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Sample records for medical imaging procedures

  1. Safety Precautions and Operating Procedures in an (A)BSL-4 Laboratory: 4. Medical Imaging Procedures.

    PubMed

    Byrum, Russell; Keith, Lauren; Bartos, Christopher; St Claire, Marisa; Lackemeyer, Matthew G; Holbrook, Michael R; Janosko, Krisztina; Barr, Jason; Pusl, Daniela; Bollinger, Laura; Wada, Jiro; Coe, Linda; Hensley, Lisa E; Jahrling, Peter B; Kuhn, Jens H; Lentz, Margaret R

    2016-10-03

    Medical imaging using animal models for human diseases has been utilized for decades; however, until recently, medical imaging of diseases induced by high-consequence pathogens has not been possible. In 2014, the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Integrated Research Facility at Fort Detrick opened an Animal Biosafety Level 4 (ABSL-4) facility to assess the clinical course and pathology of infectious diseases in experimentally infected animals. Multiple imaging modalities including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single photon emission computed tomography are available to researchers for these evaluations. The focus of this article is to describe the workflow for safely obtaining a CT image of a live guinea pig in an ABSL-4 facility. These procedures include animal handling, anesthesia, and preparing and monitoring the animal until recovery from sedation. We will also discuss preparing the imaging equipment, performing quality checks, communication methods from "hot side" (containing pathogens) to "cold side," and moving the animal from the holding room to the imaging suite.

  2. From analogue to apps--developing an app to prepare children for medical imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gigi; Greene, Siobhan

    2015-01-01

    The Royal Children's Hospital (RCH) in Melbourne has launched a world-first app for children that will help reduce anxiety and the need for anesthesia during medical imaging procedures. The free, game-based app, "Okee in Medical Imaging", helps children aged from four to eight years to prepare for all medical imaging procedures--X-ray, CT, MRI, ultrasound, nuclear medicine, and fluoroscopy. The app is designed to reduce anticipatory fear of imaging procedures, while helping to ensure that children attend imaging appointments equipped with the skills required for efficient and effective scans to be performed. This paper describes how the app was developed.

  3. [Euthanasia: medications and medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Lossignol, D

    2008-09-01

    The Belgian law relative to euthanasia has been published in 2002. A physician is allowed to help a patient with intractable suffering (physical or psychological). Legal conditions are clear. However, nothing is said about medical procedures or medications to be used. The present paper will present specific clinical situations at the end of life, practical procedures and medications. A special focus is made on psychological impact of euthanasia.

  4. Interventional therapy procedures assisted by medical imaging and simulation. The experience of U 703 Inserm (Lille France).

    PubMed

    Vermandel, M; Betrouni, N; Rousseau, J; Dubois, P

    2007-04-27

    Since the early 1990s, minimally invasive techniques have been increasingly used in ever more and diversified fields of application. These techniques have some shared characteristics (predominant role of medical imaging, intensive use of new communication technologies, a multidisciplinary medical and scientific framework, etc.) but also shared specific problems (high-tech tools unfamiliar to the medical users, a major and long period of time for technological development, unavailability of training systems, difficulties in obtaining regulatory approval). For a long time, our Laboratory of Medical Physics (U 703 Inserm) has developed an innovative research activity in biomedical engineering in the field of assisted therapy, medical imaging and medical simulation. This paper presents the general context of interventional therapy procedures assisted by image and simulation and describes our scientific activities based on realistic objectives close to medical practice.

  5. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  6. [The procedure for documentation of digital images in forensic medical histology].

    PubMed

    Putintsev, V A; Bogomolov, D V; Fedulova, M V; Gribunov, Iu P; Kul'bitskiĭ, B N

    2012-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the novel computer technologies employed in the studies of histological preparations. These technologies allow to visualize digital images, structurize the data obtained and store the results in computer memory. The authors emphasize the necessity to properly document digital images obtained during forensic-histological studies and propose the procedure for the formulation of electronic documents in conformity with the relevant technical and legal requirements. It is concluded that the use of digital images as a new study object permits to obviate the drawbacks inherent in the work with the traditional preparations and pass from descriptive microscopy to their quantitative analysis.

  7. Medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Alex

    2005-07-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging is a fundamental part of the practice of modern medicine and is responsible for the expenditure of considerable amounts of capital and revenue monies in healthcare systems around the world. Much research and development work is carried out, both by commercial companies and the academic community. This paper reviews briefly each of the major diagnostic medical imaging techniques—X-ray (planar and CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine (planar, SPECT and PET) and magnetic resonance. The technical challenges facing each are highlighted, with some of the most recent developments. In terms of the future, interventional/peri-operative imaging, the advancement of molecular medicine and gene therapy are identified as potential areas of expansion.

  8. Medical imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Kreel, L.

    1991-01-01

    There is now a wide choice of medical imaging to show both focal and diffuse pathologies in various organs. Conventional radiology with plain films, fluoroscopy and contrast medium have many advantages, being readily available with low-cost apparatus and a familiarity that almost leads to contempt. The use of plain films in chest disease and in trauma does not need emphasizing, yet there are still too many occasions when the answer obtainable from a plain radiograph has not been available. The film may have been mislaid, or the examination was not requested, or the radiograph had been misinterpreted. The converse is also quite common. Examinations are performed that add nothing to patient management, such as skull films when CT will in any case be requested or views of the internal auditory meatus and heal pad thickness in acromegaly, to quote some examples. Other issues are more complicated. Should the patient who clinically has gall-bladder disease have more than a plain film that shows gall-stones? If the answer is yes, then why request a plain film if sonography will in any case be required to 'exclude' other pathologies especially of the liver or pancreas? But then should cholecystography, CT or scintigraphy be added for confirmation? Quite clearly there will be individual circumstances to indicate further imaging after sonography but in the vast majority of patients little or no extra information will be added. Statistics on accuracy and specificity will, in the case of gall-bladder pathology, vary widely if adenomyomatosis is considered by some to be a cause of symptoms or if sonographic examinations 'after fatty meals' are performed. The arguments for or against routine contrast urography rather than sonography are similar but the possibility of contrast reactions and the need to limit ionizing radiation must be borne in mind. These diagnostic strategies are also being influenced by their cost and availability; purely pragmatic considerations are not

  9. Medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.H.; Dwyer, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers from 26 sessions. Some of the session titles are: Tomographic Reconstruction, Radiography, Fluoro/Angio, Imaging Performance Measures, Perception, Image Processing, 3-D Display, and Printers, Displays, and Digitizers.

  10. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  11. Imaging medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journeau, P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents progress on imaging the research field of Imaging Informatics, mapped as the clustering of its communities together with their main results by applying a process to produce a dynamical image of the interactions between their results and their common object(s) of research. The basic side draws from a fundamental research on the concept of dimensions and projective space spanning several streams of research about three-dimensional perceptivity and re-cognition and on their relation and reduction to spatial dimensionality. The application results in an N-dimensional mapping in Bio-Medical Imaging, with dimensions such as inflammatory activity, MRI acquisition sequencing, spatial resolution (voxel size), spatiotemporal dimension inferred, toxicity, depth penetration, sensitivity, temporal resolution, wave length, imaging duration, etc. Each field is represented through the projection of papers' and projects' `discriminating' quantitative results onto the specific N-dimensional hypercube of relevant measurement axes, such as listed above and before reduction. Past published differentiating results are represented as red stars, achieved unpublished results as purple spots and projects at diverse progress advancement levels as blue pie slices. The goal of the mapping is to show the dynamics of the trajectories of the field in its own experimental frame and their direction, speed and other characteristics. We conclude with an invitation to participate and show a sample mapping of the dynamics of the community and a tentative predictive model from community contribution.

  12. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, C. Carl

    1982-01-01

    Describes principle imaging techniques, their applications, and their limitations in terms of diagnostic capability and possible adverse biological effects. Techniques include film radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and digital radiography. PET has…

  13. Medical Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, C. Carl

    1982-01-01

    Describes principle imaging techniques, their applications, and their limitations in terms of diagnostic capability and possible adverse biological effects. Techniques include film radiography, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and digital radiography. PET has…

  14. Laboratory Procedures for Medical Assistants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Pauline

    The purpose of the manual is to provide the medical assisting student a text which presents the common laboratory procedures in use today in physician's offices. The procedures for performing a complete urinalysis are outlined, along with those for carrying out various hematological tests. Information is also presented to help the student learn to…

  15. Electronic Procedures for Medical Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Electronic procedures are replacing text-based documents for recording the steps in performing medical operations aboard the International Space Station. S&K Aerospace, LLC, has developed a content-based electronic system-based on the Extensible Markup Language (XML) standard-that separates text from formatting standards and tags items contained in procedures so they can be recognized by other electronic systems. For example, to change a standard format, electronic procedures are changed in a single batch process, and the entire body of procedures will have the new format. Procedures can be quickly searched to determine which are affected by software and hardware changes. Similarly, procedures are easily shared with other electronic systems. The system also enables real-time data capture and automatic bookmarking of current procedure steps. In Phase II of the project, S&K Aerospace developed a Procedure Representation Language (PRL) and tools to support the creation and maintenance of electronic procedures for medical operations. The goal is to develop these tools in such a way that new advances can be inserted easily, leading to an eventual medical decision support system.

  16. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  17. Medical Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The MD Image System, a true-color image processing system that serves as a diagnostic aid and tool for storage and distribution of images, was developed by Medical Image Management Systems, Huntsville, AL, as a "spinoff from a spinoff." The original spinoff, Geostar 8800, developed by Crystal Image Technologies, Huntsville, incorporates advanced UNIX versions of ELAS (developed by NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory for analysis of Landsat images) for general purpose image processing. The MD Image System is an application of this technology to a medical system that aids in the diagnosis of cancer, and can accept, store and analyze images from other sources such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

  18. Medical Image Databases

    PubMed Central

    Tagare, Hemant D.; Jaffe, C. Carl; Duncan, James

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Information contained in medical images differs considerably from that residing in alphanumeric format. The difference can be attributed to four characteristics: (1) the semantics of medical knowledge extractable from images is imprecise; (2) image information contains form and spatial data, which are not expressible in conventional language; (3) a large part of image information is geometric; (4) diagnostic inferences derived from images rest on an incomplete, continuously evolving model of normality. This paper explores the differentiating characteristics of text versus images and their impact on design of a medical image database intended to allow content-based indexing and retrieval. One strategy for implementing medical image databases is presented, which employs object-oriented iconic queries, semantics by association with prototypes, and a generic schema. PMID:9147338

  19. Radiation Exposure from Medical Exams and Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Measurements (NCRP) states that exposure to the U.S. population from medical procedures has in- creased since the 1980s (NCRP 2009). These findings can be attrib- uted to the growth in the use of medical im- aging procedures, ...

  20. [Medical image enhancement: Sharpening].

    PubMed

    Kats, L; Vered, M

    2015-04-01

    Most digital imaging systems provide opportunities for image enhancement operations. These are applied to improve the original image and to make the image more appealing visually. One possible means of enhancing digital radiographic image is sharpening. The purpose of sharpening filters is to improve image quality by removing noise or edge enhancement. Sharpening filters may make the radiographic images subjectively more appealing. But during this process, important radiographic features may disappear while artifacts that simulate pathological process might be generated. Therefore, it is of utmost importance for dentists to be familiar with and aware of the use of image enhancement operations, provided by medical digital imaging programs.

  1. Medical imaging systems

    DOEpatents

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  2. Lithotripsy procedure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is a procedure used to shatter simple stones in the kidney or upper urinary tract. Ultrasonic waves are passed through the body until they strike the dense stones. Pulses of ...

