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured discretization grids that periodically exchange information through interpolation. However, high performance computations of such large-scale realistic applications must be handled efficiently on state-of-the-art parallel supercomputers. This paper analyzes the effects of various performance enhancement techniques on the parallel efficiency of an overset grid Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machine. Specifically, the role of asynchronous communication, grid splitting, and grid grouping strategies are presented and discussed. Results indicate that performance depends critically on the level of latency hiding and the quality of load balancing across the processors.

  9. Load Balancing Strategies for Multi-Block Overset Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Biswas, Rupak; Lopez-Benitez, Noe; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The multi-block overset grid method is a powerful technique for high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process uses a grid system that discretizes the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured grids that periodically update and exchange boundary information through interpolation. For efficient high performance computations of large-scale realistic applications using this methodology, the individual grids must be properly partitioned among the parallel processors. Overall performance, therefore, largely depends on the quality of load balancing. In this paper, we present three different load balancing strategies far overset grids and analyze their effects on the parallel efficiency of a Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machine.

  10. Grid-based HPC astrophysical applications at INAF Catania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, A.; Calanducci, A.; Becciani, U.; Capuzzo Dolcetta, R.

    The research activity on grid area at INAF Catania has been devoted to two main goals: the integration of a multiprocessor supercomputer (IBM SP4) within INFN-GRID middleware and the developing of a web-portal, Astrocomp-G, for the submission of astrophysical jobs into the grid infrastructure. Most of the actual grid implementation infrastructure is based on common hardware, i.e. i386 architecture machines (Intel Celeron, Pentium III, IV, Amd Duron, Athlon) using Linux RedHat OS. We were the first institute to integrate a totally different machine, an IBM SP with RISC architecture and AIX OS, as a powerful Worker Node inside a grid infrastructure. We identified and ported to AIX OS the grid components dealing with job monitoring and execution and properly tuned the Computing Element to delivery jobs into this special Worker Node. For testing purpose we used MARA, an astrophysical application for the analysis of light curve sequences. Astrocomp-G is a user-friendly front end to our grid site. Users who want to submit the astrophysical applications already available in the portal need to own a valid personal X509 certificate in addiction to a username and password released by the grid portal web master. The personal X509 certificate is a prerequisite for the creation of a short or long-term proxy certificate that allows the grid infrastructure services to identify clearly whether the owner of the job has the permissions to use resources and data. X509 and proxy certificates are part of GSI (Grid Security Infrastructure), a standard security tool adopted by all major grid sites around the world.

  11. Silicon wire grid polarizer for ultraviolet applications.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Kroker, Stefanie; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    We present a silicon wire grid polarizer operating down to a wavelength of 300 nm. Besides metallic grating materials, semiconductors also offer appropriate material properties to realize wire grid polarizers in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral range. The presented polarizer with a period of 140 nm was realized by means of electron beam lithography and dry etching using amorphous silicon as the grating material. At a wavelength of 365 nm, a transmission of 42% and an extinction ratio of 90 (19.5 dB) are measured. The spectral bandwidth of these polarizers in the UV-spectral range is about 100 nm.

  12. Summary of parallel session I: grid testbeds and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    This paper is a summary of talks presented at ACAT 2002 in parallel session I on grid testbeds and applications. There were 12 presentations on this topic that show a lot of enthusiasm and hard work by many people in bringing physics applications onto the grid. There are encouraging success stories and also a clear view that the middleware has a way to go until it is as robust, reliable and complete as we would like it to be.

  13. Summary of Parallel Session I: Grid testbeds and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Douglas L.

    2002-10-10

    This paper is a summary of talks presented at ACAT 2002 in parallel session I on grid testbeds and applications. There were 12 presentations on this topic that show a lot of enthusiasm and hard work by many people in bringing physics applications onto the grid. There are encouraging success stories and also a clear view that the middleware has a way to go until it is as robust, reliable and complete as we would like it to be.

  14. GridPix detectors - introduction and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, J.; Bilevych, Y.; Desch, K.; Krieger, C.; Lupberger, M.

    2017-02-01

    GridPix detectors are a new kind of detectors combining a high density pixelized readout ASIC with a Micromegas gas amplification stage. Because of the alignment of mesh holes and pixels, a high efficiency for detecting and separating single primary electrons is reached. This feature leads to excellent spatial and energy resolutions as demonstrated by several different setups.

  15. Architecture of authorization mechanism for medical data sharing on the grid.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Takahito; Date, Susume; Takeda, Singo; Hasegawa, Ichiro; Shimojo, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    Data security is becoming increasingly important as the Grid matures. The advances of the Grid have allowed scientists and researchers to build a data grid where they can share and exchange research-related data and information. In reality, however, these specialists do not benefit enough from this data grid. The reason is that the current Grid does not have sufficiently robust and flexible data security. We investigate a medical data-sharing environment where medical doctors and scientists can securely share clinical and medical research data. We show medical data sharing that takes advantage of PERMIS, or an RBAC-based authorization system that achieves XML element level access control. We also describe the lessons learnt in designing the environment as well as a comparison with other existing authorization mechanisms.

  16. Enabling Science and Engineering Applications on the Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Ed

    2004-08-25

    The Grid has the potential to fundamentally change the way science and engineering are done. Aggregate power of computing resources connected by networks - of the Grid - exceeds that of any single supercomputer by many orders of magnitude. At the same time, our ability to carry out computations of the scale and level of detail required, for example, to study the Universe, or simulate a rocket engine, are severely constrained by available computing power. Hence, such applications should be one of the main driving forces behind the development of Grid computing. I will discuss some large scale applications, including simulations of colliding black holes, and show how they are driving the development of Grid computing technology. Applications are already being developed that are not only aware of their needs, but also of the resources available to them on the Grid. They will be able to adapt themselves automatically to respond to their changing needs, to spawn off tasks on other resources, and to adapt to the changing characteristics of the Grid including machine and network loads and availability. I will discuss a number of innovative scenarios for computing on the Grid enabled by such technologies, and demonstrate how close these are to being a reality.

  17. Optimal Sizing Tool for Battery Storage in Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-24

    The battery storage sizing tool developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory can be used to evaluate economic performance and determine the optimal size of battery storage in different use cases considering multiple power system applications. The considered use cases include i) utility owned battery storage, and ii) battery storage behind customer meter. The power system applications from energy storage include energy arbitrage, balancing services, T&D deferral, outage mitigation, demand charge reduction etc. Most of existing solutions consider only one or two grid services simultaneously, such as balancing service and energy arbitrage. ES-select developed by Sandia and KEMA is able to consider multiple grid services but it stacks the grid services based on priorities instead of co-optimization. This tool is the first one that provides a co-optimization for systematic and local grid services.

  18. Facilitating the Portability of User Applications in Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolano, Paul Z.

    2003-01-01

    Grid computing promises the ability to connect geographically and organizationally distributed resources to increase effective computational power, resource utilization, and resource accessibility. For grid computing to be successful, however, users must be able to easily execute the same application on different resources. Different resources, however, may be administered by different organizations with different software installed, different file system structures, and different default environment settings. Even within the same organization, the set of software installed on a given resource is in constant flux with additions, upgrades, and removals. Users cannot be expected to understand all of the idiosyncrasies of each resource they may wish to execute jobs on, thus must be provided with automated assistance. This paper describes a new OGSI-compliant grid service (the Portability Manager) that has been implemented as part of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG) project to automatically estab!ish the execution environment for user applications.

  19. Medical applications of holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bally, Gert

    1991-11-01

    From the various capabilities of holography for image processing and measuring purposes, holographic interferometric techniques have found more extended application in biological and medical research. Due to their special properties the different methods of holographic interferometry are applied to characteristic fields of biomedical investigations where--similar to nondestructive testing--vibration and deformation analysis is of interest. Features of holographic interferometry, such as the possibility of noncontactive, three-dimensional investigations with a large field-of-depth, are used with advantage. The main applications can be found in basic research e.g., in audiology, dentistry, opthalmology, and experimental orthopedics. Because of the great number of investigations and the variety of medical domains in which these investigations were performed this survey is confined to some characteristic examples. As in all fields of optics and laser metrology, a review on biomedical applications of holography would be incomplete if military developments and utilization were not mentioned. As demonstrated by selected examples, the increasing interlacing of science with the military does not stop at domains that traditionally are regarded as exclusively oriented to human welfare--like biomedical research. The term ''Star Wars Medicine'', which becomes an increasingly popular expression for laser applications (including holography) in medicine, characterizes the consequences of this development.

  20. Medical Professionals and Smartphone Applications.

    PubMed

    Arunagiri, Varun; Parimala, M; Ragumani, P; Anbalagan, Kothai

    2017-06-01

    Ever since the advent of Smartphones, Smartphone applications (SAs) are revolutionizing the contemporary medicine. Smartphone application which was created in view of swift communications among the general public has now intruded the medical fraternity. But the ethics for using these applications to transfer patients' medical records through SA is bewildering among the medical professionals (MPs).

  1. The taming of the Grid : virtual application services.

    SciTech Connect

    Keahey, K; Motawi, K.

    2004-03-29

    In this report we develop a view of the Grid based on the application service provider (ASP) model. This view enables the user to see the Grid as a collection of application services that can be published, discovered, and accessed in a relatively straightforward manner, hiding much of the complexity involved in using computational Grids and thus making it simpler and more accessible to a wider range of users. However, in order to satisfy the requirements of real-time scientific application clients, we combine the ASP model with representation of quality of service about the execution of services and the results they produce. Specifically, we focus on real-time, deadline-bound execution as the quality of service derived by a client. We describe an architecture implementing these ideas and the role of client and server in the context of the functionality we develop. We also describe preliminary experiments using an equilibrium fitting application for magnetic fusion in our architecture.

  2. Aspects and applications of patched grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walters, R. W.; Switzer, G. F.; Thomas, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Patched grid calculations within the framework of an implicit, flux-vector split upwind/relaxation algorithm for the Euler equations are presented. The effect of a metric-discontinuous interface on the convergence rate of the algorithm is discussed along with the spatial accuracy of the solution and the effect of curvature along an interface. Results are presented and discussed for the free-stream problem, shock reflection problem, supersonic inlet with a 5 degree ramp, aerodynamically choked inlet, and three-dimensional analytic forebody.

  3. Introduction to Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Ashley J.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.

    The first two parts of this book describe various theories associated with light propagation in tissue and the resulting response. If coherence or polarization information is not needed, we assume that the transport equation governs the optical interaction of light with tissue and the heat conduction equation provides the basis for estimating the thermal response of tissue to laser radiation. In part III of this book, the theory for optical and thermal interactions of laser light with tissue are used to analyze medical applications. In particular, the concepts of parts I and II

  4. An Experimental Framework for Executing Applications in Dynamic Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huedo, Eduardo; Montero, Ruben S.; Llorente, Ignacio M.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Grid opens up opportunities for resource-starved scientists and engineers to harness highly distributed computing resources. A number of Grid middleware projects are currently available to support the simultaneous exploitation of heterogeneous resources distributed in different administrative domains. However, efficient job submission and management continue being far from accessible to ordinary scientists and engineers due to the dynamic and complex nature of the Grid. This report describes a new Globus framework that allows an easier and more efficient execution of jobs in a 'submit and forget' fashion. Adaptation to dynamic Grid conditions is achieved by supporting automatic application migration following performance degradation, 'better' resource discovery, requirement change, owner decision or remote resource failure. The report also includes experimental results of the behavior of our framework on the TRGP testbed.

  5. A Web Application to Facilitate Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluations.

    PubMed

    Avoundjian, Tigran; Khosropour, Christine M; Golden, Matthew R; Barbee, Lindley A; Dombrowski, Julia C

    2017-08-28

    Many health departments use a "reactor grid" to determine which laboratory-reported syphilis serologic test results require investigation. We developed a Web-based tool, the Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluator (SRGE), to facilitate health department reactor grid evaluations and test the tool using data from Seattle & King County, Washington. We developed SRGE using the R Shiny Web application framework. When populated with a data set including titer results and final disposition codes, SRGE displays the percent of verified early syphilis cases by serologic titer result and patient age in each cell of the grid. The results can be optionally stratified by sex, test type, and previous rapid plasma reagin titer. The impact of closing laboratory results without investigation in cells selected by the user is dynamically computed. The SRGE calculates the percent of all laboratory reports closed ("efficiency gained"), the proportion of all early syphilis cases closed without investigation ("case finding loss"), and the ratio of percent of cases identified for investigation to percent of all laboratory reports investigated ("efficiency ratio"). After defining algorithms, users can compare them side-by-side, combine subgroup-specific algorithms, and export results. We used SRGE to compare the current Public Health-Seattle & King County (PHSKC) reactor grid to 5 alternate algorithms. Of 13,504 rapid plasma reagin results reported to PHSKC from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2015, 1565 were linked to verified early syphilis cases. Updating PHSKC's current reactor grid could result in an efficiency gain of 4.8% to 25.2% (653-3403 laboratory reports) and case finding loss of 1% to 8.4% (10-99 fewer cases investigated). The Syphilis Reactor Grid Evaluator can be used to rapidly evaluate alternative approaches to optimizing the reactor grid. Changing the reactor grid in King County to close more laboratory results without investigation could improve efficiency with minimal impact on

  6. Grid Technology as a Cyber Infrastructure for Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes how grids and grid service technologies can be used to develop an infrastructure for the Earth Science community. This cyberinfrastructure would be populated with a hierarchy of services, including discipline specific services such those needed by the Earth Science community as well as a set of core services that are needed by most applications. This core would include data-oriented services used for accessing and moving data as well as computer-oriented services used to broker access to resources and control the execution of tasks on the grid. The availability of such an Earth Science cyberinfrastructure would ease the development of Earth Science applications. With such a cyberinfrastructure, application work flows could be created to extract data from one or more of the Earth Science archives and then process it by passing it through various persistent services that are part of the persistent cyberinfrastructure, such as services to perform subsetting, reformatting, data mining and map projections.

  7. Laser Ablation for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Ken-Ichi

    Medical applications of laser are measurement, laser surgery, in-situ monitoring, and processing of medical devices. In this paper, author briefly reviews the trends of medical applications, describes some new applications, and then discuss about the future trends and problems of medical applications. At present, the domestic market of laser equipment for medical applications is nearly 1/10 of that for industrial applications, which has registered significant growth continuously. Laser surgery as a minimum invasive surgery under arthroscope is expected to decrease the pain of patients. Precise processing such as cutting and welding is suitable for manufacturing medical devices. Pulsed laser deposition has been successfully applied to the thin film coating. The corneal refractive surgery by ArF excimer laser has been widely accepted for its highly safe operation. Laser ablation for retinal implant in the visual prosthesis is one of the promising applications of laser ablation in medicine. New applications with femtosecond laser are expected in the near future.

  8. Data location-aware job scheduling in the grid. Application to the GridWay metascheduler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Peris, Antonio; Hernandez, Jose; Huedo, Eduardo; Llorente, Ignacio M.

    2010-04-01

    Grid infrastructures constitute nowadays the core of the computing facilities of the biggest LHC experiments. These experiments produce and manage petabytes of data per year and run thousands of computing jobs every day to process that data. It is the duty of metaschedulers to allocate the tasks to the most appropriate resources at the proper time. Our work reviews the policies that have been proposed for the scheduling of grid jobs in the context of very data-intensive applications. We indicate some of the practical problems that such models will face and describe what we consider essential characteristics of an optimum scheduling system: aim to minimise not only job turnaround time but also data replication, flexibility to support different virtual organisation requirements and capability to coordinate the tasks of data placement and job allocation while keeping their execution decoupled. These ideas have guided the development of an enhanced prototype for GridWay, a general purpose metascheduler, part of the Globus Toolkit and member of the EGEE's RESPECT program. Current GridWay's scheduling algorithm is unaware of data location. Our prototype makes it possible for job requests to set data needs not only as absolute requirements but also as functions for resource ranking. As our tests show, this makes it more flexible than currently used resource brokers to implement different data-aware scheduling algorithms.

  9. Building messaging substrates for Web and Grid applications.

    PubMed

    Fox, Geoffrey; Pallickara, Shrideep; Pierce, Marlon; Gadgil, Harshawardhan

    2005-08-15

    Grid application frameworks have increasingly aligned themselves with the developments in Web services. Web services are currently the most popular infrastructure based on service-oriented architecture (SOA) paradigm. There are three core areas within the SOA framework: (i) a set of capabilities that are remotely accessible, (ii) communications using messages and (iii) metadata pertaining to the aforementioned capabilities. In this paper, we focus on issues related to the messaging substrate hosting these services; we base these discussions on the NARADABROKERING system. We outline strategies to leverage capabilities available within the substrate without the need to make any changes to the service implementations themselves. We also identify the set of services needed to build Grids of Grids. Finally, we discuss another technology, HPSEARCH, which facilitates the administration of the substrate and the deployment of applications via a scripting interface. These issues have direct relevance to scientific Grid applications, which need to go beyond remote procedure calls in client-server interactions to support integrated distributed applications that couple databases, high performance computing codes and visualization codes.

  10. TIGGERC: Turbomachinery Interactive Grid Generator for 2-D Grid Applications and Users Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David P.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block grid generator has been developed for a new design and analysis system for studying multiple blade-row turbomachinery problems. TIGGERC is a mouse driven, interactive grid generation program which can be used to modify boundary coordinates and grid packing and generates surface grids using a hyperbolic tangent or algebraic distribution of grid points on the block boundaries. The interior points of each block grid are distributed using a transfinite interpolation approach. TIGGERC can generate a blocked axisymmetric H-grid, C-grid, I-grid or O-grid for studying turbomachinery flow problems. TIGGERC was developed for operation on Silicon Graphics workstations. Detailed discussion of the grid generation methodology, menu options, operational features and sample grid geometries are presented.

  11. Talisman--rapid application development for the grid.

    PubMed

    Oinn, Thomas M

    2003-01-01

    In order to make use of the emerging grid and network services offered by various institutes and mandated by many current research projects, some kind of user accessible client is required. In contrast with attempts to build generic workbenches, Talisman is designed to allow a bioinformatics expert to rapidly build custom applications, immediately visible using standard web technology, for users who wish to concentrate on the biology of their problem rather than the informatics aspects. As a component of the MyGrid project, it is intended to allow access to arbitrary resources, including but not limited to relational, object and flat file data sources, analysis programs and grid based storage, tracking and distributed annotation systems.

  12. Earth Science applications on Grid -advantages and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, M.; Schwichtenberg, H.

    2012-04-01

    The civil society at large has addressed to the Earth Science community many strong requirements related in particular to natural and industrial risks, climate changes, new energies…. Our total knowledge about the complex Earth system is contained in models and measurements, how we put them together has to be managed cleverly… The technical challenge is to put together databases and computing resources to answer the ES challenges. The main critical point is that on one hand the civil society and all public ask for certainties i.e. precise values with small error range as it concerns prediction at short, medium and long term in all domains; on the other hand Science can mainly answer only in terms of probability of occurrence. To improve the answer or/and decrease the uncertainties, (1) new observational networks have been deployed in order to have a better geographical coverage and more accurate measurements have been carried out in key locations and aboard satellites, (2) new algorithms and methodologies have been developed using new technologies and compute resources. Numerous applications in atmospheric chemistry, meteorology, seismology, hydrology, pollution, climate and biodiversity were deployed successfully on Grid. In order to fulfill requirements of risk management, several prototype applications have been deployed using OGC (Open geospatial Consortium) components with Grid middleware. The Grid has permitted to decrease uncertainties by increasing the probability of occurrence via a larger number of runs. Some limitations are related to the combination of databases-outside the grid infrastructure- and grid compute resources; and to real-time applications that need resource reservation in order to insure results at given time. As a matter of fact ES scientists use different compute resources according to the phase of their application are used to work in large projects and share their results. They need a service-oriented architecture and a platform of

  13. Application of the Chimera overlapped grid scheme to simulation of Space Shuttle ascent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.; Parks, Steven J.; Chan, William M.; Renze, Kevin J.

    1992-01-01

    Several issues relating to the application of Chimera overlapped grids to complex geometries and flowfields are discussed. These include the addition of geometric components with different grid topologies, gridding for intersecting pieces of geometry, and turbulence modeling in grid overlap regions. Sample results are presented for transonic flow about the Space Shuttle launch vehicle. Comparisons with wind tunnel and flight measured pressures are shown.

  14. Grids for Dummies: Featuring Earth Science Data Mining Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinke, Thomas H.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the concept and advantages of linking computers together into data grids, an emerging technology for managing information across institutions, and potential users of data grids. The logistics of access to a grid, including the use of the World Wide Web to access grids, and security concerns are also discussed. The potential usefulness of data grids to the earth science community is also discussed, as well as the Global Grid Forum, and other efforts to establish standards for data grids.

  15. Birthdates of Medical School Applicants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Ernest L; Sokol, Robert J.; Kruger, Michael L.; Yargeau, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    We determined if the "relative age" effect, wherein older students in an age cohort in early grades do better academically, extends to birthdates of applicants to medical schools, and if birthdates are related to the success of their applications. We examined birthdays of applicants from Michigan to Wayne State University's School of…

  16. A bioinformatics knowledge discovery in text application for grid computing.

    PubMed

    Castellano, Marcello; Mastronardi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Roberto; Tarricone, Gianfranco

    2009-06-16

    A fundamental activity in biomedical research is Knowledge Discovery which has the ability to search through large amounts of biomedical information such as documents and data. High performance computational infrastructures, such as Grid technologies, are emerging as a possible infrastructure to tackle the intensive use of Information and Communication resources in life science. The goal of this work was to develop a software middleware solution in order to exploit the many knowledge discovery applications on scalable and distributed computing systems to achieve intensive use of ICT resources. The development of a grid application for Knowledge Discovery in Text using a middleware solution based methodology is presented. The system must be able to: perform a user application model, process the jobs with the aim of creating many parallel jobs to distribute on the computational nodes. Finally, the system must be aware of the computational resources available, their status and must be able to monitor the execution of parallel jobs. These operative requirements lead to design a middleware to be specialized using user application modules. It included a graphical user interface in order to access to a node search system, a load balancing system and a transfer optimizer to reduce communication costs. A middleware solution prototype and the performance evaluation of it in terms of the speed-up factor is shown. It was written in JAVA on Globus Toolkit 4 to build the grid infrastructure based on GNU/Linux computer grid nodes. A test was carried out and the results are shown for the named entity recognition search of symptoms and pathologies. The search was applied to a collection of 5,000 scientific documents taken from PubMed. In this paper we discuss the development of a grid application based on a middleware solution. It has been tested on a knowledge discovery in text process to extract new and useful information about symptoms and pathologies from a large collection of

  17. A bioinformatics knowledge discovery in text application for grid computing

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Marcello; Mastronardi, Giuseppe; Bellotti, Roberto; Tarricone, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    Background A fundamental activity in biomedical research is Knowledge Discovery which has the ability to search through large amounts of biomedical information such as documents and data. High performance computational infrastructures, such as Grid technologies, are emerging as a possible infrastructure to tackle the intensive use of Information and Communication resources in life science. The goal of this work was to develop a software middleware solution in order to exploit the many knowledge discovery applications on scalable and distributed computing systems to achieve intensive use of ICT resources. Methods The development of a grid application for Knowledge Discovery in Text using a middleware solution based methodology is presented. The system must be able to: perform a user application model, process the jobs with the aim of creating many parallel jobs to distribute on the computational nodes. Finally, the system must be aware of the computational resources available, their status and must be able to monitor the execution of parallel jobs. These operative requirements lead to design a middleware to be specialized using user application modules. It included a graphical user interface in order to access to a node search system, a load balancing system and a transfer optimizer to reduce communication costs. Results A middleware solution prototype and the performance evaluation of it in terms of the speed-up factor is shown. It was written in JAVA on Globus Toolkit 4 to build the grid infrastructure based on GNU/Linux computer grid nodes. A test was carried out and the results are shown for the named entity recognition search of symptoms and pathologies. The search was applied to a collection of 5,000 scientific documents taken from PubMed. Conclusion In this paper we discuss the development of a grid application based on a middleware solution. It has been tested on a knowledge discovery in text process to extract new and useful information about symptoms and

  18. Cost Optimization Model for Business Applications in Virtualized Grid Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strebel, Jörg

    The advent of Grid computing gives enterprises an ever increasing choice of computing options, yet research has so far hardly addressed the problem of mixing the different computing options in a cost-minimal fashion. The following paper presents a comprehensive cost model and a mixed integer optimization model which can be used to minimize the IT expenditures of an enterprise and help in decision-making when to outsource certain business software applications. A sample scenario is analyzed and promising cost savings are demonstrated. Possible applications of the model to future research questions are outlined.

  19. GridPix application to dual phase TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfonsi, Matteo; van Bakel, Niels; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Decowski, Michael Patrick; van der Graaf, Harry; Schön, Rolf; Tiseni, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    GridPix is a gas-filled detector with an aluminium mesh stretched 50 μm above the Timepix CMOS pixel chip. This defines a high electric field where gas amplification occurs. A feasibility study is ongoing at Nikhef for the application of the GridPix technology as a charge sensitive device in a dual phase noble gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC), within the framework of the DARWIN design study for next generation dark matter experiments. The smallness of the device and well defined materials allow for high radio-purity and low outgassing. The high granularity of a pixel readout and the high detection efficiency of single electrons of GridPix bring benefits especially in terms of energy resolution for small energy deposits. This feature is interesting also for the measurement of the scintillation yield and the ionisation yield of noble liquids. The accurate measurements of such quantities have a direct impact on the data interpretation of dark matter experiments. The application in dual phase argon or xenon TPCs implies several technological challenges, such as the survival of the device at cryogenic temperature as well as the operation in a pure noble gas atmosphere without discharges. We describe here the recent developments of the project.

  20. Mixed Element Type Unstructured Grid Generation for Viscous Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, David L.; Gaither, J. Adam

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is presented for efficient generation of high-quality unstructured grids suitable for CFD simulation of high Reynolds number viscous flow fields. Layers of anisotropic elements are generated by advancing along prescribed normals from solid boundaries. The points are generated such that either pentahedral or tetrahedral elements with an implied connectivity can be be directly recovered. As points are generated they are temporarily attached to a volume triangulation of the boundary points. This triangulation allows efficient local search algorithms to be used when checking merging layers, The existing advancing-front/local-reconnection procedure is used to generate isotropic elements outside of the anisotropic region. Results are presented for a variety of applications. The results demonstrate that high-quality anisotropic unstructured grids can be efficiently and consistently generated for complex configurations.

  1. Cloud computing for energy management in smart grid - an application survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveen, P.; Kiing Ing, Wong; Kobina Danquah, Michael; Sidhu, Amandeep S.; Abu-Siada, Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    The smart grid is the emerging energy system wherein the application of information technology, tools and techniques that make the grid run more efficiently. It possesses demand response capacity to help balance electrical consumption with supply. The challenges and opportunities of emerging and future smart grids can be addressed by cloud computing. To focus on these requirements, we provide an in-depth survey on different cloud computing applications for energy management in the smart grid architecture. In this survey, we present an outline of the current state of research on smart grid development. We also propose a model of cloud based economic power dispatch for smart grid.

  2. Mapping PetaSHA Applications to TeraGrid Architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Y.; Moore, R.; Olsen, K.; Zhu, J.; Dalguer, L. A.; Day, S.; Cruz-Atienza, V.; Maechling, P.; Jordan, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has a science program in developing an integrated cyberfacility - PetaSHA - for executing physics-based seismic hazard analysis (SHA) computations. The NSF has awarded PetaSHA 15 million allocation service units this year on the fastest supercomputers available within the NSF TeraGrid. However, one size does not fit all, a range of systems are needed to support this effort at different stages of the simulations. Enabling PetaSHA simulations on those TeraGrid architectures to solve both dynamic rupture and seismic wave propagation have been a challenge from both hardware and software levels. This is an adaptation procedure to meet specific requirements of each architecture. It is important to determine how fundamental system attributes affect application performance. We present an adaptive approach in our PetaSHA application that enables the simultaneous optimization of both computation and communication at run-time using flexible settings. These techniques optimize initialization, source/media partition and MPI-IO output in different ways to achieve optimal performance on the target machines. The resulting code is a factor of four faster than the orignial version. New MPI-I/O capabilities have been added for the accurate Staggered-Grid Split-Node (SGSN) method for dynamic rupture propagation in the velocity-stress staggered-grid finite difference scheme (Dalguer and Day, JGR, 2007), We use execution workflow across TeraGrid sites for managing the resulting data volumes. Our lessons learned indicate that minimizing time to solution is most critical, in particular when scheduling large scale simulations across supercomputer sites. The TeraShake platform has been ported to multiple architectures including TACC Dell lonestar and Abe, Cray XT3 Bigben and Blue Gene/L. Parallel efficiency of 96% with the PetaSHA application Olsen-AWM has been demonstrated on 40,960 Blue Gene/L processors at IBM TJ Watson Center. Notable

  3. Advanced Accelerators for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Koyama, Kazuyoshi

    We review advanced accelerators for medical applications with respect to the following key technologies: (i) higher RF electron linear accelerator (hereafter "linac"); (ii) optimization of alignment for the proton linac, cyclotron and synchrotron; (iii) superconducting magnet; (iv) laser technology. Advanced accelerators for medical applications are categorized into two groups. The first group consists of compact medical linacs with high RF, cyclotrons and synchrotrons downsized by optimization of alignment and superconducting magnets. The second group comprises laserbased acceleration systems aimed of medical applications in the future. Laser plasma electron/ion accelerating systems for cancer therapy and laser dielectric accelerating systems for radiation biology are mentioned. Since the second group has important potential for a compact system, the current status of the established energy and intensity and of the required stability are given.

  4. Advanced Accelerators for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru; Koyama, Kazuyoshi

    We review advanced accelerators for medical applications with respect to the following key technologies: (i) higher RF electron linear accelerator (hereafter “linac”); (ii) optimization of alignment for the proton linac, cyclotron and synchrotron; (iii) superconducting magnet; (iv) laser technology. Advanced accelerators for medical applications are categorized into two groups. The first group consists of compact medical linacs with high RF, cyclotrons and synchrotrons downsized by optimization of alignment and superconducting magnets. The second group comprises laser-based acceleration systems aimed of medical applications in the future. Laser plasma electron/ion accelerating systems for cancer therapy and laser dielectric accelerating systems for radiation biology are mentioned. Since the second group has important potential for a compact system, the current status of the established energy and intensity and of the required stability are given.

  5. Distribution System Reliability Analysis for Smart Grid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljohani, Tawfiq Masad

    Reliability of power systems is a key aspect in modern power system planning, design, and operation. The ascendance of the smart grid concept has provided high hopes of developing an intelligent network that is capable of being a self-healing grid, offering the ability to overcome the interruption problems that face the utility and cost it tens of millions in repair and loss. To address its reliability concerns, the power utilities and interested parties have spent extensive amount of time and effort to analyze and study the reliability of the generation and transmission sectors of the power grid. Only recently has attention shifted to be focused on improving the reliability of the distribution network, the connection joint between the power providers and the consumers where most of the electricity problems occur. In this work, we will examine the effect of the smart grid applications in improving the reliability of the power distribution networks. The test system used in conducting this thesis is the IEEE 34 node test feeder, released in 2003 by the Distribution System Analysis Subcommittee of the IEEE Power Engineering Society. The objective is to analyze the feeder for the optimal placement of the automatic switching devices and quantify their proper installation based on the performance of the distribution system. The measures will be the changes in the reliability system indices including SAIDI, SAIFI, and EUE. The goal is to design and simulate the effect of the installation of the Distributed Generators (DGs) on the utility's distribution system and measure the potential improvement of its reliability. The software used in this work is DISREL, which is intelligent power distribution software that is developed by General Reliability Co.

  6. Broadband iridium wire grid polarizer for UV applications.

    PubMed

    Weber, Thomas; Käsebier, Thomas; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2011-02-15

    In this Letter, we present an iridium wire grid polarizer with a large spectral working range from IR down to the UV spectral region. The required grating period of 100 nm for an application below a wavelength of 300 nm was realized using a spatial frequency doubling technique based on ultrafast electron beam writing. The optical performance of the polarizer at a wavelength of 300 nm is a transmittance of almost 60% and an extinction ratio of about 30 (15 dB). Furthermore, the oxidation resistance is discussed.

  7. On the applications of algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung Lee

    1989-01-01

    Algebraic grid generation methods based on transfinite interpolation called the two-boundary and four-boundary methods are applied for generating grids with highly complex boundaries. These methods yield grid point distributions that allow for accurate application to regions of sharp gradients in the physical domain or time-dependent problems with small length scale phenomena. Algebraic grids are derived using the two-boundary and four-boundary methods for applications in both two- and three-dimensional domains. Grids are developed for distinctly different geometrical problems and the two-boundary and four-boundary methods are demonstrated to be applicable to a wide class of geometries.

  8. Web-based interactive visualization in a Grid-enabled neuroimaging application using HTML5.

    PubMed

    Siewert, René; Specovius, Svenja; Wu, Jie; Krefting, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Interactive visualization and correction of intermediate results are required in many medical image analysis pipelines. To allow certain interaction in the remote execution of compute- and data-intensive applications, new features of HTML5 are used. They allow for transparent integration of user interaction into Grid- or Cloud-enabled scientific workflows. Both 2D and 3D visualization and data manipulation can be performed through a scientific gateway without the need to install specific software or web browser plugins. The possibilities of web-based visualization are presented along the FreeSurfer-pipeline, a popular compute- and data-intensive software tool for quantitative neuroimaging.

  9. Graph Partitioning for Parallel Applications in Heterogeneous Grid Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisws, Rupak; Kumar, Shailendra; Das, Sajal K.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The problem of partitioning irregular graphs and meshes for parallel computations on homogeneous systems has been extensively studied. However, these partitioning schemes fail when the target system architecture exhibits heterogeneity in resource characteristics. With the emergence of technologies such as the Grid, it is imperative to study the partitioning problem taking into consideration the differing capabilities of such distributed heterogeneous systems. In our model, the heterogeneous system consists of processors with varying processing power and an underlying non-uniform communication network. We present in this paper a novel multilevel partitioning scheme for irregular graphs and meshes, that takes into account issues pertinent to Grid computing environments. Our partitioning algorithm, called MiniMax, generates and maps partitions onto a heterogeneous system with the objective of minimizing the maximum execution time of the parallel distributed application. For experimental performance study, we have considered both a realistic mesh problem from NASA as well as synthetic workloads. Simulation results demonstrate that MiniMax generates high quality partitions for various classes of applications targeted for parallel execution in a distributed heterogeneous environment.

  10. Medical applications of nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Waracki, Mateusz; Bugaj, Bartosz; Pypno, Damian; Cabała, Krzysztof

    2015-10-29

    Nanotechnologies are new areas of research focusing on affecting matter at the atomic and molecular levels. It is beyond doubt that modern medicine can benefit greatly from it; thus nanomedicine has become one of the main branches of nanotechnological research. Currently it focuses on developing new methods of preventing, diagnosing and treating various diseases. Nanomaterials show very high efficiency in destroying cancer cells and are already undergoing clinical trials. The results are so promising that nanomaterials might become an alternative to traditional cancer therapy, mostly due to the fact that they allow cancer cells to be targeted specifically and enable detailed imaging of tissues, making planning further therapy much easier. Nanoscience might also be a source of the needed breakthrough in the fight against atherosclerosis, since nanostructures may be used in both preventing and increasing the stability of atherosclerotic lesions. One area of interest is creating nanomaterials that are not only efficient, but also well tolerated by the human body. Other potential applications of nanotechnology in medicine include: nanoadjuvants with immunomodulatory properties used to deliver vaccine antigens; the nano-knife, an almost non-invasive method of destroying cancer cells with high voltage electricity; and carbon nanotubes, which are already a popular way of repairing damaged tissues and might be used to regenerate nerves in the future. The aim of this article is to outline the potential uses of nanotechnology in medicine. Original articles and reviews have been used to present the new developments and directions of studies.

  11. Environmental applications based on GIS and GRID technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontis, R.; Lorrai, E.; Marrone, V. A.; Muscas, L.; Spanu, V.; Vacca, A.; Valera, P.

    2009-04-01

    In the last decades, the collection and use of environmental data has enormously increased in a wide range of applications. Simultaneously, the explosive development of information technology and its ever wider data accessibility have made it possible to store and manipulate huge quantities of data. In this context, the GRID approach is emerging worldwide as a tool allowing to provision a computational task with administratively-distant resources. The aim of this paper is to present three environmental applications (Land Suitability, Desertification Risk Assessment, Georesources and Environmental Geochemistry) foreseen within the AGISGRID (Access and query of a distributed GIS/Database within the GRID infrastructure, http://grida3.crs4.it/enginframe/agisgrid/index.xml) activities of the GRIDA3 (Administrator of sharing resources for data analysis and environmental applications, http://grida3.crs4.it) project. This project, co-funded by the Italian Ministry of research, is based on the use of shared environmental data through GRID technologies and accessible by a WEB interface, aimed at public and private users in the field of environmental management and land use planning. The technologies used for AGISGRID include: - the client-server-middleware iRODS™ (Integrated Rule-Oriented Data System) (https://irods.org); - the EnginFrame system (http://www.nice-italy.com/main/index.php?id=32), the grid portal that supplies a frame to make available, via Intranet/Internet, the developed GRID applications; - the software GIS GRASS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System) (http://grass.itc.it); - the relational database PostgreSQL (http://www.posgresql.org) and the spatial database extension PostGis; - the open source multiplatform Mapserver (http://mapserver.gis.umn.edu), used to represent the geospatial data through typical WEB GIS functionalities. Three GRID nodes are directly involved in the applications: the application workflow is implemented at the CRS4 (Pula

  12. Automated, Parametric Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Turbomachinery Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrand, Vincent J.; Uchitel, Vadim G.; Whitmire, John B.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this Phase I project is to develop a highly automated software system for rapid geometry modeling and grid generation for turbomachinery applications. The proposed system features a graphical user interface for interactive control, a direct interface to commercial CAD/PDM systems, support for IGES geometry output, and a scripting capability for obtaining a high level of automation and end-user customization of the tool. The developed system is fully parametric and highly automated, and, therefore, significantly reduces the turnaround time for 3D geometry modeling, grid generation and model setup. This facilitates design environments in which a large number of cases need to be generated, such as for parametric analysis and design optimization of turbomachinery equipment. In Phase I we have successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the approach. The system has been tested on a wide variety of turbomachinery geometries, including several impellers and a multi stage rotor-stator combination. In Phase II, we plan to integrate the developed system with turbomachinery design software and with commercial CAD/PDM software.

  13. Potential medical applications of TAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahy, J. Ben; Kaucic, Robert; Kim, Yongmin

    1986-01-01

    In cooperation with scientists in the University of Washington Medical School, a microcomputer-based image processing system for quantitative microscopy, called DMD1 (Digital Microdensitometer 1) was constructed. In order to make DMD1 transportable to different hosts and image processors, we have been investigating the possibility of rewriting the lower level portions of DMD1 software using Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) libraries and subsystems. If successful, we hope to produce a newer version of DMD1, called DMD2, running on an IBM PC/AT under the SCO XENIX System 5 operating system, using any of seven target image processors available in our laboratory. Following this implementation, copies of the system will be transferred to other laboratories with biomedical imaging applications. By integrating those applications into DMD2, we hope to eventually expand our system into a low-cost general purpose biomedical imaging workstation. This workstation will be useful not only as a self-contained instrument for clinical or research applications, but also as part of a large scale Digital Imaging Network and Picture Archiving and Communication System, (DIN/PACS). Widespread application of these TAE-based image processing and analysis systems should facilitate software exchange and scientific cooperation not only within the medical community, but between the medical and remote sensing communities as well.

  14. TIGER: A graphically interactive grid system for turbomachinery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Ming-Hsin; Soni, Bharat K.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical grid generation algorithm associated with the flow field about turbomachinery geometries is presented. Graphical user interface is developed with FORMS Library to create an interactive, user-friendly working environment. This customized algorithm reduces the man-hours required to generate a grid associated with turbomachinery geometry, as compared to the use of general-purpose grid generation softwares. Bezier curves are utilized both interactively and automatically to accomplish grid line smoothness and orthogonality. Graphical User Interactions are provided in the algorithm, allowing the user to design and manipulate the grid lines with a mouse.

  15. A novel approach to optimize workflow in grid-based teleradiology applications.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Ayhan Ozan; Baykal, Nazife

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes an infrastructure with a reporting workflow optimization algorithm (RWOA) in order to interconnect facilities, reporting units and radiologists on a single access interface, to increase the efficiency of the reporting process by decreasing the medical report turnaround time and to increase the quality of medical reports by determining the optimum match between the inspection and radiologist in terms of subspecialty, workload and response time. Workflow centric network architecture with an enhanced caching, querying and retrieving mechanism is implemented by seamlessly integrating Grid Agent and Grid Manager to conventional digital radiology systems. The inspection and radiologist attributes are modelled using a hierarchical ontology structure. Attribute preferences rated by radiologists and technical experts are formed into reciprocal matrixes and weights for entities are calculated utilizing Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). The assignment alternatives are processed by relation-based semantic matching (RBSM) and Integer Linear Programming (ILP). The results are evaluated based on both real case applications and simulated process data in terms of subspecialty, response time and workload success rates. Results obtained using simulated data are compared with the outcomes obtained by applying Round Robin, Shortest Queue and Random distribution policies. The proposed algorithm is also applied to a real case teleradiology application process data where medical reporting workflow was performed based on manual assignments by the chief radiologist for 6225 inspections. RBSM gives the highest subspecialty success rate and integrating ILP with RBSM ratings as RWOA provides a better response time and workload distribution success rate. RWOA based image delivery also prevents bandwidth, storage or hardware related stuck and latencies. When compared with a real case teleradiology application where inspection assignments were performed manually, the proposed

  16. Overture: An Object-Oriented Framework for Overlapping Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W.D.

    2002-04-04

    The Overture framework is an object-oriented environment for solving partial differential equations on over-lapping grids. We describe some of the tools in Overture that can be used to generate grids and solve partial differential equations (PDEs). Overture contains a collection of C++ classes that can be used to write PDE solvers either at a high level or at a lower level for efficiency. There are also a number of tools provided with Overture that can be used with no programming effort. These tools include capabilities to: repair computer-aided-design (CAD) geometries and build global surface triangulations; generate surface and volume grids with hyperbolic grid generation; generate composite overlapping grids; generate hybrid (unstructured) grids; and solve particular PDEs such as the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  17. GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, George

    2015-07-03

    For nearly 4 ½ years, MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MIT/LL) led a very successful, DoE-funded team effort to develop GaN-on-Si materials and devices, targeting high-voltage (>1 kV), high-power, cost-effective electronics for grid applications. This effort, called the GaN Initiative for Grid Applications (GIGA) program, was initially made up of MIT/LL, the MIT campus group of Prof. Tomas Palacios (MIT), and the industrial partner M/A Com Technology Solutions (MTS). Later in the program a 4th team member was added (IQE MA) to provide commercial-scale GaN-on-Si epitaxial materials. A basic premise of the GIGA program was that power electronics, for ubiquitous utilization -even for grid applications - should be closer in cost structure to more conventional Si-based power electronics. For a number of reasons, more established GaN-on-SiC or even SiC-based power electronics are not likely to reach theses cost structures, even in higher manufacturing volumes. An additional premise of the GIGA program was that the technical focus would be on materials and devices suitable for operating at voltages > 1 kV, even though there is also significant commercial interest in developing lower voltage (< 1 kV), cost effective GaN-on-Si devices for higher volume applications, like consumer products. Remarkable technical progress was made during the course of this program. Advances in materials included the growth of high-quality, crack-free epitaxial GaN layers on large-diameter Si substrates with thicknesses up to ~5 μm, overcoming significant challenges in lattice mismatch and thermal expansion differences between Si and GaN in the actual epitaxial growth process. Such thick epilayers are crucial for high voltage operation of lateral geometry devices such as Schottky barrier (SB) diodes and high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). New “Normally-Off” device architectures were demonstrated – for safe operation of power electronics circuits. The trade-offs between lateral and

  18. Application of three-dimensional Bezier patches in grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1990-01-01

    Bezier and B-spline patches are popular tools in surface modeling. With these methods, a surface is represented by the tensor product of univariate approximations. The extension of this concept to three dimensions is obvious and can be applied to the problem of grid generation. This report will demonstrate how three dimensional patches can be used in solid modeling and in the generation of grids. Examples will be given demonstrating the ability to generate three dimensional grids directly from a wire frame without having to first set up the boundary surfaces. Many geometric grid properties can be imposed by the proper choice of the control net.

  19. Application of three-dimensional Bezier patches in grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, C. Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Bezier and B-spline patches are popular tools in surface modeling. With these methods, a surface is represented by the tensor product of univariate approximations. The extension of this concept to three-dimensions is obvious and can be applied to the problem of grid generation. This report will demonstrate how three-dimensional patches can be used in solid modeling and in the generation of grids. Examples will be given demonstrating the ability to generate three-dimensional grids directly from a wire frame without having to first set up the boundary surfaces. Many geometric grid properties can be imposed by the proper choice of the control net.

  20. Reliable cool-down of GridPix detectors for cryogenic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schön, R.; Schmitz, J.; Smits, S.; Bilevych, Y.; van Bakel, N.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we present thermal cycling experiments of GridPix radiation imaging detectors, in view of a potential application in a cryogenic experiment. The robustness of the GridPix detector is studied for various grid designs, as well as various mechanical and thermal surroundings. The grid design variations had insignificant effect on the grid strength. A low cool-down rate as well as good thermal contact are crucial for the durability of the grid. Further, additional strengthening at the grid edges proved necessary to maintain the integrity of the structure during thermal cycling, which was done using globtop adhesive. The combination of these measures led to 100% survival rate after thermal cycling down to -130 °C.

