Science.gov

Sample records for medical imaging devices

  1. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device. (a) Identification. A medical image storage device is a device that provides electronic storage and...

  2. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a...

  3. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a...

  4. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a...

  5. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a...

  6. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device. (a) Identification. A medical image storage device is a device that provides electronic storage and...

  7. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device. (a) Identification. A medical image hardcopy device is a device that produces a visible printed record of a...

  8. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device. (a) Identification. A medical image storage device is a device that provides electronic storage and...

  9. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image communications device. (a) Identification. A medical image communications device provides electronic transfer of...

  10. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image communications device. (a) Identification. A medical image communications device provides electronic transfer of...

  11. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image communications device. (a) Identification. A medical image communications device provides electronic transfer of...

  12. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image communications device. (a) Identification. A medical image communications device provides electronic transfer of...

  13. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image communications device. (a) Identification. A medical image communications device provides electronic transfer of...

  14. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device....

  15. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. A medical image storage device is a device that provides electronic storage and retrieval..., and digital memory. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  16. Image quality characteristics of handheld display devices for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2 × 10(-5) mm(2) at 1 mm(-1), while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7 × 10(-6) mm(2). Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  17. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  18. Monitoring biofilm attachment on medical devices surfaces using hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Hanh N. D.; Hitchins, Victoria M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Kim, Do-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Microbial biofilm is a colony of single bacteria cells (planktonic) that attached to surfaces, attract other microorganisms to attach and grow, and together they build an extracellular matrix composed of polysaccharides, protein, and DNA. Eventually, some cells will detach and spread to other surface. Biofilm on medical devices can cause severe infection to all age ranges from infant to adult. Therefore, it is important to detect biofilm in a fast and efficient manner. Hyperspectral imaging was utilized for distinguishing wide area of biofilm coverage on various materials and on different textures of stainless steeltest coupons. Not only is the coverage of biofilm important, but also the shear stress of biofilm on the attached surfaces is significant. This study investigates the effects of shear stress on the adhesion of biofilms on common medical device surfaces such as glass, polycarbonate, polytetrafluoroethylene, and stainless steel with different textures. Biofilm was grown using Ps. aeruginosa and growth was monitored after 24 and 48 hours at 37° C. The coupons covered with biofilm were tilted at 45 degrees and 90 degrees for 30 seconds to induce shear stress and Hyperspectral images were taken. We hypothesize that stronger attachment on rough surface would be able to withstand greater shear stress compared to smooth surface.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of iatrogeny: understanding imaging artifacts related to medical devices.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Kathryn J; Maxwell, Jeffry; Saad, Nael E; Yano, Motoyo; Raptis, Constantine; Menias, Christine; Narra, Vamsi

    2014-04-01

    Medical devices are frequently encountered in patients presenting for imaging studies. Knowledge of the device composition, dwell time, and location is essential for determining the safety and potential impact on the quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations. Anticipation of MRI artifacts associated with implanted devices allows the radiologist to adjust parameters to mitigate their effect on the anatomy of interest and to avoid pitfalls in interpretation. The purpose of this article is to present a pictorial review of the MRI appearance of commonly encountered implanted devices and foreign objects in order to help the radiologist anticipate their impact on final image quality.

  20. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Medical Devices Home Medical Devices Medical Device Safety Medical Device Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ...

  1. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Moon S.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2012-03-01

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially lifethreatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duodenoscopes account for the highest number of reported endoscopic infections where microbial biofilm is one of the major causes for these infections. We applied a hyperspectral imaging method to detect biofilm contamination on the surface of several common materials used for medical devices. Such materials include stainless steel, titanium, and stainless-steeltitanium alloy. Potential uses of hyperspectral imaging technique to monitor biofilm attachment to different material surfaces are discussed.

  2. Globus MEDICUS - federation of DICOM medical imaging devices into healthcare Grids.

    PubMed

    Erberich, Stephan G; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Chervenak, Ann; Schuler, Robert; Nelson, Marvin D; Kesselman, Carl

    2007-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard defines Radiology medical device interoperability and image data exchange between modalities, image databases - Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) - and image review end-points. However the scope of DICOM and PACS technology is currently limited to the trusted and static environment of the hospital. In order to meet the demand for ad-hoc tele-radiology and image guided medical procedures within the global healthcare enterprise, a new technology must provide mobility, security, flexible scale of operations, and rapid responsiveness for DICOM medical devices and subsequently medical image data. Grid technology, an informatics approach to securely federate independently operated computing, storage, and data management resources at the global scale over public networks, meets these core requirements. Here we present an approach to federate DICOM and PACS devices for large-scale medical image workflows within a global healthcare enterprise. The Globus MEDICUS (Medical Imaging and Computing for Unified Information Sharing) project uses the standards-based Globus Toolkit Grid infrastructure to vertically integrate a new service for DICOM devices - the DICOM Grid Interface Service (DGIS). This new service translates between DICOM and Grid operations and thus transparently extends DICOM to Globus based Grid infrastructure. This Grid image workflow paradigm has been designed to provide not only solutions for global image communication, but fault-tolerance and disaster recovery using Grid data replication technology. Actual use-case of 40 MEDICUS Grid connected international hospitals of the Childerns Oncology Group and the Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation and further clinical applications are discussed. The open-source Globus MEDICU http://dev.globus.org/wiki/Incubator/MEDICUS. PMID:17476069

  3. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  4. Introduction: Feature Issue on Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeeseong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Nordstrom, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue on “Phantoms for the Performance Evaluation and Validation of Optical Medical Imaging Devices.” This topic was the focus of a technical workshop that was held on November 7–8, 2011, in Washington, D.C. The feature issue includes 13 contributions from workshop attendees. PMID:22741084

  5. Medical Device Safety

    MedlinePlus

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They range from ... need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep instructions ...

  6. Real-time volume rendering of digital medical images on an iOS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noon, Christian; Holub, Joseph; Winer, Eliot

    2013-03-01

    Performing high quality 3D visualizations on mobile devices, while tantalizingly close in many areas, is still a quite difficult task. This is especially true for 3D volume rendering of digital medical images. Allowing this would empower medical personnel a powerful tool to diagnose and treat patients and train the next generation of physicians. This research focuses on performing real time volume rendering of digital medical images on iOS devices using custom developed GPU shaders for orthogonal texture slicing. An interactive volume renderer was designed and developed with several new features including dynamic modification of render resolutions, an incremental render loop, a shader-based clipping algorithm to support OpenGL ES 2.0, and an internal backface culling algorithm for properly sorting rendered geometry with alpha blending. The application was developed using several application programming interfaces (APIs) such as OpenSceneGraph (OSG) as the primary graphics renderer coupled with iOS Cocoa Touch for user interaction, and DCMTK for DICOM I/O. The developed application rendered volume datasets over 450 slices up to 50-60 frames per second, depending on the specific model of the iOS device. All rendering is done locally on the device so no Internet connection is required.

  7. Medical devices: US medical device regulation.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P; Baxley, John H

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Center for Devices and Radiological Health is responsible for protecting and promoting the public health by ensuring the safety, effectiveness, and quality of medical devices, ensuring the safety of radiation-emitting products, fostering innovation, and providing the public with accurate, science-based information about the products we oversee, throughout the total product life cycle. The FDA was granted the authority to regulate the manufacturing and marketing of medical devices in 1976. It does not regulate the practice of medicine. Devices are classified based on complexity and level of risk, and "pre-1976" devices were allowed to remain on the market after being classified without FDA review. Post-1976 devices of lower complexity and risk that are substantially equivalent to a marketed "predicate" device may be cleared through the 510(k) premarket notification process. Clinical data are typically not needed for 510(k) clearance. In contrast, higher-risk devices typically require premarket approval. Premarket approval applications must contain data demonstrating reasonable assurance of safety and efficacy, and this information typically includes clinical data. For novel devices that are not high risk, the de novo process allows FDA to simultaneously review and classify new devices. Devices that are not legally marketed are permitted to be used for clinical investigation purposes in the United States under the Investigational Device Exemptions regulation.

  8. Terahertz Imaging System for Medical Applications and Related High Efficiency Terahertz Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Toshihiko; Kajiki, Kousuke; Koizumi, Takayuki; Itsuji, Takeaki; Koyama, Yasushi; Sekiguchi, Ryota; Kubota, Oichi; Kawase, Kodo

    2013-07-01

    A terahertz (THz) imaging system and high efficient terahertz sources and detectors for medical applications were developed. A fiber laser based compact time domain terahertz tomography system was developed with a high depth resolution of less than 20 μm. Three-dimensional images of porcine skin were obtained including some physical properties such as applied skin creams. The discrimination between healthy human tissue and tumor tissue has been achieved using reflection spectra. To improve the THz imaging system, a ridge waveguide LiNbO3 based nonlinear terahertz generator was studied to achieve high output power. A ridge waveguide with 5-7 μm width was designed for high efficiency emission from the LiNbO3 crystal by the electro-optic Cherenkov effect. Terahertz electronic sources and detectors were also realized for future imaging systems. As electronic source devices, resonant tunneling diode (RTD) oscillators with a patch antenna were fabricated using an InGaAs/InAlAs/AlAs triple barrier structure. On the other side, Schottky barrier diode (SBD) detectors with a log-periodic antenna were fabricated by thin-film technology on a Si substrate. Both devices operate above 1 THz at room temperature. This electronic THz device set could provide a future high performance imaging system.

  9. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  10. Monitoring of biofilm formation on different material surfaces of medical devices using hyperspectral imaging method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contamination of the inner surface of indwelling (implanted) medical devices by microbial biofilm is a serious problem. Some microbial bacteria such as Escherichia coli form biofilms that lead to potentially life-threatening infections. Other types of medical devices such as bronchoscopes and duod...

  11. Assessment and approval of medical devices used in diagnostic imaging in the United States.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G C

    1986-01-01

    Development of new and improved medical imaging technology has been increasing rapidly over the past two decades. While media attention has focused on the revolutionary advances, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and metabolic assessment by positron emission tomography, important progress has also been made in the more conventional modalities, including contrast radiography, ultrasound, scintigraphy and mammography. These evolutionary developments have produced fundamental changes in the character of imaging information and in the methods of its acquisition, storage, manipulation, analysis and display. The assessment process-vis-à-vis safety, effectiveness, efficacy or cost-has moved from a previously well-defined physical and engineering evaluation to one of assessing quality, relevance and appropriateness of the "information." A regulatory scheme has evolved in the U.S., whereby the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for assuring that new medical devices be approved for commercial distribution only if their safety and effectiveness can be assured. Clear distinctions should be drawn between the FDA "approval" process, assessment of clinical efficacy, and planning for health care delivery. PMID:3536797

  12. Combating medical device fouling.

    PubMed

    Harding, Jacqueline L; Reynolds, Melissa M

    2014-03-01

    When interfaced with the biological environment, biomedical devices are prone to surface biofouling due to adhesion of microbial or thrombotic agents as a result of the foreign body response. Surface biofouling of medical devices occurs as a result of nonspecific adhesion of noxious substrates to the surface. Approaches for biofouling-resistant surfaces can be categorized as either the manipulation of surface chemical functionalities or through the incorporation of regulatory biomolecules. This review summarizes current strategies for creating biofouling-resistant surfaces based on surface hydrophilicity and charge, biomolecule functionalization, and drug elution. Reducing the foreign body response and restoring the function of cells around the device minimizes the risk of device rejection and potentially integrates devices with surrounding tissues and fluids. In addition, we discuss the use of peptides and NO as biomolecules that not only inhibit surface fouling, but also promote the integration of medical devices with the biological environment.

  13. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  14. 75 FR 8375 - Device Improvements to Reduce Unnecessary Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging; Public Meeting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ..., and metrics of body dose and peak skin dose are displayed to the operator(s) of the equipment and... devices, demonstrating dose reduction and image quality claims? If so, why, and what data should be..., operating principles for the technology, general information about optimizing patient dose and image...

  15. Impact of imaging landmark on the risk of MRI-related heating near implanted medical devices like cardiac pacemaker leads.

    PubMed

    Nordbeck, Peter; Ritter, Oliver; Weiss, Ingo; Warmuth, Marcus; Gensler, Daniel; Burkard, Natalie; Herold, Volker; Jakob, Peter M; Ertl, Georg; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H; Bauer, Wolfgang R

    2011-01-01

    Implanted medical devices such as cardiac pacemakers pose a potential hazard in magnetic resonance imaging. Electromagnetic fields have been shown to cause severe radio frequency-induced tissue heating in some cases. Imaging exclusion zones have been proposed as an instrument to reduce patient risk. The purpose of this study was to further assess the impact of the imaging landmark on the risk for unintended implant heating by measuring the radio frequency-induced electric fields in a body phantom under several imaging conditions at 1.5T. The results show that global radio frequency-induced coupling is highest with the torso centered along the superior-inferior direction of the transmit coil. The induced E-fields inside the body shift when changing body positioning, reducing both global and local radio frequency coupling if body and/or conductive implant are moved out from the transmit coil center along the z-direction. Adequate selection of magnetic resonance imaging landmark can significantly reduce potential hazards in patients with implanted medical devices.

  16. [Medical device use errors].

    PubMed

    Friesdorf, Wolfgang; Marsolek, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    Medical devices define our everyday patient treatment processes. But despite the beneficial effect, every use can also lead to damages. Use errors are thus often explained by human failure. But human errors can never be completely extinct, especially in such complex work processes like those in medicine that often involve time pressure. Therefore we need error-tolerant work systems in which potential problems are identified and solved as early as possible. In this context human engineering uses the TOP principle: technological before organisational and then person-related solutions. But especially in everyday medical work we realise that error-prone usability concepts can often only be counterbalanced by organisational or person-related measures. Thus human failure is pre-programmed. In addition, many medical work places represent a somewhat chaotic accumulation of individual devices with totally different user interaction concepts. There is not only a lack of holistic work place concepts, but of holistic process and system concepts as well. However, this can only be achieved through the co-operation of producers, healthcare providers and clinical users, by systematically analyzing and iteratively optimizing the underlying treatment processes from both a technological and organizational perspective. What we need is a joint platform like medilab V of the TU Berlin, in which the entire medical treatment chain can be simulated in order to discuss, experiment and model--a key to a safe and efficient healthcare system of the future. PMID:19213452

  17. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  18. [Medical Devices Law for anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Regner, M

    2015-09-01

    The Medical Devices Law is a relatively new legal system, which has replaced the still well-known medical devices regulations in Germany. The Medical Devices Law in Germany is based on European directives, which have been translated into national law with the Medical Devices Act. The Medical Devices Act is a framework of regulations and incorporates a number of decrees that address specific topics within the medical devices directives and in turn individual regulations refer to guidelines and recommendations from other sources which provide detailed technical information on specific topics. Overall, the Medical Devices Act represents a very complex legal system, which needs to be permanently observed with respect to continuous updating and adjustment. In this article the design and the structure are described but most of all the article filters significant problem areas that need to be considered when using and operating medical devices, especially for anesthesiologists.

  19. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  20. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  1. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  2. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  3. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030...) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer. (a) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a...

  4. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, C. Carl

    1982-01-01

    Describes principle imaging techniques, their applications, and their limitations in terms of diagnostic capability and possible adverse biological effects. Techniques include film radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and digital radiography. PET has…

  5. Barriers to medical device innovation

    PubMed Central

    Bergsland, Jacob; Elle, Ole Jakob; Fosse, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has defined a medical device as a health care product that does not achieve it’s purpose by chemical action or by being metabolized. This means that a vast number of products are considered medical devices. Such devices play an essential role in the practice of medicine. The FDA classifies medical devices in three classes, depending on the risk of the device. Since Class I and II devices have relatively simple requirements for getting to the market, this review will focus on “implantable devices”, which, in general, belong to Class III. The European Union and Canada use a slightly different classification system. While early generations of medical devices were introduced without much testing, either technical or clinical, the process of introducing a Class III medical device from concept to clinical practice has become strongly regulated and requires extensive technological and clinical testing. The modern era of implantable medical devices may be considered to have started in the 1920s with development of artificial hips. The implantable pacemaker was another milestone and pacemakers and cardioverters/defibrillators have since saved millions of lives and created commercial giants in the medical device industry. This review will include some examples of cardiovascular devices. Similar considerations apply to the total implantable device market, although clinical and technological applications obviously vary considerably. PMID:24966699

  6. Device for wavelength-selective imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2010-09-14

    An imaging device captures both a visible light image and a diagnostic image, the diagnostic image corresponding to emissions from an imaging medium within the object. The visible light image (which may be color or grayscale) and the diagnostic image may be superimposed to display regions of diagnostic significance within a visible light image. A number of imaging media may be used according to an intended application for the imaging device, and an imaging medium may have wavelengths above, below, or within the visible light spectrum. The devices described herein may be advantageously packaged within a single integrated device or other solid state device, and/or employed in an integrated, single-camera medical imaging system, as well as many non-medical imaging systems that would benefit from simultaneous capture of visible-light wavelength images along with images at other wavelengths.

  7. Medical Images Remote Consultation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Maurizio; Frixione, Paolo; Squarcia, Sandro

    Teleconsultation of digital images among different medical centers is now a reality. The problem to be solved is how to interconnect all the clinical diagnostic devices in a hospital in order to allow physicians and health physicists, working in different places, to discuss on interesting clinical cases visualizing the same diagnostic images at the same time. Applying World Wide Web technologies, the proposed system can be easily used by people with no specific computer knowledge providing a verbose help to guide the user through the right steps of execution. Diagnostic images are retrieved from a relational database or from a standard DICOM-PACS through the DICOM-WWW gateway allowing connection of the usual Web browsers to DICOM applications via the HTTP protocol. The system, which is proposed for radiotherapy implementation, where radiographies play a fundamental role, can be easily converted to different field of medical applications where a remote access to secure data are compulsory.

  8. [Benefit assessment of medical devices].

    PubMed

    Zens, Yvonne; Fujita-Rohwerder, N; Windeler, J

    2015-03-01

    Medical devices play an important role in both the diagnostic and therapeutic care of patients. The hope is that particularly innovative medical devices can contribute to the improvement of patient care. However, there is no mandatory need to conduct clinical studies with medical devices that allow an assessment of their benefit within the framework of EU market access or on the way to reimbursement by the statutory health insurance (SHI) in Germany. Numerous examples show that the existing legal framework for market access and for reimbursement in the SHI system is insufficient for providing patients with only those examination and treatment methods, i. e., medical devices, that comply with the benefit requirement and the imperative for quality stipulated in the Social Code Book V. However, it is possible to conduct meaningful clinical trials, i. e., randomized controlled trials, with medical devices as well. Hence, regular, indication-related benefit assessment of medical devices with a higher risk class as a prerequisite for reimbursement for a specific medical device is not only necessary, but also feasible. The 2014 report of the Advisory Council on the Assessment of Developments in the Healthcare System contains a promising recommendation for implementing this. A regulatory framework as described in the report would allow patients the fastest possible access to safe and effective medical device innovations, while increasing planning reliability for the development and marketing of new products, which has often been criticized as insufficient by manufacturers. PMID:25566843

  9. Candida Infections of Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Erna M.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2004-01-01

    The number of indwelling medical devices is escalating, and an increasing proportion of device-related infections are being caused by Candida spp. Candida spp. produce biofilms on synthetic materials, which facilitates adhesion of the organisms to devices and renders them relatively refractory to medical therapy. Management of device-related Candida infections can be challenging. Removal of the infected device is generally needed to establish cure of Candida infections of medical devices. However, since the pathogenesis of Candida bloodstream infection is complicated, more studies are necessary to determine the role of catheter exchange in patients with both gastrointestinal tract mucositis and indwelling catheters. The medical and economic impact of these infections is enormous. PMID:15084500

  10. Clinical applications of image-based airway computational fluid dynamics: assessment of inhalation medication and endobronchial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, Jan W.; Vos, Wim G.; Germonpré, Paul; Salgado, Rodrigo; Parizel, Paul M.; De Backer, Wilfried

    2009-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a technique that is used increasingly in the biomedical field. Solving the flow equations numerically provides a convenient way to assess the efficiency of therapies and devices, ranging from cardiovascular stents and heart valves to hemodialysis workflows. Also in the respiratory field CFD has gained increasing interest, especially through the combination of three dimensional image reconstruction which results in highend patient-specific models. This paper provides an overview of clinical applications of CFD through image based modeling, resulting from recent studies performed in our center. We focused on two applications: assessment of the efficiency of inhalation medication and analysis of endobronchial valve placement. In the first application we assessed the mode of action of a novel bronchodilator in 10 treated patients and 4 controls. We assessed the local volume increase and resistance change based on the combination of imaging and CFD. We found a good correlation between the changes in volume and resistance coming from the CFD results and the clinical tests. In the second application we assessed the placement and effect of one way endobronchial valves on respiratory function in 6 patients. We found a strong patientspecific result of the therapy where in some patients the therapy resulted in complete atelectasis of the target lobe while in others the lobe remained inflated. We concluded from these applications that CFD can provide a better insight into clinically relevant therapies.

  11. 76 FR 77834 - Scientific Information Request on Intravascular Diagnostic and Imaging Medical Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-14

    ... versus Angiography Alone, which is currently being conducted by the Evidence-based Practice Centers for... procedures and imaging techniques versus angiography alone. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as... compared to angiography alone--on the diagnostic thinking and therapeutic decision making,...

  12. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  13. [Medical image compression: a review].

    PubMed

    Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful compression algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of compression techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings. PMID:23715317

  14. [Medical image compression: a review].

    PubMed

    Noreña, Tatiana; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Modern medicine is an increasingly complex activity , based on the evidence ; it consists of information from multiple sources : medical record text , sound recordings , images and videos generated by a large number of devices . Medical imaging is one of the most important sources of information since they offer comprehensive support of medical procedures for diagnosis and follow-up . However , the amount of information generated by image capturing gadgets quickly exceeds storage availability in radiology services , generating additional costs in devices with greater storage capacity . Besides , the current trend of developing applications in cloud computing has limitations, even though virtual storage is available from anywhere, connections are made through internet . In these scenarios the optimal use of information necessarily requires powerful compression algorithms adapted to medical activity needs . In this paper we present a review of compression techniques used for image storage , and a critical analysis of them from the point of view of their use in clinical settings.

  15. Using medical imaging for the detection of adverse events ("incidents") during the utilization of left ventricular assist devices in adult patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Friedrich; Krabatsch, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VAD) are used for mechanical support of the terminally failing heart. Failure of these life supporting systems can be fatal. Early and reliable detection of any upcoming problems is mandatory and is crucial for the outcome. Medical imaging methods are described within this review, which are not only essential for diagnosis of typically VAD-related complications but also for the detection or verification of technical issues. Within this review the utilization of medical imaging equipment for the diagnosis of technical malfunctions or damages of implanted system components is discussed. A newly developed specialized acoustic imaging method for pump thrombosis detection will also be described along with the most common VAD-related medical complications and their respective imaging methods and the limitations induced by the use of the VAD-system.

  16. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  17. 77 FR 16239 - Medical Device User Fee Act; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... MDUFA reauthorization process with a public meeting held on September 14, 2010 (75 FR 49502, August 13...); the Medical Device Manufacturers Association (MDMA); the Medical Imaging and Technology Alliance...

  18. Medical device market in China.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Philip; Morshed, Bashir I; Mussivand, Tofy

    2015-06-01

    With China's growing old-age population and economic presence on the international stage, it has become important to evaluate its domestic and foreign market contribution to medical devices. Medical devices are instruments or apparatuses used in the prevention, rehabilitation, treatment, or knowledge generation with respect to disease or other abnormal conditions. This article provides information drawn from recent publications to describe the current state of the Chinese domestic market for medical devices and to define opportunities for foreign investment potential therein. Recent healthcare reforms implemented to meet rising demand due to an aging and migrating population are having a positive effect on market growth-a global market with a projected growth of 15% per year over the next decade.

  19. Medical device market in China.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Philip; Morshed, Bashir I; Mussivand, Tofy

    2015-06-01

    With China's growing old-age population and economic presence on the international stage, it has become important to evaluate its domestic and foreign market contribution to medical devices. Medical devices are instruments or apparatuses used in the prevention, rehabilitation, treatment, or knowledge generation with respect to disease or other abnormal conditions. This article provides information drawn from recent publications to describe the current state of the Chinese domestic market for medical devices and to define opportunities for foreign investment potential therein. Recent healthcare reforms implemented to meet rising demand due to an aging and migrating population are having a positive effect on market growth-a global market with a projected growth of 15% per year over the next decade. PMID:25735659

  20. Recent medical devices for tonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sayin, I; Cingi, C

    2012-01-01

    The most frequent and probably the earliest described surgical intervention of ENT field is tonsillectomy. Various methods were described and devices were invented up to now in order to increase safety and decrease time consumption and complications. All new created devices promises lower intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative time, postoperative pain and bleeding. But with their widely use it is seen that they cannot fulfill what they promise. Debate also continues as to which technique yields the best outcome. This study reports a summary for common medical devices which were previously used in tonsillectomy. PMID:23930051

  1. Ethics of medical device safety.

    PubMed

    Kriewall, Timothy J

    2008-01-01

    How safe is safe? The design intent of a medical device is to off er maximum flexibility, and low-cost and fail-safe features. Easily said, these requirements are difficult to deliver in a litigious society where performance standards are uncommon. Medical device manufacturers face challenges as they strive to offer the ultimate in product safety and keep the price affordable for the technology deployed, while making the usability of typically complex products common sense for the operator. As microprocessors are able to assist designers in providing intelligent, multifunctional systems, care must be taken during the design process to balance technological ability with intuitive use. The medical device development process requires rigor that is not often taught to biomedical engineers. Ethical product development requires a process that will be described in this paper using as an example the development of a recent cardiopulmonary perfusion system. However, the same techniques are germane to implantable devices such as cochlear implants. All engineering product development requires trade-off decisions considering how much is too much and how much is too little. Biomedical engineering faculty need to present this ethical dilemma to their students and give them the tools to help decide. However, in the final analysis, the operator of any medical product or installer of any medical device holds the primary responsibility for understanding how to use the system or install the implant in normal use as well as emergent or special situations; the technology is his or her backup in performing the medical professionals primary job.

  2. Medical Imaging: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Debashis; Chakraborty, Srabonti; Balitanas, Maricel; Kim, Tai-Hoon

    The rapid progress of medical science and the invention of various medicines have benefited mankind and the whole civilization. Modern science also has been doing wonders in the surgical field. But, the proper and correct diagnosis of diseases is the primary necessity before the treatment. The more sophisticate the bio-instruments are, better diagnosis will be possible. The medical images plays an important role in clinical diagnosis and therapy of doctor and teaching and researching etc. Medical imaging is often thought of as a way to represent anatomical structures of the body with the help of X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. But often it is more useful for physiologic function rather than anatomy. With the growth of computer and image technology medical imaging has greatly influenced medical field. As the quality of medical imaging affects diagnosis the medical image processing has become a hotspot and the clinical applications wanting to store and retrieve images for future purpose needs some convenient process to store those images in details. This paper is a tutorial review of the medical image processing and repository techniques appeared in the literature.

  3. 78 FR 18233 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Medical devices. 21 CFR Part 864 Blood, Medical devices, Packaging and containers. 21 CFR Part 866...) Identification. * * * This device, which is used outside the body, is used as a temporary substitute for...

  4. Medical Image Databases

    PubMed Central

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Jaffe, C. Carl; Duncan, James

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Information contained in medical images differs considerably from that residing in alphanumeric format. The difference can be attributed to four characteristics: (1) the semantics of medical knowledge extractable from images is imprecise; (2) image information contains form and spatial data, which are not expressible in conventional language; (3) a large part of image information is geometric; (4) diagnostic inferences derived from images rest on an incomplete, continuously evolving model of normality. This paper explores the differentiating characteristics of text versus images and their impact on design of a medical image database intended to allow content-based indexing and retrieval. One strategy for implementing medical image databases is presented, which employs object-oriented iconic queries, semantics by association with prototypes, and a generic schema. PMID:9147338

  5. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats.

  6. Medical image file formats.

    PubMed

    Larobina, Michele; Murino, Loredana

    2014-04-01

    Image file format is often a confusing aspect for someone wishing to process medical images. This article presents a demystifying overview of the major file formats currently used in medical imaging: Analyze, Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (Nifti), Minc, and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom). Concepts common to all file formats, such as pixel depth, photometric interpretation, metadata, and pixel data, are first presented. Then, the characteristics and strengths of the various formats are discussed. The review concludes with some predictive considerations about the future trends in medical image file formats. PMID:24338090

  7. Images, signals and devices

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This volume highlights medical imaging and monitoring and covers topics such as interactive video, diagnostic digital angiography, computerized management of intensive care patients, ambulatory ECG monitoring and magnetic resonance. Contents include: general guidelines; reveiws/surveys; office practice management guidelines; and clinical computing.

  8. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  9. Medical image processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezong; Wang, Jinxiang

    1994-12-01

    In this paper a medical image processing system is described. That system is named NAI200 Medical Image Processing System and has been appraised by Chinese Government. Principles and cases provided here. Many kinds of pictures are used in modern medical diagnoses, for example B-supersonic, X-ray, CT and MRI. Some times the pictures are not good enough for diagnoses. The noises interfere with real situation on these pictures. That means the image processing is needed. A medical image processing system is described in this paper. That system is named NAI200 Medical Image Processing System and has been appraised by Chinese Government. There are four functions in that system. The first part is image processing. More than thirty four programs are involved. The second part is calculating. The areas or volumes of single or multitissues are calculated. Three dimensional reconstruction is the third part. The stereo images of organs or tumors are reconstructed with cross-sections. The last part is image storage. All pictures can be transformed to digital images, then be stored in hard disk or soft disk. In this paper not only all functions of that system are introduced, also the basic principles of these functions are explained in detail. This system has been applied in hospitals. The images of hundreds of cases have been processed. We describe the functions combining real cases. Here we only introduce a few examples.

  10. Metrological Reliability of Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Monteiro, E.; Leon, L. F.

    2015-02-01

    The prominent development of health technologies of the 20th century triggered demands for metrological reliability of physiological measurements comprising physical, chemical and biological quantities, essential to ensure accurate and comparable results of clinical measurements. In the present work, aspects concerning metrological reliability in premarket and postmarket assessments of medical devices are discussed, pointing out challenges to be overcome. In addition, considering the social relevance of the biomeasurements results, Biometrological Principles to be pursued by research and innovation aimed at biomedical applications are proposed, along with the analysis of their contributions to guarantee the innovative health technologies compliance with the main ethical pillars of Bioethics.

  11. Characterization of Therapeutic Coatings on Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormuth, Klaus

    Therapeutic coatings on medical devices such as catheters, guide wires, and stents improve biocompatibility by favorably altering the chemical nature of the device/tissue or device/blood interface. Such coatings often minimize tissue damage (reduce friction), decrease chances for blood clot formation (prevent platelet adsorption), and improve the healing response (deliver drugs). Confocal Raman microscopy provides valuable information about biomedical coatings by, for example, facilitating the measurement of the thickness and swelling of frictionreducing hydrogel coatings on catheters and by determining the distribution of drug within a polymer-based drug-eluting coatings on stents. This chapter explores the application of Raman microscopy to the imaging of thin coatings of cross-linked poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) gels, parylene films, mixtures of dexamethasone with various polymethacrylates, and mixtures of rapamycin with hydrolysable (biodegradable) poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymers. Raman microscopy measures the thickness and swelling of coatings, reveals the degree of mixing of drug and polymer, senses the hydrolysis of biodegradable polymers, and determines the polymorphic forms of drug present within thin therapeutic coatings on medical devices.

  12. 77 FR 6028 - Taxable Medical Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... ``taxable medical device'' does not include eyeglasses, contact lenses, hearing aids, and any other medical... that the term ``taxable medical device'' does not include eyeglasses, contact lenses, hearing aids, and..., DC. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Concerning the proposed regulations, Natalie Payne or...

  13. 3D medical thermography device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Peyman

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a novel handheld 3D medical thermography system is introduced. The proposed system consists of a thermal-infrared camera, a color camera and a depth camera rigidly attached in close proximity and mounted on an ergonomic handle. As a practitioner holding the device smoothly moves it around the human body parts, the proposed system generates and builds up a precise 3D thermogram model by incorporating information from each new measurement in real-time. The data is acquired in motion, thus it provides multiple points of view. When processed, these multiple points of view are adaptively combined by taking into account the reliability of each individual measurement which can vary due to a variety of factors such as angle of incidence, distance between the device and the subject and environmental sensor data or other factors influencing a confidence of the thermal-infrared data when captured. Finally, several case studies are presented to support the usability and performance of the proposed system.

  14. The economic evaluation of medical devices: challenges.

    PubMed

    Kingkaew, Pritaporn; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2014-05-01

    While many of the principles that guide the economic evaluation of medical devices are somewhat similar to those that guide the evaluation of other health technologies, most outline a methodology that focuses on pharmaceutical products rather providing specific guidance for medical devices. Given that medical devices use a wide range of technologies and can be used for many purposes, conducting an economic analysis for medical devices is not straightforward. The cost and effectiveness of a given technology may depend on a number of factors. The objective of this paper is to provide a summary of issues that need to be addressed before undertaking an economic evaluation of medical devices and to outline a number of suggested approaches for undertaking an economic evaluation of medical devices.