  3. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    PubMed

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P<0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P<0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P<0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Avoiding Psychological Pitfalls in Aesthetic Medical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuyu; Cao, Chuan; Guo, Rui; Li, Xiaoge; Lu, Lele; Wang, Wenping; Li, Shirong

    2016-12-01

    To assess the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) in an aesthetic surgery setting in the region of Southwest China, and to ascertain the differences in terms of body images between patients in the aesthetic setting and general Chinese population. This study tracked patient satisfaction with their body image changes while undergoing aesthetic medical procedures to identify whether the condition of patients who were presenting with BDD symptoms or their psychological symptoms could be improved by enhancing their appearance. Additionally, this study explored whether there was improvement in quality of life (QoL) and self-esteem after aesthetic medical procedures. A total of 106 female patients who were undergoing aesthetic medical procedures for the first time (plastic surgery, n = 26; minimally invasive aesthetic treatment, n = 42; and aesthetic dermatological treatment, n = 38) were classified as having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms or not having body dysmorphic disorder symptoms, based on the body dysmorphic disorder examination (BDDE), which was administered preoperatively. These patients were followed up for 1 month after the aesthetic procedures. The multidimensional body self-relations questionnaire-appearance scales (MBSRQ-AS) and rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE-S) were used to assess patients' preoccupation with appearance and self-esteem pre-procedure and 1 month post-procedure. Additionally, 100 female healthy control participants were recruited as a comparative group into this study and they were also assessed using BDDE, MBSRQ-AS, and RSE-S. A total of 14.2 % of 106 aesthetic patients and 1 % of 100 healthy controls were diagnosed with BDD to varying extents. BDDE scores were 72.83 (SD ± 30.7) and 68.18 (SD ± 31.82), respectively, before and after the procedure for the aesthetic patient group and 43.44 (SD ± 15.65) for the healthy control group (F = 34.28; p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the

  5. Mobile medical image retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Samuel; Depeursinge, Adrien; Eggel, Ivan; Müller, Henning

    2011-03-01

    Images are an integral part of medical practice for diagnosis, treatment planning and teaching. Image retrieval has gained in importance mainly as a research domain over the past 20 years. Both textual and visual retrieval of images are essential. In the process of mobile devices becoming reliable and having a functionality equaling that of formerly desktop clients, mobile computing has gained ground and many applications have been explored. This creates a new field of mobile information search & access and in this context images can play an important role as they often allow understanding complex scenarios much quicker and easier than free text. Mobile information retrieval in general has skyrocketed over the past year with many new applications and tools being developed and all sorts of interfaces being adapted to mobile clients. This article describes constraints of an information retrieval system including visual and textual information retrieval from the medical literature of BioMedCentral and of the RSNA journals Radiology and Radiographics. Solutions for mobile data access with an example on an iPhone in a web-based environment are presented as iPhones are frequently used and the operating system is bound to become the most frequent smartphone operating system in 2011. A web-based scenario was chosen to allow for a use by other smart phone platforms such as Android as well. Constraints of small screens and navigation with touch screens are taken into account in the development of the application. A hybrid choice had to be taken to allow for taking pictures with the cell phone camera and upload them for visual similarity search as most producers of smart phones block this functionality to web applications. Mobile information access and in particular access to images can be surprisingly efficient and effective on smaller screens. Images can be read on screen much faster and relevance of documents can be identified quickly through the use of images contained in

  6. Qualitative approach to medical image databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizais, Yves J.; Gibaud, Bernard; Forte, Anne-Marie; Aubry, Florent; Di Paola, Robert; Scarabin, Jean-Marie

    1991-07-01

    The development of PACS image databases has long been thought of as a major technological challenge, due to the amount of data to be managed. On the contrary, the authors think that despite major improvements in storage technology, new data management techniques must be proposed to make image databases medically useful in PACS environments. More precisely, image databases must contain not only images per se, but also the description of all objects used in medical imaging, in order to permit the remote processing, analysis, and interpretation of images. In several other papers, the authors explain why they adopted an object-oriented approach to model information in medical imaging. In this paper, the focus is on the inventory of objects manipulated in medical imaging from a qualitative viewpoint. For this purpose, a large number of representative imaging procedures were selected. The authors characterized how they are asked for by clinicians, realized in imaging departments, and consumed by requiring physicians and surgeons, in three French university hospitals. On the basis of this inventory, a set of image data -- i.e. of objects used in medical imaging -- was defined to show that this set must evolve with advances in medical imaging, and to point out that relational DBMS concepts cannot represent all image data.

  7. Wavelets in medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Zahra, Noor e; Sevindir, Huliya A.; Aslan, Zafar; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-17

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  8. Wavelets in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, Noor e.; Sevindir, Hulya Kodal; Aslan, Zafer; Siddiqi, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study is to provide emerging applications of wavelet methods to medical signals and images, such as electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, functional magnetic resonance imaging, computer tomography, X-ray and mammography. Interpretation of these signals and images are quite important. Nowadays wavelet methods have a significant impact on the science of medical imaging and the diagnosis of disease and screening protocols. Based on our initial investigations, future directions include neurosurgical planning and improved assessment of risk for individual patients, improved assessment and strategies for the treatment of chronic pain, improved seizure localization, and improved understanding of the physiology of neurological disorders. We look ahead to these and other emerging applications as the benefits of this technology become incorporated into current and future patient care. In this chapter by applying Fourier transform and wavelet transform, analysis and denoising of one of the important biomedical signals like EEG is carried out. The presence of rhythm, template matching, and correlation is discussed by various method. Energy of EEG signal is used to detect seizure in an epileptic patient. We have also performed denoising of EEG signals by SWT.

  9. Digital diagnosis of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinonen, Tomi; Kuismin, Raimo; Jormalainen, Raimo; Dastidar, Prasun; Frey, Harry; Eskola, Hannu

    2001-08-01

    The popularity of digital imaging devices and PACS installations has increased during the last years. Still, images are analyzed and diagnosed using conventional techniques. Our research group begun to study the requirements for digital image diagnostic methods to be applied together with PACS systems. The research was focused on various image analysis procedures (e.g., segmentation, volumetry, 3D visualization, image fusion, anatomic atlas, etc.) that could be useful in medical diagnosis. We have developed Image Analysis software (www.medimag.net) to enable several image-processing applications in medical diagnosis, such as volumetry, multimodal visualization, and 3D visualizations. We have also developed a commercial scalable image archive system (ActaServer, supports DICOM) based on component technology (www.acta.fi), and several telemedicine applications. All the software and systems operate in NT environment and are in clinical use in several hospitals. The analysis software have been applied in clinical work and utilized in numerous patient cases (500 patients). This method has been used in the diagnosis, therapy and follow-up in various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), respiratory system (RS) and human reproductive system (HRS). In many of these diseases e.g. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (CNS), nasal airways diseases (RS) and ovarian tumors (HRS), these methods have been used for the first time in clinical work. According to our results, digital diagnosis improves diagnostic capabilities, and together with PACS installations it will become standard tool during the next decade by enabling more accurate diagnosis and patient follow-up.

  10. Medical Image Analysis Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    To improve the quality of photos sent to Earth by unmanned spacecraft. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) developed a computerized image enhancement process that brings out detail not visible in the basic photo. JPL is now applying this technology to biomedical research in its Medical lrnage Analysis Facility, which employs computer enhancement techniques to analyze x-ray films of internal organs, such as the heart and lung. A major objective is study of the effects of I stress on persons with heart disease. In animal tests, computerized image processing is being used to study coronary artery lesions and the degree to which they reduce arterial blood flow when stress is applied. The photos illustrate the enhancement process. The upper picture is an x-ray photo in which the artery (dotted line) is barely discernible; in the post-enhancement photo at right, the whole artery and the lesions along its wall are clearly visible. The Medical lrnage Analysis Facility offers a faster means of studying the effects of complex coronary lesions in humans, and the research now being conducted on animals is expected to have important application to diagnosis and treatment of human coronary disease. Other uses of the facility's image processing capability include analysis of muscle biopsy and pap smear specimens, and study of the microscopic structure of fibroprotein in the human lung. Working with JPL on experiments are NASA's Ames Research Center, the University of Southern California School of Medicine, and Rancho Los Amigos Hospital, Downey, California.

  11. Image processing for medical diagnosis using CNN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Basile, Adriano; Bucolo, Maide; Fortuna, Luigi

    2003-01-01

    Medical diagnosis is one of the most important area in which image processing procedures are usefully applied. Image processing is an important phase in order to improve the accuracy both for diagnosis procedure and for surgical operation. One of these fields is tumor/cancer detection by using Microarray analysis. The research studies in the Cancer Genetics Branch are mainly involved in a range of experiments including the identification of inherited mutations predisposing family members to malignant melanoma, prostate and breast cancer. In bio-medical field the real-time processing is very important, but often image processing is a quite time-consuming phase. Therefore techniques able to speed up the elaboration play an important rule. From this point of view, in this work a novel approach to image processing has been developed. The new idea is to use the Cellular Neural Networks to investigate on diagnostic images, like: Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Computed Tomography, and fluorescent cDNA microarray images.

  12. Cloud computing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Kagadis, George C; Kloukinas, Christos; Moore, Kevin; Philbin, Jim; Papadimitroulas, Panagiotis; Alexakos, Christos; Nagy, Paul G; Visvikis, Dimitris; Hendee, William R

    2013-07-01

    Over the past century technology has played a decisive role in defining, driving, and reinventing procedures, devices, and pharmaceuticals in healthcare. Cloud computing has been introduced only recently but is already one of the major topics of discussion in research and clinical settings. The provision of extensive, easily accessible, and reconfigurable resources such as virtual systems, platforms, and applications with low service cost has caught the attention of many researchers and clinicians. Healthcare researchers are moving their efforts to the cloud, because they need adequate resources to process, store, exchange, and use large quantities of medical data. This Vision 20/20 paper addresses major questions related to the applicability of advanced cloud computing in medical imaging. The paper also considers security and ethical issues that accompany cloud computing.

  13. [Medical imaging: its medical economics and recent situation in Japan.].

    PubMed

    Imai, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    Two fields of radiology, medical imaging and radiation therapy, are coded separately in medical fee system, and the health care statistics of 2003 shows that expenditure on the former was 5.2% of the whole medical cost and the latter 0.28%. Introduction of DPC, an abbreviation of Diagnostic Procedure Combination, was carried out in 2003, which was an essential reform of medical fee payment system that have been managed on fee-for-service base throughout, and 22% of beds for acute patients care are under the control of DPC payment in 2006. As medical imaging procedures are basically classified in inclusive payment in DPC system, their accurate statistics cannot be figured out because of the lack of description of individual procedures in DPC bills. Policy-making of medical economics will suffer a great loss from the deficiency of detailed data in published statistics. Important role in clinical diagnoses of CT and MR results an increase of fee paid for them up to more than half of total expenditure on medical imaging. So, dominant reduction of examination fee has been done for MR imaging, especially in 2002, to reduce the total cost of medical imaging. Follows could be featured as major topics of medical imaging in health insurance system, (a) fee is newly assigned for electronic handling of CT-and-MR images, and nuclear medicine, and (b) there is still a mismatch between actual payment and quality of medical facilities. As matters related to medical imaging, the followings should be stressed; (a) numbers of CT and MR units per population are dominantly high among OECD countries, but, those controlled by qualified radiologists are at the average level of those countries, (b) there is a big difference of MR examination quality among medical facilities, and (c) 76% of newly-installed high-end MR units are supplied by foreign industries. Hopefully, there will be an increase in the concern to medical fee payment system and health care cost because they possibly

  14. Medical alert bracelet (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ... People with diabetes should always wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace that emergency medical workers will ...

  15. Content standards for medical image metadata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Ornellas, Marcos C.; da Rocha, Rafael P.

    2003-12-01

    Medical images are at the heart of the healthcare diagnostic procedures. They have provided not only a noninvasive mean to view anatomical cross-sections of internal organs but also a mean for physicians to evaluate the patient"s diagnosis and monitor the effects of the treatment. For a Medical Center, the emphasis may shift from the generation of image to post processing and data management since the medical staff may generate even more processed images and other data from the original image after various analyses and post processing. A medical image data repository for health care information system is becoming a critical need. This data repository would contain comprehensive patient records, including information such as clinical data and related diagnostic images, and post-processed images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data as well as the diversified user access requirements, the implementation of the medical image archive system will be a complex and challenging task. This paper discusses content standards for medical image metadata. In addition it also focuses on the image metadata content evaluation and metadata quality management.

  16. Army Medical Imaging System - ARMIS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-08

    The Army Medical Imaging System (ARMIS) would use optical data cards, discs and small computers to perform the required functions of image...a filmless medical imaging system based on stimulable x-ray phosphors and optical data cards. Advantages of the system would be elimination of film

  17. Medical Office Laboratory Procedures: Course Proposal. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eleanor

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course, entitled "Medical Office Laboratory Procedures," which provides a laboratory introduction to microscopic and chemical analysis of blood and urine as performed in the physician's office. Following a standard cover form, a statement of the purpose of the course discusses course…

  18. ISS Medical Checklist Procedures Validation and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Tom; Goode, Julie

    1999-01-01

    The Health Maintenance System (HMS) hardware will be used to support a medical contingency for the International Space Station (ISS). During two test flights, the procedures for performing Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) were evaluated to determine the required level of detail, assess the logic of the steps and division of tasks among crew members.

  19. Medical Office Laboratory Procedures: Course Proposal. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eleanor

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course, entitled "Medical Office Laboratory Procedures," which provides a laboratory introduction to microscopic and chemical analysis of blood and urine as performed in the physician's office. Following a standard cover form, a statement of the purpose of the course discusses course…

  20. ISS Medical Checklist Procedures Validation and Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Tom; Goode, Julie

    1999-01-01

    The Health Maintenance System (HMS) hardware will be used to support a medical contingency for the International Space Station (ISS). During two test flights, the procedures for performing Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) were evaluated to determine the required level of detail, assess the logic of the steps and division of tasks among crew members.