  1. Application of multi-grid methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    This paper presents the application of a class of multi-grid methods to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional laminar flow problems. The methods consists of combining the full approximation scheme-full multi-grid technique (FAS-FMG) with point-, line- or plane-relaxation routines for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. The performance of the multi-grid methods is compared to those of several single-grid methods. The results show that much faster convergence can be procured through the use of the multi-grid approach than through the various suggestions for improving single-grid methods. The importance of the choice of relaxation scheme for the multi-grid method is illustrated.

  2. Application of multi-grid methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1989-01-01

    The application of a class of multi-grid methods to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional laminar flow problems is discussed. The methods consist of combining the full approximation scheme-full multi-grid technique (FAS-FMG) with point-, line-, or plane-relaxation routines for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. The performance of the multi-grid methods is compared to that of several single-grid methods. The results show that much faster convergence can be procured through the use of the multi-grid approach than through the various suggestions for improving single-grid methods. The importance of the choice of relaxation scheme for the multi-grid method is illustrated.

  3. Application of multi-grid methods for solving the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demuren, A. O.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a class of multi-grid methods to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for two-dimensional laminar flow problems. The methods consists of combining the full approximation scheme-full multi-grid technique (FAS-FMG) with point-, line- or plane-relaxation routines for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in primitive variables. The performance of the multi-grid methods is compared to those of several single-grid methods. The results show that much faster convergence can be procured through the use of the multi-grid approach than through the various suggestions for improving single-grid methods. The importance of the choice of relaxation scheme for the multi-grid method is illustrated.

  4. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  5. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  6. Medical applications of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1992-08-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic X-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of X-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotheraphy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatc needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  7. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  8. Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, S.; Kramer, W.; Kroposki, B.; Martin, G.; McNutt, P.; Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Hoke, A.

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a test plan for V2G testing. The test plan is designed to test and evaluate the vehicle's power electronics capability to provide power to the grid, and to evaluate the vehicle's ability to connect and disconnect from the utility according to a subset of the IEEE Std. 1547 tests.

  9. Grid Application for the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.; Wilson, F.; /Rutherford

    2006-08-14

    This paper discusses the use of e-Science Grid in providing computational resources for modern international High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. We investigate the suitability of the current generation of Grid software to provide the necessary resources to perform large-scale simulation of the experiment and analysis of data in the context of multinational collaboration.

  10. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  11. Performance Enhancement Strategies for Multi-Block Overset Grid CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    The overset grid methodology has significantly reduced time-to-solution of highfidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process resolves the geometrical complexity of the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured discretization grids that periodically exchange information through interpolation. However, high performance computations of such large-scale realistic applications must be handled efficiently on state-of-the-art parallel supercomputers. This paper analyzes the effects of various performance enhancement strategies on the parallel efficiency of an overset grid Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machinc. Specifically, the role of asynchronous communication, grid splitting, and grid grouping strategies are presented and discussed. Details of a sophisticated graph partitioning technique for grid grouping are also provided. Results indicate that performance depends critically on the level of latency hiding and the quality of load balancing across the processors.

  12. Overset grid applications on distributed memory MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chawla, Kalpana; Weeratunga, Sisira

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of modern aerospace vehicles requires the computation of flowfields about complex three dimensional geometries composed of regions with varying spatial resolution requirements. Overset grid methods allow the use of proven structured grid flow solvers to address the twin issues of geometrical complexity and the resolution variation by decomposing the complex physical domain into a collection of overlapping subdomains. This flexibility is accompanied by the need for irregular intergrid boundary communication among the overlapping component grids. This study investigates a strategy for implementing such a static overset grid implicit flow solver on distributed memory, MIMD computers; i.e., the 128 node Intel iPSC/860 and the 208 node Intel Paragon. Performance data for two composite grid configurations characteristic of those encountered in present day aerodynamic analysis are also presented.

  13. SU-E-P-30: Clinical Applications of Spatially Fractionated Radiation Therapy (GRID) Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X; Liang, X; Penagaricano, J; Morrill, S; Corry, P; Paudel, N; Vaneerat, V Ratanatharathorn; Yan, Y; Griffin, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present the first clinical applications of Helical Tomotherapy-based spatially fractionated radiotherapy (HT-GRID) for deep seated tumors and associated dosimetric study. Methods: Ten previously treated GRID patients were selected (5 HT-GRID and 5 LINAC-GRID using a commercially available GRID block). Each case was re-planned either in HT-GRID or LINAC-GRID for a total of 10 plans for both techniques using same prescribed dose of 20 Gy to maximum point dose of GRID GTV. For TOMO-GRID, a programmable virtual TOMOGRID template mimicking a GRID pattern was generated. Dosimetric parameters compared included: GRID GTV mean dose (Dmean) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD), GRID GTV dose inhomogeneity (Ratio(valley/peak)), normal tissue Dmean and EUD, and other organs-at-risk(OARs) doses. Results: The median tumor volume was 634 cc, ranging from 182 to 4646 cc. Median distance from skin to the deepest part of tumor was 22cm, ranging from 8.9 to 38cm. The median GRID GTV Dmean and EUD was 10.65Gy (9.8–12.5Gy) and 7.62Gy (4.31–11.06Gy) for HT-GRID and was 6.73Gy (4.44–8.44Gy) and 3.95Gy (0.14–4.2Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The median Ratio(valley/peak) was 0.144(0.05–0.29) for HT-GRID and was 0.055(0.0001–0.14) for LINAC-GRID. For normal tissue in HT-GRID, the median Dmean and EUD was 1.24Gy (0.34–2.54Gy) and 5.45 Gy(3.45–6.89Gy) and was 0.61 Gy(0.11–1.52Gy) and 6Gy(4.45–6.82Gy) for LINAC-GRID. The OAR doses were comparable between the HT-GRID and LINAC-GRID. However, in some cases it was not possible to avoid a critical structure in LINAC-GRID; while HT-GRID can spare more tissue doses for certain critical structures. Conclusion: HT-GRID delivers higher GRID GTV Dmean, EUD and Ratio(valley/peak) compared to LINAC-GRID. HT-GRID delivers higher Dmean and lower EUD for normal tissue compared to LINAC-GRID. TOMOGRID template can be highly patient-specific and allows adjustment of the GRID pattern to different tumor sizes and shapes when they are deeply

  14. Mobile Applications to Improve Medication Adherence.

    PubMed

    Haase, Jamie; Farris, Karen B; Dorsch, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Background and Introduction: Mobile applications are useful tools to improve medication adherence. As developers continue to improve the features of existing mobile applications, pharmacists should be aware of the current features that are available to patients. There are limited studies available that discuss which applications have the most desirable features. The aim of this study was to compare available mobile applications and identify ideal application features used to improve medication adherence. As of September 5, 2014, the search terms "medication adherence" and "medication reminder" generated a total of 225 hits. Ideal application features were used to create an Application Score Card to identify applications with the highest number of ideal features. We identified 30 applications that were written in English, medication related, last updated in 2014, and did not meet any exclusion criteria. The top five applications RxNetwork, Mango Health, MyMeds, C3HealthLink, and HuCare are discussed in detail. There are numerous studies looking at medication adherence. However, current literature regarding mobile applications to improve medication adherence is lacking. This article will provide pharmacists with a brief overview of the available mobile applications and features that could be used to improve patient adherence to medications. Existing mobile applications to improve medication adherence have ideal features that could help patients take medication as prescribed. Once further research is performed to establish their efficacy, pharmacists could begin to recommend mobile applications to their patients.

  15. Laboratory tests of IEC DER object models for grid applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Blevins, John D.; Menicucci, David F.; Byrd, Thomas, Jr.; Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Ginn, Jerry W.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan

    2007-02-01

    This report describes a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District (SRP) and Sandia National Laboratories to jointly develop advanced methods of controlling distributed energy resources (DERs) that may be located within SRP distribution systems. The controls must provide a standardized interface to allow plug-and-play capability and should allow utilities to take advantage of advanced capabilities of DERs to provide a value beyond offsetting load power. To do this, Sandia and SRP field-tested the IEC 61850-7-420 DER object model (OM) in a grid environment, with the goal of validating whether the model is robust enough to be used in common utility applications. The diesel generator OM tested was successfully used to accomplish basic genset control and monitoring. However, as presently constituted it does not enable plug-and-play functionality. Suggestions are made of aspects of the standard that need further development and testing. These problems are far from insurmountable and do not imply anything fundamentally unsound or unworkable in the standard.

  16. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  18. Medical Data GRIDs as approach towards secure cross enterprise document sharing (based on IHE XDS).

    PubMed

    Wozak, Florian; Ammenwerth, Elske; Breu, Micheal; Penz, Robert; Schabetsberger, Thomas; Vogl, Raimund; Wurz, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    Quality and efficiency of health care services is expected to be improved by the electronic processing and trans-institutional availability of medical data. A prototype architecture based on the IHE-XDS profile is currently being developed. Due to legal and organizational requirements specific adaptations to the IHE-XDS profile have been made. In this work the services of the health@net reference architecture are described in details, which have been developed with focus on compliance to both, the IHE-XDS profile and the legal situation in Austria. We expect to gain knowledge about the development of a shared electronic health record using Medical Data Grids as an Open Source reference implementation and how proprietary Hospital Information systems can be integrated in this environment.

  19. Grid Computing Application for Brain Magnetic Resonance Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, F.; Crépeault, B.; Duchesne, S.

    2012-02-01

    This work emphasizes the use of grid computing and web technology for automatic post-processing of brain magnetic resonance images (MRI) in the context of neuropsychiatric (Alzheimer's disease) research. Post-acquisition image processing is achieved through the interconnection of several individual processes into pipelines. Each process has input and output data ports, options and execution parameters, and performs single tasks such as: a) extracting individual image attributes (e.g. dimensions, orientation, center of mass), b) performing image transformations (e.g. scaling, rotation, skewing, intensity standardization, linear and non-linear registration), c) performing image statistical analyses, and d) producing the necessary quality control images and/or files for user review. The pipelines are built to perform specific sequences of tasks on the alphanumeric data and MRIs contained in our database. The web application is coded in PHP and allows the creation of scripts to create, store and execute pipelines and their instances either on our local cluster or on high-performance computing platforms. To run an instance on an external cluster, the web application opens a communication tunnel through which it copies the necessary files, submits the execution commands and collects the results. We present result on system tests for the processing of a set of 821 brain MRIs from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study via a nonlinear registration pipeline composed of 10 processes. Our results show successful execution on both local and external clusters, and a 4-fold increase in performance if using the external cluster. However, the latter's performance does not scale linearly as queue waiting times and execution overhead increase with the number of tasks to be executed.

  20. ISOGA: Integrated Services Optical Grid Architecture for Emerging E-Science Collaborative Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver Yu

    2008-11-28

    This final report describes the accomplishments in the ISOGA (Integrated Services Optical Grid Architecture) project. ISOGA enables efficient deployment of existing and emerging collaborative grid applications with increasingly diverse multimedia communication requirements over a wide-area multi-domain optical network grid; and enables collaborative scientists with fast retrieval and seamless browsing of distributed scientific multimedia datasets over a wide-area optical network grid. The project focuses on research and development in the following areas: the polymorphic optical network control planes to enable multiple switching and communication services simultaneously; the intelligent optical grid user-network interface to enable user-centric network control and monitoring; and the seamless optical grid dataset browsing interface to enable fast retrieval of local/remote dataset for visualization and manipulation.

  1. Interoperability of GADU in using heterogeneous Grid resources for bioinformatics applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Sulakhe, D.; Rodriguez, A.; Wilde, M.; Foster, I.; Maltsev, N.; Univ. of Chicago

    2008-03-01

    Bioinformatics tools used for efficient and computationally intensive analysis of genetic sequences require large-scale computational resources to accommodate the growing data. Grid computational resources such as the Open Science Grid and TeraGrid have proved useful for scientific discovery. The genome analysis and database update system (GADU) is a high-throughput computational system developed to automate the steps involved in accessing the Grid resources for running bioinformatics applications. This paper describes the requirements for building an automated scalable system such as GADU that can run jobs on different Grids. The paper describes the resource-independent configuration of GADU using the Pegasus-based virtual data system that makes high-throughput computational tools interoperable on heterogeneous Grid resources. The paper also highlights the features implemented to make GADU a gateway to computationally intensive bioinformatics applications on the Grid. The paper will not go into the details of problems involved or the lessons learned in using individual Grid resources as it has already been published in our paper on genome analysis research environment (GNARE) and will focus primarily on the architecture that makes GADU resource independent and interoperable across heterogeneous Grid resources.

  2. Polycapillary optics for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C. A.; Petruccelli, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    Polycapillary optics can be designed for a wide variety of x-ray applications, including x-ray fluorescence for non-destructive materials analysis and diffraction applications such as protein crystallography. Of particular interest are medical applications, including the removal of Compton scattering with the resultant improvement in contrast and resolution in mammography, the production of monochromatic parallel beams for high-contrast imaging in clinical settings and the localization of radioactive tracers. A recent development is the use of polycapillary optics to improve beam coherence for x-ray phase imaging. Conventional radiographic techniques depend on attenuation, which provides only low contrast between soft tissues. Phase imaging can yield significantly higher contrast but requires spatially coherent beams. Conventional sources small enough to produce high coherence are necessarily low power, requiring long exposures. Polycapillary optics employed to create a small secondary source from high power sources have been shown to yield strong phase effects. Polycapillary optics can also be combined with other x-ray optics. A combination of a toroidally bent crystal with a polycapillary optic has been shown to produce enhanced resolution in a magnified image. Another x-ray imaging technique which does not rely on the small attenuation contrast is the capture of coherently scattered radiation, for which polycapillary optics could be used as angular filters to collect the beam, resulting in a map of tissue or material type.

  3. Contemporary vascular smartphone medical applications.

    PubMed

    Carter, Thomas; O'Neill, Stephen; Johns, Neil; Brady, Richard R W

    2013-08-01

    Use of smartphones and medical mHealth applications (apps) within the clinical environment provides a potential means for delivering elements of vascular care. This article reviews the contemporary availability of apps specifically themed to major vascular diseases and the opportunities and concerns regarding their integration into practice. Smartphone apps relating to major vascular diseases were identified from the app stores for the 6 most popular smartphone platforms, including iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia, Windows, and Samsung. Search terms included peripheral artery (arterial) disease, varicose veins, aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, amputation, ulcers, hyperhydrosis, thoracic outlet syndrome, vascular malformation, and lymphatic disorders. Forty-nine vascular-themed apps were identified. Sixteen (33%) were free of charge. Fifteen apps (31%) had customer satisfaction ratings, but only 3 (6%) had greater than 100. Only 13 apps (27%) had documented medical professional involvement in their design or content. The integration of apps into the delivery of care has the potential to benefit vascular health care workers and patients. However, high-quality apps designed by clinicians with vascular expertise are currently lacking and represent an area of concern in the mHealth market. Improvement in the quality and reliability of these apps will require the development of robust regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Smart Grid Development Issues for Terrestrial and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2011-01-01

    The development of the so called Smart Grid has as many definitions as individuals working in the area. Based on the technology or technologies that are of interest, be it high speed communication, renewable generation, smart meters, energy storage, advanced sensors, etc. they can become the individual defining characteristic of the Smart Grid. In reality the smart grid encompasses all of these items and quite at bit more. This discussion attempts to look at what the needs are for the grid of the future, such as the issues of increased power flow capability, use of renewable energy, increased security and efficiency and common power and data standards. It also shows how many of these issues are common with the needs of NASA for future exploration programs. A common theme to address both terrestrial and space exploration issues is to develop micro-grids that advertise the ability to enable the load leveling of large power generation facilities. However, for microgrids to realize their promise there needs to a holistic systems approach to their development and integration. The overall system integration issues are presented along with potential solution methodologies.

  5. Smart Grid Development Issues for Terrestrial and Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, James F.

    2014-01-01

    The development of the so called Smart Grid has as many definitions as individuals working in the area. Based on the technology or technologies that are of interest, be it high speed communication, renewable generation, smart meters, energy storage, advanced sensors, etc. they can become the individual defining characteristic of the Smart Grid. In reality the smart grid encompasses all of these items and quite at bit more. This discussion attempts to look at what the needs are for the grid of the future, such as the issues of increased power flow capability, use of renewable energy, increased security and efficiency and common power and data standards. It also shows how many of these issues are common with the needs of NASA for future exploration programs. A common theme to address both terrestrial and space exploration issues is to develop micro-grids that advertise the ability to enable the load leveling of large power generation facilities. However, for microgrids to realize their promise there needs to a holistic systems approach to their development and integration. The overall system integration issues are presented along with potential solution methodologies.

  6. A Simple Algebraic Grid Adaptation Scheme with Applications to Two- and Three-dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.; Lytle, John K.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic adaptive grid scheme based on the concept of arc equidistribution is presented. The scheme locally adjusts the grid density based on gradients of selected flow variables from either finite difference or finite volume calculations. A user-prescribed grid stretching can be specified such that control of the grid spacing can be maintained in areas of known flowfield behavior. For example, the grid can be clustered near a wall for boundary layer resolution and made coarse near the outer boundary of an external flow. A grid smoothing technique is incorporated into the adaptive grid routine, which is found to be more robust and efficient than the weight function filtering technique employed by other researchers. Since the present algebraic scheme requires no iteration or solution of differential equations, the computer time needed for grid adaptation is trivial, making the scheme useful for three-dimensional flow problems. Applications to two- and three-dimensional flow problems show that a considerable improvement in flowfield resolution can be achieved by using the proposed adaptive grid scheme. Although the scheme was developed with steady flow in mind, it is a good candidate for unsteady flow computations because of its efficiency.

  7. Optimal system sizing in grid-connected photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoens, H. M.; Baert, D. H.; de Mey, G.

    A costs/benefits analysis for optimizing the combination of photovoltaic (PV) panels, batteries and an inverter for grid interconnected systems at a 500 W/day Belgian residence is presented. It is assumed that some power purchases from the grid will always be necessary, and that excess PV power can be fed into the grid. A minimal value for the cost divided by the performance is defined for economic optimization. Shortages and excesses are calculated for PV panels of 0.5-10 kWp output, with consideration given to the advantages of a battery back-up. The minimal economic value is found to increase with the magnitude of PV output, and an inverter should never be rated at more than half the array maximum output. A maximum panel size for the Belgian residence is projected to be 6 kWp.

  8. A Hierarchical and Distributed Approach for Mapping Large Applications to Heterogeneous Grids using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanyal, Soumya; Jain, Amit; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed approach for mapping a single large application to a heterogeneous grid environment. To minimize the execution time of the parallel application, we distribute the mapping overhead to the available nodes of the grid. This approach not only provides a fast mapping of tasks to resources but is also scalable. We adopt a hierarchical grid model and accomplish the job of mapping tasks to this topology using a scheduler tree. Results show that our three-phase algorithm provides high quality mappings, and is fast and scalable.

  9. Dimpled Ball Grid Array process development for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, S. L.; Mehta, A.

    2000-01-01

    The 472 Dimpled Ball Grid Array (D-BGA) package has not been used in past space flight environments, therefore it is necessary to determine the robustness and reliability of the solder joints. The 472 D-BGA packages passed the above environmental tests within the specifications and are now qualified for use on space flight electronics.

  10. MEMS for medical technology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisk, Thomas; Roxhed, Niclas; Stemme, Göran

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an in-depth description of two recent projects at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) which utilize MEMS and microsystem technology for realization of components intended for specific applications in medical technology and diagnostic instrumentation. By novel use of the DRIE fabrication technology we have developed side-opened out-of-plane silicon microneedles intended for use in transdermal drug delivery applications. The side opening reduces clogging probability during penetration into the skin and increases the up-take area of the liquid in the tissue. These microneedles offer about 200µm deep and pain-free skin penetration. We have been able to combine the microneedle chip with an electrically and heat controlled liquid actuator device where expandable microspheres are used to push doses of drug liquids into the skin. The entire unit is made of low cost materials in the form of a square one cm-sized patch. Finally, the design, fabrication and evaluation of an integrated miniaturized Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) based "electronic nose" microsystem for detection of narcotics is described. The work integrates a novel environment-to-chip sample interface with the sensor element. The choice of multifunctional materials and the geometric features of a four-component microsystem allow a functional integration of a QCM crystal, electrical contacts, fluidic contacts and a sample interface in a single system with minimal assembly effort, a potential for low-cost manufacturing, and a few orders of magnitude reduced in system size (12*12*4 mm 3) and weight compared to commercially available instruments. The sensor chip was successfully used it for the detection of 200 ng of narcotics sample.

  11. BioGrid Australia facilitates collaborative medical and bioinformatics research across hospitals and medical research institutes by linking data from diverse disease and data types.

    PubMed

    Merriel, Robert B; Gibbs, Peter; O'Brien, Terence J; Hibbert, Marienne

    2011-05-01

    BioGrid Australia is a federated data linkage and integration infrastructure that uses the Internet to enable patient specific information to be utilized for research in a privacy protected manner, from multiple databases of various data types (e.g. clinical, treatment, genomic, image, histopathology and outcome), from a range of diseases (oncological, neurological, endocrine and respiratory) and across more than 20 health services, universities and medical research institutes. BioGrid has demonstrated an ability to facilitate powerful research into the causation of human disease and the prediction of disease and treatment outcomes. BioGrid has successfully implemented technology and processes that allow researchers to efficiently extract data from multiple sources, without compromising data security and privacy. This article reviews BioGrid's first seven years and how it has overcome 9 of its top 10 challenges.

  12. Medical applications of shape memory polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory polymers are described here and major advantages in some applications are identified over other medical materials such as shape memory alloys (SMA). A number of medical applications are anticipated for shape memory polymers. Some simple applications are already utilized in medical world, others are in examination process. Lately, several important applications are being considered for CHEM foams for self-deployable vascular and coronary devices. One of these potential applications, the endovascular treatment of aneurysm was experimentally investigated with encouraging results and is described in this paper as well.

  13. Medical applications of shape memory polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory polymers are described here and major advantages in some applications are identified over other medical materials such as shape memory alloys (SMA). A number of medical applications are anticipated for shape memory polymers. Some simple applications are already utilized in medical world, others are in examination process. Lately, several important applications are being considered for CHEM foams for self-deployable vascular and coronary devices. One of these potential applications, the endovascular treatment of aneurysm was experimentally investigated with encouraging results and is described in this paper as well.

  14. On applications of chimera grid schemes to store separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cougherty, F. C.; Benek, J. A.; Steger, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A finite difference scheme which uses multiple overset meshes to simulate the aerodynamics of aircraft/store interaction and store separation is described. In this chimera, or multiple mesh, scheme, a complex configuration is mapped using a major grid about the main component of the configuration, and minor overset meshes are used to map each additional component such as a store. As a first step in modeling the aerodynamics of store separation, two dimensional inviscid flow calculations were carried out in which one of the minor meshes is allowed to move with respect to the major grid. Solutions of calibrated two dimensional problems indicate that allowing one mesh to move with respect to another does not adversely affect the time accuracy of an unsteady solution. Steady, inviscid three dimensional computations demonstrate the capability to simulate complex configurations, including closely packed multiple bodies.

  15. Dimpled ball grid array process development for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, S. L.; Mehta, A.

    2000-01-01

    A 472 dimpled ball grid array (D-BGA) package has not been used in past space flight environments, therefore it was necessary to develop a process that would yield robust and reliable solder joints. The process developing assembly, inspection and rework techniques, were verified by conducting environmental tests. Since the 472 D-BGA packages passed the above environmental tests within the specifications, the process was successfully developed for space flight electronics.

  16. On-demand grid application tuning and debugging with the netloggeractivation service

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, Dan; Tierney, Brian L.; Tull, Craig E.; Virmani, Vibha

    2003-08-15

    Typical Grid computing scenarios involve many distributed hardware and software components. The more components that are involved, the more likely it is that one of them may fail. In order for Grid computing to succeed, there must be a simple mechanism to determine which component failed and why. Instrumentation of all Grid applications and middleware is an important part of the solution to this problem. However, it must be possible to control and adapt the amount of instrumentation data produced in order to not be flooded by this data. In this paper we describe a scalable, high-performance instrumentation activation mechanism that addresses this problem.

  17. Grid Application Meta-Repository System: Repository Interconnectivity and Cross-domain Application Usage in Distributed Computing Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudose, Alexandru; Terstyansky, Gabor; Kacsuk, Peter; Winter, Stephen

    Grid Application Repositories vary greatly in terms of access interface, security system, implementation technology, communication protocols and repository model. This diversity has become a significant limitation in terms of interoperability and inter-repository access. This paper presents the Grid Application Meta-Repository System (GAMRS) as a solution that offers better options for the management of Grid applications. GAMRS proposes a generic repository architecture, which allows any Grid Application Repository (GAR) to be connected to the system independent of their underlying technology. It also presents applications in a uniform manner and makes applications from all connected repositories visible to web search engines, OGSI/WSRF Grid Services and other OAI (Open Archive Initiative)-compliant repositories. GAMRS can also function as a repository in its own right and can store applications under a new repository model. With the help of this model, applications can be presented as embedded in virtual machines (VM) and therefore they can be run in their native environments and can easily be deployed on virtualized infrastructures allowing interoperability with new generation technologies such as cloud computing, application-on-demand, automatic service/application deployments and automatic VM generation.

  18. Medical applications of artificial olfactometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); Severin, Erik J. (Inventor); Wong, Bernard (Inventor); Kelso, David M. (Inventor); Munoz, Beth C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for detecting the presence of an analyte indicative of various medical conditions, including halitosis, periodontal disease and other diseases are also disclosed.

  19. Development of numerical methods for overset grids with applications for the integrated Space Shuttle vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.

    1995-01-01

    Algorithms and computer code developments were performed for the overset grid approach to solving computational fluid dynamics problems. The techniques developed are applicable to compressible Navier-Stokes flow for any general complex configurations. The computer codes developed were tested on different complex configurations with the Space Shuttle launch vehicle configuration as the primary test bed. General, efficient and user-friendly codes were produced for grid generation, flow solution and force and moment computation.

  20. Development and application of a 3D Cartesian grid Euler method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Berger, Marsha J.; Wong, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes recent progress in the development and application of 3D Cartesian grid generation and Euler flow solution techniques. Improvements to flow field grid generation algorithms, geometry representations, and geometry refinement criteria are presented, including details of a procedure for correctly identifying and resolving extremely thin surface features. An initial implementation of automatic flow field refinement is also presented. Results for several 3D multi-component configurations are provided and discussed.

  1. A generalized patched-grid algorithm with application to the F-18 forebody with actuated control strake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biedron, R. T.; Thomas, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of complex configurations using structured grids virtually demands multiple blocks of grids. To facilitate calculations involving multiple blocks, a geneal grid-block patching algorithm based on generalized coordinate inerpolation has been developed. The computational grid may contain as many arbirarily shaped blocks as required to make the grid generation problem tractable and to accurately model the fow features. Results are presented for several test cases as well as for the F-18 forebody control strake. The methodology developed has application to overlapped or embedded grids.

  2. Extracurricular activities of medical school applicants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate medical school applicants’ involvements in extracurricular activities including medical volunteering/community services, nonmedical community services, club activities, leadership role, and research. Methods: Extracurricular characteristics were compared for 448 applicants (223 males and 225 females) who applied to Kangwon Medical School in 2013 to 2014. Frequency analysis, chi-square test, and simple correlation were conducted with the collected data. Results: The 448 applicants participated in medical volunteer/community services (15.3%), nonmedical community services (39.8%), club activities (22.9%), club officials (10%), and research (13.4%). On average, applicants from foreign universities participated in 0.9 medical volunteer/community service, 0.8 nonmedical community service, 1.7 club activities, and 0.6 research work. On the other hand, applicants from domestic universities reported 0.2 medical volunteer/community service, 1.0 nonmedical community service, 0.7 club activity, and 0.3 research. Conclusion: Involvement in extracurricular activities was extensive for medical school applicants. Participation in extracurricular activities differed between applicants from foreign and domestic universities. Females consistently reported greater participation in extracurricular activities than males. The data can be helpful for admission committees to recruit well-rounded applicants and compare between applicants with similar academic backgrounds. PMID:26996435

  3. Residential photovoltaic power conditioning technology for grid connected applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Key, T. S.; Klein, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Major advances in photovoltaic (PV) Power Conditioning (PC) with respect to performance and low-cost potential have been made. Solutions have been obtained to interface and control problems related to adapting available inverter designs to the grid-connected, residential photovoltaic experiments. A description is presented to contributing research and development activities. Attention is given to aspects of residential systems experience, conceptual design studies, questions of optimum topology development, and promising advanced designs for residential PV provided by development efforts of the private sector.

  4. Application of advanced grid generation techniques for flow field computations about complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flowfields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct a boundary-fitted coordinate system. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach; its applications are investigated. The method conservative providing conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-stage Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed. The solutions include: low speed flow over a sphere, high speed flow over a slender body, supersonic flow through a duct, and supersonic internal/external flow interaction for an aircraft configuration at various angles of attack. The results demonstrate that the multiple grids approach along with the conservative interfacing is capable of computing the flows about the complex configurations where the use of a single grid system is not possible.

  5. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  6. MAGNETIC GRID

    DOEpatents

    Post, R.F.

    1960-08-01

    An electronic grid is designed employing magnetic forces for controlling the passage of charged particles. The grid is particularly applicable to use in gas-filled tubes such as ignitrons. thyratrons, etc., since the magnetic grid action is impartial to the polarity of the charged particles and, accordingly. the sheath effects encountered with electrostatic grids are not present. The grid comprises a conductor having sections spaced apart and extending in substantially opposite directions in the same plane, the ends of the conductor being adapted for connection to a current source.

  7. Experimental Demonstration of a Self-organized Architecture for Emerging Grid Computing Applications on OBS Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Hong, Xiaobin; Wu, Jian; Lin, Jintong

    As Grid computing continues to gain popularity in the industry and research community, it also attracts more attention from the customer level. The large number of users and high frequency of job requests in the consumer market make it challenging. Clearly, all the current Client/Server(C/S)-based architecture will become unfeasible for supporting large-scale Grid applications due to its poor scalability and poor fault-tolerance. In this paper, based on our previous works [1, 2], a novel self-organized architecture to realize a highly scalable and flexible platform for Grids is proposed. Experimental results show that this architecture is suitable and efficient for consumer-oriented Grids.

  8. Real-time medical applications and telecommunications.

    PubMed

    Stravs, M

    1999-01-01

    Telecommunications play an important role in telemedicine. Many forms of telecommunication services based on different telecommunication technologies are developed for various needs. The paper deals with complex real-time applications which demand high telecommunication requirements. At the beginning, medical applications are categorised and real-time applications qualified as multimedia applications. Requirements for multimedia elements are listed separately. Later on, short introduction of related telecommunication protocols is given. Real-time medical applications can show their ability in case of guaranteed quality of services delivered by telecommunication network as it is explained in the end.

  9. GreenView and GreenLand Applications Development on SEE-GRID Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihon, Danut; Bacu, Victor; Gorgan, Dorian; Mészáros, Róbert; Gelybó, Györgyi; Stefanut, Teodor

    2010-05-01

    The GreenView and GreenLand applications [1] have been developed through the SEE-GRID-SCI (SEE-GRID eInfrastructure for regional eScience) FP7 project co-funded by the European Commission [2]. The development of environment applications is a challenge for Grid technologies and software development methodologies. This presentation exemplifies the development of the GreenView and GreenLand applications over the SEE-GRID infrastructure by the Grid Application Development Methodology [3]. Today's environmental applications are used in vary domains of Earth Science such as meteorology, ground and atmospheric pollution, ground metal detection or weather prediction. These applications run on satellite images (e.g. Landsat, MERIS, MODIS, etc.) and the accuracy of output results depends mostly of the quality of these images. The main drawback of such environmental applications regards the need of computation power and storage power (some images are almost 1GB in size), in order to process such a large data volume. Actually, almost applications requiring high computation resources have approached the migration onto the Grid infrastructure. This infrastructure offers the computing power by running the atomic application components on different Grid nodes in sequential or parallel mode. The middleware used between the Grid infrastructure and client applications is ESIP (Environment Oriented Satellite Image Processing Platform), which is based on gProcess platform [4]. In its current format, gProcess is used for launching new processes on the Grid nodes, but also for monitoring the execution status of these processes. This presentation highlights two case studies of Grid based environmental applications, GreenView and GreenLand [5]. GreenView is used in correlation with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite images and meteorological datasets, in order to produce pseudo colored temperature and vegetation maps for different geographical CEE (Central

  10. Hydrological Scenario Using Tools and Applications Available in enviroGRIDS Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacu, V.; Mihon, D.; Stefanut, T.; Rodila, D.; Cau, P.; Manca, S.; Soru, C.; Gorgan, D.

    2012-04-01

    Nowadays the decision makers but also citizens are concerning with the sustainability and vulnerability of land management practices on various aspects and in particular on water quality and quantity in complex watersheds. The Black Sea Catchment is an important watershed in the Central and East Europe. In the FP7 project enviroGRIDS [1] was developed a Web Portal that incorporates different tools and applications focused on geospatial data management, hydrologic model calibration, execution and visualization and training activities. This presentation highlights, from the end-user point of view, the scenario related with hydrological models using the tools and applications available in the enviroGRIDS Web Portal [2]. The development of SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) hydrological models is a well known procedure for the hydrological specialists [3]. Starting from the primary data (information related to weather, soil properties, topography, vegetation, and land management practices of the particular watershed) that are used to develop SWAT hydrological models, to specific reports, about the water quality in the studied watershed, the hydrological specialist will use different applications available in the enviroGRIDS portal. The tools and applications available through the enviroGRIDS portal are not dealing with the building up of the SWAT hydrological models. They are mainly focused on: calibration procedure (gSWAT [4]) - uses the GRID computational infrastructure to speed-up the calibration process; development of specific scenarios (BASHYT [5]) - starts from an already calibrated SWAT hydrological model and defines new scenarios; execution of scenarios (gSWATSim [6]) - executes the scenarios exported from BASHYT; visualization (BASHYT) - displays charts, tables and maps. Each application is built-up as a stack of functional layers. We combine different layers of applications by vertical interoperability in order to build the desired complex functionality. On

  11. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  12. The Application Hosting Environment: lightweight middleware for Grid based computational science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coveney, P. V.; Saksena, R. S.; Zasada, S.

    Current grid computing technologies have often been seen as being too heavyweight and unwieldy from an end user's perspective, requiring complicated installation and configuration steps to be taken that are too time consuming for most end users. This has led many of the people who would benefit most from grid technology, namely computational scientists, to avoid using it. In response to this we have developed the Application Hosting Environment, a lightweight, easily deployable environment designed to allow the scientist to quickly and easily run unmodified applications on distributed grid resources. This is done by building a layer of middleware on top of existing technologies such as Globus, and exposing the functionally as web services using the WSRF::Lite toolkit. The scientist can start and manage an application via these services, with the extra layer of middleware abstracting the details of the particular underlying grid resource in use. The scientist can concentrate on performing their scientific investigations, rather than learning how to manipulate the underlying grid middleware.

  13. A Hierarchy of Network Performance Characteristics for Grid Applications and Services

    SciTech Connect

    Lowekamp, B

    2004-07-06

    This document describes a standard set of network characteristics that are useful for Grid applications and services as well as a classification hierarchy for these characteristics. The goal of this work is to identify the various types of network measurements according to the network characteristic they measure and the network entity on which they are taken. This document defines standard terminology to describe those measurements, but it does not attempt to define new standard measurement methodologies or attempt to define the best measurement methodologies to use for grid applications. However, it does attempt to point out the advantages and disadvantages of different measurement methodologies. This document was motivated by the need for the interchange of measurements taken by various systems in the Grid and to develop a common dictionary to facilitate discussions about and specifications for measurement systems. The application of this naming system will facilitate the creation of common schemata for describing network monitoring data in Grid Monitoring and Discovery Services, and thus help to address portability issues between the wide variety of network measurements used between sites of a Grid.

  14. Radioactive nuclei for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastrzębski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    The radioisotopes used for labeling the diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are contemporaneously produced using neutrons in reactors and light charged particles from accelerators (cyclotrons). After the presentation of both methods the commercially available cyclotrons are reviewed. Some examples of the most popular medical radioisotopes are given. The new Radiopharmaceuticals Production and Research Centre at the University of Warsaw is presented.

  15. Calibration services for medical applications of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, L.A.

    1993-12-31

    Calibration services for the medical community applications of radiation involve measuring radiation precisely and having traceability to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Radiation therapy applications involve the use of ionization chambers and electrometers for external beams and well-type ionization chamber systems as well as radioactive sources for brachytherapy. Diagnostic x-ray applications involve ionization chamber systems and devices to measure other parameters of the x-ray machine, such as non-invasive kVp meters. Calibration laboratories have been established to provide radiation calibration services while maintaining traceability to NIST. New radiation applications of the medical community spur investigation to provide the future calibration needs.

  16. A Novel Application of Parallel Betweenness Centrality to Power Grid Contingency Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Shuangshuang; Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Feo, John T.; Wong, Pak C.

    2010-04-19

    In Energy Management Systems, contingency analysis is commonly performed for identifying and mitigating potentially harmful power grid component failures. The exponentially increasing combinatorial number of failure modes imposes a significant computational burden for massive contingency analysis. It is critical to select a limited set of high-impact contingency cases within the constraint of computing power and time requirements to make it possible for real-time power system vulnerability assessment. In this paper, we present a novel application of parallel betweenness centrality to power grid contingency selection. We cross-validate the proposed method using the model and data of the western US power grid, and implement it on a Cray XMT system - a massively multithreaded architecture - leveraging its advantages for parallel execution of irregular algorithms, such as graph analysis. We achieve a speedup of 55 times (on 64 processors) compared against the single-processor version of the same code running on the Cray XMT. We also compare an OpenMP-based version of the same code running on an HP Superdome shared-memory machine. The performance of the Cray XMT code shows better scalability and resource utilization, and shorter execution time for large-scale power grids. This proposed approach has been evaluated in PNNL’s Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center (EIOC). It is expected to provide a quick and efficient solution to massive contingency selection problems to help power grid operators to identify and mitigate potential widespread cascading power grid failures in real time.

  17. Application of a self-adaptive grid method to complex flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, G. S.; Venkatapathy, E.; Davies, C.; Djomehri, J.; Abrahamson, K.

    1989-01-01

    A directional-split, modular, user-friendly grid point distribution code is applied to several test problems. The code is self-adaptive in the sense that grid point spacing is determined by user-specified constants denoting maximum and minimum grid spacings and constants relating the relative influence of smoothness and orthogonality. Estimates of truncation error, in terms of flow-field gradients and/or geometric features, are used to determine the point distribution. Points are redistributed along grid lines in a specified direction in an elliptic manner over a user-specified subdomain, while orthogonality and smoothness are controlled in a parabolic (marching) manner in the remaining directions. Multidirectional adaption is achieved by sequential application of the method in each coordinate direction. The flow-field solution is redistributed onto the newly distributed grid points after each unidirectional adaption by a simple one-dimensional interpolation scheme. For time-accurate schemes such interpolation is not necessary and time-dependent metrics are carried in the fluid dynamic equations to account for grid movement.

  18. Printing Technologies for Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Shafiee, Ashkan; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    Over the past 15 years, printers have been increasingly utilized for biomedical applications in various areas of medicine and tissue engineering. This review discusses the current and future applications of 3D bioprinting. Several 3D printing tools with broad applications from surgical planning to 3D models are being created, such as liver replicas and intermediate splints. Numerous researchers are exploring this technique to pattern cells or fabricate several different tissues and organs, such as blood vessels or cardiac patches. Current investigations in bioprinting applications are yielding further advances. As one of the fastest areas of industry expansion, 3D additive manufacturing will change techniques across biomedical applications, from research and testing models to surgical planning, device manufacturing, and tissue or organ replacement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Enhancements to the GRIDGEN structured grid generation system for internal and external flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Chawner, John R.

    1992-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a government domain software package for interactive generation of multiple block grids around general configurations. Though it has been freely available since 1989, it has not been widely embraced by the internal flow community due to a misconception that it was designed for external flow use only. In reality GRIDGEN has always worked for internal flow applications, and GRIDGEN ongoing enhancements are increasing the quality of and efficiency with which grids for external and internal flow problems may be constructed. The software consists of four codes used to perform the four steps of the grid generation process. GRIDBLOCK is first used to decompose the flow domain into a collection of component blocks and then to establish interblock connections and flow solver boundary conditions. GRIDGEN2D is then used to generate surface grids on the outer shell of each component block. GRIDGEN3D generates grid points on the interior of each block, and finally GRIDVUE3D is used to inspect the resulting multiple block grid. Three of these codes (GRIDBLOCK, GRIDGEN2D, and GRIDVUE3D) are highly interactive and graphical in nature, and currently run on Silicon Graphics, Inc., and IBM RS/6000 workstations. The lone batch code (GRIDGEN3D) may be run on any of several Unix based platforms. Surface grid generation in GRIDGEN2D is being improved with the addition of higher order surface definitions (NURBS and parametric surfaces input in IGES format and bicubic surfaces input in PATRAN Neutral File format) and double precision mathematics. In addition, two types of automation have been added to GRIDGEN2D that reduce the learning curve slope for new users and eliminate work for experienced users. Volume grid generation using GRIDGEN3D has been improved via the addition of an advanced hybrid control function formulation that provides both orthogonality and clustering control at the block faces and clustering control on the block interior.

  20. Enhancements to the GRIDGEN structured grid generation system for internal and external flow applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbrenner, John P.; Chawner, John R.

    1992-01-01

    GRIDGEN is a government domain software package for interactive generation of multiple block grids around general configurations. Though it has been freely available since 1989, it has not been widely embraced by the internal flow community due to a misconception that it was designed for external flow use only. In reality GRIDGEN has always worked for internal flow applications, and GRIDGEN ongoing enhancements are increasing the quality of and efficiency with which grids for external and internal flow problems may be constructed. The software consists of four codes used to perform the four steps of the grid generation process. GRIDBLOCK is first used to decompose the flow domain into a collection of component blocks and then to establish interblock connections and flow solver boundary conditions. GRIDGEN2D is then used to generate surface grids on the outer shell of each component block. GRIDGEN3D generates grid points on the interior of each block, and finally GRIDVUE3D is used to inspect the resulting multiple block grid. Three of these codes (GRIDBLOCK, GRIDGEN2D, and GRIDVUE3D) are highly interactive and graphical in nature, and currently run on Silicon Graphics, Inc., and IBM RS/6000 workstations. The lone batch code (GRIDGEN3D) may be run on any of several Unix based platforms. Surface grid generation in GRIDGEN2D is being improved with the addition of higher order surface definitions (NURBS and parametric surfaces input in IGES format and bicubic surfaces input in PATRAN Neutral File format) and double precision mathematics. In addition, two types of automation have been added to GRIDGEN2D that reduce the learning curve slope for new users and eliminate work for experienced users. Volume grid generation using GRIDGEN3D has been improved via the addition of an advanced hybrid control function formulation that provides both orthogonality and clustering control at the block faces and clustering control on the block interior.

  1. [Standards in Medical Informatics: Fundamentals and Applications].

    PubMed

    Suárez-Obando, Fernando; Camacho Sánchez, Jhon

    2013-09-01

    The use of computers in medical practice has enabled novel forms of communication to be developed in health care. The optimization of communication processes is achieved through the use of standards to harmonize the exchange of information and provide a common language for all those involved. This article describes the concept of a standard applied to medical informatics and its importance in the development of various applications, such as computational representation of medical knowledge, disease classification and coding systems, medical literature searches and integration of biological and clinical sciences.

  2. Medical Applications of Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    1989-01-01

    Lasers are finding many applications in medicine and biology. While most laser use focuses on the heat generation of the laser beam interacting with tissue, spectroscopic aspects play a more dominating part in a number of emerging applications. Tumour-seeking agents, such as hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD), in combination with laser radiation provide new possibilities for cancer tumour detection and treatment. The fluorescence emission from tissue irradiated with UV light can be used for tumour localization. Natural tissue fluorescence as well as fluorescence due to injected HPD can be utilized. Results from studies on animals and from clinical applications are reported. The use of fluorescence for identifying atherosclerotic plaque in human vessels is illustrated. Spectroscopic analysis of the laser-induced plasma obtained when a high-power, pulsed laser beam interacts with tissue is also discussed with applications to plaque removal and laser fragmentation of kidney- and gall-stones.

  3. Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Microtech provided positive feedback about the manufacturability of the machine-printed electrode pattern. Drive System Shells were electrode with...the novel three-electrode drive scheme developed for this application was investigated for large-scale manufacturability . Figure 3 shows the prototype...life, and may be of value in some applications. Aging data for UVC Plasma-shells manufactured at the start of Phase I are shown in Figure 4 where

  4. Multi-Resolution Unstructured Grid-Generation for Geophysical Applications on the Sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engwirda, Darren

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm for the generation of non-uniform unstructured grids on ellipsoidal geometries is described. This technique is designed to generate high quality triangular and polygonal meshes appropriate for general circulation modelling on the sphere, including applications to atmospheric and ocean simulation, and numerical weather predication. Using a recently developed Frontal-Delaunay-refinement technique, a method for the construction of high-quality unstructured ellipsoidal Delaunay triangulations is introduced. A dual polygonal grid, derived from the associated Voronoi diagram, is also optionally generated as a by-product. Compared to existing techniques, it is shown that the Frontal-Delaunay approach typically produces grids with near-optimal element quality and smooth grading characteristics, while imposing relatively low computational expense. Initial results are presented for a selection of uniform and non-uniform ellipsoidal grids appropriate for large-scale geophysical applications. The use of user-defined mesh-sizing functions to generate smoothly graded, non-uniform grids is discussed.