  15. Medical ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Schuy, S

    1982-01-01

    The development of ultrasonic imaging techniques is by no means finished even today. The morphological display of anatomical cross-sections has already reached a high standard and is characterized by the realization of real-time compound scanners. Automated water-bath scanners, either compound or single pass, are intended to help ultrasound to play a more dominant role in mammography, especially as a screening method, although at present it cannot be used very efficiently for this purpose. Considerable progress can be expected with the increasing use of computer facilities, especially digital signal-processing techniques. They should not only further improve image fidelity and intelligibility, but also the comfort of the handling. A major step forward will be the implementation of objective transducer-independent tissue-differentiation facilities into imaging devices. The development of alternative ultrasonic imaging techniques like the transmission camera should increase the scope of ultrasonic application rather than compete with B-scan imaging.

  16. Laboratory partnership with the Medical Devices Agency.

    PubMed

    Lee, S

    2001-09-01

    To improve the quality of the information and advice provided to the Health Service, the Medical Devices Agency (MDA) is actively seeking to increase the number of reports from hospital laboratories. The Medical Devices Agency relies heavily on laboratory reports of problems with in vitro diagnostic medical devices to investigate and take action where necessary. Laboratories are encouraged to report all suspected adverse incidents to the MDA.

  17. [Software version and medical device software supervision].

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The importance of software version in the medical device software supervision does not cause enough attention at present. First of all, the effect of software version in the medical device software supervision is discussed, and then the necessity of software version in the medical device software supervision is analyzed based on the discussion of the misunderstanding of software version. Finally the concrete suggestions on software version naming rules, software version supervision for the software in medical devices, and software version supervision scheme are proposed.

  18. Imaging and Analytics: The changing face of Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas

    There have been significant technological advances in imaging capability over the past 40 years. Medical imaging capabilities have developed rapidly, along with technology development in computational processing speed and miniaturization. Moving to all-digital, the number of images that are acquired in a routine clinical examination has increased dramatically from under 50 images in the early days of CT and MRI to more than 500-1000 images today. The staggering number of images that are routinely acquired poses significant challenges for clinicians to interpret the data and to correctly identify the clinical problem. Although the time provided to render a clinical finding has not substantially changed, the amount of data available for interpretation has grown exponentially. In addition, the image quality (spatial resolution) and information content (physiologically-dependent image contrast) has also increased significantly with advances in medical imaging technology. On its current trajectory, medical imaging in the traditional sense is unsustainable. To assist in filtering and extracting the most relevant data elements from medical imaging, image analytics will have a much larger role. Automated image segmentation, generation of parametric image maps, and clinical decision support tools will be needed and developed apace to allow the clinician to manage, extract and utilize only the information that will help improve diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. As medical imaging devices continue to improve in spatial resolution, functional and anatomical information content, image/data analytics will be more ubiquitous and integral to medical imaging capability.

  19. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  20. Wavelets in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Noor e.; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  1. Wavelets in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  2. Medical devices and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Mattox, Elizabeth

    2012-08-01

    Errors related to health care devices are not well understood. Nurses in intensive care and progressive care environments can benefit from understanding manufacturer-related error and device-use error, the principles of human factors engineering, and the steps that can be taken to reduce risk of errors related to health care devices.

  3. [Information safety test of digital medical device].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiong

    2014-07-01

    According to the background of the age of big data, the medical devices are informatized, we analyze the safety and efficiency for the information and data of digital medical devices or medical systems, also discussed some test methods. Lack of a suitable standard system of digital medical devices is a big problem both for domain standard and international standard. GB25000.51 is too ambiguous and free for testing, also not very operational. So this paper suggested some test advices and some prospective method. These test methods are helpful for finding the problem and performing the standards. What's more, these methods are famous in the world and used widely in the 3C region but just start in the medical region, which can promote the development of the medical devices. PMID:25330611

  4. Digital diagnosis of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Kuismin, Raimo; Jormalainen, Raimo; Dastidar, Prasun; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    2001-08-01

    The popularity of digital imaging devices and PACS installations has increased during the last years. Still, images are analyzed and diagnosed using conventional techniques. Our research group begun to study the requirements for digital image diagnostic methods to be applied together with PACS systems. The research was focused on various image analysis procedures (e.g., segmentation, volumetry, 3D visualization, image fusion, anatomic atlas, etc.) that could be useful in medical diagnosis. We have developed Image Analysis software (www.medimag.net) to enable several image-processing applications in medical diagnosis, such as volumetry, multimodal visualization, and 3D visualizations. We have also developed a commercial scalable image archive system (ActaServer, supports DICOM) based on component technology (www.acta.fi), and several telemedicine applications. All the software and systems operate in NT environment and are in clinical use in several hospitals. The analysis software have been applied in clinical work and utilized in numerous patient cases (500 patients). This method has been used in the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up in various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), respiratory system (RS) and human reproductive system (HRS). In many of these diseases e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (CNS), nasal airways diseases (RS) and ovarian tumors (HRS), these methods have been used for the first time in clinical work. According to our results, digital diagnosis improves diagnostic capabilities, and together with PACS installations it will become standard tool during the next decade by enabling more accurate diagnosis and patient follow-up.

  5. Privacy Challenges for Wireless Medical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lagesse, Brent J

    2010-01-01

    Implantable medical devices are becoming more pervasive as new technologies increase their reliability and safety. Furthermore, these devices are becoming increasingly reliant on wireless communication for interaction with the device. Such technologies have the potential to leak information that could be utilized by an attacker to threaten the lives of patients. Privacy of patient information is essential; however, this information is not the only privacy issue that must be considered. In this paper, we discuss why information privacy is insufficient for protecting patients from some attacks and how information regarding the presence of individual devices can leak vulnerabilities. Furthermore, we examine existing privacy enhancing algorithms and discuss their applicability to implantable medical devices.

  6. Anti-malware software and medical devices.

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    Just as much as healthcare information systems, medical devices need protection against cybersecurity threats. Anti-malware software can help safeguard the devices in your facility-but it has limitations and even risks. Find out what steps you can take to manage anti-malware applications in your devices. PMID:21306047

  7. Anti-malware software and medical devices.

    PubMed

    2010-10-01

    Just as much as healthcare information systems, medical devices need protection against cybersecurity threats. Anti-malware software can help safeguard the devices in your facility-but it has limitations and even risks. Find out what steps you can take to manage anti-malware applications in your devices.

  8. Handheld ultrasound array imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Juin-Jet; Quistgaard, Jens

    1999-06-01

    A handheld ultrasound imaging device, one that weighs less than five pounds, has been developed for diagnosing trauma in the combat battlefield as well as a variety of commercial mobile diagnostic applications. This handheld device consists of four component ASICs, each is designed using the state of the art microelectronics technologies. These ASICs are integrated with a convex array transducer to allow high quality imaging of soft tissues and blood flow in real time. The device is designed to be battery driven or ac powered with built-in image storage and cineloop playback capability. Design methodologies of a handheld device are fundamentally different to those of a cart-based system. As system architecture, signal and image processing algorithm as well as image control circuit and software in this device is deigned suitably for large-scale integration, the image performance of this device is designed to be adequate to the intent applications. To elongate the battery life, low power design rules and power management circuits are incorporated in the design of each component ASIC. The performance of the prototype device is currently being evaluated for various applications such as a primary image screening tool, fetal imaging in Obstetrics, foreign object detection and wound assessment for emergency care, etc.

  9. Cloud computing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kagadis, George C; Kloukinas, Christos; Moore, Kevin; Philbin, Jim; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Alexakos, Christos; Nagy, Paul G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hendee, William R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past century technology has played a decisive role in defining, driving, and reinventing procedures, devices, and pharmaceuticals in healthcare. Cloud computing has been introduced only recently but is already one of the major topics of discussion in research and clinical settings. The provision of extensive, easily accessible, and reconfigurable resources such as virtual systems, platforms, and applications with low service cost has caught the attention of many researchers and clinicians. Healthcare researchers are moving their efforts to the cloud, because they need adequate resources to process, store, exchange, and use large quantities of medical data. This Vision 20/20 paper addresses major questions related to the applicability of advanced cloud computing in medical imaging. The paper also considers security and ethical issues that accompany cloud computing. PMID:23822402

  10. Cloud computing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kagadis, George C; Kloukinas, Christos; Moore, Kevin; Philbin, Jim; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Alexakos, Christos; Nagy, Paul G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hendee, William R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past century technology has played a decisive role in defining, driving, and reinventing procedures, devices, and pharmaceuticals in healthcare. Cloud computing has been introduced only recently but is already one of the major topics of discussion in research and clinical settings. The provision of extensive, easily accessible, and reconfigurable resources such as virtual systems, platforms, and applications with low service cost has caught the attention of many researchers and clinicians. Healthcare researchers are moving their efforts to the cloud, because they need adequate resources to process, store, exchange, and use large quantities of medical data. This Vision 20/20 paper addresses major questions related to the applicability of advanced cloud computing in medical imaging. The paper also considers security and ethical issues that accompany cloud computing.

  11. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  12. 21 CFR 880.6310 - Medical device data system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical device data system. 880.6310 Section 880...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6310 Medical device data system. (a) Identification. (1) A medical device data system...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6310 - Medical device data system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical device data system. 880.6310 Section 880...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6310 Medical device data system. (a) Identification. (1) A medical device data system...

  14. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  15. Irish medical device industry update.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Sharon

    2005-12-01

    The continued growth of the Irish medical technology industry has not been accidental. The sector is proactive in its drive for excellence in all aspects of the business, from concept to commercialisation. This reports on some recent initiatives.

  16. 75 FR 16351 - Medical Devices; Technical Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... protection. 21 CFR Part 1040 Electronic products, Labeling, Lasers, Medical devices, Radiation protection... MICROWAVE AND RADIO FREQUENCY EMITTING PRODUCTS 0 12. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 1030 is...

  17. Medical devices for the anesthetist: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ingrande, Jerry; Lemmens, Hendrikus Jm

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are unique among most physicians in that they routinely use technology and medical devices to carry out their daily activities. Recently, there have been significant advances in medical technology. These advances have increased the number and utility of medical devices available to the anesthesiologist. There is little doubt that these new tools have improved the practice of anesthesia. Monitoring has become more comprehensive and less invasive, airway management has become easier, and placement of central venous catheters and regional nerve blockade has become faster and safer. This review focuses on key medical devices such as cardiovascular monitors, airway equipment, neuromonitoring tools, ultrasound, and target controlled drug delivery software and hardware. This review demonstrates how advances in these areas have improved the safety and efficacy of anesthesia and facilitate its administration. When applicable, indications and contraindications to the use of these novel devices will be explored as well as the controversies surrounding their use. PMID:24707188

  18. Medical devices for the anesthetist: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ingrande, Jerry; Lemmens, Hendrikus JM

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesiologists are unique among most physicians in that they routinely use technology and medical devices to carry out their daily activities. Recently, there have been significant advances in medical technology. These advances have increased the number and utility of medical devices available to the anesthesiologist. There is little doubt that these new tools have improved the practice of anesthesia. Monitoring has become more comprehensive and less invasive, airway management has become easier, and placement of central venous catheters and regional nerve blockade has become faster and safer. This review focuses on key medical devices such as cardiovascular monitors, airway equipment, neuromonitoring tools, ultrasound, and target controlled drug delivery software and hardware. This review demonstrates how advances in these areas have improved the safety and efficacy of anesthesia and facilitate its administration. When applicable, indications and contraindications to the use of these novel devices will be explored as well as the controversies surrounding their use. PMID:24707188

  19. 78 FR 68853 - International Medical Device Regulators Forum; Medical Device Single Audit Program International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Device Single Audit Program International Coalition Pilot Program; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... in the Medical Device Single Audit Program International Coalition Pilot Program. The Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP) was designed and developed to ensure a single audit will provide...

  20. [Maintenance and obsolescence of medical devices].

    PubMed

    Ancellin, J

    1999-02-01

    Maintenance of medical devices is either curative, in case of a failure of the device, or preventive. Preventive maintenance (PM) is undertaken either at constant time intervals or when a given parameter crosses a specified limit. The aim of PM is to amend wear from intensive use as well as from ageing. Normally, the modalities of PM are defined by the manufacturer who must anticipate the possible deficiencies of the device. Some manufacturers tend to recommend exaggerated maintenance procedures. Obsolescence of a medical device is defined by one of the following criteria: a) loss of its initial performances; b) development of medical techniques requiring a wider spectrum of performances; c) presence of new devices with improved securities. PMID:10207602

  1. Handheld Diagnostic Device Delivers Quick Medical Readings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To monitor astronauts' health remotely, Glenn Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Cambridge, Massachusetts-based DNA Medical Institute, which developed a device capable of analyzing blood cell counts and a variety of medical biomarkers. The technology will prove especially useful in rural areas without easy access to labs.

  2. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOEpatents

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  3. Multimode imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Mihailescu, Lucian; Vetter, Kai M

    2013-08-27

    Apparatus for detecting and locating a source of gamma rays of energies ranging from 10-20 keV to several MeV's includes plural gamma ray detectors arranged in a generally closed extended array so as to provide Compton scattering imaging and coded aperture imaging simultaneously. First detectors are arranged in a spaced manner about a surface defining the closed extended array which may be in the form a circle, a sphere, a square, a pentagon or higher order polygon. Some of the gamma rays are absorbed by the first detectors closest to the gamma source in Compton scattering, while the photons that go unabsorbed by passing through gaps disposed between adjacent first detectors are incident upon second detectors disposed on the side farthest from the gamma ray source, where the first spaced detectors form a coded aperture array for two or three dimensional gamma ray source detection.

  4. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  5. MRI compatibility and visibility assessment of implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Schueler, B A; Parrish, T B; Lin, J C; Hammer, B E; Pangrle, B J; Ritenour, E R; Kucharczyk, J; Truwit, C L

    1999-04-01

    We have developed a protocol to evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) compatibility of implantable medical devices. The testing protocol consists of the evaluation of magnetic field-induced movement, electric current, heating, image distortion, and device operation. In addition, current induction is evaluated with a finite element analysis simulation technique that models the effect of radiofrequency fields on each device. The protocol has been applied to several implantable infusion pumps and neurostimulators with associated attachments. Experiments were performed using a 1.5-T whole-body MR system with parameters selected to approximate the intended clinical and worst case configuration. The devices exhibited moderate magnetic field-induced deflection and torque but had significant image artifacts. No heating was detected for any of the devices. Pump operation was halted in the magnetic field, but resumed after removed. Exposure to the magnetic field activated some of the neurostimulators. PMID:10232520

  6. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Kimbrough, Joseph R.

    1996-01-01

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO.sub.2 insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron's generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO.sub.2 layer.

  7. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1996-11-19

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

  8. Government health policy and the diffusion of new medical devices.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, B J

    1986-01-01

    The combination of absent financial incentives, aspects of physicians' clinical training, and the uncertainty surrounding the appropriate application of expensive new medical devices have been the most significant factors in promoting their wasteful diffusion and use. This presentation summarizes the forces that have resulted in regulatory and reimbursement initiatives to make more efficient the acquisition and utilization of new medical devices. The case histories of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) serve as a paradigm demonstrating why such initiatives have thus far proved ineffectual. More effective would be to abandon distinctions between inpatient and outpatient reimbursement for using new medical devices and to improve the relationship between reimbursement and technology assessment. PMID:3818311

  9. Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application. PMID:24441941

  10. 21 CFR 801.6 - Medical devices; misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; misleading statements. 801.6... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.6 Medical devices; misleading statements. Among representations in the labeling of a device which render such device misbranded is a...

  11. [Design and application of implantable medical device information management system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaoping; Yin, Chunguang; Zhao, Zhenying

    2013-03-01

    Through the establishment of implantable medical device information management system, with the aid of the regional joint sharing of resources, we further enhance the implantable medical device traceability management level, strengthen quality management, control of medical risk. PMID:23777076

  12. [Design and application of implantable medical device information management system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaoping; Yin, Chunguang; Zhao, Zhenying

    2013-03-01

    Through the establishment of implantable medical device information management system, with the aid of the regional joint sharing of resources, we further enhance the implantable medical device traceability management level, strengthen quality management, control of medical risk.

  13. Deformable Medical Image Registration: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Davatzikos, Christos; Paragios, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Deformable image registration is a fundamental task in medical image processing. Among its most important applications, one may cite: i) multi-modality fusion, where information acquired by different imaging devices or protocols is fused to facilitate diagnosis and treatment planning; ii) longitudinal studies, where temporal structural or anatomical changes are investigated; and iii) population modeling and statistical atlases used to study normal anatomical variability. In this paper, we attempt to give an overview of deformable registration methods, putting emphasis on the most recent advances in the domain. Additional emphasis has been given to techniques applied to medical images. In order to study image registration methods in depth, their main components are identified and studied independently. The most recent techniques are presented in a systematic fashion. The contribution of this paper is to provide an extensive account of registration techniques in a systematic manner. PMID:23739795

  14. [Batteries Used in Active Implantable Medical Devices].

    PubMed

    Ma, Bozhi; Hao, Hongwei; Li, Luming

    2015-03-01

    In recent years active implantable medical devices(AIMD) are being developed rapidly. Many battery systems have been developed for different AIMD applications. These batteries have the same requirements which include high safety, reliability, energy density and long service life, discharge indication. History, present and future of batteries used in AIMD are introduced in the article. PMID:26524787

  15. 77 FR 72924 - Taxable Medical Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... rulemaking (REG-113770-10) (the proposed regulations) in the Federal Register (77 FR 6028). The IRS and the.... Purchase at Retail Several commenters suggested that Internet sales should be included in the factor... consumers who are not medical professionals can purchase a device over the Internet should be a factor...

  16. 78 FR 15877 - Taxable Medical Devices; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 72924). The final regulations provide guidance on the excise tax imposed on the sale of... Accordingly, the final regulations (TD 9604), that are the subject of FR Doc. 2012-29628, are corrected as... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 48 RIN 1545-BJ44 Taxable Medical Devices; Correction AGENCY:...

  17. The grays of medical device color additives.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    The United States' medical device color additive regulations are unknown to some, and confusing to many. This article reviews statutory language on color additives in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), as amended, including the Delaney Clause on carcinogenicity; color additive regulatory language as it relates to medical devices in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Parts 70-82; reports on the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) likely current and historical practices in dealing with color additives in medical devices; and speculates on what may have given rise to decades of seemingly ad hoc color additives practices, which may now be difficult to reconstruct and satisfactorily modify. Also addressed is the Center for Devices and Radiological Health's (CDRH's) recent publicly-vetted approach to color additives in Section 7 of its April 2013 draft guidance, Use of International Standard ISO-10993, "Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices Part 1: Evaluation and Testing," which the author concludes is a change in the right direction, but which, at least in its current draft form, is not a fix to the CDRH's color additives dilemma. Lastly, the article suggests what the CDRH might consider in further developing a new approach to color additives. Such an approach would treat color additives as if they were any other potentially toxic group of chemicals, and could be fashioned in such a way that the CDRH could still satisfy the broad aspects of Congressional color additives mandates, and.yet be consistent with ISO 10993. In doing this, the CDRH would need to recommend a more directed use of its Quality System Regulation, 21 C.F.R. Part 820, for material and vendor qualification and validation in general; approach Congress for needed statutory changes; or make administrative changes. In order for any approach to be successful, whether it is a new twist on past practices, or an entirely new path forward, the FDA must, to the best of its

  18. Bluetooth Communication for Battery Powered Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babušiak, Branko; Borik, Štefan

    2016-01-01

    wireless communication eliminates obtrusive cables associated with wearable sensors and considerably increases patient comfort during measurement and collection of medical data. Wireless communication is very popular in recent years and plays a significant role in telemedicine and homecare applications. Bluetooth technology is one of the most commonly used wireless communication types in medicine. This paper describes the design of a universal wireless communication device with excellent price/performance ratio. The said device is based on the low-cost RN4020 Bluetooth module with Microchip Low-energy Data Profile (MLDP) and due to low-power consumption is especially suitable for the transmission of biological signals (ECG, EMG, PPG, etc.) from wearable medical/personal health devices. A unique USB dongle adaptor was developed for wireless communication via UART interface and power consumption was evaluated under various conditions.

  19. Onboard tagging for smart medical devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Kejia; Warren, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Most medical devices are 'dumb:' their role is to acquire, display, and forward data. They make few if any operational decisions based on those data. Onboard tagging is a means whereby a device can embed information about itself, its data, and the sensibility of those data into its data stream. This diagnostic add-on offers a move toward 'smart' devices that will have the ability to affect changes in operational modes based on onboard contextual decision making, such as decisions to avoid needless wireless transmission of corrupt data. This paper presents a description of three types of onboard tags that relate to device hardware (type I tag), signal statistics (type II tag), and signal viability for the intended application (type III tag). A custom wireless pulse oximeter is presented as a use case to show how type II and III tags that convey photoplethysmogram (PPG) statistics and usability specifiers can be calculated and embedded into the data stream without degrading performance.

  20. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  1. Compressive sensing in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400

  2. Power Approaches for Implantable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Ben Amar, Achraf; Kouki, Ammar B; Cao, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Implantable medical devices have been implemented to provide treatment and to assess in vivo physiological information in humans as well as animal models for medical diagnosis and prognosis, therapeutic applications and biological science studies. The advances of micro/nanotechnology dovetailed with novel biomaterials have further enhanced biocompatibility, sensitivity, longevity and reliability in newly-emerged low-cost and compact devices. Close-loop systems with both sensing and treatment functions have also been developed to provide point-of-care and personalized medicine. Nevertheless, one of the remaining challenges is whether power can be supplied sufficiently and continuously for the operation of the entire system. This issue is becoming more and more critical to the increasing need of power for wireless communication in implanted devices towards the future healthcare infrastructure, namely mobile health (m-Health). In this review paper, methodologies to transfer and harvest energy in implantable medical devices are introduced and discussed to highlight the uses and significances of various potential power sources. PMID:26580626

  3. Power Approaches for Implantable Medical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amar, Achraf; Kouki, Ammar B.; Cao, Hung

    2015-01-01

    Implantable medical devices have been implemented to provide treatment and to assess in vivo physiological information in humans as well as animal models for medical diagnosis and prognosis, therapeutic applications and biological science studies. The advances of micro/nanotechnology dovetailed with novel biomaterials have further enhanced biocompatibility, sensitivity, longevity and reliability in newly-emerged low-cost and compact devices. Close-loop systems with both sensing and treatment functions have also been developed to provide point-of-care and personalized medicine. Nevertheless, one of the remaining challenges is whether power can be supplied sufficiently and continuously for the operation of the entire system. This issue is becoming more and more critical to the increasing need of power for wireless communication in implanted devices towards the future healthcare infrastructure, namely mobile health (m-Health). In this review paper, methodologies to transfer and harvest energy in implantable medical devices are introduced and discussed to highlight the uses and significances of various potential power sources. PMID:26580626

  4. Medical devices; medical device distributor reporting; opportunity for comments--FDA. Final rule; opportunity for comments.

    PubMed

    1993-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for public comments on the final rule on medical device distributor reporting, which is published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. The medical device distributor reporting tentative final rule became final on May 28, 1992, by operation of the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1992 (the 1992 amendments). Although not required to do so, FDA realizes that there may be issues not previously considered, such as technical issues on specific provisions, and therefore is providing this additional time for comment. If changes are warranted by comments, FDA will make further changes in the rules.

  5. 21 CFR 801.127 - Medical devices; expiration of exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. 801.127... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.127 Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. (a) If a shipment or delivery, or any part thereof, of a device which is...

  6. 21 CFR 801.127 - Medical devices; expiration of exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. 801.127... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.127 Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. (a) If a shipment or delivery, or any part thereof, of a device which is...

  7. 21 CFR 801.127 - Medical devices; expiration of exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. 801.127... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.127 Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. (a) If a shipment or delivery, or any part thereof, of a device which is...

  8. 21 CFR 801.127 - Medical devices; expiration of exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. 801.127... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.127 Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. (a) If a shipment or delivery, or any part thereof, of a device which is...

  9. 21 CFR 801.127 - Medical devices; expiration of exemptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. 801.127... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.127 Medical devices; expiration of exemptions. (a) If a shipment or delivery, or any part thereof, of a device which is...

  10. Open-source hardware for medical devices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Open-source hardware is hardware whose design is made publicly available so anyone can study, modify, distribute, make and sell the design or the hardware based on that design. Some open-source hardware projects can potentially be used as active medical devices. The open-source approach offers a unique combination of advantages, including reducing costs and faster innovation. This article compares 10 of open-source healthcare projects in terms of how easy it is to obtain the required components and build the device. PMID:27158528

  11. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2015-11-24

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  12. Microscopy imaging device with advanced imaging properties

    DOEpatents

    Ghosh, Kunal; Burns, Laurie; El Gamal, Abbas; Schnitzer, Mark J.; Cocker, Eric; Ho, Tatt Wei

    2016-10-25

    Systems, methods and devices are implemented for microscope imaging solutions. One embodiment of the present disclosure is directed toward an epifluorescence microscope. The microscope includes an image capture circuit including an array of optical sensor. An optical arrangement is configured to direct excitation light of less than about 1 mW to a target object in a field of view of that is at least 0.5 mm.sup.2 and to direct epi-fluorescence emission caused by the excitation light to the array of optical sensors. The optical arrangement and array of optical sensors are each sufficiently close to the target object to provide at least 2.5 .mu.m resolution for an image of the field of view.

  13. Cosmic Ultraviolet Polarimetric Imaging Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgh, Eric B.; Nordsieck, Kenneth H.; Jaehnig, Kurt P.; Harris, Walter M.; Bershady, Matthew A.

    The Cosmic Ultraviolet Polarimetric Imaging Device (CUPID) is a suborbital sounding rocket payload designed to perform wide-field, polarimetric imaging of the extragalactic ultraviolet background. In doing so, it will also measure the contribution to the UV background from the diffuse Galactic light (DGL), starlight from the Milky Way scattered off of dust. Current uncertanties in the contribution of the DGL to the UV background are due almost entirely to a poor knowledge of the optical properties of the dust in the diffuse ISM at ultraviolet wavelengths. The polarization of the scattered light is sensitive to scattering angle and thus CUPID imaging may help to constrain the spatial distribution and scattering properties of Galactic dust.

  14. An open architecture for medical image workstation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Liang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiangyun

    2005-04-01

    Dealing with the difficulties of integrating various medical image viewing and processing technologies with a variety of clinical and departmental information systems and, in the meantime, overcoming the performance constraints in transferring and processing large-scale and ever-increasing image data in healthcare enterprise, we design and implement a flexible, usable and high-performance architecture for medical image workstations. This architecture is not developed for radiology only, but for any workstations in any application environments that may need medical image retrieving, viewing, and post-processing. This architecture contains an infrastructure named Memory PACS and different kinds of image applications built on it. The Memory PACS is in charge of image data caching, pre-fetching and management. It provides image applications with a high speed image data access and a very reliable DICOM network I/O. In dealing with the image applications, we use dynamic component technology to separate the performance-constrained modules from the flexibility-constrained modules so that different image viewing or processing technologies can be developed and maintained independently. We also develop a weakly coupled collaboration service, through which these image applications can communicate with each other or with third party applications. We applied this architecture in developing our product line and it works well. In our clinical sites, this architecture is applied not only in Radiology Department, but also in Ultrasonic, Surgery, Clinics, and Consultation Center. Giving that each concerned department has its particular requirements and business routines along with the facts that they all have different image processing technologies and image display devices, our workstations are still able to maintain high performance and high usability.

  15. Devices, systems, and methods for imaging

    DOEpatents

    Appleby, David; Fraser, Iain; Watson, Scott

    2008-04-15

    Certain exemplary embodiments comprise a system, which can comprise an imaging plate. The imaging plate can be exposable by an x-ray source. The imaging plate can be configured to be used in digital radiographic imaging. The imaging plate can comprise a phosphor-based image storage device configured to convert an image stored therein into light.

  16. Stereoscopic medical imaging collaboration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Fumio; Hirano, Takenori; Nakabayasi, Yuusuke; Minoura, Hirohito; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2007-02-01

    The computerization of the clinical record and the realization of the multimedia have brought improvement of the medical service in medical facilities. It is very important for the patients to obtain comprehensible informed consent. Therefore, the doctor should plainly explain the purpose and the content of the diagnoses and treatments for the patient. We propose and design a Telemedicine Imaging Collaboration System which presents a three dimensional medical image as X-ray CT, MRI with stereoscopic image by using virtual common information space and operating the image from a remote location. This system is composed of two personal computers, two 15 inches stereoscopic parallax barrier type LCD display (LL-151D, Sharp), one 1Gbps router and 1000base LAN cables. The software is composed of a DICOM format data transfer program, an operation program of the images, the communication program between two personal computers and a real time rendering program. Two identical images of 512×768 pixcels are displayed on two stereoscopic LCD display, and both images show an expansion, reduction by mouse operation. This system can offer a comprehensible three-dimensional image of the diseased part. Therefore, the doctor and the patient can easily understand it, depending on their needs.

  17. Medical gamma ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Osborne, Louis S.; Lanza, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the distribution of a position-emitting radioisotope into an object, the apparatus consisting of a wire mesh radiation converter, an ionizable gas for propagating ionization events caused by electrodes released by the converter, a drift field, a spatial position detector and signal processing circuitry for correlating near-simultaneous ionization events and determining their time differences, whereby the position sources of back-to-back collinear radiation can be located and a distribution image constructed.

  18. 76 FR 12743 - Medical Device Reporting; Malfunction Reporting Frequency

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Reporting; Malfunction Reporting Frequency AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... continue to submit malfunction reports in full compliance with FDA's Medical Device Reporting...

  19. 77 FR 18829 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide... related to medical devices intended for obese patients. The committee will provide...

  20. 21 CFR 801.6 - Medical devices; misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; misleading statements. 801.6 Section 801.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.6 Medical devices;...

  1. 21 CFR 801.6 - Medical devices; misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; misleading statements. 801.6 Section 801.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.6 Medical devices;...

  2. 21 CFR 801.6 - Medical devices; misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; misleading statements. 801.6 Section 801.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.6 Medical devices;...

  3. 21 CFR 801.6 - Medical devices; misleading statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; misleading statements. 801.6 Section 801.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.6 Medical devices;...

  4. Hacking medical devices a review - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Programmable, implantable and external biomedical devices (such as pacemakers, defibrillators, insulin pumps, pain management pumps, vagus nerve stimulators and others) may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, commonly referred to as “hacking”. This intrusion may lead to compromise of confidential patient data or loss of control of the device itself, which may be deadly. Risks to health from unauthorized access is in addition to hazards from faulty (“buggy”) software or circuitry. Historically, this aspect of medical device design has been underemphasized by both manufacturers and regulatory bodies until recently. However, an insulin pump was employed as a murder weapon in 2001 and successful hacking of an implantable defibrillator was demonstrated in 2008. To remedy these problems, professional groups have announced a variety of design standards and the governmental agencies of several countries have enacted device regulations. In turn, manufacturers have developed new software products and hardware circuits to assist biomedical engineering firms to improve their commercial offerings. In this paper the author discusses these issues, reviewing known problems and zero-day threats, with potential solutions. He outlines his approach to secure software and hardware challenges using the Forth language. A plausible scenario is described in which hacking of an implantable defibrillator by terrorists results in a severe national security threat to the United States. PMID:23686179

  5. Hacking medical devices a review - biomed 2013.

    PubMed

    Frenger, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Programmable, implantable and external biomedical devices (such as pacemakers, defibrillators, insulin pumps, pain management pumps, vagus nerve stimulators and others) may be vulnerable to unauthorized access, commonly referred to as “hacking”. This intrusion may lead to compromise of confidential patient data or loss of control of the device itself, which may be deadly. Risks to health from unauthorized access is in addition to hazards from faulty (“buggy”) software or circuitry. Historically, this aspect of medical device design has been underemphasized by both manufacturers and regulatory bodies until recently. However, an insulin pump was employed as a murder weapon in 2001 and successful hacking of an implantable defibrillator was demonstrated in 2008. To remedy these problems, professional groups have announced a variety of design standards and the governmental agencies of several countries have enacted device regulations. In turn, manufacturers have developed new software products and hardware circuits to assist biomedical engineering firms to improve their commercial offerings. In this paper the author discusses these issues, reviewing known problems and zero-day threats, with potential solutions. He outlines his approach to secure software and hardware challenges using the Forth language. A plausible scenario is described in which hacking of an implantable defibrillator by terrorists results in a severe national security threat to the United States.

  6. 77 FR 68788 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function... multilumen device with two balloons mounted near the distal tip. The proximal end has a multiport...

  7. Radiofrequency identification and medical devices: the regulatory framework on electromagnetic compatibility. Part I: medical devices.