  1. Medical image analysis with artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Trundle, P; Ren, J

    2010-12-01

    Given that neural networks have been widely reported in the research community of medical imaging, we provide a focused literature survey on recent neural network developments in computer-aided diagnosis, medical image segmentation and edge detection towards visual content analysis, and medical image registration for its pre-processing and post-processing, with the aims of increasing awareness of how neural networks can be applied to these areas and to provide a foundation for further research and practical development. Representative techniques and algorithms are explained in detail to provide inspiring examples illustrating: (i) how a known neural network with fixed structure and training procedure could be applied to resolve a medical imaging problem; (ii) how medical images could be analysed, processed, and characterised by neural networks; and (iii) how neural networks could be expanded further to resolve problems relevant to medical imaging. In the concluding section, a highlight of comparisons among many neural network applications is included to provide a global view on computational intelligence with neural networks in medical imaging. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Intelligent distributed medical image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Yun, David Y.

    1995-05-01

    The rapid advancements in high performance global communication have accelerated cooperative image-based medical services to a new frontier. Traditional image-based medical services such as radiology and diagnostic consultation can now fully utilize multimedia technologies in order to provide novel services, including remote cooperative medical triage, distributed virtual simulation of operations, as well as cross-country collaborative medical research and training. Fast (efficient) and easy (flexible) retrieval of relevant images remains a critical requirement for the provision of remote medical services. This paper describes the database system requirements, identifies technological building blocks for meeting the requirements, and presents a system architecture for our target image database system, MISSION-DBS, which has been designed to fulfill the goals of Project MISSION (medical imaging support via satellite integrated optical network) -- an experimental high performance gigabit satellite communication network with access to remote supercomputing power, medical image databases, and 3D visualization capabilities in addition to medical expertise anywhere and anytime around the country. The MISSION-DBS design employs a synergistic fusion of techniques in distributed databases (DDB) and artificial intelligence (AI) for storing, migrating, accessing, and exploring images. The efficient storage and retrieval of voluminous image information is achieved by integrating DDB modeling and AI techniques for image processing while the flexible retrieval mechanisms are accomplished by combining attribute- based and content-based retrievals.

  3. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  4. Medical imaging 4

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, M.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: human visual pattern recognition, fractals, rules, and segments, three-dimensional image processing, MRI, MRI and mammography, clinical applications 1, angiography, image processing systems, image processing poster session.

  5. Medical evaluation for outpatient dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Webb, B W

    1978-05-01

    Family physicians are often consulted to evaluate medically a patient for various dental procedures. The majority of the referrals are for diseases of the cardiovascular system. General guidelines have been established at the University of Maryland Family Health Center for the evaluation of these patients. These guidelines pertain to the use of local anesthetics and prophylaxis for endocarditis, as well as to the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease, hypertension, pulmonary disease, endocrine disease, neurological disease, hepatic disease, pregnancy, and anticoagulant therapy.

  6. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V.

    2016-05-03

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  7. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  8. Cancer Risks Associated with External Radiation From Diagnostic Imaging Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Linet, Martha S.; Slovis, Thomas L.; Miller, Donald L.; Kleinerman, Ruth; Lee, Choonsik; Rajaraman, Preetha; de Gonzalez, Amy Berrington

    2012-01-01

    The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures, oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives, development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians, and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures. PMID:22307864

  9. Cancer risks associated with external radiation from diagnostic imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Linet, Martha S; Slovis, Thomas L; Miller, Donald L; Kleinerman, Ruth; Lee, Choonsik; Rajaraman, Preetha; Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The 600% increase in medical radiation exposure to the US population since 1980 has provided immense benefit, but increased potential future cancer risks to patients. Most of the increase is from diagnostic radiologic procedures. The objectives of this review are to summarize epidemiologic data on cancer risks associated with diagnostic procedures, describe how exposures from recent diagnostic procedures relate to radiation levels linked with cancer occurrence, and propose a framework of strategies to reduce radiation from diagnostic imaging in patients. We briefly review radiation dose definitions, mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis, key epidemiologic studies of medical and other radiation sources and cancer risks, and dose trends from diagnostic procedures. We describe cancer risks from experimental studies, future projected risks from current imaging procedures, and the potential for higher risks in genetically susceptible populations. To reduce future projected cancers from diagnostic procedures, we advocate the widespread use of evidence-based appropriateness criteria for decisions about imaging procedures; oversight of equipment to deliver reliably the minimum radiation required to attain clinical objectives; development of electronic lifetime records of imaging procedures for patients and their physicians; and commitment by medical training programs, professional societies, and radiation protection organizations to educate all stakeholders in reducing radiation from diagnostic procedures.

  10. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images. PMID:20177565

  11. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  12. Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application.

  13. Medical hyperspectral imaging: a review

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guolan; Fei, Baowei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications, especially in disease diagnosis and image-guided surgery. HSI acquires a three-dimensional dataset called hypercube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Spatially resolved spectral imaging obtained by HSI provides diagnostic information about the tissue physiology, morphology, and composition. This review paper presents an overview of the literature on medical hyperspectral imaging technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application. PMID:24441941

  14. Automated medical image segmentation techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Lalit M

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT) and Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  15. Medical image segmentation using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Maulik, Ujjwal

    2009-03-01

    Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been found to be effective in the domain of medical image segmentation, since the problem can often be mapped to one of search in a complex and multimodal landscape. The challenges in medical image segmentation arise due to poor image contrast and artifacts that result in missing or diffuse organ/tissue boundaries. The resulting search space is therefore often noisy with a multitude of local optima. Not only does the genetic algorithmic framework prove to be effective in coming out of local optima, it also brings considerable flexibility into the segmentation procedure. In this paper, an attempt has been made to review the major applications of GAs to the domain of medical image segmentation.

  16. Images for medical diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Ebrecht, D

    1978-01-01

    Dr. Dietrich Meyer-Ebrecht provides a broad and helpful overview of the many techniques and latest trends in diagnostic imaging. Latest sensing technology is reviewed including: X-ray systems, ultrasound, thermography, radionuclide imaging, endoscopy, and optical methods. Approximate system cost ranges are indicated. This paper examines the technological trends in: sensors, imagers, hardcopy production, computer enhancement, storage, and communication of images. Dr. Meyer-Ebrecht describes three generations of computed tomographic scanners and alternative approaches to three-dimensional imaging. Image storage is presented as a major limitation of present technology. A view of future systems approaches envisions "picture bases" that will complement present data bases of hospital information systems. Integration of latest technology into diagnostic picture information systems will lead to advanced systems.

  17. 11 CFR 1.6 - Special procedure: Medical records. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedure: Medical records. 1.6 Section 1.6 Federal Elections FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION PRIVACY ACT § 1.6 Special procedure: Medical records....

  18. Machine Learning for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Bradley J.; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Akkus, Zeynettin; Kline, Timothy L.

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a technique for recognizing patterns that can be applied to medical images. Although it is a powerful tool that can help in rendering medical diagnoses, it can be misapplied. Machine learning typically begins with the machine learning algorithm system computing the image features that are believed to be of importance in making the prediction or diagnosis of interest. The machine learning algorithm system then identifies the best combination of these image features for classifying the image or computing some metric for the given image region. There are several methods that can be used, each with different strengths and weaknesses. There are open-source versions of most of these machine learning methods that make them easy to try and apply to images. Several metrics for measuring the performance of an algorithm exist; however, one must be aware of the possible associated pitfalls that can result in misleading metrics. More recently, deep learning has started to be used; this method has the benefit that it does not require image feature identification and calculation as a first step; rather, features are identified as part of the learning process. Machine learning has been used in medical imaging and will have a greater influence in the future. Those working in medical imaging must be aware of how machine learning works. PMID:28212054

  19. Machine Learning for Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Bradley J; Korfiatis, Panagiotis; Akkus, Zeynettin; Kline, Timothy L

    2017-01-01

    Machine learning is a technique for recognizing patterns that can be applied to medical images. Although it is a powerful tool that can help in rendering medical diagnoses, it can be misapplied. Machine learning typically begins with the machine learning algorithm system computing the image features that are believed to be of importance in making the prediction or diagnosis of interest. The machine learning algorithm system then identifies the best combination of these image features for classifying the image or computing some metric for the given image region. There are several methods that can be used, each with different strengths and weaknesses. There are open-source versions of most of these machine learning methods that make them easy to try and apply to images. Several metrics for measuring the performance of an algorithm exist; however, one must be aware of the possible associated pitfalls that can result in misleading metrics. More recently, deep learning has started to be used; this method has the benefit that it does not require image feature identification and calculation as a first step; rather, features are identified as part of the learning process. Machine learning has been used in medical imaging and will have a greater influence in the future. Those working in medical imaging must be aware of how machine learning works. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  20. Compressive sensing in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Christian G.; Sidky, Emil Y.

    2015-01-01

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed. PMID:25968400

  1. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  2. Medical imaging: the radiation issue.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J

    2009-06-01

    The collective doses of ionizing radiation to Western populations have risen dramatically in the past three decades. Preliminary data on changes in radiation dose to the US population indicate that this increase has been driven largely by medical imaging, to which cardiovascular imaging modalities-such as nuclear stress testing, invasive coronary angiography, and cardiovascular CT-contribute greatly. Given the putative association between low-dose radiation exposure and cancer risk, which most experts agree is supported by the available evidence, the 'radiation issue' in medical imaging has garnered increasing interest. This opinion piece focuses on changes in the use of and doses from medical imaging, the relationship between radiation dose and cancer risk and the controversy surrounding this subject, and clinical implications of radiation exposure from imaging tests.

  3. Improving Performance During Image-Guided Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, James R.; Tabriz, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective Image-guided procedures have become a mainstay of modern health care. This article reviews how human operators process imaging data and use it to plan procedures and make intraprocedural decisions. Methods A series of models from human factors research, communication theory, and organizational learning were applied to the human-machine interface that occupies the center stage during image-guided procedures. Results Together, these models suggest several opportunities for improving performance as follows: 1. Performance will depend not only on the operator’s skill but also on the knowledge embedded in the imaging technology, available tools, and existing protocols. 2. Voluntary movements consist of planning and execution phases. Performance subscores should be developed that assess quality and efficiency during each phase. For procedures involving ionizing radiation (fluoroscopy and computed tomography), radiation metrics can be used to assess performance. 3. At a basic level, these procedures consist of advancing a tool to a specific location within a patient and using the tool. Paradigms from mapping and navigation should be applied to image-guided procedures. 4. Recording the content of the imaging system allows one to reconstruct the stimulus/response cycles that occur during image-guided procedures. Conclusions When compared with traditional “open” procedures, the technology used during image-guided procedures places an imaging system and long thin tools between the operator and the patient. Taking a step back and reexamining how information flows through an imaging system and how actions are conveyed through human-machine interfaces suggest that much can be learned from studying system failures. In the same way that flight data recorders revolutionized accident investigations in aviation, much could be learned from recording video data during image-guided procedures. PMID:24921628

  4. Advanced ultrasound probes for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildes, Douglas G.; Smith, L. Scott

    2012-05-01

    New medical ultrasound probe architectures and materials build upon established 1D phased array technology and provide improved imaging performance and clinical value. Technologies reviewed include 1.25D and 1.5D arrays for elevation slice thickness control; electro-mechanical and 2D array probes for real-time 3D imaging; catheter probes for imaging during minimally-invasive procedures; single-crystal piezoelectric materials for greater frequency bandwidth; and cMUT arrays using silicon MEMS in place of piezo materials.

  5. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 310.6... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... transmission of the medical information directly to the requesting individual could have an adverse effect...

  6. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 310.6... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... transmission of the medical information directly to the requesting individual could have an adverse effect upon...

  7. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an individual's...

  8. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an individual's...

  9. 12 CFR 310.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 310.6 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records shall be disclosed on... information to a medical doctor named by the requesting individual for release of the patient. ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records....

  10. 37 CFR 102.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical... Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records by an... routine use, for all systems of records containing medical records, consultations with an individual's...

  11. Medical imaging V

    SciTech Connect

    Loew, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: preprocessing and enhancement 1-3; segmentation, feature extraction, and detection 1-2; hardware and software systems for display; and user interface; MRI; MRI and PET; 3-D; image reconstruction, modeling, description, and coding; and knowledge-based methods.

  12. Medical Imaging Informatics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, William; El-Saden, Suzie; Taira, Ricky K

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important sources of clinically observable evidence that provides broad coverage, can provide insight on low-level scale properties, is noninvasive, has few side effects, and can be performed frequently. Thus, imaging data provides a viable observable that can facilitate the instantiation of a theoretical understanding of a disease for a particular patient context by connecting imaging findings to other biologic parameters in the model (e.g., genetic, molecular, symptoms, and patient survival). These connections can help inform their possible states and/or provide further coherent evidence. The field of radiomics is particularly dedicated to this task and seeks to extract quantifiable measures wherever possible. Example properties of investigation include genotype characterization, histopathology parameters, metabolite concentrations, vascular proliferation, necrosis, cellularity, and oxygenation. Important issues within the field include: signal calibration, spatial calibration, preprocessing methods (e.g., noise suppression, motion correction, and field bias correction), segmentation of target anatomic/pathologic entities, extraction of computed features, and inferencing methods connecting imaging features to biological states.