  5. Beyond the NAS Parallel Benchmarks: Measuring Dynamic Program Performance and Grid Computing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biswas, Rupak; Frumkin, Michael; Feng, Huiyu; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) A brief history of NPB; 2) What is (not) being measured by NPB; 3) Irregular dynamic applications (UA Benchmark); and 4) Wide area distributed computing (NAS Grid Benchmarks-NGB). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  6. Silica Materials for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Vallet-Regí, María; Balas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The two main applications of silica-based materials in medicine and biotechnology, i.e. for bone-repairing devices and for drug delivery systems, are presented and discussed. The influence of the structure and chemical composition in the final characteristics and properties of every silica-based material is also shown as a function of the both applications presented. The adequate combination of the synthesis techniques, template systems and additives leads to the development of materials that merge the bioactive behavior with the drug carrier ability. These systems could be excellent candidates as materials for the development of devices for tissue engineering. PMID:19662110

  7. Application of a variational method for generating adaptive grids. [for gas dynamics past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreis, R. I.; Hassan, H. A.; Thames, F. C.

    1985-01-01

    The application of variational methods for generating adaptive grids is not as straightforward as one is led to believe. Proper scaling, suitable weight functions and appropriate clustering on boundaries must be employed to obtain a satisfactory grid. This work, which is based on the framework developed by Brackbill and Saltzman, provides simple methods for determining scaling and investigates possible options for selecting the weight function and clustering points on the boundaries. The concepts developed here are applied to two two-dimensional problems: a model problem based on Burger's equation which contains two length scales and, transonic flow past airfoils using the Euler equations.

  8. Staggered-grid PSTD on local Fourier basis and its applications to surface tissue modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming; Chen, Kun

    2010-04-26

    We introduce a high performance parallelization to the PSTD solution of Maxwell equations by employing the fast Fourier transform on local Fourier basis. Meanwhile a reformatted derivative operator allows the adoption of a staggered-grid such as the Yee lattice in PSTD, which can overcome the numerical errors in a collocated-grid when spatial discontinuities are present. The accuracy and capability of our method are confirmed by two analytical models. In two applications to surface tissue optics, an ultra wide coherent backscattering cone from the surface layer is found, and the penetration depth of polarization gating identified. Our development prepares a tool for investigating the optical properties of surface tissue structures.

  9. Bandwidth enhancement using Polymeric Grid Array Antenna for millimeter-wave application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad, Wan Asilah Wan; Ngah, Razali; Jamlos, Mohd Faizal; Soh, Ping Jack; Ali, Mohd Tarmizi

    2017-01-01

    A new grid array antenna designed on a polymeric polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate is presented. A good relative permittivity of the PDMS substrate increases the antenna bandwidth. The PDMS surface is also hardened to protect the proposed grid array antenna's radiating element. A SMA coaxial connector is used to feed the 36 × 35 mm2 antenna from its bottom. A bandwidth enhancement of 72.1% is obtained compared to conventional antenna. Besides, its efficiency is increased up to 70%. The simulated and measured results agreed well and the proposed antenna is validated to suit millimeter-wave applications.

  10. Application-Level Interoperability Across Grids and Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Shantenu; Luckow, Andre; Merzky, Andre; Erdely, Miklos; Sehgal, Saurabh

    Application-level interoperability is defined as the ability of an application to utilize multiple distributed heterogeneous resources. Such interoperability is becoming increasingly important with increasing volumes of data, multiple sources of data as well as resource types. The primary aim of this chapter is to understand different ways in which application-level interoperability can be provided across distributed infrastructure. We achieve this by (i) using the canonical wordcount application, based on an enhanced version of MapReduce that scales-out across clusters, clouds, and HPC resources, (ii) establishing how SAGA enables the execution of wordcount application using MapReduce and other programming models such as Sphere concurrently, and (iii) demonstrating the scale-out of ensemble-based biomolecular simulations across multiple resources. We show user-level control of the relative placement of compute and data and also provide simple performance measures and analysis of SAGA-MapReduce when using multiple, different, heterogeneous infrastructures concurrently for the same problem instance. Finally, we discuss Azure and some of the system-level abstractions that it provides and show how it is used to support ensemble-based biomolecular simulations.

  11. A preprocessor for numerical grid generation of boundary-fitted grids - An application to a solid propellant ablating boundary problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garriz, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A code is described which demonstrates the versatility of the differential equations method of grid generation for generating boundary-fitted grids. Two problems from the field of solid mechanics are used to show the code's utility. The problem of successively generating grids for a geometry which changes with time is illustrated with the case of an ablating solid rocket propellant grain. On a more quantitative basis, the problem of successively generating grids whose grid points automatically position or 'adapt' themselves in order to resolve gradients of interest in an evolving solution is illustrated with the classic case of analyzing the state of stress in an axially loaded, rectangular plate with a centered circular hole.

  12. Current trend of robotics application in medical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, O. A.; Faieza, A. A.; Syakirah, K.

    2013-06-01

    The applications of robotics in recent years has emerged beyond the field of manufacturing or industrial robots itself. Robotics applications are now widely used in medical, transport, underwater, entertainment and military sector. In medical field, these applications should be emphasized in view of the increasing challenges due to the variety of findings in the field of medicine which requires new inventions to ease work process. The objective of this review paper is to study and presents the past and on-going research in medical robotics with emphasis on rehabilitation (assistive care) and surgery robotics which are certainly the two main practical fields where robots application are commonly used presently. The study found that, rehabilitation and surgery robotics applications grow extensively with the finding of new invention, as well as research that is being undertaken and to be undertaken. The importance of medical robot in medical industry is intended to offer positive outcomes to assist human business through a complicated task that involves a long period, accuracy, focus and other routines that cannot be accomplished by human ability alone.

  13. Ultraviolet Communication for Medical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    the transceiver. The Plasma-shells have superior life, and may be of value in some applications. Aging data for UVC Plasma-shells manufactured at the...future single-board transceiver modules. 5 Two complete systems have been integrated into bread box sized enclosure with a small commercially...Solar Blind Filter Additional Solar blind filter manufacturers were identified in order to determine the best possible solution. Existing filters are

  14. Performance of a Heterogeneous Grid Partitioner for N-body Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Daniel J.; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    An important characteristic of distributed grids is that they allow geographically separated multicomputers to be tied together in a transparent virtual environment to solve large-scale computational problems. However, many of these applications require effective runtime load balancing for the resulting solutions to be viable. Recently, we developed a latency tolerant partitioner, called MinEX, specifically for use in distributed grid environments. This paper compares the performance of MinEX to that of METIS, a popular multilevel family of partitioners, using simulated heterogeneous grid configurations. A solver for the classical N-body problem is implemented to provide a framework for the comparisons. Experimental results show that MinEX provides superior quality partitions while being competitive to METIS in speed of execution.

  15. NPSS on NASA's Information Power Grid: Using CORBA and Globus to Coordinate Multidisciplinary Aeroscience Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Isaac; Follen, Gregory J.; Gutierrez, Richard; Foster, Ian; Ginsburg, Brian; Larsson, Olle; Martin, Stuart; Tuecke, Steven; Woodford, David

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a project to evaluate the feasibility of combining Grid and Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) technologies, with a view to leveraging the numerous advantages of commodity technologies in a high-performance Grid environment. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center and Argonne National Laboratory has been studying three problems: a desktop-controlled parameter study using Excel (Microsoft Corporation); a multicomponent application using ADPAC, NPSS, and a controller program-, and an aviation safety application running about 100 jobs in near real time. The team has successfully demonstrated (1) a Common-Object- Request-Broker-Architecture- (CORBA-) to-Globus resource manager gateway that allows CORBA remote procedure calls to be used to control the submission and execution of programs on workstations and massively parallel computers, (2) a gateway from the CORBA Trader service to the Grid information service, and (3) a preliminary integration of CORBA and Grid security mechanisms. We have applied these technologies to two applications related to NPSS, namely a parameter study and a multicomponent simulation.

  16. Medical diagnostic applications and sources.

    PubMed

    Whittingham, T A

    2007-01-01

    The ways in which ultrasound is used in medical diagnosis are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the ultrasound source (probe) and implications for acoustic exposure. A brief discussion of the choice of optimum frequency for various target depths is followed by a description of the general features of diagnostic ultrasound probes, including endo-probes. The different modes of diagnostic scanning are then discussed in turn: A-mode, M-mode, B-mode, three-dimensional (3D) and 4D scanning, continuous wave (CW) Doppler, pulse-wave spectral Doppler and Doppler imaging. Under the general heading of B-mode imaging, there are individual descriptions of the principles of chirps and binary codes, B-flow, tissue harmonic imaging and ultrasound contrast agent-specific techniques. Techniques for improving image quality within the constraints of real-time operation are discussed, including write zoom, parallel beam forming, spatial compounding and multiple zone transmission focusing, along with methods for reducing slice thickness. At the end of each section there is a summarising comment on the basic features of the acoustic output and its consequences for patient safety.

  17. Recent developments in photodetection for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    The use of the most advanced technology in medical imaging results in the development of high performance detectors that can significantly improve the performance of the medical devices employed in hospitals. Scintillator crystals coupled to photodetectors remain to be essential detectors in terms of performance and cost for medical imaging applications in different imaging modalities. Recent advances in photodetectors result in an increase of the performance of the medical scanners. Solid state detectors can provide substantial performance improvement, but are more complex to integrate into clinical detectors due mainly to their higher cost. Solid state photodetectors (APDs, SiPMs) have made new detector concepts possible and have led to improvements in different imaging modalities. Recent advances in detectors for medical imaging are revised.

  18. Medical applications for pharmacists using mobile devices.

    PubMed

    Aungst, Timothy Dy

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices (eg, smartphones, tablet computers) have become ubiquitous and subsequently there has been a growth in mobile applications (apps). Concurrently, mobile devices have been integrated into health care practice due to the availability and quality of medical apps. These mobile medical apps offer increased access to clinical references and point-of-care tools. However, there has been little identification of mobile medical apps suitable for the practice of pharmacy. To address the shortage of recommendations of mobile medical apps for pharmacists in daily practice. Mobile medical apps were identified via the iTunes and Google Play Stores via the "Medical" app categories and key word searches (eg, drug information, medical calculators). In addition, reviews provided by professional mobile medical app review websites were used to identify apps. Mobile medical apps were included if they had been updated in the previous 3 months, were available in the US, used evidence-based information or literature support, had dedicated app support, and demonstrated stability. Exclusion criteria included apps that were not available in English, had advertisement bias, used nonreferenced sources, were available only via an institution-only subscription, and were web-based portals. Twenty-seven mobile apps were identified and reviewed that involved general pharmacy practice, including apps that involved drug references, clinical references, medical calculators, laboratory references, news and continuing medical education, and productivity. Mobile medical apps have a variety of features that are beneficial to pharmacy practice. Individual clinicians should consider several characteristics of these apps to determine which are suitable to incorporate into their daily practice.

  19. Application of an Unstructured Grid Navier-Stokes Solver to a Generic Helicopter Boby: Comparison of Unstructured Grid Results with Structured Grid Results and Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1999-01-01

    An unstructured-grid Navier-Stokes solver was used to predict the surface pressure distribution, the off-body flow field, the surface flow pattern, and integrated lift and drag coefficients on the ROBIN configuration (a generic helicopter) without a rotor at four angles of attack. The results are compared to those predicted by two structured- grid Navier-Stokes solvers and to experimental surface pressure distributions. The surface pressure distributions from the unstructured-grid Navier-Stokes solver are in good agreement with the results from the structured-grid Navier-Stokes solvers. Agreement with the experimental pressure coefficients is good over the forward portion of the body. However, agreement is poor on the lower portion of the mid-section of the body. Comparison of the predicted surface flow patterns showed similar regions of separated flow. Predicted lift and drag coefficients were in fair agreement with each other.

  20. Photovoltaic system design in grid-connected applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. J.

    The design of photovoltaic (PV) systems was traditionally done from the owner's viewpoint. This does not present a problem in central station applications but may result in misleading guidance for distributed system configurations. The results of the traditional design approach are contrasted with those obtained when the utility and application are viewed as a whole. The typical design assumes that on-site energy use must be maximized leading to a synergism between on-site loads and design optimization. This is shown to be a false requirement, resulting from considering only the system owner. When the system and utility are viewed together, the value of PV energy is found to be independent of the point of consumption. Load management, conservation, and passive solar design may affect energy use but have no impact on PV energy value. Furthermore, the value of PV energy is essentially the same for all systems, whether distributed or centralized.

  1. Medical applications of shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Witold; Metcalfe, Annick; Hayashi, Shunichi; Yahia, L'Hocine; Raymond, Jean

    2007-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are lightweight, have a high strain/shape recovery ability, are easy to process, and required properties can be tailored for variety of applications. Recently a number of medical applications have been considered and investigated, especially for polyurethane-based SMP. SMP materials were found to be biocompatible, non-toxic and non-mutagenic. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) can be tailored for shape restoration/self-deployment of clinical devices when inserted in the human body. Newly developed SMP foams, together with cold hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) processing, further broaden their potential biomedical applications. Polyurethane-based SMP are described here and major advantages are identified over other medical materials. Some SMP applications are already used in a clinical setting, whereas others are still in development. Lately, several important applications are being considered for CHEM foams as self-deployable vascular and coronary devices. One example is the endovascular treatment of aneurysms.

  2. Carbon nanostructures for orthopedic medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhang, Lijuan; Webster, Thomas J

    2011-09-01

    Carbon nanostructures (including carbon nanofibers, nanostructured diamond, fullerene materials and so forth) possess extraordinary physiochemical, mechanical and electrical properties attractive to bioengineers and medical researchers. In the past decade, numerous developments towards the fabrication and biological studies of carbon nanostructures have provided opportunities to improve orthopedic applications. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide an up-to-date review on carbon nanostructure advances in orthopedic research. Orthopedic medical device applications of carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers and nanostructured diamond (including particulate nanodiamond and nanocrystalline diamond coatings) are emphasized here along with other carbon nanostructures that have promising potential. In addition, widely used fabrication techniques for producing carbon nanostructures in both the laboratory and in industry are briefly introduced. In conclusion, carbon nanostructures have demonstrated tremendous promise for orthopedic medical device applications to date, and although some safety, reliability and durability issues related to the manufacturing and implantation of carbon nanomaterials remain, their future is bright.

  3. Glass microspheres for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conzone, Samuel David

    Radioactive dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres have been developed as biodegradable radiation delivery vehicles for the radiation synovectomy treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Once injected into a diseased joint, the microspheres deliver a potent dose of radiation to the diseased tissue, while a non-uniform chemical reaction converts the glass into an amorphous, porous, hydrated dysprosium phosphate reaction product. The non-radioactive, lithium-borate component is dissolved from the glass (up to 94% weight loss), while the radioactive 165Dy reacts with phosphate anions in the body fluids, and becomes "chemically" trapped in a solid, dysprosium phosphate reaction product that has the same size as the un-reacted glass microsphere. Ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA) chelation therapy can be used to dissolve the dysprosium phosphate reaction product after the radiation delivery has subsided. The dysprosium phosphate reaction product, which formed in vivo in the joint of a Sprague-Dawley rat, was dissolved by EDTA chelation therapy in <1 week, without causing any detectable joint damage. The combination of dysprosium lithium borate glass microspheres and EDTA chelation therapy provides an unique "tool" for the medical community, which can deliver a large dose (>100 Gy) of localized beta radiation to a treatment site within the body, followed by complete biodegradability. The non-uniform reaction process is a desirable characteristic for a biodegradable radiation delivery vehicle, but it is also a novel material synthesis technique that can convert a glass to a highly porous materials with widely varying chemical composition by simple, low-temperature, glass/solution reaction. The reaction product formed by nonuniform reaction occupies the same volume as the un-reacted glass, and after drying for 1 h at 300°C, has a specific surface area of ≈200 m2/g, a pore size of ≈30 nm, and a nominal crushing strength of ≈10 MPa. Finally, rhenium glass

  4. A Current Sensor Based on the Giant Magnetoresistance Effect: Design and Potential Smart Grid Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A−1, linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C−1 with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids. PMID:23202221

  5. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  6. Functionalized Nanodiamonds for Biological and Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2015-02-01

    Nanodiamond is a promising material for biological and medical applications, owning to its relatively inexpensive and large-scale synthesis, unique structure, and superior optical properties. However, most biomedical applications, such as drug delivery and bio-imaging, are dependent upon the precise control of the surfaces, and can be significantly affected by the type, distribution and stability of chemical funtionalisations of the nanodiamond surface. In this paper, recent studies on nanodiamonds and their biomedical applications by conjugating with different chemicals are reviewed, while highlighting the critical importance of surface chemical states for various applications.

  7. Medical applications of electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Henry C.; Singh, Narendra P.

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we describe two possible applications of low-intensity non-ionizing electromagnetic fields (EMF) for the treatment of malaria and cancer, respectively. In malaria treatment, a low-intensity extremely-low frequency magnetic field can be used to induce vibration of hemozoin, a super-paramagnetic polymer particle, inside malaria parasites. This disturbance could cause free radical and mechanical damages leading to the death of the parasite. This concept has been tested in vitro on malaria parasites and found to be effective. This may provide a low cost effective treatment for malaria infection in humans. The rationale for cancer treatment using low-intensity EMF is based on two concepts that have been well established in the literature: (1) low-intensity non-thermal EMF enhances cytotoxic free radicals via the iron-mediated Fenton reaction; and (2) cancer cells have higher amounts of free iron, thus are more susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of EMF. Since normal cells contain minimal amount of free iron, the effect would be selectively targeting cancer cells. Thus, no adverse side effect would be expected as in traditional chemotherapy and radiation therapy. This concept has also been tested on human cancer cell and normal cells in vitro and proved to be feasible.

  8. Hydrogels and their medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiak, Janusz M.; Yoshii, Fumio

    1999-05-01

    Biomaterials play a key role in most approaches for engineering tissues as substitutes for functional replacement, for components of devices related to therapy and diagnosis, for drug delivery systems and supportive scaffolds for guided tissue growth. Modern biomaterials could be composed of various components, e.g. metals, ceramics, natural tissues, polymers. In this last group, the hydrogels, hydrophilic polymeric gels with requested biocompatibility and designed interaction with living surrounding seem to be one of the most promising group of biomaterials. Especially, if they are formed by means of ionizing radiation. In early 1950s, the pioneers of the radiation chemistry of polymers began some experiments with radiation crosslinking of hydrophilic polymers. However, hydrogels were analyzed mainly from the point of view of the phenomenon associated with radiation synthesis, with topology of network and relation between radiation parameters of the processes. Fundamental monographs on radiation polymer physics and chemistry written by A. Charlesby (Atomic Radition and polymers, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1960) and A. Chapiro (Radiation Chemistry of Polymeric Systems, Interscience, New York, 1962) proceed from this time. The noticeable interest in the application of radiation techniques to obtain hydrogels for biomedical purposes began in the late sixties as a result of the papers and patents invented by Japanese and American scientists, headed by Kaetsu in Japan and Hoffman in USA. Immobilization of biologically active species in hydrogel matrices, their use as drug delivery systems and enzyme traps as well as the modification of material surfaces to improve biocompatibility and their ability to bond antigens and antibodies had been the main subjects of these investigations. In this article a brief summary of investigations on mechanism and kinetics of radiation formation of hydrogels as well as some examples of commercialized hydrogel biomaterials have been

  9. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    Over the past two decades there has been a phenomenal growth in the number of dedicated synchrotron radiation facilities and a corresponding growth in the number of applications in both basic and applied sciences. The high flux and brightness, tunable beams, time structure and polarization of synchrotron radiation provide an ideal x- ray source for many applications in the medical sciences. There is a dual aspect to the field of medical applications of synchrotron radiation. First there are the important in-vitro programs such as structural biology, x-ray microscopy, and radiation cell biology. Second there are the programs that are ultimately targeted at in-vivo applications. The present status of synchrotron coronary angiography, bronchography, multiple energy computed tomography, mammography and radiation therapy programs at laboratories around the world is reviewed.

  10. Domain modeling and grid generation for multi-block structured grids with application to aerodynamic and hydrodynamic configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spekreijse, S. P.; Boerstoel, J. W.; Vitagliano, P. L.; Kuyvenhoven, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    About five years ago, a joint development was started of a flow simulation system for engine-airframe integration studies on propeller as well as jet aircraft. The initial system was based on the Euler equations and made operational for industrial aerodynamic design work. The system consists of three major components: a domain modeller, for the graphical interactive subdivision of flow domains into an unstructured collection of blocks; a grid generator, for the graphical interactive computation of structured grids in blocks; and a flow solver, for the computation of flows on multi-block grids. The industrial partners of the collaboration and NLR have demonstrated that the domain modeller, grid generator and flow solver can be applied to simulate Euler flows around complete aircraft, including propulsion system simulation. Extension to Navier-Stokes flows is in progress. Delft Hydraulics has shown that both the domain modeller and grid generator can also be applied successfully for hydrodynamic configurations. An overview is given about the main aspects of both domain modelling and grid generation.

  11. Application of unstructured grid methods to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose is to describe the development of unstructured grid methods which have several advantages when compared to methods which make use of structured grids. Unstructured grids, for example, easily allow the treatment of complex geometries, allow for general mesh movement for realistic motions and structural deformations of complete aircraft configurations which is important for aeroelastic analysis, and enable adaptive mesh refinement to more accurately resolve the physics of the flow. Steady Euler calculations for a supersonic fighter configuration to demonstrate the complex geometry capability; unsteady Euler calculations for the supersonic fighter undergoing harmonic oscillations in a complete-vehicle bending mode to demonstrate the general mesh movement capability; and vortex-dominated conical-flow calculations for highly-swept delta wings to demonstrate the adaptive mesh refinement capability are discussed. The basic solution algorithm is a multi-stage Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme with a finite-volume spatial discretization based on an unstructured grid of triangles in 2D or tetrahedra in 3D. The moving mesh capability is a general procedure which models each edge of each triangle (2D) or tetrahedra (3D) with a spring. The resulting static equilibrium equations which result from a summation of forces are then used to move the mesh to allow it to continuously conform to the instantaneous position or shape of the aircraft. The adaptive mesh refinement procedure enriches the unstructured mesh locally to more accurately resolve the vortical flow features. These capabilities are described in detail along with representative results which demonstrate several advantages of unstructured grid methods. The applicability of the unstructured grid methodology to steady and unsteady aerodynamic problems and directions for future work are discussed.

  12. Medically related activities of application team program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Application team methodology identifies and specifies problems in technology transfer programs to biomedical areas through direct contact with users of aerospace technology. The availability of reengineering sources increases impact of the program on the medical community and results in broad scale application of some bioinstrumentation systems. Examples are given that include devices adapted to the rehabilitation of neuromuscular disorders, power sources for artificial organs, and automated monitoring and detection equipment in clinical medicine.

  13. Regulatory frameworks for mobile medical applications.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    A mobile application (app) is a software program that runs on mobile communication devices such as a smartphone. The concept of a mobile medical app has gained popularity and diffusion but its reference regulatory context has raised discussion and concerns. Theoretically, a mobile app can be developed and uploaded easily by any person or entity. Thus, if an app can have some effects on the health of the users, it is mandatory to identify its reference regulatory context and the applicable prescriptions.

  14. Theory development and application in medical education.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, Anna T; Eva, Kevin W; Colliver, Jerry A

    2013-01-01

    The role and status of theory is by no means a new topic in medical education. Yet summarizing where we have been and where we are going with respect to theory development and application is difficult because our community has not yet fully elucidated what constitutes medical education theory. In this article, we explore the idea of conceptualizing theory as an effect on scholarly dialogue among medical educators. We describe theory-enabled conversation as argumentation, which frames inquiry, permits the evaluation of evidence, and enables the acquisition of community understanding that has utility beyond investigators' local circumstances. We present ideas for assessing argumentation quality and suggest approaches to increasing the frequency and quality of argumentation in the exchange among diverse medical education scholars.

  15. New Medical Applications Of Metal Vapor Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Robert S.; McIntosh, Alexander I.

    1989-06-01

    The first medical application for metal vapor lasers has been granted marketing approval by the FDA. This represents a major milestone for this technology. Metalaser Technologies recently received this approval for its Vasculase unit in the treatment of vascular lesions such as port wine stains, facial telangiectasia and strawberry hemangiomas.

  16. Regional Studies and Applications with a Variable Resolution Stretched Grid Data Assimilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael; Dee, Dick; Takacs, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    The variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS) incorporating the GEOS SG-GCM, is used for regional analysis, forecast, and climate applications. The region of interest with enhanced horizontal resolution, mostly used in experiments, is a rectangle over the U.S. The SG-DAS is capable of reproducing regional mesoscale fields, patterns and diagnostics that are not produced by the medium uniform resolution run with the same amount of grid points as for the SG. The SG-DAS regional analyses and diagnostics are used for: validation of regional climate simulation experiments produced with the SG-GCM for the U.S. 1988 summer drought; and are planned to be used for atmospheric chemistry transport experiments. Also, a case study is conducted on a super-typhoon development in December 1997. The SG-DAS appears to be a viable candidate for a variety of regional studies and applications.

  17. Analysis Tools for Sizing and Placement of Energy Storage for Grid Applications - A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Michael G.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sadovsky, Artyom; DeSteese, John G.

    2010-09-24

    The purpose of this report was to review pertinent literature and studies that might reveal models capable of optimizing the siting, sizing and economic value of energy storage in the future smart grid infrastructure. Energy storage technology and utility system deployment have been subjects of intense research and development for over three decades. During this time, many models have been developed that consider energy storage implementation in the electric power industry and other applications. Nevertheless, this review of literature discovered no actual models and only a few software tools that relate specifically to the application environment and expected requirements of the evolving smart grid infrastructure. This report indicates the existing need for such a model and describes a pathway for developing it.

  18. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  19. Measuring emotional intelligence of medical school applicants.

    PubMed

    Carrothers, R M; Gregory, S W; Gallagher, T J

    2000-05-01

    To discuss the development, pilot testing, and analysis of a 34-item semantic differential instrument for measuring medical school applicants' emotional intelligence (the EI instrument). The authors analyzed data from the admission interviews of 147 1997 applicants to a six-year BS/MD program that is composed of three consortium universities. They compared the applicants' scores on traditional admission criteria (e.g., GPA and traditional interview assessments) with their scores on the EI instrument (which comprised five dimensions of emotional intelligence), breaking the data out by consortium university (each of which has its own educational ethos) and gender. They assessed the EI instrument's reliability and validity for assessing noncognitive personal and interpersonal qualities of medical school applicants. The five dimensions of emotional intelligence (maturity, compassion, morality, sociability, and calm disposition) indicated fair to excellent internal consistency: reliability coefficients were .66 to .95. Emotional intelligence as measured by the instrument was related to both being female and matriculating at the consortium university that has an educational ethos that values the social sciences and humanities. Based on this pilot study, the 34-item EI instrument demonstrates the ability to measure attributes that indicate desirable personal and interpersonal skills in medical school applicants.

  20. Microwave generator for scientific and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surducan, V.; Surducan, E.; Ciupa, R.; Neamtu, C.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays power microwave radiation is widely used in medical applications as hyperthermia, diathermy or ablation and for scientific applications such as plasma generation, digestion, or as a catalyst in green chemistry. Nevertheless, designing a suitably adapted microwave generator that meets both the scientific and the more restrictive medical criteria remains a difficult task. We present here a simplified approach in designing such a microwave generator, according to the IEC60601 medical standard. The generator, based on a continuous wave (CW) magnetron, is coupled via a TE10 waveguide to feed either a hyperthermia applicator or a reactor chamber. Microwave interactions with the probe (or the tissue) depend strongly on the magnetron's power supply parameters and the impedance match of the entire microwave circuit. Any unmatched elements (magnetron to waveguide, waveguide to applicator, applicator to patient) give rise to a large voltage standing wave ratio (VSWR) which loads the generator with a surplus energy, converted to heat. Extra heating of the magnetron will deteriorate the amplitude of the generated microwave power field. We show here that, by using a proprietary patented temperature sensor sheet, we were able to detect and improve the impedance matching of the microwave circuit.

  1. Globally gridded terrestrial water storage variations from GRACE satellite gravimetry for hydrometeorological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Thomas, Maik

    2016-07-01

    Globally gridded estimates of monthly-mean anomalies of terrestrial water storage (TWS) are estimated from the most recent GRACE release 05a of GFZ Potsdam in order to provide non-geodetic users a convenient access to state-of-the-art GRACE monitoring data. We use an ensemble of five global land model simulations with different physics and different atmospheric forcing to obtain reliable gridded scaling factors required to correct for spatial leakage introduced during data processing. To allow for the application of this data-set for large-scale monitoring tasks, model validation efforts, and subsequently also data assimilation experiments, globally gridded estimates of TWS uncertainties that include (i) measurement, (ii) leakage and (iii) re-scaling errors are provided as well. The results are generally consistent with the gridded data provided by Tellus, but deviate in some basins which are largely affected by the uncertainties of the model information required for re-scaling, where the approach based on the median of a small ensemble of global land models introduced in this paper leads to more robust results.

  2. Generation of reproducible turbulent inflows for wind tunnel applications using active grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroeger, Lars; Guelker, Gerd; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent flows are omnipresent in nature. In the case of wind energy applications, reproducible measurements in situ are quite difficult, therefore research in turbulence demands for experimental setups with reproducible turbulent flow fields. To simulate the situation from the outside in a wind tunnel an active grid can be used. It consists of horizontal and vertical rotating axes with attached square flaps which could be moved individually. This dynamically driven setup and the possibility to repeat the motions of the active grid axes permits to generate reproducible, statistically well defined turbulence with a wide range of statistical behavior. The objective of this work is to create turbulence with two active grids of different dimensions, to establish comparable setups in our available wind tunnel facilities. In this study the wake of the active grids was investigated by high speed PIV and hotwire measurements. To determine the similarities and limitations between the setups of different dimensions the hotwire data is compared using higher order statistics, increment analysis and the power spectra. The PIV data is used to observe spatial correlations and the prevailing length scales in the turbulent wakes. First results regarding this comparison are shown.

  3. Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) and Battery Management System (BMS) for Grid-Scale Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lawder, M. T.; Suthar, B.; Northrop, P. W. C.; De, S.; Hoff, C. M.; Leitermann, O.; Crow, M. L.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Subramanian, V. R.

    2014-05-07

    The current electric grid is an inefficient system that wastes significant amounts of the electricity it produces because there is a disconnect between the amount of energy consumers require and the amount of energy produced from generation sources. Power plants typically produce more power than necessary to ensure adequate power quality. By taking advantage of energy storage within the grid, many of these inefficiencies can be removed. Advanced modeling is required when using battery energy storage systems (BESS) for grid storage in order to accurately monitor and control the storage system. Battery management systems (BMS) control how the storage system will be used and a BMS that utilizes advanced physics-based models will offer for much more robust operation of the storage system. The paper outlines the current state of the art for modeling in BMS and the advanced models required to fully utilize BMS for both lithium-ion batteries and vanadium redox-flow batteries. In addition, system architecture and how it can be useful in monitoring and control is discussed. A pathway for advancing BMS to better utilize BESS for grid-scale applications is outlined.

  4. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Tosi, Daniele; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; Leen, Gabriel; McGrath, Deirdre; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-01-01

    This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas. PMID:26184228

  5. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Poeggel, Sven; Tosi, Daniele; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; Leen, Gabriel; McGrath, Deirdre; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-07-15

    This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

  6. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M; Krams, Rob

    2015-05-06

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON-OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes.

  7. Mammalian synthetic biology: emerging medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Zoltán; Pereira, Hugo Sant'Ana; Homma, Takayuki; Pedrigi, Ryan M.; Krams, Rob

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we discuss new emerging medical applications of the rapidly evolving field of mammalian synthetic biology. We start with simple mammalian synthetic biological components and move towards more complex and therapy-oriented gene circuits. A comprehensive list of ON–OFF switches, categorized into transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational and post-translational, is presented in the first sections. Subsequently, Boolean logic gates, synthetic mammalian oscillators and toggle switches will be described. Several synthetic gene networks are further reviewed in the medical applications section, including cancer therapy gene circuits, immuno-regulatory networks, among others. The final sections focus on the applicability of synthetic gene networks to drug discovery, drug delivery, receptor-activating gene circuits and mammalian biomanufacturing processes. PMID:25808341

  8. A new service-oriented grid-based method for AIoT application and implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yiqin; Quan, Li

    2017-07-01

    The traditional three-layer Internet of things (IoT) model, which includes physical perception layer, information transferring layer and service application layer, cannot express complexity and diversity in agricultural engineering area completely. It is hard to categorize, organize and manage the agricultural things with these three layers. Based on the above requirements, we propose a new service-oriented grid-based method to set up and build the agricultural IoT. Considering the heterogeneous, limitation, transparency and leveling attributes of agricultural things, we propose an abstract model for all agricultural resources. This model is service-oriented and expressed with Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA). Information and data of agricultural things were described and encapsulated by using XML in this model. Every agricultural engineering application will provide service by enabling one application node in this service-oriented grid. Description of Web Service Resource Framework (WSRF)-based Agricultural Internet of Things (AIoT) and the encapsulation method were also discussed in this paper for resource management in this model.

  9. Spatial services grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Li, Qi; Cheng, Jicheng

    2005-10-01

    This paper discusses the concept, key technologies and main application of Spatial Services Grid. The technologies of Grid computing and Webservice is playing a revolutionary role in studying the spatial information services. The concept of the SSG (Spatial Services Grid) is put forward based on the SIG (Spatial Information Grid) and OGSA (open grid service architecture). Firstly, the grid computing is reviewed and the key technologies of SIG and their main applications are reviewed. Secondly, the grid computing and three kinds of SIG (in broad sense)--SDG (spatial data grid), SIG (spatial information grid) and SSG (spatial services grid) and their relationships are proposed. Thirdly, the key technologies of the SSG (spatial services grid) is put forward. Finally, three representative applications of SSG (spatial services grid) are discussed. The first application is urban location based services gird, which is a typical spatial services grid and can be constructed on OGSA (Open Grid Services Architecture) and digital city platform. The second application is region sustainable development grid which is the key to the urban development. The third application is Region disaster and emergency management services grid.

  10. A new formula for bivariate Hermite interpolation on variable step grids and its application to image interpolation.

    PubMed

    Delibasis, Konstantinos K; Kechriniotis, Aristides

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present a novel formula of the bivariate Hermite interpolating (BHI) polynomial in the case of support points arranged on a grid with variable step. This expression is applicable when interpolation of a bivariate function is required, given its value and the values of its partial derivatives of arbitrarily high order, at the support points. The proposed formula is a generalization of an existing formula for the bivariate Hermite polynomial. It is also algebraically much simpler, thus can be computed more efficiently. In order to apply Hermite interpolation to image interpolation, we simplify the proposed (BHI) to handle support points on a regular unit-step grid. The values of image partial derivatives are arithmetically approximated using compact finite differences. The proposed method is being assessed in a number of image interpolation experiments that include a synthetic image, for which the values of the partial derivatives are computed analytically, as well as a collection of images from different medical modalities. The proposed BHI with up to second-order image partial derivatives, outperforms the convolution-based interpolation methods, as well as generalized interpolation methods with the same number of support points that was compared with, in the majority of image interpolation experiments. The computational load of the proposed BHI is calculated and its behaviour with respect to its controlling parameters is investigated.

  11. PathGrid: The Transfer of Astronomical Image Algorithms to the Analysis of Medical Microscopy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, N. A.; Brenton, J. D.; Caldas, C.; Irwin, M. J.; Akram, A.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Lewis, J. R.; MacCullum, P.; Morris, L. J.; Rixon, G. T.

    2009-09-01

    We describe our pilot `PathGrid' study which applies astronomical image processing and data handling techniques to the challenges involved in analysing Tissue Micro Array (TMA) image data. Image analysis has been applied to the input TMA data using open source solutions developed for an astronomical context. The resulting data products are in turn interfaced to the clinical trials systems in use at the Cambridge Research Institute (Cancer Research-UK).

  12. Validation of the Efficacy of a Solar-Thermal Powered Autoclave System for Off-Grid Medical Instrument Wet Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization. PMID:22848098

  13. Validation of the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave system for off-grid medical instrument wet sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A

    2012-10-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization.

  14. Grid-based methods for biochemical ab initio quantum chemical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, M.E.; Nelson, J.S.; Mori, E.

    1997-01-01

    A initio quantum chemical methods are seeing increased application in a large variety of real-world problems including biomedical applications ranging from drug design to the understanding of environmental mutagens. The vast majority of these quantum chemical methods are {open_quotes}spectral{close_quotes}, that is they describe the charge distribution around the nuclear framework in terms of a fixed analytic basis set. Despite the additional complexity they bring, methods involving grid representations of the electron or solvent charge can provide more efficient schemes for evaluating spectral operators, inexpensive methods for calculating electron correlation, and methods for treating the electrostatic energy of salvation in polar solvents. The advantage of mixed or {open_quotes}pseudospectral{close_quotes} methods is that they allow individual non-linear operators in the partial differential equations, such as coulomb operators, to be calculated in the most appropriate regime. Moreover, these molecular grids can be used to integrate empirical functionals of the electron density. These so-called density functional methods (DFT) are an extremely promising alternative to conventional post-Hartree Fock quantum chemical methods. The introduction of a grid at the molecular solvent-accessible surface allows a very sophisticated treatment of a polarizable continuum solvent model (PCM). Where most PCM approaches use a truncated expansion of the solute`s electric multipole expansion, e.g. net charge (Born model) or dipole moment (Onsager model), such a grid-based boundary-element method (BEM) yields a nearly exact treatment of the solute`s electric field. This report describes the use of both DFT and BEM methods in several biomedical chemical applications.

  15. Modular Cascaded H-Bridge Multilevel PV Inverter with Distributed MPPT for Grid-Connected Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Bailu; Hang, Lijun; Mei, Jun; ...

    2014-09-04

    This paper presents a modular cascaded H-bridge multilevel photovoltaic (PV) inverter for single- or three-phase grid-connected applications. The modular cascaded multilevel topology helps to improve the efficiency and flexibility of PV systems. To realize better utilization of PV modules and maximize the solar energy extraction, a distributed maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control scheme is applied to both single-phase and three-phase multilevel inverters, which allows the independent control of each dc-link voltage. For three-phase grid-connected applications, PV mismatches may introduce unbalanced supplied power, leading to unbalanced grid current. To solve this issue, a control scheme with modulation compensation is alsomore » proposed. An experimental three-phase 7-level cascaded H-bridge inverter has been built utilizing 9 H-bridge modules (3 modules per phase). Each H-bridge module is connected to a 185 W solar panel. Simulation and experimental results are presented to verify the feasibility of the proposed approach.« less

  16. Modular Cascaded H-Bridge Multilevel PV Inverter with Distributed MPPT for Grid-Connected Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Bailu; Hang, Lijun; Mei, Jun; Riley, Cameron; Tolbert, Leon M.; Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-09-04

    This paper presents a modular cascaded H-bridge multilevel photovoltaic (PV) inverter for single- or three-phase grid-connected applications. The modular cascaded multilevel topology helps to improve the efficiency and flexibility of PV systems. To realize better utilization of PV modules and maximize the solar energy extraction, a distributed maximum power point tracking (MPPT) control scheme is applied to both single-phase and three-phase multilevel inverters, which allows the independent control of each dc-link voltage. For three-phase grid-connected applications, PV mismatches may introduce unbalanced supplied power, leading to unbalanced grid current. To solve this issue, a control scheme with modulation compensation is also proposed. An experimental three-phase 7-level cascaded H-bridge inverter has been built utilizing 9 H-bridge modules (3 modules per phase). Each H-bridge module is connected to a 185 W solar panel. Simulation and experimental results are presented to verify the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  17. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the physics of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  18. An Application of Overset Grids to Payload/Fairing Three-Dimensional Internal Flow CFD Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandula, Max; Nallasamy, R.; Schallhorn, P.; Duncil, L.

    2007-01-01

    The application of overset grids to the computational fluid dynamics analysis of three-dimensional internal flow in the payload/fairing of an expendable launch vehicle is described. In conjunction with the overset grid system, the flowfield in the payload/fairing configuration is obtained with the aid of OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes code. The solution exhibits a highly three dimensional complex flowfield with swirl, separation, and vortices. Some of the computed flow features are compared with the measured Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) data on a 1/5th scale model of the payload/fairing configuration. The counter-rotating vortex structures and the location of the saddle point predicted by the CFD analysis are in general agreement with the LDV data. Comparisons of the computed (CFD) velocity profiles on horizontal and vertical lines in the LDV measurement plane in the faring nose region show reasonable agreement with the LDV data.

  19. [Additive Manufacturing and Its Medical Applications].

    PubMed

    Song, Zewen; Wang, Guohui; Gao, Qin; Zhu, Shaihong

    2015-04-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is a collection of technologies based on the layer-by-layer manufacturing. Characterized by its direct manufacturing and rapidity, it has been regarded by the Economist Journal as one of the key techniques which will trigger the third industry reformation. The present article, beginning with a brief introduction of the history of AM and the process of its major technologies, focuses on the advantages and disadvantages and medical applications of the technique.

  20. Nuclear data calculation methods for medical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.; Lunev, V.P.; Masterov, V.S.; Kurenkov, N.V.; Kulikov, E.V.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron deficient radionuclides play an important role in medicine, where they are used for diagnostic with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPET). Using some reactions connected with the producing most widely used radioisotopes {sup 123}I, {sup 201}Tl, {sup 99}Tc as example we calculated reaction cross sections and discuss the possibilities of the models and codes and recent progress in the methods to predict nuclear data for medical and other applications in medium energy region.

  1. Application of Light Sources to Medical Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizojiri, Takafumi; Kimura, Makoto

    The purpose of this paper is to show application of light sources to medical field. It is described the process of light sources development applied to photodynamic therapy; PDT or photodynamic diagnosis; PDD. Actually, as a successful experience, we show the verification results obtained by primary and clinical experiments using metal halide lamp which emitted spectra is optimized to absorbed wavelength of photosensitizer for PDT.

  2. Application of superconductivity to medical diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, D.E.; Tripp, J.H.; Zanzucchi, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    This communication discusses a development in medical diagnostics, made possible by the application of a SQUID magnetic susceptometer to in vivo measurement of the iron stored in human tissue. Some new results are reported which indicate that a carefully designed susceptometer can provide the clinician with a useful non-invasive measure of excess iron in the human liver. Extension of this technique to other important iron storage problems is discussed.

  3. The regulation of mobile medical applications.

    PubMed

    Yetisen, Ali Kemal; Martinez-Hurtado, J L; da Cruz Vasconcellos, Fernando; Simsekler, M C Emre; Akram, Muhammad Safwan; Lowe, Christopher R

    2014-03-07

    The rapidly expanding number of mobile medical applications have the potential to transform the patient-healthcare provider relationship by improving the turnaround time and reducing costs. In September 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued guidance to regulate these applications and protect consumers by minimising the risks associated with their unintended use. This guidance distinguishes between the subset of mobile medical apps which may be subject to regulation and those that are not. The marketing claims of the application determine the intent. Areas of concern include compliance with regular updates of the operating systems and of the mobile medical apps themselves. In this article, we explain the essence of this FDA guidance by providing examples and evaluating the impact on academia, industry and other key stakeholders, such as patients and clinicians. Our assessment indicates that awareness and incorporation of the guidelines into product development can hasten the commercialisation and market entry process. Furthermore, potential obstacles have been discussed and directions for future development suggested.

  4. Co-Simulation of Detailed Whole Building with the Power System to Study Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Fuller, Jason C.; Srivastava, Viraj; Ciraci, Selim; Daily, Jeffrey A.

    2014-12-24

    Modernization of the power system in a way that ensures a sustainable energy system is arguably one of the most pressing concerns of our time. Buildings are important components in the power system. First, they are the main consumers of electricity and secondly, they do not have constant energy demand. Conventionally, electricity has been difficult to store and should be consumed as it is generated. Therefore, maintaining the demand and supply is critical in the power system. However, to reduce the complexity of power models, buildings (i.e., end-use loads) are traditionally modeled and represented as aggregated “dumb” nodes in the power system. This means we lack effective detailed whole building energy models that can support requirements and emerging technologies of the smart power grid. To gain greater insight into the relationship between building energy demand and power system performance, it is important to constitute a co-simulation framework to support detailed building energy modeling and simulation within the power system to study capabilities promised by the modern power grid. This paper discusses ongoing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and presents underlying tools and framework needed to enable co-simulation of building, building energy systems and their control in the power system to study applications such as demand response, grid-based HVAC control, and deployment of buildings for ancillary services. The optimal goal is to develop an integrated modeling and simulation platform that is flexible, reusable, and scalable. Results of this work will contribute to future building and power system studies, especially those related to the integrated ‘smart grid’. Results are also expected to advance power resiliency and local (micro) scale grid studies where several building and renewable energy systems transact energy directly. This paper also reviews some applications that can be supported and studied using the framework introduced

  5. Attitudes of Medical Graduate and Undergraduate Students toward the Learning and Application of Medical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yi, Dong

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the teaching of medical statistics needs to be improved, yet areas for priority are unclear as medical students' learning and application of statistics at different levels is not well known. Our goal is to assess the attitudes of medical students toward the learning and application of medical statistics, and discover their…

  6. Attitudes of Medical Graduate and Undergraduate Students toward the Learning and Application of Medical Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yazhou; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Yanqi; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yi, Dong

    2015-01-01

    It is clear that the teaching of medical statistics needs to be improved, yet areas for priority are unclear as medical students' learning and application of statistics at different levels is not well known. Our goal is to assess the attitudes of medical students toward the learning and application of medical statistics, and discover their…

  7. Sodium-Beta Batteries for Grid-Scale Storage: Planar Sodium-Beta Batteries for Renewable Integration and Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: EaglePicher is developing a sodium-beta alumina (Na-Beta) battery for grid-scale energy storage. High-temperature Na-Beta batteries are a promising grid-scale energy storage technology, but existing approaches are expensive and unreliable. EaglePicher has modified the shape of the traditional, tubular-shaped Na-Beta battery. It is using an inexpensive stacked design to improve performance at lower temperatures, leading to a less expensive overall storage technology. The new design greatly simplifies the manufacturing process for beta alumina membranes (a key enabling technology), providing a subsequent pathway to the production of scalable, modular batteries at half the cost of the existing tubular designs.