    PubMed

    Censi, Federica; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro; Calcagnini, Giovanni

    2012-05-01

    Radiofrequency identification (RFID) technology has acheived significant success and has penetrated into various areas of healthcare. Several RFID-based applications are used in various modalities with the ultimate aim of improving patient care. When a wireless technology is used in a healthcare environment, attention must be paid to the potential risks deriving from its use; one of the most important being electromagnetic interference with medical devices. In this paper, the regulatory framework concerning the electromagnetic compatibility between RFID and medical devices is analyzed to understand whether and how the application of the current standards allows for the effective control of the risks of electromagnetic interference.

  8. Charge coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of a charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensors for use in spacecraft-borne imaging systems was conducted. The study resulted in design recommendations for two sensors, an approximately 500 times 500 element imaging device and a 1 times 190 element linear imaging device with a 190 times 121 buffer store. Emphasis was placed on the higher resolution, area-imaging sensor. The objectives of the proposed sensors are listed, results of the experiments are analyzed, and estimates of the device performance are presented. A summary of the major technical recommendations is included.

  9. Charge-coupled device image sensor study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design specifications and predicted performance characteristics of a Charge-Coupled Device Area Imager and a Charge-Coupled Device Linear Imager are presented. The Imagers recommended are intended for use in space-borne imaging systems and therefore would meet the requirements for the intended application. A unique overlapping metal electrode structure and a buried channel structure are described. Reasons for the particular imager designs are discussed.

  10. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  11. Transaction recording in medical image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Christian H.; Ploeger, Andreas; Onnasch, Dietrich G. W.; Mehdorn, Hubertus M.

    1999-07-01

    In medical image processing original image data on archive servers may absolutely not be modified directly. On the other hand, images from read-only devices like CD-ROM cannot be changed and saved on the same storage medium. In both cases the modified data have to be stored as a second version and large amounts of storage volume are needed. We avoid these problems by using a program which records only each transaction prescribed to images. Each transaction is stored and used for further utilization and for renewed submission of the modified data. Conventionally, every time an image is viewed or printed, the modified version has to be saved in addition to the recorded data, either automatically or by the user. Compared to these approaches which not only squander storage space but area also time consuming our program has the following and advantages: First, the original image data which may not be modified are protected against manipulation. Second, small amounts of storage volume and network range are needed. Third, approved image operations can be automated by macros derived from transaction recordings. Finally, operations on the original data can always be controlled and traced back. As the handling of images gets easier with this concept, security for original image data is granted.

  12. A system for ultrasonic beacon-guidance of catheters and other minimally-invasive medical devices.

    PubMed

    Vilkomerson, D; Lyons, D

    1997-01-01

    Catheters and other interventional medical devices are presently guided by X-ray imaging, despite the advantages of ultrasound imaging over X-ray imaging in cost, safety, and availability. X-ray imaging is used because ultrasound reflects specularly from catheters and similar devices; their visibility is highly angle-dependent. With an omni-directional receiver mounted on a device, the receiver's location in the ultrasound image can be deduced from knowing which acoustic ray struck the receiver and the time from transmission of the imaging pulse to its reception by the receiver. This information is independent of specular reflection. The location of the device can then be indicated in the ultrasound image by an arrow pointing to the sensor, making possible ultrasound guidance of these devices. This paper describes the technical and practical considerations in the design and construction of the device-mounted receiver and associated electronics, and describes some clinical uses.

  13. Integrated Microbatteries for Implantable Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; West, William

    2008-01-01

    Integrated microbatteries have been proposed to satisfy an anticipated need for long-life, low-rate primary batteries, having volumes less than 1 mm3, to power electronic circuitry in implantable medical devices. In one contemplated application, such a battery would be incorporated into a tubular hearing-aid device to be installed against an eardrum. This device is based on existing tube structures that have already been approved by the FDA for use in human ears. As shown in the figure, the battery would comprise a single cell at one end of the implantable tube. A small volume of Li-based primary battery cathode material would be compacted and inserted in the tube near one end, followed by a thin porous separator, followed by a pressed powder of a Li-containing alloy. Current-collecting wires would be inserted, with suitably positioned insulators to prevent a short circuit. The battery would contain a liquid electrolyte consisting of a Li-based salt in an appropriate solvent. Hermetic seals would be created by plugging both ends with a waterproof polymer followed by deposition of parylene.

  14. 75 FR 14170 - Medical Device Epidemiology Network: Developing Partnership Between the Center for Devices and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Epidemiology Network: Developing Partnership... public workshop entitled ``Medical Device Epidemiology Network (MDEpiNet): Developing Partnership Between... to facilitate discussion among FDA and academic researchers with expertise in epidemiology and...

  15. Contextual medical-image viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ramon A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2004-04-01

    One of the greatest difficulties of dealing with medical images is their distinct characteristics, in terms of generation process and noise that requires different forms of treatment for visualization and processing. Besides that, medical images are only a compounding part of the patient"s history, which should be accessible for the user in an understandable way. Other factors that can be used to enhance the user capability and experience are: the computational power of the client machine; available knowledge about the case; if the access is local or remote and what kind of user is accessing the system (physician, nurse, administrator, etc...). These information compose the context of an application and should define its behavior during execution time. In this article, we present the architecture of a viewer that takes into account the contextual information that is present at the moment of execution. We also present a viewer of X-Ray Angiographic images that uses contextual information about the client's hardware and the kind of user to, if necessary, reduce the image size and hide demographic information of the patient. The proposed architecture is extensible, allowing the inclusion of new tools and viewers, being adaptive along time to the evolution of the medical systems.

  16. Regulatory science based approach in development of novel medical devices.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    For development rational evaluation method for medical devices' safety and efficacy, regulatory science studies are important. Studies on regulatory affairs related to a medical device under development should be conducted as well as its technological development. Clinical performance of a medical device is influenced by performance of the device, medical doctors' skill, pathological condition of a patient, and so on. Thus it is sometimes difficult to demonstrate superiority of the device in terms of clinical outcome although its efficacy as a medical device is accepted. Setting of appropriate end points is required to evaluate a medical device appropriately. Risk assessment and risk management are the basis of medical device safety assurance. In case of medical device software, there are difficulties in identifying the risk due to its complexity of user environment and different design and manufacturing procedure compared with conventional hardware based medical devices. Recent technological advancement such as information and communication technologies (ICT) for medical devices and wireless network has raised new issue on risk management: cybersecurity. We have to watch closely the progress of safety standard development. PMID:26736611

  17. Regulatory science based approach in development of novel medical devices.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Ichiro

    2015-08-01

    For development rational evaluation method for medical devices' safety and efficacy, regulatory science studies are important. Studies on regulatory affairs related to a medical device under development should be conducted as well as its technological development. Clinical performance of a medical device is influenced by performance of the device, medical doctors' skill, pathological condition of a patient, and so on. Thus it is sometimes difficult to demonstrate superiority of the device in terms of clinical outcome although its efficacy as a medical device is accepted. Setting of appropriate end points is required to evaluate a medical device appropriately. Risk assessment and risk management are the basis of medical device safety assurance. In case of medical device software, there are difficulties in identifying the risk due to its complexity of user environment and different design and manufacturing procedure compared with conventional hardware based medical devices. Recent technological advancement such as information and communication technologies (ICT) for medical devices and wireless network has raised new issue on risk management: cybersecurity. We have to watch closely the progress of safety standard development.

  18. Medical Imaging of Hyperpolarized Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G. Wilson

    2009-08-04

    Since the introduction of hyperpolarized {sup 3}He and {sup 129}Xe as gaseous MRI contrast agents more than a decade ago, a rich variety of imaging techniques and medical applications have been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the inhaled gas depicts ventilated lung airspaces with unprecedented detail, and allows one to track airflow and pulmonary mechanics during respiration. Information about lung structure and function can also be obtained using the physical properties of the gas, including spin relaxation in the presence of oxygen, restricted diffusion inside the alveolar airspaces, and the NMR frequency shift of xenon dissolved in blood and tissue.

  19. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-01-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient’s body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  20. Implantable photonic devices for improved medical treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinman, Victor; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Toichuev, Rakhmanbek; Eshiev, Abdyrakhman; Abdullaeva, Svetlana; Egemkulov, Talantbek; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-10-01

    An evolving area of biomedical research is related to the creation of implantable units that provide various possibilities for imaging, measurement, and the monitoring of a wide range of diseases and intrabody phototherapy. The units can be autonomic or built-in in some kind of clinically applicable implants. Because of specific working conditions in the live body, such implants must have a number of features requiring further development. This topic can cause wide interest among developers of optical, mechanical, and electronic solutions in biomedicine. We introduce preliminary clinical trials obtained with an implantable pill and devices that we have developed. The pill and devices are capable of applying in-body phototherapy, low-level laser therapy, blue light (450 nm) for sterilization, and controlled injection of chemicals. The pill is also capable of communicating with an external control box, including the transmission of images from inside the patient's body. In this work, our pill was utilized for illumination of the sinus-carotid zone in dog and red light influence on arterial pressure and heart rate was demonstrated. Intrabody liver tissue laser ablation and nanoparticle-assisted laser ablation was investigated. Sterilization effect of intrabody blue light illumination was applied during a maxillofacial phlegmon treatment.

  1. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... regulatory classification for diagnostic devices known as methotrexate enzyme immunoassays. Methotrexate enzyme immunoassays are considered pre- Amendment devices since they were in commercial distribution prior to May 28, 1976 when the Medical Device Amendments became effective. Methotrexate...

  2. 77 FR 61768 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical... onset. The CoAxia NeuroFlo Catheter is a 7F multi-lumen device with two balloons mounted near the...

  3. 75 FR 72832 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  4. 76 FR 6625 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  5. 75 FR 44273 - Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Radiological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  6. 77 FR 42503 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and recommendations...

  7. 21 CFR 801.63 - Medical devices; warning statements for devices containing or manufactured with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; warning statements for devices... Section 801.63 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Labeling Requirements for Over-the-Counter Devices § 801.63...

  8. The value of diagnostic medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Don; Bradley, Kendall E

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging has clear clinical utility, but it also imposes significant costs on the health care system. This commentary reviews the factors that drive the cost of medical imaging, discusses current interventions, and suggests possible future courses of action.

  9. Medical devices regulatory aspects: a special focus on polymeric material based devices.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Pliszka, Damian; Luo, He-Kuan; Chin Lim, Keith Hsiu; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices form a broad range of appliances from a basic nanoparticle coating or surgical gloves to a complicated laser therapy device. These devices are designed to support patients, surgeons and healthcare personnel in meeting patients' healthcare needs. Regulatory authorities of each country regulate the process of approval, manufacturing and sales of these medical devices so as to ensure safety and quality to patients or users. Recent recalls of medical devices has increased importance of safety, awareness and regulation of the devices. Singapore and India have strong presence and national priorities in medical devices development and use. Herein we capture the rationale of each of these national regulatory bodies and compare them with the medical devices regulatory practices of USA and European nations. Apart from the comparison of various regulatory aspects, this review will specifically throw light on the polymer material based medical devices and their safety.

  10. 76 FR 7220 - Medical Device Innovation Initiative; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Innovation Initiative; Request for Comments... Innovation Initiative'' (the report). The report proposes potential actions for FDA's Center for Devices and... global leader in medical device innovation and CDRH is committed to assuring that American patients...

  11. [USA approval of high-risk medical device].

    PubMed

    Chang, Yongheng

    2013-03-01

    During the practice of supervision and management of medical device in different countries, the strict regulatory and needs of the program by the regulations is to be determined by the risk level of the medical equipment. This paper briefly describes the regulatory requirements of the United States to enter the market for high-risk medical device. PMID:23777072

  12. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  13. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  14. Archimedes, an archive of medical images.

    PubMed

    Tahmoush, Dave; Samet, Hanan

    2006-01-01

    We present a medical image and medical record database for the storage, research, transmission, and evaluation of medical images. Medical images from any source that supports the DICOM standard can be stored and accessed, as well as associated analysis and annotations. Retrieval is based on patient info, date, doctor's annotations, features in the images, or a spatial combination. This database supports the secure transmission of sensitive data for tele-medicine and follows all HIPPA regulations.

  15. Education and training in regulatory science for medical device development.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory science can be defined as the science aimed at the optimal introduction into society of new products of science, such as discovered substances and new scientific tools and technologies as well as knowledge and information. In addition to engineering researches that create novel medical devices, scientific methods for evaluating efficacy, safety and quality of medical devices are necessary to enable rational and scientific evaluation of the device in device approval process. Engineers and medical doctors involving research and development of novel medical devices are required to have basic knowledge on medical device safety standard, medical device regulation, and relevant methodologies. In Japan, several graduate schools in Japan have started educational programs on regulatory sciences in collaboration of Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), Japan. In 2012, program for researches for development of evaluation guidelines for novel medical device products started where personnel exchanges between academic researches institutes and PMDA. Example of these programs will be introduced in the presentation and its impact on improvement of medical device research and development process will be discussed.

  16. Education and training in regulatory science for medical device development.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory science can be defined as the science aimed at the optimal introduction into society of new products of science, such as discovered substances and new scientific tools and technologies as well as knowledge and information. In addition to engineering researches that create novel medical devices, scientific methods for evaluating efficacy, safety and quality of medical devices are necessary to enable rational and scientific evaluation of the device in device approval process. Engineers and medical doctors involving research and development of novel medical devices are required to have basic knowledge on medical device safety standard, medical device regulation, and relevant methodologies. In Japan, several graduate schools in Japan have started educational programs on regulatory sciences in collaboration of Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA), Japan. In 2012, program for researches for development of evaluation guidelines for novel medical device products started where personnel exchanges between academic researches institutes and PMDA. Example of these programs will be introduced in the presentation and its impact on improvement of medical device research and development process will be discussed. PMID:24110397

  17. Legislative aspects of the development of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Marešová, Petra; Klímová, Blanka; Krejcar, Ondřej; Kuča, Kamil

    2015-09-01

    European industry of medical device technologies represents 30% of all worlds sales. New health technologies bring effective treatment approaches, help shorten stays in hospital1),bring better treatment results and accelerate rehabilitation which leads to the earlier patients recovery.Legislative aspects are one of the key areas influencing the speed of development of medical devices and their launching. The aim of this article is to specify current state of legislation in the development of medical devices in the European Union in comparison with the market leaders such as China, Japan and USA.The best established market of medical devices is in the USA. Both Japan and China follow the USA model. However, a non-professional code of ethics in China in some respect contributes to the decrease of quality of medical devices, while Japan as well as the EU countries try really hard to conform to all the regulations imposed on the manufacturing of medical devices.

  18. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Aghajani, Mahdi; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2013-10-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems.

  19. MEDEMAS -Medical Device Management and Maintenance System Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Ülkü Balcı; Dogan, Mehmet Ugur; Ülgen, Yekta; Özkan, Mehmed

    In the proposed study, a medical device maintenance management system (MEDEMAS) is designed and implemented which provides a data pool of medical devices, the maintenance protocols and other required information for these devices. The system also contains complete repair and maintenance history of a specific device. MEDEMAS creates optimal maintenance schedule for devices and enables the service technician to carry out and report maintenance/repair processes via remote access. Thus predicted future failures are possible to prevent or minimize. Maintenance and repair is essential for patient safety and proper functioning of the medical devices, as it prevents performance decrease of the devices, deterioration of the equipment, and detrimental effects on the health of a patient, the user or other interacting people. The study aims to make the maintenance process more accurate, more efficient, faster and easier to manage and organize; and much less confusing. The accumulated history of medical devices and maintenance personnel helps efficient facility planning.

  20. Home Healthcare Medical Devices: A Checklist

    MedlinePlus

    ... your device and follow them for: - cleaning - replacing batteries, filters - protecting your device (e.g. keep food ... after-hour phone numbers. * If appropriate, keep extra batteries for your device. - Know how to replace them. ...

  1. Novel Algorithm for Classification of Medical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Juneja, Monika

    2010-11-01

    Content-based image retrieval (CBIR) methods in medical image databases have been designed to support specific tasks, such as retrieval of medical images. These methods cannot be transferred to other medical applications since different imaging modalities require different types of processing. To enable content-based queries in diverse collections of medical images, the retrieval system must be familiar with the current Image class prior to the query processing. Further, almost all of them deal with the DICOM imaging format. In this paper a novel algorithm based on energy information obtained from wavelet transform for the classification of medical images according to their modalities is described. For this two types of wavelets have been used and have been shown that energy obtained in either case is quite distinct for each of the body part. This technique can be successfully applied to different image formats. The results are shown for JPEG imaging format.

  2. 76 FR 36548 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... delivery system also comes with a sheath, introducer, loader, dilator, balloon (used to pre-dilate...

  3. 77 FR 25183 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... valve. The delivery system also comes with a sheath, introducer, loader, dilator, balloon (used to...

  4. 77 FR 7589 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical... Stent System with Gateway PTA Balloon Catheter for the treatment of intracranial arterial stenosis....

  5. Regulatory approval of new medical devices: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Christopher J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara; Nandi, Dipankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the regulatory approval of new medical devices. Design Cross sectional study of new medical devices reported in the biomedical literature. Data sources PubMed was searched between 1 January 2000 and 31 December 2004 to identify clinical studies of new medical devices. The search was carried out during this period to allow time for regulatory approval. Eligibility criteria for study selection Articles were included if they reported a clinical study of a new medical device and there was no evidence of a previous clinical study in the literature. We defined a medical device according to the US Food and Drug Administration as an “instrument, apparatus, implement, machine, contrivance, implant, in vitro reagent, or other similar or related article.” Main outcome measures Type of device, target specialty, and involvement of academia or of industry for each clinical study. The FDA medical databases were then searched for clearance or approval relevant to the device. Results 5574 titles and abstracts were screened, 493 full text articles assessed for eligibility, and 218 clinical studies of new medical devices included. In all, 99/218 (45%) of the devices described in clinical studies ultimately received regulatory clearance or approval. These included 510(k) clearance for devices determined to be “substantially equivalent” to another legally marketed device (78/99; 79%), premarket approval for high risk devices (17/99; 17%), and others (4/99; 4%). Of these, 43 devices (43/99; 43%) were actually cleared or approved before a clinical study was published. Conclusions We identified a multitude of new medical devices in clinical studies, almost half of which received regulatory clearance or approval. The 510(k) pathway was most commonly used, and clearance often preceded the first published clinical study. PMID:27207165

  6. Client-side Medical Image Colorization in a Collaborative Environment.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an application related to collaborative medicine using a browser based medical visualization system with focus on the medical image colorization process and the underlying open source web development technologies involved. Browser based systems allow physicians to share medical data with their remotely located counterparts or medical students, assisting them during patient diagnosis, treatment monitoring, surgery planning or for educational purposes. This approach brings forth the advantage of ubiquity. The system can be accessed from a any device, in order to process the images, assuring the independence towards having a specific proprietary operating system. The current work starts with processing of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and ends with the rendering of the resulting bitmap images on a HTML5 (fifth revision of the HyperText Markup Language) canvas element. The application improves the image visualization emphasizing different tissue densities.

  7. Client-side Medical Image Colorization in a Collaborative Environment.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an application related to collaborative medicine using a browser based medical visualization system with focus on the medical image colorization process and the underlying open source web development technologies involved. Browser based systems allow physicians to share medical data with their remotely located counterparts or medical students, assisting them during patient diagnosis, treatment monitoring, surgery planning or for educational purposes. This approach brings forth the advantage of ubiquity. The system can be accessed from a any device, in order to process the images, assuring the independence towards having a specific proprietary operating system. The current work starts with processing of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and ends with the rendering of the resulting bitmap images on a HTML5 (fifth revision of the HyperText Markup Language) canvas element. The application improves the image visualization emphasizing different tissue densities. PMID:25991287

  8. Medical Image Retrieval: A Multimodal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yu; Steffey, Shawn; He, Jianbiao; Xiao, Degui; Tao, Cui; Chen, Ping; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is becoming a vital component of war on cancer. Tremendous amounts of medical image data are captured and recorded in a digital format during cancer care and cancer research. Facing such an unprecedented volume of image data with heterogeneous image modalities, it is necessary to develop effective and efficient content-based medical image retrieval systems for cancer clinical practice and research. While substantial progress has been made in different areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) research, direct applications of existing CBIR techniques to the medical images produced unsatisfactory results, because of the unique characteristics of medical images. In this paper, we develop a new multimodal medical image retrieval approach based on the recent advances in the statistical graphic model and deep learning. Specifically, we first investigate a new extended probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis model to integrate the visual and textual information from medical images to bridge the semantic gap. We then develop a new deep Boltzmann machine-based multimodal learning model to learn the joint density model from multimodal information in order to derive the missing modality. Experimental results with large volume of real-world medical images have shown that our new approach is a promising solution for the next-generation medical imaging indexing and retrieval system. PMID:26309389

  9. Medical Image Retrieval: A Multimodal Approach.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Steffey, Shawn; He, Jianbiao; Xiao, Degui; Tao, Cui; Chen, Ping; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is becoming a vital component of war on cancer. Tremendous amounts of medical image data are captured and recorded in a digital format during cancer care and cancer research. Facing such an unprecedented volume of image data with heterogeneous image modalities, it is necessary to develop effective and efficient content-based medical image retrieval systems for cancer clinical practice and research. While substantial progress has been made in different areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) research, direct applications of existing CBIR techniques to the medical images produced unsatisfactory results, because of the unique characteristics of medical images. In this paper, we develop a new multimodal medical image retrieval approach based on the recent advances in the statistical graphic model and deep learning. Specifically, we first investigate a new extended probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis model to integrate the visual and textual information from medical images to bridge the semantic gap. We then develop a new deep Boltzmann machine-based multimodal learning model to learn the joint density model from multimodal information in order to derive the missing modality. Experimental results with large volume of real-world medical images have shown that our new approach is a promising solution for the next-generation medical imaging indexing and retrieval system.

  10. The regulation of cognitive enhancement devices: extending the medical model.

    PubMed

    Maslen, Hannah; Douglas, Thomas; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Levy, Neil; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a model for regulating cognitive enhancement devices (CEDs). Recently, it has become very easy for individuals to purchase devices which directly modulate brain function. For example, transcranial direct current stimulators are increasingly being produced and marketed online as devices for cognitive enhancement. Despite posing risks in a similar way to medical devices, devices that do not make any therapeutic claims do not have to meet anything more than basic product safety standards. We present the case for extending existing medical device legislation to cover CEDs. Medical devices and CEDs operate by the same or similar mechanisms and pose the same or similar risks. This fact coupled with the arbitrariness of the line between treatment and enhancement count in favour of regulating these devices in the same way. In arguing for this regulatory model, the paper highlights potential challenges to its implementation, and suggests solutions. PMID:25243073

  11. The regulation of cognitive enhancement devices: extending the medical model

    PubMed Central

    Maslen, Hannah; Douglas, Thomas; Cohen Kadosh, Roi; Levy, Neil; Savulescu, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a model for regulating cognitive enhancement devices (CEDs). Recently, it has become very easy for individuals to purchase devices which directly modulate brain function. For example, transcranial direct current stimulators are increasingly being produced and marketed online as devices for cognitive enhancement. Despite posing risks in a similar way to medical devices, devices that do not make any therapeutic claims do not have to meet anything more than basic product safety standards. We present the case for extending existing medical device legislation to cover CEDs. Medical devices and CEDs operate by the same or similar mechanisms and pose the same or similar risks. This fact coupled with the arbitrariness of the line between treatment and enhancement count in favour of regulating these devices in the same way. In arguing for this regulatory model, the paper highlights potential challenges to its implementation, and suggests solutions. PMID:25243073

  12. Towards sustainable design for single-use medical devices.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jacob J; Hitchcock, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    Despite their sophistication and value, single-use medical devices have become commodity items in the developed world. Cheap raw materials along with large scale manufacturing and distribution processes have combined to make many medical devices more expensive to resterilize, package and restock than to simply discard. This practice is not sustainable or scalable on a global basis. As the petrochemicals that provide raw materials become more expensive and the global reach of these devices continues into rapidly developing economies, there is a need for device designs that take into account the total life-cycle of these products, minimize the amount of non-renewable materials consumed and consider alternative hybrid reusable / disposable approaches. In this paper, we describe a methodology to perform life cycle and functional analyses to create additional design requirements for medical devices. These types of sustainable approaches can move the medical device industry even closer to the "triple bottom line"--people, planet, profit.

  13. Medical Device Integration Model Based on the Internet of Things

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Aiyu; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    At present, hospitals in our country have basically established the HIS system, which manages registration, treatment, and charge, among many others, of patients. During treatment, patients need to use medical devices repeatedly to acquire all sorts of inspection data. Currently, the output data of the medical devices are often manually input into information system, which is easy to get wrong or easy to cause mismatches between inspection reports and patients. For some small hospitals of which information construction is still relatively weak, the information generated by the devices is still presented in the form of paper reports. When doctors or patients want to have access to the data at a given time again, they can only look at the paper files. Data integration between medical devices has long been a difficult problem for the medical information system, because the data from medical devices are lack of mandatory unified global standards and have outstanding heterogeneity of devices. In order to protect their own interests, manufacturers use special protocols, etc., thus causing medical decices to still be the "lonely island" of hospital information system. Besides, unfocused application of the data will lead to failure to achieve a reasonable distribution of medical resources. With the deepening of IT construction in hospitals, medical information systems will be bound to develop towards mobile applications, intelligent analysis, and interconnection and interworking, on the premise that there is an effective medical device integration (MDI) technology. To this end, this paper presents a MDI model based on the Internet of Things (IoT). Through abstract classification, this model is able to extract the common characteristics of the devices, resolve the heterogeneous differences between them, and employ a unified protocol to integrate data between devices. And by the IoT technology, it realizes interconnection network of devices and conducts associate matching

  14. Medical Device Integration Model Based on the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aiyu; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    At present, hospitals in our country have basically established the HIS system, which manages registration, treatment, and charge, among many others, of patients. During treatment, patients need to use medical devices repeatedly to acquire all sorts of inspection data. Currently, the output data of the medical devices are often manually input into information system, which is easy to get wrong or easy to cause mismatches between inspection reports and patients. For some small hospitals of which information construction is still relatively weak, the information generated by the devices is still presented in the form of paper reports. When doctors or patients want to have access to the data at a given time again, they can only look at the paper files. Data integration between medical devices has long been a difficult problem for the medical information system, because the data from medical devices are lack of mandatory unified global standards and have outstanding heterogeneity of devices. In order to protect their own interests, manufacturers use special protocols, etc., thus causing medical decices to still be the "lonely island" of hospital information system. Besides, unfocused application of the data will lead to failure to achieve a reasonable distribution of medical resources. With the deepening of IT construction in hospitals, medical information systems will be bound to develop towards mobile applications, intelligent analysis, and interconnection and interworking, on the premise that there is an effective medical device integration (MDI) technology. To this end, this paper presents a MDI model based on the Internet of Things (IoT). Through abstract classification, this model is able to extract the common characteristics of the devices, resolve the heterogeneous differences between them, and employ a unified protocol to integrate data between devices. And by the IoT technology, it realizes interconnection network of devices and conducts associate matching

  15. Medical Device Integration Model Based on the Internet of Things.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aiyu; Wang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    At present, hospitals in our country have basically established the HIS system, which manages registration, treatment, and charge, among many others, of patients. During treatment, patients need to use medical devices repeatedly to acquire all sorts of inspection data. Currently, the output data of the medical devices are often manually input into information system, which is easy to get wrong or easy to cause mismatches between inspection reports and patients. For some small hospitals of which information construction is still relatively weak, the information generated by the devices is still presented in the form of paper reports. When doctors or patients want to have access to the data at a given time again, they can only look at the paper files. Data integration between medical devices has long been a difficult problem for the medical information system, because the data from medical devices are lack of mandatory unified global standards and have outstanding heterogeneity of devices. In order to protect their own interests, manufacturers use special protocols, etc., thus causing medical decices to still be the "lonely island" of hospital information system. Besides, unfocused application of the data will lead to failure to achieve a reasonable distribution of medical resources. With the deepening of IT construction in hospitals, medical information systems will be bound to develop towards mobile applications, intelligent analysis, and interconnection and interworking, on the premise that there is an effective medical device integration (MDI) technology. To this end, this paper presents a MDI model based on the Internet of Things (IoT). Through abstract classification, this model is able to extract the common characteristics of the devices, resolve the heterogeneous differences between them, and employ a unified protocol to integrate data between devices. And by the IoT technology, it realizes interconnection network of devices and conducts associate matching

  16. 75 FR 35495 - Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ophthalmic Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... should have normal gonioscopic anatomy and a visually significant cataract eligible...

  17. 77 FR 125 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... Staff; Medical Device Classification Product Codes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... of the draft guidance entitled ``Medical Device Classification Product Codes.'' The purpose of the... classification product codes for medical devices regulated by the Center for Devices and Radiological...

  18. CMOS Imaging Device for Optical Imaging of Biological Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishido, Sanshiro; Oguro, Yasuhiro; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    In this paper, we propose a CMOS image sensor device placed on the brain surface or cerebral sulcus (Fig. 1). The device has a photo detector array where a single optical detector is usually used. The proposed imaging device enables the analysis which reflects a surface blood pattern in the observed area. It is also possible to improve effective sensitivity by image processing and to simplify the measurement system by the CMOS sensor device with on-chip light source. We describe the design details and characterization of proposed device. We also demonstrate detection of hemoglobin oxygenation level with external light source, imaging capability of biological activities, and image processing for sensitivity improvement is also realized.

  19. Scaling device for photographic images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivera, Jorge E. (Inventor); Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Cox, Robert B. (Inventor); Haskell, William D. (Inventor); Stevenson, Charles G. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A scaling device projects a known optical pattern into the field of view of a camera, which can be employed as a reference scale in a resulting photograph of a remote object, for example. The device comprises an optical beam projector that projects two or more spaced, parallel optical beams onto a surface of a remotely located object to be photographed. The resulting beam spots or lines on the object are spaced from one another by a known, predetermined distance. As a result, the size of other objects or features in the photograph can be determined through comparison of their size to the known distance between the beam spots. Preferably, the device is a small, battery-powered device that can be attached to a camera and employs one or more laser light sources and associated optics to generate the parallel light beams. In a first embodiment of the invention, a single laser light source is employed, but multiple parallel beams are generated thereby through use of beam splitting optics. In another embodiment, multiple individual laser light sources are employed that are mounted in the device parallel to one another to generate the multiple parallel beams.

  20. Image display device in digital TV

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Seung Jong

    2006-07-18

    Disclosed is an image display device in a digital TV that is capable of carrying out the conversion into various kinds of resolution by using single bit map data in the digital TV. The image display device includes: a data processing part for executing bit map conversion, compression, restoration and format-conversion for text data; a memory for storing the bit map data obtained according to the bit map conversion and compression in the data processing part and image data inputted from an arbitrary receiving part, the receiving part receiving one of digital image data and analog image data; an image outputting part for reading the image data from the memory; and a display processing part for mixing the image data read from the image outputting part and the bit map data converted in format from the a data processing part. Therefore, the image display device according to the present invention can convert text data in such a manner as to correspond with various resolution, carry out the compression for bit map data, thereby reducing the memory space, and support text data of an HTML format, thereby providing the image with the text data of various shapes.

  1. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  2. Medical Devices in the Treatment of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Julietta; Brethauer, Stacy

    2016-09-01

    Obesity continues to be a growing epidemic worldwide. Although bariatric surgery remains the most effective and durable treatment of obesity and its comorbidities, there is a need for less invasive yet efficacious weight loss therapies. Currently the Food and Drug Administration has approved two endoscopically placed intragastric balloon devices and a surgically placed vagal blockade device. Another device that holds promise, particularly for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, is the endoscopically placed duodenojejunal bypass sleeve. This article reviews the indications and current data regarding results for these devices. PMID:27519137

  3. Product-based Safety Certification for Medical Devices Embedded Software.

    PubMed

    Neto, José Augusto; Figueiredo Damásio, Jemerson; Monthaler, Paul; Morais, Misael

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide medical device embedded software certification practices are currently focused on manufacturing best practices. In Brazil, the national regulatory agency does not hold a local certification process for software-intensive medical devices and admits international certification (e.g. FDA and CE) from local and international industry to operate in the Brazilian health care market. We present here a product-based certification process as a candidate process to support the Brazilian regulatory agency ANVISA in medical device software regulation. Center of Strategic Technology for Healthcare (NUTES) medical device embedded software certification is based on a solid safety quality model and has been tested with reasonable success against the Class I risk device Generic Infusion Pump (GIP).

  4. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  5. A New Bipolar Imaging Device (BASIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Shigeyuki; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    1989-10-01

    A bipolar imaging device consisting of a capacitor loaded emitter follower circuit for a photo-transistor has been implemented into linear image sensors, which has capabilities of charge amplification and self-noise-reduction. The linear sensors are demonstrated experimentally to exhibit excellent performance such as a linearity in a wide dynamic range and a high sensitivity.

  6. [Data transparency regarding medical devices - the position of the medical device industry].