  13. Medical gamma ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Osborne, Louis S.; Lanza, Richard C.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the distribution of a position-emitting radioisotope into an object, the apparatus consisting of a wire mesh radiation converter, an ionizable gas for propagating ionization events caused by electrodes released by the converter, a drift field, a spatial position detector and signal processing circuitry for correlating near-simultaneous ionization events and determining their time differences, whereby the position sources of back-to-back collinear radiation can be located and a distribution image constructed.

  14. Stereoscopic medical imaging collaboration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Fumio; Hirano, Takenori; Nakabayasi, Yuusuke; Minoura, Hirohito; Tsuruoka, Shinji

    2007-02-01

    The computerization of the clinical record and the realization of the multimedia have brought improvement of the medical service in medical facilities. It is very important for the patients to obtain comprehensible informed consent. Therefore, the doctor should plainly explain the purpose and the content of the diagnoses and treatments for the patient. We propose and design a Telemedicine Imaging Collaboration System which presents a three dimensional medical image as X-ray CT, MRI with stereoscopic image by using virtual common information space and operating the image from a remote location. This system is composed of two personal computers, two 15 inches stereoscopic parallax barrier type LCD display (LL-151D, Sharp), one 1Gbps router and 1000base LAN cables. The software is composed of a DICOM format data transfer program, an operation program of the images, the communication program between two personal computers and a real time rendering program. Two identical images of 512×768 pixcels are displayed on two stereoscopic LCD display, and both images show an expansion, reduction by mouse operation. This system can offer a comprehensible three-dimensional image of the diseased part. Therefore, the doctor and the patient can easily understand it, depending on their needs.

  15. Nazi Medical Research in Neuroscience: Medical Procedures, Victims, and Perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Loewenau, Aleksandra; Weindling, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Issues relating to the euthanasia killings of the mentally ill, the medical research conducted on collected body parts, and the clinical investigations on living victims under National Socialism are among the best-known abuses in medical history. But to date, there have been no statistics compiled regarding the extent and number of the victims and perpetrators, or regarding their identities in terms of age, nationality, and gender. "Victims of Unethical Human Experiments and Coerced Research under National Socialism," a research project based at Oxford Brookes University, has established an evidence-based documentation of the overall numbers of victims and perpetrators through specific record linkages of the evidence from the period of National Socialism, as well as from post-WWII trials and other records. This article examines the level and extent of these unethical medical procedures as they relate to the field of neuroscience. It presents statistical information regarding the victims, as well as detailing the involvement of the perpetrators and Nazi physicians with respect to their post-war activities and subsequent court trials.

  16. Body Image and Body Contouring Procedures.

    PubMed

    Sarwer, David B; Polonsky, Heather M

    2016-10-01

    Dissatisfaction with physical appearance and body image is a common psychological phenomena in Western society. Body image dissatisfaction is frequently reported by those who have excess body weight, but also is seen in those of normal body weight. For both groups of individuals, this dissatisfaction impacts self-esteem and quality of life. Furthermore, it is believed to be the motivational catalyst to a range of appearance-enhancing behaviors, including weight loss efforts and physical activity. Body image dissatisfaction is also believed to play a role in the decision to seek the wide range of body contouring procedures offered by aesthetic physicians. Individuals who seek these procedures typically report increased body image dissatisfaction, focus on the feature they wish to alter with treatment, and often experience improvement in body image following treatment. At the same time, extreme body image dissatisfaction is a symptom of a number of recognized psychiatric disorders. These include anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), all of which can contraindicate aesthetic treatment. This special topic review paper provides an overview of the relationship between body image dissatisfaction and aesthetic procedures designed to improve body contouring. The review specifically focuses on the relationship of body image and body weight, as well as the presentation of body image psychopathology that would contraindicate aesthetic surgery. The overall goal of the paper is to highlight the clinical implications of the existing research and provide suggestions for future research on the psychological aspects of body contouring procedures.

  17. MR imaging guidance for minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Terence Z.; Kettenbach, Joachim; Silverman, Stuart G.; Schwartz, Richard B.; Morrison, Paul R.; Kacher, Daniel F.; Jolesz, Ferenc A.

    1998-04-01

    Image guidance is one of the major challenges common to all minimally invasive procedures including biopsy, thermal ablation, endoscopy, and laparoscopy. This is essential for (1) identifying the target lesion, (2) planning the minimally invasive approach, and (3) monitoring the therapy as it progresses. MRI is an ideal imaging modality for this purpose, providing high soft tissue contrast and multiplanar imaging, capability with no ionizing radiation. An interventional/surgical MRI suite has been developed at Brigham and Women's Hospital which provides multiplanar imaging guidance during surgery, biopsy, and thermal ablation procedures. The 0.5T MRI system (General Electric Signa SP) features open vertical access, allowing intraoperative imaging to be performed. An integrated navigational system permits near real-time control of imaging planes, and provides interactive guidance for positioning various diagnostic and therapeutic probes. MR imaging can also be used to monitor cryotherapy as well as high temperature thermal ablation procedures sing RF, laser, microwave, or focused ultrasound. Design features of the interventional MRI system will be discussed, and techniques will be described for interactive image acquisition and tracking of interventional instruments. Applications for interactive and near-real-time imaging will be presented as well as examples of specific procedures performed using MRI guidance.

  18. 5 CFR 2504.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records... PRESIDENT PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 2504.6 Special procedures for medical records. (a) When the Privacy Act Officer receives a request from an individual for access to those official medical records which belong...

  19. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it...

  20. 12 CFR 1403.6 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 1403.6 Section 1403.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 1403.6 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the Farm Credit System...

  1. 12 CFR 603.325 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 603.325 Section 603.325 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 603.325 Special procedures for medical records. Medical records in the custody of the...

  2. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7... Requests by Individual to Whom Record Pertains § 261a.7 Special procedures for medical records. Medical or psychological records requested pursuant to § 261a.5 of this part shall be disclosed directly to the...

  3. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection...

  4. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure...

  5. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which...

  6. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of medical...

  7. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in the...

  8. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would be...

  9. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of medical...

  10. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it determines...

  11. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in the...

  12. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this part, will be disclosed to the requester...

  13. 7 CFR 1.115 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1.115 Section 1... Regulations § 1.115 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event an agency receives a request pursuant to § 1.112 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure it determines...

  14. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure of...

  15. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which...

  16. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in the...

  17. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would be...

  18. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure of...

  19. 15 CFR 4.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 4... GOVERNMENT INFORMATION Privacy Act § 4.26 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) No response to any request for access to medical records from an individual will be issued by the Privacy Officer for a period of...

  20. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7... (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures: Medical records. Medical records, requested pursuant to § 319.5 of this part, will be disclosed to the requester...

  1. 5 CFR 2412.7 - Special procedures; medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special procedures; medical records. 2412.7 Section 2412.7 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE... Special procedures; medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which, in the...

  2. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27... APPLICATION Safeguarding Individual Privacy Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a § 201.27 Special procedures: Medical... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  3. 29 CFR 1611.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1611.6 Section 1611.6... REGULATIONS § 1611.6 Special procedures: Medical records. In the event the Commission receives a request pursuant to § 1611.3 for access to medical records (including psychological records) whose disclosure of...

  4. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 201.27... APPLICATION Safeguarding Individual Privacy Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a § 201.27 Special procedures: Medical... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special...

  5. 40 CFR 16.8 - Special procedures: Medical Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical Records. 16... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 16.8 Special procedures: Medical Records. Should EPA receive a request for access to medical records (including psychological records) disclosure of which the system manager decides would be...

  6. 22 CFR 215.6 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 215.6... PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 215.6 Special procedures: Medical records. If the Assistant Director for Administration or the Privacy Liaison Officer, determines that the release directly to the individual of medical...

  7. 29 CFR 1410.5 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 1410.5 Section 1410.5 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE PRIVACY § 1410.5 Special procedures: Medical records. (a) If medical records are requested for inspection which...

  8. CMAS: a rich media annotation system for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, I.-Jong; Chao, Hui

    2006-03-01

    We have developed the CMAS system (Collaborative Medical Annotation System) so that medical professionals will be able to easily annotate digital medical records that contain medical imaging or procedure videos. The CMAS system enables a non-technical person to annotate a medical image or video with their recorded presence. The CMAS system displays medical images via a projector onto a screen; when a doctor (or patient) physically walks in front of this screen with the medical image and gives his/her opinion while gesturing at the image, the CMAS system intuitively captures this interaction by creating a video annotation with HP's Active Shadows technology. The CMAS system automatically transforms physical interactions, ranging from a laser pointer spot to a doctor's physical presence, into video annotation that then can be overlaid on top of the medical image or seamlessly inserted into the procedure video. Annotated in such a manner, the medical record retains the historical development of the diagnostic medical opinion, explained through presence of doctors and their respective annotations. The CMAS system structures the annotation of digital medical records such that image/video annotations from multiple sources, at different times, and from different locations can be maintained within a historical context and be consistently referenced among multiple annotations.

  9. MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN MEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    ANGENENT, SIGURD; PICHON, ERIC; TANNENBAUM, ALLEN

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some central mathematical problems in medical imaging. The subject has been undergoing rapid changes driven by better hardware and software. Much of the software is based on novel methods utilizing geometric partial differential equations in conjunction with standard signal/image processing techniques as well as computer graphics facilitating man/machine interactions. As part of this enterprise, researchers have been trying to base biomedical engineering principles on rigorous mathematical foundations for the development of software methods to be integrated into complete therapy delivery systems. These systems support the more effective delivery of many image-guided procedures such as radiation therapy, biopsy, and minimally invasive surgery. We will show how mathematics may impact some of the main problems in this area, including image enhancement, registration, and segmentation. PMID:23645963

  10. An overview of nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Peter; Lawson, Richard

    2015-11-25

    Nuclear medicine imaging is not generally well understood by nurses who work outside this area. Consequently, nurses can find themselves unable to answer patients' questions about nuclear medicine imaging procedures or give them proper information before they attend for a test. This article aims to explain what is involved in some common diagnostic nuclear medicine imaging procedures so that nurses are able to discuss this with patients. It also addresses some common issues about radiation protection that nurses might encounter in their usual working routine. The article includes links to videos showing some typical nuclear medicine imaging procedures from a patient's point of view and links to an e-Learning for Healthcare online resource that provides detailed information for nurses.

  11. Medical physics personnel for medical imaging: requirements, conditions of involvement and staffing levels-French recommendations.

    PubMed

    Isambert, Aurélie; Le Du, Dominique; Valéro, Marc; Guilhem, Marie-Thérèse; Rousse, Carole; Dieudonné, Arnaud; Blanchard, Vincent; Pierrat, Noëlle; Salvat, Cécile

    2015-04-01

    The French regulations concerning the involvement of medical physicists in medical imaging procedures are relatively vague. In May 2013, the ASN and the SFPM issued recommendations regarding Medical Physics Personnel for Medical Imaging: Requirements, Conditions of Involvement and Staffing Levels. In these recommendations, the various areas of activity of medical physicists in radiology and nuclear medicine have been identified and described, and the time required to perform each task has been evaluated. Criteria for defining medical physics staffing levels are thus proposed. These criteria are defined according to the technical platform, the procedures and techniques practised on it, the number of patients treated and the number of persons in the medical and paramedical teams requiring periodic training. The result of this work is an aid available to each medical establishment to determine their own needs in terms of medical physics.

  12. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a medical...

  13. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a medical...

  14. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a medical...

  15. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: Medical records. 701.306 Section 701.306 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Protection of Privacy § 701.306 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) An individual requesting disclosure of a record which contains medical or psychological information may name a medical...

  16. Contextual medical-image viewer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Ramon A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2004-04-01

    One of the greatest difficulties of dealing with medical images is their distinct characteristics, in terms of generation process and noise that requires different forms of treatment for visualization and processing. Besides that, medical images are only a compounding part of the patient"s history, which should be accessible for the user in an understandable way. Other factors that can be used to enhance the user capability and experience are: the computational power of the client machine; available knowledge about the case; if the access is local or remote and what kind of user is accessing the system (physician, nurse, administrator, etc...). These information compose the context of an application and should define its behavior during execution time. In this article, we present the architecture of a viewer that takes into account the contextual information that is present at the moment of execution. We also present a viewer of X-Ray Angiographic images that uses contextual information about the client's hardware and the kind of user to, if necessary, reduce the image size and hide demographic information of the patient. The proposed architecture is extensible, allowing the inclusion of new tools and viewers, being adaptive along time to the evolution of the medical systems.