  8. Power-grid Network Partitioning and Cluster Optimization with Applications to Florida and Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Abou Hamad, Ibrahim; Israels, Brett; Poroseva, Svetlana V.

    2012-02-01

    Cascading power-grid failures pose serious threats to lives and property, and it is desirable to contain them within a limited geographical area. One method to achieve this is Intelligent Intentional Islanding (I3): the purposeful partitioning of a grid into weakly connected ``islands'' of closely connected generators and loads. If such islands can be quickly isolated, the spread of faults can be limited. An additional constraint is that generating capacity and power demand within each island should be closely balanced to ensure self-sufficiency. I3 thus corresponds to constrained community detection in a network. After a matrix-based initial agglomeration of nearby loads and generators, we implement Monte Carlo simulated annealing to simultaneously optimize load-balance and internal connectivity of the resulting islands. The optimized network of islands is treated as a new network with the first-generation islands as the new nodes (``supergenerators'' and ``superloads''), and the same agglomeration and MC procedures are iteratively applied, reminiscent of real-space renormalization. Applications to the Floridian [1] and Texan high-voltage grids are demonstrated.[4pt] [1] I. Abou Hamad et al., Phys. Proc. 4, 125-129 (2010); Phys. Proc. 15, 2-6 (2011).

  9. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  10. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles: fabrication methods and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Masahiro; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxylapatite (or hydroxyapatite, HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with various kinds of cells and tissues, making it an ideal candidate for tissue engineering, orthopedic and dental applications. Nanosized materials offer improved performances compared with conventional materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratios. This review summarizes existing knowledge and recent progress in fabrication methods of nanosized (or nanostructured) HAp particles, as well as their recent applications in medical and dental fields. In section 1, we provide a brief overview of HAp and nanoparticles. In section 2, fabrication methods of HAp nanoparticles are described based on the particle formation mechanisms. Recent applications of HAp nanoparticles are summarized in section 3. The future perspectives in this active research area are given in section 4. PMID:27877527

  11. Hydroxylapatite nanoparticles: fabrication methods and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-12-01

    Hydroxylapatite (or hydroxyapatite, HAp) exhibits excellent biocompatibility with various kinds of cells and tissues, making it an ideal candidate for tissue engineering, orthopedic and dental applications. Nanosized materials offer improved performances compared with conventional materials due to their large surface-to-volume ratios. This review summarizes existing knowledge and recent progress in fabrication methods of nanosized (or nanostructured) HAp particles, as well as their recent applications in medical and dental fields. In section 1, we provide a brief overview of HAp and nanoparticles. In section 2, fabrication methods of HAp nanoparticles are described based on the particle formation mechanisms. Recent applications of HAp nanoparticles are summarized in section 3. The future perspectives in this active research area are given in section 4.

  12. Ultrafast laser pulses for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Will, Fabian; Serbin, Jesper; Bauer, Thorsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Welling, Herbert; Mueller, Wiebke; Schwab, Burkard; Singh, Ajoy I.; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2002-04-01

    Ultrafast lasers have become a promising tool for micromachining and extremely precise ablation of all kinds of materials. Due to the low energy threshold, thermal and mechanical side effects are limited to the bu micrometers range. The neglection of side effects enables the use of ultrashort laser pulses in a broad field of medical applications. Moreover, the interaction process based on nonlinear absorption offers the opportunity to process transparent tissue three dimensionally inside the bulk. We demonstrate the feasibility of surgical procedures in different fields of medical interest: in ophthalmology intrastromal cutting and preparing of cornael flaps for refractive surgery in living animals is presented. Besides, the very low mechanical side effects enables the use of fs- laser in otoralyngology to treat ocecular bones. Moreover, the precise cutting quality can be used in fields of cardiovascular surgery for the treatment of arteriosklerosis as well as in dentistry to remove caries from dental hard tissue.

  13. Grid infrastructure for automatic processing of SAR data for flood applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussul, Natalia; Skakun, Serhiy; Shelestov, Andrii

    2010-05-01

    More and more geosciences applications are being put on to the Grids. Due to the complexity of geosciences applications that is caused by complex workflow, the use of computationally intensive environmental models, the need of management and integration of heterogeneous data sets, Grid offers solutions to tackle these problems. Many geosciences applications, especially those related to the disaster management and mitigations require the geospatial services to be delivered in proper time. For example, information on flooded areas should be provided to corresponding organizations (local authorities, civil protection agencies, UN agencies etc.) no more than in 24 h to be able to effectively allocate resources required to mitigate the disaster. Therefore, providing infrastructure and services that will enable automatic generation of products based on the integration of heterogeneous data represents the tasks of great importance. In this paper we present Grid infrastructure for automatic processing of synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) satellite images to derive flood products. In particular, we use SAR data acquired by ESA's ENVSAT satellite, and neural networks to derive flood extent. The data are provided in operational mode from ESA rolling archive (within ESA Category-1 grant). We developed a portal that is based on OpenLayers frameworks and provides access point to the developed services. Through the portal the user can define geographical region and search for the required data. Upon selection of data sets a workflow is automatically generated and executed on the resources of Grid infrastructure. For workflow execution and management we use Karajan language. The workflow of SAR data processing consists of the following steps: image calibration, image orthorectification, image processing with neural networks, topographic effects removal, geocoding and transformation to lat/long projection, and visualisation. These steps are executed by different software, and can be

  14. Application of Chimera Grid Scheme to Combustor Flowfields at all Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yungster, Shaye; Chen, Kuo-Huey

    1997-01-01

    A CFD method for solving combustor flowfields at all speeds on complex configurations is presented. The approach is based on the ALLSPD-3D code which uses the compressible formulation of the flow equations including real gas effects, nonequilibrium chemistry and spray combustion. To facilitate the analysis of complex geometries, the chimera grid method is utilized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of the chimera scheme to reacting flows. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of this numerical approach, several benchmark calculations of subsonic flows are presented. These include steady and unsteady flows, and bluff-body stabilized spray and premixed combustion flames.

  15. Nanoporous membranes for medical and biological applications

    PubMed Central

    Adiga, Shashishekar P; Jin, Chunmin; Curtiss, Larry A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Narayan, Roger J

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic nanoporous materials have numerous potential biological and medical applications that involve sorting, sensing, isolating and releasing biological molecules. Nanoporous systems engineered to mimic natural filtration systems are actively being developed for use in smart implantable drug delivery systems, bioartificial organs, and other novel nano-enabled medical devices. Recent advances in nanoscience have made it possible to precisely control the morphology as well as physical and chemical properties of the pores in nanoporous materials that make them increasingly attractive for regulating and sensing transport at the molecular level. In this work, an overview of nanoporous membranes for biomedical applications is given. Various in vivo and in vitro membrane applications, including biosensing, biosorting, immunoisolation and drug delivery, are presented. Different types of nanoporous materials and their fabrication techniques are discussed with an emphasis on membranes with ordered pores. Desirable properties of membranes used in implantable devices, including biocompatibility and antibiofouling behavior, are discussed. The use of surface modification techniques to improve the function of nanoporous membranes is reviewed. Despite the extensive research carried out in fabrication, characterization, and modeling of nanoporous materials, there are still several challenges that must be overcome in order to create synthetic nanoporous systems that behave similarly to their biological counterparts. PMID:20049818

  16. Medical laser application: translation into the clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Hennig, Georg; Brittenham, Gary M.; Rühm, Adrian; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Medical laser applications based on widespread research and development is a very dynamic and increasingly popular field from an ecological as well as an economic point of view. Conferences and personal communication are necessary to identify specific requests and potential unmet needs in this multi- and interdisciplinary discipline. Precise gathering of all information on innovative, new, or renewed techniques is necessary to design medical devices for introduction into clinical applications and finally to become established for routine treatment or diagnosis. Five examples of successfully addressed clinical requests are described to show the long-term endurance in developing light-based innovative clinical concepts and devices. Starting from laboratory medicine, a noninvasive approach to detect signals related to iron deficiency is shown. Based upon photosensitization, fluorescence-guided resection had been discovered, opening the door for photodynamic approaches for the treatment of brain cancer. Thermal laser application in the nasal cavity obtained clinical acceptance by the introduction of new laser wavelengths in clinical consciousness. Varicose veins can be treated by innovative endoluminal treatment methods, thus reducing side effects and saving time. Techniques and developments are presented with potential for diagnosis and treatment to improve the clinical situation for the benefit of the patient.

  17. Nanosilver: a nanoproduct in medical application.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Schluesener, H J

    2008-01-04

    Nanotechnology is a most promising field for generating new applications in medicine. However, only few nanoproducts are currently in use for medical purposes. A most prominent nanoproduct is nanosilver. Nanosilver particles are generally smaller than 100nm and contain 20-15,000 silver atoms. At nanoscale, silver exhibits remarkably unusual physical, chemical and biological properties. Due to its strong antibacterial activity, nanosilver coatings are used on various textiles but as well as coatings on certain implants. Further, nanosilver is used for treatment of wounds and burns or as a contraceptive and marketed as a water disinfectant and room spray. Thus, use of nanosilver is becoming more and more widespread in medicine and related applications and due to increasing exposure toxicological and environmental issues need to be raised. In sharp contrast to the attention paid to new applications of nanosilver, few studies provide only scant insights into the interaction of nanosilver particle with the human body after entering via different portals. Biodistribution, organ accumulation, degradation, possible adverse effects and toxicity are only slowly recognized and this review is focusing on major questions associated with the increased medical use of nanosilver and related nanomaterials.

  18. Optical parametric oscillators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloster, Lawrie A. W.; Golding, Paul S.; King, Terence A.

    1996-04-01

    In recent years optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) have undergone a renaissance largely due to the discovery of new nonlinear materials capable of wide continuous tuning ranges spanning from the UV to the near-infrared spectral regions. To date, however, OPOs have not been exploited in the medical field despite their advantages over the dye laser in terms of tuning range and solid state structure. We consider the development of an OPO based on barium borate (BBO) which can be tailored to suit applications in medicine. Converting the maximum number of pump photons to tunable signal and idler photons is of great importance to secure high-fluence radiation necessary for many treatments. With this in mind, we report on an all- solid-state system using BBO which has been optimized by computer modeling with the potential of delivering amplification factors of typically up to 20 over a continuous tuning range of 700 nm to 1000 nm. As an example of its biomedical application, we describe the selective excitation of biomolecules and chromophores for cell destruction using malachite green isothiocyanate labelled bacteria. The potential for development is reviewed towards other medical applications such as diagnostic sensing and phototherapy.

  19. Laser safety aspects for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Shimon

    2003-12-01

    Most applications of lasers in medicine are based on the producing of a controlled thermal damage into a preferably tissue location. Laser safety deals with non controlled damage (thermal or other) that could be randomly produced into a non preferable tissue locations. This kind of damage is not allowed and the laser safety material is designed to provide the user with a knowledge and with sufficient safety instructions and means to prevent such damage. Following the laser safety instructions is especially important for the medical applications because in these applications the laser beam is brought in a close proximity to the patient's body and non-desired damage can be easily produced. Most medical lasers are classified as Class 4 laser products, the highest hazard class. Direct laser beam of class 4 is capable to produce skin burns and to ignite flammable materials, and even its scattered beam may produce severe eye damage. The paper presents the nature of the skin and eye damage for different spectral range, and the state of the art rules in preventing such damage. The safety means that should be implemented in, and around, the laser clinique and in the laser surgery room will also be highlighted.

  20. INITIAL APPL;ICATION OF THE ADAPTIVE GRID AIR POLLUTION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an adaptive-grid algorithm used in air pollution models. The algorithm reduces errors related to insufficient grid resolution by automatically refining the grid scales in regions of high interest. Meanwhile the grid scales are coarsened in other parts of the d...

  1. Study of a novel fast restoration mechanism for data-intensive applications in grid-enabled optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Li; Wu, Runze; Qiao, Yaojun; Ji, Yuefeng

    2007-11-01

    During the past few years, gird technology has gained a rapid progress in E-Science, E-education, etc. All these typical grid applications are involved with huge data transacting and collaborating that need a more capable network infrastructure with sufficient bandwidth provisioning and high QOS guarantee other then the traditional Internet. Thus gives birth to the concept of Grid-enabled Optical Network (Optical Grid), which mainly orients to the data-intensive applications. In this paper, we give a vivid definition to Optical Grid, expound the most distinguished characteristics of it, propose a novel SOA-based architecture for it, and then introduce a fast and flexible restoration mechanism, named DIR, based on mature RSVP-TE for its control plane to support data-intensive grid applications, then make a deep analysis and illustration on the proposed mechanism, finally draw a conclusion that the DIR mechanism can achieve much rapid service recovery speed thus be very applicable for the distributed grid environment.

  2. Fibers and materials of medical application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridman, L. I.

    1993-01-01

    Efferent sorption methods of organism detoxication (by medical trend) are presented. Recently, specialists have shown their keen interest in the problem of treating exogenous and endogenous intoxications. This was stipulated by the growing production and accumulation of chemical products for industrial, agricultural, and domestic needs. To solve this problem the industrial production of carbon fibrous adsorbents was developed and implemented at NII Chimvolokno in St. Petersburg. A description of the carbon fibers is given. Also, application of modern composite materials for manufacturing compression-distraction apparatus used for setting fractured bones is described.

  3. 15 CFR Notes Applicable to State... - Notes applicable to State of Understanding related to Medical Equipment:

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the practice of medicine (does not include medical research). (2) Commodities or software are... Understanding related to Medical Equipment: applicable Notes applicable to State of Understanding related to Medical Equipment: Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign...

  4. Nutritional and medical applications of spirulina microalgae.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, S M; Khosravi-Darani, K; Mozafari, M R

    2013-06-01

    Spirulina spp. and its processing products are employed in agriculture, food industry, pharmaceutics, perfumery and medicine. Spirulina has several pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial (including antiviral and antibacterial), anticancer, metalloprotective (prevention of heavy-metal poisoning against Cd, Pb, Fe, Hg), as well as immunostimulant and antioxidant effects due to its rich content of protein, polysaccharide, lipid, essential amino and fatty acids, dietary minerals and vitamins. This article serves as an overview, introducing the basic biochemical composition of this algae and moves to its medical applications. For each application the basic description of disease, mechanism of damage, particular content of Spirulina spp. for treatment, in vivo and/or in vitro usage, factors associated with therapeutic role, problems encountered and advantages are given.

  5. Optical polymers for laser medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, Nina G.; Kasarova, Stefka N.; Nikolov, Ivan D.

    2016-01-01

    In medicine, optical polymers are used not only in ophthalmology but in many laser surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic systems. The application in lens design is determined by their refractive and dispersive properties in the considered spectral region. We have used different measuring techniques to obtain precise refractometric data in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Dispersive, thermal and other important optical characteristics of polymers have been studied. Design of a plastic achromatic objective, used in a surgical stereo-microscope at 1064 nm laser wavelength, is accomplished. Geometrical and wavefront aberrations are calculated. Another example of application of polymers is the designed all-mirror apochromatic micro-lens, intended for superluminescent diode fiber coupling in medical systems.

  6. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research

    SciTech Connect

    Thomlinson, W.

    1995-12-31

    The medical projects employing synchrotron radiation as discussed in this paper are, for the most part, still in their infancies and no one can predict the direction in which they will develop. Both the basic research and applied medical programs are sure to be advanced at the new facilities coming on line, especially the ESRF and Spring- 8. However, success is not guaranteed. There is a lot of competition from advances in conventional imaging with the development of digital angiography, computed tomography, functional magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound. The synchrotron programs will have to provide significant advantages over these modalities in order to be accepted by the medical profession. Advances in image processing and potentially the development of compact sources will be required in order to move the synchrotron developed imaging technologies into the clinical world. In any event, it can be expected that the images produced by the synchrotron technologies will establish ``gold standards`` to be targeted by conventional modalities. A lot more work needs to be done in order to bring synchrotron radiation therapy and surgery to the level of human studies and, subsequently, to clinical applications.

  7. Data and knowledge in medical distributed applications.

    PubMed

    Serban, Alexandru; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2014-01-01

    Building a clinical decision support system (CDSS) capable to collect process and diagnose data from the patients automatically, based on information, symptoms and investigations is one of the current challenges for researchers and medical science. The purpose of the current study is to design a cloud-based CDSS to improve patient safety, quality of care and organizational efficiency. It presents the design of a cloud-based application system using a medical based approach, which covers different diseases to diagnosis, differentiated on most important pathologies. Using online questionnaires, traditional and new data will be collected from patients. After data input, the application will formulate a presumptive diagnosis and will direct patients to the correspondent department. A questionnaire will dynamically ask questions about the interface, and functionality improvements. Based on the answers, the functionality of the system and the user interface will be improved considering the real needs expressed by the end-users. The cloud-based CDSS, as a useful tool for patients, physicians and healthcare providers involves the computer support in the diagnosis of different pathologies and an accurate automatic differential diagnostic system.

  8. PSO-Based Smart Grid Application for Sizing and Optimization of Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed A.; Eltamaly, Ali M.; Alolah, Abdulrahman I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an optimal sizing algorithm for a hybrid renewable energy system using smart grid load management application based on the available generation. This algorithm aims to maximize the system energy production and meet the load demand with minimum cost and highest reliability. This system is formed by photovoltaic array, wind turbines, storage batteries, and diesel generator as a backup source of energy. Demand profile shaping as one of the smart grid applications is introduced in this paper using load shifting-based load priority. Particle swarm optimization is used in this algorithm to determine the optimum size of the system components. The results obtained from this algorithm are compared with those from the iterative optimization technique to assess the adequacy of the proposed algorithm. The study in this paper is performed in some of the remote areas in Saudi Arabia and can be expanded to any similar regions around the world. Numerous valuable results are extracted from this study that could help researchers and decision makers. PMID:27513000

  9. Lambda Station: On-demand flow based routing for data intensive Grid applications over multitopology networks

    SciTech Connect

    Bobyshev, A.; Crawford, M.; DeMar, P.; Grigaliunas, V.; Grigoriev, M.; Moibenko, A.; Petravick, D.; Rechenmacher, R.; Newman, H.; Bunn, J.; Van Lingen, F.; Nae, D.; Ravot, S.; Steenberg, C.; Su, X.; Thomas, M.; Xia, Y.; /Caltech

    2006-08-01

    Lambda Station is an ongoing project of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and the California Institute of Technology. The goal of this project is to design, develop and deploy network services for path selection, admission control and flow based forwarding of traffic among data-intensive Grid applications such as are used in High Energy Physics and other communities. Lambda Station deals with the last-mile problem in local area networks, connecting production clusters through a rich array of wide area networks. Selective forwarding of traffic is controlled dynamically at the demand of applications. This paper introduces the motivation of this project, design principles and current status. Integration of Lambda Station client API with the essential Grid middleware such as the dCache/SRM Storage Resource Manager is also described. Finally, the results of applying Lambda Station services to development and production clusters at Fermilab and Caltech over advanced networks such as DOE's UltraScience Net and NSF's UltraLight is covered.

  10. PSO-Based Smart Grid Application for Sizing and Optimization of Hybrid Renewable Energy Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed A; Eltamaly, Ali M; Alolah, Abdulrahman I

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an optimal sizing algorithm for a hybrid renewable energy system using smart grid load management application based on the available generation. This algorithm aims to maximize the system energy production and meet the load demand with minimum cost and highest reliability. This system is formed by photovoltaic array, wind turbines, storage batteries, and diesel generator as a backup source of energy. Demand profile shaping as one of the smart grid applications is introduced in this paper using load shifting-based load priority. Particle swarm optimization is used in this algorithm to determine the optimum size of the system components. The results obtained from this algorithm are compared with those from the iterative optimization technique to assess the adequacy of the proposed algorithm. The study in this paper is performed in some of the remote areas in Saudi Arabia and can be expanded to any similar regions around the world. Numerous valuable results are extracted from this study that could help researchers and decision makers.

  11. Applications of digital photogrammetry to medical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, H. L.

    Photogrammetric measurement for the diagnosis and treatment of human conditions and for bio-medical research is a form of close-range photogrammetry with its own distinctive challenges and constraints. Reports of fully digital systems are somewhat limited so far, being restricted primarily to face and body measurement and to motion recording, but clear patterns are apparent in the approaches being adopted. The effectiveness of photogrammetric measurement in gait analyses and some other body measurements involving targets, has stimulated commercial development of a number of comprehensive digital systems. They are characterised by the use of multiple cameras, LED or reflective targets, fast image processing based on target detection, links to other recording systems, and by the provision of comprehensive medical information. Surface shape measurements by state-of-the-art photogrammetric systems have been aimed primarily at the face, back and torso. But in contrast to target-based measurement systems, they are characterised not by commercial systems, but by individually tailored hardware and software systems based on low-cost, low-resolution cameras, the casting of a texturising light pattern, image processing to detect features within the pattern, and area-based rather than feature-based matching methods for automated stereoscopic correlation. In common with motion measurement, effective and informative output is crucial for these applications. Medical photogrammetry does not end with these applications, but distinctive trends in the use of digital methodology are not apparent among other measurement tasks. On the other hand, digital image processing has contributed usefully to optical measurement techniques which are not strictly photogrammetric but which are useful for external measurement on the human body.

  12. GridKit

    SciTech Connect

    Peles, Slaven

    2016-11-06

    GridKit is a software development kit for interfacing power systems and power grid application software with high performance computing (HPC) libraries developed at National Labs and academia. It is also intended as interoperability layer between different numerical libraries. GridKit is not a standalone application, but comes with a suite of test examples illustrating possible usage.

  13. A Tool for Automatic Data Distribution for CFD Applications on Structured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    Development of HPF versions of NPB and ARC3D has shown that HPF provides an efficient, concise way to express parallelism and to organize data traffic. The use of HPF, as noted in the papers, requires an intimate knowledge of the applications and a detailed analysis of data affinity, data movement, and data granularity. To simplify and accelerate the task of developing HPF versions of existing CFD applications we have designed and implemented ADAPT (Automatic Data Alignment and Placement Tool). ADAPT analyzes a CFD application working on a single structured grid and generates HPF TEMPLATE, (RE)DISTRIBUTION, ALIGNMENT, and INDEPENDENT directives. The directives can be generated on the nest level, subroutine level, application level, or on the application interface level. ADAPT annotates an existing CFD FORTRAN application, performing computations on single or multiple grids. On each grid the application is considered as a sequence of operators, each applied to a set of variables defined in a particular grid domain. ADAPT automatically detects implicit operators (i.e., having data dependences) and explicit operators (without data dependences). For parallelization of an explicit operator ADAPT creates a template for the operator domain, aligns arrays used in the operator with the template, distributes the template, and declares the loops over the distributed dimensions as INDEPENDENT. For parallelization of an implicit operator, the distribution of the operator's domain should be consistent with the operator's dependences. Any dependence between sections distributed on different processors would preclude parallelization if the compiler does not have an ability to pipeline computations. If a data distribution is "orthogonal" to the dependences of an implicit operator, then the loop which implements the operator can be declared as INDEPENDENT. ADAPT starts with an analysis of array index expressions of the loop nests. For each pair of arrays referenced in an assignment

  14. Grid Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Ian

    2001-08-01

    The term "Grid Computing" refers to the use, for computational purposes, of emerging distributed Grid infrastructures: that is, network and middleware services designed to provide on-demand and high-performance access to all important computational resources within an organization or community. Grid computing promises to enable both evolutionary and revolutionary changes in the practice of computational science and engineering based on new application modalities such as high-speed distributed analysis of large datasets, collaborative engineering and visualization, desktop access to computation via "science portals," rapid parameter studies and Monte Carlo simulations that use all available resources within an organization, and online analysis of data from scientific instruments. In this article, I examine the status of Grid computing circa 2000, briefly reviewing some relevant history, outlining major current Grid research and development activities, and pointing out likely directions for future work. I also present a number of case studies, selected to illustrate the potential of Grid computing in various areas of science.

  15. Latency Hiding in Dynamic Partitioning and Load Balancing of Grid Computing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Sajal K.; Harvey, Daniel J.; Biswas, Rupak

    2001-01-01

    The Information Power Grid (IPG) concept developed by NASA is aimed to provide a metacomputing platform for large-scale distributed computations, by hiding the intricacies of highly heterogeneous environment and yet maintaining adequate security. In this paper, we propose a latency-tolerant partitioning scheme that dynamically balances processor workloads on the.IPG, and minimizes data movement and runtime communication. By simulating an unsteady adaptive mesh application on a wide area network, we study the performance of our load balancer under the Globus environment. The number of IPG nodes, the number of processors per node, and the interconnected speeds are parameterized to derive conditions under which the IPG would be suitable for parallel distributed processing of such applications. Experimental results demonstrate that effective solution are achieved when the IPG nodes are connected by a high-speed asynchronous interconnection network.

  16. Surface grid generation for flowfield applications using B-spline surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwood, Christopher A.; Vogel, Jerald M.

    1989-01-01

    The adequate discretization of the flowfield domain in structured grid techniques depends on the body surface, the zones, and the interior grid. Attention is presently given to the problem of obtaining a versatile surface-definition and grid-generation technique; a general surface grid-generation technique is presented which develops three-dimensional patches from point data. The grid is generated on a two-dimensional field on the basis of either a direct or inverse interpolation procedure. It is then mapped onto physical space to yield the surface grid.

  17. A simple algebraic grid adaptation scheme with applications to two- and three-dimensional flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Andrew T.; Lytle, John K.

    1989-01-01

    An algebraic adaptive grid scheme based on the concept of arc equidistribution is presented which provides high flowfield resolution when applied to two-dimensional and three-dimensional flow problems. The present scheme locally adjusts the grid density using gradients of selected flow variables from either finite difference or finite volume calculations, and it can specify user-prescribed grid stretching such that control of the grid spacing can be maintained in areas of known flowfield behavior. A robust and efficient grid smoothing technique has been incorporated into the adaptive grid routine.

  18. GOC-TX: A Reliable Ticket Synchronization Application for the Open Science Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Soichi; Gopu, Arvind; Quick, Robert

    2011-12-01

    One of the major operational issues faced by large multi-institutional collaborations is permitting its users and support staff to use their native ticket tracking environment while also exchanging these tickets with collaborators. After several failed attempts at email-parser based ticket exchanges, the OSG Operations Group has designed a comprehensive ticket synchronizing application. The GOC-TX application uses web-service interfaces offered by various commercial, open source and other homegrown ticketing systems, to synchronize tickets between two or more of these systems. GOC-TX operates independently from any ticketing system. It can be triggered by one ticketing system via email, active messaging, or a web-services call to check for current sync-status, pull applicable recent updates since prior synchronizations to the source ticket, and apply the updates to a destination ticket. The currently deployed production version of GOC-TX is able to synchronize tickets between the Numara Footprints ticketing system used by the OSG and the following systems: European Grid Initiative's system Global Grid User Support (GGUS) and the Request Tracker (RT) system used by Brookhaven. Additional interfaces to the BMC Remedy system used by Fermilab, and to other instances of RT used by other OSG partners, are expected to be completed in summer 2010. A fully configurable open source version is expected to be made available by early autumn 2010. This paper will cover the structure of the GOC-TX application, its evolution, and the problems encountered by OSG Operations group with ticket exchange within the OSG Collaboration.

  19. Development of grid-like applications for public health using Web 2.0 mashup techniques.

    PubMed

    Scotch, Matthew; Yip, Kevin Y; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2008-01-01

    Development of public health informatics applications often requires the integration of multiple data sources. This process can be challenging due to issues such as different file formats, schemas, naming systems, and having to scrape the content of web pages. A potential solution to these system development challenges is the use of Web 2.0 technologies. In general, Web 2.0 technologies are new internet services that encourage and value information sharing and collaboration among individuals. In this case report, we describe the development and use of Web 2.0 technologies including Yahoo! Pipes within a public health application that integrates animal, human, and temperature data to assess the risk of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks. The results of development and testing suggest that while Web 2.0 applications are reasonable environments for rapid prototyping, they are not mature enough for large-scale public health data applications. The application, in fact a "systems of systems," often failed due to varied timeouts for application response across web sites and services, internal caching errors, and software added to web sites by administrators to manage the load on their servers. In spite of these concerns, the results of this study demonstrate the potential value of grid computing and Web 2.0 approaches in public health informatics.

  20. Medical Applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, A. K.; Rai, N. K.; Singh, Ankita; Rai, A. K.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Rai, Pramod K.

    2014-11-01

    Sedentary lifestyle of human beings has resulted in various diseases and in turn we require a potential tool that can be used to address various issues related to human health. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is one such potential optical analytical tool that has become quite popular because of its distinctive features that include applicability to any type/phase of samples with almost no sample preparation. Several reports are available that discusses the capabilities of LIBS, suitable for various applications in different branches of science which cannot be addressed by traditional analytical methods but only few reports are available for the medical applications of LIBS. In the present work, LIBS has been implemented to understand the role of various elements in the formation of gallstones (formed under the empyema and mucocele state of gallbladder) samples along with patient history that were collected from Purvancal region of Uttar Pradesh, India. The occurrence statistics of gallstones under the present study reveal higher occurrence of gallstones in female patients. The gallstone occurrence was found more prevalent for those male patients who were having the habit of either tobacco chewing, smoking or drinking alcohols. This work further reports in-situ LIBS study of deciduous tooth and in-vivo LIBS study of human nail.

  1. Collaborative social and medical service application.

    PubMed

    Petermann, C A; Buffone, G J; Bobroff, R B; Moore, D M; Dargahi, R; Moreau, D R; Gilson, H S; Li, Y; Fowler, J; Beck, J R

    1995-01-01

    Baylor College of Medicine has five Teen Health Clinics (THC) dispersed throughout Harris county. The population served by the clinics includes inner-city adolescent boys and girls 19 years of age and under. Patients receive services such as family planning, sexually transmitted disease screening and treatment, perinatal care, counseling, and support services. Adolescents may receive services at any one of the clinics at no cost to the adolescent or their dependents. Given the geographical distribution of the clinics and the reliance on paper-based records, client services cannot be provided efficiently or expeditiously. According to the statistics developed by Clinic staff, ineffective coordination of service needs and client schedules undermine the follow-up needed for effective care. For example, a counselor will often need to balance a school schedule, clinic visits, well baby follow-up, and the Best Friends Program for a new mother. In addition, the lack of ready access to patient information impairs the ability of clinical and social service staff to provide continuity of care. In fact, some cases of client dropout are attributable to these difficulties. We have developed the Collaborative Social and Medical Service Application (CSMSA) to facilitate the provision of social and medical services to this population. The CSMSA is a domain-specific application based on a robust infrastructure known as the Ambulatory Services Architecture (ASA). This system is designed to support integrated social and ambulatory care. The ASA is a Baylor developed application framework and architecture for the computerization of the patient medical record in the ambulatory care setting. The working environment for the CSMSA user is an integrated desktop which provides an operating environment for both third-party applications and the CSMSA, as well as a fundamental set of services. The integrated desktop services include a mechanism for object organization or grouping, a facility

  2. Medical applications of infrared thermography: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Philip, John

    2012-07-01

    Abnormal body temperature is a natural indicator of illness. Infrared thermography (IRT) is a fast, passive, non-contact and non-invasive alternative to conventional clinical thermometers for monitoring body temperature. Besides, IRT can also map body surface temperature remotely. Last five decades witnessed a steady increase in the utility of thermal imaging cameras to obtain correlations between the thermal physiology and skin temperature. IRT has been successfully used in diagnosis of breast cancer, diabetes neuropathy and peripheral vascular disorders. It has also been used to detect problems associated with gynecology, kidney transplantation, dermatology, heart, neonatal physiology, fever screening and brain imaging. With the advent of modern infrared cameras, data acquisition and processing techniques, it is now possible to have real time high resolution thermographic images, which is likely to surge further research in this field. The present efforts are focused on automatic analysis of temperature distribution of regions of interest and their statistical analysis for detection of abnormalities. This critical review focuses on advances in the area of medical IRT. The basics of IRT, essential theoretical background, the procedures adopted for various measurements and applications of IRT in various medical fields are discussed in this review. Besides background information is provided for beginners for better understanding of the subject.

  3. Successful fiber sensor for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Brett A.

    1993-05-01

    The use of fiber optics in communications and data transmission applications has become wide spread in the last decade. At the same time fiber optic sensors have not gained wide commercial acceptance even though many are known and indeed numerous U.S. and foreign patents have been granted. Camino Laboratories a small medical device concern has successfully marketed a fiber optic pressure monitoring system and become a leader in the area of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Some curiosity about the company and its products has been expressed. This presentation will briefly give a background of the company, an explanation of the product, an account of the transfer from concept to volume manufacture and a word on limiting drawbacks of an intensity modulating fiber optic sensor.

  4. Tongue Color Analysis for Medical Application

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingzheng; You, Jane

    2013-01-01

    An in-depth systematic tongue color analysis system for medical applications is proposed. Using the tongue color gamut, tongue foreground pixels are first extracted and assigned to one of 12 colors representing this gamut. The ratio of each color for the entire image is calculated and forms a tongue color feature vector. Experimenting on a large dataset consisting of 143 Healthy and 902 Disease (13 groups of more than 10 samples and one miscellaneous group), a given tongue sample can be classified into one of these two classes with an average accuracy of 91.99%. Further testing showed that Disease samples can be split into three clusters, and within each cluster most if not all the illnesses are distinguished from one another. In total 11 illnesses have a classification rate greater than 70%. This demonstrates a relationship between the state of the human body and its tongue color. PMID:23737824

  5. Applications of medical intelligence in remote monitoring.

    PubMed

    Vassányi, István; Kozmann, György; Bánhalmi, András; Végsö, Balázs; Kósa, István; Dulai, Tibor; Tarjányi, Zsolt; Tuboly, Gergely; Cserti, Péter; Pintér, Balázs

    2011-01-01

    Prevention and rehabilitation efficiency can greatly benefit from the application of intelligent, 24 hour tele-diagnostics and tele-care information systems. Tele-monitoring also supports a new level of medical supervision over the patient's lifestyle. In this paper we briefly present the architecture and development phase results of the Alpha remote monitoring system. The novelty of the system is the unified and flexible processing of various signals retrieved from modern, unobtrusive devices in an efficient signal abstraction framework. The signals include PIR motion sensors that record patient movement in the home, physiological signals and also patient responses in various tests performed on the GUI of the central home unit. We have developed and tested the prototype system with promising results.

  6. Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology: A Systems Class Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Daniel W; Wohlgemuth, John; Carlson, David E; Clark, Roger F; Gleaton, Mark; Posbic, John P; Zahler, James

    2010-12-06

    The primary target market for this program was the residential and commercial PV markets, drawing on BP Solar's premium product and service offerings, brand and marketing strength, and unique routes to market. These two markets were chosen because: (1) in 2005 they represented more than 50% of the overall US PV market; (2) they are the two markets that will likely meet grid parity first; and (3) they are the two market segments in which product development can lead to the added value necessary to generate market growth before reaching grid parity. Federal investment in this program resulted in substantial progress toward the DOE TPP target, providing significant advancements in the following areas: (1) Lower component costs particularly the modules and inverters. (2) Increased availability and lower cost of silicon feedstock. (3) Product specifically developed for residential and commercial applications. (4) Reducing the cost of installation through optimization of the products. (5) Increased value of electricity in mid-term to drive volume increases, via the green grid technology. (6) Large scale manufacture of PV products in the US, generating increased US employment in manufacturing and installation. To achieve these goals BP Solar assembled a team that included suppliers of critical materials, automated equipment developers/manufacturers, inverter and other BOS manufacturers, a utility company, and University research groups. The program addressed all aspects of the crystalline silicon PV business from raw materials (particularly silicon feedstock) through installation of the system on the customers site. By involving the material and equipment vendors, we ensured that supplies of silicon feedstock and other PV specific materials like encapsulation materials (EVA and cover glass) will be available in the quantities required to meet the DOE goals of 5 to 10 GW of installed US PV by 2015 and at the prices necessary for PV systems to reach grid parity in 2015

  7. A Run-Time Verification Framework for Smart Grid Applications Implemented on Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Ciraci, Selim; Sozer, Hasan; Tekinerdogan, Bedir

    2013-05-18

    Smart grid applications are implemented and tested with simulation frameworks as the developers usually do not have access to large sensor networks to be used as a test bed. The developers are forced to map the implementation onto these frameworks which results in a deviation between the architecture and the code. On its turn this deviation makes it hard to verify behavioral constraints that are de- scribed at the architectural level. We have developed the ConArch toolset to support the automated verification of architecture-level behavioral constraints. A key feature of ConArch is programmable mapping for architecture to the implementation. Here, developers implement queries to identify the points in the target program that correspond to architectural interactions. ConArch generates run- time observers that monitor the flow of execution between these points and verifies whether this flow conforms to the behavioral constraints. We illustrate how the programmable mappings can be exploited for verifying behavioral constraints of a smart grid appli- cation that is implemented with two simulation frameworks.

  8. Capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids for downstream cryo-electron microscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Gabriella; Chen, Xuemin; Brindley, Melinda A; Campbell, Patricia; Afonso, Claudio L; Ke, Zunlong; Holl, Jens M; Guerrero-Ferreira, Ricardo C; Byrd-Leotis, Lauren A; Steel, John; Steinhauer, David A; Plemper, Richard K; Kelly, Deborah F; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2014-02-01

    Electron microscopy (EM), cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) are essential techniques used for characterizing basic virus morphology and determining the three-dimensional structure of viruses. Enveloped viruses, which contain an outer lipoprotein coat, constitute the largest group of pathogenic viruses to humans. The purification of enveloped viruses from cell culture presents certain challenges. Specifically, the inclusion of host-membrane-derived vesicles, the complete destruction of the viruses, and the disruption of the internal architecture of individual virus particles. Here, we present a strategy for capturing enveloped viruses on affinity grids (AG) for use in both conventional EM and cryo-EM/ET applications. We examined the utility of AG for the selective capture of human immunodeficiency virus virus-like particles, influenza A, and measles virus. We applied nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid lipid layers in combination with molecular adaptors to selectively adhere the viruses to the AG surface. This further development of the AG method may prove essential for the gentle and selective purification of enveloped viruses directly onto EM grids for ultrastructural analyses.

  9. 78 FR 29390 - Applications; SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Applications; SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc. AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Medical Technologies (SHINE) filed with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pursuant to...

  10. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  11. Enhancing the cyber-security of smart grids with applications to synchrophasor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Seemita

    In the power grids, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are used as part of the Energy Management System (EMS) for enabling grid monitoring, control and protection. In recent times, with the ongoing installation of thousands of Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs), system operators are becoming increasingly reliant on PMU-generated synchrophasor measurements for executing wide-area monitoring and real-time control. The availability of PMU data facilitates dynamic state estimation of the system, thus improving the efficiency and resiliency of the grid. Since the SCADA and PMU data are used to make critical control decisions including actuation of physical systems, the timely availability and integrity of this networked data is of paramount importance. Absence or wrong control actions can potentially lead to disruption of operations, monetary loss, damage to equipments or surroundings or even blackout. This has posed new challenges to information security especially in this age of ever-increasing cyber-attacks. In this thesis, potential cyber-attacks on smart grids are presented and effective and implementable schemes are proposed for detecting them. The focus is mainly on three kinds of cyber-attacks and their detection: (i) gray-hole attacks on synchrophasor systems, (ii) PMU data manipulation attacks and (iii) data integrity attacks on SCADA systems. In the case of gray-hole attacks, also known as packet-drop attacks, the adversary may arbitrarily drop PMU data packets as they traverse the network, resulting in unavailability of time-sensitive data for the various critical power system applications. The fundamental challenge is to distinguish packets dropped by the adversary from those that occur naturally due to network congestion.The proposed gray-hole attack detection technique is based on exploiting the inherent timing information in the GPS time-stamped PMU data packets and using the temporal trends of the latencies to classify the cause of

  12. The Grid as a healthcare provision tool.

    PubMed

    Hernández, V; Blanquer, I

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a survey on HealthGrid technologies, describing the current status of Grid and eHealth and analyzing them in the medium-term future. The objective is to analyze the key points, barriers and driving forces for the take-up of HealthGrids. The article considers the procedures from other Grid disciplines such as high energy physics or biomolecular engineering and discusses the differences with respect to healthcare. It analyzes the status of the basic technology, the needs of the eHealth environment and the successes of current projects in health and other relevant disciplines. Information and communication technology (ICT) in healthcare is a promising area for the use of the Grid. There are many driving forces that are fostering the application of the secure, pervasive, ubiquitous and transparent access to information and computing resources that Grid technologies can provide. However, there are many barriers that must be solved. Many technical problems that arise in eHealth (standardization of data, federation of databases, content-based knowledge extraction, and management of personal data ...) can be solved with Grid technologies. The article presents the development of successful and demonstrative applications as the key for the take-up of HealthGrids, where short-term future medical applications will surely be biocomputing-oriented, and the future of Grid technologies on medical imaging seems promising. Finally, exploitation of HealthGrid is analyzed considering the curve of the adoption of ICT solutions and the definition of business models, which are far more complex than in other e-business technologies such ASP.

  13. 38 CFR 8.9 - Application and medical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Application and medical evidence. 8.9 Section 8.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Reinstatement § 8.9 Application and medical evidence. The applicant for...

  14. 38 CFR 8.9 - Application and medical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Application and medical evidence. 8.9 Section 8.9 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Reinstatement § 8.9 Application and medical evidence. The applicant for...

  15. Potential applications of medical and non-medical robots for neurosurgical applications.

    PubMed

    Alric, Matthieu; Chapelle, Frédéric; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Gogu, Grigore

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to review the state-of-the-art in medical robotic systems used for different surgical applications, and to position and evaluate their concepts according to the design requirements of an innovative, robotized neurosurgical system, capable of performing tumor ablation or electrode positioning. A few other non-medical systems, which have interesting concepts, will also be discussed. The overall aim is to determine the robotic concept (structure, actuation, etc.) most applicable to specific tasks in neurosurgery. The first section of the article describes the requirements of the task and each important aspect is expressed by an evaluation criterion. Then, 59 systems are described, according to the fields of medical applications and the robotic concepts. An evaluation of the different systems is conducted, based on the five most significant criteria. However, the main characteristic assessed is the deployment capability of the system i.e. extension and retraction. The final section presents an overview of concepts transferable to neurosurgical applications. Continuum concepts, such as "elephant trunks", seem to be the most adapted solutions, utilizing pneumatic and/or spring and/or cable actuations. Pneumatics offer deployment forces and cables can control and guide the deployment. The design of a new neurosurgical device should take into account these observations as a base.

  16. [Research on medical data mining and its applications].

    PubMed

    Liu, Chanzhen; Wang, Youjun

    2014-10-01

    With the development of computer technology, medical data has developed from traditional paper pattern into electronic mode, which could effectively promote the medical development. This paper at first presents the status and characteristics of medical data mining. Then, it discusses the critical method of medical data mining in classification, clustering and prediction, respectively. The paper focuses on the application and assessment of five algorithms which are designed for medical data mining, including decision tree, cluster analysis, association rule, intelligent algorithm and the mix algorithm. Finally, this paper outlooks the data mining application in medical domain.

  17. Confocal Endomicroscopy: Instrumentation and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Bixler, Joel N.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic technology and miniaturized optics and mechanics have propelled confocal endomicroscopy into the clinical realm. This high resolution, non-invasive imaging technology provides the ability to microscopically evaluate cellular and sub-cellular features in tissue in vivo by optical sectioning. Because many cancers originate in epithelial tissues accessible by endoscopes, confocal endomicroscopy has been explored to detect regions of possible neoplasia at an earlier stage by imaging morphological features in vivo that are significant in histopathologic evaluation. This technique allows real-time assessment of tissue which may improve diagnostic yield by guiding biopsy. Research and development continues to reduce the overall size of the imaging probe, increase the image acquisition speed, and improve resolution and field of view of confocal endomicroscopes. Technical advances will continue to enable application to less accessible organs and more complex systems in the body. Lateral and axial resolutions down to 0.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively, field of view as large as 800×450 μm, and objective lens and total probe outer diameters down to 350 μm and 1.25 mm, respectively, have been achieved. We provide a review of the historical developments of confocal imaging in vivo, the evolution of endomicroscope instrumentation, and the medical applications of confocal endomicroscopy. PMID:21994069

  18. Shape memory alloys for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Planell, J A

    1998-01-01

    The shape memory alloys exhibit a number of remarkable properties, which open new possibilities in engineering and more specifically in biomedical engineering. The most important alloy used in biomedical applications is NiTi. This alloy combines the characteristics of the shape memory effect and superelasticity with excellent corrosion resistance, wear characteristics, mechanical properties and a good biocompatibility. These properties make it an ideal biological engineering material, especially in orthopaedic surgery and orthodontics. In this work the basis of the memory effect lies in the fact that the materials exhibiting such a property undergo a thermoelastic martensitic transformation. In order to understand even the most elementary engineering aspects of the shape memory effect it is necessary to review some basic principles of the formation and the characteristics of the martensitic phase. The different properties of shape memory, superelasticity, two-way shape memory, rubber-like behaviour and a high damping capacity are reviewed. Some applications proposed in recent years are described and classified according to different medical fields.