    PubMed

    Soskuty, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The medical device industry, strongly dominated by medium-sized firms, has significant growth potential and a high number of job opportunities with 170,000 employees in more than 11,000 companies. Approximately one third of the business volume is achieved with innovative products that are less than three years old. The safety, quality and efficiency of the products is tested and approved by CE certification. Due to the heterogeneous field of devices, however, evidence requirements must be differentiated according to the type of device in question. Transparency is as important as the type of evidence, and industry is well aware of the significance of transparency for credibility in the market. Industry believes that all the stakeholders affected must collaborate to define the evidence requirements and decide which data are necessary to assess the benefits of a technology. Before a consistent level of transparency can be achieved, however, it is crucial to jointly develop a framework of requirements including invasiveness, risk potential, patient-relevant endpoints and intended use of the technology, as well as the data source. Transparency is a process that can only be achieved if all stakeholders cooperate successfully. Also, it is important to keep in mind that the development of study designs and reliable evidence needs time. In the interest of all patients it is essential to maintain an innovation-friendly climate in Germany.

  7. MIARS: a medical image retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Mueen, A; Zainuddin, R; Baba, M Sapiyan

    2010-10-01

    The next generation of medical information system will integrate multimedia data to assist physicians in clinical decision-making, diagnoses, teaching, and research. This paper describes MIARS (Medical Image Annotation and Retrieval System). MIARS not only provides automatic annotation, but also supports text based as well as image based retrieval strategies, which play important roles in medical training, research, and diagnostics. The system utilizes three trained classifiers, which are trained using training images. The goal of these classifiers is to provide multi-level automatic annotation. Another main purpose of the MIARS system is to study image semantic retrieval strategy by which images can be retrieved according to different levels of annotation.

  8. NEED FOR HARMONIZATION OF LABELING OF MEDICAL DEVICES: A REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Songara, Raiendra K.; Sharma, Ganesh N.; Gupta, Vipul K.; Gupta, Promila

    2010-01-01

    Medical device labeling is any information associated with a device targeted to the patient or lay caregiver. It is intended to help assure that the device is used safely and effectively. Medical device labeling is supplied in many formats, for example, as patient brochures, patient leaflets, user manuals, and videotapes. The European commission has discussed a series of agreements with third countries, Australia, New Zealand, USA, Canada, Japan and Eastern European countries wishing to join the EU, concerning the mutual acceptance of inspection bodies, proof of conformity in connection with medical devices. Device labeling is exceedingly difficult for manufacturers for many reasons like regulations from government bodies to ensure compliance, increased competent authority surveillance, increased audits and language requirements. PMID:22247840

  9. A concept ideation framework for medical device design.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Thomas J; Grosse, Ian R; Krishnamurty, Sundar

    2015-06-01

    Medical device design is a challenging process, often requiring collaboration between medical and engineering domain experts. This collaboration can be best institutionalized through systematic knowledge transfer between the two domains coupled with effective knowledge management throughout the design innovation process. Toward this goal, we present the development of a semantic framework for medical device design that unifies a large medical ontology with detailed engineering functional models along with the repository of design innovation information contained in the US Patent Database. As part of our development, existing medical, engineering, and patent document ontologies were modified and interlinked to create a comprehensive medical device innovation and design tool with appropriate properties and semantic relations to facilitate knowledge capture, enrich existing knowledge, and enable effective knowledge reuse for different scenarios. The result is a Concept Ideation Framework for Medical Device Design (CIFMeDD). Key features of the resulting framework include function-based searching and automated inter-domain reasoning to uniquely enable identification of functionally similar procedures, tools, and inventions from multiple domains based on simple semantic searches. The significance and usefulness of the resulting framework for aiding in conceptual design and innovation in the medical realm are explored via two case studies examining medical device design problems. PMID:25956618

  10. A concept ideation framework for medical device design.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Thomas J; Grosse, Ian R; Krishnamurty, Sundar

    2015-06-01

    Medical device design is a challenging process, often requiring collaboration between medical and engineering domain experts. This collaboration can be best institutionalized through systematic knowledge transfer between the two domains coupled with effective knowledge management throughout the design innovation process. Toward this goal, we present the development of a semantic framework for medical device design that unifies a large medical ontology with detailed engineering functional models along with the repository of design innovation information contained in the US Patent Database. As part of our development, existing medical, engineering, and patent document ontologies were modified and interlinked to create a comprehensive medical device innovation and design tool with appropriate properties and semantic relations to facilitate knowledge capture, enrich existing knowledge, and enable effective knowledge reuse for different scenarios. The result is a Concept Ideation Framework for Medical Device Design (CIFMeDD). Key features of the resulting framework include function-based searching and automated inter-domain reasoning to uniquely enable identification of functionally similar procedures, tools, and inventions from multiple domains based on simple semantic searches. The significance and usefulness of the resulting framework for aiding in conceptual design and innovation in the medical realm are explored via two case studies examining medical device design problems.

  11. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. Methods In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters 18F, 64Cu, 89Zr, and 124I; β-emitter 131I; and α-particle emitter 225Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 89Zr-desferrioxamine B-[DFO-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Results Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-,β-, and α-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of 89Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. Conclusion These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  12. Risk management in the design of medical device software systems.

    PubMed

    Jones, Paul L; Jorgens, Joseph; Taylor, Alford R; Weber, Markus

    2002-01-01

    The safety of any medical device system is dependent on the application of a disciplined, well-defined, risk management process throughout the product life cycle. Hardware, software, human, and environmental interactions must be assessed in terms of intended use, risk, and cost/benefit criteria. This article addresses these issues in the context of medical devices that incorporate software. The article explains the principles of risk management, using terminology and examples from the domain of software engineering. It may serve as a guide to those new to the concepts of risk management and as an aide-memoire for medical device system/software engineers who are more familiar with the topic.

  13. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical imaging... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.513 Technical requirements for medical imaging systems. (a) The UWB... MHz and 10,600 MHz. (b) Operation under the provisions of this section is limited to medical...

  14. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical imaging... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.513 Technical requirements for medical imaging systems. (a) The UWB... MHz and 10,600 MHz. (b) Operation under the provisions of this section is limited to medical...

  15. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical imaging... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.513 Technical requirements for medical imaging systems. (a) The UWB... MHz and 10,600 MHz. (b) Operation under the provisions of this section is limited to medical...

  16. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Technical requirements for medical imaging... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.513 Technical requirements for medical imaging systems. (a) The UWB... MHz and 10,600 MHz. (b) Operation under the provisions of this section is limited to medical...

  17. Medical imaging V: Image capture, formatting, and display

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Digital image display I-V; Quality assurance I-V; Clinical image presentation I-V; Imaging systems; Image compression; Workstations; and Medical diagnostic imaging support system for military medicine and other federal agencies.

  18. Standalone medical device software: The evolving regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Avril D; Lawford, Patricia V

    2014-01-01

    The paper provides an introduction to the regulatory landscape affecting a particular category of medical technology, namely standalone software-sometimes referred to as 'software as a medical device'. To aid the reader's comprehension of an often complex area, six case studies are outlined and discussed before the paper continues to provide detail of how software with a medical purpose in its own right can potentially be classified as a medical device. The reader is provided an appreciation of how to go about classifying such software and references to support the developer new to the field in locating detailed regulatory support documents and contact points for advice. PMID:26415828

  19. Standalone medical device software: The evolving regulatory framework.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Avril D; Lawford, Patricia V

    2014-01-01

    The paper provides an introduction to the regulatory landscape affecting a particular category of medical technology, namely standalone software-sometimes referred to as 'software as a medical device'. To aid the reader's comprehension of an often complex area, six case studies are outlined and discussed before the paper continues to provide detail of how software with a medical purpose in its own right can potentially be classified as a medical device. The reader is provided an appreciation of how to go about classifying such software and references to support the developer new to the field in locating detailed regulatory support documents and contact points for advice.

  20. Informatics in radiology: Efficiency metrics for imaging device productivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengqi; Pavlicek, William; Liu, Patrick T; Zhang, Muhong; Langer, Steve G; Wang, Shanshan; Place, Vicki; Miranda, Rafael; Wu, Teresa Tong

    2011-01-01

    Acute awareness of the costs associated with medical imaging equipment is an ever-present aspect of the current healthcare debate. However, the monitoring of productivity associated with expensive imaging devices is likely to be labor intensive, relies on summary statistics, and lacks accepted and standardized benchmarks of efficiency. In the context of the general Six Sigma DMAIC (design, measure, analyze, improve, and control) process, a World Wide Web-based productivity tool called the Imaging Exam Time Monitor was developed to accurately and remotely monitor imaging efficiency with use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) combined with a picture archiving and communication system. Five device efficiency metrics-examination duration, table utilization, interpatient time, appointment interval time, and interseries time-were derived from DICOM values. These metrics allow the standardized measurement of productivity, to facilitate the comparative evaluation of imaging equipment use and ongoing efforts to improve efficiency. A relational database was constructed to store patient imaging data, along with device- and examination-related data. The database provides full access to ad hoc queries and can automatically generate detailed reports for administrative and business use, thereby allowing staff to monitor data for trends and to better identify possible changes that could lead to improved productivity and reduced costs in association with imaging services. © RSNA, 2011. PMID:21257928

  1. Informatics in radiology: Efficiency metrics for imaging device productivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mengqi; Pavlicek, William; Liu, Patrick T; Zhang, Muhong; Langer, Steve G; Wang, Shanshan; Place, Vicki; Miranda, Rafael; Wu, Teresa Tong

    2011-01-01

    Acute awareness of the costs associated with medical imaging equipment is an ever-present aspect of the current healthcare debate. However, the monitoring of productivity associated with expensive imaging devices is likely to be labor intensive, relies on summary statistics, and lacks accepted and standardized benchmarks of efficiency. In the context of the general Six Sigma DMAIC (design, measure, analyze, improve, and control) process, a World Wide Web-based productivity tool called the Imaging Exam Time Monitor was developed to accurately and remotely monitor imaging efficiency with use of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) combined with a picture archiving and communication system. Five device efficiency metrics-examination duration, table utilization, interpatient time, appointment interval time, and interseries time-were derived from DICOM values. These metrics allow the standardized measurement of productivity, to facilitate the comparative evaluation of imaging equipment use and ongoing efforts to improve efficiency. A relational database was constructed to store patient imaging data, along with device- and examination-related data. The database provides full access to ad hoc queries and can automatically generate detailed reports for administrative and business use, thereby allowing staff to monitor data for trends and to better identify possible changes that could lead to improved productivity and reduced costs in association with imaging services. © RSNA, 2011.

  2. 75 FR 875 - Guidance for Industry on New Contrast Imaging Indication Considerations for Devices and Approved...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-06

    ... September 30, 2008 (73 FR 58604, October 7, 2008); the comment period closed on January 5, 2009. FDA held.../biological products that provide image contrast enhancement. The final guidance announced in this document... developers of medical imaging devices and imaging drug/ biological products that provide image...

  3. 47 CFR 15.513 - Technical requirements for medical imaging systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... system, it is permissible to operate an imaging system by remote control provided the imaging system... DEVICES Ultra-Wideband Operation § 15.513 Technical requirements for medical imaging systems. (a) The UWB... radiated emissions at or below 960 MHz from a device operating under the provisions of this section...

  4. Bacterial resistance to silver in wound care and medical devices.

    PubMed

    Landsdown, A B G; Williams, A

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the molecular and genetic evidence for silver resistance in bacteria isolated from skin wounds and medical devices with reference to a case study of resistant Enterobacter cloacae from the leg ulcers of an elderly woman.

  5. 78 FR 26786 - Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Microbiology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Microbiology Devices Panel of the...

  6. 76 FR 12973 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... (76 FR 6625). The amendment is being ] made to reflect a change in the Agenda portion of the document... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Neurological Devices Panel of...

  7. 76 FR 48871 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Immunology Devices Panel of the...

  8. 76 FR 55398 - Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of Postponement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... in the Federal Register of August 9, 2011 (76 FR 48871). The meeting is postponed so that FDA can... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Immunology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is postponing the meeting of the Immunology Devices...

  9. 76 FR 50485 - Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 14, 2011 (76 FR 41507). The amendment is being made to reflect a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Obstetrics and Gynecology Devices Panel of the...

  10. 78 FR 11208 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... approval application for the MitraClip Delivery System sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The system consists...

  11. 76 FR 58019 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... sponsored by AtriCure, Inc., for the AtriCure Synergy Ablation System to be used for the treatment of...

  12. 77 FR 18829 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel...

  13. 75 FR 81282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... PMA supplement for the RX Acculink Carotid Stent System, sponsored by Abbott Vascular. The RX...

  14. 78 FR 55081 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... Monitoring System. The CardioMEMS HF System is a permanently implantable pressure measurement system...

  15. 77 FR 16038 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... the premarket approval application (PMA) for the HeartWare Ventricular Assist System (HVAS)...

  16. 78 FR 67365 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel...

  17. 76 FR 56200 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... and are pre-loaded onto 6 or 7 Fr \\1\\ (diameter of 2 or 2.3 mm) delivery systems. Upon deployment,...

  18. 75 FR 7282 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of... recommendations and vote on a PMA for the REVO MRI Pacemaker System sponsored by Medtronic. The REVO MRI...

  19. 76 FR 63928 - Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Circulatory System Devices Panel of...: ``Medtronic cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) systems are indicated for heart...

  20. The algorithm stitching for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenishchev, E.; Marchuk, V.; Voronin, V.; Pismenskova, M.; Tolstova, I.; Svirin, I.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we propose a stitching algorithm of medical images into one. The algorithm is designed to stitching the medical x-ray imaging, biological particles in microscopic images, medical microscopic images and other. Such image can improve the diagnosis accuracy and quality for minimally invasive studies (e.g., laparoscopy, ophthalmology and other). The proposed algorithm is based on the following steps: the searching and selection areas with overlap boundaries; the keypoint and feature detection; the preliminary stitching images and transformation to reduce the visible distortion; the search a single unified borders in overlap area; brightness, contrast and white balance converting; the superimposition into a one image. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the task of image stitching.

  1. Post-approval studies in France, challenges facing medical devices.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Karine; Coqueblin, Claire; Guillot, Bernard; Aubourg, Lucie; Avouac, Bernard; Carbonneil, Cédric; Cucherat, Michel; Descamps-Mandine, Patricia; Hanoka, Serge; Goldberg, Marcel; Josseran, Anne; Parquin, François; Pitel, Séverine; Ratignier, Christelle; Sechoy, Odile; Szwarcenstein, Karine; Tanti, André; Teiger, Emmanuel; Thevenet, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices are characterized notably by a wide heterogeneity (from tongue depressors to hip prostheses, and from non-implantable to invasive devices), a short life cycle with recurrent incremental innovations (from 18 months to 5 years), and an operator-dependent nature. The objective of the current round table was to develop proposals and recommendations concerning the prerequisites needed in order to meet the French health authorities expectations concerning requests for post-approval studies for medical devices, required in cases where short and long-term consequences are unknown. These studies, which are the responsibility of the manufacturer or the distributor of the medical device, are designed to confirm the role of the medical device in the therapeutic management strategy in a real-life setting. There are currently approximately 150 post-approval studies underway, mainly concerning class III devices, and the majority face difficulties implementing the study or meeting the study objectives. In light of this, the round table endeavored to clearly identify the conditions for implementation of post-approval studies specific to the characteristics of medical devices. Various areas of progress have been envisaged to improve the performance of these studies, and by consequence, the efficiency of reimbursement of medical devices by the national health insurance. These include providing manufacturers with the opportunity to better anticipate post-approval requirements, defining a study-specific primary objective, integrating a phase allowing dialogue between the manufacturer, the health authorities and the scientific committee, and increasing awareness and training of health professionals on the impact of post-approval clinical studies in terms of the reimbursement of medical devices by the national insurance.

  2. Content standards for medical image metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ornellas, Marcos C.; da Rocha, Rafael P.

    2003-12-01

    Medical images are at the heart of the healthcare diagnostic procedures. They have provided not only a noninvasive mean to view anatomical cross-sections of internal organs but also a mean for physicians to evaluate the patient"s diagnosis and monitor the effects of the treatment. For a Medical Center, the emphasis may shift from the generation of image to post processing and data management since the medical staff may generate even more processed images and other data from the original image after various analyses and post processing. A medical image data repository for health care information system is becoming a critical need. This data repository would contain comprehensive patient records, including information such as clinical data and related diagnostic images, and post-processed images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data as well as the diversified user access requirements, the implementation of the medical image archive system will be a complex and challenging task. This paper discusses content standards for medical image metadata. In addition it also focuses on the image metadata content evaluation and metadata quality management.

  3. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  4. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  5. Development of Implantable Medical Devices: From an Engineering Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    From the first pacemaker implant in 1958, numerous engineering and medical activities for implantable medical device development have faced challenges in materials, battery power, functionality, electrical power consumption, size shrinkage, system delivery, and wireless communication. With explosive advances in scientific and engineering technology, many implantable medical devices such as the pacemaker, cochlear implant, and real-time blood pressure sensors have been developed and improved. This trend of progress in medical devices will continue because of the coming super-aged society, which will result in more consumers for the devices. The inner body is a special space filled with electrical, chemical, mechanical, and marine-salted reactions. Therefore, electrical connectivity and communication, corrosion, robustness, and hermeticity are key factors to be considered during the development stage. The main participants in the development stage are the user, the medical staff, and the engineer or technician. Thus, there are three different viewpoints in the development of implantable devices. In this review paper, considerations in the development of implantable medical devices will be presented from the viewpoint of an engineering mind. PMID:24143287

  6. Seeing it through: translational validation of new medical imaging modalities

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Melissa B.; Marshall, Milton V.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Lanza, Greg; Kotyk, John; Culver, Joseph; Wang, Lihong V.; Uddin, Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Liao, Joseph C.; Contag, Chris; Crawford, James M.; Wang, Ken; Reisdorph, Bill; Appelman, Henry; Turgeon, D. Kim; Meyer, Charles; Wang, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, surgical guidance, and assessment of treatment efficacy. The Network for Translational Research (NTR) for Optical Imaging consists of four research groups working to “bridge the gap” between lab discovery and clinical use of fluorescence- and photoacoustic-based imaging devices used with imaging biomarkers. While the groups are using different modalities, all the groups face similar challenges when attempting to validate these systems for FDA approval and, ultimately, clinical use. Validation steps taken, as well as future needs, are described here. The group hopes to provide translational validation guidance for itself, as well as other researchers. PMID:22574264

  7. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  8. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  9. 76 FR 71041 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Collection; Comment Request; Medical Device Recall Authority AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... on the information collection requirements for medical device recall authority. DATES: Submit either... of information technology. Medical Device Recall Authority--21 CFR Part 810 (OMB Control Number...

  10. Color hard copy requirements for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargill, Ellen B.

    1995-04-01

    Traditionally, color mapping has not been utilized for diagnostic medical imaging. Color mapping was not possible prior to the emergence of electronic imaging modalities. Diagnostic imaging is considered in view of its purpose and goals as distinguished from photographic and scientific imaging. The applications for color in digital imaging modalities are discussed, as well as research directions for color utilized as a means of increasing the information density available to an observer. Requirements for color hardcopy are discussed.

  11. The medical information bus: overview of the medical device data language.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, H W

    1991-01-01

    The Medical Information Bus (MIB) reference model defines a new, object-oriented Medical Device Data Language (MDDL), under development by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society (IEEE) P1073 MIB Standard Committee. The MDDL treats medical devices, host computers, humans and device parameters as objects, and provides a flexible and extensible language for describing and passing messages between objects. This paper describes the MDDL semantic reference model and presents an overview of the MDDL structure, within the framework of the International Standards Organization (ISO) System Management Overview (SMO) model. A simple example of how the MDDL can be used to construct a device event report is also described.

  12. Medical image informatics infrastructure design and applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K; Wong, S T; Pietka, E

    1997-01-01

    Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) is a system integration of multimodality images and health information systems designed for improving the operation of a radiology department. As it evolves, PACS becomes a hospital image document management system with a voluminous image and related data file repository. A medical image informatics infrastructure can be designed to take advantage of existing data, providing PACS with add-on value for health care service, research, and education. A medical image informatics infrastructure (MIII) consists of the following components: medical images and associated data (including PACS database), image processing, data/knowledge base management, visualization, graphic user interface, communication networking, and application oriented software. This paper describes these components and their logical connection, and illustrates some applications based on the concept of the MIII. PMID:9509399

  13. Image-Capture Devices Extend Medicine's Reach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Johnson Space Center, Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, and Houston-based Wyle Laboratories collaborated on NASA's Advanced Diagnostic Ultrasound in Microgravity (ADUM) experiment, which developed revolutionary medical ultrasound diagnostic techniques for long-distance use. Mediphan, a Canadian company with U.S. operations in Springfield, New Jersey drew on NASA expertise to create frame-grabber and data archiving technology that enables ultrasound users with minimal training to send diagnostic-quality ultrasound images and video to medical professionals via the Internet in near real time allowing patients as varied as professional athletes, Olympians, and mountain climbers to receive medical attention as soon as it is needed.

  14. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging.

  15. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  16. Medical device integration using mobile telecommunications infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Bridget A; Cockle, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Financial pressures, an aging population, and a rising number of patients with chronic diseases, have encouraged the use of remote monitoring technologies. This usually entails at least one physiological parameter measurement for a clinician. Mobile telecommunication technologies lend themselves to this functionality, and in some cases, avoid some of the issues encountered with device integration. Moreover, the inherent characteristics of the mobile telecommunications infrastructure allow a coupling of business and clinical functions that were not possible before. Table I compares and contrasts some key aspect of device integration in and out of a healthcare facility. An HTM professional may be part of the team that acquires and/or manages a system using a mobile telecommunications technology. It is important for HTM professionals to ensure the data is in a standard format so that the interfaces across this system don't become brittle and break easily if one part changes. Moreover, the security and safety considerations of the system and the data should be a primary consideration in and y purchase, with attention given to the proper environmental and encryption mechanisms. Clinical engineers and other HTM professionals are unique in that they understand the patient/clinician/device interface and the need to ensure its safety and effectiveness regardless of geographical environment.

  17. Medical device integration using mobile telecommunications infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Bridget A; Cockle, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Financial pressures, an aging population, and a rising number of patients with chronic diseases, have encouraged the use of remote monitoring technologies. This usually entails at least one physiological parameter measurement for a clinician. Mobile telecommunication technologies lend themselves to this functionality, and in some cases, avoid some of the issues encountered with device integration. Moreover, the inherent characteristics of the mobile telecommunications infrastructure allow a coupling of business and clinical functions that were not possible before. Table I compares and contrasts some key aspect of device integration in and out of a healthcare facility. An HTM professional may be part of the team that acquires and/or manages a system using a mobile telecommunications technology. It is important for HTM professionals to ensure the data is in a standard format so that the interfaces across this system don't become brittle and break easily if one part changes. Moreover, the security and safety considerations of the system and the data should be a primary consideration in and y purchase, with attention given to the proper environmental and encryption mechanisms. Clinical engineers and other HTM professionals are unique in that they understand the patient/clinician/device interface and the need to ensure its safety and effectiveness regardless of geographical environment. PMID:23692108

  18. Variable Shadow Screens for Imaging Optical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ed; Chretien, Jean L.

    2004-01-01

    Variable shadow screens have been proposed for reducing the apparent brightnesses of very bright light sources relative to other sources within the fields of view of diverse imaging optical devices, including video and film cameras and optical devices for imaging directly into the human eye. In other words, variable shadow screens would increase the effective dynamic ranges of such devices. Traditionally, imaging sensors are protected against excessive brightness by use of dark filters and/or reduction of iris diameters. These traditional means do not increase dynamic range; they reduce the ability to view or image dimmer features of an image because they reduce the brightness of all parts of an image by the same factor. On the other hand, a variable shadow screen would darken only the excessively bright parts of an image. For example, dim objects in a field of view that included the setting Sun or bright headlights could be seen more readily in a picture taken through a variable shadow screen than in a picture of the same scene taken through a dark filter or a narrowed iris. The figure depicts one of many potential variations of the basic concept of the variable shadow screen. The shadow screen would be a normally transparent liquid-crystal matrix placed in front of a focal-plane array of photodetectors in a charge-coupled-device video camera. The shadow screen would be placed far enough from the focal plane so as not to disrupt the focal-plane image to an unacceptable degree, yet close enough so that the out-of-focus shadows cast by the screen would still be effective in darkening the brightest parts of the image. The image detected by the photodetector array itself would be used as feedback to drive the variable shadow screen: The video output of the camera would be processed by suitable analog and/or digital electronic circuitry to generate a negative partial version of the image to be impressed on the shadow screen. The parts of the shadow screen in front of

  19. Quality management for the processing of medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Klosz, Kerstin

    2008-01-01

    Rules on the reprocessing of medical devices were put into place in Germany in 2001. The present article explains the background situation and the provisions that are currently in force. The implementation of these statutory requirements is described using the example of the quality management system of Germany’s market leader, Vanguard AG. This quality management system was successfully certified pursuant to DIN EN ISO 13485:2003 for the scope "reprocessing of medical devices", including class “critical C”, in accordance with the recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) on the “Hygiene requirements for reprocessing of medical devices”. PMID:20204094

  20. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  1. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. (c) U.S. financial institutions are authorized to conduct all... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July...

  2. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. (c) U.S. financial institutions are authorized to conduct all... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July...

  3. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  4. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006,...

  5. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006,...

  6. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  7. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  8. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006,...

  9. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. (c) U.S. financial institutions are authorized to conduct all... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July...

  10. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. (c) U.S. financial institutions are authorized to conduct all... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July...

  11. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine, medical... donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6, 2006,...

  12. 76 FR 34845 - Medical Devices; Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices; Classification of the Wireless Air-Conduction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 874 Medical Devices; Ear, Nose, and Throat Devices; Classification of... established by this final rule create ``requirements'' for specific medical devices under 21 U.S.C. 360k, even..., 1976 (the date of enactment of the Medical Device Amendments of 1976), generally referred to...

  13. Devices for medical diagnosis with GaN lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasny, Miroslaw; Mierczyk, Zygmunt

    2003-10-01

    This paper presents laser-induced fluroescence method (LIF) employing endogenous ("autofluroescence") and exogenous fluorophores. LIF is applied for clinical diagnosis in dermatology, gynaecology, urology, lung tumors as well as for early dentin caries. We describe the analysers with He-Ne, He-Cd, and SHG Nd:YAG lasers and new generation systems based on blue semiconductor GaN lasers that have been implemented into clinical practice till now. The LIF method, fundamental one for many medical applications, with excitation radiation of wavelength 400 nm could be appl,ied only using tunable dye lasers or titanium lasers adequte for laboratory investigations. Development of GaN laser shows possibility to design portable, compact diagnostic devices as multi-channel analysers of fluorescence spectra and surface imaging devoted to clinical application. The designed systems used for spectra measurement and registration of fluorescence images include lasers of power 5-30 mW and generate wavelengths of 405-407 nm. They are widely used in PDT method for investigation of superficial distribution of accumulation kinetics of all known photosensitizers, their elimination, and degradation as well as for treatment of superficial lesions of mucosa and skin. Excitation of exogenous porphrins in Soret band makes possible to estimate their concentration and a period of healthy skin photosensitivity that occurs after photosensitiser injections. Due to high sensitivity of spectrum analysers, properties of photosensitisers can be investigated in vitro (e.g. their aggregation, purity, chromatographic distributions) when their concentrations are 2-3 times lower in comparison to concentrations investigated with typical spectrofluorescence methods. Dentistry diagnosis is a new field in which GaN laser devices can be applied. After induction with blue light, decreased autofluorescence intensity can be observed when dentin caries occur and strong characteristic bands of endogenous porphyrines

  14. Image registration method for medical image sequences

    DOEpatents

    Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

    2013-03-26

    Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

  15. Medical image libraries: ICoS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honniball, John; Thomas, Peter

    1999-08-01

    FOr use of digital techniques for the production, manipulation and storage of images has resulted in the creation of digital image libraries. These libraries often store many thousands of images. While provision of storage media for such large amounts of data has been straightforward, provision of effective searching and retrieval tools has not. Medicine relies heavily on images as a diagnostic tool. The most obvious example is the x-ray, but many other image forms are in everyday use. Advances in technology are affecting the ways medical images are generated, stored and retrieved. The paper describes the work of the Image COding and Segmentation to Support Variable Rate Transmission Channels and Variable Resolution Platforms (ICoS) research project currently under way in Bristol, UK. ICoS is a project of the Mobile of England and Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories Europe. Funding is provided by the Engineering and PHysical Sciences Research Council. The aim of the ICoS project is to demonstrate the practical application of computer networking to medical image libraries. Work at the University of the West of England concentrates on user interface and indexing issues. Metadata is used to organize the images, coded using the WWW Consortium standard Resource Description Framework. We are investigating the application of such standards to medical images, one outcome being to implement a metadata-based image library. This paper describes the ICoS project in detail and discuses both metadata system and user interfaces in the context of medical applications.

  16. THz Medical Imaging: in vivo Hydration Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Zachary D.; Singh, Rahul S.; Bennett, David B.; Tewari, Priyamvada; Kealey, Colin P.; Bajwa, Neha; Culjat, Martin O.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Lee, Hua; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Brown, Elliott R.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The application of THz to medical imaging is experiencing a surge in both interest and federal funding. A brief overview of the field is provided along with promising and emerging applications and ongoing research. THz imaging phenomenology is discussed and tradeoffs are identified. A THz medical imaging system, operating at ~525 GHz center frequency with ~125 GHz of response normalized bandwidth is introduced and details regarding principles of operation are provided. Two promising medical applications of THz imaging are presented: skin burns and cornea. For burns, images of second degree, partial thickness burns were obtained in rat models in vivo over an 8 hour period. These images clearly show the formation and progression of edema in and around the burn wound area. For cornea, experimental data measuring the hydration of ex vivo porcine cornea under drying is presented demonstrating utility in ophthalmologic applications. PMID:26085958

  17. 75 FR 68200 - Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... controls). The device type is intended to produce planar digital x-ray images of the entire breast; this... digital x-ray images of the entire breast. This generic type of device may include digital mammography... 892.1715. The final rule uses the term ``planar'' instead of ``full- field'' to describe digital...

  18. From radio-astronomy to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Peters, T M

    1991-12-01

    A common thread in much of the medical imaging that has developed over the past 20 years has been the Fourier transform. It was Richard Bates' interest in radio-interferometry, as well as his fascination with problems of medical imaging that prompted an initial interest in applying Fourier techniques to medical imaging in general and to Computed Tomography in particular. This resulted 20 years ago in one of the earliest technical papers advocating Fourier techniques for reconstructing cross-sections from radiographic projections (Bates and Peters, NZ J Science 14:883-896, 1971). Since those early days, medical imaging has explored into a multi-billion dollar industry. The CT scanner has become the workhorse imaging modality in the radiology department, while its more recent relative, the MR scanner, is rapidly gaining ground as a technique of even greater importance. Richard Bates, with his team of "Medical Imagers" was a very significant force in the development of the field of Medical Imaging as we know it today. This paper attempts to chronicle the genesis of this process from the personal perspective of the author.

  19. Theory of Electron Imaging in Small Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, Eric J.

    2015-05-21

    The research in this program involved theoretical investigations of the transport of charge in graphene and small heterostructure devices. There is an important trend toward imaging electronic systems in real space, with the goal of understanding the specifics of individual samples rather than settling for ensemble and statistical descriptions. For example one of our goals has been the understanding of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) imaging of systems in which the motion of the carriers is restricted to two degrees of freedom, such as in grapheme and the two dimensional electron (and hole) gas (2DEGs and 2DHGs) in GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, or when the motion is restricted to one degree of freedom as in nanowires. SPM imaging uses the tip of a movable charged probe to alter the electrons locally, depleting or alternatively increasing the amount of charges in the electron gas just below the tip results in a change to the flow pattern of the charge. The focus of this research was on understanding how the tunable tip affects functional aspects of the device that can be used to understand electronic and transport properties. For instance, scanning over the device while measuring the conductance results in conductance maps, an imaging of the charge transport. This imaging is often semi-direct and requires theory and interpretation to extract all that can be deduced about the underlying physical quantities.

  20. Multilanthanide Systems for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Jeremiah D.; Allen, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Molecules containing multiple lanthanide ions have unique potential in applications for medical imaging including the areas of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluoresence imaging. The study of multilanthanide complexes as contrast agents for MRI and as biologically responsive fluorescent probes has resulted in an improved understanding of the structural characteristics that govern the behavior of these complexes. This review will survey the last five years of progress in multinuclear lanthanide complexes with a specific focus on the structural parameters that impact potential medical imaging applications. The patents cited in this review are from the last five years and describe contrast agents that contain multiple lanthanide ions. PMID:23543789

  1. Web-based medical image archive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Edward B.; Warach, Steven; Cheung, Huey; Wang, Shaohua A.; Tangiral, Phanidral; Luby, Marie; Martino, Robert L.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a Web-based medical image archive system in three-tier, client-server architecture for the storage and retrieval of medical image data, as well as patient information and clinical data. The Web-based medical image archive system was designed to meet the need of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for a central image repository to address questions of stroke pathophysiology and imaging biomarkers in stroke clinical trials by analyzing images obtained from a large number of clinical trials conducted by government, academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers. In the database management-tier, we designed the image storage hierarchy to accommodate large binary image data files that the database software can access in parallel. In the middle-tier, a commercial Enterprise Java Bean server and secure Web server manages user access to the image database system. User-friendly Web-interfaces and applet tools are provided in the client-tier for easy access to the image archive system over the Internet. Benchmark test results show that our three-tier image archive system yields fast system response time for uploading, downloading, and querying the image database.