  17. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Bacteriology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents laboratory procedures for the differentiation and identification of disease agents from clinical materials. Included are procedures for the collection of specimens, preparation of culture media, pure culture methods, cultivation of the microorganisms in natural and simulated natural environments, and procedures in…

  18. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Bacteriology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents laboratory procedures for the differentiation and identification of disease agents from clinical materials. Included are procedures for the collection of specimens, preparation of culture media, pure culture methods, cultivation of the microorganisms in natural and simulated natural environments, and procedures in…

  19. Image Processing in Medical Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Kendall

    1986-01-01

    Full automation in medical microscopy has been accomplished in the field of clinical determination of the white blood cell differential count. Manufacture of differential counting microscopes commenced in 1974, and approximately 1,000 of these robots are now in the field. They analyze images of human white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets at the global rate of approximately 100,000 slides per day. This incredible throughout represents automated image analysis and pattern recognition at the rate of 5 billion images per year and represents a major accomplishments in the application of machine vision in medicine. In other areas, such as cytology and cytogenetics, automated computer vision is still in the research phase. This paper discusses the state of the art in blood smear analysis automation and in other related areas including multi-resolution microscopy where images are currently being generated over a 64:1 magnification containing from one-quarter megapixel to one gigapixel in full color.

  20. Polyimide MEMS actuators for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zara, Jason M.; Mills, Patrick; Patterson, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of several years of research in the use of polyimide MEMS actuators for medical imaging applications, including high frequency ultrasound and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These scanning devices are microfabricated out of polyimide substrates using conventional integrated circuit technology. The material properties of the polyimide allow very large scan angles to be realized and also allow the resonant frequencies of the structures to be in the appropriate ranges for real-time imaging. The primary application of these probes is endoscopic and catheter-based imaging procedures. The microfabrication enables the creation of very small devices essential for compact imaging probes. In addition, they can be fabricated in bulk, reducing their cost and potentially making them disposable to reduce the cost of patient care and minimize the potential for patient cross-contamination. Several different scanning geometries and actuators have been investigated for imaging applications, including both forward-viewing and side-scanning configurations. Probes that utilize both electrostatic polyimide actuators and piezoelectric bimorphs to mechanically scan the ultrasound or OCT imaging beams will be presented. These probes have been developed for both use in both ultrasound and OCT imaging systems. Medical applications of these probes include the early detection of cancerous and precancerous conditions in the bladder and other mucosal tissues. These imaging probes will allow the physician to visualize the subsurface microstructure of the tissues and detect abnormalities not visible through the use of conventional endoscopic imaging techniques. Prototype devices have been used to image geometric wire phantoms, in vitro porcine tissue, and in vivo subjects. The progress made over the last several years in the development of these polyimide scanning probes will be presented.

  1. Medical imaging, PACS, and imaging informatics: retrospective.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K

    2014-01-01

    Historical reviews of PACS (picture archiving and communication system) and imaging informatics development from different points of view have been published in the past (Huang in Euro J Radiol 78:163-176, 2011; Lemke in Euro J Radiol 78:177-183, 2011; Inamura and Jong in Euro J Radiol 78:184-189, 2011). This retrospective attempts to look at the topic from a different angle by identifying certain basic medical imaging inventions in the 1960s and 1970s which had conceptually defined basic components of PACS guiding its course of development in the 1980s and 1990s, as well as subsequent imaging informatics research in the 2000s. In medical imaging, the emphasis was on the innovations at Georgetown University in Washington, DC, in the 1960s and 1970s. During the 1980s and 1990s, research and training support from US government agencies and public and private medical imaging manufacturers became available for training of young talents in biomedical physics and for developing the key components required for PACS development. In the 2000s, computer hardware and software as well as communication networks advanced by leaps and bounds, opening the door for medical imaging informatics to flourish. Because many key components required for the PACS operation were developed by the UCLA PACS Team and its collaborative partners in the 1980s, this presentation is centered on that aspect. During this period, substantial collaborative research efforts by many individual teams in the US and in Japan were highlighted. Credits are due particularly to the Pattern Recognition Laboratory at Georgetown University, and the computed radiography (CR) development at the Fuji Electric Corp. in collaboration with Stanford University in the 1970s; the Image Processing Laboratory at UCLA in the 1980s-1990s; as well as the early PACS development at the Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, in the late 1970s, and film scanner and digital radiography developed by Konishiroku Photo Ind. Co. Ltd

  2. Facial reanimation procedures depicted on radiologic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ginat, D T; Bhama, P; Cunnane, M E; Hadlock, T A

    2014-09-01

    Various facial reanimation procedures can be performed for treating patients with chronic facial nerve paralysis. The radiologic imaging features of static and dynamic techniques are reviewed in this article with clinical correlation, including brow lift, eyelid weights and springs, gracilis free flaps, fascia lata grafts, temporalis flaps, and Gore-Tex suspension slings. Although the anatomic alterations resulting from facial reanimation surgery may not necessarily be the focus of the imaging examination, it is important to recognize such changes and be familiar with MR imaging compatibility of the associated implanted materials. Furthermore, imaging is sometimes used to specifically evaluate the postoperative results, such as vessel patency following free gracilis transfer.

  3. Medical confidentiality and patient safety: reporting procedures.

    PubMed

    Abbing, Henriette Roscam

    2014-06-01

    Medical confidentiality is of individual and of general interest. Medical confidentiality is not absolute. European countries differ in their legislative approaches of consent for data-sharing and lawful breaches of medical confidentiality. An increase of interference by the legislator with medical confidentiality is noticeable. In The Netherlands for instance this takes the form of new mandatory duties to report resp. of legislation providing for a release of medical confidentiality in specific situations, often under the condition that reporting takes place on the basis of a professional code that includes elements imposed by the legislator (e.g. (suspicion of) child abuse, domestic violence). Legislative interference must not result in the patient loosing trust in healthcare. To avoid erosion of medical confidentiality, (comparative) effectiveness studies and privacy impact assessments are necessary (European and national level). Medical confidentiality should be a subject of permanent education of health personnel.

  4. [Realization of DICOM medical image compression technology].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenxi; Wang, Quan; Ren, Haiping

    2013-05-01

    This paper introduces the implement method of DICOM medical image compression technology, The image part of DICOM files are extracted and converted to BMP format. The non-image information in DICOM file are stored into the text. When the final image of JPEG standard and non-image information are encapsulated to DICOM format images, it realizes the compression of medical image, which is beneficial to the image storage and transmission.

  5. The value of diagnostic medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Don; Bradley, Kendall E

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic medical imaging has clear clinical utility, but it also imposes significant costs on the health care system. This commentary reviews the factors that drive the cost of medical imaging, discusses current interventions, and suggests possible future courses of action.

  6. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Special procedures-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of...

  7. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Special procedures-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of...

  8. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special procedures-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of...

  9. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Special procedures-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of...

  10. Gallium-68 in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Martiniova, Lucia; Palatis, Louis De; Etchebehere, Elba; Ravizzini, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several years, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging agents labeled with ;68Gallium (68Ga) have undergone a significant increase in clinical utilization. 68Ga is conveniently produced from a germanium-68/gallium-68 (68Ge/68Ga) generator. Because of the compact size and ease of use of the generator, 68Ga labeled compounds may be more cost-effective than PET radioisotopes that are cyclotron-produced. The convenient half-life of 68Ga (T1/2=68 min) provides sufficient radioactivity for various PET imaging applications, while delivering acceptable radiation doses to patients. This chapter summarizes the emerging clinical utilization of 68Ga-based radiotracers in medical imaging. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Information Processing in Medical Imaging Meeting (IPMI)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-30

    Information Processing in Medical Imaging - Meeting (IPMI) F49620-93-1-0352 6. AUTHOR(S) Professor Harrison H. Barrett 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...distribution unlimited. Final Report of 1993 Information Processing in Medical Imaging Meeting The 1993 Information Processing in Medical Imaging (IPMI...that the extracted information is correct? Although the emphasis of the meeting was clearly on medical imaging , the techniques and issues discussed

  12. Archimedes, an Archive of Medical Images

    PubMed Central

    Tahmoush, Dave; Samet, Hanan

    2006-01-01

    We present a medical image and medical record database for the storage, research, transmission, and evaluation of medical images. Medical images from any source that supports the DICOM standard can be stored and accessed, as well as associated analysis and annotations. Retrieval is based on patient info, date, doctor’s annotations, features in the images, or a spatial combination. This database supports the secure transmission of sensitive data for tele-medicine and follows all HIPPA regulations. PMID:17238733

  13. Archimedes, an archive of medical images.

    PubMed

    Tahmoush, Dave; Samet, Hanan

    2006-01-01

    We present a medical image and medical record database for the storage, research, transmission, and evaluation of medical images. Medical images from any source that supports the DICOM standard can be stored and accessed, as well as associated analysis and annotations. Retrieval is based on patient info, date, doctor's annotations, features in the images, or a spatial combination. This database supports the secure transmission of sensitive data for tele-medicine and follows all HIPPA regulations.

  14. 18 CFR 1301.16 - Special procedures-medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-medical records. 1301.16 Section 1301.16 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES Privacy Act § 1301.16 Special procedures—medical records. If, in the judgment of TVA, the transmission of medical records, including psychological records, directly to a requesting...

  15. X-ray detectors in medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Healthcare systems are subject to continuous adaptation, following trends such as the change of demographic structures, the rise of life-style related and chronic diseases, and the need for efficient and outcome-oriented procedures. This also influences the design of new imaging systems as well as their components. The applications of X-ray imaging in the medical field are manifold and have led to dedicated modalities supporting specific imaging requirements, for example in computed tomography (CT), radiography, angiography, surgery or mammography, delivering projection or volumetric imaging data. Depending on the clinical needs, some X-ray systems enable diagnostic imaging while others support interventional procedures. X-ray detector design requirements for the different medical applications can vary strongly with respect to size and shape, spatial resolution, frame rates and X-ray flux, among others. Today, integrating X-ray detectors are in common use. They are predominantly based on scintillators (e.g. CsI or Gd2O2S) and arrays of photodiodes made from crystalline silicon (Si) or amorphous silicon (a-Si) or they employ semiconductors (e.g. Se) with active a-Si readout matrices. Ongoing and future developments of X-ray detectors will include optimization of current state-of-the-art integrating detectors in terms of performance and cost, will enable the usage of large size CMOS-based detectors, and may facilitate photon counting techniques with the potential to further enhance performance characteristics and foster the prospect of new clinical applications.

  16. Processing of medical images using Maple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toro Betancur, V.

    2013-05-01

    Maple's Image Tools package was used to process medical images. The results showed clearer images and records of its intensities and entropy. The medical images of a rhinocerebral mucormycosis patient, who was not early diagnosed, were processed and analyzed using Maple's tools, which showed, in a clearer way, the affected parts in the perinasal cavities.

  17. Enzyme immunoassays and related procedures in diagnostic medical virology

    PubMed Central

    Kurstak, Edouard; Tijssen, Peter; Kurstak, Christine; Morisset, Richard

    1986-01-01

    This review article describes several applications of the widely used enzyme immunoassay (EIA) procedure. EIA methods have been adapted to solve problems in diagnostic virology where sensitivity, specificity, or practicability is required. Concurrent developments in hybridoma and conjugation methods have increased significantly the use of these assays. A general overview of EIA methods is given together with typical examples of their use in diagnostic medical virology; attention is drawn to possible pitfalls. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology have made it possible to produce highly specific nucleic acid probes that have a sensitivity approximately 100 times greater than that of EIA. Some applications of these probes are described. Although the non-labelled nucleic acid probes for use in the field are not as refined as non-labelled immunoassays, their range of applications is expected to expand rapidly in the near future. ImagesFig. 4 PMID:3533302

  18. Guide to conservative, medical, and procedural therapies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R I; Chopra, P; Upshur, C

    2001-11-01

    For patients without a specific diagnosis, treatment of low back pain begins with strategies to avoid re-injury and exacerbation. Most patients benefit from some form of medical therapy, guided by the three-step World Health Organization analgesic ladder. Opioid therapy is appropriate when needed for low back pain, especially in the acute period. Adjuvant medication (eg, an anticonvulsant or antidepressant) may help reduce or eliminate the need for opioid therapy. Side effects are common with opioid medications, although many resolve with time. Patient education in exercise, back protection, nutrition, and sexual concerns is an important component of treatment. Some patients may benefit from referral to a pain center for multidisciplinary management. Those with a structural or mechanical cause of pain may do well with surgery.