  19. Three-dimensional elliptic grid generation technique with application to turbomachinery cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, S. C.; Schwab, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a numerical method for generating 3-D grids for turbomachinery computational fluid dynamic codes. The basic method is general and involves the solution of a quasi-linear elliptic partial differential equation via pointwise relaxation with a local relaxation factor. It allows specification of the grid point distribution on the boundary surfaces, the grid spacing off the boundary surfaces, and the grid orthogonality at the boundary surfaces. A geometry preprocessor constructs the grid point distributions on the boundary surfaces for general turbomachinery cascades. Representative results are shown for a C-grid and an H-grid for a turbine rotor. Two appendices serve as user's manuals for the basic solver and the geometry preprocessor.

  20. Medical Applications and Toxicities of Gallium Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chitambar, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use. PMID:20623028

  1. Medical applications and toxicities of gallium compounds.

    PubMed

    Chitambar, Christopher R

    2010-05-01

    Over the past two to three decades, gallium compounds have gained importance in the fields of medicine and electronics. In clinical medicine, radioactive gallium and stable gallium nitrate are used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents in cancer and disorders of calcium and bone metabolism. In addition, gallium compounds have displayed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activity in animal models of human disease while more recent studies have shown that gallium compounds may function as antimicrobial agents against certain pathogens. In a totally different realm, the chemical properties of gallium arsenide have led to its use in the semiconductor industry. Gallium compounds, whether used medically or in the electronics field, have toxicities. Patients receiving gallium nitrate for the treatment of various diseases may benefit from such therapy, but knowledge of the therapeutic index of this drug is necessary to avoid clinical toxicities. Animals exposed to gallium arsenide display toxicities in certain organ systems suggesting that environmental risks may exist for individuals exposed to this compound in the workplace. Although the arsenic moiety of gallium arsenide appears to be mainly responsible for its pulmonary toxicity, gallium may contribute to some of the detrimental effects in other organs. The use of older and newer gallium compounds in clinical medicine may be advanced by a better understanding of their mechanisms of action, drug resistance, pharmacology, and side-effects. This review will discuss the medical applications of gallium and its mechanisms of action, the newer gallium compounds and future directions for development, and the toxicities of gallium compounds in current use.

  2. Radioisotope Production for Medical and Physics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mausner, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Radioisotopes are critical to the science and technology base of the US. Discoveries and applications made as a result of the availability of radioisotopes span widely from medicine, biology, physics, chemistry and homeland security. The clinical use of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis is the largest sector of use, with about 16 million procedures a year in the US. The use of ^99Mo/^99mTc generator and ^18F make up the majority, but ^201Tl, ^123I, ^111In, and ^67Ga are also used routinely to perform imaging of organ function. Application of radioisotopes for therapy is dominated by use of ^131I for thyroid malignancies, ^90Y for some solid tumors, and ^89Sr for bone cancer, but production of several more exotic species such as ^225Ac and ^211At are of significant current research interest. In physics ^225Ra is of interest for CP violation studies, and the actinides ^242Am, ^249Bk, and ^254Es are needed as targets for experiments to create superheavy elements. Large amounts of ^252Cf are needed as a fission source for the CARIBU experiment at ANL. The process of radioisotope production is multidisciplinary. Nuclear physics input based on nuclear reaction excitation function data is needed to choose an optimum target/projectile in order to maximize desired isotope production and minimize unwanted byproducts. Mechanical engineering is needed to address issues of target heating, induced mechanical stress and material compatibility of target and claddings. Radiochemists are involved as well since chemical separation to purify the desired final radioisotope product from the bulk target and impurities is also usually necessary. Most neutron rich species are produced at a few government and university reactors. Other radioisotopes are produced in cyclotrons in the commercial sector, university/hospital based facilities, and larger devices at the DOE labs. The landscape of US facilities, the techniques involved, and current supply challenges will be reviewed.

  3. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    PubMed

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion.

  4. 75 FR 29403 - Special Issuance of Airman Medical Certificates to Applicants Being Treated With Certain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... With Certain Antidepressant Medications; Re-Opening of Comment Period AGENCY: Federal Aviation... airmen medical certificates to applicants using certain antidepressant medication. The comment period is... Medical Certificates to Applicants Being Treated With Certain Antidepressant Medications.'' The FAA...

  5. Nanotechnology on duty in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Kubik, T; Bogunia-Kubik, K; Sugisaka, M

    2005-02-01

    At the beginning of 21(st) century, fifty years after discovery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double helix structure, scientific world is faced with a great progress in many disciplines of biological research, especially in the field of molecular biology and operating on nucleid acid molecules. Many molecular biology techniques have been implemented successfully in biology, biotechnology, medical science, diagnostics, and many more. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) resulted in improving old and designing new laboratory devices for PCR amplification and analysis of amplified DNA fragments. In parallel to these efforts, the nature of DNA molecules and their construction have attracted many researchers. In addition, some studies concerning mimicking living systems, as well as developing and constructing artificial nanodevices, such as biomolecular sensors and artificial cells, have been conducted. This review is focused on the potential of nanotechnology in health care and medicine, including the development of nanoparticles for diagnostic and screening purposes, the manufacture of unique drug delivery systems, antisense and gene therapy applications and the enablement of tissue engineering, including the future of nanorobot construction.

  6. The application of Linear Cryptanalysis to Medical Information Security.

    PubMed

    Yunguang, Wang; Dong, Wang

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the key issues of medical information security and is intended to spark discussion and generate comments for improvement. First we produce four definitions and one lemma of linear cryptanalysis about medical information, and then accordingly come to four important application of linear cryptanalysis to medical information security.

  7. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of

  8. On the application of Chimera/unstructured hybrid grids for conjugate heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Kai-Hsiung; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1995-01-01

    A hybrid grid system that combines the Chimera overset grid scheme and an unstructured grid method is developed to study fluid flow and heat transfer problems. With the proposed method, the solid structural region, in which only the heat conduction is considered, can be easily represented using an unstructured grid method. As for the fluid flow region external to the solid material, the Chimera overset grid scheme has been shown to be very flexible and efficient in resolving complex configurations. The numerical analyses require the flow field solution and material thermal response to be obtained simultaneously. A continuous transfer of temperature and heat flux is specified at the interface, which connects the solid structure and the fluid flow as an integral system. Numerical results are compared with analytical and experimental data for a flat plate and a C3X cooled turbine cascade. A simplified drum-disk system is also simulated to show the effectiveness of this hybrid grid system.

  9. The CrossGrid project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, M.; CrossGrid Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    There are many large-scale problems that require new approaches to computing, such as earth observation, environmental management, biomedicine, industrial and scientific modeling. The CrossGrid project addresses realistic problems in medicine, environmental protection, flood prediction, and physics analysis and is oriented towards specific end-users: Medical doctors, who could obtain new tools to help them to obtain correct diagnoses and to guide them during operations; industries, that could be advised on the best timing for some critical operations involving risk of pollution; flood crisis teams, that could predict the risk of a flood on the basis of historical records and actual hydrological and meteorological data; physicists, who could optimize the analysis of massive volumes of data distributed across countries and continents. Corresponding applications will be based on Grid technology and could be complex and difficult to use: the CrossGrid project aims at developing several tools that will make the Grid more friendly for average users. Portals for specific applications will be designed, that should allow for easy connection to the Grid, create a customized work environment, and provide users with all necessary information to get their job done.

  10. Misrepresentation of Research Citations among Medical School Faculty Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goe, Leon C.; Herrera, Adriana M.; Mower, William R.

    1998-01-01

    A review of 250 faculty applicant bibliographies in 1995 from eight medical institutions representing six medical specialties investigated the legitimacy of each journal, abstract, and book citation, finding 56 misrepresented citations among 2149 verified articles, distributed among 39 applicants. Most were discrepancies in authorship order, and…

  11. Application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to Medical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    to mammography and other areas of medical imaging . Prof. Chapman is a co-developer of the technique and intends to determine the applicability of... medical imaging . This award has allowed Prof. Chapman to: 1) explore the potential application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to mammography, 2...cancer research, and medical imaging , 4) explore the possibility of developing a dedicated imaging program at the Advanced Photon Source, with the

  12. Grid workflow validation using ontology-based tacit knowledge: A case study for quantitative remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Liu, Longli; Xue, Yong; Dong, Jing; Hu, Yingcui; Hill, Richard; Guang, Jie; Li, Chi

    2017-01-01

    Workflow for remote sensing quantitative retrieval is the ;bridge; between Grid services and Grid-enabled application of remote sensing quantitative retrieval. Workflow averts low-level implementation details of the Grid and hence enables users to focus on higher levels of application. The workflow for remote sensing quantitative retrieval plays an important role in remote sensing Grid and Cloud computing services, which can support the modelling, construction and implementation of large-scale complicated applications of remote sensing science. The validation of workflow is important in order to support the large-scale sophisticated scientific computation processes with enhanced performance and to minimize potential waste of time and resources. To research the semantic correctness of user-defined workflows, in this paper, we propose a workflow validation method based on tacit knowledge research in the remote sensing domain. We first discuss the remote sensing model and metadata. Through detailed analysis, we then discuss the method of extracting the domain tacit knowledge and expressing the knowledge with ontology. Additionally, we construct the domain ontology with Protégé. Through our experimental study, we verify the validity of this method in two ways, namely data source consistency error validation and parameters matching error validation.

  13. Application of a Navier-Stokes Solver to the Analysis of Multielement Airfoils and Wings Using Multizonal Grid Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Kenneth M.; Biedron, Robert T.; Whitlock, Mark

    1995-01-01

    A computational study was performed to determine the predictive capability of a Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code (CFL3D) for two-dimensional and three-dimensional multielement high-lift systems. Three configurations were analyzed: a three-element airfoil, a wing with a full span flap and a wing with a partial span flap. In order to accurately model these complex geometries, two different multizonal structured grid techniques were employed. For the airfoil and full span wing configurations, a chimera or overset grid technique was used. The results of the airfoil analysis illustrated that although the absolute values of lift were somewhat in error, the code was able to predict reasonably well the variation with Reynolds number and flap position. The full span flap analysis demonstrated good agreement with experimental surface pressure data over the wing and flap. Multiblock patched grids were used to model the partial span flap wing. A modification to an existing patched- grid algorithm was required to analyze the configuration as modeled. Comparisons with experimental data were very good, indicating the applicability of the patched-grid technique to analyses of these complex geometries.

  14. Handheld Computer Application for Medical Disaster Management

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We developed a prototype system that can provide reliable communications in the event of a medical disaster. The system uses redundant wireless protocols on handheld computers to deploy medical personnel, and to facilitate communication between ancillary treatment sites and a command center. PMID:17238551

  15. The CUNY Energy Institute Electrical Energy Storage Development for Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Sanjoy

    2013-03-31

    1. Project Objectives The objectives of the project are to elucidate science issues intrinsic to high energy density electricity storage (battery) systems for smart-grid applications, research improvements in such systems to enable scale-up to grid-scale and demonstrate a large 200 kWh battery to facilitate transfer of the technology to industry. 2. Background Complex and difficult to control interfacial phenomena are intrinsic to high energy density electrical energy storage systems, since they are typically operated far from equilibrium. One example of such phenomena is the formation of dendrites. Such dendrites occur on battery electrodes as they cycle, and can lead to internal short circuits, reducing cycle life. An improved understanding of the formation of dendrites and their control can improve the cycle life and safety of many energy storage systems, including rechargeable lithium and zinc batteries. Another area where improved understanding is desirable is the application of ionic liquids as electrolytes in energy storage systems. An ionic liquid is typically thought of as a material that is fully ionized (consisting only of anions and cations) and is fluid at or near room temperature. Some features of ionic liquids include a generally high thermal stability (up to 450 °C), a high electrochemical window (up to 6 V) and relatively high intrinsic conductivities. Such features make them attractive as battery or capacitor electrolytes, and may enable batteries which are safer (due to the good thermal stability) and of much higher energy density (due to the higher voltage electrode materials which may be employed) than state of the art secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Of particular interest is the use of such liquids as electrolytes in metal air batteries, where energy densities on the order of 1-2,000 Wh / kg are possible; this is 5-10 times that of existing state of the art lithium battery technology. The Energy Institute has been engaged in the

  16. Sparsity-Cognizant Algorithms with Applications to Communications, Signal Processing, and the Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hao

    Sparsity plays an instrumental role in a plethora of scientific fields, including statistical inference for variable selection, parsimonious signal representations, and solving under-determined systems of linear equations - what has led to the ground-breaking result of compressive sampling (CS). This Thesis leverages exciting ideas of sparse signal reconstruction to develop sparsity-cognizant algorithms, and analyze their performance. The vision is to devise tools exploiting the 'right' form of sparsity for the 'right' application domain of multiuser communication systems, array signal processing systems, and the emerging challenges in the smart power grid. Two important power system monitoring tasks are addressed first by capitalizing on the hidden sparsity. To robustify power system state estimation, a sparse outlier model is leveraged to capture the possible corruption in every datum, while the problem nonconvexity due to nonlinear measurements is handled using the semidefinite relaxation technique. Different from existing iterative methods, the proposed algorithm approximates well the global optimum regardless of the initialization. In addition, for enhanced situational awareness, a novel sparse overcomplete representation is introduced to capture (possibly multiple) line outages, and develop real-time algorithms for solving the combinatorially complex identification problem. The proposed algorithms exhibit near-optimal performance while incurring only linear complexity in the number of lines, which makes it possible to quickly bring contingencies to attention. This Thesis also accounts for two basic issues in CS, namely fully-perturbed models and the finite alphabet property. The sparse total least-squares (S-TLS) approach is proposed to furnish CS algorithms for fully-perturbed linear models, leading to statistically optimal and computationally efficient solvers. The S-TLS framework is well motivated for grid-based sensing applications and exhibits higher

  17. Application of the Cubed-Sphere Grid to Tilted Black-Hole Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Fragile, P C; Lindner, C C; Anninos, P; Salmonson, J D

    2008-09-24

    In recent work we presented the first results of global general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of tilted (or misaligned) accretion disks around rotating black holes. The simulated tilted disks showed dramatic differences from comparable untilted disks, such as asymmetrical accretion onto the hole through opposing 'plunging streams' and global precession of the disk powered by a torque provided by the black hole. However, those simulations used a traditional spherical-polar grid that was purposefully underresolved along the pole, which prevented us from assessing the behavior of any jets that may have been associated with the tilted disks. To address this shortcoming we have added a block-structured 'cubed-sphere' grid option to the Cosmos++ GRMHD code, which will allow us to simultaneously resolve the disk and polar regions. Here we present our implementation of this grid and the results of a small suite of validation tests intended to demonstrate that the new grid performs as expected. The most important test in this work is a comparison of identical tilted disks, one evolved using our spherical-polar grid and the other with the cubed-sphere grid. We also demonstrate an interesting dependence of the early-time evolution of our disks on their orientation with respect to the grid alignment. This dependence arises from the differing treatment of current sheets within the disks, especially whether they are aligned with symmetry planes of the grid or not.

  18. GSRP/David Marshall: Fully Automated Cartesian Grid CFD Application for MDO in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    With the renewed interest in Cartesian gridding methodologies for the ease and speed of gridding complex geometries in addition to the simplicity of the control volumes used in the computations, it has become important to investigate ways of extending the existing Cartesian grid solver functionalities. This includes developing methods of modeling the viscous effects in order to utilize Cartesian grids solvers for accurate drag predictions and addressing the issues related to the distributed memory parallelization of Cartesian solvers. This research presents advances in two areas of interest in Cartesian grid solvers, viscous effects modeling and MPI parallelization. The development of viscous effects modeling using solely Cartesian grids has been hampered by the widely varying control volume sizes associated with the mesh refinement and the cut cells associated with the solid surface. This problem is being addressed by using physically based modeling techniques to update the state vectors of the cut cells and removing them from the finite volume integration scheme. This work is performed on a new Cartesian grid solver, NASCART-GT, with modifications to its cut cell functionality. The development of MPI parallelization addresses issues associated with utilizing Cartesian solvers on distributed memory parallel environments. This work is performed on an existing Cartesian grid solver, CART3D, with modifications to its parallelization methodology.

  19. Applications of Lagrangian blending functions for grid generation around airplane geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Tiwari, Surendra N.; Smith, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple procedure has been developed and applied for the grid generation around an airplane geometry. This approach is based on a transfinite interpolation with Lagrangian interpolation for the blending functions. A monotonic rational quadratic spline interpolation has been employed for the grid distributions.

  20. Application of Game Theory to Improve the Defense of the Smart Grid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Requirements [28] System Situation Response Time Substation IEDs, Primary short circuit protection and control Routine power equipment signal...closer to thermal limits and beyond normal system voltage or stability limits. [38]. 17 Table 4. Percentages of Most Common SPS Types [36] Type... systems . [38] In this vision for the smart grid, Distributed Intelligent Agents provide decentralized monitoring and control of smart grid

  1. Applications of Lagrangian blending functions for grid generation around airplane geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Tiwari, Surendra N.; Smith, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    A simple procedure has been developed and applied for the grid generation around an airplane geometry. This approach is based on a transfinite interpolation with Lagrangian interpolation for the blending functions. A monotonic rational quadratic spline interpolation has been employed for the grid distributions.

  2. Application of Lagrangian blending functions for grid generation around airplane geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abolhassani, Jamshid S.; Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed and applied for the grid generation around an airplane geometry. This approach is based on a transfinite interpolation with Lagrangian interpolation for the blending functions. A monotonic rational quadratic spline interpolation was employed for the grid distributions.

  3. Patched-grid calculations with the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations: Theory and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, M. M.

    1986-01-01

    A patched-grid approach is one in which the flow region of interest is divided into subregions which are then discretized independently using existing grid generator. The equations of motion are integrated in each subregion in conjunction with patch-boundary schemes which allow proper information transfer across interfaces that separate subregions. The patched-grid approach greatly simplifies the treatment of complex geometries and also the addition of grid points to selected regions of the flow. A conservative patch-boundary condition that can be used with explicit, implicit factored and implicit relaxation schemes is described. Several example calculations that demonstrate the capabilities of the patched-grid scheme are also included.

  4. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  5. MEMS/Nanotechnology Integration for Bio-Medical Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    MEMS / Nanotechnology Integration for Bio-Medical Applications Klaus Schadow Schadow Technology 2896 Calle Heraldo San Clemente, CA 92673 E...mail: schadowkc@cox.net The integration of MEMS and nanotechnologies has resulted in new capabilities for environmental monitoring and bio-nano...applications, to identify chemical RTO-EN-AVT-129bis 9 - 1 Schadow, K. (2007) MEMS / Nanotechnology Integration for Bio-Medical Applications

  6. Application of adaptive hierarchical sparse grid collocation to the uncertainty quantification of nuclear reactor simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Yankov, A.; Downar, T.

    2013-07-01

    Recent efforts in the application of uncertainty quantification to nuclear systems have utilized methods based on generalized perturbation theory and stochastic sampling. While these methods have proven to be effective they both have major drawbacks that may impede further progress. A relatively new approach based on spectral elements for uncertainty quantification is applied in this paper to several problems in reactor simulation. Spectral methods based on collocation attempt to couple the approximation free nature of stochastic sampling methods with the determinism of generalized perturbation theory. The specific spectral method used in this paper employs both the Smolyak algorithm and adaptivity by using Newton-Cotes collocation points along with linear hat basis functions. Using this approach, a surrogate model for the outputs of a computer code is constructed hierarchically by adaptively refining the collocation grid until the interpolant is converged to a user-defined threshold. The method inherently fits into the framework of parallel computing and allows for the extraction of meaningful statistics and data that are not within reach of stochastic sampling and generalized perturbation theory. This paper aims to demonstrate the advantages of spectral methods-especially when compared to current methods used in reactor physics for uncertainty quantification-and to illustrate their full potential. (authors)

  7. Social marketing: application to medical education.

    PubMed

    David, S P; Greer, D S

    2001-01-16

    Medical education is often a frustrating endeavor, particularly when it attempts to change practice behavior. Traditional lecture-based educational methods are limited in their ability to sustain concentration and interest and to promote learner adherence to best-practice guidelines. Marketing techniques have been very effective in changing consumer behavior and physician behavior. However, the techniques of social marketing-goal identification, audience segmentation, and market research-have not been harnessed and applied to medical education. Social marketing can be applied to medical education in the effort to go beyond inoculation of learners with information and actually change behaviors. The tremendous potential of social marketing for medical education should be pilot-tested and systematically evaluated.

  8. Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible

  9. Application of Stereo-Imaging Technology to Medical Field

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. Methods We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Results Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. Conclusions The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices. PMID:23115737

  10. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  11. Advanced grid-stiffened composite shells for applications in heavy-lift helicopter rotor blade spars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nampy, Sreenivas

    Modern rotor blades are constructed using composite materials to exploit their superior structural performance compared to metals. Helicopter rotor blade spars are conventionally designed as monocoque structures. Blades of the proposed Heavy Lift Helicopter are envisioned to be as heavy as 800 lbs when designed using the monocoque spar design. A new and innovative design is proposed to replace the conventional spar designs with light weight grid-stiffened composite shell. Composite stiffened shells have been known to provide excellent strength to weight ratio and damage tolerance with an excellent potential to reduce weight. Conventional stringer--rib stiffened construction is not suitable for rotor blade spars since they are limited in generating high torsion stiffness that is required for aeroelastic stability of the rotor. As a result, off-axis (helical) stiffeners must be provided. This is a new design space where innovative modeling techniques are needed. The structural behavior of grid-stiffened structures under axial, bending, and torsion loads, typically experienced by rotor blades need to be accurately predicted. The overall objective of the present research is to develop and integrate the necessary design analysis tools to conduct a feasibility study in employing grid-stiffened shells for heavy-lift rotor blade spars. Upon evaluating the limitations in state-of-the-art analytical models in predicting the axial, bending, and torsion stiffness coefficients of grid and grid-stiffened structures, a new analytical model was developed. The new analytical model based on the smeared stiffness approach was developed employing the stiffness matrices of the constituent members of the grid structure such as an arch, helical, or straight beam representing circumferential, helical, and longitudinal stiffeners. This analysis has the capability to model various stiffening configurations such as angle-grid, ortho-grid, and general-grid. Analyses were performed using an

  12. 38 CFR 8.9 - Application and medical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Reinstatement § 8.9 Application and medical evidence. The applicant for reinstatement of National Service Life Insurance, during his or her lifetime, and within 5 years after the date... physical examination may be required. Applications for reinstatement submitted after expiration of the...

  13. 38 CFR 8.9 - Application and medical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Reinstatement § 8.9 Application and medical evidence. The applicant for reinstatement of National Service Life Insurance, during his or her lifetime, and within 5 years after the date... physical examination may be required. Applications for reinstatement submitted after expiration of the...

  14. 38 CFR 8.9 - Application and medical evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Reinstatement § 8.9 Application and medical evidence. The applicant for reinstatement of National Service Life Insurance, during his or her lifetime, and within 5 years after the date... physical examination may be required. Applications for reinstatement submitted after expiration of the...

  15. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid m...

  16. Photochemical grid model implementation and application of VOC, NOx, and O3 source apportionment

    EPA Science Inventory

    For the purposes of developing optimal emissions control strategies, efficient approaches are needed to identify the major sources or groups of sources that contribute to elevated ozone (O3) concentrations. Source-based apportionment techniques implemented in photochemical grid m...

  17. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  18. Grid management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny

    1992-01-01

    A computational environment that allows many Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) engineers to work on the same project exists in the Special Project Office (SPO). This environment enables several users to carry out the task of grid generation. The grid management system, used by the engineers, is described in a brief overview. The topics will include the grid file naming system, the grid-generation procedure, grid storage, and the grid format standard.

  19. Using CASIP to Assess Aptitudes of Medical Students and of Applicants to Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Anbar, Michael

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the use of CASIP, an authoring language for CAI materials with unrestricted natural language input, to produce brief tests that assess in an objective and standardized manner a variety of aptitudes in medical students, residents or applicants to medical school. These aptitudes include decisiveness, methodical thinking, ethical values, crisis management ability, persistence, combativeness, and ease of frustration.

  20. Application of spatially gridded temperature and land cover data sets for urban heat island analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, Kevin; Xian, George Z.

    2014-01-01

    Two gridded data sets that included (1) daily mean temperatures from 2006 through 2011 and (2) satellite-derived impervious surface area, were combined for a spatial analysis of the urban heat-island effect within the Dallas-Ft. Worth Texas region. The primary advantage of using these combined datasets included the capability to designate each 1 × 1 km grid cell of available temperature data as urban or rural based on the level of impervious surface area within the grid cell. Generally, the observed differences in urban and rural temperature increased as the impervious surface area thresholds used to define an urban grid cell were increased. This result, however, was also dependent on the size of the sample area included in the analysis. As the spatial extent of the sample area increased and included a greater number of rural defined grid cells, the observed urban and rural differences in temperature also increased. A cursory comparison of the spatially gridded temperature observations with observations from climate stations suggest that the number and location of stations included in an urban heat island analysis requires consideration to assure representative samples of each (urban and rural) environment are included in the analysis.

  1. Application of data mining to medical risk management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumoto, Shusaku; Matsuoka, Kimiko; Yokoyama, Shigeki

    2008-03-01

    This paper proposes an application of data mining to medical risk management, where data mining techniques were applied to detection, analysis and evaluation of risks potentially existing in clinical environments. We applied this technique to the following two medical domains: risk aversion of nurse incidents and infection control. The results show that data mining methods were effective to detection and aversion of risk factors.

  2. Medical Applications of Remote Electronic Browsing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Joseph

    The purposes of this study are to identify and define viable remote browsing techniques and the requirements for an interactive medical information system that would permit the use of such techniques. The main emphasis is in the areas of: (1) remote viewing of page material; and (2) remote interrogation of fact banks with question-answering…

  3. Capillary waveguide optrodes for Medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Weigl, Bernhard H.; Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-01-01

    Glass capillaries with a chemically sensitive coating on the inner surface are used as optical sensors for medical diagnostics. The capillary simultaneously serves as a sample compartment, a sensor element, and an inhomogeneous optical waveguide. Different optical setups have been investigated and compared regarding its waveguiding properties.

  4. Medical technology management: from planning to application.

    PubMed

    David, Y; Jahnke, E

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively manage their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for optimizing costs of ownership of all equipment. Clinical engineers can identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They can review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with cost accounting analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. Cost accounting analysis is a multivariate function that includes determining the amount, based upon a strategic plan and financial resources, of funding to be allocated annually for medical equipment acquisition and replacement. Often this function works closely with clinical engineering to establish equipment useful life and prioritization of acquisition, upgrade, and replacement of inventory within budget confines and without conducting time consuming, individual financial capital project evaluations.

  5. EMAAS: An extensible grid-based Rich Internet Application for microarray data analysis and management

    PubMed Central

    Barton, G; Abbott, J; Chiba, N; Huang, DW; Huang, Y; Krznaric, M; Mack-Smith, J; Saleem, A; Sherman, BT; Tiwari, B; Tomlinson, C; Aitman, T; Darlington, J; Game, L; Sternberg, MJE; Butcher, SA

    2008-01-01

    Background Microarray experimentation requires the application of complex analysis methods as well as the use of non-trivial computer technologies to manage the resultant large data sets. This, together with the proliferation of tools and techniques for microarray data analysis, makes it very challenging for a laboratory scientist to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in this field. Our aim was to develop a distributed e-support system for microarray data analysis and management. Results EMAAS (Extensible MicroArray Analysis System) is a multi-user rich internet application (RIA) providing simple, robust access to up-to-date resources for microarray data storage and analysis, combined with integrated tools to optimise real time user support and training. The system leverages the power of distributed computing to perform microarray analyses, and provides seamless access to resources located at various remote facilities. The EMAAS framework allows users to import microarray data from several sources to an underlying database, to pre-process, quality assess and analyse the data, to perform functional analyses, and to track data analysis steps, all through a single easy to use web portal. This interface offers distance support to users both in the form of video tutorials and via live screen feeds using the web conferencing tool EVO. A number of analysis packages, including R-Bioconductor and Affymetrix Power Tools have been integrated on the server side and are available programmatically through the Postgres-PLR library or on grid compute clusters. Integrated distributed resources include the functional annotation tool DAVID, GeneCards and the microarray data repositories GEO, CELSIUS and MiMiR. EMAAS currently supports analysis of Affymetrix 3' and Exon expression arrays, and the system is extensible to cater for other microarray and transcriptomic platforms. Conclusion EMAAS enables users to track and perform microarray data management and analysis tasks

  6. [Current problems of information technologies application for forces medical service].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, V V; Korneenkov, A A; Bogomolov, V D; Borisov, D N; Rezvantsev, M V

    2013-06-01

    The modern information technologies are the key factors for the upgrading of forces medical service. The aim of this article is the analysis of prospective information technologies application for the upgrading of forces medical service. The authors suggested 3 concepts of information support of Russian military health care on the basis of data about information technologies application in the foreign armed forces, analysis of the regulatory background, prospects of military-medical service and gathered experience of specialists. These three concepts are: development of united telecommunication network of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation medical service, working out and implementation of standard medical information systems for medical units and establishments, monitoring the military personnel health state and military medical service resources. It is noted that on the assumption of sufficient centralized financing and industrial implementation of the military medical service prospective information technologies, by the year 2020 the united information space of the military medical service will be created and the target information support effectiveness will be achieved.

  7. Interoperability and HealthGRID.

    PubMed

    Bescos, C; Schmitt, D; Kass, J; García-Barbero, M; Kantchev, P

    2005-01-01

    GRID technology, with initiatives like the GGF, will have the potential to allow both competition and interoperability not only among applications and toolkits, but also among implementations of key services. The pyramid of eHealth interoperability should be achieved from standards in communication and data security, storage and processing, to the policy initiatives, including organizational protocols, financing procedures, and legal framework. The open challenges for GRID use in clinical fields illustrate the potential of the combination of grid technologies with medical routine into a wider interoperable framework. The Telemedicine Alliance is a consortium (ESA, WHO and ITU), initiated in 2002, in building a vision for the provision of eHealth to European citizens by 2010. After a survey with more that 50 interviews of experts, interoperability was identified as the main showstopper to eHealth implementation. There are already several groups and organizations contributing to standardization. TM-Alliance is supporting the "e-Health Standardization Coordination Group" (eHSCG). It is now, in the design and development phase of GRID technology in Health, the right moment to act with the aim of achieving an interoperable and open framework. The Health area should benefit from the initiatives started at the GGF in terms of global architecture and services definitions, as well as from the security and other web services applications developed under the Internet umbrella. There is a risk that existing important results of the standardization efforts in this area are not taken up simply because they are not always known.

  8. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  9. Development of new scintillators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, Paul

    2016-02-01

    For a long time the discovery of new scintillators has been more serendipitous than driven by a deep understanding of the mechanisms at the origin of the scintillation process. This situation has dramatically changed since the 1990's with an increased demand for scintillators of better performance for large particle physics experiments as well as for medical imaging. It is now possible to design a scintillator for a specific purpose. The bandgap can be adjusted, the traps energy levels and their concentration can be finely tuned and their influence can be damped or on the contrary enhanced by specific doping for an optimization of the performance of the scintillator. Several examples are given in this paper of such crystal engineering attempts to improve the performance of crystal scintillators used in medical imaging devices. An attention is also given to spectacular progress in crystal production technologies, which open new perspectives for large scale and cost effective crystal production with consistent quality.

  10. Medical Engineering and Microneurosurgery: Application and Future

    PubMed Central

    MORITA, Akio; SORA, Shigeo; NAKATOMI, Hirofumi; HARADA, Kanako; SUGITA, Naohiko; SAITO, Nobuhito; MITSUISHI, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Robotics and medical engineering can convert traditional surgery into digital and scientific procedures. Here, we describe our work to develop microsurgical robotic systems and apply engineering technology to assess microsurgical skills. With the collaboration of neurosurgeons and an engineering team, we have developed two types of microsurgical robotic systems. The first, the deep surgical systems, enable delicate surgical procedures such as vessel suturing in a deep and narrow space. The second type allows for super-fine surgical procedures such as anastomosing artificial vessels of 0.3 mm in diameter. Both systems are constructed with master and slave manipulator robots connected to local area networks. Robotic systems allowed for secure and accurate procedures in a deep surgical field. In cadaveric models, these systems showed a good potential of being useful in actual human surgeries, but mechanical refinements in thickness and durability are necessary for them to be established as clinical systems. The super-fine robotic system made the very intricate surgery possible and will be applied in clinical trials. Another trial included the digitization of surgical technique and scientific analysis of surgical skills. Robotic and human hand motions were analyzed in numerical fashion as we tried to define surgical skillfulness in a digital format. Engineered skill assessment is also feasible and should be useful for microsurgical training. Robotics and medical engineering should bring science into the surgical field and training of surgeons. Active collaboration between medical and engineering teams and academic and industry groups is mandatory to establish such medical systems to improve patient care. PMID:27464471

  11. Medical Engineering and Microneurosurgery: Application and Future.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akio; Sora, Shigeo; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Harada, Kanako; Sugita, Naohiko; Saito, Nobuhito; Mitsuishi, Mamoru

    2016-10-15

    Robotics and medical engineering can convert traditional surgery into digital and scientific procedures. Here, we describe our work to develop microsurgical robotic systems and apply engineering technology to assess microsurgical skills. With the collaboration of neurosurgeons and an engineering team, we have developed two types of microsurgical robotic systems. The first, the deep surgical systems, enable delicate surgical procedures such as vessel suturing in a deep and narrow space. The second type allows for super-fine surgical procedures such as anastomosing artificial vessels of 0.3 mm in diameter. Both systems are constructed with master and slave manipulator robots connected to local area networks. Robotic systems allowed for secure and accurate procedures in a deep surgical field. In cadaveric models, these systems showed a good potential of being useful in actual human surgeries, but mechanical refinements in thickness and durability are necessary for them to be established as clinical systems. The super-fine robotic system made the very intricate surgery possible and will be applied in clinical trials. Another trial included the digitization of surgical technique and scientific analysis of surgical skills. Robotic and human hand motions were analyzed in numerical fashion as we tried to define surgical skillfulness in a digital format. Engineered skill assessment is also feasible and should be useful for microsurgical training. Robotics and medical engineering should bring science into the surgical field and training of surgeons. Active collaboration between medical and engineering teams and academic and industry groups is mandatory to establish such medical systems to improve patient care.

  12. Optical properties of plastic materials for medical vision applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanova, N. G.; Kasarova, S. N.; Nikolov, I. D.

    2012-12-01

    Several types of optical polymer materials suitable for ophthalmic or medical vision applications have been studied. We have measured refractive indices of studied plastics at various wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions. Important optical characteristics as Abbe numbers, dispersion coefficients and curves, principal and relative partial dispersion have been evaluated. Calculated refractometric data at many laser emission wavelengths used for medical surgery, therapy and diagnostics is included. As an example of a medical vision application of plastics, optical design of a micro-triplet for use in disposable endoscopes is presented.

  13. Structure overset grid method and its applications to simulation of multi-body separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, HaiRui; Fan, JingJing; Yuan, Wu; Zhang, WeiHua

    2015-09-01

    This paper proposes an automatic structure overset grid method, which utilizes the hole-surface optimization with one-step searching, wall-surface grid oversetting, and dynamic overset grid approaches to achieve the high adaptability of overset grids for complex multi-body aircrafts. Specifically, based on the automatic structure overset grids, the method first solves the coupling of Navier-Stokes (N-S) unsteady flow equation and 6DOF motion equation, and establishes the multi-body collision model. Then, the numerical simulation of unsteady flow for complex aircrafts' multi-body separation, the simulation of multi-body separating trajectory and the separation safety analysis are accomplished. Thus, the method can properly handle practical engineering problems including the wing/drop tank separation, aircraft/mount separation, and cluster bomb projection. Experiments show that our numerical results match well with experimental results, which demonstrates the effectiveness of our methods in solving the multi-body separation problem for aircrafts with complex shapes.

  14. The development of an hourly gridded rainfall product for hydrological applications in England and Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liguori, Sara; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Souvignet, Maxime; Coxon, Gemma; Freer, Jim; Woods, Ross

    2014-05-01

    This research presents a newly developed observed sub-daily gridded precipitation product for England and Wales. Importantly our analysis specifically allows a quantification of rainfall errors from grid to the catchment scale, useful for hydrological model simulation and the evaluation of prediction uncertainties. Our methodology involves the disaggregation of the current one kilometre daily gridded precipitation records available for the United Kingdom[1]. The hourly product is created using information from: 1) 2000 tipping-bucket rain gauges; and 2) the United Kingdom Met-Office weather radar network. These two independent datasets provide rainfall estimates at temporal resolutions much smaller than the current daily gridded rainfall product; thus allowing the disaggregation of the daily rainfall records to an hourly timestep. Our analysis is conducted for the period 2004 to 2008, limited by the current availability of the datasets. We analyse the uncertainty components affecting the accuracy of this product. Specifically we explore how these uncertainties vary spatially, temporally and with climatic regimes. Preliminary results indicate scope for improvement of hydrological model performance by the utilisation of this new hourly gridded rainfall product. Such product will improve our ability to diagnose and identify structural errors in hydrological modelling by including the quantification of input errors. References [1] Keller V, Young AR, Morris D, Davies H (2006) Continuous Estimation of River Flows. Technical Report: Estimation of Precipitation Inputs. in Agency E (ed.). Environmental Agency.

  15. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    PubMed Central

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  16. Grid multi-category response logistic models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuan; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Wenchao; Li, Pinghao; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-02-18

    Multi-category response models are very important complements to binary logistic models in medical decision-making. Decomposing model construction by aggregating computation developed at different sites is necessary when data cannot be moved outside institutions due to privacy or other concerns. Such decomposition makes it possible to conduct grid computing to protect the privacy of individual observations. This paper proposes two grid multi-category response models for ordinal and multinomial logistic regressions. Grid computation to test model assumptions is also developed for these two types of models. In addition, we present grid methods for goodness-of-fit assessment and for classification performance evaluation. Simulation results show that the grid models produce the same results as those obtained from corresponding centralized models, demonstrating that it is possible to build models using multi-center data without losing accuracy or transmitting observation-level data. Two real data sets are used to evaluate the performance of our proposed grid models. The grid fitting method offers a practical solution for resolving privacy and other issues caused by pooling all data in a central site. The proposed method is applicable for various likelihood estimation problems, including other generalized linear models.

  17. A self-adaptive-grid method with application to airfoil flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakahashi, K.; Deiwert, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A self-adaptive-grid method is described that is suitable for multidimensional steady and unsteady computations. Based on variational principles, a spring analogy is used to redistribute grid points in an optimal sense to reduce the overall solution error. User-specified parameters, denoting both maximum and minimum permissible grid spacings, are used to define the all-important constants, thereby minimizing the empiricism and making the method self-adaptive. Operator splitting and one-sided controls for orthogonality and smoothness are used to make the method practical, robust, and efficient. Examples are included for both steady and unsteady viscous flow computations about airfoils in two dimensions, as well as for a steady inviscid flow computation and a one-dimensional case. These examples illustrate the precise control the user has with the self-adaptive method and demonstrate a significant improvement in accuracy and quality of the solutions.

  18. [Application of HIS Hospital Management System in Medical Equipment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the effect of HIS hospital management system in medical equipment. From April 2012 to 2013 in our hospital 5 100 sets of medical equipment as the control group, another 2013 in our hospital from April 2014 may 100 sets of medical equipment as the study group, comparative analysis of two groups of medical equipment scrap rate, usage, maintenance score and the score of benefit etc. Control group and taken to hospital information system, his research group equipment scrap rate, there was a significant difference, the research group of equipment maintenance score and efficiency scores were higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05), the study group of equipment maintenance score and efficiency scores were higher than those of the control group. HIS hospital management system for medical equipment management has positive clinical application value, can effectively improve the use of medical equipment, it is worth to draw and promote.

  19. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  20. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  1. Learning and Career Specialty Preferences of Medical School Applicants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Terry D.; Witzke, Donald B.; Elam, Carol L.; Cheever, Todd R.

    2005-01-01

    The present research examined relationships among medical school applicants' preferred approaches to learning, methods of instruction, and specialty areas (n=912). Based on confidential responses to a progressive series of paired comparisons, applicants' preferences for lecture (L), self-study (SS), group discussion (GD), and computers (C) were…

  2. Residency Applicants Misinterpret Their United States Medical Licensing Exam Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Roger C.; Desbiens, Norman A.

    2009-01-01

    Proper interpretation of the results of the United States Medical Licensing Exam (USMLE) is important for program directors, residents, and faculty who advise applicants about applying for residency positions. We suspected that applicants often misinterpreted their performance in relationship to others who took the same examination. In 2005, 54…

  3. Learning and Career Specialty Preferences of Medical School Applicants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Terry D.; Witzke, Donald B.; Elam, Carol L.; Cheever, Todd R.

    2005-01-01

    The present research examined relationships among medical school applicants' preferred approaches to learning, methods of instruction, and specialty areas (n=912). Based on confidential responses to a progressive series of paired comparisons, applicants' preferences for lecture (L), self-study (SS), group discussion (GD), and computers (C) were…

  4. Application of a Scalable, Parallel, Unstructured-Grid-Based Navier-Stokes Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, Paresh

    2001-01-01

    A parallel version of an unstructured-grid based Navier-Stokes solver, USM3Dns, previously developed for efficient operation on a variety of parallel computers, has been enhanced to incorporate upgrades made to the serial version. The resultant parallel code has been extensively tested on a variety of problems of aerospace interest and on two sets of parallel computers to understand and document its characteristics. An innovative grid renumbering construct and use of non-blocking communication are shown to produce superlinear computing performance. Preliminary results from parallelization of a recently introduced "porous surface" boundary condition are also presented.

  5. CAVASS: a framework for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George; Udupa, Jayaram; Odhner, Dewey

    2009-10-01

    Computer Aided Visualization and Analysis Software System (CAVASS) is an open-source software system that is being developed by the Medical Image Processing Group (MIPG) at the University of Pennsylvania. CAVASS is freely available, open source, integrated with popular toolkits, and runs on Windows, Unix, Linux, and Mac OS. It includes extremely efficient of the most commonly used image display, manipulation, and processing operations. Parallel implementations of computationally demanding tasks such as deformable registration are provided as well using the inexpensive COW (Cluster of Workstations) model. CAVASS also seamlessly integrates and interfaces with ITK and provides a graphical user interface for ITK as well. CAVASS can easily interface with a PACS by directly reading and writing medical images in the industry standard DICOM format and can also input and output other common image formats as well. We describe the key features, general software architecture, interface with ITK, parallel architecture, and the CAVASS build and test environment. New stereo rendering capabilities are described as well.

  6. Application of computerized adaptive testing in medical education.

    PubMed

    Huh, Sun

    2009-06-01

    Application of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) in medical education is still spare in the high stakes examination or in the school-based examination. In the medical school in Belgium, CAT was used for an assessment tool in general practice as pilot test was reported. In Hallym University, CAT has been introduced in the evaluation of the students' performance as in-course general evaluation test and parasitology test. Another examples of application of CAT for high stakes examination are Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination - Part 1 in Canada and National Council Licensure EXamination - Registered Nurse in USA. CAT has some merits such as accurate estimation of the ability parameters of the examinees and the shorter period of examination. To apply the CAT in medical education more actively, medical teachers should have an interest in the modern measurement theories such as item response theory and technologies. It is still uncertain if CAT may be prosperous in the medical education as a tool for the measurement of the examinees' ability. However, we should prepare the era of application of CAT in high stakes examination such as medical licensing examination.

  7. Safe Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Edward T.; Stewart, Helen; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The biggest users of GRID technologies came from the science and technology communities. These consist of government, industry and academia (national and international). The NASA GRID is moving into a higher technology readiness level (TRL) today; and as a joint effort among these leaders within government, academia, and industry, the NASA GRID plans to extend availability to enable scientists and engineers across these geographical boundaries collaborate to solve important problems facing the world in the 21 st century. In order to enable NASA programs and missions to use IPG resources for program and mission design, the IPG capabilities needs to be accessible from inside the NASA center networks. However, because different NASA centers maintain different security domains, the GRID penetration across different firewalls is a concern for center security people. This is the reason why some IPG resources are been separated from the NASA center network. Also, because of the center network security and ITAR concerns, the NASA IPG resource owner may not have full control over who can access remotely from outside the NASA center. In order to obtain organizational approval for secured remote access, the IPG infrastructure needs to be adapted to work with the NASA business process. Improvements need to be made before the IPG can be used for NASA program and mission development. The Secured Advanced Federated Environment (SAFE) technology is designed to provide federated security across NASA center and NASA partner's security domains. Instead of one giant center firewall which can be difficult to modify for different GRID applications, the SAFE "micro security domain" provide large number of professionally managed "micro firewalls" that can allow NASA centers to accept remote IPG access without the worry of damaging other center resources. The SAFE policy-driven capability-based federated security mechanism can enable joint organizational and resource owner approved remote

  8. Development of NO Generator for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namihira, Takao; Wang, Douyan; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Okamoto, Kazufumi

    Since NO was identified as effective in treatments involving endothelium-derived relaxing factor in 1987, inhalation of NO (iNO) has been widely used in the medical treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury, high blood pressure, and other related illnesses. Current iNO systems usually include a gas cylinder of N2 with a high concentration of NO. This system has an inherent risk of generating nitric dioxide (NO2) if leaked NO mixes with air. NO2 is thought to be toxic to the lungs. Therefore, a system that does not include storage of NO is very desirable for administering iNO. In this paper, Prototype of On-site NO generator, which includes a discharge reactor, a NO2-NO catalyst, a charcoal and a particle filter, is developed for animal experiments.