  2. Aliphatic polyesters for medical imaging and theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Nottelet, Benjamin; Darcos, Vincent; Coudane, Jean

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging is a cornerstone of modern medicine. In that context the development of innovative imaging systems combining biomaterials and contrast agents (CAs)/imaging probes (IPs) for improved diagnostic and theranostic applications focuses intense research efforts. In particular, the classical aliphatic (co)polyesters poly(lactide) (PLA), poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), attract much attention due to their long track record in the medical field. This review aims therefore at providing a state-of-the-art of polyester-based imaging systems. In a first section a rapid description of the various imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical imaging, computed tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) and radionuclide imaging (SPECT, PET) will be given. Then, the two main strategies used to combine the CAs/IPs and the polyesters will be discussed. In more detail we will first present the strategies relying on CAs/IPs encapsulation in nanoparticles, micelles, dendrimers or capsules. We will then present chemical modifications of polyesters backbones and/or polyester surfaces to yield macromolecular imaging agents. Finally, opportunities offered by these innovative systems will be illustrated with some recent examples in the fields of cell labeling, diagnostic or theranostic applications and medical devices.

  3. Economic content in medical journal advertisements for medical devices and prescription drugs.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, D Clay; Glickman, Seth W; Schulman, Kevin A

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies of economic content in medical journal advertisements have not examined all types of economic content and have not included advertisements for medical devices. To examine trends in the economic content of medical device and pharmaceutical advertisements in medical journals. Three reviewers examined pharmaceutical and medical device advertisements in six leading medical journals from 1997 through 2006. Product characteristics, economic claims and evidence to support those claims were evaluated. Economic content appeared in 23.5% (561/2389) of pharmaceutical and device advertisements; 11.9% made market share claims and 12.7% made other economic claims. From 1997 through 2006, the percentage of medical device advertisements containing economic content declined from 26.7% to 6.7% (p = 0.02), whereas the percentage of pharmaceutical advertisements containing economic content remained stable (21.6-22.0%; p = 0.99). For pharmaceuticals, price claims declined significantly (15.7-4.2%; p < 0.01) and market share claims increased (2.8-11.5%; p = 0.09), and both consistently presented evidence (83% and 98%, respectively) while other types did not (e.g. 13.5% of formulary claims). Medical device economic claims differed from pharmaceutical economic claims; they made fewer market share claims (1.1% vs 12.8%) but more cost-effectiveness (6.5% vs 0.6%) and reimbursement (4.9% vs 0.8%) claims. Fewer than 2% of device advertisements with economic claims provided supporting evidence. The prevalence and type of economic content in pharmaceutical and device advertisements changed between 1997 and 2006, which may reflect evolving market dynamics, such as changes in reimbursement systems. Furthermore, the lack of supporting evidence in medical device advertisements and pharmaceutical formulary claims are potential areas of concern that require additional scrutiny by regulators and journal editors. PMID:20402543

  4. Image-based device tracking for the co-registration of angiography and intravascular ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Terrence; Ecabert, Olivier; Prummer, Simone; Ostermeier, Martin; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2011-01-01

    The accurate and robust tracking of catheters and transducers employed during image-guided coronary intervention is critical to improve the clinical workflow and procedure outcome. Image-based device detection and tracking methods are preferred due to the straightforward integration into existing medical equipments. In this paper, we present a novel computational framework for image-based device detection and tracking applied to the co-registration of angiography and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), two modalities commonly used in interventional cardiology. The proposed system includes learning-based detections, model-based tracking, and registration using the geodesic distance. The system receives as input the selection of the coronary branch under investigation in a reference angiography image. During the subsequent pullback of the IVUS transducers, the system automatically tracks the position of the medical devices, including the IVUS transducers and guiding catheter tips, under fluoroscopy imaging. The localization of IVUS transducers and guiding catheter tips is used to continuously associate an IVUS imaging plane to the vessel branch under investigation. We validated the system on a set of 65 clinical cases, with high accuracy (mean errors less than 1.5mm) and robustness (98.46% success rate). To our knowledge, this is the first reported system able to automatically establish a robust correspondence between the angiography and IVUS images, thus providing clinicians with a comprehensive view of the coronaries.

  5. Metrological characterization of 3D imaging devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidi, G.

    2013-04-01

    Manufacturers often express the performance of a 3D imaging device in various non-uniform ways for the lack of internationally recognized standard requirements for metrological parameters able to identify the capability of capturing a real scene. For this reason several national and international organizations in the last ten years have been developing protocols for verifying such performance. Ranging from VDI/VDE 2634, published by the Association of German Engineers and oriented to the world of mechanical 3D measurements (triangulation-based devices), to the ASTM technical committee E57, working also on laser systems based on direct range detection (TOF, Phase Shift, FM-CW, flash LADAR), this paper shows the state of the art about the characterization of active range devices, with special emphasis on measurement uncertainty, accuracy and resolution. Most of these protocols are based on special objects whose shape and size are certified with a known level of accuracy. By capturing the 3D shape of such objects with a range device, a comparison between the measured points and the theoretical shape they should represent is possible. The actual deviations can be directly analyzed or some derived parameters can be obtained (e.g. angles between planes, distances between barycenters of spheres rigidly connected, frequency domain parameters, etc.). This paper shows theoretical aspects and experimental results of some novel characterization methods applied to different categories of active 3D imaging devices based on both principles of triangulation and direct range detection.

  6. I2Cnet medical image annotation service.

    PubMed

    Chronaki, C E; Zabulis, X; Orphanoudakis, S C

    1997-01-01

    I2Cnet (Image Indexing by Content network) aims to provide services related to the content-based management of images in healthcare over the World-Wide Web. Each I2Cnet server maintains an autonomous repository of medical images and related information. The annotation service of I2Cnet allows specialists to interact with the contents of the repository, adding comments or illustrations to medical images of interest. I2Cnet annotations may be communicated to other users via e-mail or posted to I2Cnet for inclusion in its local repositories. This paper discusses the annotation service of I2Cnet and argues that such services pave the way towards the evolution of active digital medical image libraries.

  7. Current perspectives in medical image perception

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Medical images constitute a core portion of the information a physician utilizes to render diagnostic and treatment decisions. At a fundamental level, this diagnostic process involves two basic processes: visually inspecting the image (visual perception) and rendering an interpretation (cognition). The likelihood of error in the interpretation of medical images is, unfortunately, not negligible. Errors do occur, and patients’ lives are impacted, underscoring our need to understand how physicians interact with the information in an image during the interpretation process. With improved understanding, we can develop ways to further improve decision making and, thus, to improve patient care. The science of medical image perception is dedicated to understanding and improving the clinical interpretation process. PMID:20601701

  8. Towards THz medical imaging; reflective imaging of animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Taylor, Zachary D; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Brown, Elliott R

    2008-01-01

    A reflective THz imaging system has been developed, and features a photoconductive switch and zero-bias Schottky diode detector. The system was used to image deli meats and can distinguish between muscle and adipose tissue based on water content. This capability is a step towards the development of THz medical imaging systems.

  9. A cloud-based medical image repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Anthony J.; Planitz, Birgit M.; El Rifai, Diaa

    2012-02-01

    Many widely used digital medical image collections have been established but these are generally used as raw data sources without related image analysis toolsets. Providing associated functionality to allow specific types of operations to be performed on these images has proved beneficial in some cases (e.g. brain image registration and atlases). However, toolset development to provide generic image analysis functions on medical images has tended to be ad hoc, with Open Source options proliferating (e.g. ITK). Our Automated Medical Image Collection Annotation (AMICA) system is both an image repository, to which the research community can contribute image datasets, and a search/retrieval system that uses automated image annotation. AMICA was designed for the Windows Azure platform to leverage the flexibility and scalability of the cloud. It is intended that AMICA will expand beyond its initial pilot implementation (for brain CT, MR images) to accommodate a wide range of modalities and anatomical regions. This initiative aims to contribute to advances in clinical research by permitting a broader use and reuse of medical image data than is currently attainable. For example, cohort studies for cases with particular physiological or phenotypical profiles will be able to source and include enough cases to provide high statistical power, allowing more individualised risk factors to be assessed and thus allowing screening and staging processes to be optimised. Also, education, training and credentialing of clinicians in image interpretation, will be more effective because it will be possible to select instances of images with specific visual aspects, or correspond to types of cases where reading performance improvement is desirable.

  10. Study of the in vitro cytotoxicity testing of medical devices

    PubMed Central

    LI, WEIJIA; ZHOU, JING; XU, YUYIN

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity test is one of the biological evaluation and screening tests that use tissue cells in vitro to observe the cell growth, reproduction and morphological effects by medical devices. Cytotoxicity is preferred as a pilot project test and an important indicator for toxicity evaluation of medical devices as it is simple, fast, has a high sensitivity and can save animals from toxicity. Three types of cytotoxicity test are stated in the International Organization for Standardization 109993-5: Extract, direct contact and indirect contact tests. The xCELLigence real-time cell analysis system shows a significant potential in regards to cytotoxicity in recent years. The present review provides a brief insight into the in vitro cytotoxicity testing of medical devices. PMID:26405534

  11. Developing medical device software in compliance with regulations.

    PubMed

    Zema, M; Rosati, S; Gioia, V; Knaflitz, M; Balestra, G

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the use of information technology (IT) in healthcare has taken a growing role. In fact, the adoption of an increasing number of computer tools has led to several benefits related to the process of patient care and allowed easier access to social and health care resources. At the same time this trend gave rise to new challenges related to the implementation of these new technologies. Software used in healthcare can be classified as medical devices depending on the way they are used and on their functional characteristics. If they are classified as medical devices they must satisfy specific regulations. The aim of this work is to present a software development framework that can allow the production of safe and high quality medical device software and to highlight the correspondence between each software development phase and the appropriate standard and/or regulation. PMID:26736514

  12. [Ethic review on clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Wanjun; Chao, Yong; Wang, Ning; Xu, Shining

    2011-07-01

    Clinical experiments are always used to evaluate the safety and validity of medical devices. The experiments have two types of clinical trying and testing. Ethic review must be done by the ethics committee of the medical department with the qualification of clinical research, and the approval must be made before the experiments. In order to ensure the safety and validity of clinical experiments of medical devices in medical institutions, the contents, process and approval criterions of the ethic review were analyzed and discussed. PMID:22097752

  13. 78 FR 28733 - Medical Devices; General Hospital and Personal Use Monitoring Devices; Classification of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 880 Medical Devices; General Hospital and... CFR part 880 is amended as follows: PART 880--GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES 0 1....

  14. 77 FR 16925 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of the Near Infrared Brain Hematoma Detector AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Near Infrared (NIR)...

  15. 77 FR 73034 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a...

  16. 76 FR 36993 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Clarification of Classification for Human Dura Mater...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... classification for human dura mater. This action is being taken to improve the accuracy of the regulations. DATES... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 882 (formerly Docket No. 1997N-0484P) Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Clarification of Classification for Human Dura Mater; Technical...

  17. 76 FR 17422 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and...

  18. 77 FR 71195 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... July 6, 2012 (77 FR 39953), FDA issued a proposed rule which, if made final, would make Shortwave... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION:...

  19. 77 FR 8117 - Medical Devices; Cardiovascular Devices; Classification of the Endovascular Suturing System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 870 Medical Devices; Cardiovascular Devices; Classification of the Endovascular Suturing System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the endovascular suturing system into...

  20. 75 FR 68972 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Tissue Adhesive With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 878 Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery..., 21 CFR part 878 is amended as follows: PART 878--GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES 0 1. The... wounds from surgical incisions, including punctures from minimally invasive surgery, and...

  1. 75 FR 36660 - Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and...

  2. Medical devices transition to information systems: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Charters, Kathleen G

    2012-01-01

    Medical devices designed to network can share data with a Clinical Information System (CIS), making that data available within clinician workflow. Some lessons learned by transitioning anesthesia reporting and monitoring devices (ARMDs) on a local area network (LAN) to integration of anesthesia documentation within a CIS include the following categories: access, contracting, deployment, implementation, planning, security, support, training and workflow integration. Areas identified for improvement include: Vendor requirements for access reconciled with the organizations' security policies and procedures. Include clauses supporting transition from stand-alone devices to information integrated into clinical workflow in the medical device procurement contract. Resolve deployment and implementation barriers that make the process less efficient and more costly. Include effective field communication and creative alternatives in planning. Build training on the baseline knowledge of trainees. Include effective help desk processes and metrics. Have a process for determining where problems originate when systems share information. PMID:24199054

  3. Monitoring of Vital Signs with Flexible and Wearable Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Khan, Yasser; Ostfeld, Aminy E; Lochner, Claire M; Pierre, Adrien; Arias, Ana C

    2016-06-01

    Advances in wireless technologies, low-power electronics, the internet of things, and in the domain of connected health are driving innovations in wearable medical devices at a tremendous pace. Wearable sensor systems composed of flexible and stretchable materials have the potential to better interface to the human skin, whereas silicon-based electronics are extremely efficient in sensor data processing and transmission. Therefore, flexible and stretchable sensors combined with low-power silicon-based electronics are a viable and efficient approach for medical monitoring. Flexible medical devices designed for monitoring human vital signs, such as body temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, blood pressure, pulse oxygenation, and blood glucose have applications in both fitness monitoring and medical diagnostics. As a review of the latest development in flexible and wearable human vitals sensors, the essential components required for vitals sensors are outlined and discussed here, including the reported sensor systems, sensing mechanisms, sensor fabrication, power, and data processing requirements.

  4. [Harm related to medical device use - legal and organisational risks].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, U M

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of the risk management systems established by medical device manufacturers and health-care facilities is clearly mitigated by European and national legal provisions. Laws, regulations and authorities prevent the systematic exchange of much safety-relevant information. The obligation to report adverse events is suspended for many relevant risks associated with medical device use. Reporting into the vigilance system is of little avail for users. Reporting even may endanger the information provider. The federal fragmentation of the German vigilance system poses a risk for patients. Risk management in health-care facilities without risk policy is dangerously incomplete.

  5. [Harm related to medical device use - legal and organisational risks].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, U M

    2014-12-01

    The effectiveness of the risk management systems established by medical device manufacturers and health-care facilities is clearly mitigated by European and national legal provisions. Laws, regulations and authorities prevent the systematic exchange of much safety-relevant information. The obligation to report adverse events is suspended for many relevant risks associated with medical device use. Reporting into the vigilance system is of little avail for users. Reporting even may endanger the information provider. The federal fragmentation of the German vigilance system poses a risk for patients. Risk management in health-care facilities without risk policy is dangerously incomplete. PMID:24824355

  6. Automated medical image library creation for education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark; Feied, Craig; Gillam, Michael; Handler, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a method to create a medical teaching library that is automatically maintained, contains tens of thousands of radiologic images and is built using existing, internal, hospital dictations, radiologic images, and an off-the-shelf commercial search engine product (Google Inc.).

  7. Use Of Medical Images In Today's Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ralph G.

    1982-01-01

    Medicine is a visual discipline. In the Practice of medicine, physicians require many forms of visual information to successfully conduct their tasks of diagnosing the presence or absence of disease; evaluating the progression or remission of disease; developing strategies for individual patient treatment planning; and in educating their peers and students. Thus, today's hospitals must provide an effective management strategy for a variety of medical images. This management strategy includes the functions of the acquisition of patient images, the archiving of patient images, and the storage of patient images. In a hospital, each medical specialty generates a class of visual images from which information is extracted for use by the patient's physician. This paper will address four issues in the use of medical images in today's hospitals. First, an estimate of the sources and utilization of clinical images in a hospital will be presented. Second, estimates will be provided regarding the magnitude of each of these images sources. Third, current management strategies for dealing with these images will be reviewed. Fourth, several potential solutions will be described for improving the management and archiving of these image sources in a hospital environment.

  8. Micro Computer Tomography for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, Florine; Zurbach, Raphael; Roggo, Yves

    2015-04-10

    Biomedical device and medicine product manufacturing are long processes facing global competition. As technology evolves with time, the level of quality, safety and reliability increases simultaneously. Micro Computer Tomography (Micro CT) is a tool allowing a deep investigation of products: it can contribute to quality improvement. This article presents the numerous applications of Micro CT for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis. The samples investigated confirmed CT suitability for verification of integrity, measurements and defect detections in a non-destructive manner.

  9. Medical devices and procedures in the hyperbaric chamber.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present current controversies concerning the safety of medical devices and procedures under pressure in a hyperbaric chamber including: defibrillation in a multiplace chamber; implantable devices during hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) and the results of a recent European questionnaire on medical devices used inside hyperbaric chambers. Early electrical defibrillation is the only effective therapy for cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure of defibrillation under hyperbaric conditions is inherently dangerous owing to the risk of fire, but it can be conducted safely if certain precautions are taken. Recently, new defibrillators have been introduced for hyperbaric medicine, which makes the procedure easier technically, but it must be noted that sparks and fire have been observed during defibrillation, even under normobaric conditions. Therefore, delivery of defibrillation shock in a hyperbaric environment must still be perceived as a hazardous procedure. Implantable devices are being seen with increasing frequency in patients referred for HBOT. These devices create a risk of malfunction when exposed to hyperbaric conditions. Some manufacturers support patients and medical practitioners with information on how their devices behave under increased pressure, but in some cases an individual risk-benefit analysis should be conducted on the patient and the specific implanted device, taking into consideration the patient's clinical condition, the indication for HBOT and the capability of the HBOT facility for monitoring and intervention in the chamber. The results of the recent survey on use of medical devices inside European hyperbaric chambers are also presented. A wide range of non-CE-certified equipment is used in European chambers. PMID:25596835

  10. Medical devices and procedures in the hyperbaric chamber.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present current controversies concerning the safety of medical devices and procedures under pressure in a hyperbaric chamber including: defibrillation in a multiplace chamber; implantable devices during hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) and the results of a recent European questionnaire on medical devices used inside hyperbaric chambers. Early electrical defibrillation is the only effective therapy for cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure of defibrillation under hyperbaric conditions is inherently dangerous owing to the risk of fire, but it can be conducted safely if certain precautions are taken. Recently, new defibrillators have been introduced for hyperbaric medicine, which makes the procedure easier technically, but it must be noted that sparks and fire have been observed during defibrillation, even under normobaric conditions. Therefore, delivery of defibrillation shock in a hyperbaric environment must still be perceived as a hazardous procedure. Implantable devices are being seen with increasing frequency in patients referred for HBOT. These devices create a risk of malfunction when exposed to hyperbaric conditions. Some manufacturers support patients and medical practitioners with information on how their devices behave under increased pressure, but in some cases an individual risk-benefit analysis should be conducted on the patient and the specific implanted device, taking into consideration the patient's clinical condition, the indication for HBOT and the capability of the HBOT facility for monitoring and intervention in the chamber. The results of the recent survey on use of medical devices inside European hyperbaric chambers are also presented. A wide range of non-CE-certified equipment is used in European chambers.

  11. [Radiotherapy and implantable medical device: example of infusion pumps].

    PubMed

    Abrous-Anane, S; Benhassine, S; Lopez, S; Cristina, K; Mazeron, J-J

    2013-12-01

    Indication for radiotherapy is often questioned for patients equipped with implantable medical devices like infusion pumps as the radiation tolerance is poor or not known. We report here on the case of a patient who we treated with pelvic radiotherapy for cervical cancer and who had an infusion pump in iliac fossa. We conducted a series of tests on five identical pumps that insured that the treatment protocol is harmless to the implanted device.

  12. Bulk Metallic Glasses for Implantable Medical Devices and Surgical Tools.

    PubMed

    Meagher, Philip; O'Cearbhaill, Eoin D; Byrne, James H; Browne, David J

    2016-07-01

    With increasing knowledge of the materials science of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and improvements in their properties and processing, they have started to become candidate materials for biomedical devices. A dichotomy in the types of medical applications has also emerged, in which some families of BMGs are being developed for permanent devices whilst another family - of Mg-based alloys - is showing promise in bioabsorbable implants. The current status of these metallurgical and technological developments is summarized.

  13. A Review of Simulators with Haptic Devices for Medical Training.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Castillejos, David; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis; Magana, Alejandra; Benes, Bedrich

    2016-04-01

    Medical procedures often involve the use of the tactile sense to manipulate organs or tissues by using special tools. Doctors require extensive preparation in order to perform them successfully; for example, research shows that a minimum of 750 operations are needed to acquire sufficient experience to perform medical procedures correctly. Haptic devices have become an important training alternative and they have been considered to improve medical training because they let users interact with virtual environments by adding the sense of touch to the simulation. Previous articles in the field state that haptic devices enhance the learning of surgeons compared to current training environments used in medical schools (corpses, animals, or synthetic skin and organs). Consequently, virtual environments use haptic devices to improve realism. The goal of this paper is to provide a state of the art review of recent medical simulators that use haptic devices. In particular we focus on stitching, palpation, dental procedures, endoscopy, laparoscopy, and orthopaedics. These simulators are reviewed and compared from the viewpoint of used technology, the number of degrees of freedom, degrees of force feedback, perceived realism, immersion, and feedback provided to the user. In the conclusion, several observations per area and suggestions for future work are provided. PMID:26888655

  14. A Review of Simulators with Haptic Devices for Medical Training.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Castillejos, David; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis; Magana, Alejandra; Benes, Bedrich

    2016-04-01

    Medical procedures often involve the use of the tactile sense to manipulate organs or tissues by using special tools. Doctors require extensive preparation in order to perform them successfully; for example, research shows that a minimum of 750 operations are needed to acquire sufficient experience to perform medical procedures correctly. Haptic devices have become an important training alternative and they have been considered to improve medical training because they let users interact with virtual environments by adding the sense of touch to the simulation. Previous articles in the field state that haptic devices enhance the learning of surgeons compared to current training environments used in medical schools (corpses, animals, or synthetic skin and organs). Consequently, virtual environments use haptic devices to improve realism. The goal of this paper is to provide a state of the art review of recent medical simulators that use haptic devices. In particular we focus on stitching, palpation, dental procedures, endoscopy, laparoscopy, and orthopaedics. These simulators are reviewed and compared from the viewpoint of used technology, the number of degrees of freedom, degrees of force feedback, perceived realism, immersion, and feedback provided to the user. In the conclusion, several observations per area and suggestions for future work are provided.

  15. Implementation of a Low-Cost Mobile Devices to Support Medical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    García Sánchez, Carlos; Botella Juan, Guillermo; Ayuso Márquez, Fermín; González Rodríguez, Diego; Prieto-Matías, Manuel; Tirado Fernández, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging has become an absolutely essential diagnostic tool for clinical practices; at present, pathologies can be detected with an earliness never before known. Its use has not only been relegated to the field of radiology but also, increasingly, to computer-based imaging processes prior to surgery. Motion analysis, in particular, plays an important role in analyzing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine. This short paper presents several low-cost hardware implementation approaches for the new generation of tablets and/or smartphones for estimating motion compensation and segmentation in medical images. These systems have been optimized for breast cancer diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging technology with several advantages over traditional X-ray mammography, for example, obtaining patient information during a short period. This paper also addresses the challenge of offering a medical tool that runs on widespread portable devices, both on tablets and/or smartphones to aid in patient diagnostics. PMID:24489600

  16. Multispectral imaging for medical diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.

    1977-01-01

    Photography technique determines amount of morbidity present in tissue. Imaging apparatus incorporates numerical filtering. Overall system operates in near-real time. Information gained from this system enables physician to understand extent of injury and leads to accelerated treatment.

  17. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  18. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications.

  19. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V.

    2016-05-03

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  20. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  1. 42 CFR 419.66 - Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Medical devices. (a) General rule. CMS makes a pass-through payment for a medical device that meets the... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.... (3) Except for medical devices identified in paragraph (e) of this section, CMS determines the...

  2. 42 CFR 419.66 - Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Medical devices. (a) General rule. CMS makes a pass-through payment for a medical device that meets the... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.... (3) Except for medical devices identified in paragraph (e) of this section, CMS determines the...

  3. 42 CFR 419.66 - Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Medical devices. (a) General rule. CMS makes a pass-through payment for a medical device that meets the... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transitional pass-through payments: Medical devices.... (3) Except for medical devices identified in paragraph (e) of this section, CMS determines the...

  4. [The Preliminary Study on the Construction of Medical Device Naming System in China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wanjuan; Li, Jun; Li, Jingli

    2015-11-01

    The article has summarized the situation related to medical device naming, analyzed the problems of medical device naming in our country, put forward some new thinking in building the naming system of medical device in our country provided some reference on technical study of medical device naming. PMID:27066687

  5. Medical Devices Assess, Treat Balance Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    series of dynamic protocols to isolate and assess balance function deficiencies. The technology was based on Nashner s novel, engineering-inspired concept of balance as an adaptable collaboration between multiple sensory and motor systems. CDP proved useful not only for examining astronauts, but for anyone suffering from balance problems. Today, CDP is the standard medical tool for objectively evaluating balance control.

  6. Robust Light Filters Support Powerful Imaging Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Infrared (IR) light filters developed by Lake Shore Cryotronics Inc. of Westerville, Ohio -- using SBIR funding from NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Langley Research Center -- employ porous silicon and metal mesh technology to provide optical filtration even at the ultra-low temperatures required by many IR sensors. With applications in the astronomy community, Lake Shore s SBIR-developed filters are also promising tools for use in terahertz imaging, the next wave of technology for applications like medical imaging, the study of fragile artworks, and airport security.

  7. Improved Interactive Medical-Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Twombly, Ian A.; Senger, Steven

    2003-01-01

    An improved computational-simulation system for interactive medical imaging has been invented. The system displays high-resolution, three-dimensional-appearing images of anatomical objects based on data acquired by such techniques as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). The system enables users to manipulate the data to obtain a variety of views for example, to display cross sections in specified planes or to rotate images about specified axes. Relative to prior such systems, this system offers enhanced capabilities for synthesizing images of surgical cuts and for collaboration by users at multiple, remote computing sites.

  8. Teaching about the Physics of Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollman, Dean; McBride, Dyan; Murphy, Sytil; Aryal, Bijaya; Kalita, Spartak; Wirjawan, Johannes v. d.

    2010-07-01

    Even before the discovery of X-rays, attempts at non-invasive medical imaging required an understanding of fundamental principles of physics. Students frequently do not see these connections because they are not taught in beginning physics courses. To help students understand that physics and medical imaging are closely connected, we have developed a series of active learning units. For each unit we begin by studying how students transfer their knowledge from traditional physics classes and everyday experiences to medical applications. Then, we build instructional materials to take advantage of the students' ability to use their existing learning and knowledge resources. Each of the learning units involves a combination of hands-on activities, which present analogies, and interactive computer simulations. Our learning units introduce students to the contemporary imaging techniques of CT scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and wavefront aberrometry. The project's web site is http://web.phys.ksu.edu/mmmm/.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  10. Evolution of Medical Imaging and Computational Demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deans, Stanley R.

    2000-11-01

    The first medical images produced using x-rays appeared less than a year after the discovery of x-rays by Wilhelm Roentgen in 1895. For over a century x-ray projection radiography has been and continues to be the most widely used diagnostic imaging modality. For over seventy years mathematics and computational methods were used in a general way for image processing and analysis. The really challenging mathematical and computational problems did not emerge until the 1970s with the beginning of computed tomography (CT) to produce images popularly known as CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scans. This was followed rapidly by positron-emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) emerged in the 1980s and is in many ways the most informative medical imaging methodology. Computer-based mathematical methods are fundamental to the success of these imaging modalities, and are increasingly important in several other novel imaging techniques. The technologies involved in each modality are competely different, have varying diagnostic value, and are described by different fundamental equations. The common underlying theme is that of the reconstruction of important characteristics of medical interest from indirect measurements. Several of these methodologies for visualizing internal body anatomy and function will be discussed and related to the evolution of computational capabilities. This brings out aspects of these biomedical imaging technologies where a deeper understanding is needed, and to frontiers where future advances are likely to come from continued research in physics jointly with the mathematical sciences.

  11. Sharing medical images: a proposal of a reference image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Furuie, Sérgio S.

    2006-03-01

    Due to increasing number of digital images used in medical diagnosis, the image processing and analysis are becoming essential for many tasks in medicine. One of the obstacles within the field of medical image processing is the lack of reference image datasets freely available for groups and/or individual users, in order to evaluate their new methods and applications. In order to improve this situation, this work presents the development of a framework to make available a free, online, multipurpose and multimodality medical image database for software and algorithm evaluation. The project is implemented as a distributed architecture for medical image database including a publishing workflow, authoring tools, and role-based access control. Our effort aims to offer a testbed and a set of resources including software, links to scientific papers, gold standards, reference and post-processed images, enabling the medical image processing community (scientists, physicians, students and industrials) to be more aware of evaluation issues. The proposed approach has been used as an electronic teaching system in Radiology as well.

  12. Development of wearable medical device for Bio-MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Yamamoto, Hidetake; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Uetsuji, Yasutomo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2006-01-01

    Biomedical Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (Bio-MEMS) have been applied to the development of a variety of health care related products including health Monitoring Systems (HMS) and Drug Delivery Systems (DDS). We focus on research to develop the new type compact medical device used for blood sugar control. The new type compact medical device comprises (1) a micropump system to extract blood using a pressure change occurred by electrolysis, (2) a platinum (Pt) electrode as a blood sugar sensor immobilized Glucose Oxidase (GOx) and attached to the gate electrode of Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) to detect the amount of glucose in extracted blood, and (3) a micropump system to inject insulin using a pressure change occurred by electrolysis. The device can extract blood in a few microliter through a painless microneedle with the micropump, which used the pressure change occurred by electrolysis. The liquid extraction ability of the micropump system through a microneedle, which is 3.8 mm in length and 100 μm in internal diameter, was measured. The wearable medical device with using the micropump controlled by electrolysis could extract human blood at the speed of 0.15 μl/sec. If the wearable medical device extracts human blood for 6 seconds, it is enough human blood volume to measure a glucose level, compared to the amount of commercial based glucose level monitor. The compact medical device with the air bubble that occurred by electrolysis could inject insulin at the speed of 6.15μl/sec.

  13. A lossless encryption method for medical images using edge maps.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yicong; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2009-01-01

    Image encryption is an effective approach for providing security and privacy protection for medical images. This paper introduces a new lossless approach, called EdgeCrypt, to encrypt medical images using the information contained within an edge map. The algorithm can fully protect the selected objects/regions within medical images or the entire medical images. It can also encrypt other types of images such as grayscale images or color images. The algorithm can be used for privacy protection in the real-time medical applications such as wireless medical networking and mobile medical services.

  14. Medical imaging in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heelan, R.T.; Bains, M.S.; Yeh, S.

    1987-10-01

    The routine imaging work-up of suspected lung cancer should include posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs and, in most cases, a computed tomographic (CT) scan of the entire thorax and adrenal glands. In asymptomatic patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung, there is justification for doing routine contrast-enhanced CT examination of the brain. Further imaging workup will be suggested by the patient's history, physical findings, and laboratory findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in patients with lung cancer is being investigated, but current studies comparing it with CT demonstrate no definite advantage at this time, with the possible exception of the lung apex in which T1 weighted thin-section coronal views are useful.

  15. 76 FR 48169 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Microbiology/ Medical Countermeasure Devices; Public Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... following public meeting: ``Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical... multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and public...

  16. 31 CFR 594.515 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine....515 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  17. 31 CFR 597.511 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. (c) U.S. financial institutions are authorized to conduct all... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine... Licensing Policy § 597.511 In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services....

  18. 31 CFR 595.513 - In-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations, 15 CFR part 774, supplement no. 1. Note to paragraph (b): Nongovernmental organizations that are... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false In-kind donations of medicine...-kind donations of medicine, medical devices, and medical services. (a) Effective July 6,...

  19. Image stabilization for SWIR advanced optoelectronic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiopu, Paul; Manea, Adrian; Cristea, Ionica; Grosu, Neculai; Craciun, Anca-Ileana; Craciun, Alexandru; Granciu, Dana

    2015-02-01

    At long ranges and under low visibility conditions, Advanced Optoelectronic Device provides the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in the Short-wave Infra-red - SWIR (wavelengths between 1,1 ÷2,5 μm), significantly better than in the near wave infrared - NWIR and visible spectral bands [1,2]. The quality of image is nearly independent of the polarization in the incoming light, but it is influenced by the relative movement between the optical system and the observer (the operators' handshake), and the movement towards the support system (land and air vehicles). All these make it difficult to detect objectives observation in real time. This paper presents some systems enhance which the ability of observation and sighting through the optical systems without the use of the stands, tripods or other means. We have to eliminate the effect of "tremors of the hands" and the vibration in order to allow the use of optical devices by operators on the moving vehicles on land, on aircraft, or on boats, and to provide additional comfort for the user to track the moving object through the optical system, without losing the control in the process of detection and tracking. The practical applications of stabilization image process, in SWIR, are the most advanced part of the optical observation systems available worldwide [3,4,5]. This application has a didactic nature, because it ensures understanding by the students about image stabilization and their participation in research.