  19. Application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to Medical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    to mammography and other areas of medical imaging . Prof. Chapman is a co-developer of the technique and intends to determine the applicability of... medical imaging . This award has allowed Prof. Chapman to: 1) explore the potential application of Diffraction Enhanced Imaging to mammography, 2...cancer research, and medical imaging , 4) explore the possibility of developing a dedicated imaging program at the Advanced Photon Source, with the

  20. Medical Image Retrieval: A Multimodal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yu; Steffey, Shawn; He, Jianbiao; Xiao, Degui; Tao, Cui; Chen, Ping; Müller, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is becoming a vital component of war on cancer. Tremendous amounts of medical image data are captured and recorded in a digital format during cancer care and cancer research. Facing such an unprecedented volume of image data with heterogeneous image modalities, it is necessary to develop effective and efficient content-based medical image retrieval systems for cancer clinical practice and research. While substantial progress has been made in different areas of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) research, direct applications of existing CBIR techniques to the medical images produced unsatisfactory results, because of the unique characteristics of medical images. In this paper, we develop a new multimodal medical image retrieval approach based on the recent advances in the statistical graphic model and deep learning. Specifically, we first investigate a new extended probabilistic Latent Semantic Analysis model to integrate the visual and textual information from medical images to bridge the semantic gap. We then develop a new deep Boltzmann machine-based multimodal learning model to learn the joint density model from multimodal information in order to derive the missing modality. Experimental results with large volume of real-world medical images have shown that our new approach is a promising solution for the next-generation medical imaging indexing and retrieval system. PMID:26309389

  1. [Autopsy-a procedure of medical history?].

    PubMed

    Petros, K; Wittekind, C

    2014-03-01

    An autopsy is an important tool of quality assurance in clinical medicine. It serves to determine the exact cause of death, unravel unexpected complications of disease processes including adverse or any other effects of treatment as well as to validate the official mortality statistics. An autopsy also makes an important contribution to training medical students and physicians; however, the rate of clinical autopsies has been declining drastically for decades, the causes being manifold. Lack of interest among clinicians, mainly due to inadequate knowledge of the advantages of autopsy seems to play a special role. The lack of reasonable reimbursement has also been discussed as another possible cause. In order to counteract this negative trend, efforts should be made to work on the awareness of medical students and young clinicians so that an autopsy is perceived as a general measure of quality assurance and physician self-control. Furthermore, a realistic reimbursement of financial and personnel expense is necessary.

  2. Procedures Performed by Emergency Medical Services in the United States.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Jestin N; Karns, Christopher; Mann, N Clay; E Jacobson, Karen; Dai, Mengtao; Colleran, Caroline; Wang, Henry E

    2016-01-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) must provide a wide range of care for patients in the out-of-hospital setting. Although previous work has detailed that EMS providers rarely perform certain procedures, (e.g., endotracheal intubation) there are limited data detailing the frequency of procedures across the breadth of EMS providers' scope of practice. We sought to characterize procedures performed by EMS in the United States. We conducted an analysis of the 2011 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) research data set, encompassing EMS emergency response data from 40 states and two territories. From these data, we report the number and incidence of EMS procedures. We also characterize procedures performed. There were 14,371,941 submitted EMS responses, of which 7,680,559 had complete information on procedures performed on adults. Of these, 4,206,360 EMS responses had procedures performed totaling 11,407,396 procedures. The most common procedures performed were peripheral venous access (28.4%), cardiac monitoring (16.1%) pulse oximetry (13.5%), and blood glucose analysis (10.4%). Procedures were performed most often in patients with traumatic injury (20.0%) followed by chest pain/discomfort (14.0%). Critical procedures (cardioversion, defibrillation, endotracheal intubation, etc.) were infrequently performed (n = 277,785, 2.4%). These data highlight the frequency with which EMS providers perform procedures across the United States. This may help to guide future EMS training and education efforts by highlighting the relative frequency and infrequency of specific procedures.

  3. Comparison and use of 3D scanners to improve the quantification of medical images (surface structures and volumes) during follow up of clinical (surgical) procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokkari, Niki; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Liberton, Niels; Wolff, Jan; den Heijer, Martin; van der Veen, Albert; Klaessens, John H.

    2017-02-01

    It is difficult to obtain quantitative measurements as to surface areas and volumes from standard photos of the body parts of patients which is highly desirable for objective follow up of treatments in e.g. dermatology. plastic, aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. Recently, 3-D scanners have become available to provide quantification. Phantoms (3-D printed hand, nose and ear, colored bread sculpture) were developed to compare a range from low-cost (Sense), medium (HP Sprout) to high end (Artec Spider, Vectra M3) scanners using different 3D imaging technologies, as to resolution, working range, surface color representation, user friendliness. The 3D scans files (STL, OBJ) were processed with Artec studio and GOM software as to deviation compared to the high resolution Artec Spider scanner taken as `golden' standard. The HP Spout, which uses a fringe projection, proved to be nearly as good as the Artec, however, needs to be converted for clinical use. Photogrammetry as used by the Vectra M3 scanner is limited to provide sufficient data points for accurate surface mapping however provides good color/structure representation. The low performance of the Sense is not recommended for clinical use. The Artec scanner was successfully used to measure the structure/volume changes in the face after hormone treatment in transgender patients. 3D scanners can greatly improve quantitative measurements of surfaces and volumes as objective follow up in clinical studies performed by various clinical specialisms (dermatology, aesthetic and reconstructive surgery). New scanning technologies, like fringe projection, are promising for development of low-cost, high precision scanners.

  4. Nasal Irrigation: An Imprecisely Defined Medical Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Nasal irrigation (NI) is an old practice of upper respiratory tract care that likely originated in the Ayurvedic medical tradition. It is used alone or in association with other therapies in several conditions—including chronic rhinosinusitis and allergic rhinitis—and to treat and prevent upper respiratory tract infections, especially in children. However, despite it being largely prescribed in everyday clinical practice, NI is not included or is only briefly mentioned by experts in the guidelines for treatment of upper respiratory tract diseases. In this review, present knowledge about NI and its relevance in clinical practice is discussed to assist physicians in understanding the available evidence and the potential use of this medical intervention. Analysis of the literature showed that NI seems to be effective in the treatment of several acute and chronic sinonasal conditions. However, although in recent years several new studies have been performed, most of the studies that have evaluated NI have relevant methodologic problems. Only multicenter studies enrolling a great number of subjects can solve the problem of the real relevance of NI, and these studies are urgently needed. Methods for performing NI have to be standardized to determine which solutions, devices and durations of treatment are adequate to obtain favorable results. This seems particularly important for children that suffer a great number of sinonasal problems and might benefit significantly from an inexpensive and simple preventive and therapeutic measure such as NI. PMID:28492494

  5. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  6. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  7. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES REGARDING ACCESS TO PERSONAL INFORMATION UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT 1974 Procedures for...

  8. 32 CFR 319.7 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures: Medical records. 319.7 Section 319.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM DEFENSE INTELLIGENCE AGENCY PRIVACY PROGRAM § 319.7 Special procedures:...

  9. Bio-medical flow sensor. [intrvenous procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, H. E. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A bio-medical flow sensor including a packageable unit of a bottle, tubing and hypodermic needle which can be pre-sterilized and is disposable. The tubing has spaced apart tubular metal segments. The temperature of the metal segments and fluid flow therein is sensed by thermistors and at a downstream location heat is input by a resistor to the metal segment by a control electronics. The fluids flow and the electrical power required for the resisto to maintain a constant temperature differential between the tubular metal segments is a measurable function of fluid flow through the tubing. The differential temperature measurement is made in a control electronics and also can be used to control a flow control valve or pump on the tubing to maintain a constant flow in the tubing and to shut off the tubing when air is present in the tubing.

  10. NASA Technology Finds Uses in Medical Imaging

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA software has been incorporated into a new medical imaging device that could one day aid in the interpretation of mammograms, ultrasounds, and other medical imagery. The new MED-SEG system, dev...

  11. Imaging and Analytics: The changing face of Medical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foo, Thomas

    There have been significant technological advances in imaging capability over the past 40 years. Medical imaging capabilities have developed rapidly, along with technology development in computational processing speed and miniaturization. Moving to all-digital, the number of images that are acquired in a routine clinical examination has increased dramatically from under 50 images in the early days of CT and MRI to more than 500-1000 images today. The staggering number of images that are routinely acquired poses significant challenges for clinicians to interpret the data and to correctly identify the clinical problem. Although the time provided to render a clinical finding has not substantially changed, the amount of data available for interpretation has grown exponentially. In addition, the image quality (spatial resolution) and information content (physiologically-dependent image contrast) has also increased significantly with advances in medical imaging technology. On its current trajectory, medical imaging in the traditional sense is unsustainable. To assist in filtering and extracting the most relevant data elements from medical imaging, image analytics will have a much larger role. Automated image segmentation, generation of parametric image maps, and clinical decision support tools will be needed and developed apace to allow the clinician to manage, extract and utilize only the information that will help improve diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity. As medical imaging devices continue to improve in spatial resolution, functional and anatomical information content, image/data analytics will be more ubiquitous and integral to medical imaging capability.

  12. Medical Image Tamper Detection Based on Passive Image Authentication.

    PubMed

    Ulutas, Guzin; Ustubioglu, Arda; Ustubioglu, Beste; V Nabiyev, Vasif; Ulutas, Mustafa

    2017-05-08

    Telemedicine has gained popularity in recent years. Medical images can be transferred over the Internet to enable the telediagnosis between medical staffs and to make the patient's history accessible to medical staff from anywhere. Therefore, integrity protection of the medical image is a serious concern due to the broadcast nature of the Internet. Some watermarking techniques are proposed to control the integrity of medical images. However, they require embedding of extra information (watermark) into image before transmission. It decreases visual quality of the medical image and can cause false diagnosis. The proposed method uses passive image authentication mechanism to detect the tampered regions on medical images. Structural texture information is obtained from the medical image by using local binary pattern rotation invariant (LBPROT) to make the keypoint extraction techniques more successful. Keypoints on the texture image are obtained with scale invariant feature transform (SIFT). Tampered regions are detected by the method by matching the keypoints. The method improves the keypoint-based passive image authentication mechanism (they do not detect tampering when the smooth region is used for covering an object) by using LBPROT before keypoint extraction because smooth regions also have texture information. Experimental results show that the method detects tampered regions on the medical images even if the forged image has undergone some attacks (Gaussian blurring/additive white Gaussian noise) or the forged regions are scaled/rotated before pasting.

  13. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  14. A survey of GPU-based medical image computing techniques

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lin; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Heye; Xie, Yongming

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging currently plays a crucial role throughout the entire clinical applications from medical scientific research to diagnostics and treatment planning. However, medical imaging procedures are often computationally demanding due to the large three-dimensional (3D) medical datasets to process in practical clinical applications. With the rapidly enhancing performances of graphics processors, improved programming support, and excellent price-to-performance ratio, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has emerged as a competitive parallel computing platform for computationally expensive and demanding tasks in a wide range of medical image applications. The major purpose of this survey is to provide a comprehensive reference source for the starters or researchers involved in GPU-based medical image processing. Within this survey, the continuous advancement of GPU computing is reviewed and the existing traditional applications in three areas of medical image processing, namely, segmentation, registration and visualization, are surveyed. The potential advantages and associated challenges of current GPU-based medical imaging are also discussed to inspire future applications in medicine. PMID:23256080

  15. A survey of GPU-based medical image computing techniques.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Heye; Xie, Yongming; Wang, Defeng

    2012-09-01

    Medical imaging currently plays a crucial role throughout the entire clinical applications from medical scientific research to diagnostics and treatment planning. However, medical imaging procedures are often computationally demanding due to the large three-dimensional (3D) medical datasets to process in practical clinical applications. With the rapidly enhancing performances of graphics processors, improved programming support, and excellent price-to-performance ratio, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has emerged as a competitive parallel computing platform for computationally expensive and demanding tasks in a wide range of medical image applications. The major purpose of this survey is to provide a comprehensive reference source for the starters or researchers involved in GPU-based medical image processing. Within this survey, the continuous advancement of GPU computing is reviewed and the existing traditional applications in three areas of medical image processing, namely, segmentation, registration and visualization, are surveyed. The potential advantages and associated challenges of current GPU-based medical imaging are also discussed to inspire future applications in medicine.

  16. Medical imaging V: Image capture, formatting, and display

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Digital image display I-V; Quality assurance I-V; Clinical image presentation I-V; Imaging systems; Image compression; Workstations; and Medical diagnostic imaging support system for military medicine and other federal agencies.

  17. Major mandibular surgical procedures as an indication for intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Gbara, Ali; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated 3-dimensional (3D) imaging with intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in major mandibular reconstruction procedures. The study group was comprised of 125 patients (83 males, 42 females) admitted for surgical treatment of the mandible. The patients ranged in age from 3 months to 91 years (average age, 40.72 +/- 22.843 years). Surgical procedures of the mandible were subdivided into repair of body fractures (17 patients), angle fractures (21 patients), condylar fractures (14 patients), and multiple fractures (30 patient). In addition, the study group included 21 patients undergoing orthognatic surgery and 22 undergoing reconstructive surgery on the mandible. Intraoperatively, 3D images were generated with a mobile CBCT scanner (Arcadis Orbic 3D; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany). During open reduction of mandibular fractures, not all fracture sites can be readily exposed for direct visual control. For example, the lingual cortical bone of the mandible is difficult to assess intraoperatively. This structure and others can be effectively visualized using the 3D mode of CBCT. Furthermore, screw placement can be evaluated, specifically in insertions near the alveolar nerve. The intraoperative acquisition of the data sets is uncomplicated, and the image quality is sufficient to allow evaluation of the postoperative result in all cases. Intraoperative CBCT has proven to be a reliable imaging technique for providing visual control during major mandibular procedures.