  9. Grid computing in image analysis.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Klaus; Görtler, Jürgen; Borkenfeld, Stephan; Kayser, Gian

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic surgical pathology or tissue–based diagnosis still remains the most reliable and specific diagnostic medical procedure. The development of whole slide scanners permits the creation of virtual slides and to work on so-called virtual microscopes. In addition to interactive work on virtual slides approaches have been reported that introduce automated virtual microscopy, which is composed of several tools focusing on quite different tasks. These include evaluation of image quality and image standardization, analysis of potential useful thresholds for object detection and identification (segmentation), dynamic segmentation procedures, adjustable magnification to optimize feature extraction, and texture analysis including image transformation and evaluation of elementary primitives. Grid technology seems to possess all features to efficiently target and control the specific tasks of image information and detection in order to obtain a detailed and accurate diagnosis. Grid technology is based upon so-called nodes that are linked together and share certain communication rules in using open standards. Their number and functionality can vary according to the needs of a specific user at a given point in time. When implementing automated virtual microscopy with Grid technology, all of the five different Grid functions have to be taken into account, namely 1) computation services, 2) data services, 3) application services, 4) information services, and 5) knowledge services. Although all mandatory tools of automated virtual microscopy can be implemented in a closed or standardized open system, Grid technology offers a new dimension to acquire, detect, classify, and distribute medical image information, and to assure quality in tissue–based diagnosis.

  10. Effective Grid Utilization: A Technical Assessment and Application Guide; April 2011 - September 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Balser, S.; Sankar, S.; Miller, R.; Rawlins, A.; Israel, M.; Curry, T.; Mason, T.

    2012-09-01

    In order to more fully integrate renewable resources, such as wind and solar, into the transmission system, additional capacity must be realized in the short term using the installed transmission capacity that exists today. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Transmission and Grid Integration Group supported this study to assemble the history of regulations and status of transmission technology to expand existing grid capacity. This report compiles data on various transmission technology methods and upgrades for increased capacity utilization of the existing transmission system and transmission corridors. The report discusses the technical merit of each method and explains how the method could be applied within the current regulatory structure to increase existing transmission conductor and/or corridor capacity. The history and current state of alternatives to new construction is presented for regulators, legislators, and other policy makers wrestling with issues surrounding integration of variable generation. Current regulations are assessed for opportunities to change them to promote grid expansion. To support consideration of these alternatives for expanding grid capacity, the report lists relevant rules, standards, and policy changes.

  11. FEASIBILITY OF A HOLLOW-CATHODE NEGATIVE-GRID TUBE FOR VHF-UHF APPLICATIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Included in this final report is the study of slotted hollow cathodes. Relationship to spacings, temperature, and grid structures are reported. D.C...as well as pulse, tests and noise measurements are shown. The performance of a microwave triode containing a hollow cathode is compared with a

  12. Development and deployment of a Desktop and Mobile application on grid for GPS studie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntumba, Patient; Lotoy, Vianney; Djungu, Saint Jean; Fleury, Rolland; Petitdidier, Monique; Gemünd, André; Schwichtenberg, Horst

    2013-04-01

    GPS networks for scientific studies are developed all other the world and large databases, regularly updated, like IGS are also available. Many GPS have been installed in West and Central Africa during AMMA (African Monsoon Multiplidisciplinary Analysis), IHY (International heliophysical Year)and many other projects since 2005. African scientists have been educated to use those data especially for meteorological and ionospheric studies. The annual variations of ionospheric parameters for a given station or map of a given region are very intensive computing. Then grid or cloud computing may be a solution to obtain results in a relatively short time. Real time At the University of Kinshasa the chosen solution is a grid of several PCs. It has been deployed by using Globus Toolkit on a Condor pool in order to support the processing of GPS data for ionospheric studies. To be user-friendly, graphical user interfaces(GUI) have been developed to help the user to prepare and submit jobs. One is a java GUI for desktop client, the other is an Android GUI for mobile client. The interest of a grid is the possibility to send a bunch of jobs with an adequate agent control in order to survey the job execution and result storage. After the feasibility study the grid will be extended to a larger number of PCs. Other solutions will be in parallel explored.

  13. Reliability Investigation of Ball Grid Array Assemblies for Space Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, D. K.; Walton, S.

    1997-01-01

    JPL, in a partnership with an industrial consortium, is currently engaged in the investigation of reliability and quality issues if ball grid array (BGA) packages as they may be applied to space flight electronics. Performing tests to determine the solder joint reliability of assemblies using BGAs under temperature cycling has proved to be a real challenge for test engineers.

  14. Requirements for dry hard copy in medical diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Langhe, Dirk; De Clerck, Marc; Tytgat, Bart; McLain, Jim; Defieuw, Geert; Verdonck, Emiel

    1996-03-01

    Today, dry process and color printers are more and more common in medical applications. The main applications for these printers are in ultrasound, nuclear medicine, medical imaging workstations and endoscopy. Each of these disciplines has its specific application requirements. Image quality and other considerations with regard to medical applications are discussed. Although the emphasis in medical imaging lies within grayscale imaging, the increased use of techniques such as doppler imaging, power doppler in ultrasound and image processing with workstations, intensify the need for high quality color output on hardcopy. For the radiology department, hardcopy must be of diagnostic quality and suitable for light box viewing. The different criteria to meet these requirements such as resolution, noise, density and physical properties are discussed. Also a short description of the implementation in the Agfa DRYSTAR 2000TM printer and its consumables will be explained. The achieved quality level will be supported by measurements. Starting from specific image processing for grayscale imaging (such as Look Up Tables) and specific imaging processing for color imaging, a new dedicated image processing method for medical dry hard copy will be presented. Both optimal grayscale imaging and color imaging combined are needed in ultrasound. In relation to this item, some non resolved issues will be explained. As a conclusion, a brief presentation of a hospital application test, validating the system for diagnostic purposes is given.

  15. Nanomedicine: application of nanobiotechnology in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Jain, K K

    2008-01-01

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanobiotechnologies to medicine. This article starts with the basics of nanobiotechnology, followed by its applications in molecular diagnostics, nanodiagnostics, and improvements in the discovery, design and delivery of drugs, including nanopharmaceuticals. It will improve biological therapies such as vaccination, cell therapy and gene therapy. Nanobiotechnology forms the basis of many new devices being developed for medicine and surgery such as nanorobots. It has applications in practically every branch of medicine and examples are presented of those concerning cancer (nanooncology), neurological disorders (nanoneurology), cardiovascular disorders (nanocardiology), diseases of bones and joints (nanoorthopedics), diseases of the eye (nanoophthalmology), and infectious diseases. Safety issues of in vivo use of nanomaterials are also discussed. Nanobiotechnology will facilitate the integration of diagnostics with therapeutics and facilitate the development of personalized medicine, i.e. prescription of specific therapeutics best suited for an individual. Many of the developments have already started and within a decade a definite impact will be felt in the practice of medicine. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The Computing and Data Grid Approach: Infrastructure for Distributed Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, William E.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of Grids - infrastructure for using and managing widely distributed computing and data resources in the science environment - there is now an opportunity to provide a standard, large-scale, computing, data, instrument, and collaboration environment for science that spans many different projects and provides the required infrastructure and services in a relatively uniform and supportable way. Grid technology has evolved over the past several years to provide the services and infrastructure needed for building 'virtual' systems and organizations. We argue that Grid technology provides an excellent basis for the creation of the integrated environments that can combine the resources needed to support the large- scale science projects located at multiple laboratories and universities. We present some science case studies that indicate that a paradigm shift in the process of science will come about as a result of Grids providing transparent and secure access to advanced and integrated information and technologies infrastructure: powerful computing systems, large-scale data archives, scientific instruments, and collaboration tools. These changes will be in the form of services that can be integrated with the user's work environment, and that enable uniform and highly capable access to these computers, data, and instruments, regardless of the location or exact nature of these resources. These services will integrate transient-use resources like computing systems, scientific instruments, and data caches (e.g., as they are needed to perform a simulation or analyze data from a single experiment); persistent-use resources. such as databases, data catalogues, and archives, and; collaborators, whose involvement will continue for the lifetime of a project or longer. While we largely address large-scale science in this paper, Grids, particularly when combined with Web Services, will address a broad spectrum of science scenarios. both large and small scale.

  17. Efficient grid generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, Bill

    1989-01-01

    The application of a new efficient grid generation method in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. After 100 iterations, final grids were produced in about 110 seconds using a VAX 8650 computer in a time-shared mode. Using a SUN 3/50 workstation, a similar version of the program completed 100 iterations in about 15 minutes.

  18. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels. PMID:27877320

  19. Anticholinesterases: Medical applications of neurochemical principles

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, C.B.; Broomfield, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Cholinesterases form a family of serine esterases that arise in animals from at least two distinct genes. Multiple forms of these enzymes can be precisely localized and regulated by alternative mRNA splicing and by co- or posttranslational modifications. The high catalytic efficiency of the cholinesterases is quelled by certain very selective reversible and irreversible inhibitors. Owing largely to the important role of acetylcholine hydrolysis in neurotransmission, cholinesterase and its inhibitors have been studied extensively in vivo. In parallel, there has emerged an equally impressive enzyme chemistry literature. Cholinesterase inhibitors are used widely as pesticides; in this regard the compounds are beneficial with concomitant health risks. Poisoning by such compounds can result in an acute but usually manageable medical crisis and may damage the ONS and the PNS, as well as cardiac and skeletal muscle tissue. Some inhibitors have been useful for the treatment of glaucoma and myasthenia gravis, and others are in clinical trials as therapy for Alzheimer`s dementia. Concurrently, the most potent inhibitors have been developed as highly toxic chemical warfare agents. We review treatments and sequelae of exposure to selected anticholinesterases, especially organophosphorus compounds and carbamates, as they relate to recent progress in enzyme chemistry.

  20. Wireless power transmission for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Josh; Song, Kyo D.; Yang, Sang Y.; Kim, Jaehwan; Park, Yeonjoon; Choi, Sang H.

    2009-03-01

    We studied the wireless power transmission capabilities of microwave through human skin-tissue. Microwave transmission through simulated human skins was tested with rectenna array as a power receiver located under the simulated human skin tissue. Most of transplanted medical devices and sensors require power to operate autonomously but currently by imbedded battery. Wireless power transmission alleviates the needs of imbedded power source and hard-wire power network. We used human skin-like materials, such as various polyurethanes and pork skin, under X-band microwave exposure. Transmission rate through various polyurethanes under the threshold limit value (TLV) and dielectric constant was measured in this experiment. It is also critical to measure specific absorption rates (SAR) of polyurethanes and transmission rates through polyurethanes as well as pork skin. This paper presents power transmission rates under varying thickness of polyurethanes, and effectiveness and efficiency of rectennas under the TLV of microwave power. In addition, we will discuss milimeter wave thermograph and hazards the absorption characteristics of human skin under 8-13 GHz using the results of polyurethanes and pork skin.

  1. Energy sources and their development for application in medical devices.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Phee, Louis Soo Jay

    2010-09-01

    Electronic medical devices have become an indispensable part of modern healthcare. Currently, a wide variety of electronic medical devices are being used to monitor physiological parameters of the body, perform therapy and supplement or even entirely replace complex biological functions. Cardiac pacemakers, cardioverter-defibrillators and cochlear implants are a few examples of such medical devices. Proper functionality of these devices relies heavily on the continuous supply of a sufficient amount of electricity to them. In this sense, a reliable, safe and convenient method for the provision of energy is very crucial. Various approaches have been developed to fulfil the divergent and challenging energy requirements of medical devices. In this article, we present a brief overview of the energy requirements of medical devices and review the existing and emerging energy sources for application in these devices, particularly wearable and implantable devices.

  2. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema

    Tijana Rajh

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  3. Nanosilver particles in medical applications: synthesis, performance, and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Jun; Li, Xiaojian; Xing, Malcolm MQ

    2014-01-01

    Nanosilver particles (NSPs), are among the most attractive nanomaterials, and have been widely used in a range of biomedical applications, including diagnosis, treatment, drug delivery, medical device coating, and for personal health care. With the increasing application of NSPs in medical contexts, it is becoming necessary for a better understanding of the mechanisms of NSPs’ biological interactions and their potential toxicity. In this review, we first introduce the synthesis routes of NSPs, including physical, chemical, and biological or green synthesis. Then the unique physiochemical properties of NSPs, such as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory activity, are discussed in detail. Further, some recent applications of NSPs in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in medical fields are described. Finally, potential toxicology considerations of NSPs, both in vitro and in vivo, are also addressed. PMID:24876773

  4. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Tijana Rajh

    2009-10-14

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  5. Present and future medical applications of microbial exopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Moscovici, Misu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) have found outstanding medical applications since the mid-20th century, with the first clinical trials on dextran solutions as plasma expanders. Other EPS entered medicine firstly as conventional pharmaceutical excipients (e.g., xanthan – as suspension stabilizer, or pullulan – in capsules and oral care products). Polysaccharides, initially obtained from plant or animal sources, became easily available for a wide range of applications, especially when they were commercially produced by microbial fermentation. Alginates are used as anti-reflux, dental impressions, or as matrix for tablets. Hyaluronic acid and derivatives are used in surgery, arthritis treatment, or wound healing. Bacterial cellulose is applied in wound dressings or scaffolds for tissue engineering. The development of drug controlled-release systems and of micro- and nanoparticulated ones, has opened a new era of medical applications for biopolymers. EPS and their derivatives are well-suited potentially non-toxic, biodegradable drug carriers. Such systems concern rating and targeting of controlled release. Their large area of applications is explained by the available manifold series of derivatives, whose useful properties can be thereby controlled. From matrix inclusion to conjugates, different systems have been designed to solubilize, and to assure stable transport in the body, target accumulation and variable rate-release of a drug substance. From controlled drug delivery, EPS potential applications expanded to vaccine adjuvants and diagnostic imaging systems. Other potential applications are related to the bioactive (immunomodulator, antitumor, antiviral) characteristics of EPS. The numerous potential applications still wait to be developed into commercial pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Based on previous and recent results in important medical-pharmaceutical domains, one can undoubtedly state that EPS medical applications have a broad future ahead

  6. Present and future medical applications of microbial exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Moscovici, Misu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial exopolysaccharides (EPS) have found outstanding medical applications since the mid-20th century, with the first clinical trials on dextran solutions as plasma expanders. Other EPS entered medicine firstly as conventional pharmaceutical excipients (e.g., xanthan - as suspension stabilizer, or pullulan - in capsules and oral care products). Polysaccharides, initially obtained from plant or animal sources, became easily available for a wide range of applications, especially when they were commercially produced by microbial fermentation. Alginates are used as anti-reflux, dental impressions, or as matrix for tablets. Hyaluronic acid and derivatives are used in surgery, arthritis treatment, or wound healing. Bacterial cellulose is applied in wound dressings or scaffolds for tissue engineering. The development of drug controlled-release systems and of micro- and nanoparticulated ones, has opened a new era of medical applications for biopolymers. EPS and their derivatives are well-suited potentially non-toxic, biodegradable drug carriers. Such systems concern rating and targeting of controlled release. Their large area of applications is explained by the available manifold series of derivatives, whose useful properties can be thereby controlled. From matrix inclusion to conjugates, different systems have been designed to solubilize, and to assure stable transport in the body, target accumulation and variable rate-release of a drug substance. From controlled drug delivery, EPS potential applications expanded to vaccine adjuvants and diagnostic imaging systems. Other potential applications are related to the bioactive (immunomodulator, antitumor, antiviral) characteristics of EPS. The numerous potential applications still wait to be developed into commercial pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Based on previous and recent results in important medical-pharmaceutical domains, one can undoubtedly state that EPS medical applications have a broad future ahead.

  7. A new interpolation method for gridded extensive variables with application in Lagrangian transport and dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hittmeir, Sabine; Philipp, Anne; Seibert, Petra

    2017-04-01

    In discretised form, an extensive variable usually represents an integral over a 3-dimensional (x,y,z) grid cell. In the case of vertical fluxes, gridded values represent integrals over a horizontal (x,y) grid face. In meteorological models, fluxes (precipitation, turbulent fluxes, etc.) are usually written out as temporally integrated values, thus effectively forming 3D (x,y,t) integrals. Lagrangian transport models require interpolation of all relevant variables towards the location in 4D space of each of the computational particles. Trivial interpolation algorithms usually implicitly assume the integral value to be a point value valid at the grid centre. If the integral value would be reconstructed from the interpolated point values, it would in general not be correct. If nonlinear interpolation methods are used, non-negativity cannot easily be ensured. This problem became obvious with respect to the interpolation of precipitation for the calculation of wet deposition FLEXPART (http://flexpart.eu) which uses ECMWF model output or other gridded input data. The presently implemented method consists of a special preprocessing in the input preparation software and subsequent linear interpolation in the model. The interpolated values are positive but the criterion of cell-wise conservation of the integral property is violated; it is also not very accurate as it smoothes the field. A new interpolation algorithm was developed which introduces additional supporting grid points in each time interval with linear interpolation to be applied in FLEXPART later between them. It preserves the integral precipitation in each time interval, guarantees the continuity of the time series, and maintains non-negativity. The function values of the remapping algorithm at these subgrid points constitute the degrees of freedom which can be prescribed in various ways. Combining the advantages of different approaches leads to a final algorithm respecting all the required conditions. To

  8. Structural and electrical properties of Ag grid/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrene sulfonate) coatings for diode application through advanced printing technology.

    PubMed

    Duraisamy, Navaneethan; Ponniah, Ganeshthangaraj; Jo, Jeongdai; Choi, Kyung-Hyun

    2013-08-01

    This paper is focused on printed techniques for the fabrication of hybrid structure of silver (Ag) grid/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): Poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) on polyethylene terepthalate (PET) as a flexible substrate. Ag grid has been printed on PET substrate by using gravure offset printing process, followed by PEDOT:PSS thin film deposition on Ag grid through electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) technique. The important parameters for achieving uniform hybrid structure of Ag grid/PEDOT:PSS through printed techniques have been clearly discussed. Field emission scanning electron microscope studies revealed the uniformity of printed Ag grid with homogeneous deposition of PEDOT:PSS on Ag grid. The optical properties of Ag grid/PEDOT:PSS were measured by UV-visible spectroscopy, which showed nearly 80-82% of transparency in the visible region and it was nearly same as PEDOT:PSS thin film on PET substrate. Current-voltage (I-V) analysis of fabricated hybrid device by using printed Ag grid/PEDOT:PSS as a bottom electrode showed good rectifying behavior with possible interfacial mechanisms. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) analysis was carried over different frequencies. These results suggest that fabrication of hybrid structure through printed techniques will play a significant role in mass production of printed electronic devices for commercial application by using flexible substrate.

  9. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Erli, Hans J; Marx, Rudolf; Paar, Othmar; Niethard, Fritz U; Weber, Michael; Wirtz, Dieter C

    2003-01-01

    Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties) usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m). This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body. PMID:14561228

  10. Near ultraviolet-visible radial wire grid polarizer for tight focusing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, Katsiaryna; Costa Assafrao, Alberto da; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul

    2015-10-01

    A circular wire grid polarizer (WGP) as a device to produce high quality radially polarized light at near UV wavelength range (in particular at the wavelength of λ=405 nm) is presented starting from design modeling followed by fabrication and performance analysis. The wire grid consists of concentric subwavelength metallic cylinders covering a high quality glass substrate and fabricated using an electron beam pattern generator and etching techniques. The theoretical modeling using the rigorous finite-element method and measurements of the transmitted light through the mask have been evaluated. An analysis on adjustments of the geometry of the WGP to produce the optimum focused spot of the longitudinal component of the electric field, its implementation, and qualitative testing are also presented.

  11. Application of multi-grid method on the simulation of incremental forging processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Khaled, Mahmoud; Fourment, Lionel

    2016-10-01

    Numerical simulation becomes essential in manufacturing large part by incremental forging processes. It is a splendid tool allowing to show physical phenomena however behind the scenes, an expensive bill should be paid, that is the computational time. That is why many techniques are developed to decrease the computational time of numerical simulation. Multi-Grid method is a numerical procedure that permits to reduce computational time of numerical calculation by performing the resolution of the system of equations on several mesh of decreasing size which allows to smooth faster the low frequency of the solution as well as its high frequency. In this paper a Multi-Grid method is applied to cogging process in the software Forge 3. The study is carried out using increasing number of degrees of freedom. The results shows that calculation time is divide by two for a mesh of 39,000 nodes. The method is promising especially if coupled with Multi-Mesh method.

  12. The QUANTGRID Project (RO)—Quantum Security in GRID Computing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dima, M.; Dulea, M.; Petre, M.; Petre, C.; Mitrica, B.; Stoica, M.; Udrea, M.; Sterian, R.; Sterian, P.

    2010-01-01

    The QUANTGRID Project, financed through the National Center for Programme Management (CNMP-Romania), is the first attempt at using Quantum Crypted Communications (QCC) in large scale operations, such as GRID Computing, and conceivably in the years ahead in the banking sector and other security tight communications. In relation with the GRID activities of the Center for Computing & Communications (Nat.'l Inst. Nucl. Phys.—IFIN-HH), the Quantum Optics Lab. (Nat.'l Inst. Plasma and Lasers—INFLPR) and the Physics Dept. (University Polytechnica—UPB) the project will build a demonstrator infrastructure for this technology. The status of the project in its incipient phase is reported, featuring tests for communications in classical security mode: socket level communications under AES (Advanced Encryption Std.), both proprietary code in C++ technology. An outline of the planned undertaking of the project is communicated, highlighting its impact in quantum physics, coherent optics and information technology.

  13. Experiences with the application of the ADIC automatic differentiation tool for to the CSCMDO 3-D volume grid generation code

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Mauer, A.; Jones, W.T.

    1995-12-31

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is a methodology for developing reliable sensitivity-enhanced versions of arbitrary computer programs with little human effort. It can vastly accelerate the use of advanced simulation codes in multidisciplinary design optimization, since the time for generating and verifying derivative codes is greatly reduced. In this paper, we report on the application of the recently developed ADIC automatic differentiation tool for ANSI C programs to the CSCMDO multiblock three-dimensional volume grid generator. The ADIC-generated code can easily be interfaced with Fortran derivative codes generated with the ADIFOR AD tool FORTRAN 77 programs, thus providing efficient sensitivity-enhancement techniques for multilanguage, multidiscipline problems.

  14. The development and application of the self-adaptive grid code, SAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, Carol B.

    1993-01-01

    The multidimensional self-adaptive grid code, SAGE, has proven to be a flexible and useful tool in the solution of complex flow problems. Both 2- and 3-D examples given in this report show the code to be reliable and to substantially improve flowfield solutions. Since the adaptive procedure is a marching scheme the code is extremely fast and uses insignificant CPU time compared to the corresponding flow solver. The SAGE program is also machine and flow solver independent. Significant effort was made to simplify user interaction, though some parameters still need to be chosen with care. It is also difficult to tell when the adaption process has provided its best possible solution. This is particularly true if no experimental data are available or if there is a lack of theoretical understanding of the flow. Another difficulty occurs if local features are important but missing in the original grid; the adaption to this solution will not result in any improvement, and only grid refinement can result in an improved solution. These are complex issues that need to be explored within the context of each specific problem.

  15. Recovery Act - Demonstration of Sodium Ion Battery for Grid Level Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, Ted; Whitacre, Jay; Weber, Eric; Eshoo, Michael; Noland, James; Blackwood, David; Campbell, Williams; Sheen, Eric; Spears, Christopher; Smith, Christopher

    2012-08-31

    Aquion Energy received a $5.179 million cooperative research agreement under the Department of Energy's Smart Grid Demonstration Program Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies (Program Area 2.5) of FOA DE-FOE-0000036. The main objective of this project was to demonstrate Aquion's low cost, grid-scale, ambient temperature sodium ion energy storage device. The centerpiece of the technology is a novel hybrid energy storage chemistry that has been proven in a laboratory environment. The objective was to translate these groundbreaking results from the small-batch, small-cell test environment to the pilot scale to enable significant numbers of multiple ampere-hour cells to be manufactured and assembled into test batteries. Aquion developed a proof of concept demonstration unit that showed similar performance and major cost improvement over existing technologies. Beyond minimizing cell and system cost, Aquion built a technology that is safe, environmentally benign and durable over many thousands of cycles as used in a variety of grid support roles.

  16. Micro- and nanoparticles--medical applications.

    PubMed

    Jătariu, Anca; Peptu, Cătălina; Popa, M; Indrei, Anca

    2009-01-01

    It is a long-standing need of the pharmaceutical industry, physicians, and patients to improve pharmaceutical formulations by establishing simpler, less expensive preparations and treatments, while reducing toxicity. This need can be met with the know-how of drug delivery science that has already made advance developments in improved delivery of injectibles, oral formulations, drug device implants, as well as topical and transdermal delivery formulations, especially in the case of drug delivery to the brain, an untouchable region by traditional drug delivery systems. The reason behind the failure of conventional delivery systems in reaching the brain is the blood brain barrier (BBB) composed of tight tissues making it impervious to outside agents. Nanotechnology has the potential to address and resolve this challenge and make brain a reachable target for drug delivery systems, by combining unique elements of size, surface activity and charge of nanostructures. Micro and nanoparticles have opened up unexpected ways in diagnostics and therapeutics in medicine. The previous treatment strategies in the fields of autoimmune diseases and cancer involved non-targeted treatment options with extensive "collateral damage." Nanodelivery of drugs is predicted to reduce this collateral damage, extend the drug's availability and effectiveness at the site, and reduce toxicity and cost with a high pay-off load. In this review we present the role of micro and nanoparticles in drug delivery and some applications in the health care fields.

  17. Exploiting for medical and biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giano, Michael C.

    Biotherapeutics are an emerging class of drug composed of molecules ranging in sizes from peptides to large proteins. Due to their poor stability and mucosal membrane permeability, biotherapeutics are administered by a parenteral method (i.e., syringe, intravenous or intramuscular). Therapeutics delivered systemically often experience short half-lives. While, local administration may involve invasive surgical procedures and suffer from poor retention at the site of application. To compensate, the patient receives frequent doses of highly concentrated therapeutic. Unfortunately, the off-target side effects and discomfort associated with multiple injections results in poor patient compliance. Therefore, new delivery methods which can improve therapeutic retention, reduce the frequency of administration and may aid in decreasing the off-target side effects is a necessity. Hydrogels are a class of biomaterials that are gaining interests for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Hydrogel materials are defined as porous, 3-dimensional networks that are primarily composed of water. Generally, they are mechanically rigid, cytocompatible and easily chemically functionalized. Collectively, these properties make hydrogels fantastic candidates to perform as drug delivery depots. Current hydrogel delivery systems physically entrap the target therapeutic which is then subsequently released over time at the site of administration. The swelling and degradation of the material effect the diffusion of the therapy from the hydrogel, and therefore should be controlled. Although these strategies provide some regulation over therapeutic release, full control of the delivery is not achieved. Newer approaches are focused on designing hydrogels that exploit known interactions, covalently attach the therapy or respond to an external stimulus in an effort to gain improved control over the therapy's release. Unfortunately, the biotherapeutic is typically required to be chemically

  18. Nanoporous hard carbon membranes for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Roger J; Jin, Chunming; Menegazzo, Nicola; Mizaikoff, Boris; Gerhardt, Rosario A; Andara, Melanie; Agarwal, Arvind; Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Lin, Shing-Jong; Su, Yea-Yang

    2007-01-01

    Current blood glucose sensors have proven to be inadequate for long term in vivo applications; membrane biofouling and inflammation play significant roles in sensor instability. An ideal biosensor membrane material must prevent protein adsorption and promote integration of the sensor with the surrounding tissue. Furthermore, biosensor membranes must be sufficiently thin and porous in order to allow the sensor to rapidly respond to fluctuations in analyte concentration. In this study, the use of diamondlike carbon-coated anodized aluminum oxide as a potential biosensor membrane is discussed. Diamondlike carbon films and diamondlike carbon-coated anodized aluminum oxide nanoporous membranes were examined using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and platelet rich plasma testing. The diamondlike carbon-coated anodized aluminum oxide membranes remained free from protein adsorption during in vitro platelet rich plasma testing. We anticipate that this novel membrane could find use in immunoisolation devices, pacemakers, kidney dialysis membranes, microdialysis systems, and other devices facing biocompatibility issues that limit in vivo function.

  19. Wire-grid electromagnetic modelling of metallic cylindrical objects with arbitrary section, for Ground Penetrating Radar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2014-05-01

    Authors demonstrated that the well-known same-area criterion yields affordable results but is quite far from being the optimum: better results can be obtained with a wire radius shorter than what is suggested by the rule. In utility detection, quality controls of reinforced concrete, and other civil-engineering applications, many sought targets are long and thin: in these cases, two-dimensional scattering methods can be employed for the electromagnetic modelling of scenarios. In the present work, the freeware tool GPRMAX2D [6], implementing the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method, is used to implement the wire-grid modelling of buried two-dimensional objects. The source is a line of current, with Ricker waveform. Results obtained in [5] are confirmed in the time domain and for different geometries. The highest accuracy is obtained by shortening the radius of about 10%. It seems that fewer (and larger) wires need minor shortening; however, more detailed investigations are required. We suggest to use at least 8 - 10 wires per wavelength if the field scattered by the structure has to be evaluated. The internal field is much more sensitive to the modelling configuration than the external one, and more wires should be employed when shielding effects are concerned. We plan to conduct a more comprehensive analysis, in order to extract guidelines for wire sizing, to be validated on different shapes. We also look forward to verifying the possibility of using the wire-grid modelling method for the simulation of slotted objects. This work is a contribution to COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar". The Authors thanks COST for funding COST Action TU1208. References [1] J.H. Richmond, A wire grid model for scattering by conducting bodies, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagation AP-14 (1966), pp. 782-786. [2] S.M. Rao, D.R. Wilton, A.W. Glisson, Electromagnetic scattering by surfaces of arbitrary shape, IEEE Trans. Antennas Propagation AP-30 (1982

  20. Grid Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pointwise Inc.'s, Gridgen Software is a system for the generation of 3D (three dimensional) multiple block, structured grids. Gridgen is a visually-oriented, graphics-based interactive code used to decompose a 3D domain into blocks, distribute grid points on curves, initialize and refine grid points on surfaces and initialize volume grid points. Gridgen is available to U.S. citizens and American-owned companies by license.

  1. Medical applications studies at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.; Lang, C.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Negoita, F.; Zamfir, V.

    2011-05-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in (γ, γ) photoexcitation reactions or (γ, xn+yp) photonuclear reactions for the examples of 195mPt,117mSn and 44Ti with high flux [(1013 - 1015)γ/s], small beam diameter and small energy band width (ΔE/E ~ 10-3 - 10-4) γ beams. In order to realize an optimum γ-focal spot, a refractive γ-lens consisting of a stack of many concave micro-lenses will be used. It allows for the production of a high specific activity and the use of enriched isotopes. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow γ beam, the energy deposition in the target can be reduced by using a stack of thin target wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton electrons and e+e- pairs. The well-defined initial excitation energy of the compound nucleus leads to a small number of reaction channels and enables new combinations of target isotope and final radioisotope. The narrow-bandwidth γ excitation may make use of collective resonances in γ-width, leading to increased cross sections. (γ, γ) isomer production via specially selected γ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground state occurs. The produced isotopes will open the way for completely new clinical applications of radioisotopes. For example 195mPt could be used to verify the patient's response to chemotherapy with platinum compounds before a complete treatment is performed. In targeted radionuclide therapy the short-range Auger and conversion electrons of 195mPt and 117mSn enable a very local treatment. The generator 44Ti allows for a PET with an additional γ-quantum (γ-PET), resulting in a reduced dose or better spatial resolution.

  2. Secure Grid Services for Cooperative Work in Medicine and Life Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbecker, Anette; Falkner, Jürgen

    MediGRID provides a grid infrastructure to solve challenging problems in medical and life sciences by enhancing the productivity and by enabling locationindependent, interdisciplinary collaboration. The usage of grid technology has enabled the development of new application and services for research in medical and life sciences. In order to enlarge the range of services and to get a broader range of users sustainable business models are needed. In Services@MediGRID methods for monitoring, accounting, and billing which fulfilled the high security demands within medicine and life sciences will be developed. Also different requirements of academic and industrial grid customers are considered in order to establish the sustainable business models for grid computing.

  3. Mass Conservation of the Unified Continuous and Discontinuous Element-Based Galerkin Methods on Dynamically Adaptive Grids with Application to Atmospheric Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    that matter. [12] (with a later follow-up in [13]) addressed the conservation issue of the conforming continuous Galerkin method on the cubed -sphere...atmospheric dynamical core on the cubed -sphere grid, in: J. Phys. Conf. Ser., Vol. 78, IOP Publishing, 2007, p. 012074. [13] M. A. Taylor, A. Fournier, A...Discontinuous Element-Based Galerkin Methods on Dynamically Adaptive Grids with Application to Atmospheric Simulations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  4. Modularized multilevel and z-source power converter as renewable energy interface for vehicle and grid-connected applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dong

    Due the energy crisis and increased oil price, renewable energy sources such as photovoltaic panel, wind turbine, or thermoelectric generation module, are used more and more widely for vehicle and grid-connected applications. However, the output of these renewable energy sources varies according to different solar radiation, wind speed, or temperature difference, a power converter interface is required for the vehicle or grid-connected applications. Thermoelectric generation (TEG) module as a renewable energy source for automotive industry is becoming very popular recently. Because of the inherent characteristics of TEG modules, a low input voltage, high input current and high voltage gain dc-dc converters are needed for the automotive load. Traditional high voltage gain dc-dc converters are not suitable for automotive application in terms of size and high temperature operation. Switched-capacitor dc-dc converters have to be used for this application. However, high voltage spike and EMI problems exist in traditional switched-capacitor dc-dc converters. Huge capacitor banks have to be utilized to reduce the voltage ripple and achieve high efficiency. A series of zero current switching (ZCS) or zero voltage switching switched-capacitor dc-dc converters have been proposed to overcome the aforementioned problems of the traditional switched-capacitor dc-dc converters. By using the proposed soft-switching strategy, high voltage spike is reduced, high EMI noise is restricted, and the huge capacitor bank is eliminated. High efficiency, high power density and high temperature switched-capacitor dc-dc converters could be made for the TEG interface in vehicle applications. Several prototypes have been made to validate the proposed circuit and confirm the circuit operation. In order to apply PV panel for grid-connected application, a low cost dc-ac inverter interface is required. From the use of transformer and safety concern, two different solutions can be implemented, non

  5. High illuminance light-emitting diode headlight for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ui-Hyung; Jung, Jae-hun; Park, Seung Hyun; Lee, Gye Seon; Ju, Young-Gu

    2010-11-01

    High brightness light emitting diodes have been used to develop high illuminance headlight for medical applications. It provides various advantages such as high illuminance, long life time, reduced infra red light, extended operation time with battery and light weight. A 3 W LED was employed to achieve the high performance medical headlight. The optical design includes two lenses for high energy transmission and high illuminance. The LED headlight shows 42,000 lux with spot diameter of 80 mm at the distance of 300 mm. For comparison purpose, 5 W LED was also used to obtain the high illuminance headlight. However, the large divergence angle and large spot size of the 5 W LED limits the illuminance to 31,000 lux with increased burden on heat dissipation. The thermal images of the heat sinks indicate that the temperature of the headlight using a 3 W LED is below 50 degree C, which is suitable for medical applications.

  6. Time-of-flight spectroscopy for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plucinski, Jerzy

    2004-08-01

    The paper presents benefits of optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for medical applications. It also presents the principles of measurement and describes how the basic optical properties of tissue can be estimated from measured data. The potential of time-of-flight spectroscopy is demonstrated, based on measurements conducted for highly scattering materials, such as paper samples, technological liquids from paper mills and aqueous milk solutions. Picosecond semiconductor pulse lasers and fast light detectors (a streak camera and an avalanche photodiode working in Geiger mode) were used. Obtained results show that it is possible to construct a new type of optic fiber sensors for medical applications. The chief advantage of the sensors is their ability to perform measurements in difficult to reach places (e.g. inside human body). Moreover, it is expected that fiber optic sensors based on time-of-flight spectroscopy will significantly reduce the costs of medical diagnosis.

  7. Virtual Reality in Psychological, Medical and Pedagogical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichenberg, Christiane, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book has an aim to present latest applications, trends and developments of virtual reality technologies in three humanities disciplines: in medicine, psychology and pedagogy. Studies show that people in both educational as well as in the medical therapeutic range expect more and more that modern media are included in the corresponding demand…

  8. Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Yicong

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces a new multimedia security system for the performance of object recognition and multimedia encryption in security and medical applications. The system embeds an enhancement and multimedia encryption process into the traditional recognition system in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of object detection and…

  9. [Applications of polylactide and its copolymers in medical device fields].

    PubMed

    Qi, Xuefei; Pang, Xiubing; Wu, Kan

    2014-07-01

    Polylactide and its copolymers are a kind of biomedical material andhave been approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This paper briefly introduces its applications in surgical suture, orthopedics, plastic surgery, ophthalmology and other medical device fields, and also analyzes its development in our country.

  10. Uncertainties in the Selection of Applicants for Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbassat, Jochanan; Baumal, Reuben

    2007-01-01

    Decisions about admissions to medical school are based on assessments of the applicants' cognitive achievements and non-cognitive traits. Admission criteria are expected to be fair, transparent, evidence-based and legally defensible. However, unlike cognitive criteria, which are highly reliable and moderately valid, the reliability and validity of…

  11. Study on the medical application of silver material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Min; Li, Shan

    2008-12-01

    There are several ways to kill the bacterium and treat the wound by use of silver material. The silver material also is a kind of sedative to keep people calm, especially for children. Because the bacterium resistance to the action of drug, the medical application of silver material should be paid attention to.

  12. Virtual Reality in Psychological, Medical and Pedagogical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichenberg, Christiane, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book has an aim to present latest applications, trends and developments of virtual reality technologies in three humanities disciplines: in medicine, psychology and pedagogy. Studies show that people in both educational as well as in the medical therapeutic range expect more and more that modern media are included in the corresponding demand…

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Staggs, Michael C.

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos; Stavros , Staggs; Michael C.

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  15. Space and Medical Applications of the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Joseph

    2008-10-01

    Geant4 is a toolkit to simulate the passage of particles through matter. While Geant4 was developed for High Energy Physics (HEP), applications now include Nuclear, Medical and Space Physics. Medical applications have been increasing rapidly due to the overall growth of Monte Carlo in Medical Physics and the unique qualities of Geant4 as an all-particle code able to handle complex geometry, motion and fields with the flexibility of modern programming and an open free source code. Work has included characterizing beams and sources, treatment planning and imaging. The all-particle nature of Geant4 has made it popular for the newest modes of radiation treatment: Proton and Particle therapy. Geant4 has been used by ESA, NASA and JAXA to study radiation effects to spacecraft and personnel. The flexibility of Geant4 has enabled teams to incorporate it into their own applications (SPENVIS MULASSIS space environment from QinetiQ and ESA, RADSAFE simulation from Vanderbilt University and NASA). We provide an overview of applications and discuss how Geant4 has responded to specific challenges of moving from HEP to Medical and Space Physics, including recent work to extend Geant4's energy range to low dose radiobiology.

  16. Multimedia Security System for Security and Medical Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Yicong

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces a new multimedia security system for the performance of object recognition and multimedia encryption in security and medical applications. The system embeds an enhancement and multimedia encryption process into the traditional recognition system in order to improve the efficiency and accuracy of object detection and…

  17. Miniature pin-type lithium batteries for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Mikito; Saraswat, Ashok; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Yumoto, Hiroyuki; Skinlo, David M.; Takeya, Kaname; Tsukamoto, Hisashi

    Miniature pin-type batteries featuring lithium-ion rechargeable chemistry and lithium/CF x chemistry have been developed for implantable medical applications. The characteristics of these batteries include hermeticity, small volume, and high power. Optimizing the jellyroll configuration and battery electrode design allows small volumes and high power.

  18. Clinical simulators: applications and implications for rural medical education.

    PubMed

    Ypinazar, V A; Margolis, S A

    2006-01-01

    Medical education has undergone significant changes globally. Calls for the revitalisation of centuries old pathways of learning have resulted in innovative medical curricula. Didactic modes of teaching which involved the learning of copious amounts of facts have given way to curricula that focus on the horizontal and vertical integration of basic and clinical sciences. Increasing concern for patient care and safety has led to a 'gap' between the needs of medical students to acquire necessary psychomotor skills and the safety and wellbeing of the patient. This has resulted in alternate teaching methods that include non-patient based training for the acquisition of clinical skills. The use of computerised, full-sized human simulators provides medical students with the necessary psychomotor and clinical reasoning skills in a realistic learning environment, while remaining risk free to patients. These clinical simulators are powerful learning tools that have applications at all levels of medical education across multiple disciplines, emphasising the multidisciplinary approach required in many medical situations. This article reviews the literature on medical simulation and provides the contextual basis for the establishment of a Clinical Simulation Learning Centre (CSLC) in a rural clinical school in Australia. The educational program, as well as the design, layout and equipment of the CSLC are described, as well as implications for rural practitioners. The CSLC has been a major capital investment in a relatively under-resourced part of regional Australia and has provided opportunities for ongoing education across a range of healthcare professionals in the community.

  19. Integrated medication management in mHealth applications.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Hubert; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Kastner, Peter; Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Continuous medication monitoring is essential for successful management of heart failure patients. Experiences with the recently established heart failure network HerzMobil Tirol show that medication monitoring limited to heart failure specific drugs could be insufficient, in particular for general practitioners. Additionally, some patients are confused about monitoring only part of their prescribed drugs. Sometimes medication will be changed without informing the responsible physician. As part of the upcoming Austrian electronic health record system ELGA, the eMedication system will collect prescription and dispensing data of drugs and these data will be accessible to authorized healthcare professionals on an inter-institutional level. Therefore, we propose two concepts on integrated medication management in mHealth applications that integrate ELGA eMedication and closed-loop mHealth-based telemonitoring. As a next step, we will implement these concepts and analyze--in a feasibility study--usability and practicability as well as legal aspects with respect to automatic data transfer from the ELGA eMedication service.

  20. Advanced Imaging and Robotics Technologies for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamune, Ken; Hong, Jaesung

    2011-10-01

    Due to the importance of surgery in the medical field, a large amount of research has been conducted in this area. Imaging and robotics technologies provide surgeons with the advanced eye and hand to perform their surgeries in a safer and more accurate manner. Recently medical images have been utilized in the operating room as well as in the diagnostic stage. If the image to patient registration is done with sufficient accuracy, medical images can be used as "a map" for guidance to the target lesion. However, the accuracy and reliability of the surgical navigation system should be sufficiently verified before applying it to the patient. Along with the development of medical imaging, various medical robots have also been developed. In particular, surgical robots have been researched in order to reach the goal of minimal invasiveness. The most important factors to consider are determining the demand, the strategy for their use in operating procedures, and how it aids patients. In addition to the above considerations, medical doctors and researchers should always think from the patient's point of view. In this article, the latest medical imaging and robotic technologies focusing on surgical applications are reviewed based upon the factors described in the above.

  1. DOE Center of Excellence in Medical Laser Applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacques, S.L. )

    1998-01-01

    An engineering network of collaborating medical laser laboratories are developing laser and optical technologies for medical diagnosis and therapy and are translating the engineering into medical centers in Portland, OR, Houston, TX, and Galveston, TX. The Center includes the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the University of Texas-Austin, Texas A and M University, Rice University, the University Texas Medical Branch-Galveston, Oregon Medical Laser Center (Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Oregon Health Sciences University, and Oregon Graduate Institute, Portland, OR), and the University of Oregon. Diagnostics include reflectance, fluorescence, Raman IR, laser photoacoustics, optical coherence tomography, and several new video techniques for spectroscopy and imaging. Therapies include photocoagulation therapy, laser welding, pulsed laser ablation, and light-activated chemotherapy of cancer (photodynamic therapy, or PDT). Medical applications reaching the clinic include optical monitoring of hyperbilirubinemia in newborns, fluorescence detection of cervical dysplasia, laser thrombolysis of blood clots in heart attack and brain stroke, photothermal coagulation of benign prostate hyperplasia, and PDT for both veterinary and human cancer. New technologies include laser optoacoustic imaging of breast tumors and hemorrhage in head trauma and brain stroke, quality control monitoring of dosimetry during PDT for esophageal and lung cancer, polarization video reflectometry of skin cancer, laser welding of artificial tissue replacements, and feedback control of laser welding.