  20. Photoacoustic imaging: opening new frontiers in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Rao, Navalgund A

    2011-01-01

    In today's world, technology is advancing at an exponential rate and medical imaging is no exception. During the last hundred years, the field of medical imaging has seen a tremendous technological growth with the invention of imaging modalities including but not limited to X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These tools have led to better diagnosis and improved patient care. However, each of these modalities has its advantages as well as disadvantages and none of them can reveal all the information a physician would like to have. In the last decade, a new diagnostic technology called photoacoustic imaging has evolved which is moving rapidly from the research phase to the clinical trial phase. This article outlines the basics of photoacoustic imaging and describes our hands-on experience in developing a comprehensive photoacoustic imaging system to detect tissue abnormalities.

  1. Scientific evaluation and pricing of medical devices and associated procedures in France.

    PubMed

    Gilard, Martine; Debroucker, Frederique; Dubray, Claude; Allioux, Yves; Aper, Eliane; Barat-Leonhardt, Valérie; Brami, Michèle; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Coqueblin, Claire; Fare, Sandrine; Giri, Isabelle; Goehrs, Jean-Marie; Levesque, Karine; Maugendre, Philippe; Parquin, François; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Szwarcensztein, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices are many and various, ranging from tongue spatulas to implantable or invasive devices and imaging machines; their lifetimes are short, between 18 months and 5 years, due to incessant incremental innovation; and they are operator-dependent: in general, the clinical user performs a fitting procedure (hip implant or pacemaker), a therapeutic procedure using a non-implantable invasive device (arrhythmic site ablation probe, angioplasty balloon, extension spondyloplasty system, etc.) or follow-up of an active implanted device (long-term follow-up of an implanted cardiac defibrillator or of a deep brain stimulator in Parkinson's patients). A round-table held during the XXVIII(th) Giens Workshops meeting focused on the methodology of scientific evaluation of medical devices and the associated procedures with a view to their pricing and financing by the French National Health Insurance system. The working hypothesis was that the available data-set was sufficient for and compatible with scientific evaluation with clinical benefit. Post-registration studies, although contributing to the continuity of assessment, were not dealt with. Moreover, the focus was restricted to devices used in health establishments, where the association between devices and technical medical procedures is optimally representative. An update of the multiple regulatory protocols governing medical devices and procedures is provided. Issues more specifically related to procedures as such, to non-implantable devices and to innovative devices are then dealt with, and the proposals and discussion points raised at the round-table for each of these three areas are presented.

  2. 78 FR 63225 - Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Ear, Nose and Throat Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  3. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  4. Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of Strabismus Detection Device. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-09-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the strabismus detection device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the strabismus detection device's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27658316

  5. Human visual pattern recognition of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, Irving

    1990-07-01

    The output of most medical imaging systems is a display for interpretation by human observers. This paper provides a general summary of recent work on shape recognition by humans. Two broad modes of visual image processing executed by different cortical loci can be distinguished: a) a mode for motor interaction which is sensitive to quantitative variation in image parameters and b) a mode for basic-level object recognition which is based on a small set of qualitative contrasts in viewpoint invariant properties of images edges. Many medical image classifications pose inherently difficult problems for the recognition system in that they are based on quantitative and surface patch variations--rather than qualitative--variations. But when recognition can be achieved quickly and accurately it is possible that a small viewpoint invariant contrast has been discovered and is being exploited by the interpreter.

  6. Regulation of medicines and medical devices: contrasts and similarities.

    PubMed

    Parvizi, Nassim; Woods, Kent

    2014-02-01

    In recent times, there has been an unprecedented level of public interest and active debate regarding the regulation of medical devices. This is in light of the topical, rather dissimilar, incidents involving poly-implant-prothèse (PIP) breast and metal-on-metal hip implants. Although medicines and devices are regulated under European Union (EU) law, the regulatory regimes are very different and some have argued that features of the pharmaceutical regime should be applied to medical devices in the current review of the medical devices directives. Both medicines and certain devices need to have an assessment of their risks and benefits before being used in patients, and undergo subsequent monitoring for adverse events. However, there are significant differences between these two groups in terms of the number of products, the pattern of innovation and development, and the types of adverse events that arise from their use. This review will summarise the key issues through a comparison of how both are regulated and monitored. PMID:24532735

  7. Balancing adoption and affordability of medical devices in Europe.

    PubMed

    Schreyögg, Jonas; Bäumler, Michael; Busse, Reinhard

    2009-10-01

    Dramatic increases in health expenditures have led to a substantial number of regulatory interventions in the markets for devices over the last years. However, little attention has been paid thus far to the regulation of medical devices and its effects. This article explores the policies pursued by European countries to find the right balance between improving access to new medical devices and restricting market forces to contain costs and ensure affordability. We outline the medical device policies of the four European countries with the largest expenditures on devices: Germany, France, Italy, and the UK. Subsequently, we discuss how these policies attempt to balance technological adoption and affordability by illustrating two case studies from Italy and Germany. We find that reference prices, if defined as maximum reimbursement levels, can help to achieve balance, because they are supposed to contain costs effectively, but do not necessarily act as a hurdle for the adoption of innovations. We also find that policy tools that encourage technological adoption should be used carefully since the benefits of a new technology are often difficult to predict. Finally, we draw a number of policy implications based on our observations.

  8. Imaging requirements for medical applications of additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Huotilainen, Eero; Paloheimo, Markku; Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Björkstrand, Roy; Tuomi, Jukka; Markkola, Antti; Mäkitie, Antti

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), formerly known as rapid prototyping, is steadily shifting its focus from industrial prototyping to medical applications as AM processes, bioadaptive materials, and medical imaging technologies develop, and the benefits of the techniques gain wider knowledge among clinicians. This article gives an overview of the main requirements for medical imaging affected by needs of AM, as well as provides a brief literature review from existing clinical cases concentrating especially on the kind of radiology they required. As an example application, a pair of CT images of the facial skull base was turned into 3D models in order to illustrate the significance of suitable imaging parameters. Additionally, the model was printed into a preoperative medical model with a popular AM device. Successful clinical cases of AM are recognized to rely heavily on efficient collaboration between various disciplines - notably operating surgeons, radiologists, and engineers. The single main requirement separating tangible model creation from traditional imaging objectives such as diagnostics and preoperative planning is the increased need for anatomical accuracy in all three spatial dimensions, but depending on the application, other specific requirements may be present as well. This article essentially intends to narrow the potential communication gap between radiologists and engineers who work with projects involving AM by showcasing the overlap between the two disciplines.

  9. Device for imaging scenes with very large ranges of intensity

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance Albert

    2011-11-15

    A device for imaging scenes with a very large range of intensity having a pair of polarizers, a primary lens, an attenuating mask, and an imaging device optically connected along an optical axis. Preferably, a secondary lens, positioned between the attenuating mask and the imaging device is used to focus light on the imaging device. The angle between the first polarization direction and the second polarization direction is adjustable.

  10. Nanotechnology-supported THz medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements and progress in the field of medical imaging have dramatically enhanced the early detection and treatment of many pathological conditions. The development of new imaging modalities, especially non-ionising ones, which will improve prognosis, is of crucial importance. A number of novel imaging modalities have been developed but they are still in the initial stages of development and serious drawbacks obstruct them from offering their benefits to the medical field. In the 21 st century, it is believed that nanotechnology will highly influence our everyday life and dramatically change the world of medicine, including medical imaging. Here we discuss how nanotechnology, which is still in its infancy, can improve Terahertz (THz) imaging, an emerging imaging modality, and how it may find its way into real clinical applications. THz imaging is characterised by the use of non-ionising radiation and although it has the potential to be used in many biomedical fields, it remains in the field of basic research. An extensive review of the recent available literature shows how the current state of this emerging imaging modality can be transformed by nanotechnology. Innovative scientific concepts that use nanotechnology-based techniques to overcome some of the limitations of the use of THz imaging are discussed. We review a number of drawbacks, such as a low contrast mechanism, poor source performance and bulky THz systems, which characterise present THz medical imaging and suggest how they can be overcome through nanotechnology. Better resolution and higher detection sensitivity can also be achieved using nanotechnology techniques. PMID:24555052

  11. Generalized nonconvex optimization for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Joshi, Sujit

    2000-06-01

    Design of a generalized technique for medical image segmentation is a challenging task. Currently a number of approaches are being investigated for 2-D and 3-D medical image segmentation for diagnostic and research applications. The methodology used in this work is aimed at obtaining a generalized solution of non-convex optimization problems by including a structural constraint of mass or density and the concept of additivity properties of entropy to a recently developed statistical approach to clustering and classification. The original computationally intensive procedure is made more efficient both in processing time and accuracy by employing a new similarity parameter for generating the initial clusters that are updated by minimizing an energy function relating the image entropy and expected distortion. The application of the computationally intensive yet generalized solution to nonconvex optimization to a limited set of medical images has resulted in excellent segmentation when compared to other clustering based segmentation approaches. The addition of the parametric approach to determine the initial number of clusters allows significant reduction in processing time and better design of automated segmentation procedure. This research work generalizes a deterministic annealing i.e. a specific statistical approach to solve nonconvex optimization problems by developing a more efficient technique applicable to nonconvex optimization problems (getting trapped in local minima). However, the DA approach is extremely computationally intensive for applications such as image segmentation. The new integrated approach developed in this work allows this optimization technique to be used for medical image segmentation.

  12. Clinical research challenges in the era of cardiovascular medical devices

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic alternatives, such as innovative medical devices, are frequently the only treatment options left for patients when other efficient medical modalities are lacking or insufficient. Development of novel devices, which are safe and effective, requires understanding of complex premarket and postmarket provisions, including characteristics of clinical trials. Speeding up patient access to new technologies may imply the need to make choices in terms of extent and robustness of clinical evaluation without losing the patient safety perspective. In such situations, some challenges can readily arise due to existing methodological solutions and aspects of current legislation in the field. In this context, some challenges, occurring at various stages of the device lifecycle, will be presented in order to observe the changes and hopefully to contribute to better knowledge and improvements in the area. PMID:27785138

  13. Quantitative imaging features: extension of the oncology medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P. T.; Young, K. C.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. With the advent of digital imaging modalities and the rapid growth in both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of data is of paramount importance. The Oncology Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) was created to provide a centralized, fully annotated dataset for research. The database contains both processed and unprocessed images, associated data, and annotations and where applicable expert determined ground truths describing features of interest. Medical imaging provides the ability to detect and localize many changes that are important to determine whether a disease is present or a therapy is effective by depicting alterations in anatomic, physiologic, biochemical or molecular processes. Quantitative imaging features are sensitive, specific, accurate and reproducible imaging measures of these changes. Here, we describe an extension to the OMI-DB whereby a range of imaging features and descriptors are pre-calculated using a high throughput approach. The ability to calculate multiple imaging features and data from the acquired images would be valuable and facilitate further research applications investigating detection, prognosis, and classification. The resultant data store contains more than 10 million quantitative features as well as features derived from CAD predictions. Theses data can be used to build predictive models to aid image classification, treatment response assessment as well as to identify prognostic imaging biomarkers.

  14. 77 FR 38829 - Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Imaging Devices; Institution of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic imaging devices by... electronic imaging devices that infringe one or more of claims 1-5, 7, 8, 10, 22, 24, 26, 28, 31, 34-43,...

  15. Medical imaging applications of amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mireshghi, A.; Drewery, J.S.; Hong, W.S.; Jing, T.; Kaplan, S.N.; Lee, H.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1994-07-01

    Two dimensional hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) pixel arrays are good candidates as flat-panel imagers for applications in medical imaging. Various performance characteristics of these imagers are reviewed and compared with currently used equipments. An important component in the a-Si:H imager is the scintillator screen. A new approach for fabrication of high resolution CsI(Tl) scintillator layers, appropriate for coupling to a-Si:H arrays, are presented. For nuclear medicine applications, a new a-Si:H based gamma camera is introduced and Monte Carlo simulation is used to evaluate its performance.

  16. French Sizing of Medical Devices is not Fit for Purpose

    SciTech Connect

    Kibriya, Nabil Hall, Rebecca; Powell, Steven; How, Thien; McWilliams, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study is to quantify the variation in the metric equivalent of French size in a range of medical devices, from various manufacturers, used in interventional radiology.MethodsThe labelling of a range of catheters, introducers, drains, balloons, stents, and endografts was examined. Products were chosen to achieve a broad range of French sizes from several manufacturers. To assess manufacturing accuracy, eight devices were selected for measurement using a laser micrometer. The external diameters of three specimens of each device were measured at centimeter intervals along the length of the device to ensure uniformity.ResultsA total of 200 labels of interventional radiology equipment were scrutinized. The results demonstrate a wide variation in the metric equivalent of French sizing. Labelled products can vary in diameter across the product range by up to 0.79 mm.The devices selected for measurement with the non-contact laser micrometer demonstrate acceptable manufacturing consistency. The external diameter differed by 0.05 mm on average.ConclusionsOur results demonstrate wide variation in the interpretation of the French scale by different manufacturers of medical devices. This has the potential to lead to problems using coaxial systems especially when the products are from different manufacturers. It is recommended that standard labelling should be employed by all manufacturers conveying specific details of the equipment. Given the wide variation in the interpretation of the French scale, our opinion is that this scale either needs to be abandoned or be strictly defined and followed.

  17. Body image and cosmetic medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Crerand, Canice E

    2004-01-01

    Cosmetic medical treatments have become increasingly popular over the past decade. The explosion in popularity can be attributed to several factors-the evolution of safer, minimally invasive procedures, increased mass media attention, and the greater willingness of individuals to undergo cosmetic procedures as a means to enhance physical appearance. Medical and mental health professionals have long been interested in understanding both the motivations for seeking a change in physical appearance as well as the psychological outcomes of these treatments. Body image has been thought to play a key role in the decision to seek cosmetic procedures, however, only recently have studies investigated the pre- and postoperative body image concerns of patients. While body image dissatisfaction may motivate the pursuit of cosmetic medical treatments, psychiatric disorders characterized by body image disturbances, such as body dysmorphic disorder and eating disorders, may be relatively common among these patients. Subsequent research on persons who alter their physical appearance through cosmetic medical treatments are likely provide important information on the nature of body image.

  18. Issues associated with off label use of medical devices.

    PubMed

    David, Yadin; Hyman, William A

    2007-01-01

    Off label use as applied to medical devices is the application of the device for a purpose that is not included as an indication in the FDA and EC approved device labeling. Such applications are also called unapproved or new uses. Beyond a use not being indicated, some off label uses may be expressly contraindicated as well as explicitly warned against. One example here is the currently controversial topic of the reuse of devices labeled single use only, although off label use is a far more widespread issue than reuse. The justification for off label use can range from reasoned and studied applications beyond those for which the manufacturer has sought clearance or approval, to misapplication based on faulty analysis or ignorance. This paper will review the critical need to incorporate a risk assessment process for potential off label use. PMID:18002765

  19. Feasibility of energy harvesting techniques for wearable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Voss, Thaddaeus J; Subbian, Vignesh; Beyette, Fred R

    2014-01-01

    Wearable devices are arguably one of the most rapidly growing technologies in the computing and health care industry. These systems provide improved means of monitoring health status of humans in real-time. In order to cope with continuous sensing and transmission of biological and health status data, it is desirable to move towards energy autonomous systems that can charge batteries using passive, ambient energy. This not only ensures uninterrupted data capturing, but could also eliminate the need to frequently remove, replace, and recharge batteries. To this end, energy harvesting is a promising area that can lead to extremely power-efficient portable medical devices. This paper presents an experimental prototype to study the feasibility of harvesting two energy sources, solar and thermoelectric energy, in the context of wearable devices. Preliminary results show that such devices can be powered by transducing ambient energy that constantly surrounds us.

  20. A New Concept for Medical Imaging Centered on Cellular Phone Technology

    PubMed Central

    Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode. PMID:18446199

  1. Medical Devices; Ophthalmic Devices; Classification of Nasolacrimal Compression Device. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the nasolacrimal compression device into class I (general controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class I (general controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:27295735

  2. 76 FR 71982 - Advancing Regulatory Science for Highly Multiplexed Microbiology/Medical Countermeasure Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... highly multiplexed microbiology/medical countermeasure (MCM) devices, their clinical application and... Application of Highly Multiplexed Microbiology Devices: Their clinical application and public health/clinical... clinical performance of highly multiplexed microbiology devices; approaches to device validation...

  3. 21 CFR 801.150 - Medical devices; processing, labeling, or repacking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; processing, labeling, or... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Other Exemptions § 801.150 Medical devices... shipment or other delivery of a device which is, in accordance with the practice of the trade, to...

  4. 21 CFR 801.116 - Medical devices having commonly known directions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices having commonly known directions... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.116 Medical devices having commonly known directions. A device shall be exempt from section 502(f)(1) of the...

  5. 21 CFR 801.116 - Medical devices having commonly known directions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices having commonly known directions... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.116 Medical devices having commonly known directions. A device shall be exempt from section 502(f)(1) of the...

  6. 21 CFR 801.16 - Medical devices; Spanish-language version of certain required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; Spanish-language version of... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.16 Medical devices; Spanish-language version of certain required statements. If devices restricted...

  7. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.15 Medical devices... information, resulting from the use of label space for any word, statement, design, or device which is...

  8. 21 CFR 801.116 - Medical devices having commonly known directions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices having commonly known directions... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.116 Medical devices having commonly known directions. A device shall be exempt from section 502(f)(1) of the...

  9. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  10. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.15 Medical devices... information, resulting from the use of label space for any word, statement, design, or device which is...

  11. 21 CFR 801.116 - Medical devices having commonly known directions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices having commonly known directions... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING Exemptions From Adequate Directions for Use § 801.116 Medical devices having commonly known directions. A device shall be exempt from section 502(f)(1) of the...

  12. Management information system of medical equipment using mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, C.; Castro, D.

    2011-09-01

    The large numbers of technologies currently incorporated into mobile devices transform them into excellent tools for capture and to manage the information, because of the increasing computing power and storage that allow to add many miscellaneous applications. In order to obtain benefits of these technologies, in the biomedical engineering field, it was developed a mobile information system for medical equipment management. The central platform for the system it's a mobile phone, which by a connection with a web server, it's capable to send and receive information relative to any medical equipment. Decoding a type of barcodes, known as QR-Codes, the management process is simplified and improved. These barcodes identified the medical equipments in a database, when these codes are photographed and decoded with the mobile device, you can access to relevant information about the medical equipment in question. This Project in it's actual state is a basic support tool for the maintenance of medical equipment. It is also a modern alternative, competitive and economic in the actual market.

  13. Micro Computer Tomography for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Hindelang, Florine; Zurbach, Raphael; Roggo, Yves

    2015-04-10

    Biomedical device and medicine product manufacturing are long processes facing global competition. As technology evolves with time, the level of quality, safety and reliability increases simultaneously. Micro Computer Tomography (Micro CT) is a tool allowing a deep investigation of products: it can contribute to quality improvement. This article presents the numerous applications of Micro CT for medical device and pharmaceutical packaging analysis. The samples investigated confirmed CT suitability for verification of integrity, measurements and defect detections in a non-destructive manner. PMID:25710902

  14. [Design of medical devices management system supporting full life-cycle process management].

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Zhong, Jianping

    2014-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the present status of medical devices management, this paper optimized management process, developed a medical devices management system with Web technologies. With information technology to dynamic master the use of state of the entire life-cycle of medical devices. Through the closed-loop management with pre-event budget, mid-event control and after-event analysis, improved the delicacy management level of medical devices, optimized asset allocation, promoted positive operation of devices.

  15. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  16. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  17. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin

    2010-07-01

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the `Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1—monochromatic and white—to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  18. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin

    2010-07-23

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the 'Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1 - monochromatic and white - to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  19. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  20. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  1. Elastomeric actuator devices for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven (Inventor); Hafez, Moustapha (Inventor); Jolesz, Ferenc A. (Inventor); Kacher, Daniel F. (Inventor); Lichter, Matthew (Inventor); Weiss, Peter (Inventor); Wingert, Andreas (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed to devices and systems used in magnetic imaging environments that include an actuator device having an elastomeric dielectric film with at least two electrodes, and a frame attached to the actuator device. The frame can have a plurality of configurations including, such as, for example, at least two members that can be, but not limited to, curved beams, rods, plates, or parallel beams. These rigid members can be coupled to flexible members such as, for example, links wherein the frame provides an elastic restoring force. The frame preferably provides a linear actuation force characteristic over a displacement range. The linear actuation force characteristic is defined as .+-.20% and preferably 10% over a displacement range. The actuator further includes a passive element disposed between the flexible members to tune a stiffness characteristic of the actuator. The passive element can be a bi-stable element. The preferred embodiment actuator includes one or more layers of the elastomeric film integrated into the frame. The elastomeric film can be made of many elastomeric materials such as, for example, but not limited to, acrylic, silicone and latex.

  2. Medical image registration using sparse coding of image patches.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Maryam; Ghaffari, Aboozar; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Image registration is a basic task in medical image processing applications like group analysis and atlas construction. Similarity measure is a critical ingredient of image registration. Intensity distortion of medical images is not considered in most previous similarity measures. Therefore, in the presence of bias field distortions, they do not generate an acceptable registration. In this paper, we propose a sparse based similarity measure for mono-modal images that considers non-stationary intensity and spatially-varying distortions. The main idea behind this measure is that the aligned image is constructed by an analysis dictionary trained using the image patches. For this purpose, we use "Analysis K-SVD" to train the dictionary and find the sparse coefficients. We utilize image patches to construct the analysis dictionary and then we employ the proposed sparse similarity measure to find a non-rigid transformation using free form deformation (FFD). Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to robustly register 2D and 3D images in both simulated and real cases. The proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures and decreases the transformation error compared to the previous methods. Even in the presence of bias field distortion, the proposed method aligns images without any preprocessing. PMID:27085311

  3. Medical image registration using sparse coding of image patches.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Maryam; Ghaffari, Aboozar; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Image registration is a basic task in medical image processing applications like group analysis and atlas construction. Similarity measure is a critical ingredient of image registration. Intensity distortion of medical images is not considered in most previous similarity measures. Therefore, in the presence of bias field distortions, they do not generate an acceptable registration. In this paper, we propose a sparse based similarity measure for mono-modal images that considers non-stationary intensity and spatially-varying distortions. The main idea behind this measure is that the aligned image is constructed by an analysis dictionary trained using the image patches. For this purpose, we use "Analysis K-SVD" to train the dictionary and find the sparse coefficients. We utilize image patches to construct the analysis dictionary and then we employ the proposed sparse similarity measure to find a non-rigid transformation using free form deformation (FFD). Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to robustly register 2D and 3D images in both simulated and real cases. The proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures and decreases the transformation error compared to the previous methods. Even in the presence of bias field distortion, the proposed method aligns images without any preprocessing.

  4. Medical devices; physical medicine devices; classification of the powered lower extremity exoskeleton; republication. Final order; republication.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is republishing in its entirety a final order entitled ``Medical Devices; Physical Medicine Devices; Classification of the Powered Lower Extremity Exoskeleton'' that published in the Federal Register on February 24, 2015. FDA is republishing to correct an inadvertent omission of information. FDA is classifying the powered lower extremity exoskeleton into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the powered lower extremity exoskeleton's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:25985478

  5. Medical devices; physical medicine devices; classification of the powered lower extremity exoskeleton; republication. Final order; republication.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or the Agency) is republishing in its entirety a final order entitled ``Medical Devices; Physical Medicine Devices; Classification of the Powered Lower Extremity Exoskeleton'' that published in the Federal Register on February 24, 2015. FDA is republishing to correct an inadvertent omission of information. FDA is classifying the powered lower extremity exoskeleton into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the powered lower extremity exoskeleton's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  6. [The EU medical device market process and enlightenment for the review].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qingfeng

    2014-05-01

    European Union (EU) medical device supervision system is more complete, has a lot of experiences and characteristics worth learning. This paper introduces a brief overview of the process of medical devices market in the EU, including three core medical device directives, process of obtaining CE mark, medical devices vigilance system and supervision after obtaining the CE mark, etc. Simultaneously, preliminary enlightenments of the EU medical devices supervision to our national medical devices' technical review process are discussed with the aim of providing reference for supervision, technical review unit and manufacturer.

  7. Developing an equivalent to the National Medicines Policy for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew W; Faunce, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    While Australia has enjoyed the benefits of a National Medicines Policy (NMP) for many years, there is no equivalent national policy for medical devices. This is despite an established medical device legal framework that spans multiple departments across the Australian Government. The existing NMP offers an effective and proven benchmark for the development of a national medical devices policy. The four NMP principles of industry, standards, access and use are applicable to all phases of the medical device life-cycle and align with existing medical devices policy. This article proposes that Australia's approach to medical devices stands to benefit from an equivalent whole-of-government policy.

  8. Developing an equivalent to the National Medicines Policy for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew W; Faunce, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    While Australia has enjoyed the benefits of a National Medicines Policy (NMP) for many years, there is no equivalent national policy for medical devices. This is despite an established medical device legal framework that spans multiple departments across the Australian Government. The existing NMP offers an effective and proven benchmark for the development of a national medical devices policy. The four NMP principles of industry, standards, access and use are applicable to all phases of the medical device life-cycle and align with existing medical devices policy. This article proposes that Australia's approach to medical devices stands to benefit from an equivalent whole-of-government policy. PMID:20169801

  9. Towards automated assistance for operating home medical devices.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zan; Detyniecki, Marcin; Chen, Ming-Yu; Wu, Wen; Hauptmann, Alexander G; Wactlar, Howard D

    2010-01-01

    To detect errors when subjects operate a home medical device, we observe them with multiple cameras. We then perform action recognition with a robust approach to recognize action information based on explicitly encoding motion information. This algorithm detects interest points and encodes not only their local appearance but also explicitly models local motion. Our goal is to recognize individual human actions in the operations of a home medical device to see if the patient has correctly performed the required actions in the prescribed sequence. Using a specific infusion pump as a test case, requiring 22 operation steps from 6 action classes, our best classifier selects high likelihood action estimates from 4 available cameras, to obtain an average class recognition rate of 69%.

  10. Ethics considerations for medical device R&D.

    PubMed

    Citron, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Medical devices have emerged as an important clinical option to treat certain serious diseases for which there are no equivalently effective surgical or pharmaceutical alternatives. Although all clinical activities impose high ethical standards of comportment to protect patients, medical device R&D and product application have a number of relatively unique aspects that distinguish them from other technologies such as pharmaceuticals. These include the following: R&D project selection; regulatory requirements, and their intended and unintended effects; when is a new product design sufficiently safe and effective for routine use in patients; and, physician-industry relationships in the innovation process in the context of real or perceived conflict of interest (COI). Each of these factors has implications for the delivery of care, health care leadership, and patient well-being. PMID:23217435

  11. Transfer representation learning for medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chuen-Kai Shie; Chung-Hisang Chuang; Chun-Nan Chou; Meng-Hsi Wu; Chang, Edward Y

    2015-08-01

    There are two major challenges to overcome when developing a classifier to perform automatic disease diagnosis. First, the amount of labeled medical data is typically very limited, and a classifier cannot be effectively trained to attain high disease-detection accuracy. Second, medical domain knowledge is required to identify representative features in data for detecting a target disease. Most computer scientists and statisticians do not have such domain knowledge. In this work, we show that employing transfer learning can remedy both problems. We use Otitis Media (OM) to conduct our case study. Instead of using domain knowledge to extract features from labeled OM images, we construct features based on a dataset entirely OM-irrelevant. More specifically, we first learn a codebook in an unsupervised way from 15 million images collected from ImageNet. The codebook gives us what the encoders consider being the fundamental elements of those 15 million images. We then encode OM images using the codebook and obtain a weighting vector for each OM image. Using the resulting weighting vectors as the feature vectors of the OM images, we employ a traditional supervised learning algorithm to train an OM classifier. The achieved detection accuracy is 88.5% (89.63% in sensitivity and 86.9% in specificity), markedly higher than all previous attempts, which relied on domain experts to help extract features.

  12. [Medical image automatic adjusting window and segmentation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenhuan; Chen, Siping; Tao, Duchun; Chen, Xinhai

    2005-04-01

    Image guided surgical navigation system is the most advanced surgical apparatus, which develops most rapidly and has great application prospects in neurosurgery, orthopaedics, E.N.T. department etc. In current surgical navigation systems, windowing, segmenting and registration of medical images all depend on manual operation, and automation of image processing is urgently needed. This paper proposes the algorithm which realizes very well automatic windowing and segmentation of medical images: first, we analyze a lot of MRI and CT images and propose corresponding windowing algorithm according to their common features of intensity distribution. Experiments show that the effects of windowing of most MRI and CT images are optimized. Second, we propose the seed growing algorithm based on intensity connectivity,which can segment tumor and its boundary exactly by simply clicking the mouse, and control dynamically the results in real time. If computer memory permits, the algorithm can segment 3D images directly. Tests show that this function is able to shorten the time of surgical planning, lower the complexity, and improve the efficiency in navigation surgery. PMID:15884547

  13. Medical device-induced thrombosis: what causes it and how can we prevent it?

    PubMed

    Jaffer, I H; Fredenburgh, J C; Hirsh, J; Weitz, J I

    2015-06-01

    Blood-contacting medical devices, such as vascular grafts, stents, heart valves, and catheters, are often used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Thrombus formation is a common cause of failure of these devices. This study (i) examines the interface between devices and blood, (ii) reviews the pathogenesis of clotting on blood-contacting medical devices, (iii) describes contemporary methods to prevent thrombosis on blood-contacting medical devices, (iv) explains why some anticoagulants are better than others for prevention of thrombosis on medical devices, and (v) identifies future directions in biomaterial research for prevention of thrombosis on blood-contacting medical devices.

  14. Estimating fractal dimension of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Alan I.; Loew, Murray H.

    1996-04-01

    Box counting (BC) is widely used to estimate the fractal dimension (fd) of medical images on the basis of a finite set of pixel data. The fd is then used as a feature to discriminate between healthy and unhealthy conditions. We show that BC is ineffective when used on small data sets and give examples of published studies in which researchers have obtained contradictory and flawed results by using BC to estimate the fd of data-limited medical images. We present a new method for estimating fd of data-limited medical images. In the new method, fractal interpolation functions (FIFs) are used to generate self-affine models of the underlying image; each model, upon discretization, approximates the original data points. The fd of each FIF is analytically evaluated. The mean of the fds of the FIFs is the estimate of the fd of the original data. The standard deviation of the fds of the FIFs is a confidence measure of the estimate. The goodness-of-fit of the discretized models to the original data is a measure of self-affinity of the original data. In a test case, the new method generated a stable estimate of fd of a rib edge in a standard chest x-ray; box counting failed to generate a meaningful estimate of the same image.

  15. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  16. The medical device data language for the P1073 medical information bus standard.

    PubMed

    Wittenber, J; Shabot, M M

    1990-04-01

    A new object-oriented Medical Device Data Language (MDDL) has been developed by the P1073 Medical Information Bus (MIB) Standard Committee, under the auspices of the Engineering in Biology and Medicine Society (EMBS) of the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE). The MDDL treats devices, host computers, persons and parameters as objects, and provides methods for describing and passing messages between objects. An elegant method of specifying parameter attributes incorporates the inheritance and encapsulation qualities common to object-oriented languages. Existing standards for device, parameter and attribute nomenclatures are used to represent MDDL components whenever possible. The MDDL provides a rich and extensible method for standardized host-device communications.

  17. 77 FR 14272 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Norovirus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology... delegated to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 866 is amended as follows: PART...

  18. 76 FR 16292 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian Adnexal Mass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology... delegated to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 866 is amended as follows: PART...

  19. 77 FR 19534 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Norovirus Serological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ..., HHS. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: In the Federal Register of March 9, 2012 (76 FR 14272..., 301- 796-6694. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2012-5675 appearing on page 14272 in the Federal... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Immunology and...

  20. 76 FR 22322 - Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Ovarian Adnexal Mass...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... (FDA) is correcting a final rule that appeared in the Federal Register of March 23, 2011 (76 FR 16292..., Rm. 3208, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-9148. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2011-6620... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Medical Devices; Immunology and...

  1. 76 FR 71983 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and...

  2. 75 FR 57968 - Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Gastroenterology and Urology Devices Panel of the Medical... Administration (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Gastroenterology and...

  3. 78 FR 60291 - Investigational Device Exemptions for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... comprehensive tutorial on best clinical practices for investigational medical device studies. Concurrent with the publication of this guidance in draft, November 10, 2011 (76 FR 70150), FDA initiated a pilot program for early feasibility study IDE applications (November 10, 2011, 76 FR 70152) to...