  18. Medical image archive node simulation and architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Ted T.; Tang, Yau-Kuo

    1996-05-01

    It is a well known fact that managed care and new treatment technologies are revolutionizing the health care provider world. Community Health Information Network and Computer-based Patient Record projects are underway throughout the United States. More and more hospitals are installing digital, `filmless' radiology (and other imagery) systems. They generate a staggering amount of information around the clock. For example, a typical 500-bed hospital might accumulate more than 5 terabytes of image data in a period of 30 years for conventional x-ray images and digital images such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computer Tomography images. With several hospitals contributing to the archive, the storage required will be in the hundreds of terabytes. Systems for reliable, secure, and inexpensive storage and retrieval of digital medical information do not exist today. In this paper, we present a Medical Image Archive and Distribution Service (MIADS) concept. MIADS is a system shared by individual and community hospitals, laboratories, and doctors' offices that need to store and retrieve medical images. Due to the large volume and complexity of the data, as well as the diversified user access requirement, implementation of the MIADS will be a complex procedure. One of the key challenges to implementing a MIADS is to select a cost-effective, scalable system architecture to meet the ingest/retrieval performance requirements. We have performed an in-depth system engineering study, and developed a sophisticated simulation model to address this key challenge. This paper describes the overall system architecture based on our system engineering study and simulation results. In particular, we will emphasize system scalability and upgradability issues. Furthermore, we will discuss our simulation results in detail. The simulations study the ingest/retrieval performance requirements based on different system configurations and architectures for variables such as workload, tape

  19. The Computational Challenges of Medical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    JASON will undertake a study for the DOE and the NIH National Institute for Bio- medical Imaging and Bio-engineering on the role of computation...broadly defined to include raw computational capabilities, mass storage needs, and connectivity) for medical imaging . This study will address the

  20. The Pediatric Urinary Tract and Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Penny, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    The pediatric urinary tract often is assessed with medical imaging. Consequently, it is essential for medical imaging professionals to have a fundamental understanding of pediatric anatomy, physiology, and common pathology of the urinary tract to provide optimal patient care. This article provides an overview of fetal development, pediatric urinary anatomy and physiology, and common diseases and conditions of the pediatric urinary tract.

  1. Advanced Imaging and Robotics Technologies for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masamune, Ken; Hong, Jaesung

    2011-10-01

    Due to the importance of surgery in the medical field, a large amount of research has been conducted in this area. Imaging and robotics technologies provide surgeons with the advanced eye and hand to perform their surgeries in a safer and more accurate manner. Recently medical images have been utilized in the operating room as well as in the diagnostic stage. If the image to patient registration is done with sufficient accuracy, medical images can be used as "a map" for guidance to the target lesion. However, the accuracy and reliability of the surgical navigation system should be sufficiently verified before applying it to the patient. Along with the development of medical imaging, various medical robots have also been developed. In particular, surgical robots have been researched in order to reach the goal of minimal invasiveness. The most important factors to consider are determining the demand, the strategy for their use in operating procedures, and how it aids patients. In addition to the above considerations, medical doctors and researchers should always think from the patient's point of view. In this article, the latest medical imaging and robotic technologies focusing on surgical applications are reviewed based upon the factors described in the above.

  2. The algorithm stitching for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenishchev, E.; Marchuk, V.; Voronin, V.; Pismenskova, M.; Tolstova, I.; Svirin, I.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we propose a stitching algorithm of medical images into one. The algorithm is designed to stitching the medical x-ray imaging, biological particles in microscopic images, medical microscopic images and other. Such image can improve the diagnosis accuracy and quality for minimally invasive studies (e.g., laparoscopy, ophthalmology and other). The proposed algorithm is based on the following steps: the searching and selection areas with overlap boundaries; the keypoint and feature detection; the preliminary stitching images and transformation to reduce the visible distortion; the search a single unified borders in overlap area; brightness, contrast and white balance converting; the superimposition into a one image. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in the task of image stitching.

  3. Image analysis in medical imaging: recent advances in selected examples

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, G

    2010-01-01

    Medical imaging has developed into one of the most important fields within scientific imaging due to the rapid and continuing progress in computerised medical image visualisation and advances in analysis methods and computer-aided diagnosis. Several research applications are selected to illustrate the advances in image analysis algorithms and visualisation. Recent results, including previously unpublished data, are presented to illustrate the challenges and ongoing developments. PMID:21611048

  4. Medical applications of digital image morphing.

    PubMed

    Penska, Keith; Folio, Les; Bunger, Rolf

    2007-09-01

    The authors present a unique medical technical application for illustrating the success and/or failure of the physiological healing process as a dynamically morphed video. Two examples used in this report include the healing of a severely fractured humerus from an explosion in Iraq and the other of dramatic tissue destruction from a poisonous spider bite. For the humerus, several sequential x-rays obtained throughout orthopedic surgical procedures and the healing process were morphed together representing a time-lapsed video of the healing process. The end result is a video that demonstrates the healing process in an animation that radiologists envision and report to other clinicians. For the brown recluse spider bite, a seemingly benign skin lesion transforms into a wide gaping necrotic wound with dramatic appearance within days. This novel technique is not presented for readily apparent clinical advantage, rather, it may have more immediate application in providing treatment options to referring providers and/or patients, as well as educational value of healing or disease progression over time. Image morphing is one of those innovations that is just starting to come into its own. Morphing is an image processing technology that transforms one image into another by generating a series of intermediate synthetic images. It is the same process that Hollywood uses to turn people into animals in movies, for example. The ability to perform morphing, once restricted to high-end graphics workstations, is now widely available for desktop computers. The authors describe how a series of radiographic images were morphed into a short movie clip using readily available software and an average laptop. The resultant video showed the healing process of an open comminuted humerus fracture that helped demonstrate how amazingly the human body heals in a case presentation in a time-lapse fashion.

  5. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  6. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  7. Examining Invasive Bedside Procedure Performance at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Kay, Cynthia; Wozniak, Erica M; Szabo, Aniko; Jackson, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Explore the performance patterns of invasive bedside procedures at an academic medical center, evaluate whether patient characteristics predict referral, and examine procedure outcomes. This was a prospective, observational, and retrospective chart review of adults admitted to a general medicine service who had a paracentesis, thoracentesis, or lumbar puncture between February 22, 2013 and February 21, 2014. Of a total of 399 procedures, 335 (84%) were referred to a service other than the primary team for completion. Patient characteristics did not predict referral status. Complication rates were low overall and did not differ, either by referral status or location of procedure. Model-based results showed a 41% increase in the average length of time until procedure completion for those referred to the hospital procedure service or radiology (7.9 vs 5.8 hours; P < 0.05) or done in radiology instead of at the bedside (9.0 vs 5.8 hours; P < 0.001). The average procedure cost increased 38% ($1489.70 vs $1023.30; P < 0.001) for referred procedures and 56% ($1625.77 vs $1150.98; P < 0.001) for radiology-performed procedures. Although referral often is the easier option, our study shows its shortcomings, specifically pertaining to cost and time until completion. Procedure performance remains an important skill for residents and hospitalists to learn and use as a part of patient care.

  8. Image registration method for medical image sequences

    DOEpatents

    Gee, Timothy F.; Goddard, James S.

    2013-03-26

    Image registration of low contrast image sequences is provided. In one aspect, a desired region of an image is automatically segmented and only the desired region is registered. Active contours and adaptive thresholding of intensity or edge information may be used to segment the desired regions. A transform function is defined to register the segmented region, and sub-pixel information may be determined using one or more interpolation methods.

  9. [Image fusion in medical radiology].

    PubMed

    Burger, C

    1996-07-20

    Image fusion supports the correlation between images of two or more studies of the same organ. First, the effect of differing geometries during image acquisitions, such as a head tilt, is compensated for. As a consequence, congruent images can easily be obtained. Instead of merely putting them side by side in a static manner and burdening the radiologist with the whole correlation task, image fusion supports him with interactive visualization techniques. This is especially worthwhile for small lesions as they can be more precisely located. Image fusion is feasible today. Easy and robust techniques are readily available, and furthermore DICOM, a rapidly evolving data exchange standard, diminishes the once severe compatibility problems for image data originating from systems of different manufacturers. However, the current solutions for image fusion are not yet established enough for a high throughput of fusion studies. Thus, for the time being image fusion is most appropriately confined to clinical research studies.

  10. Medical imaging in the diagnosis and management of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Carlos; Shibata, Dean

    2009-08-01

    Within the past few decades medical imaging has evolved very rapidly, now becoming an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients with cancer-related pain. Multiple imaging modalities are available for the assessment of cancer patients, each one with different advantages and limitations that are important to consider at the time we order a diagnostic study or plan an image-guided procedure. This article reviews the role that various imaging modalities play in the management of cancer pain and provides an overview of the latest technological advances.

  11. Medical imaging in new drug clinical development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Deng, Min

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging can help answer key questions that arise during the drug development process. The role of medical imaging in new drug clinical trials includes identification of likely responders; detection and diagnosis of lesions and evaluation of their severity; and therapy monitoring and follow-up. Nuclear imaging techniques such as PET can be used to monitor drug pharmacokinetics and distribution and study specific molecular endpoints. In assessing drug efficacy, imaging biomarkers and imaging surrogate endpoints can be more objective and faster to measure than clinical outcomes, and allow small group sizes, quick results and good statistical power. Imaging also has important role in drug safety monitoring, particularly when there is no other suitable biomarkers available. Despite the long history of radiological sciences, its application to the drug development process is relatively recent. This review highlights the processes, opportunities, and challenges of medical imaging in new drug development.

  12. Denoising Medical Images using Calculus of Variations.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Mahdi Nakhaie; Behnam, Hamid

    2011-07-01

    We propose a method for medical image denoising using calculus of variations and local variance estimation by shaped windows. This method reduces any additive noise and preserves small patterns and edges of images. A pyramid structure-texture decomposition of images is used to separate noise and texture components based on local variance measures. The experimental results show that the proposed method has visual improvement as well as a better SNR, RMSE and PSNR than common medical image denoising methods. Experimental results in denoising a sample Magnetic Resonance image show that SNR, PSNR and RMSE have been improved by 19, 9 and 21 percents respectively.

  13. Content-Based Medical Image Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Henning; Deserno, Thomas M.

    This chapter details the necessity for alternative access concepts to the currently mainly text-based methods in medical information retrieval. This need is partly due to the large amount of visual data produced, the increasing variety of medical imaging data and changing user patterns. The stored visual data contain large amounts of unused information that, if well exploited, can help diagnosis, teaching and research. The chapter briefly reviews the history of image retrieval and its general methods before technologies that have been developed in the medical domain are focussed. We also discuss evaluation of medical content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems and conclude with pointing out their strengths, gaps, and further developments. As examples, the MedGIFT project and the Image Retrieval in Medical Applications (IRMA) framework are presented.

  14. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES REGARDING ACCESS TO PERSONAL INFORMATION UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT 1974...

  15. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES REGARDING ACCESS TO PERSONAL INFORMATION UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT 1974...

  16. 12 CFR 261a.7 - Special procedures for medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special procedures for medical records. 261a.7 Section 261a.7 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES REGARDING ACCESS TO PERSONAL INFORMATION UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT 1974...

  17. Psychological Aspects of Patient Education for Stressful Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Carolyn L.; Kendall, Philip C.

    1985-01-01

    Summarizes many of the issues relevant to patient education programs concerning psychological preparation for stressful medical procedures. Individual differences among patients and their differential responses to types of intervention are emphasized, and descriptions of information provision, skills training, relaxation training/desensitization,…

  18. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  19. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  20. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  1. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  2. 12 CFR 1102.104 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Subcommittee § 1102.104 Special procedure: Medical records. (a) Statement of physician or mental health... or a mental health professional indicating that, in his or her opinion, disclosure of the requested...) Designation of physician or mental health professional to receive records. If the ASC believes, in good...

  3. Normalized methodology for medical infrared imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, J. V. C.; Brioschi, M. L.; Dias, F. G.; Parolin, M. B.; Mulinari-Brenner, F. A.; Ordonez, J. C.; Colman, D.

    2009-01-01

    A normalized procedure for medical infrared imaging is suggested, and illustrated by a leprosy and hepatitis C treatment follow-up, in order to investigate the effect of concurrent treatment which has not been reported before. A 50-year-old man with indeterminate leprosy and a 20-year history of hepatitis C was monitored for 587 days, starting from the day the patient received treatment for leprosy. Standard therapy for hepatitis C started 30 days later. Both visual observations and normalized infrared imaging were conducted periodically to assess the response to leprosy treatment. The primary end points were effectiveness of the method under different boundary conditions over the period, and rapid assessment of the response to leprosy treatment. The patient achieved sustained hepatitis C virological response 6 months after the end of the treatment. The normalized infrared results demonstrate the leprosy treatment success in spite of the concurrent hepatitis C treatment, since day 87, whereas repigmentation was visually assessed only after day 182, and corroborated with a skin biopsy on day 390. The method detected the effectiveness of the leprosy treatment in 87 days, whereas repigmentation started only in 182 days. Hepatitis C and leprosy treatment did not affect each other.