  2. Nanotechnologies for efficient solar and wind energy harvesting and storage in smart-grid and transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of nanotechnologies can be used to improve the efficiency of energy harvest from the Sun and the wind, and the efficiency of energy storage in secondary batteries, for use in smart grid and transportation applications. High-quality nanostructured copper indium gallium selenide thin films help produce high-efficiency photovoltaic modules. Various nanotechnologies are utilized to improve the efficiency of power-generating wind turbines, including nanoparticle-containing lubricants that reduce the friction generated from the rotation of the turbines, nanocoatings for de-icing and self-cleaning technologies, and advanced nanocomposites that provide lighter and stronger wind blades. A number of nanotechnologies can be beneficial in advanced high-capacity secondary batteries for smart grid and transportation applications. These technologies include nanostructured carbon-nanotube-based and silicon-nanowire-based electrodes with ultrahigh surface areas, as well as nanoengineered β-alumina ceramic electrolytes with well-controlled grains, grain boundaries, and crystal orientation, which are used to boost the energy and power densities in secondary batteries such as lithium-ion, sodium-sulfur, flow, and dry cell batteries.

  3. Nanotechnologies for efficient solar and wind energy harvesting and storage in smart-grid and transportation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay

    2011-01-01

    A wide array of nanotechnologies can be used to improve the efficiency of energy harvest from the Sun and the wind, and the efficiency of energy storage in secondary batteries, for use in smart grid and transportation applications. High-quality nanostructured copper indium gallium selenide thin films help produce high-efficiency photovoltaic modules. Various nanotechnologies are utilized to improve the efficiency of power-generating wind turbines, including nanoparticle-containing lubricants that reduce the friction generated from the rotation of the turbines, nanocoatings for de-icing and self-cleaning technologies, and advanced nanocomposites that provide lighter and stronger wind blades. A number of nanotechnologies can be beneficial in advanced high-capacity secondary batteries for smart grid and transportation applications. These technologies include nanostructured carbon-nanotube-based and silicon-nanowire-based electrodes with ultrahigh surface areas, as well as nanoengineered β-alumina ceramic electrolytes with well-controlled grains, grain boundaries, and crystal orientation, which are used to boost the energy and power densities in secondary batteries such as lithium-ion, sodium-sulfur, flow, and dry cell batteries.

  4. Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part II: Evaluations and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, K.; Sasai, T.; Kato, S.; Niwa, Y.; Saito, M.; Takagi, H.; Matsunaga, T.; Hiraki, K.; Maksyutov, S. S.; Yokota, T.

    2015-12-01

    Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern in land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many studies have been trying to reveal distribution of carbon exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and atmosphere for understanding global carbon cycle dynamics by using terrestrial biosphere models, satellite data, inventory data, and so on. However, most studies remained within several tens of kilometers grid spatial resolution, and the results have not been enough to understand the detailed pattern of carbon exchanges based on ecological community and to evaluate the carbon stocks by forest ecosystems in each countries. Improving the sophistication of spatial resolution is obviously necessary to enhance the accuracy of carbon exchanges. Moreover, the improvement may contribute to global warming awareness, policy makers and other social activities. We show global terrestrial carbon exchanges (net ecosystem production, net primary production, and gross primary production) with 1km-grid resolution. The methodology for these estimations are shown in the 2015 AGU FM poster "Estimation of Global 1km-grid Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Part I: Developing Inputs and Modelling". In this study, we evaluated the carbon exchanges in various regions with other approaches. We used the satellite-driven biosphere model (BEAMS) as our estimations, GOSAT L4A CO2 flux data, NEP retrieved by NICAM and CarbonTracer2013 flux data, for period from Jun 2001 to Dec 2012. The temporal patterns for this period were indicated similar trends between BEAMS, GOSAT, NICAM, and CT2013 in many sub-continental regions. Then, we estimated the terrestrial carbon exchanges in each countries, and could indicated the temporal patterns of the exchanges in large carbon stock regions.Global terrestrial carbon cycle largely depends on a spatial pattern of land cover type, which is heterogeneously-distributed over regional and global scales. Many

  5. The open science grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pordes, R.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The U.S. LHC Tier-1 and Tier-2 laboratories and universities are developing production Grids to support LHC applications running across a worldwide Grid computing system. Together with partners in computer science, physics grid projects and active experiments, we will build a common national production grid infrastructure which is open in its architecture, implementation and use. The Open Science Grid (OSG) model builds upon the successful approach of last year's joint Grid2003 project. The Grid3 shared infrastructure has for over eight months provided significant computational resources and throughput to a range of applications, including ATLAS and CMS data challenges, SDSS, LIGO, and biology analyses, and computer science demonstrators and experiments. To move towards LHC-scale data management, access and analysis capabilities, we must increase the scale, services, and sustainability of the current infrastructure by an order of magnitude or more. Thus, we must achieve a significant upgrade in its functionalities and technologies. The initial OSG partners will build upon a fully usable, sustainable and robust grid. Initial partners include the US LHC collaborations, DOE & NSF Laboratories and Universities & Trillium Grid projects. The approach is to federate with other application communities in the U.S. to build a shared infrastructure open to other sciences and capable of being modified and improved to respond to needs of other applications, including CDF, D0, BaBar, and RHIC experiments. We describe the application-driven, engineered services of the OSG, short term plans and status, and the roadmap for a consortium, its partnerships and national focus.

  6. Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) use in human medical applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lifei; Kubat, Nicole J; Isenberg, Richard A

    2011-03-01

    A number of electromagnetic field-based technologies are available for therapeutic medical applications. These therapies can be broken down into different categories based on technical parameters employed and type of clinical application. Pulsed radio frequency energy (PRFE) therapy is a non invasive, electromagnetic field-based therapeutic that is based on delivery of pulsed, shortwave radio frequency energy in the 13-27.12 MHz carrier frequency range, and designed for local application to a target tissue without the intended generation of deep heat. It has been studied for use in a number of clinical applications, including as a palliative treatment for both postoperative and non postoperative pain and edema, as well as in wound healing applications. This review provides an introduction to the therapy, a summary of clinical efficacy studies using the therapy in specific applications, and an overview of treatment-related safety.

  7. Development and Demonstration of Smart grid inverters for High-Penetration PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Roose, Leon; Liang, Nathan; Noma, Edwin; Tran, Thai; Matsuura, Marc

    2014-10-31

    The objective of this Smart Grid Inverter (SGI) project is to implement, on operating utility distribution feeders with “very high” penetration of rooftop PV, enhanced capability smart inverters to achieve improved operational performance, control and visibility. This is accomplished by creating, deploying, and evaluating new smart inverters using integrated inverter management control software (IMCS) and standards-based communications systems. Detailed distribution modeling is also employed to aid in development of inverter control algorithms/settings. The project will test various inverter control strategies in two project deployment locations – Maui, Hawai’i and Maryland/Washington D.C.

  8. Application of magnetic pulse compression to the grid system of the ETA/ATA accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Cook, E.G.; Reginato, L.L.; Schmidt, J.A.; Smith, M.W.

    1982-11-02

    During the past year, several magnetic pulse compression systems have been built and applied to the ETA accelerator. In view of their excellent performance, a non-linear magnetic system has been adopted for the ATA grid drive in place of the spark gap driven Blumlein. The magnetic system will give us a much higher reliability and greater flexibility by being independent of the high pressure gas blown system. A further advantage of this system will be the capability of achieving higher rep-rates in case of a future upgrade. System design and performance under burst mode will be described.

  9. Application of an unstructured grid flow solver to planes, trains and automobiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spragle, Gregory S.; Smith, Wayne A.; Yadlin, Yoram

    1993-01-01

    Rampant, an unstructured flow solver developed at Fluent Inc., is used to compute three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, compressible flow fields within complex solution domains. Rampant is an explicit, finite-volume flow solver capable of computing flow fields using either triangular (2d) or tetrahedral (3d) unstructured grids. Local time stepping, implicit residual smoothing, and multigrid techniques are used to accelerate the convergence of the explicit scheme. The paper describes the Rampant flow solver and presents flow field solutions about a plane, train, and automobile.

  10. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  11. Reliable Detection and Smart Deletion of Malassez Counting Chamber Grid in Microscopic White Light Images for Microbiological Applications.

    PubMed

    Denimal, Emmanuel; Marin, Ambroise; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-08-01

    In biology, hemocytometers such as Malassez slides are widely used and are effective tools for counting cells manually. In a previous work, a robust algorithm was developed for grid extraction in Malassez slide images. This algorithm was evaluated on a set of 135 images and grids were accurately detected in most cases, but there remained failures for the most difficult images. In this work, we present an optimization of this algorithm that allows for 100% grid detection and a 25% improvement in grid positioning accuracy. These improvements make the algorithm fully reliable for grid detection. This optimization also allows complete erasing of the grid without altering the cells, which eases their segmentation.

  12. Development of a Cartesian-grid finite-volume characteristic flux model for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, C.; Le Touzé, D.; Alessandrini, B.

    2010-06-01

    A Finite Volume method based on Characteristic Fluxes for compressible fluids is developed. An explicit cell-centered resolution is adopted, where second-order accuracy is provided by using a MUSCL scheme with Sweby or Superbee limiters for the hyperbolic part. Resolution is performed on a generic unstructured Cartesian grid, where solid boundaries are handled by a Cut-Cell method. Interfaces are explicitely advected in a non-diffusive way, ensuring local mass conservation of each fluid. An improved cell cutting has been developed to handle boundaries of arbitrary geometrical complexity. The mesh density is locally adapted to provide accuracy along these boundaries, which can be fixed or move inside the mesh. Instead of using a polygon clipping algorithm, we use the Voxel traversal algorithm coupled with a local floodfill scanline to intersect 2D or 3D boundary surface meshes with the fixed Cartesian grid. Small cells stability problem near the boundaries is solved using a fully conservative merging method. Inflow and outflow conditions are also implemented in the model. The solver is validated on 2D academic test cases, such as the flow past a cylinder. The latter test cases are performed both in the frame of the body and in a fixed frame where the body is moving across the mesh. Extension to 3D is presently being implemented and first results will be presented at the conference.

  13. The application of control charts to determine the effect of grid cell size on landform morphometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napieralski, Jacob; Nalepa, Nick

    2010-02-01

    Geoscientists have become increasingly dependent on digital elevation models (DEMs) to delineate and measure landforms and landscapes. However, the DEM grid cell size available may not be the optimum resolution; this can mask subtle changes in measurements and lead to erroneous results. This paper presents a standardized statistical technique (i.e. statistical process control charts (SPCC)) for determining the optimum DEM resolution (i.e. the coarsest resolution in which detail is not sacrificed) for landforms (e.g. drumlins). For this study, forty-four DEM resolutions, ranging from 1 to 80 m, were used to assess the effect of resolution on drumlin size, shape, and centroid. The results indicate that the optimum resolution for the size variables (width and length) was coarser than the optimum resolution for shape indices (elongation and rose curve). Drumlin location tends to drift in a predictable direction and rate as grid cell size coarsens above particular thresholds. The results prove that resolution plays a critical role in correctly evaluating drumlin morphometry and that care must be taken when utilizing DEMs to summarize drumlin characteristics. The creation of a standardized technique to describe drumlins will allow for scrutiny of previous work and straightforward comparative analyses between studies, while utilizing the optimum resolution will help decipher landform patterns, reveal relationships, and provide more insight into landform evolution.

  14. Applying non-uniform grids to evaluating susceptibility from flow-type phenomena: an example of application to Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongolan, Vena Pearl; Lupiano, Valeria; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Rongo, Rocco; Spataro, William; Iovine, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena - e.g. lava flows, earth flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches - can be assessed by analysing a proper set of simulations of hypothetical events. Non-uniform grids are commonly used to study particular areas of interest in computational domains. Examples of application concern, for instance, the turbulence in a boundary layer. While non-uniform grids frequently appear in adaptive methods, they may also be used in a "static" environment. A purposive sampling method, based on a non-uniform grid of sources coupled with numerical simulations of independent events, has recently been employed to evaluate the hazard induced by flow-type phenomena. An example of application to lava-flows at Mount Etna (Italy) is described in this study. The method aims at refining the spatial distribution of hypothetical eruptive vents with respect to an original uniform grid. The density of eruptive vents has been determined by considering the historical distribution of lateral and eccentric vents, and the distribution of the main faults/structures on the volcano. A higher number of sources marks higher-probability zones of vent opening, based on classes of activation: the number of vents in each class has been set proportionally to the probability of activation of the class. By considering the different types of eruption expected from the considered volcano, based on the historical activity of the past 400 years, a set of simulations per each vent has been performed. The employed model is SCIARA-fv2, a Cellular Automata numerical code recently applied to the same study area for preliminary hazard analyses. In this work, calibration could therefore be skipped, by taking advantage from such experience of tuning of the parameters. Performed simulations have been analysed by a GIS, to verify the number of events affecting each cell of the domain. A probability of occurrence could be assigned to each simulation, based on statistics of

  15. Carbon nanotubes: potential medical applications and safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Amenta, Valeria; Aschberger, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have unique atomic structure, as well as outstanding thermal, mechanical, and electronic properties, making them extremely attractive materials for several different applications. Many research groups are focusing on biomedical applications of carbon-based nanomaterials, however the application of CNTs to the biomedical field is not developing as fast as in other areas. While CNTs-based products are already being used in textiles, polymer matrices to strengthen materials, sports articles, microelectronics, energy storage, etc., medicinal products and medical devices for in vivo application based on CNTs have not been commercialized yet. However, CNTs for biomedical application, i.e., CNTs conjugated to siRNA for cancer therapy, or CNTs for imaging of colorectal cancer and many other products may enter clinical trials in the next years. Concerns related to the toxicity of CNTs must be overcome in order to have these products commercialized in a near future. This article reviews emerging biomedical applications of CNTs, specifically for therapy. It also deals with challenges associated with possible medical applications of CNTs, such as their not fully understood toxicological profile in the human body. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Imaging requirements for medical applications of additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Huotilainen, Eero; Paloheimo, Markku; Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Björkstrand, Roy; Tuomi, Jukka; Markkola, Antti; Mäkitie, Antti

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), formerly known as rapid prototyping, is steadily shifting its focus from industrial prototyping to medical applications as AM processes, bioadaptive materials, and medical imaging technologies develop, and the benefits of the techniques gain wider knowledge among clinicians. This article gives an overview of the main requirements for medical imaging affected by needs of AM, as well as provides a brief literature review from existing clinical cases concentrating especially on the kind of radiology they required. As an example application, a pair of CT images of the facial skull base was turned into 3D models in order to illustrate the significance of suitable imaging parameters. Additionally, the model was printed into a preoperative medical model with a popular AM device. Successful clinical cases of AM are recognized to rely heavily on efficient collaboration between various disciplines - notably operating surgeons, radiologists, and engineers. The single main requirement separating tangible model creation from traditional imaging objectives such as diagnostics and preoperative planning is the increased need for anatomical accuracy in all three spatial dimensions, but depending on the application, other specific requirements may be present as well. This article essentially intends to narrow the potential communication gap between radiologists and engineers who work with projects involving AM by showcasing the overlap between the two disciplines.

  17. Applications of artificial neural networks in medical science.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jigneshkumar L; Goyal, Ramesh K

    2007-09-01

    Computer technology has been advanced tremendously and the interest has been increased for the potential use of 'Artificial Intelligence (AI)' in medicine and biological research. One of the most interesting and extensively studied branches of AI is the 'Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs)'. Basically, ANNs are the mathematical algorithms, generated by computers. ANNs learn from standard data and capture the knowledge contained in the data. Trained ANNs approach the functionality of small biological neural cluster in a very fundamental manner. They are the digitized model of biological brain and can detect complex nonlinear relationships between dependent as well as independent variables in a data where human brain may fail to detect. Nowadays, ANNs are widely used for medical applications in various disciplines of medicine especially in cardiology. ANNs have been extensively applied in diagnosis, electronic signal analysis, medical image analysis and radiology. ANNs have been used by many authors for modeling in medicine and clinical research. Applications of ANNs are increasing in pharmacoepidemiology and medical data mining. In this paper, authors have summarized various applications of ANNs in medical science.

  18. The transient behavior of scaling in the atmosphere: stratiform/convective transition and applications to sub-grid scale statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nogueira, M.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Multifractal behavior holds to a remarkable approximation over wide ranges of spatial scales in orographic rainfall and cloud fields. The scaling exponents characterizing this behavior are shown to be fundamentally transient with nonlinear dependencies on the particular atmospheric state and terrain forcing. In particular, a robust transition is found in the scaling parameters between non-convective (stable) and convective (unstable) regimes, with clear physical correspondence to the transition from stratiform to organized convective orographic precipitation. These results can explain two often reported scaling regimes for atmospheric wind, temperature and water observations. On the one hand, spectral slopes around 2-2.3 arise under non-convective or very weak convective conditions when the spatial patterns are dominated by large-scale gradients and landform. On the other hand, under convective conditions the scaling exponents generally fluctuate around 5/3, in agreement with the Kolmogorov turbulent regime accounting for the intermittency correction. High-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are able to reproduce the ubiquitous scaling behavior of observed atmospheric fields down to their effective resolution length-scale, below which the variability is misrepresented by the model. The effective resolution is shown to be a transient property dependent on the particular simulated conditions and NWP formulation, implying that a blunt decrease in grid spacing without adjusting numerical techniques may not lead to the improvements desired.Finally, the application of transient spatial scaling behavior for stochastic downscaling and sub-grid scale parameterization of cloud and rainfall fields is investigated. The proposed fractal methods are able to rapidly generate large ensembles of high-resolution statistically robust fields from the coarse resolution information alone, which can provide significant improvements for stochastic hydrological prediction

  19. Software development for safety-critical medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, John C.

    1992-01-01

    There are many computer-based medical applications in which safety and not reliability is the overriding concern. Reduced, altered, or no functionality of such systems is acceptable as long as no harm is done. A precise, formal definition of what software safety means is essential, however, before any attempt can be made to achieve it. Without this definition, it is not possible to determine whether a specific software entity is safe. A set of definitions pertaining to software safety will be presented and a case study involving an experimental medical device will be described. Some new techniques aimed at improving software safety will also be discussed.

  20. [Features of PHITS and its application to medical physics].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shintaro; Niita, Koji; Matsuda, Norihiro; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Iwase, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Noda, Shusaku; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Fukahori, Tokio; Furuta, Takuya; Chiba, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    PHITS is a general purpose Monte Carlo particle transport simulation code to analyze the transport in three-dimensional phase space and collisions of nearly all particles, including heavy ions, over wide energy range up to 100 GeV/u. Various quantities, such as particle fluence and deposition energies in materials, can be deduced using estimator functions "tally". Recently, a microdosimetric tally function was also developed to apply PHITS to medical physics. Owing to these features, PHITS has been used for medical applications, such as radiation therapy and protection.

  1. WITS - A Coaxial Cable Bus Network for Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    LaSonde, Clarence J.

    1980-01-01

    Walter Reed ARMY Medical Center has been serving as a Army test bed for coaxial cable-based local area networks since early 1978. This particular network, called the WRAMC Information Transfer System (WITS), carries commercial television, FM radio, closed-circuit TV and maintenance intercom audio, as well as digital data. The technology has proven successful. Broadband coaxial cable systems provide an opportunity to realize communications architectures that are flexible, highly reliable, and inexpensive. They are particularly appropriate for use in medical facilities where applications change over time and when many and varied systems are required to interact together.

  2. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN.

  3. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network

    PubMed Central

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN. PMID:26835422

  4. The physical metallurgy of nitinol for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelton, Alan R.; Russell, Scott M.; Dicello, John

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current processing and resultant properties of Nitinol for medical device applications. The melting and fabrication of Nitinol present a number of unique challenges because of the strong sensitivity of the alloy system to chemistry and processing. The first part of this paper will summarize the effect of alloy fabrication on key material properties, vacuum-melting techniques, hot working, and cold working. The effects of the final shape-setting heat treatments on transformation temperature and mechanical properties for medical devices will also be reviewed.

  5. Integrated Medical Model Project - Overview and Summary of Historical Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Butler, D.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; Shah, R.; Garcia, Y.; Sirmons, B.; Walton, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project. Methods: Figure 1 [see document] illustrates the IMM modeling system and scenario process. As illustrated, the IMM computational architecture is based on Probabilistic Risk Assessment techniques. Nineteen assumptions and limitations define the IMM application domain. Scenario definitions include crew medical attributes and mission specific details. The IMM forecasts probabilities of loss of crew life (LOCL), evacuation (EVAC), quality time lost during the mission, number of medical resources utilized and the number and type of medical events by combining scenario information with in-flight, analog, and terrestrial medical information stored in the iMED. In addition, the metrics provide the integrated information necessary to estimate optimized in-flight medical kit contents under constraints of mass and volume or acceptable level of mission risk. Results and Conclusions

  6. Medical applications of model-based dynamic thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, Antoni; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Ruminski, Jacek; Hryciuk, Marcin; Renkielska, Alicja; Grudzinski, Jacek; Siebert, Janusz; Jagielak, Dariusz; Rogowski, Jan; Roszak, Krzysztof; Stojek, Wojciech

    2001-03-01

    The proposal to use active thermography in medical diagnostics is promising in some applications concerning investigation of directly accessible parts of the human body. The combination of dynamic thermograms with thermal models of investigated structures gives attractive possibility to make internal structure reconstruction basing on different thermal properties of biological tissues. Measurements of temperature distribution synchronized with external light excitation allow registration of dynamic changes of local temperature dependent on heat exchange conditions. Preliminary results of active thermography applications in medicine are discussed. For skin and under- skin tissues an equivalent thermal model may be determined. For the assumed model its effective parameters may be reconstructed basing on the results of transient thermal processes. For known thermal diffusivity and conductivity of specific tissues the local thickness of a two or three layer structure may be calculated. Results of some medical cases as well as reference data of in vivo study on animals are presented. The method was also applied to evaluate the state of the human heart during the open chest cardio-surgical interventions. Reference studies of evoked heart infarct in pigs are referred, too. We see the proposed new in medical applications technique as a promising diagnostic tool. It is a fully non-invasive, clean, handy, fast and affordable method giving not only qualitative view of investigated surfaces but also an objective quantitative measurement result, accurate enough for many applications including fast screening of affected tissues.

  7. Prospects and applications of nanobiotechnology: a medical perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanobiotechnology is the application of nanotechnology in biological fields. Nanotechnology is a multidisciplinary field that currently recruits approach, technology and facility available in conventional as well as advanced avenues of engineering, physics, chemistry and biology. Method A comprehensive review of the literature on the principles, limitations, challenges, improvements and applications of nanotechnology in medical science was performed. Results Nanobiotechnology has multitude of potentials for advancing medical science thereby improving health care practices around the world. Many novel nanoparticles and nanodevices are expected to be used, with an enormous positive impact on human health. While true clinical applications of nanotechnology are still practically inexistent, a significant number of promising medical projects are in an advanced experimental stage. Implementation of nanotechnology in medicine and physiology means that mechanisms and devices are so technically designed that they can interact with sub-cellular (i.e. molecular) levels of the body with a high degree of specificity. Thus therapeutic efficacy can be achieved to maximum with minimal side effects by means of the targeted cell or tissue-specific clinical intervention. Conclusion More detailed research and careful clinical trials are still required to introduce diverse components of nanobiotechnology in random clinical applications with success. Ethical and moral concerns also need to be addressed in parallel with the new developments. PMID:22817658

  8. Construction and Application of Theoretical Line Loss Calculation Platform for 220 kV and above Power Grid in Shanghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, F.; Liu, J.; Li, S. Q.

    2017-05-01

    Instead of drawing power grid and inputting component parameters manually to establish calculation model, the theoretical line loss calculation platform for 220 kV and above power grid in Shanghai is developed based on grid dispatching D5000 system, capable of capturing real-time power grid basic / operational data and offline graphics saving. It resolves all data for previous day automatically before commencing theoretical line loss calculation. The theoretical line loss calculation results for 500 / 220 kV showed its validity and accuracy. The project effectively accumulates the scientific data and promote State Grid Shanghai Municipal Electric Power Company to fully grasp the related equipment operating conditions of Shanghai 500 / 220kV power grid. The analysis results not only help power company to guide production practice, but also provide a better understanding for power grid weakness and loss composition, which enables power company managers to guide future construction and transformation of power grid accurately and effectively.

  9. Applicability of grid-net detection system for landfill leachate and diesel fuel release in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Myounghak; Seo, Min Woo; Lee, Seunghak; Park, Junboum

    2008-02-01

    The grid-net system estimating the electrical conductivity changes was evaluated as a potential detection system for the leakage of diesel fuel and landfill leachate. Aspects of electrical conductivity changes were varied upon the type of contaminant. The electrical conductivity in the homogeneous mixtures of soil and landfill leachate linearly increased with the ionic concentration of pore fluid, which became more significant at higher volumetric water contents. However, the electrical conductivity in soil/diesel fuel mixture decreased with diesel fuel content and it was more significant at lower water contents. The electrode spacing should be determined by considering the type of contaminant to enhance the electrode sensitivity especially when two-electrode sensors are to be used. The electrode sensitivity for landfill leachate was constantly maintained regardless of the electrode spacings while that for the diesel fuel significantly increased at smaller electrode spacings. This is possibly due to the fact that the insulating barrier effect of the diesel fuel in non-aqueous phase was less predominant at large electrode spacing because electrical current can form the round-about paths over the volume with relatively small diesel fuel content. The model test results showed that the grid-net detection system can be used to monitor the leakage from waste landfill and underground storage tank sites. However, for a successful application of the detection system in the field, data under various field conditions should be accumulated.

  10. A Variable Resolution Stretched Grid Data Assimilation System for Regional Studies and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Dee, Dick P.

    1999-01-01

    The variable resolution stretched grid (SG) version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation System (DAS) incorporating the GEOS SG-GCM, has been developed and tested. The area/region of interest used in experiments is a rectangle over the U.S. with -60 km horizontal resolution and 70 layers extending from the surface to 0.1 hPa. The forecast error statistics has been reassessed for finer regional resolution. The experiments are performed for winter and summer seasons. The SG-GCM and SG-DAS experiments show that a definite down-scaling takes place over the area of interest. The SG-DAS is capable of reproducing regional mesoscale patterns and diagnostics that are not produced by coarser uniform resolution runs. The SG-DAS fields and diagnostics are used for regional forecasting, new instrument impact studies, and for validation of regional climate simulation experiments.

  11. Application of Optimal Production Control theory for Home Energy Management in a Micro Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas; Djouadi, Seddik M; Kuruganti, Teja

    2016-01-01

    We consider the optimal stochastic control problem for home energy systems with solar and energy storage devices when the demand is realized from the grid. The demand is subject to Brownian motions with both drift and variance parameters modulated by a continuous-time Markov chain that represents the regime of electricity price. We model the systems as pure stochastic differential equation models, and then we follow the completing square technique to solve the stochastic home energy management problem. The effectiveness of the efficiency of the proposed approach is validated through a simulation example. For practical situations with constraints consistent to those studied here, our results imply the proposed framework could reduce the electricity cost from short-term purchase in peak hour market.

  12. Perceptual attributes of poultry and other meat products: a repertory grid application.

    PubMed

    Michel, L Martínez; Punter, P H; Wismer, W V

    2011-04-01

    Increased demand for processed poultry products through the growth of home meal replacements and ready to eat products, present an opportunity for the development of new value-added poultry products. Repertory grid interviews were conducted to generate insight into consumer driven product development of these products. Procrustes analysis revealed that healthiness, nutrition, convenience, and processing attributes were most important parameters for discriminating amongst 24 meat and meat alternatives. "White meat", "healthier", "leaner", "good source of protein", "easy to cook" and "convenient", were found to positively influence consumer preferences for unprocessed chicken products, eggs and salmon while price did not appear to be important for differentiating the products. Traditional processed fish and poultry products, such as chicken nuggets, represented undesirable composition, processing and quality concerns. Identification of consumer attributes for discriminating poultry products among other meat alternatives can guide the development of competitive value-added poultry products.

  13. Progress in unstructured-grid methods development for unsteady aerodynamic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.

    1992-01-01

    The development of unstructured-grid methods for the solution of the equations of fluid flow and what was learned over the course of the research are summarized. The focus of the discussion is on the solution of the time-dependent Euler equations including spatial discretizations, temporal discretizations, and boundary conditions. An example calculation with an implicit upwind method using a CFL number of infinity is presented for the Boeing 747 aircraft. The results were obtained in less than one hour CPU time on a Cray-2 computer, thus, demonstrating the speed and robustness of the capability. Additional calculations for the ONERA M6 wing demonstrate the accuracy of the method through the good agreement between calculated results and experimental data for a standard transonic flow case.

  14. Post-lithography pattern modification and its application to a tunable wire grid polarizer.

    PubMed

    Stach, Michal; Chang, En-Chiang; Yang, Chung-Yuan; Lo, Cheng-Yao

    2013-03-22

    This study reports a simple and cost-effective post-lithography solution for reducing the characteristic dimensions of structures on the nanometer scale using an external mechanical force without any modification of the existing exposure system. In particular, this study presents a tunable aluminum wire grid polarizer (WGP) made by a laser interference lithography and i-line (365 nm) exposure setup on polyethylene naphthalate. The WGP achieves a 58% maximum linewidth shrinkage of the metal nanowire on the polymer substrate, and further improved the polarization extinction ratio by 83% with a defined operation window and optimized strain. The simulations in this study prove the rise of the extinction ratio with the modulation of the WGP pattern. Physical evidence explains the fall of the extinction ratio for both the increase of the metal crack volume and the delaminated randomly oriented fall-on fragments under extensive operation.

  15. Equil: A Global Grid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Sebastian; Reimer, Christioph; Paulik, Christoph; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    Geophysical parameters derived from space-borne Earth Observation Systems are either assigned to discrete points on a fixed Earth grid (e.g. regular lon/lat grid) or located on orbital point nodes with a customized arrangement, often in-line with the instrument's measurement geometry. The driving factors of the choice and structure of a spatial reference system (i.e. the grid) are typically spatial resolution, instrument geometry, measurement technique or application.In this study we propose a global grid system, the so- called Equil grid, and demonstrate its realization and structure. An exemplary Equil grid with a base sampling distance of 12.5 km is compared against two other grids commonly used in the domain of remote sensing of soil moisture. The simple nearly-equidistant grid design makes it interesting for a wide range of other geophysical parameters as well.

  16. VersiCharge-SG - Smart Grid Capable Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) for Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Dong; Haas, Harry; Terricciano, Paul

    2015-09-30

    In his 2011 State of the Union address, President Obama called for one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015 [1]. With large-scale Electric Vehicle (EV) or Plug-in Electric Vehicle (PEV or EV for short) or Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle (PHEV) penetration into the US market, there will be drastic reduction in fossil fuel consumption, thus significantly reducing our dependency on foreign oil [2-6]. There will also be significant reduction on Green House Gas (GHG) emissions and smog in the major US cities [3, 7, 8]. Similar studies have also been done other industrial counties [9]. For the fuel cost, with the home electricity rate around $0.13 per kWh, it would cost about $0.05 per mile for DC operation and $0.03 cents per mile for AC operation. But, assuming 25 miles per gallon for a typical vehicle and $4 per gallon, fossil fuel will cost $0.16 per mile [10]. The overall lifecycle cost of PEVs will be several folds lower than the existing fossil fueled vehicles. Despite the above advantages of the EVs, the current cost of EVSE is not affordable for the average consumer. Presently, the cost of installing state-of-the-art residential EVSE ranges from $1500 to $2500 [11]. Low priced EVSE technology, which is easy to install, and affordable to operate and maintain by an average consumer, is essential for the large-scale market penetration of EVs. In addition, the long-term success of this technology is contingent on the PEVs having minimal excessive load and shift impact on the grid, especially at peak times. In a report [2] published by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the exiting electric power generation infrastructure, if used at its full capacity 24 hours a day, would support up to 84% of the nation’s cars, pickup trucks and SUVs for an average daily drive of 33 miles. This mileage estimate is certainly much below what an average driver would drive his/her vehicle per day. Another report [3] by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  17. Communication technologies and applications in a medical environment.

    PubMed

    Pombortsis, A S

    1998-01-01

    As we move into the next millennium, we anticipate a rapid introduction of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) into the medical environment. In applying these technologies in Health Care Environments, the basic goals are to improve: (a) the collaboration between the different partners in the health sector, (b) the access to care and (c) the medical education, and to enhance overall quality (by increasing the availability of some applications, improve the quality of others and facilitate some completely new ones), and all these at affordable cost. This requires close interaction between health care practitioners and information technologists to ensure that the proposed technologies satisfy current user's needs, and anticipate future. The public awareness and the acceptance of the new medical environments by the users are key factors for successful implementations.

  18. Impact of high tuition on medical school applicants and enrollees.

    PubMed

    Ayers, W R; Stangert, A C; Dennis, M J; Henry, J B

    1981-10-01

    As direct federal support of medical education has been reduced, tuition at U.S. medical schools has increased. Concern has been expressed over a decline in the socioeconomic diversity and the academic qualifications of the applicants. Experience gained at Georgetown University School of Medicine, the medical school with the highest tuition in the United States, indicates that the academic and nonacademic characteristics of the entering class have remained stable over a seven-year period despite a fourfold increase in tuition. Virtually all (98 percent) enrolled students currently receive some form of financial aid, mostly in the form of federally insured loans or federal scholarships with a service commitment. Maintenance of socioeconomic diversity depends on the continued availability of federally supported student loans and scholarships.

  19. Application of nuclear physics in medical physics and nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear physics has a long history of influencing and advancing medical fields. At TRIUMF we use the applications of nuclear physics to diagnose several diseases via medical isotopes and treat cancer by using proton beams. The Life Science division has a long history of producing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) isotopes but we are also investigating the production of SPECT and PET isotopes with a potential shortage for clinical operation or otherwise limited access to chemists, biologists and medical researchers. New targets are being developed, aided by a simulation platform investigating the processes inside a target under proton irradiation - nuclear, thermodynamic, and chemical. Simulations also aid in the development of new beam-shaping devices for TRIUMF's Proton Therapy facility, Canada's only proton therapy facility, as well as new treatment testing systems. Both promise improved treatment delivery for cancer patients.

  20. How to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Aungst, T D; Clauson, K A; Misra, S; Lewis, T L; Husain, I

    2014-02-01

    There are thousands of medical applications for mobile devices targeting use by healthcare professionals. However, several factors related to the structure of the existing market for medical applications create significant barriers preventing practitioners from effectively identifying mobile medical applications for individual professional use. To define existing market factors relevant to selection of medical applications and describe a framework to empower clinicians to identify, assess and utilise mobile medical applications in their own practice. Resources available on the Internet regarding mobile medical applications, guidelines and published research on mobile medical applications. Mobile application stores (e.g. iTunes, Google Play) are not effective means of identifying mobile medical applications. Users of mobile devices that desire to implement mobile medical applications into practice need to carefully assess individual applications prior to utilisation. Searching and identifying mobile medical applications requires clinicians to utilise multiple references to determine what application is best for their individual practice methods. This can be done with a cursory exploration of mobile application stores and then moving onto other available resources published in the literature or through Internet resources (e.g. blogs, medical websites, social media). Clinicians must also take steps to ensure that an identified mobile application can be integrated into practice after carefully reviewing it themselves. Clinicians seeking to identify mobile medical application for use in their individual practice should use a combination of app stores, published literature, web-based resources, and personal review to ensure safe and appropriate use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Smartphones and Medical Applications in the Emergency Department Daily Practice

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshir, Amirhosein; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Sheikh, Hojjat; Vahedi, Motahar; Momeni, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Medical applications help physicians to make more rapid and evidence based decisions that may provide better patient care. This study aimed to determine the extent to which smart phones and medical applications are integrated in the emergency department daily practice. Method: In a cross sectional study, a modified standard questionnaire (Payne et al.) consisting of demographic data and information regarding quality and quantity of smartphone and medical app utilization was sent to emergency-medicine residents and interns twice (two weeks apart), in January 2015. The questionnaire was put online using open access "Web-form Module" and the address of the web page was e-mailed along with a cover letter explaining the survey. Finally, responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 22 software. Results: 65 cases participated (response rate 86%). The mean age of interns and residents were 25.03 ± 1.13 and 30.27 ± 4.68 years, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between interns and residents in owning a smartphone (p = 0.5). Android was more popular than IOS (67.7% against 25.8%) and the most popular medical apps were Medscape and UpToDate, respectively. 38 (61.3%) of the respondents were using their apps more than once a day and mostly for drug information. English (83.9%), Persian (12.9%), and other languages (3.2%) were preferred languages for designing a medical software among the participants, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of present study showed that smartphones are very popular among Iranian interns and residents in emergency department and a substantial number of them own a smartphone and are using medical apps regularly in their clinical practice. PMID:28286821

  2. Smartphones and Medical Applications in the Emergency Department Daily Practice.

    PubMed

    Jahanshir, Amirhosein; Karimialavijeh, Ehsan; Sheikh, Hojjat; Vahedi, Motahar; Momeni, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    Medical applications help physicians to make more rapid and evidence based decisions that may provide better patient care. This study aimed to determine the extent to which smart phones and medical applications are integrated in the emergency department daily practice. In a cross sectional study, a modified standard questionnaire (Payne et al.) consisting of demographic data and information regarding quality and quantity of smartphone and medical app utilization was sent to emergency-medicine residents and interns twice (two weeks apart), in January 2015. The questionnaire was put online using open access "Web-form Module" and the address of the web page was e-mailed along with a cover letter explaining the survey. Finally, responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics and SPSS 22 software. 65 cases participated (response rate 86%). The mean age of interns and residents were 25.03 ± 1.13 and 30.27 ± 4.68 years, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference between interns and residents in owning a smartphone (p = 0.5). Android was more popular than IOS (67.7% against 25.8%) and the most popular medical apps were Medscape and UpToDate, respectively. 38 (61.3%) of the respondents were using their apps more than once a day and mostly for drug information. English (83.9%), Persian (12.9%), and other languages (3.2%) were preferred languages for designing a medical software among the participants, respectively. The findings of present study showed that smartphones are very popular among Iranian interns and residents in emergency department and a substantial number of them own a smartphone and are using medical apps regularly in their clinical practice.

  3. Medication-use evaluation with a Web application.

    PubMed

    Burk, Muriel; Moore, Von; Glassman, Peter; Good, Chester B; Emmendorfer, Thomas; Leadholm, Thomas C; Cunningham, Francesca

    2013-12-15

    A Web-based application for coordinating medication-use evaluation (MUE) initiatives within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is described. The MUE Tracker (MUET) software program was created to improve VA's ability to conduct national medication-related interventions throughout its network of 147 medical centers. MUET initiatives are centrally coordinated by the VA Center for Medication Safety (VAMedSAFE), which monitors the agency's integrated databases for indications of suboptimal prescribing or drug therapy monitoring and adverse treatment outcomes. When a pharmacovigilance signal is detected, VAMedSAFE identifies "trigger groups" of at-risk veterans and uploads patient lists to the secure MUET application, where locally designated personnel (typically pharmacists) can access and use the data to target risk-reduction efforts. Local data on patient-specific interventions are stored in a centralized database and regularly updated to enable tracking and reporting for surveillance and quality-improvement purposes; aggregated data can be further analyzed for provider education and benchmarking. In a three-year pilot project, the MUET program was found effective in promoting improved prescribing of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and enhanced laboratory monitoring of ESA-treated patients in all specified trigger groups. The MUET initiative has since been expanded to target other high-risk drugs, and efforts are underway to refine the tool for broader utility. The MUET application has enabled the increased standardization of medication safety initiatives across the VA system and may serve as a useful model for the development of pharmacovigilance tools by other large integrated health care systems.

  4. IRMA--content-based image retrieval in medical applications.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Thomas M; Güld, Mark O; Thies, Christian; Plodowski, Bartosz; Keysers, Daniel; Ott, Bastian; Schubert, Henning

    2004-01-01

    The impact of content-based access to medical images is frequently reported but existing systems are designed for only a particular modality or context of diagnosis. Contrarily, our concept of image retrieval in medical applications (IRMA) aims at a general structure for semantic content analysis that is suitable for numerous applications in case-based reasoning or evidence-based medicine. Within IRMA, stepwise processing results in six layers of information modeling (raw data layer, registered data layer, feature layer, scheme layer, object layer, knowledge layer) incorporating medical expert knowledge. At the scheme layer, medical images are represented by a hierarchical structure of ellipses (blobs) describing image regions. Hence, image retrieval transforms to graph matching. The multilayer processing is implemented using a distributed system designed with only three core elements. The central database holds program sources, process-ing schemes, images, features, and blob trees; the scheduler balances distributed computing by addressing daemons running on all connected workstations; and the web server provides graphical user interfaces for data entry and retrieval..

  5. Hyaluronan, a truly "youthful" polysaccharide. Its medical applications.

    PubMed

    Robert, L

    2015-02-01

    Hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid, HA) is a ubiquitous linear polysaccharide endowed with some exceptional physicochemical properties such as strong hydration and viscoelasticity that depend on the size of the molecule. It plays a variety of important physiological roles in tissue hydration and mechanical protection, for example in the umbilical cord, skin and most other tissues. Since its large scale preparation and the invention by E.A. Balazs of the preparation of its non-inflammatory fraction (NIF-NaHA), there have been several important medical and cosmetic applications, most notably of viscosurgery for eye operation, intra-articular injections for osteoarthritis and also for wrinkle filling on the face, as well as for drug administration. Its concentration in tissues is decreasing with age, source of loss of function and structure of tissues. The purpose of this review is to present a succinct overview of the essential properties of hyaluronan and its medical and esthetic applications.

  6. Extending Medical Center Computer Application to Rural Health Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Gottfredson, Douglas K.

    1983-01-01

    A paper entitled “A COMPUTER DATA BASE FOR CLINICIANS, MANAGERS AND RESEARCHERS,” presented during the 1981 SCAMC, described the Salt Lake VA Medical Center computer system. Since that time, two Rural Health Clinics each about 150 miles from Salt Lake City were established by the SL VAMC to reduce traveling distances and improve services for Veterans. Although many existing computer applications were available with no modifications, additional software was needed to support unique needs of the clinics. The Rural Health package of software was designed to gather and store demographic and clinical information on each Veteran, determine the types of services provided, track services over time, monitor services provided by local hospitals and clinical laboratories which are paid for by the VA, determine total clinic costs, etc. These computer applications may be of interest to Medical Centers with separate clinics or outreach programs and individuals or groups in private practice with programs similar to the VA Rural Health Clinics.

  7. Grid enabled Service Support Environment - SSE Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goor, Erwin; Paepen, Martine

    2010-05-01

    The SSEGrid project is an ESA/ESRIN project which started in 2009 and is executed by two Belgian companies, Spacebel and VITO, and one Dutch company, Dutch Space. The main project objectives are the introduction of a Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure at the Image Processing Centre for earth observation products at VITO and the inclusion of Grid processing services in the Service Support Environment (SSE) at ESRIN. The Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure is meant to support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators (PI) and allow the design and execution of multi-sensor applications with geographically spread data while minimising the transfer of huge volumes of data. In the first scenario, 'support a Grid processing on demand model for Principal Investigators', we aim to provide processing power close to the EO-data at the processing and archiving centres. We will allow a PI (non-Grid expert user) to upload his own algorithm, as a process, and his own auxiliary data from the SSE Portal and use them in an earth observation workflow on the SSEGrid Infrastructure. The PI can design and submit workflows using his own processes, processes made available by VITO/ESRIN and possibly processes from other users that are available on the Grid. These activities must be user-friendly and not requiring detailed knowledge about the underlying Grid middleware. In the second scenario we aim to design, implement and demonstrate a methodology to set up an earth observation processing facility, which uses large volumes of data from various geographically spread sensors. The aim is to provide solutions for problems that we face today, like wasting bandwidth by copying large volumes of data to one location. We will avoid this by processing the data where they are. The multi-mission Grid-based processing on demand infrastructure will allow developing and executing complex and massive multi-sensor data (re-)processing applications more

  8. Investigation of ferrofluid nanostructure by laser light scattering: medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepomnyashchaya, E. K.; Velichko, E. N.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Aksenov, E. T.; Savchenko, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of ferrofluids nanostructure by the laser light scattering technique is presented. Experimental studies involved measurements of the intensity of the laser radiation scattered by ferrofluid particles in interaction with albumin and under the influence of magnetic field. The effects of the magnitude and duration of the applied magnetic field on the formation of aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles and also the influence of magnetic fluids of different concentrations on blood proteins are considered. The findings may be useful for medical applications.

  9. Hybrid cathode lithium batteries for implantable medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kaimin; Merritt, Donald R.; Howard, William G.; Schmidt, Craig L.; Skarstad, Paul M.

    Lithium batteries with hybrid cathodes of Ag 2V 4O 11 and CF x have been developed that combine the best features of both cathode components. They can offer power density and energy density that are competitive with or superior to other developed battery chemistries, along with the stability and reliability needed for implantable medical applications. More than 100,000 have been used in human implants since introduction in 1999.

  10. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Jose R.

    2000-08-01

    Isotopes and accelerators, hallmarks of nuclear physics, are finding increasingly sophisticated and effective applications in the medical field. Diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioisotopes are now a $10B/yr business worldwide, with over 10 million procedures and patient studies performed every year. This paper will discuss the use of isotopes for these applications. In addition, beams of protons and heavy ions are being more and more widely used clinically for treatment of malignancies. To be discussed here as well will be the rationale and techniques associated with charged-particle therapy, and the progress in implementation and optimization of these technologies for clinical use.