  4. Antimicrobial selenium nanoparticle coatings on polymeric medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phong A.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria colonization on medical devices remains one of the most serious complications following implantation. Traditional antibiotic treatment has proven ineffective, creating an increasingly high number of drug-resistant bacteria. Polymeric medical devices represent a significant portion of the total medical devices used today due to their excellent mechanical properties (such as durability, flexibility, etc). However, many polymers (such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU) and silicone) become readily colonized and infected by bacteria immediately after use. Therefore, in this study, a novel antimicrobial coating was developed to inhibit bacterial growth on PVC, PU and silicone. Specifically, here, the aforementioned polymeric substrates were coated with selenium (Se) nanoparticles in situ. The Se-coated substrates were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and bacteria assays. Most importantly, bacterial growth was significantly inhibited on the Se-coated substrates compared to their uncoated counterparts. The reduction of bacteria growth directly correlated with the density of Se nanoparticles on the coated substrate surfaces. In summary, these results demonstrate that Se should be further studied as a novel anti-bacterial polymeric coating material which can decrease bacteria functions without the use of antibiotics.

  5. Printable thermoelectric devices and conductive patterns for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungmin; Kim, Hyunjung; Chen, Linfeng; Choi, Sang H.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    Remote point-of-care is expected to revolutionize the modern medical practice, and many efforts have been made for the development of wireless health monitoring systems for continuously detecting the physiological signals of patients. To make the remote point-of-care generally accepted and widely used, it is necessary to develop cost-effective and durable wireless health monitoring systems. Printing technique will be helpful for the fabrication of high-quality and low-cost medical devices and systems because it allows high-resolution and high-speed fabrication, low material consumption and nano-sized patterning on both flexible and rigid substrates. Furthermore, application of thermoelectric generators can replace conventional batteries as the power sources for wireless health monitoring systems because thermoelectric generators can convert the wasted heat or the heat from nature into electricity which is required for the operation of the wireless health monitoring systems. In this research, we propose the concept of printable thermoelectric devices and conductive patterns for the realization of more portable and cost-effective medical devices. To print thermoelectric generators and conductive patterns on substrates, printing inks with special characteristics should be developed. For the development of thermoelectric inks, nano-structured thermoelectric materials are synthesized and characterized; and for the development of conductive inks, two kinds of surface treated carbon nanotubes are used as active materials.

  6. Materials Advances for Next-Generation Ingestible Electronic Medical Devices.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Electronic medical implants have collectively transformed the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, but have many inherent limitations. Electronic implants require invasive surgeries, operate in challenging microenvironments, and are susceptible to bacterial infection and persistent inflammation. Novel materials and nonconventional device fabrication strategies may revolutionize the way electronic devices are integrated with the body. Ingestible electronic devices offer many advantages compared with implantable counterparts that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of pathologies ranging from gastrointestinal infections to diabetes. This review summarizes current technologies and highlights recent materials advances. Specific focus is dedicated to next-generation materials for packaging, circuit design, and on-board power supplies that are benign, nontoxic, and even biodegradable. Future challenges and opportunities are also highlighted.

  7. Transmitting patient and device data via GSM--central management for decentral mobile medical devices.

    PubMed

    Bachmor, T; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    Equipping medical devices with long range telemetry opens completely new possibilities for emergency response, home care and remote diagnosis. Mobile communications nowadays seem to be a generally accepted part of our modern world, but bridging the gap between new (consumer-) technologies and medical devices still is a challenge today. Providing a telemetry link (GSM) is just the trivial part--ensuring security, reliability and service management are the more critical tasks that need to be addressed. Therefore, a complete system concept consists of an automatic fleet management (e.g. periodic device-initiated service calls) as well as customer relationship management (CRM), including technical service and a trouble-ticket system. PMID:12451860

  8. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    PubMed

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  9. Automatic scale selection for medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Ersin; Wyatt, Christopher L.; Ge, Yaorong

    2001-07-01

    The scale of interesting structures in medical images is space variant because of partial volume effects, spatial dependence of resolution in many imaging modalities, and differences in tissue properties. Existing segmentation methods either apply a single scale to the entire image or try fine-to-coarse/coarse-to-fine tracking of structures over multiple scales. While single scale approaches fail to fully recover the perceptually important structures, multi-scale methods have problems in providing reliable means to select proper scales and integrating information over multiple scales. A recent approach proposed by Elder and Zucker addresses the scale selection problem by computing a minimal reliable scale for each image pixel. The basic premise of this approach is that, while the scale of structures within an image vary spatially, the imaging system is fixed. Hence, sensor noise statistics can be calculated. Based on a model of edges to be detected, and operators to be used for detection, one can locally compute a unique minimal reliable scale at which the likelihood of error due to sensor noise is less than or equal to a predetermined threshold. In this paper, we improve the segmentation method based on the minimal reliable scale selection and evaluate its effectiveness with both simulated and actual medical data.

  10. Digital Pathology: Data-Intensive Frontier in Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lee A. D.; Carter, Alexis B.; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Fusheng; Kong, Jun; Gutman, David A.; Widener, Patrick; Pan, Tony C.; Cholleti, Sharath R.; Sharma, Ashish; Kurc, Tahsin M.; Brat, Daniel J.; Saltz, Joel H.

    2013-01-01

    Pathology is a medical subspecialty that practices the diagnosis of disease. Microscopic examination of tissue reveals information enabling the pathologist to render accurate diagnoses and to guide therapy. The basic process by which anatomic pathologists render diagnoses has remained relatively unchanged over the last century, yet advances in information technology now offer significant opportunities in image-based diagnostic and research applications. Pathology has lagged behind other healthcare practices such as radiology where digital adoption is widespread. As devices that generate whole slide images become more practical and affordable, practices will increasingly adopt this technology and eventually produce an explosion of data that will quickly eclipse the already vast quantities of radiology imaging data. These advances are accompanied by significant challenges for data management and storage, but they also introduce new opportunities to improve patient care by streamlining and standardizing diagnostic approaches and uncovering disease mechanisms. Computer-based image analysis is already available in commercial diagnostic systems, but further advances in image analysis algorithms are warranted in order to fully realize the benefits of digital pathology in medical discovery and patient care. In coming decades, pathology image analysis will extend beyond the streamlining of diagnostic workflows and minimizing interobserver variability and will begin to provide diagnostic assistance, identify therapeutic targets, and predict patient outcomes and therapeutic responses. PMID:25328166

  11. Tiny Devices Project Sharp, Colorful Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Displaytech Inc., based in Longmont, Colorado and recently acquired by Micron Technology Inc. of Boise, Idaho, first received a Small Business Innovation Research contract in 1993 from Johnson Space Center to develop tiny, electronic, color displays, called microdisplays. Displaytech has since sold over 20 million microdisplays and was ranked one of the fastest growing technology companies by Deloitte and Touche in 2005. Customers currently incorporate the microdisplays in tiny pico-projectors, which weigh only a few ounces and attach to media players, cell phones, and other devices. The projectors can convert a digital image from the typical postage stamp size into a bright, clear, four-foot projection. The company believes sales of this type of pico-projector may exceed $1.1 billion within 5 years.

  12. Nanostructured selenium for preventing biofilm formation on polycarbonate medical devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of persistent infections on medical devices as they are easy to form and hard to treat. The objective of this study was for the first time to coat selenium (a natural element in the body) nanoparticles on the surface of polycarbonate medical devices (such as those used for medical catheters) and to examine their effectiveness at preventing biofilm formation. The size and distribution of selenium coatings were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The strength of the selenium coating on polycarbonate was assessed by tape-adhesion tests followed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Results showed that selenium nanoparticles had a diameter of 50-100 nm and were well distributed on the polycarbonate surface. In addition, more than 50% of the selenium coating survived the tape-adhesion test as larger nanoparticles had less adhesion strength to the underlying polycarbonate substrate than smaller selenium nanoparticles. Most significantly, the results of this in vitro study showed that the selenium coatings on polycarbonate significantly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus growth to 8.9% and 27% when compared with an uncoated polycarbonate surface after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Importantly, this was accomplished without using antibiotics but rather with an element (selenium) that is natural to the human body. Thus, this study suggests that coating polymers (particularly, polycarbonate) with nanostructured selenium is a fast and effective way to reduce bacteria functions that lead to medical device infections. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 100A: 3205-3210, 2012.

  13. 75 FR 51829 - Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology: Manufacturing, Characterization, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Public Workshop on Medical Devices and Nanotechnology...) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Medical Devices & Nanotechnology: Manufacturing... brief statement that describes your experience or expertise with nanotechnology. There will be a...

  14. 78 FR 66941 - Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Guidance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, Institutional Review Boards and... entitled ``Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices.'' This...

  15. Improvised explosive devices: pathophysiology, injury profiles and current medical management.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, A; Hill, A M; Clasper, J C

    2009-12-01

    The improvised explosive device (IED), in all its forms, has become the most significant threat to troops operating in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices range from rudimentary home made explosives to sophisticated weapon systems containing high-grade explosives. Within this broad definition they may be classified as roadside explosives and blast mines, explosive formed pojectile (EFP) devices and suicide bombings. Each of these groups causeinjury through a number of different mechanisms and can result in vastly different injury profiles. The "Global War on Terror" has meant that incidents which were previously exclusively seen in conflict areas, can occur anywhere, and clinicians who are involved in emergency trauma care may be required to manage casualties from similar terrorist attacks. An understanding of the types of devices and their pathophysiological effects is necessary to allow proper planning of mass casualty events and to allow appropriate management of the complex poly-trauma casualties they invariably cause. The aim of this review article is to firstly describe the physics and injury profile from these different devices and secondly to present the current clinical evidence that underpins their medical management.

  16. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms. PMID:23286072

  17. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    ANGENENT, SIGURD; PICHON, ERIC; TANNENBAUM, ALLEN

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some central mathematical problems in medical imaging. The subject has been undergoing rapid changes driven by better hardware and software. Much of the software is based on novel methods utilizing geometric partial differential equations in conjunction with standard signal/image processing techniques as well as computer graphics facilitating man/machine interactions. As part of this enterprise, researchers have been trying to base biomedical engineering principles on rigorous mathematical foundations for the development of software methods to be integrated into complete therapy delivery systems. These systems support the more effective delivery of many image-guided procedures such as radiation therapy, biopsy, and minimally invasive surgery. We will show how mathematics may impact some of the main problems in this area, including image enhancement, registration, and segmentation. PMID:23645963

  18. [The management of implantable medical device and the application of the internet of things in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Xu, Liang

    2011-11-01

    Implantable medical device is a special product which belongs to medical devices. It not only possesses product characteristics in common, but also has specificity for safety and effectiveness. Implantable medical device must be managed by the relevant laws and regulations of the State Food and Drug Administration. In this paper, we have used cardiac pacemakers as an example to describe the significance of the management of implantable medical device products and the application of the internet of things in hospitals.

  19. Web-based platform for collaborative medical imaging research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittner, Leticia; Bento, Mariana P.; Costa, André L.; Souza, Roberto M.; Machado, Rubens C.; Lotufo, Roberto A.

    2015-03-01

    Medical imaging research depends basically on the availability of large image collections, image processing and analysis algorithms, hardware and a multidisciplinary research team. It has to be reproducible, free of errors, fast, accessible through a large variety of devices spread around research centers and conducted simultaneously by a multidisciplinary team. Therefore, we propose a collaborative research environment, named Adessowiki, where tools and datasets are integrated and readily available in the Internet through a web browser. Moreover, processing history and all intermediate results are stored and displayed in automatic generated web pages for each object in the research project or clinical study. It requires no installation or configuration from the client side and offers centralized tools and specialized hardware resources, since processing takes place in the cloud.

  20. Hyperspectral imaging applied to medical diagnoses and food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Oscar; Gomez, Richard B.; Chainani, Arun; Roper, William E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper analyzes the feasibility and performance of HSI systems for medical diagnosis as well as for food safety. Illness prevention and early disease detection are key elements for maintaining good health. Health care practitioners worldwide rely on innovative electronic devices to accurately identify disease. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technique that may provide a less invasive procedure than conventional diagnostic imaging. By analyzing reflected and fluorescent light applied to the human body, a HSI system serves as a diagnostic tool as well as a method for evaluating the effectiveness of applied therapies. The safe supply and production of food is also of paramount importance to public health illness prevention. Although this paper will focus on imaging and spectroscopy in food inspection procedures -- the detection of contaminated food sources -- to ensure food quality, HSI also shows promise in detecting pesticide levels in food production (agriculture.)

  1. Machine learning for medical images analysis.

    PubMed

    Criminisi, A

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the application of machine learning for the analysis of medical images. Specifically: (i) We show how a special type of learning models can be thought of as automatically optimized, hierarchically-structured, rule-based algorithms, and (ii) We discuss how the issue of collecting large labelled datasets applies to both conventional algorithms as well as machine learning techniques. The size of the training database is a function of model complexity rather than a characteristic of machine learning methods.

  2. A recommender system for medical imaging diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Eriksson; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos; Oliveira, José Luís

    2015-01-01

    The large volume of data captured daily in healthcare institutions is opening new and great perspectives about the best ways to use it towards improving clinical practice. In this paper we present a context-based recommender system to support medical imaging diagnostic. The system relies on data mining and context-based retrieval techniques to automatically lookup for relevant information that may help physicians in the diagnostic decision.

  3. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle. PMID:27080633

  4. Organisational impact: Definition and assessment methods for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Roussel, Christophe; Carbonneil, Cédric; Audry, Antoine

    2016-02-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is a rapidly developing area and the value of taking non-clinical fields into consideration is growing. Although the health-economic aspect is commonly recognised, evaluating organisational impact has not been studied nearly as much. The goal of this work was to provide a definition of organisational impact in the sector of medical devices by defining its contours and exploring the evaluation methods specific to this field. Following an analysis of the literature concerning the impact of technologies on organisations as well as the medical literature, and also after reviewing the regulatory texts in this respect, the group of experts identified 12 types of organisational impact. A number of medical devices were carefully screened using the criteria grid, which proved to be operational and to differentiate properly. From the analysis of the practice and of the methods described, the group was then able to derive a few guidelines to successfully evaluate organisational impact. This work shows that taking organisational impact into consideration may be critical alongside of the other criteria currently in favour (clinically and economically). What remains is to confer a role in the decision-making process on this factor and one that meets the economic efficiency principle.

  5. Development and clinical translation of OTIS: a wide-field OCT imaging device for ex-vivo tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Elizabeth A.; Rempel, David; Danner, Christine; Atchia, Yaaseen; Valic, Michael S.; Berkeley, Andrew; Davoudi, Bahar; Magnin, Paul A.; Akens, Margarete; Done, Susan J.; Kulkarni, Supriya; Leong, Wey-Liang; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an automated, wide-field optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based imaging device (OTISTM Perimeter Medical Imaging) for peri-operative, ex-vivo tissue imaging. This device features automated image acquisition, enabling rapid capture of high-resolution (15 μm) OCT images from samples up to 10 cm in diameter. We report on the iterative progression of device development from phantom and pre-clinical (tumor xenograft) models through to initial clinical results. We discuss the challenges associated with proving a novel imaging technology against the clinical "gold standard" of conventional post-operative pathology.

  6. 76 FR 7222 - Medical Device Innovation Initiative; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Innovation Initiative; Public Meeting... ``CDRH's Medical Device Innovation Initiative Public Workshop.'' The purpose of the public meeting is to...) document, ``Medical Device Innovation Initiative'' (report). FDA is seeking input on a number of...

  7. Additional peculiarities of medical devices that should be considered in their development process.

    PubMed

    Santos, Isa C T; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2013-05-01

    Medical devices are peculiar products: their definition varies from country to country, they are used to treat diseases and they are different from pharmaceuticals. In 2012, the authors began to describe the complex and demanding environment of the medical device industry. In this article, the authors' previous research is extended with additional peculiarities of medical devices such as recall, pricing and adoption factors.

  8. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  9. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  10. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  11. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  12. 37 CFR 1.777 - Calculation of patent term extension for a medical device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a medical device. 1.777 Section 1.777 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... term extension for a medical device. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent... patent for a medical device will be extended by the length of the regulatory review period for...

  13. 31 CFR 560.533 - Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commodities, medicine, and medical devices. 560.533 Section 560.533 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Policy § 560.533 Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices. (a) General... agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices, provided that the sale and exportation...

  14. 31 CFR 560.533 - Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... commodities, medicine, and medical devices. 560.533 Section 560.533 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Policy § 560.533 Brokering sales of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices. (a) General... of agricultural commodities, medicine, and medical devices, provided that the sale and exportation...

  15. Designing medical devices for conformance with harmonized standards. The European Community's Medical Devices Directives and their effect on the product development process.

    PubMed

    Fries, R C; Graber, M D

    1995-01-01

    The European Community's Medical Devices Directives represent an ambitious effort to streamline the regulation of medical devices within the European Economic Area, and area comprising more than 380 million people. In this, the first of two special reports, Richard C. Fries and Mark D. Graber describe the Medical Devices Directives and their effect on the product development process. In the second report, appearing on page 294 Jean A. Goggins uses a case study format to demonstrate the process that would be used to gain European approval for a hypothetical medical device. PMID:7550495

  16. Visual performance in medical imaging using liquid crystal displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchou, Philip Marcel

    2007-12-01

    This thesis examined the contrast performance of liquid crystal display (LCD) devices for use in medical imaging. Novel experimental methods were used to measure the ability of medical LCD devices to produce just noticeable contrast. It was demonstrated that medical LCD devices are capable of high performance in medical imaging and are suitable for conducting psychovisual research experiments. Novel methods for measuring and controlling the luminance response of an LCD were presented in Chapter 3 and used to develop a software tools to apply DICOM GSDF calibrations. Several medical LCD systems were calibrated, demonstrating that the methods can be used to reliably measure luminance and manipulate fine contrast. Chapter 4 reports on a novel method to generate low contrast bi-level bar patterns by using the full palette of available gray values. The method was used in a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) psychovisual experiment to measure the contrast threshold of human observers. Using a z-score analysis method, the results were found to be consistent with the Barten model of contrast sensitivity. Chapter 5 examined error distortion associated with using z-scores. A maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was presented as an alternative and was used to reevaluate the results from Chapter 4. The new results were consistent with the Barten model. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the statistical precision of the MLE method in relation to the number and distribution of trials. In Chapter 6, 2AFC tests were conducted examining contrast thresholds for complex sinusoid, white noise, and filtered noise patterns. The sinusoid test results were consistent with the Barten model while the noise patterns required more contrast for visibility. The effects of adaptation were also demonstrated. A noise visibility index (NVI) was introduced to describe noise power weighted by contrast sensitivity. Just noticeable white and filtered noise patterns exhibited similar NVI

  17. PACS and multimodality in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Asseler, Y; Koole, M; Van Laere, K; Vandenberghe, S; Bouwens, L; Van de Walle, R; Van de Wiele, C; Lemahieu, I; Dierckx, R A

    2000-01-01

    A PACS (Picture Archiving and Communication System) is a system that is able to store, exchange, display and manipulate images and associated diagnoses from any modality within a hospital in a timely and cost-effective way. Several developments, such as the DICOM standard, fast and convenient networking, and new storage solutions for large amounts of data, make the setup of such a PACS system possible. As the information acquired with various imaging modalities is then available and often complementary, it is desirable for the clinician to have a point-by-point spatial co-registration of images from different modalities in order to enable a synergistic use of the multimodality imaging of a patient for increased diagnostic accuracy. Various types of algorithms are available for the matching of medical images from the same or from different modalities. Co-registration algorithms based on voxel properties consist of a similarity or dissimilarity measure and an iterative or non-iterative method minimizing the dissimilarity or maximizing the similarity between the two images by a transformation of one image relative to the other. PMID:10942990

  18. The FDA Review Process for Cardiac Medical Devices in Children: A Review for the Clinician.

    PubMed

    Almond, Christopher S

    2012-05-01

    Pediatric medical devices play a vital role in the treatment of children with cardiovascular disease. Most cardiac medical devices used in children today are used off-label where the risk-benefit of devices has not been well characterized. Pediatric medical devices face a variety of challenges to FDA approval related in large part to the small target population, heterogeneity of the patient population and ethical considerations of device testing in children. While relatively few cardiac devices have received FDA approval in children, the number of devices navigating the approval process successfully is growing. Most pediatric device approvals are being granted through the humanitarian device exemption (HDE) pathway, which is designed for rare diseases making it suitable for devices treating congenital heart disease. This review summarizes the FDA review process for pediatric medical devices as it continues to evolve in response to the unique challenges of understanding device performance in the pediatric population. PMID:22661882

  19. Development of medical electronic devices in the APL space department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Several electronic devices for automatically correcting specific defects in a body's physiologic regulation and allowing approximately normal functioning are described. A self-injurious behavior inhibiting system (SIBIS) is fastened to the arm of a person with chronic self-injurious behavior patterns. An electric shock is delivered into the arm whenever the device senses above-threshold acceleration of the head such as occur with head-bangers. Sounding a buzzer tone with the shock eventually allows transference of the aversive stimulus to the buzzer so shocks are no longer necessary. A programmable implantable medication system features a solenoid pump placed beneath the skin and refueled by hypodermic needle. The pump functions are programmable and can deliver insulin, chemotherapy mixes and/or pain killers according to a preset schedule or on patient demand. Finally, an automatic implantible defibrillator has four electrodes attached directly to the heart for sensing electrical impulses or emitting them in response to cardiac fibrillation.

  20. Navigating conflicts of interest for the medical device entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Aine; Kaplan, Aaron V

    2012-01-01

    The past fifty years has witnessed dramatic progress in the understanding and treatment of patients suffering from cardiovascular disease leading to symptomatic relief and impressive increases in longevity. These advances have been due in large part to the development, study and implementation of new technology. Within interventional cardiology in particular, these advances have been driven by the availability of new technology in the form of medical devices. Successful device development efforts require close collaboration among basic scientist, clinician-inventors/entrepreneurs, clinician-investigators and corporations. Though the role of the clinician is central to this process, these activities present important conflicts-of-interest (COIs). The purpose of this paper is to 1) characterize these conflicts, 2) provide a context from which to approach their management and 3) recommend management strategies. PMID:23217436

  1. Navigating conflicts of interest for the medical device entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Aine; Kaplan, Aaron V

    2012-01-01

    The past fifty years has witnessed dramatic progress in the understanding and treatment of patients suffering from cardiovascular disease leading to symptomatic relief and impressive increases in longevity. These advances have been due in large part to the development, study and implementation of new technology. Within interventional cardiology in particular, these advances have been driven by the availability of new technology in the form of medical devices. Successful device development efforts require close collaboration among basic scientist, clinician-inventors/entrepreneurs, clinician-investigators and corporations. Though the role of the clinician is central to this process, these activities present important conflicts-of-interest (COIs). The purpose of this paper is to 1) characterize these conflicts, 2) provide a context from which to approach their management and 3) recommend management strategies.

  2. Assessment and non-clinical impact of medical devices.

    PubMed

    Dervaux, Benoît; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Josseran, Anne; Barna, Alexandre; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chevrie, Karine; Debroucker, Frédérique; Grumblat, Anne; Grumel, Olivier; Massol, Jacques; Maugendre, Philippe; Méchin, Hubert; Orlikowski, David; Roussel, Christophe; Rumeau-Pichon, Catherine; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Vicaut, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Medical devices (MDs) cover a wide variety of products. They accompany changes in medical practice in step with technology innovations. Innovations in the field of MDs can improve the conditions of use of health technology and/or modify the organisation of care beyond the strict diagnostic or therapeutic benefit for the patients. However, these non purely clinical criteria seem to be only rarely documented or taken into account in the assessment of MDs during reimbursement decisions at national level or for formulary listing by hospitals even though multidimensional models for the assessment of health technologies have been developed that take into account the views of all stakeholders in the healthcare system In this article, after summarising the background concerning the assessment of health technologies in France, a definition of non-clinical criteria for the assessment of MDs is proposed and a decision tree for the assessment of MDs is described. Future lines of approach are proposed as a conclusion.

  3. Empowering patients: total product life cycle for medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ciarkowski, Arthur A

    2003-01-01

    Patients today demand a stake in the care of their own health. The expectation is that patients who take responsibility for their own care will communicate more effectively with their health care team and be productive citizens in our society. Medical technology today and those products visible on the horizon, coupled in a telehealth network, provide promise to empower patients to participate fully in the management of their own health. Technology alone, however, will not integrate the elements required for an effective telehealth system. This chapter considers the non-technical matters of this issue such as trends in the medical device industry, trends in the point of care, public health care policies, and the role of government regulation, working together to achieve these public health goals.

  4. What the Internet means for the medical device industry.

    PubMed

    Frank, T

    2000-12-01

    The Internet is dramatically changing the structure of the industry. For the first time, direct communication between all suppliers and all hospitals is available. The Internet-based electronic market place not only provides the ability to choose products from a standardized catalogue, but also to send orders direct to suppliers' enterprise resource planning systems. One-to-one marketing is also becoming a reality. Medical device manufacturers are advised to test the different electronic sales and marketing initiatives that are now available. PMID:11200157

  5. Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas for Decontamination of Complex Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Winter, Jörn; Polak, Martin; Ehlbeck, Jörg; von Woedtke, Thomas

    Atmospheric pressure plasma sources produce a multiplicity of different antimicrobial agents and are applicable to even complicated geometries as well as to heat sensitive materials. Thus, atmospheric pressure plasmas have a huge potential for the decontamination of even complex medical devices like central venous catheters and endoscopes. In this paper we present practicable realizations of atmospheric pressure plasma sources, namely plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge and microwave driven discharge that are able to penetrate fine lumen or are adaptable to difficult geometries. Furthermore, the antimicrobial efficacy of these sources is given for one example setup in each case.

  6. Polymeric biomaterials for load-bearing medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Lisa; Furmanski, Jevan

    2009-09-01

    This paper aims to give a broad overview of the challenges that are faced in load-bearing medical devices and focuses specifically on the challenges faced in utilizing polymeric materials in such applications. Three specific cases are given in the field of polymeric biomaterials. These cases build in complexity and initiate with examination of the evolution of intravascular catheter design in which the materials, properties, and processing have been optimized to develop a system that can be used in an angioplasty procedure with little concern of clinical failure.

  7. A medical device regulatory framework - case study: South Africa.

    PubMed

    Poluta, Mladen A

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of medical devices is well-established in industrialized countries, with increasing global standardization and harmonization. In developing and resource-poor countries, however, there is a much greater degree of variability and implementation. For such countries, this paper suggests a comprehensive and integrated regulatory framework approach using the South African health technology policy framework as a basis for comparison and benchmarking. It is hoped that this compact model, which covers a wide range of HTM-related aspects, will be useful to governments and their partners, amongst other role-players.

  8. Challenges to validation of a complex nonsterile medical device tray.

    PubMed

    Prince, Daniel; Mastej, Jozef; Hoverman, Isabel; Chatterjee, Raja; Easton, Diana; Behzad, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Validation by steam sterilization of reusable medical devices requires careful attention to many parameters that directly influence whether or not complete sterilization occurs. Complex implant/instrument tray systems have a variety of configurations and components. Geobacillus stearothermophilus biological indicators (BIs) are used in overkill cycles to to simulate worst case conditions and are intended to provide substantial sterilization assurance. Survival of G. stearothermophilus spores was linked to steam access and size of load in the chamber. By a small and reproducible margin, it was determined that placement of the trays in a rigid container into minimally loaded chambers were more difficult to completely sterilize than maximally loaded chambers. PMID:25046511

  9. Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Medical Imaging Applications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chen; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have attracted enormous research attention due to their unique magnetic properties that enable the detection by the non-invasive medical imaging modality—magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). By incorporating advanced features, such as specific targeting, multimodality, therapeutic delivery, the detectability and applicability of MNPs have been dramatically expanded. A delicate design on structure, composition and surface chemistry is essential to achieving desired properties in MNP systems, such as high imaging contrast and chemical stability, non-fouling surface, target specificity and/or multimodality. This article presents the design fundamentals on the development of MNP systems, from discussion of material selection for nanoparticle cores and coatings, strategies for chemical synthesis and surface modification and their merits and limitations, to conjugation of special biomolecules for intended functions, and reviews the recent advances in the field. PMID:20593005

  10. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  11. Multiphase Systems for Medical Image Region Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamendi, J. F.; Malpica, N.; Schiavi, E.

    2009-05-01

    Variational methods for region classification have shown very promising results in medical image analysis. The Chan-Vese model is one of the most popular methods, but its numerical resolution is slow and it has serious drawbacks for most multiphase applications. In this work, we extend the link, stablished by Chambolle, between the two classes binary Chan-Vese model and the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi (ROF) model to a multiphase four classes minimal partition problem. We solve the ROF image restoration model and then we threshold the image by means of a genetic algorithm. This strategy allows for a more efficient algorithm due to the fact that only one well posed elliptic problem is solved instead of solving the coupled parabolic equations arising in the original multiphase Chan-Vese model.

  12. Interpretation of Medical Imaging Data with a Mobile Application: A Mobile Digital Imaging Processing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng Kuan; Nicolini, Oliver; Waxenegger, Harald; Galloway, Graham J.; Ullmann, Jeremy F. P.; Janke, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Digital Imaging Processing (DIP) requires data extraction and output from a visualization tool to be consistent. Data handling and transmission between the server and a user is a systematic process in service interpretation. The use of integrated medical services for management and viewing of imaging data in combination with a mobile visualization tool can be greatly facilitated by data analysis and interpretation. This paper presents an integrated mobile application and DIP service, called M-DIP. The objective of the system is to (1) automate the direct data tiling, conversion, pre-tiling of brain images from Medical Imaging NetCDF (MINC), Neuroimaging Informatics Technology Initiative (NIFTI) to RAW formats; (2) speed up querying of imaging measurement; and (3) display high-level of images with three dimensions in real world coordinates. In addition, M-DIP provides the ability to work on a mobile or tablet device without any software installation using web-based protocols. M-DIP implements three levels of architecture with a relational middle-layer database, a stand-alone DIP server, and a mobile application logic middle level realizing user interpretation for direct querying and communication. This imaging software has the ability to display biological imaging data at multiple zoom levels and to increase its quality to meet users’ expectations. Interpretation of bioimaging data is facilitated by an interface analogous to online mapping services using real world coordinate browsing. This allows mobile devices to display multiple datasets simultaneously from a remote site. M-DIP can be used as a measurement repository that can be accessed by any network environment, such as a portable mobile or tablet device. In addition, this system and combination with mobile applications are establishing a virtualization tool in the neuroinformatics field to speed interpretation services. PMID:23847587

  13. Quantification of heterogeneity observed in medical images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been much recent interest in the quantification of visually evident heterogeneity within functional grayscale medical images, such as those obtained via magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography. In the case of images of cancerous tumors, variations in grayscale intensity imply variations in crucial tumor biology. Despite these considerable clinical implications, there is as yet no standardized method for measuring the heterogeneity observed via these imaging modalities. Methods In this work, we motivate and derive a statistical measure of image heterogeneity. This statistic measures the distance-dependent average deviation from the smoothest intensity gradation feasible. We show how this statistic may be used to automatically rank images of in vivo human tumors in order of increasing heterogeneity. We test this method against the current practice of ranking images via expert visual inspection. Results We find that this statistic provides a means of heterogeneity quantification beyond that given by other statistics traditionally used for the same purpose. We demonstrate the effect of tumor shape upon our ranking method and find the method applicable to a wide variety of clinically relevant tumor images. We find that the automated heterogeneity rankings agree very closely with those performed visually by experts. Conclusions These results indicate that our automated method may be used reliably to rank, in order of increasing heterogeneity, tumor images whether or not object shape is considered to contribute to that heterogeneity. Automated heterogeneity ranking yields objective results which are more consistent than visual rankings. Reducing variability in image interpretation will enable more researchers to better study potential clinical implications of observed tumor heterogeneity. PMID:23453000

  14. Multilayer descriptors for medical image classification.

    PubMed

    Lumini, Alessandra; Nanni, Loris; Brahnam, Sheryl

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for improving the performance of 2D descriptors by building an n-layer image using different preprocessing approaches from which multilayer descriptors are extracted and used as feature vectors for training a Support Vector Machine. The different preprocessing approaches are used to build different n-layer images (n=3, n=5, etc.). We test both color and gray-level images, two well-known texture descriptors (Local Phase Quantization and Local Binary Pattern), and three of their variants suited for n-layer images (Volume Local Phase Quantization, Local Phase Quantization Three-Orthogonal-Planes, and Volume Local Binary Patterns). Our results show that multilayers and texture descriptors can be combined to outperform the standard single-layer approaches. Experiments on 10 datasets demonstrate the generalizability of the proposed descriptors. Most of these datasets are medical, but in each case the images are very different. Two datasets are completely unrelated to medicine and are included to demonstrate the discriminative power of the proposed descriptors across very different image recognition tasks. A MATLAB version of the complete system developed in this paper will be made available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357.

  15. Twofold processing for denoising ultrasound medical images.

    PubMed

    Kishore, P V V; Kumar, K V V; Kumar, D Anil; Prasad, M V D; Goutham, E N D; Rahul, R; Krishna, C B S Vamsi; Sandeep, Y

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound medical (US) imaging non-invasively pictures inside of a human body for disease diagnostics. Speckle noise attacks ultrasound images degrading their visual quality. A twofold processing algorithm is proposed in this work to reduce this multiplicative speckle noise. First fold used block based thresholding, both hard (BHT) and soft (BST), on pixels in wavelet domain with 8, 16, 32 and 64 non-overlapping block sizes. This first fold process is a better denoising method for reducing speckle and also inducing object of interest blurring. The second fold process initiates to restore object boundaries and texture with adaptive wavelet fusion. The degraded object restoration in block thresholded US image is carried through wavelet coefficient fusion of object in original US mage and block thresholded US image. Fusion rules and wavelet decomposition levels are made adaptive for each block using gradient histograms with normalized differential mean (NDF) to introduce highest level of contrast between the denoised pixels and the object pixels in the resultant image. Thus the proposed twofold methods are named as adaptive NDF block fusion with hard and soft thresholding (ANBF-HT and ANBF-ST). The results indicate visual quality improvement to an interesting level with the proposed twofold processing, where the first fold removes noise and second fold restores object properties. Peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR), normalized cross correlation coefficient (NCC), edge strength (ES), image quality Index (IQI) and structural similarity index (SSIM), measure the quantitative quality of the twofold processing technique. Validation of the proposed method is done by comparing with anisotropic diffusion (AD), total variational filtering (TVF) and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for enhancement of US images. The US images are provided by AMMA hospital radiology labs at Vijayawada, India. PMID:26697285

  16. Medical Imaging In An Object Oriented Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Daniel; Vannier, Michael W.

    1988-06-01

    A workstation has been developed to evaluate computed tomographic (CT) image data in 2 and 3 dimensions. The workstation consists of an independent image display station (Independent Viewing and Analysis Station or WAS, International Imaging Systems, Inc., Milpitas, Calif.) and a VAX host computer. The WAS has 1024 X 1024 X 24 bits of image memory plus 4 bits of graphics overlay. An independent VLSI graphics processor and 1024 X 1024 X 4 bit graphics memory, independent of the image memory, are included in the self-contained WAS unit. A local microprocessor host (Motorola 68000 microprocessor) controls the IVAS from directives obtained through a direct memory access channel to the VAX host. This facilitated the creation of an object oriented software enviroment for the IVAS under control of a VAX host program written in the C language. The workstation created has an interactive user interface consisting of a mouse and pull-down menus. The workstation enables loading multiple images, typically 256 x 256 or 512 x 512, into the 1024 X 1024 frame buffer. Once loaded, the images can be manipulated by applying gray scale transforms, editing them and performing 3-D reconstructions from serial sections. Algorithms for three dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were implemented in the VAX/VMS host computer environment and are available on the workstation through special menu functions for handling these reconstructions. The functions interactively combine depth and gradient shading of surfaces to suit specific applications in craniofacial surgical planning or orthopedics. This workstation is user friendly and is very easy to handle. A workstation of this type may become a popular tool for physicians and surgeons in evalution of medical images.

  17. Medical image archive node simulation and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Ted T.; Tang, Yau-Kuo

    1996-05-01

    It is a well known fact that managed care and new treatment technologies are revolutionizing the health care provider world. Community Health Information Network and Computer-based Patient Record projects are underway throughout the United States. More and more hospitals are installing digital, `filmless' radiology (and other imagery) systems. They generate a staggering amount of information around the clock. For example, a typical 500-bed hospital might accumulate more than 5 terabytes of image data in a period of 30 years for conventional x-ray images and digital images such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computer Tomography images. With several hospitals contributing to the archive, the storage required will be in the hundreds of terabytes. Systems for reliable, secure, and inexpensive storage and retrieval of digital medical information do not exist today. In this paper, we present a Medical Image Archive and Distribution Service (MIADS) concept. MIADS is a system shared by individual and community hospitals, laboratories, and doctors' offices that need to store and retrieve medical images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data, as well as the diversified user access requirement, implementation of the MIADS will be a complex procedure. One of the key challenges to implementing a MIADS is to select a cost-effective, scalable system architecture to meet the ingest/retrieval performance requirements. We have performed an in-depth system engineering study, and developed a sophisticated simulation model to address this key challenge. This paper describes the overall system architecture based on our system engineering study and simulation results. In particular, we will emphasize system scalability and upgradability issues. Furthermore, we will discuss our simulation results in detail. The simulations study the ingest/retrieval performance requirements based on different system configurations and architectures for variables such as workload, tape

  18. Mining knowledge in medical image databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, Petra

    2000-04-01

    Availability of digital data within picture archiving and communication systems raises a possibility of health care and research enhancement associated with manipulation, processing and handling of data by computers. That is the basis for computer-assisted radiology development. Further development of computer-assisted radiology is associated with the use of new intelligent capabilities such as multimedia support and data mining in order to discover the relevant knowledge for diagnosis. In this paper, we present our work on data mining in medical picture archiving systems. We use decision tree induction in order to learn the knowledge for computer- assisted image analysis. We are applying our method to interpretation of x-ray images for lung cancer diagnosis. We are describing our methodology on how to perform data mining on picture archiving systems and our tool for data mining. Results are given. The method has shown very good results so that we are going on to apply it to other medical image diagnosis tasks such as lymph node diagnosis in MRI and investigation of breast MRI.

  19. [Tattoos and medical imaging: issues and myths].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Tattooing is characterized by the introduction in the dermis of exogenous pigments to obtain a permanent design. Whether it is a traditional tattoo applied on the skin or a cosmetic one (permanent make-up), its prevalence has boomed for the past 20 years. The increased prevalence of tattooed patients along with medical progresses, in the field of therapeutics or diagnostic means have lead to the discovery of "new" complications and unexpected issues. Medical imaging world has also been affected by the tattoo craze. It has been approximately 20 years when the first issues related to tattooing and permanent make-up aroused. However, cautions and questions as well as anecdotal severe case reports have sometimes led to an over-exaggerated response by some physicians such as the systematic avoidance of RMN imaging for tattooed individuals. This review is intended to summarize the risks but also the "myths" associated with tattoo in the daily practice of the radiologist for RMN, CT scan, mammography, Pet-scan and ultrasound imaging.

  20. PET: a revolution in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Abass; Lakhani, Paras; Mavi, Ayse; Kung, Justin W; Zhuang, Hongming

    2004-11-01

    FDG-PET has had remarkable influence on the assessment of physiologic and pathologic states. The authors predict that FDG-PET imaging could soon become the most common procedure used by nuclear medicine laboratories and could remain so for an extended period of time. The power of molecular imaging lies in the vast potential for using biochemical and pharmacologic probes to extend applications arising from an understanding of cell biology to a large number of well-characterized pathologic states. Molecular imaging based upon tracer kinetics with positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals could become the main source of information for the management of cancer patients. In that case, nuclear medicine procedures might become the most common imaging studies performed in the practice of medicine. This speculation is not farfetched when one realizes the enormous change that a single biologically important compound, FDG, has brought to the medical arena. The major challenge today is to attract the highly qualified individuals and to secure the resources needed to harness the opportunities in the specialty of molecular imaging. PMID:15488553

  1. Multimodality and nanoparticles in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yen; Davis, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    A number of medical imaging techniques are used heavily in the provision of spatially resolved information on disease and physiological status and accordingly play a critical role in clinical diagnostics and subsequent treatment. Though, for most imaging modes, contrast is potentially enhanced through the use of contrast agents or improved hardware or imaging protocols, no single methodology provides, in isolation, a detailed mapping of anatomy, disease markers or physiological status. In recent years, the concept of complementing the strengths of one imaging modality with those of another has come to the fore and been further bolstered by the development of fused instruments such as PET/CT and PET/MRI stations. Coupled with the continual development in imaging hardware has been a surge in reports of contrast agents bearing multiple functionality, potentially providing not only a powerful and highly sensitised means of co-localising physiological/disease status and anatomy, but also the tracking and delineation of multiple markers and indeed subsequent or simultaneous highly localized therapy (“theragnostics”). PMID:21409202

  2. Scalar-vector quantization of medical images.

    PubMed

    Mohsenian, N; Shahri, H; Nasrabadi, N M

    1996-01-01

    A new coding scheme based on the scalar-vector quantizer (SVQ) is developed for compression of medical images. The SVQ is a fixed rate encoder and its rate-distortion performance is close to that of optimal entropy-constrained scalar quantizers (ECSQs) for memoryless sources. The use of a fixed-rate quantizer is expected to eliminate some of the complexity of using variable-length scalar quantizers. When transmission of images over noisy channels is considered, our coding scheme does not suffer from error propagation that is typical of coding schemes using variable-length codes. For a set of magnetic resonance (MR) images, coding results obtained from SVQ and ECSQ at low bit rates are indistinguishable. Furthermore, our encoded images are perceptually indistinguishable from the original when displayed on a monitor. This makes our SVQ-based coder an attractive compression scheme for picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). PACS are currently under study for use in an all-digital radiology environment in hospitals, where reliable transmission, storage, and high fidelity reconstruction of images are desired. PMID:18285124

  3. A balancing act: a phenomenological exploration of medical students' experiences of using mobile devices in the clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Rashid-Doubell, F; Mohamed, S; Elmusharaf, K; O'Neill, C S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of senior students using mobile devices in a clinical setting while learning and interacting with clinical teachers, patients and each other, and to identify challenges that facilitated or impeded the use of such devices in the hospital. Design Interpretative phenomenology was chosen to guide our enquiry. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to examine the experiences of five senior medical students using mobile devices in the clinical setting. Setting and participants Senior medical students at an international medical school in the Middle East. Results Three main themes emerged from the data analysis: learning; professional identity and transitioning from student to doctor. The findings showed that using mobile devices in the clinical area as a learning tool was not a formalised process. Rather, it was opportunistic learning at the bedside and on occasion a source of distraction from clinical teaching. Students needed to negotiate relationships between themselves, the clinical teacher and patients in order to ensure that they maintained an acceptable professional image. Participants experienced and negotiated the change from student to doctor making them mindful of using their devices at the bedside. Conclusions Mobile devices are part of daily life for a medical student and there is a need to adapt medical education in the clinical setting, to allow the students to use their devices in a sensitive manner. PMID:27142860

  4. Integrating the results of user research into medical device development: insights from a case study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is well established that considering users is an important aspect of medical device development. However it is also well established that there are numerous barriers to successfully conducting user research and integrating the results into product development. It is not sufficient to simply conduct user research, it must also be effectively integrated into product development. Methods A case study of the development of a new medical imaging device was conducted to examine in detail how users were involved in a medical device development project. Two user research studies were conducted: a requirements elicitation interview study and an early prototype evaluation using contextual inquiry. A descriptive in situ approach was taken to investigate how these studies contributed to the product development process and how the results of this work influenced the development of the technology. Data was collected qualitatively through interviews with the development team, participant observation at development meetings and document analysis. The focus was on investigating the barriers that exist to prevent user data from being integrated into product development. Results A number of individual, organisational and system barriers were identified that functioned to prevent the results of the user research being fully integrated into development. The user and technological aspects of development were seen as separate work streams during development. The expectations of the developers were that user research would collect requirements for the appearance of the device, rather than challenge its fundamental concept. The manner that the user data was communicated to the development team was not effective in conveying the significance or breadth of the findings. Conclusion There are a range of informal and formal organisational processes that can affect the uptake of user data during medical device development. Adopting formal decision making processes may assist

  5. 76 FR 42136 - In the Matter of Certain Motion-Sensitive Sound Effects Devices and Image Display Devices and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-18

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Motion-Sensitive Sound Effects Devices and Image Display Devices and... devices and image display devices and components and products containing same by reason of infringement of... image display devices and components and products containing same that infringe one or more of claims...

  6. The FDA's role in medical device clinical studies of human subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviola, James

    2005-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the United States Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) role as a regulatory agency in medical device clinical studies involving human subjects. The FDA's regulations and responsibilities are explained and the device application process discussed. The specific medical device regulatory authorities are described as they apply to the development and clinical study of retinal visual prosthetic devices. The FDA medical device regulations regarding clinical studies of human subjects are intended to safeguard the rights and safety of subjects. The data gathered in pre-approval clinical studies provide a basis of valid scientific evidence in order to demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of a medical device. The importance of a working understanding of applicable medical device regulations from the beginning of the device development project is emphasized particularly for novel, complex products such as implantable visual prosthetic devices.

  7. [Assessment of benefit and efficiency of innovative medical devices].

    PubMed

    Perleth, M; Lühmann, D

    2010-08-01

    Medical devices cover a wide spectrum of products with very different diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, for market licensing, uniform rules apply. Uniform rules are also valid for coverage decisions in German health care. In this article, the criteria for the assessment of benefit and efficiency of innovative biomedical technologies are described from the perspective of the statutory health insurance system. The key concepts relevant in the mandatory health insurance' "innovation"' "benefit", and "economic efficiency" are characterized. Only measurable effects of an intervention which lead to a more than marginal improvement in prognosis, symptoms, or quality of life as compared to a standard treatment are considered as beneficial. An innovative device is, therefore, subject to a benefit assessment if it is not yet reimbursed (or not yet part of the benefit package), when it is relevant to the health care system and a high public interest exists. In addition, it is important to consider a positive benefit assessment as a part of the value added chain to avoid conflicts of interest. Within the scope of early technology assessment, some conclusions can already be drawn in the early developmental stage of a device.

  8. Osiris: a medical image-manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Ligier, Y; Ratib, O; Logean, M; Girard, C

    1994-01-01

    We designed a general-purpose computer program, Osiris, for the display, manipulation, and analysis of digital medical images. The program offers an intuitive, window-based interface with direct access to generic tools. Characterized by user-friendliness, portability, and extensibility, Osiris is compatible with both Unix-based and Macintosh-based platforms. It is readily modified and can be used to develop new tools. It is able to monitor the entries made during a work session and thus provide data on its use. Osiris and its source code are being distributed, free of charge, to universities and research groups around the world.

  9. SmartWADO: an Extensible WADO Middleware for Regional Medical Image Sharing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lijun; Liu, Li; Fu, Xiaodong; Huang, Qingsong; Zhang, Yin; Luo, Qiaoyi; Xiong, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Medical image sharing is an important problem in modern radiology, with wide applications in Internet and mobile devices. Some important features need to be added and optimized to medical image sharing. In this paper, we present an extensible Web Access to DICOM Persistent Objects (WADO) middleware based on image cache and real-time Web monitor technology for regional medical image sharing. We first develop the extension method of WADO standard and workflow of extended WADO service. Then, we design a medical image cache method to improve the performance of medical image on-demand transmission. Using the real-time monitor can discover the performance bottlenecks and optimized critical points. The experimental results show that the middleware effectively delivers medical images and reports to Web clients over the Internet, regardless of the platform used for access. It can be deployed in one hospital to provide WADO service to medical workers and also can be applied to regional picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) to transmit medical images and reports to Internet users in a way that is transparent to end-user applications. PMID:25813895

  10. [Industry regulation and its relationship to the rapid marketing of medical devices].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Atsuko

    2012-01-01

    In the market of medical devices, non-Japanese products hold a large part even in Japan. To overcome this situation, the Japanese government has been announcing policies to encourage the medical devices industry, such as the 5-year strategy for medical innovation (June 6, 2012). The Division of Medical Devices has been contributing to rapid marketing of medical devices by working out the standards for approval review and accreditation of medical devices, guidances on evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and test methods for biological safety evaluation of medical devices, as a part of practice in the field of regulatory science. The recent outcomes are 822 standards of accreditation for Class II medical devices, 14 guidances on safety evaluation of medical devices with emerging technology, and the revised test methods for biological safety evaluation (MHLW Notification by Director, OMDE, Yakushokuki-hatsu 0301 No. 20 "Basic Principles of Biological Safety Evaluation Required for Application for Approval to Market Medical Devices"). PMID:23243983

  11. MMSPix - A multimedia service (MMS) medical images weblog.

    PubMed

    Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang; Muin, Michael; Ducut, Erick; Ackerman, Michael; Paalan-Vasquez, Franciene

    2007-01-01

    Smartphones with cameras have added a new dimension to augmenting medical image collections for education and teleconsultation. It allows healthcare personnel to instantly capture and send images through the multimedia messaging service (MMS) protocol. We developed a searchable archive, a mobile images Weblog of camera phone images for medical education. Registered users can view and comment on uploaded images. The archive is compartmentalized to allow sharing images with all viewers and by clinical specialty groups.

  12. 76 FR 65200 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee: Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee scheduled for December 1, 2011. The meeting was announced in the Federal Register of Friday, October 7, 2011 (76 FR 62419). The... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the...

  13. 76 FR 42713 - General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. This meeting was announced in the Federal Register of July 7, 2011 (76 FR 39882). The amendment is being made to reflect a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration General and Plastic Surgery Devices Panel of the...

  14. US FDA perspective on the regulations of medical-grade polymers: cyanoacrylate polymer medical device tissue adhesives.

    PubMed

    Mattamal, George J

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the uses and clinical applications of medical-grade polymers, in particular synthetic cyanoacrylate adhesive/glue devices that have been cleared and/or approved as medical devices by the US FDA since the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 were enacted. This includes Class I cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., liquid bandages), Class II cyanoacrylate devices (e.g., dental cements), and Class III (premarket approval) cyanoacrylate devices such as Dermabond, Indermil Tissue Adhesive, Histoacryl and Histoacryl Blue Topical Skin Adhesive, and Trufill n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate Embolic Agent. By citing an example of FDA approved Class III devices in the cyanoacrylate technology, the article provides a brief discussion of the FDA approval process of medical devices. It includes the FDA issues regarding the published guidance document for 'Cyanoacrylate Topical Tissue Adhesives' that will provide guidance to regulatory personnel and manufacturers in the preparation of investigational device exception applications and in the development of valid scientific evidence to support premarket approval applications for cyanocrylate tissue adhesives intended for topical approximation of skin and others. The article provides a short regulatory description of the US FDA; under what laws its operates, how the FDA evaluates new devices for marketing, and how the device regulatory system works, for example, Class I, Class II, and Class III cyanoacrylate medical devices.

  15. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process.

  16. Facilitating medical information search using Google Glass connected to a content-based medical image retrieval system.

    PubMed

    Widmer, Antoine; Schaer, Roger; Markonis, Dimitrios; Muller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Wearable computing devices are starting to change the way users interact with computers and the Internet. Among them, Google Glass includes a small screen located in front of the right eye, a camera filming in front of the user and a small computing unit. Google Glass has the advantage to provide online services while allowing the user to perform tasks with his/her hands. These augmented glasses uncover many useful applications, also in the medical domain. For example, Google Glass can easily provide video conference between medical doctors to discuss a live case. Using these glasses can also facilitate medical information search by allowing the access of a large amount of annotated medical cases during a consultation in a non-disruptive fashion for medical staff. In this paper, we developed a Google Glass application able to take a photo and send it to a medical image retrieval system along with keywords in order to retrieve similar cases. As a preliminary assessment of the usability of the application, we tested the application under three conditions (images of the skin; printed CT scans and MRI images; and CT and MRI images acquired directly from an LCD screen) to explore whether using Google Glass affects the accuracy of the results returned by the medical image retrieval system. The preliminary results show that despite minor problems due to the relative stability of the Google Glass, images can be sent to and processed by the medical image retrieval system and similar images are returned to the user, potentially helping in the decision making process. PMID:25570993

  17. The Vascular Model Repository: A Public Resource of Medical Imaging Data and Blood Flow Simulation Results.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nathan M; Ortiz, Ana K; Johnson, Allison B

    2013-12-01

    Patient-specific blood flow simulations may provide insight into disease progression, treatment options, and medical device design that would be difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. However, publicly available image data and computer models for researchers and device designers are extremely limited. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored Open Source Medical Software Corporation (contract nos. HHSN268200800008C and HHSN268201100035C) and its university collaborators to build a repository (www.vascularmodel.org) including realistic, image-based anatomic models and related hemodynamic simulation results to address this unmet need.

  18. XEMIS: A liquid xenon detector for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego Manzano, L.; Bassetto, S.; Beaupere, N.; Briend, P.; Carlier, T.; Cherel, M.; Cussonneau, J.-P.; Donnard, J.; Gorski, M.; Hamanishi, R.; Kraeber Bodéré, F.; Le Ray, P.; Lemaire, O.; Masbou, J.; Mihara, S.; Morteau, E.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Stutzmann, J.-S.; Tauchi, T.; Thers, D.

    2015-07-01

    A new medical imaging technique based on the precise 3D location of a radioactive source by the simultaneous detection of 3γ rays has been proposed by Subatech laboratory. To take advantage of this novel technique a detection device based on a liquid xenon Compton telescope and a specific (β+, γ) emitter radionuclide, 44Sc, are required. A first prototype of a liquid xenon time projection chamber called XEMIS1 has been successfully developed showing very promising results for the energy and spatial resolutions for the ionization signal in liquid xenon, thanks to an advanced cryogenics system, which has contributed to a high liquid xenon purity with a very good stability and an ultra-low noise front-end electronics (below 100 electrons) operating at liquid xenon temperature. The very positive results obtained with XEMIS1 have led to the development of a second prototype for small animal imaging, XEMIS2, which is now under development. To study the feasibility of the 3γ imaging technique and optimize the characteristics of the device, a complete Monte Carlo simulation has been also carried out. A preliminary study shows very positive results for the sensitivity, energy and spatial resolutions of XEMIS2.

  19. Pediatric medical devices: a look at significant US legislation to address unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Samuels-Reid, Joy H; Blake, Erica D

    2014-03-01

    There are many barriers to the availability of medical devices intended for the pediatric population causing healthcare providers to use creative measures to address pediatric unmet device needs. The USA has taken significant legislative measures to spur medical device development and address the unmet needs in all pediatric subpopulations. For example, the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002 amended the Federal Food Drug and Cosmetic Act by adding new provisions intended to promote the development of safe and effective pediatric devices, and to protect the pediatric population during clinical trials. In 2004, the Medical Devices Technical Corrections Act was added to address potential difficulties in bringing pediatric devices to the market. Further, the Pediatric Medical Device Safety and Improvement Act of 2007 and the Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 provided the FDA significant new responsibilities and authorities regarding pediatric use.

  20. EDI system definition for a European medical device vigilance system.

    PubMed

    Doukidis, G; Pallikarakis, N; Pangalos, G; Vassilacopoulos, G; Pramataris, K

    1996-01-01

    EDI is expected to be the dominant form of business communication between organizations moving to the Electronic Commerce era of 2000. The healthcare sector is already using EDI in the hospital supply function as well as in the clinical area and the reimbursement process. In this paper, we examine the use of EDI in the healthcare administration sector and more specifically its application to the Medical Device Vigilance System. Firstly, the potential of this approach is examined, followed by the definition of the EDI System Reference Model and the specification of the required system architecture. Each of the architecture's components are then explained in more detail, followed by the most important implementation options relating to them. PMID:9062886

  1. 77 FR 43846 - Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop; Notice of Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices... Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following workshop: FDA Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop. This meeting is intended to focus on challenges in pediatric device...

  2. 21 CFR 801.16 - Medical devices; Spanish-language version of certain required statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; Spanish-language version of....16 Medical devices; Spanish-language version of certain required statements. If devices restricted to prescription use only are labeled solely in Spanish for distribution in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico...

  3. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label statements. 801.15 Section 801.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.15 Medical...

  4. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label statements. 801.15 Section 801.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.15 Medical...

  5. 21 CFR 801.15 - Medical devices; prominence of required label statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; prominence of required label statements. 801.15 Section 801.15 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.15 Medical...

  6. Nanobionics: the impact of nanotechnology on implantable medical bionic devices.

    PubMed

    Wallace, G G; Higgins, M J; Moulton, S E; Wang, C

    2012-08-01

    The nexus of any bionic device can be found at the electrode-cellular interface. Overall efficiency is determined by our ability to transfer electronic information across that interface. The nanostructure imparted to electrodes plays a critical role in controlling the cascade of events that determines the composition and structure of that interface. With commonly used conductors: metals, carbon and organic conducting polymers, a number of approaches that promote control over structure in the nanodomain have emerged in recent years with subsequent studies revealing a critical dependency between nanostructure and cellular behaviour. As we continue to develop our understanding of how to create and characterise electromaterials in the nanodomain, this is expected to have a profound effect on the development of next generation bionic devices. In this review, we focus on advances in fabricating nanostructured electrodes that present new opportunities in the field of medical bionics. We also briefly evaluate the interactions of living cells with the nanostructured electromaterials, in addition to highlighting emerging tools used for nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation of the electrode-cellular interface.

  7. Crystal diffraction lens for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R. K.; Roa, D. E.

    2000-02-25

    A crystal diffraction lens for focusing energetic gamma rays has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for use in medical imaging of radioactivity in the human body. A common method for locating possible cancerous growths in the body is to inject radioactivity into the blood stream of the patient and then look for any concentration of radioactivity that could be associated with the fast growing cancer cells. Often there are borderline indications of possible cancers that could be due to statistical functions in the measured counting rates. In order to determine if these indications are false or real, one must resort to surgical means and take tissue samples in the suspect area. They are developing a system of crystal diffraction lenses that will be incorporated into a 3-D imaging system with better sensitivity (factors of 10 to 100) and better spatial resolution (a few mm in both vertical and horizontal directions) than most systems presently in use. The use of this new imaging system will allow one to eliminate 90% of the false indications and both locate and determine the size of the cancer with mm precision. The lens consists of 900 single crystals of copper, 4 mm x 4 mm on a side and 2--4 mm thick, mounted in 13 concentric rings.

  8. Fast neutron imaging device and method

    DOEpatents

    Popov, Vladimir; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Musatov, Igor V.

    2014-02-11

    A fast neutron imaging apparatus and method of constructing fast neutron radiography images, the apparatus including a neutron source and a detector that provides event-by-event acquisition of position and energy deposition, and optionally timing and pulse shape for each individual neutron event detected by the detector. The method for constructing fast neutron radiography images utilizes the apparatus of the invention.

  9. Development of microwave imaging reflectometry in large helical device.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, S; Nagayama, Y; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Shi, Z B; Kogi, Y; Mase, A

    2008-10-01

    Three key devices of the microwave imaging reflectometry (MIR) are under development in large helical device (LHD). The 2-D mixer array is developed by stacking the one-dimensional array of the planar Yagi-Uda antenna. The new type of the bandpass filter bank is modified to match the requirement of the MIR. The low-cost quadrature demodulator is also developed for the phase detection system. By using the low-price commercial wireless devices, the development cost becomes much lower than the expensive waveguide system. These devices enable the development of 2-D/3-D microwave imaging system for the plasma diagnostics and industrial applications.

  10. [Utility of medical devices: approaches to planning and conducting clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Andreas; Heimerl, Albert; Krockenberger, Katja; Hemmelmann, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Medicines and medical devices do not only differ in the approval process, but also in the aim and conduct of clinical trials. We first discuss important differences between medicinal products and medical devices. Emphasis is put on the differences in the framework for clinical trials. We point out that a different analysis set should be used in clinical trials of medical devices when compared with medicinal products and medical devices in the USA. Specifically, regulators generally ask for the full analysis set based on the intention-to-treat principle as proof of efficacy of medicines. A central aspect of clinical trials of medical devices is that they have to be tested under normal conditions of use according to the performance data. As a result, all data acquired while the medical device was not during normal conditions of use should be excluded from statistical analyses. We discuss statistical methodological particularities of medical devices, such as blinding and the control of placebo effects. Using the conservative treatment of anal incontinence as an example, we show that comprehensive technical and physical knowledge is required for assessing the utility of medical devices. Finally, we consider reporting of severe adverse events and of severe adverse device effects of medical devices.

  11. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Aditya; Wu, Dawei; Wu, Chunyan; Zhao, Weizhao

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging modalities, such as X-ray, MRI, CT, ultrasound and PET, forms an essential component of such an education. Internet technologies provide a vehicle to carry medical imaging education online. There exist a number of internet-based medical imaging hyper-books or online documentations. However, there are few providing interactive computational simulations. We focus on delivering knowledge of the physical principles and engineering implementation of medical imaging techniques through an interactive website environment. The online medical imaging simulation system presented in this report outlines basic principles underlying different imaging techniques and image processing algorithms and offers trainees an interactive virtual laboratory. For education purposes, this system aims to provide general understanding of each imaging modality with comprehensive explanations, ample illustrations and copious references as its thrust, rather than complex physics or detailed math. This report specifically describes the development of the tutorial for commonly used medical imaging modalities. An internet-accessible interface is used to simulate various imaging algorithms with user-adjustable parameters. The tutorial is under the MATLAB Web Server environment. Macromedia Director MX is used to develop interactive animations integrating theory with graphic-oriented simulations. HTML and JavaScript are used to enable a user to explore these modules online in a web browser. Numerous multiple choice questions, links and references for advanced study are

  12. Cathode-ray tube displays for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Keller, P A

    1990-02-01

    This paper will discuss the principles of cathode-ray tube displays in medical imaging and the parameters essential to the selection of displays for specific requirements. A discussion of cathode-ray tube fundamentals and medical requirements is included.

  13. Highly sensitive pyrogen detection on medical devices by the monocyte activation test.

    PubMed

    Stang, Katharina; Fennrich, Stefan; Krajewski, Stefanie; Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Burgener, Iwan Anton; Wendel, Hans-Peter; Post, Marcell

    2014-04-01

    Pyrogens are components of microorganisms, like bacteria, viruses or fungi, which can induce a complex inflammatory response in the human body. Pyrogen contamination on medical devices prior operation is still critical and associated with severe complications for the patients. The aim of our study was to develop a reliable test, which allows detection of pyrogen contamination on the surface of medical devices. After in vitro pyrogen contamination of different medical devices and incubation in a rotation model, the human whole blood monocyte activation test (MAT), which is based on an IL-1β-specific ELISA, was employed. Our results show that when combining a modified MAT protocol and a dynamic incubation system, even smallest amounts of pyrogens can be directly detected on the surface of medical devices. Therefore, screening of medical devices prior clinical application using our novel assay, has the potential to significantly reduce complications associated with pyrogen-contaminated medical devices.

  14. [Study on situations of review and pre-evaluation for medical device product specification in China].

    PubMed

    Li, Baolin

    2013-07-01

    This paper researched on course of registration and administrative licensing for medical device product specification, analyzed the existing demands of review and pre-evaluation, discussed about how to improve and manage pre-evaluation results for testing laboratory and manufacturer in China, based on "Provision of Medical Device Product Specification Standardization", "Provision on Medical Device Registration" and relative documents of States Food & Drug Administration. It suggested that set up and maintain a professional team of review and approval staff, further strengthen standardization of medical device specification, arming at current situations of non-compatibility between documents and inconformity of performance in different provinces. It paid attention to control the quality of medical device to ensure the core of safety and effectiveness for using medical device.

  15. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis. PMID:27526188

  16. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis.

  17. Survey on Neural Networks Used for Medical Image Processing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhenghao; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to present a review of neural networks used in medical image processing. We classify neural networks by its processing goals and the nature of medical images. Main contributions, advantages, and drawbacks of the methods are mentioned in the paper. Problematic issues of neural network application for medical image processing and an outlook for the future research are also discussed. By this survey, we try to answer the following two important questions: (1) What are the major applications of neural networks in medical image processing now and in the nearby future? (2) What are the major strengths and weakness of applying neural networks for solving medical image processing tasks? We believe that this would be very helpful researchers who are involved in medical image processing with neural network techniques. PMID:26740861

  18. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  19. Lessons from image perception studies for the design of medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, David L.; Jabri, Kadri N.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M.; Srinivas, Yogesh; Salem, Kyle A.

    2000-06-01

    Our laboratory uses image perception studies to optimize the acquisition and processing of image sequences from x-ray fluoroscopy and interventional MRI (iMRI) both of which are used to guide complex minimally invasive treatments of cancer and vascular disease. Fluoroscopy consists of high frame rate, quantum-limited image sequences. Since it accounts for over half of the diagnostic population x-ray dose, we attempt to reduce dose by optimizing image acquisition and filtering. We quantify image quality using human detection experiments and modeling. Human spatio-temporal processing greatly affects results. For example, spatial noise reduction filtering is significantly more effective on image sequences than on single image frames where it gives relatively little improvement due to the deleterious effect of spatial noise correlation. At CWRU, we use iMRI to guide a radio-frequency probe used for the thermal ablation of cancer. Improving the speed and accuracy of insertion to the target will reduce patient risk and discomfort. We are investigating keyhole imaging whereby one updates only a portion of the Fourier domain at each time step, producing a fast, approximate image sequence. To optimize the very large number of techniques and parameters, we use a perceptual difference model that quantifies the degrading effects introduced by fast MR imaging, including the blurring of interventional devices. Preliminary studies show that a perpendicular frequency encoding direction provides superior image quality in the region of interest compared to other keyhole stripe orientations. Together these two applications illustrate that image perception studies can impact the design of medical imaging systems.

  20. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification and reserved devices; class I. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its classification regulations to designate class I devices that are exempt from the premarket notification requirements, subject to certain limitations, and to designate those class I devices that remain subject to premarket notification requirements under the new statutory criteria for premarket notification requirements. The devices FDA is designating as exempt do not include class I devices that have been previously exempted by regulation from the premarket notification requirements. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA), and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). FDA is taking this action in order to implement a requirement of FDAMA. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing that it is withdrawing proposed rules to revoke existing exemptions from premarket notification for two devices. PMID:11010655