  11. Cloud Computing for the Grid: GridControl: A Software Platform to Support the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    2012-02-08

    GENI Project: Cornell University is creating a new software platform for grid operators called GridControl that will utilize cloud computing to more efficiently control the grid. In a cloud computing system, there are minimal hardware and software demands on users. The user can tap into a network of computers that is housed elsewhere (the cloud) and the network runs computer applications for the user. The user only needs interface software to access all of the cloud’s data resources, which can be as simple as a web browser. Cloud computing can reduce costs, facilitate innovation through sharing, empower users, and improve the overall reliability of a dispersed system. Cornell’s GridControl will focus on 4 elements: delivering the state of the grid to users quickly and reliably; building networked, scalable grid-control software; tailoring services to emerging smart grid uses; and simulating smart grid behavior under various conditions.

  12. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E.; Rohrbaugh, John W.; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  13. Novel Applications of Laser Doppler Vibration Measurements to Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, Habib; Oliver, David E; Rohrbaugh, John W; Papadopoulos, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been widely used in engineering applications involving non-contact vibration and sound measurements. This technique has also been used in some biomedical applications including hearing research. The detectable frequencies are in the range of near-DC to 1 GHz or higher. This paper reviews applications of LDV in biomedical engineering and proposes new medical imaging applications based on measuring surface vibrations of tissues and organs. Tests were conducted on human skin using single point and scanning laser vibrometers. These tests suggest that skin vibrations due to the forcing excitation from the heart can be used in imaging of blood flow. The results of these tests illustrate the potential of such vibration measurements in a variety of diagnostic medical imaging applications including blood flow/restrictions, real-time monitoring of blood pressure variations, wound healing, muscle movements, etc. The fact that the measurements can be conducted remotely (non-contact) is an important benefit that adds to the promise of this approach.

  14. Modern compact accelerators of cyclotron type for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ion beam therapy and hadron therapy are types of external beam radiotherapy. Recently, the vast majority of patients have been treated with protons and carbon ions. Typically, the types of accelerators used for therapy were cyclotrons and synchrocyclotrons. It is intuitively clear that a compact facility fits best to a hospital environment intended for particle therapy and medical diagnostics. Another criterion for selection of accelerators to be mentioned in this article is application of superconducting technology to the magnetic system design of the facility. Compact isochronous cyclotrons, which accelerate protons in the energy range 9-30 MeV, have been widely used for production of radionuclides. Energy of 230 MeV has become canonical for all proton therapy accelerators. Similar application of a carbon beam requires ion energy of 430 MeV/u. Due to application of superconducting coils the magnetic field in these machines can reach 4-5 T and even 9 T in some cases. Medical cyclotrons with an ironless or nearly ironless magnetic system that have a number of advantages over the classical accelerators are in the development stage. In this work an attempt is made to describe some conceptual and technical features of modern accelerators under consideration. The emphasis is placed on the magnetic and acceleration systems along with the beam extraction unit, which are very important from the point of view of the facility compactness and compliance with the strict medical requirements.

  15. Medical applications of atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Samjin; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Kim, Kyung Sook; Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent research and application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy techniques, which are considered the multi-functional and powerful toolkits for probing the nanostructural, biomechanical and physicochemical properties of biomedical samples in medical science. We introduce briefly the basic principles of AFM and Raman spectroscopy, followed by diagnostic assessments of some selected diseases in biomedical applications using them, including mitochondria isolated from normal and ischemic hearts, hair fibers, individual cells, and human cortical bone. Finally, AFM and Raman spectroscopy applications to investigate the effects of pharmacotherapy, surgery, and medical device therapy in various medicines from cells to soft and hard tissues are discussed, including pharmacotherapy--paclitaxel on Ishikawa and HeLa cells, telmisartan on angiotensin II, mitomycin C on strabismus surgery and eye whitening surgery, and fluoride on primary teeth--and medical device therapy--collagen cross-linking treatment for the management of progressive keratoconus, radiofrequency treatment for skin rejuvenation, physical extracorporeal shockwave therapy for healing of Achilles tendinitis, orthodontic treatment, and toothbrushing time to minimize the loss of teeth after exposure to acidic drinks.

  16. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  17. Fibonacci Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, Richard; Purser, James

    2006-01-01

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in a variety of non-standard computational grids for global numerical prediction. The motivation has been to reduce problems associated with the converging meridians and the polar singularities of conventional regular latitude-longitude grids. A further impetus has come from the adoption of massively parallel computers, for which it is necessary to distribute work equitably across the processors; this is more practicable for some non-standard grids. Desirable attributes of a grid for high-order spatial finite differencing are: (i) geometrical regularity; (ii) a homogeneous and approximately isotropic spatial resolution; (iii) a low proportion of the grid points where the numerical procedures require special customization (such as near coordinate singularities or grid edges). One family of grid arrangements which, to our knowledge, has never before been applied to numerical weather prediction, but which appears to offer several technical advantages, are what we shall refer to as "Fibonacci grids". They can be thought of as mathematically ideal generalizations of the patterns occurring naturally in the spiral arrangements of seeds and fruit found in sunflower heads and pineapples (to give two of the many botanical examples). These grids possess virtually uniform and highly isotropic resolution, with an equal area for each grid point. There are only two compact singular regions on a sphere that require customized numerics. We demonstrate the practicality of these grids in shallow water simulations, and discuss the prospects for efficiently using these frameworks in three-dimensional semi-implicit and semi-Lagrangian weather prediction or climate models.

  18. Random array grid collimator

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-08-22

    A hexagonally shaped quasi-random no-two-holes touching grid collimator. The quasi-random array grid collimator eliminates contamination from small angle off-axis rays by using a no-two-holes-touching pattern which simultaneously provides for a self-supporting array increasng throughput by elimination of a substrate. The presentation invention also provides maximum throughput using hexagonally shaped holes in a hexagonal lattice pattern for diffraction limited applications. Mosaicking is also disclosed for reducing fabrication effort.

  19. Overture: The grid classes

    SciTech Connect

    Brislawn, K.; Brown, D.; Chesshire, G.; Henshaw, W.

    1997-01-01

    Overture is a library containing classes for grids, overlapping grid generation and the discretization and solution of PDEs on overlapping grids. This document describes the Overture grid classes, including classes for single grids and classes for collections of grids.

  20. Weekly-gridded Aquarius L-band radiometer/scatterometer observations and salinity retrievals over the polar regions: applications for cryospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brucker, L.; Dinnat, E.; Koenig, L. S.

    2013-12-01

    Passive and active observations at L band (frequency ~1.413 GHz) from the Aquarius/SAC-D mission offer new capabilities to study the polar regions. However, due to the lack of polar-gridded products, applications over the cryosphere are limited. To allow for an efficient use of the Aquarius data over the polar regions, and to move forward our understanding of the L-band observations of ice sheet, sea ice, permafrost, and polar oceans, we present three weekly-polar-gridded products. Aquarius data at latitudes higher than 50° were averaged and gridded into three weekly products of Brightness Temperature (TB), Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS), and Sea Surface Salinity (SSS). These products are suited for cryospheric studies, and each grid cell contains sea ice fraction and the standard deviation of TB, NRCS, and SSS along with the number of footprint observations collected during the seven-day cycle. The data sets are produced on the version 2.0 Equal-Area Scalable Earth (EASE2.0) grid, with a grid cell resolution of 36 km. This paper describes the products, and presents maps and time series of Aquarius weekly-gridded data over the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, sea ice in both hemispheres, subarctic land where seasonal snow and frozen soil may exist, and the polar oceans. A brief analysis of L-band observations is given to encourage future use of the products. They can be used for improving our understanding of low microwave frequency observations, and for the development of algorithms. The new weekly-polar-gridded datasets start in August 2011, with the first Aquarius observations, and it is anticipated that they will be updated on a monthly basis following the release schedule of the Level 2 data sets.

  1. Grids = Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrington, Linda; Carter, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Proposes that narrow columns provide a flexible system of organization for designers. Notes that grids serve the content on the pages, help to develop a layout that will clearly direct the reader to information; and prevent visual monotony. Concludes when grid layouts are used, school publications look as good as professional ones. (PM)

  2. PLL Based Energy Efficient PV System with Fuzzy Logic Based Power Tracker for Smart Grid Applications.

    PubMed

    Rohini, G; Jamuna, V

    This work aims at improving the dynamic performance of the available photovoltaic (PV) system and maximizing the power obtained from it by the use of cascaded converters with intelligent control techniques. Fuzzy logic based maximum power point technique is embedded on the first conversion stage to obtain the maximum power from the available PV array. The cascading of second converter is needed to maintain the terminal voltage at grid potential. The soft-switching region of three-stage converter is increased with the proposed phase-locked loop based control strategy. The proposed strategy leads to reduction in the ripple content, rating of components, and switching losses. The PV array is mathematically modeled and the system is simulated and the results are analyzed. The performance of the system is compared with the existing maximum power point tracking algorithms. The authors have endeavored to accomplish maximum power and improved reliability for the same insolation of the PV system. Hardware results of the system are also discussed to prove the validity of the simulation results.

  3. All-Iron Redox Flow Battery Tailored for Off-Grid Portable Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Michael C.; Phillips, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2015-11-20

    We proposed and developed an all-iron redox flow battery for end users without access to an electricity grid. The concept is a low-cost battery which the user assembles, discharges, and then disposes of the active materials. Our design goals are: (1) minimize upfront cost, (2) maximize discharge energy, and (3) utilize non-toxic and environmentally benign materials. These are different goals than typically considered for electrochemical battery technology, which provides the opportunity for a novel solution. The selected materials are: low-carbon-steel negative electrode, paper separator, porous-carbon-paper positive electrode, and electrolyte solution containing 0.5 m Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 active material and 1.2 m NaCl supporting electrolyte. Furthermore, with these materials, an average power density around 20 mW cm -2 and a maximum energy density of 11.5 Wh L -1 are achieved. A simple cost model indicates the consumable materials cost US$6.45 per kWh -1 , or only US$0.034 per mobile phone charge.

  4. PLL Based Energy Efficient PV System with Fuzzy Logic Based Power Tracker for Smart Grid Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rohini, G.; Jamuna, V.

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at improving the dynamic performance of the available photovoltaic (PV) system and maximizing the power obtained from it by the use of cascaded converters with intelligent control techniques. Fuzzy logic based maximum power point technique is embedded on the first conversion stage to obtain the maximum power from the available PV array. The cascading of second converter is needed to maintain the terminal voltage at grid potential. The soft-switching region of three-stage converter is increased with the proposed phase-locked loop based control strategy. The proposed strategy leads to reduction in the ripple content, rating of components, and switching losses. The PV array is mathematically modeled and the system is simulated and the results are analyzed. The performance of the system is compared with the existing maximum power point tracking algorithms. The authors have endeavored to accomplish maximum power and improved reliability for the same insolation of the PV system. Hardware results of the system are also discussed to prove the validity of the simulation results. PMID:27294189

  5. All-Iron Redox Flow Battery Tailored for Off-Grid Portable Applications

    DOE PAGES

    Tucker, Michael C.; Phillips, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

    2015-11-20

    We proposed and developed an all-iron redox flow battery for end users without access to an electricity grid. The concept is a low-cost battery which the user assembles, discharges, and then disposes of the active materials. Our design goals are: (1) minimize upfront cost, (2) maximize discharge energy, and (3) utilize non-toxic and environmentally benign materials. These are different goals than typically considered for electrochemical battery technology, which provides the opportunity for a novel solution. The selected materials are: low-carbon-steel negative electrode, paper separator, porous-carbon-paper positive electrode, and electrolyte solution containing 0.5 m Fe 2 (SO 4 ) 3 activemore » material and 1.2 m NaCl supporting electrolyte. Furthermore, with these materials, an average power density around 20 mW cm -2 and a maximum energy density of 11.5 Wh L -1 are achieved. A simple cost model indicates the consumable materials cost US$6.45 per kWh -1 , or only US$0.034 per mobile phone charge.« less

  6. Resilience Analytics with Application to Power Grid of a Developing Region.

    PubMed

    Thorisson, Heimir; Lambert, James H; Cardenas, John J; Linkov, Igor

    2016-09-30

    Infrastructure development of volatile regions is a significant investment by international government and nongovernment organizations, with attendant requirements for risk management. Global development banks may be tasked to manage these investments and provide a channel between donors and borrowers. Moreover, various stakeholders from the private sector, local and international agencies, and the military can be engaged in conception, planning, and implementation of constituent projects. Emergent and future conditions of military conflict, politics, economics, technology, environment, behaviors, institutions, and society that stress infrastructure development are prevalent, and funding mechanisms are vulnerable to fraud, waste, and abuse. This article will apply resilience analytics with scenario-based preferences to identify the stressors that most influence a prioritization of initiatives in the electric power sector of Afghanistan. The resilience in this article is conceived in terms of the degree of disruption of priorities when stressors influence the preferences of stakeholders, and ultimately a prioritization of initiatives. The ancillary results include an understanding of which initiatives contribute most and least across strategic criteria and which criteria have the most impact for the analysis. The article concludes with recommendations for risk monitoring and risk management of the portfolio of stressors through the life cycle and horizon of grid capacity expansion.

  7. All-Iron Redox Flow Battery Tailored for Off-Grid Portable Applications.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Michael C; Phillips, Adam; Weber, Adam Z

    2015-12-07

    An all-iron redox flow battery is proposed and developed for end users without access to an electricity grid. The concept is a low-cost battery which the user assembles, discharges, and then disposes of the active materials. The design goals are: (1) minimize upfront cost, (2) maximize discharge energy, and (3) utilize non-toxic and environmentally benign materials. These are different goals than typically considered for electrochemical battery technology, which provides the opportunity for a novel solution. The selected materials are: low-carbon-steel negative electrode, paper separator, porous-carbon-paper positive electrode, and electrolyte solution containing 0.5 m Fe2 (SO4 )3 active material and 1.2 m NaCl supporting electrolyte. With these materials, an average power density around 20 mW cm(-2) and a maximum energy density of 11.5 Wh L(-1) are achieved. A simple cost model indicates the consumable materials cost US$6.45 per kWh(-1) , or only US$0.034 per mobile phone charge.

  8. [Non-medical applications for brain MRI: Ethical considerations].

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, S; Fagot-Largeault, A; Leboyer, M; Houenou, J

    2015-04-01

    The recent neuroimaging techniques offer the possibility to better understand complex cognitive processes that are involved in mental disorders and thus have become cornerstone tools for research in psychiatry. The performances of functional magnetic resonance imaging are not limited to medical research and are used in non-medical fields. These recent applications represent new challenges for bioethics. In this article we aim at discussing the new ethical issues raised by the applications of the latest neuroimaging technologies to non-medical fields. We included a selection of peer-reviewed English medical articles after a search on NCBI Pubmed database and Google scholar from 2000 to 2013. We screened bibliographical tables for supplementary references. Websites of governmental French institutions implicated in ethical questions were also screened for governmental reports. Findings of brain areas supporting emotional responses and regulation have been used for marketing research, also called neuromarketing. The discovery of different brain activation patterns in antisocial disorder has led to changes in forensic psychiatry with the use of imaging techniques with unproven validity. Automated classification algorithms and multivariate statistical analyses of brain images have been applied to brain-reading techniques, aiming at predicting unconscious neural processes in humans. We finally report the current position of the French legislation recently revised and discuss the technical limits of such techniques. In the near future, brain imaging could find clinical applications in psychiatry as diagnostic or predictive tools. However, the latest advances in brain imaging are also used in non-scientific fields raising key ethical questions. Involvement of neuroscientists, psychiatrists, physicians but also of citizens in neuroethics discussions is crucial to challenge the risk of unregulated uses of brain imaging. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by

  9. 21 CFR 515.11 - Supplemental medicated feed mill license applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplemental medicated feed mill license... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS MEDICATED FEED MILL LICENSE Applications § 515.11 Supplemental medicated feed mill license applications. (a) After approval of a medicated feed...

  10. A Speckle Reduction Filter Using Wavelet-Based Methods for Medical Imaging Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    A Speckle Reduction Filter using Wavelet-Based Methods for Medical Imaging Application Su...Wavelet-Based Methods for Medical Imaging Application Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number Work

  11. A Software Development Platform for Wearable Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruikai; Lin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Wearable medical devices have become a leading trend in healthcare industry. Microcontrollers are computers on a chip with sufficient processing power and preferred embedded computing units in those devices. We have developed a software platform specifically for the design of the wearable medical applications with a small code footprint on the microcontrollers. It is supported by the open source real time operating system FreeRTOS and supplemented with a set of standard APIs for the architectural specific hardware interfaces on the microcontrollers for data acquisition and wireless communication. We modified the tick counter routine in FreeRTOS to include a real time soft clock. When combined with the multitasking features in the FreeRTOS, the platform offers the quick development of wearable applications and easy porting of the application code to different microprocessors. Test results have demonstrated that the application software developed using this platform are highly efficient in CPU usage while maintaining a small code foot print to accommodate the limited memory space in microcontrollers.

  12. Properties and medical applications of shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Tarniţă, Daniela; Tarniţă, D N; Bîzdoacă, N; Mîndrilă, I; Vasilescu, Mirela

    2009-01-01

    One of the most known intelligent material is nitinol, which offers many functional advantages over conventional implantable alloys. Applications of SMA to the biomedical field have been successful because of their functional qualities, enhancing both the possibility and the execution of less invasive surgeries. The biocompatibility of these alloys is one of their most important features. Different applications exploit the shape memory effect (one-way or two-way) and the super elasticity, so that they can be employed in orthopedic and cardiovascular applications, as well as in the manufacture of new surgical tools. Therefore, one can say that smart materials, especially SMA, are becoming noticeable in the biomedical field. Super elastic NiTi has become a material of strategic importance as it allows to overcome a wide range of technical and design issues relating to the miniaturization of medical devices and the increasing trend for less invasive and therefore less traumatic procedures. This paper will consider just why the main properties of shape memory alloys hold so many opportunities for medical devices and will review a selection of current applications.

  13. Applications of Professional Video Equipment in Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Y. K.; Cvetko, J. F.; Sandau, J.

    1996-03-01

    The use of full-motion video technology in scientific applications is common. Yet, most researchers utilize remarkably simple technology, frequently intended for consumer applications. In many cases, this may be adequate. However, equipment budget issues aside, we find that this is often caused by a lack of familiarity with the state-of-the-art. From the world of broadcasters, production houses, and other professional users of video, there exists a wide range of equipment based on different industry standards. They provide storage, retrieval, and transport capabilities that add functionality and flexibility unavailable in lower-end equipment. We have developed an interactive video system, on which multiple high-resolution video sources may be recorded synchronously at a fixed frame rate of 30/s. The stored video can be forwarded over local- or wide-area networks and viewed on analog display monitors. Applications to bio-medical imaging systems will be emphasized here.

  14. Infrared laser-based sensing in medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigrist, Markus W.; Bartlome, Richard; Gianella, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Laser-spectroscopic applications in medicine increase in importance. We present two medical applications of laser-based analyses of trace gases. The analysis of exhaled breath concerns the determination of the D/H isotope ratio after intake of a small amount of heavy water. The D/H isotope ratio can be used to deduce the total body water weight and lays the foundation for many other laser-based clinical applications. An elevated D/H ratio could be monitored in breath samples up to 30 days after ingestion of only 5 ml of D2O. A second example concerns the analysis of surgical smoke produced in minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery with electroknives. The quantitative determination of harmless and hazardous compounds down to the ppm level is demonstrated. A specific example is the presence of sevoflurane at concentrations of 80 to 300 ppm, an anesthetic, which to our knowledge is measured for the first time in an abdominal cavity.

  15. User Interface Design in Medical Distributed Web Applications.

    PubMed

    Serban, Alexandru; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Mada, Leonard; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara

    2016-01-01

    User interfaces are important to facilitate easy learning and operating with an IT application especially in the medical world. An easy to use interface has to be simple and to customize the user needs and mode of operation. The technology in the background is an important tool to accomplish this. The present work aims to creating a web interface using specific technology (HTML table design combined with CSS3) to provide an optimized responsive interface for a complex web application. In the first phase, the current icMED web medical application layout is analyzed, and its structure is designed using specific tools, on source files. In the second phase, a new graphic adaptable interface to different mobile terminals is proposed, (using HTML table design (TD) and CSS3 method) that uses no source files, just lines of code for layout design, improving the interaction in terms of speed and simplicity. For a complex medical software application a new prototype layout was designed and developed using HTML tables. The method uses a CSS code with only CSS classes applied to one or multiple HTML table elements, instead of CSS styles that can be applied to just one DIV tag at once. The technique has the advantage of a simplified CSS code, and a better adaptability to different media resolutions compared to DIV-CSS style method. The presented work is a proof that adaptive web interfaces can be developed just using and combining different types of design methods and technologies, using HTML table design, resulting in a simpler to learn and use interface, suitable for healthcare services.

  16. Aliphatic polyesters for medical imaging and theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Nottelet, Benjamin; Darcos, Vincent; Coudane, Jean

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging is a cornerstone of modern medicine. In that context the development of innovative imaging systems combining biomaterials and contrast agents (CAs)/imaging probes (IPs) for improved diagnostic and theranostic applications focuses intense research efforts. In particular, the classical aliphatic (co)polyesters poly(lactide) (PLA), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), attract much attention due to their long track record in the medical field. This review aims therefore at providing a state-of-the-art of polyester-based imaging systems. In a first section a rapid description of the various imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and radionuclide imaging (SPECT, PET) will be given. Then, the two main strategies used to combine the CAs/IPs and the polyesters will be discussed. In more detail we will first present the strategies relying on CAs/IPs encapsulation in nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers or capsules. We will then present chemical modifications of polyesters backbones and/or polyester surfaces to yield macromolecular imaging agents. Finally, opportunities offered by these innovative systems will be illustrated with some recent examples in the fields of cell labeling, diagnostic or theranostic applications and medical devices.

  17. Grid generation using classical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1980-01-01

    A brief historical review of conformal mapping and its applications to problems in fluid mechanics and electromagnetism is presented. The use of conformal mapping as a grid generator is described. The philosophy of the 'closed form' approach and its application to a Neumann problem is discussed. Karman-Trefftz mappings and grids for ablated, three dimensional bodies are also discussed.

  18. Plasma medicine—current state of research and medical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th

    2017-01-01

    Plasma medicine means the direct application of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on or in the human body for therapeutic purposes. Further, the field interacts strongly with results gained for biological decontamination. Experimental research as well as first practical application is realized using two basic principles of CAP sources: dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) and atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJ). Originating from the fundamental insights that the biological effects of CAP are most probably caused by changes of the liquid environment of cells, and are dominated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), basic mechanisms of biological plasma activity are identified. It was demonstrated that there is no increased risk of cold plasma application and, above all, there are no indications for genotoxic effects. The most important biological effects of cold atmospheric pressure plasma were identified: (1) inactivation of a broad spectrum of microorganisms including multidrug resistant ones; (2) stimulation of cell proliferation and tissue regeneration with lower plasma treatment intensity (treatment time); (3) inactivation of cells by initialization of programmed cell death (apoptosis) with higher plasma treatment intensity (treatment time). In recent years, the main focus of clinical applications was in the field of wound healing and treatment of infective skin diseases. First CAP sources are CE-certified as medical devices now which is the main precondition to start the introduction of plasma medicine into clinical reality. Plasma application in dentistry and, above all, CAP use for cancer treatment are becoming more and more important research fields in plasma medicine. A further in-depth knowledge of control and adaptation of plasma parameters and plasma geometries is needed to obtain suitable and reliable plasma sources for the different therapeutic indications and to open up new fields of medical application.

  19. Daily temperature grids for Austria since 1961—concept, creation and applicability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiebl, Johann; Frei, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Current interest into past climate change and its potential role for changes in the environment call for spatially distributed climate datasets of high temporal resolution and extending over several decades. To foster such research, we present a new gridded dataset of daily minimum and maximum temperature covering Austria at 1-km resolution and extending back till 1961 at daily time resolution. To account for the complex and highly variable thermal distributions in this high-mountain region, we adapt and employ a recently published interpolation method that estimates nonlinear temperature profiles with altitude and accounts for the non-Euclidean spatial representativity of station measurements. The spatial analysis builds upon 150 station series in and around Austria (homogenised where available), all of which extend over or were gap-filled to cover the entire study period. The restriction to (almost) complete records shall avoid long-term inconsistencies from changes in the station network. Systematic leave-one-out cross-validation reveals interpolation errors (mean absolute error) of about 1 °C. Errors are relatively larger for minimum compared to maximum temperatures, for the interior of the Alps compared to the flatland and for winter compared to summer. Visual comparisons suggest that valley-scale inversions and föhn are more realistically captured in the new compared to existing datasets. The usefulness of the presented dataset (SPARTACUS) is illustrated in preliminary analyses of long-term trends in climate impact indices. These reveal spatially variable and eventually considerable changes in the thermal climate in Austria.

  20. Dynamic modeling of hybrid renewable energy systems for off-grid applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasemeyer, Mark David

    The volatile prices of fossil fuels and their contribution to global warming have caused many people to turn to renewable energy systems. Many developing communities are forced to use these systems as they are too far from electrical distribution. As a result, numerous software models have been developed to simulate hybrid renewable energy systems. However almost, if not all, implementations are static in design. A static design limits the ability of the model to account for changes over time. Dynamic modeling can be used to fill the gaps where other modeling techniques fall short. This modeling practice allows the user to account for the effects of technological and economic factors over time. These factors can include changes in energy demand, energy production, and income level. Dynamic modeling can be particularly useful for developing communities who are off-grid and developing at rapid rates. In this study, a dynamic model was used to evaluate a real world system. A non-governmental organization interested in improving their current infrastructure was selected. Five different scenarios were analyzed and compared in order to discover which factors the model is most sensitive to. In four of the scenarios, a new energy system was purchased in order to account for the opening of a restaurant that would be used as a source of local income generation. These scenarios were then compared to a base case in which a new system was not purchased, and the restaurant was not opened. Finally, the results were used to determine which variables had the greatest impact on the various outputs of the simulation.

  1. Medical Applications Of CO2 Laser Fiber Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCord, R. C.

    1981-07-01

    In 1978, Hughes Laboratories reported development of fiber optics that were capable of transmitting CO2 laser energy. These fibers are now being tested for medical applications. Wide ranging medical investigation with CO2 lasers has occurred during the twelve years since the first observations of laser hemostasis. Specialists in ophthalmology, neurosurgery, urology, gynecology, otolaryngology, maxillo-facial/plastic surgery, dermatology, and oncology among others, have explored its use. In principle, all these specialists use CO2 laser radiation at 10.6 microns to thermally destroy diseased tissues. As such, CO2 lasers compare and compete with electrosurgical devices. The fundamental difference between these modalities lies in how they generate heat in treated tissue.

  2. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-12-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country.

  3. Recent application of quantification II in Japanese medical research.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, T; Kudo, A

    1979-01-01

    Hayashi's Quantification II is a method of multivariate discrimination analysis to manipulate attribute data as predictor variables. It is very useful in the medical research field for estimation, diagnosis, prognosis, evaluation of epidemiological factors, and other problems based on multiplicity of attribute data. In Japan, this method is so well known that most of the computer program packages include the Hayashi Quantification, but it seems to be yet unfamiliar with the method for researchers outside Japan. In view of this situation, we introduced 19 selected articles of recent applications of the Quantification II in Japanese medical research. In reviewing these papers, special mention is made to clarify how the researchers were satisfied with findings provided by the method. At the same time, some recommendations are made about terminology and program packages. Also a brief discussion of the background of the quantification methods is given with special reference to the Behaviormetric Society of Japan. PMID:540587

  4. Using medical genetics applications to educate for computer competence.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, J A

    1991-01-01

    This article proposes specific areas of computing competence and illustrates how these skills can be acquired as an integral part of the curriculum of medical genetics. Geneticists are at the forefront in the use of computers for medical care, because of the driving force of the Human Genome Project. Computer searching of international data bases is the most efficient method to keep current with the explosion in molecular genetics data and with its immediate relevance to clinical care. The use of computers in genetics education could go far beyond the use of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) to show how to use computer systems to assist with clinical decisions. The proposed basic computer skills can be obtained using genetics software. The six proposed skills include the use of (1) microcomputers, (2) productivity software, (3) CAI, patient simulations and specific application programs, (4) remote computers, (5) data bases and knowledge bases, and (6) computers to improve the clinical care of patients. PMID:1928095

  5. Medical applications of microarray technologies: a regulatory science perspective.

    PubMed

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Hackett, Joseph L; Lesko, Lawrence J; Puri, Raj K; Gutman, Steven I; Chumakov, Konstantin; Woodcock, Janet; Feigal, David W; Zoon, Kathryn C; Sistare, Frank D

    2002-12-01

    The potential medical applications of microarrays have generated much excitement, and some skepticism, within the biomedical community. Some researchers have suggested that within the decade microarrays will be routinely used in the selection, assessment, and quality control of the best drugs for pharmaceutical development, as well as for disease diagnosis and for monitoring desired and adverse outcomes of therapeutic interventions. Realizing this potential will be a challenge for the whole scientific community, as breakthroughs that show great promise at the bench often fail to meet the requirements of clinicians and regulatory scientists. The development of a cooperative framework among regulators, product sponsors, and technology experts will be essential for realizing the revolutionary promise that microarrays hold for drug development, regulatory science, medical practice and public health.

  6. Similarities and differences of hyperbaric oxygen and medical ozone applications.

    PubMed

    Ozler, Mehmet; Akay, Coskun; Oter, Sukru; Ay, Hakan; Korkmaz, Ahmet

    2011-11-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment is based on the principle of having the patient breath 100% oxygen in an environment above atmospheric pressure. Ozone (O(3)) is a colourless gas with a specific odour and consists of three oxygen atoms. The classical scientific understanding is that the world has become a place suitable for life for aerobic organisms with the increasing oxygen in the atmosphere billions of years ago. The formation of ozone after oxygen has then protected aerobic creatures from harmful rays. We now use these two gases for treatment purposes. It is noteworthy that the oxygen and ozone molecules that are formed by the same atom in different numbers are used for similar medical indications. We will try to emphasize the similarities and differences of HBO and medical ozone applications in this article.

  7. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-01-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country. PMID:26807414

  8. Medical and biological applications for ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Will, Fabian; Singh, Ajoy I.; Serbin, Jesper; Ostendorf, Andreas; Kermani, Omid; Heermann, R.; Welling, Herbert; Ertmer, Wolfgang

    2003-02-01

    Due to the low energy threshold of photodisruption with fs laser pulses, thermal and mechanical side effects are limited to the sub μm range. The neglection of side effects enables the use of ultrashort laser pulses in a broad field of medical applications. Moreover, the interaction process based on nonlinear absorption offers the opportunity to process transparent tissue three dimensionally inside the bulk. We demonstrate the feasibility of surgical procedures in different fields of medical interest: In ophthalmology intrastromal cutting and preparing of corneal flaps for refractive surgery in living animals is presented. Besides, the very low mechanical side effects enables the use of fs-laser in otoralyngology to treat ocecular bones. Moreover, the precise cutting quality can be used in fields of cardiovascular surgery for the treatment of arteriosclerosis as well as in dentistry to remove caries from dental hard tissue.

  9. Nuclear Data for Medical Applications - Recent Developments and Future Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, A. L.; Capote, R.

    2014-06-01

    Cancer treatment represents a major economic and medical issue because of the extensive incidence of the disease worldwide, with a particularly large rate of increase to be found in developing countries. Over the previous twenty years, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has dedicated a series of investigations towards identifying and quantifying the production routes and decay characteristics of radioisotopes judged to be of existing and emerging importance in nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. Both the recommendations formulated during the course of these technical debates and the results of recently completed and on-going IAEA coordinated research projects are focused towards the successful evolution of improvements in nuclear data for medical applications throughout the early 21st century.

  10. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  11. CaGrid Workflow Toolkit: A taverna based workflow tool for cancer grid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In biological and medical domain, the use of web services made the data and computation functionality accessible in a unified manner, which helped automate the data pipeline that was previously performed manually. Workflow technology is widely used in the orchestration of multiple services to facilitate in-silico research. Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) is an information network enabling the sharing of cancer research related resources and caGrid is its underlying service-based computation infrastructure. CaBIG requires that services are composed and orchestrated in a given sequence to realize data pipelines, which are often called scientific workflows. Results CaGrid selected Taverna as its workflow execution system of choice due to its integration with web service technology and support for a wide range of web services, plug-in architecture to cater for easy integration of third party extensions, etc. The caGrid Workflow Toolkit (or the toolkit for short), an extension to the Taverna workflow system, is designed and implemented to ease building and running caGrid workflows. It provides users with support for various phases in using workflows: service discovery, composition and orchestration, data access, and secure service invocation, which have been identified by the caGrid community as challenging in a multi-institutional and cross-discipline domain. Conclusions By extending the Taverna Workbench, caGrid Workflow Toolkit provided a comprehensive solution to compose and coordinate services in caGrid, which would otherwise remain isolated and disconnected from each other. Using it users can access more than 140 services and are offered with a rich set of features including discovery of data and analytical services, query and transfer of data, security protections for service invocations, state management in service interactions, and sharing of workflows, experiences and best practices. The proposed solution is general enough to be

  12. CaGrid Workflow Toolkit: a Taverna based workflow tool for cancer grid.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei; Madduri, Ravi; Nenadic, Alexandra; Soiland-Reyes, Stian; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Foster, Ian; Goble, Carole A

    2010-11-02

    In biological and medical domain, the use of web services made the data and computation functionality accessible in a unified manner, which helped automate the data pipeline that was previously performed manually. Workflow technology is widely used in the orchestration of multiple services to facilitate in-silico research. Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG) is an information network enabling the sharing of cancer research related resources and caGrid is its underlying service-based computation infrastructure. CaBIG requires that services are composed and orchestrated in a given sequence to realize data pipelines, which are often called scientific workflows. CaGrid selected Taverna as its workflow execution system of choice due to its integration with web service technology and support for a wide range of web services, plug-in architecture to cater for easy integration of third party extensions, etc. The caGrid Workflow Toolkit (or the toolkit for short), an extension to the Taverna workflow system, is designed and implemented to ease building and running caGrid workflows. It provides users with support for various phases in using workflows: service discovery, composition and orchestration, data access, and secure service invocation, which have been identified by the caGrid community as challenging in a multi-institutional and cross-discipline domain. By extending the Taverna Workbench, caGrid Workflow Toolkit provided a comprehensive solution to compose and coordinate services in caGrid, which would otherwise remain isolated and disconnected from each other. Using it users can access more than 140 services and are offered with a rich set of features including discovery of data and analytical services, query and transfer of data, security protections for service invocations, state management in service interactions, and sharing of workflows, experiences and best practices. The proposed solution is general enough to be applicable and reusable within other

  13. Historical (1850-2000) gridded anthropogenic and biomass burning emissions of reactive gases and aerosols:methodology and application

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarque, J. F.; Bond, Tami C.; Eyring, Veronika; Granier, Claire; Heil, Angelika; Klimont, Z.; Lee, David S.; Liousse, Catherine; Mieville, Aude; Owen, Bethan; Schultz, Martin; Shindell, Drew; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; van Aardenne, John; Cooper, Owen; Kainuma, M.; Mahowald, Natalie; McConnell, J.R.; Naik, Vaishali; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2010-08-11

    We present and discuss a new dataset of gridded emissions covering the historical period (1850-2000) in decadal increments at a horizontal resolution of 0.5° in latitude and longitude. The primary purpose of this inventory is to provide consistent gridded emissions of reactive gases and aerosols for use in chemistry model simulations needed by climate models for the Climate Model Intercomparison Program #5 (CMIP5) in support of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment report. Our best estimate for the year 2000 inventory represents a combination of existing regional and global inventories to capture the best information available at this point; 40 regions and 12 sectors were used to combine the various sources. The historical reconstruction of each emitted compound, for each region and sector, was then forced to agree with our 2000 estimate, ensuring continuity between past and 2000 emissions. Application of these emissions into two chemistry-climate models is used to test their ability to capture long-term changes in atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide and aerosols distributions. The simulated long-term change in the Northern mid-latitudes surface and mid-troposphere ozone is not quite as rapid as observed. However, stations outside this latitude band show much better agreement in both present-day and long-term trend. The model simulations consistently underestimate the carbon monoxide trend, while capturing the long-term trend at the Mace Head station. The simulated sulfate and black carbon deposition over Greenland is in very good agreement with the ice-core observations spanning the simulation period. Finally, aerosol optical depth and additional aerosol diagnostics are shown to be in good agreement with previously published estimates.

  14. Current Grid operation and future role of the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, O.

    2012-12-01

    Grid-like technologies and approaches became an integral part of HEP experiments. Some other scientific communities also use similar technologies for data-intensive computations. The distinct feature of Grid computing is the ability to federate heterogeneous resources of different ownership into a seamless infrastructure, accessible via a single log-on. Like other infrastructures of similar nature, Grid functioning requires not only technologically sound basis, but also reliable operation procedures, monitoring and accounting. The two aspects, technological and operational, are closely related: weaker is the technology, more burden is on operations, and other way around. As of today, Grid technologies are still evolving: at CERN alone, every LHC experiment uses an own Grid-like system. This inevitably creates a heavy load on operations. Infrastructure maintenance, monitoring and incident response are done on several levels, from local system administrators to large international organisations, involving massive human effort worldwide. The necessity to commit substantial resources is one of the obstacles faced by smaller research communities when moving computing to the Grid. Moreover, most current Grid solutions were developed under significant influence of HEP use cases, and thus need additional effort to adapt them to other applications. Reluctance of many non-HEP researchers to use Grid negatively affects the outlook for national Grid organisations, which strive to provide multi-science services. We started from the situation where Grid organisations were fused with HEP laboratories and national HEP research programmes; we hope to move towards the world where Grid will ultimately reach the status of generic public computing and storage service provider and permanent national and international Grid infrastructures will be established. How far will we be able to advance along this path, depends on us. If no standardisation and convergence efforts will take place

  15. Integrating web portlet technologies with caGrid to enable rapid application development: the CRC Patient Study Calendar.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O; Payne, Philip Richard Orrin; Kwok, Alan; Greaves, Andrew W

    2008-11-06

    The caGrid middleware provides an extensible platform for the integration of heterogeneous data sources and services; such as those found in geographically distributed research consortia. We describe an architectural approach to the integration of web portlet technologies with caGrid in order to facilitate the rapid development of highly usable presentation models for grid-based data sources and services, using the development of a patient study calendar for the CLL Research Consortium as a motivating use case.

  16. ``Low Power Wireless Technologies: An Approach to Medical Applications''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellido O., Francisco J.; González R., Miguel; Moreno M., Antonio; de La Cruz F, José Luis

    Wireless communication supposed a great both -quantitative and qualitative, jump in the management of the information, allowing the access and interchange of it without the need of a physical cable connection. The wireless transmission of voice and information has remained in constant evolution, arising new standards like BluetoothTM, WibreeTM or ZigbeeTM developed under the IEEE 802.15 norm. These newest wireless technologies are oriented to systems of communication of short-medium distance and optimized for a low cost and minor consume, becoming recognized as a flexible and reliable medium for data communications across a broad range of applications due to the potential that the wireless networks presents to operate in demanding environments providing clear advantages in cost, size, power, flexibility, and distributed intelligence. About the medical applications, the remote health or telecare (also called eHealth) is getting a bigger place into the manufacturers and medical companies, in order to incorporate products for assisted living and remote monitoring of health parameteres. At this point, the IEEE 1073, Personal Health Devices Working Group, stablish the framework for these kind of applications. Particularly, the 1073.3.X describes the physical and transport layers, where the new ultra low power short range wireless technologies can play a big role, providing solutions that allow the design of products which are particularly appropriate for monitor people’s health with interoperability requirements.

  17. Access Control based on Attribute Certificates for Medical Intranet Applications

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, Christos; Pangalos, George; Khair, Marie

    2001-01-01

    Background Clinical information systems frequently use intranet and Internet technologies. However these technologies have emphasized sharing and not security, despite the sensitive and private nature of much health information. Digital certificates (electronic documents which recognize an entity or its attributes) can be used to control access in clinical intranet applications. Objectives To outline the need for access control in distributed clinical database systems, to describe the use of digital certificates and security policies, and to propose the architecture for a system using digital certificates, cryptography and security policy to control access to clinical intranet applications. Methods We have previously developed a security policy, DIMEDAC (Distributed Medical Database Access Control), which is compatible with emerging public key and privilege management infrastructure. In our implementation approach we propose the use of digital certificates, to be used in conjunction with DIMEDAC. Results Our proposed access control system consists of two phases: the ways users gain their security credentials; and how these credentials are used to access medical data. Three types of digital certificates are used: identity certificates for authentication; attribute certificates for authorization; and access-rule certificates for propagation of access control policy. Once a user is identified and authenticated, subsequent access decisions are based on a combination of identity and attribute certificates, with access-rule certificates providing the policy framework. Conclusions Access control in clinical intranet applications can be successfully and securely managed through the use of digital certificates and the DIMEDAC security policy. PMID:11720951

  18. Development of an unstructured-grid wave-current coupled model and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xingru; Yin, Baoshu; Yang, Dezhou

    2016-08-01

    An unstructured grid wave-current coupled model was developed by coupling the SWAN (Simulating Waves Nearshore) wave model and ADCIRC (Advanced Circulation model) ocean model through the Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT). The developed coupled model has high spatial resolution in the coastal area and is efficient for computation. The efficiency of the newly developed SWAN + ADCIRC model was compared with that of the widely-used SWAN + ADCIRC coupled model, in which SWAN and ADCIRC are coupled directly rather than through the MCT. Results show that the directly-coupled model is more efficient when the total number of computational cores is small, but the MCT-coupled model begin to run faster than the directly-coupled model when more computational cores are used. The MCT-coupled model maintains the scalability longer and can increase the simulation efficiency more than 35% by comparing the minimum wall clock time of one day simulation in the test runs. The MCT-coupled SWAN + ADCIRC model was used to simulate the storm surge and waves during the typhoon Usagi which formed in the western Pacific on September 17, 2013 and landed at Shanwei, China. Three numerical experiments were performed to investigate the effect of wave-current interaction on the storm surge and waves. The results show that the coupled model can better simulate the storm surge and waves when considering the wave-induced radiation stress, the wave effect on the wind stress drag coefficient and the modulation of current and water level on waves. During the typhoon Usagi, the effect of wave radiation stress could result in a maximum of 0.75 m increase in the extreme storm surge, and the wave induced wind stress could cause a -0.82∼0.48 m change of the extreme storm surge near the coastal area. Besides, the radiation stress forced currents cannot be ignored either in the study of mass transport at coastal zones. Results of this study are useful for understanding the wave-current interaction processes and

  19. Medical and surgical applications of space biosensor technology.

    PubMed

    Hines, J W

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in space life sciences are rapidly approaching a technology impasse. Many of the critical questions on the impact of spaceflight on living systems simply cannot be answered with the limited available technologies. Research subjects, particularly small animal models like the rat, must be allowed to function relatively untended and unrestrained for long periods to fully reflect the impact of microgravity and spaceflight on their behavior and physiology. These requirements preclude the use of present hard-wired instrumentation techniques and limited data acquisition systems. Implantable sensors and miniaturized biotelemetry are the only means of capturing the fundamental and critical data. This same biosensor and biotelemetry technology has direct application to Earth-based medicine and surgery. Continuous, on-line data acquisition and improved measurement capabilities combined with the ease and flexibility offered by automated, wireless, and portable instruments and data systems, should provide a boon to the health care industry. Playing a key role in this technology revolution is the Sensors 2000! (S2K!) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. S2K!, in collaboration with space life sciences researchers and managers, provides an integrated capability for sensor technology development and applications, including advanced biosensor technology development, spaceflight hardware development, and technology transfer and commercialization. S2K! is presently collaborating on several spaceflight projects with dual-use medical applications. One prime example is a collaboration with the Fetal Treatment Center (FTC) at the University of California at San Francisco. The goal is to develop and apply implantable chemical sensor and biotelemetry technology to continuously monitor fetal patients during extra-uterine surgery, replacement into the womb, through birth and beyond. Once validated for ground use, the method will be transitioned to spaceflight applications to

  20. Medical and surgical applications of space biosensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers in space life sciences are rapidly approaching a technology impasse. Many of the critical questions on the impact of spaceflight on living systems simply cannot be answered with the limited available technologies. Research subjects, particularly small animal models like the rat, must be allowed to function relatively untended and unrestrained for long periods to fully reflect the impact of microgravity and spaceflight on their behavior and physiology. These requirements preclude the use of present hard-wired instrumentation techniques and limited data acquisition systems. Implantable sensors and miniaturized biotelemetry are the only means of capturing the fundamental and critical data. This same biosensor and biotelemetry technology has direct application to Earth-based medicine and surgery. Continuous, on-line data acquisition and improved measurement capabilities combined with the ease and flexibility offered by automated, wireless, and portable instruments and data systems, should provide a boon to the health care industry. Playing a key role in this technology revolution is the Sensors 2000! (S2K!) Program at NASA Ames Research Center. S2K!, in collaboration with space life sciences researchers and managers, provides an integrated capability for sensor technology development and applications, including advanced biosensor technology development, spaceflight hardware development, and technology transfer and commercialization. S2K! is presently collaborating on several spaceflight projects with dual-use medical applications. One prime example is a collaboration with the Fetal Treatment Center (FTC) at the University of California at San Francisco. The goal is to develop and apply implantable chemical sensor and biotelemetry technology to continuously monitor fetal patients during extra-uterine surgery, replacement into the womb, through birth and beyond. Once validated for ground use, the method will be transitioned to spaceflight applications to