  4. Medical image libraries: ICoS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honniball, John; Thomas, Peter

    1999-08-01

    FOr use of digital techniques for the production, manipulation and storage of images has resulted in the creation of digital image libraries. These libraries often store many thousands of images. While provision of storage media for such large amounts of data has been straightforward, provision of effective searching and retrieval tools has not. Medicine relies heavily on images as a diagnostic tool. The most obvious example is the x-ray, but many other image forms are in everyday use. Advances in technology are affecting the ways medical images are generated, stored and retrieved. The paper describes the work of the Image COding and Segmentation to Support Variable Rate Transmission Channels and Variable Resolution Platforms (ICoS) research project currently under way in Bristol, UK. ICoS is a project of the Mobile of England and Hewlett-Packard Research Laboratories Europe. Funding is provided by the Engineering and PHysical Sciences Research Council. The aim of the ICoS project is to demonstrate the practical application of computer networking to medical image libraries. Work at the University of the West of England concentrates on user interface and indexing issues. Metadata is used to organize the images, coded using the WWW Consortium standard Resource Description Framework. We are investigating the application of such standards to medical images, one outcome being to implement a metadata-based image library. This paper describes the ICoS project in detail and discuses both metadata system and user interfaces in the context of medical applications.

  5. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. Methods To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. Results When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. Conclusion It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original. PMID:22849336

  6. Determining optimal medical image compression: psychometric and image distortion analysis.

    PubMed

    Flint, Alexander C

    2012-07-31

    Storage issues and bandwidth over networks have led to a need to optimally compress medical imaging files while leaving clinical image quality uncompromised. To determine the range of clinically acceptable medical image compression across multiple modalities (CT, MR, and XR), we performed psychometric analysis of image distortion thresholds using physician readers and also performed subtraction analysis of medical image distortion by varying degrees of compression. When physician readers were asked to determine the threshold of compression beyond which images were clinically compromised, the mean image distortion threshold was a JPEG Q value of 23.1 ± 7.0. In Receiver-Operator Characteristics (ROC) plot analysis, compressed images could not be reliably distinguished from original images at any compression level between Q = 50 and Q = 95. Below this range, some readers were able to discriminate the compressed and original images, but high sensitivity and specificity for this discrimination was only encountered at the lowest JPEG Q value tested (Q = 5). Analysis of directly measured magnitude of image distortion from subtracted image pairs showed that the relationship between JPEG Q value and degree of image distortion underwent an upward inflection in the region of the two thresholds determined psychometrically (approximately Q = 25 to Q = 50), with 75 % of the image distortion occurring between Q = 50 and Q = 1. It is possible to apply lossy JPEG compression to medical images without compromise of clinical image quality. Modest degrees of compression, with a JPEG Q value of 50 or higher (corresponding approximately to a compression ratio of 15:1 or less), can be applied to medical images while leaving the images indistinguishable from the original.

  7. Hypnosis before diagnostic or therapeutic medical procedures: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheseaux, Nicole; de Saint Lager, Alix Juillet; Walder, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to estimate the efficiency of hypnosis prior to medical procedures. Different databases were analyzed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing hypnosis to control interventions. All RCTs had to report pain or anxiety. Eighteen RCTs with a total of 968 patients were included; study size was from 20 to 200 patients (14 RCTs ≤ 60 patients). Fourteen RCTs included 830 adults and 4 RCTs included 138 children. Twelve of 18 RCTs had major quality limitations related to unclear allocation concealments, provider's experience in hypnosis, patient's adherence to hypnotic procedures, and intention-to-treat design. This systematic review observed major methodological limitations in RCTs on hypnosis prior to medical procedures.

  8. THz Medical Imaging: in vivo Hydration Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Zachary D.; Singh, Rahul S.; Bennett, David B.; Tewari, Priyamvada; Kealey, Colin P.; Bajwa, Neha; Culjat, Martin O.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Lee, Hua; Hubschman, Jean-Pierre; Brown, Elliott R.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    2015-01-01

    The application of THz to medical imaging is experiencing a surge in both interest and federal funding. A brief overview of the field is provided along with promising and emerging applications and ongoing research. THz imaging phenomenology is discussed and tradeoffs are identified. A THz medical imaging system, operating at ~525 GHz center frequency with ~125 GHz of response normalized bandwidth is introduced and details regarding principles of operation are provided. Two promising medical applications of THz imaging are presented: skin burns and cornea. For burns, images of second degree, partial thickness burns were obtained in rat models in vivo over an 8 hour period. These images clearly show the formation and progression of edema in and around the burn wound area. For cornea, experimental data measuring the hydration of ex vivo porcine cornea under drying is presented demonstrating utility in ophthalmologic applications. PMID:26085958

  9. Slice-to-volume medical image registration: A survey.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Enzo; Paragios, Nikos

    2017-07-01

    During the last decades, the research community of medical imaging has witnessed continuous advances in image registration methods, which pushed the limits of the state-of-the-art and enabled the development of novel medical procedures. A particular type of image registration problem, known as slice-to-volume registration, played a fundamental role in areas like image guided surgeries and volumetric image reconstruction. However, to date, and despite the extensive literature available on this topic, no survey has been written to discuss this challenging problem. This paper introduces the first comprehensive survey of the literature about slice-to-volume registration, presenting a categorical study of the algorithms according to an ad-hoc taxonomy and analyzing advantages and disadvantages of every category. We draw some general conclusions from this analysis and present our perspectives on the future of the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical Management of Tumor Lysis Syndrome, Postprocedural Pain, and Venous Thromboembolism Following Interventional Radiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzalian, Ali; Armitage, Keith B.; Kapoor, Baljendra; Kalva, Sanjeeva P.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid expansion of minimally invasive image-guided procedures has led to their extensive use in the interdisciplinary management of patients with vascular, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, and oncologic diseases. Given the increased availability and breadth of these procedures, it is important for physicians to be aware of common complications and their management. In this article, the authors describe management of select common complications from interventional radiology procedures including tumor lysis syndrome, acute on chronic postprocedural pain, and venous thromboembolism. These complications are discussed in detail and their medical management is outlined according to generally accepted practice and evidence from the literature. PMID:26038627

  11. Web-based medical image archive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Edward B.; Warach, Steven; Cheung, Huey; Wang, Shaohua A.; Tangiral, Phanidral; Luby, Marie; Martino, Robert L.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a Web-based medical image archive system in three-tier, client-server architecture for the storage and retrieval of medical image data, as well as patient information and clinical data. The Web-based medical image archive system was designed to meet the need of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for a central image repository to address questions of stroke pathophysiology and imaging biomarkers in stroke clinical trials by analyzing images obtained from a large number of clinical trials conducted by government, academic and pharmaceutical industry researchers. In the database management-tier, we designed the image storage hierarchy to accommodate large binary image data files that the database software can access in parallel. In the middle-tier, a commercial Enterprise Java Bean server and secure Web server manages user access to the image database system. User-friendly Web-interfaces and applet tools are provided in the client-tier for easy access to the image archive system over the Internet. Benchmark test results show that our three-tier image archive system yields fast system response time for uploading, downloading, and querying the image database.

  12. Towards THz medical imaging; reflective imaging of animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Taylor, Zachary D; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Brown, Elliott R

    2008-01-01

    A reflective THz imaging system has been developed, and features a photoconductive switch and zero-bias Schottky diode detector. The system was used to image deli meats and can distinguish between muscle and adipose tissue based on water content. This capability is a step towards the development of THz medical imaging systems.

  13. Advances in scintillators for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loef, Edgar V.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2014-09-01

    A review is presented of some recent work in the field of inorganic scintillator research for medical imaging applications, in particular scintillation detectors for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET).

  14. Medical Tourism: The Trend toward Outsourcing Medical Procedures to Foreign Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The rising costs of medical treatment in the United States are fueling a movement to outsource medical treatment. Estimates of the number of Americans traveling overseas for treatment range from 50,000 to 500,000. Charges for common procedures such as heart bypass can be $11,000 in Thailand compared to $130,000 in the United States. Knee…

  15. Medical Tourism: The Trend toward Outsourcing Medical Procedures to Foreign Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The rising costs of medical treatment in the United States are fueling a movement to outsource medical treatment. Estimates of the number of Americans traveling overseas for treatment range from 50,000 to 500,000. Charges for common procedures such as heart bypass can be $11,000 in Thailand compared to $130,000 in the United States. Knee…

  16. Medical emergencies in the imaging department of a university hospital: event and imaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Tonder, F C; Sutherland, T; Smith, R J; Chock, J M E; Santamaria, J D

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of medical emergencies that occurred in the medical imaging department (MID) of a university hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A database of 'Respond Medical Emergency Team (MET)' and 'Respond Blue' calls was retrospectively examined for the period June 2003 to November 2010 in relation to events that occurred in the MID. The hospital medical imaging database was also examined in relation to these events and, where necessary, patients' notes were reviewed. Ethics approval was granted by the hospital ethics review board. There were 124 medical emergency calls in the MID during the study period, 28% Respond Blue and 72% Respond MET. Of these 124 calls, 26% occurred outside of usual work hours and 12% involved cardiac arrest. The most common reasons for the emergency calls were seizures (14%) and altered conscious state (13%). Contrast anaphylaxis precipitated the emergency in 4% of cases. In 83% of cases the emergency calls were for patients attending the MID for diagnostic imaging, the remainder being for a procedure. Of the scheduled imaging techniques, 45% were for computed tomography. The scheduled imaging was abandoned due to the emergency in 12% of cases. When performed, imaging informed patient management in 34% of cases in diagnostic imaging and in all cases in the context of image-guided procedures. Medical emergency calls in the MID often occurred outside usual work hours and were attributed to a range of medical problems. The emergencies occurred in relation to all imaging techniques and imaging informed patient management in many cases. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Medical image segmentation by MDP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yisu; Chen, Wufan

    2011-11-01

    MDP (Dirichlet Process Mixtures) model is applied to segment medical images in this paper. Segmentation can been automatically done without initializing segmentation class numbers. The MDP model segmentation algorithm is used to segment natural images and MR (Magnetic Resonance) images in the paper. To demonstrate the accuracy of the MDP model segmentation algorithm, many compared experiments, such as EM (Expectation Maximization) image segmentation algorithm, K-means image segmentation algorithm and MRF (Markov Field) image segmentation algorithm, have been done to segment medical MR images. All the methods are also analyzed quantitatively by using DSC (Dice Similarity Coefficients). The experiments results show that DSC of MDP model segmentation algorithm of all slices exceed 90%, which show that the proposed method is robust and accurate.

  18. Anniversary paper: evaluation of medical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Jiang, Yulei

    2008-02-01

    Medical imaging used to be primarily within the domain of radiology, but with the advent of virtual pathology slides and telemedicine, imaging technology is expanding in the healthcare enterprise. As new imaging technologies are developed, they must be evaluated to assess the impact and benefit on patient care. The authors review the hierarchical model of the efficacy of diagnostic imaging systems by Fryback and Thornbury [Med. Decis. Making 11, 88-94 (1991)] as a guiding principle for system evaluation. Evaluation of medical imaging systems encompasses everything from the hardware and software used to acquire, store, and transmit images to the presentation of images to the interpreting clinician. Evaluation of medical imaging systems can take many forms, from the purely technical (e.g., patient dose measurement) to the increasingly complex (e.g., determining whether a new imaging method saves lives and benefits society). Evaluation methodologies cover a broad range, from receiver operating characteristic (ROC) techniques that measure diagnostic accuracy to timing studies that measure image-interpretation workflow efficiency. The authors review briefly the history of the development of evaluation methodologies and review ROC methodology as well as other types of evaluation methods. They discuss unique challenges in system evaluation that face the imaging community today and opportunities for future advances.

  19. Current perspectives in medical image perception

    PubMed Central

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Medical images constitute a core portion of the information a physician utilizes to render diagnostic and treatment decisions. At a fundamental level, this diagnostic process involves two basic processes: visually inspecting the image (visual perception) and rendering an interpretation (cognition). The likelihood of error in the interpretation of medical images is, unfortunately, not negligible. Errors do occur, and patients’ lives are impacted, underscoring our need to understand how physicians interact with the information in an image during the interpretation process. With improved understanding, we can develop ways to further improve decision making and, thus, to improve patient care. The science of medical image perception is dedicated to understanding and improving the clinical interpretation process. PMID:20601701

  20. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2016-01-01

    The computer-assisted analysis for better interpreting images have been longstanding issues in the medical imaging field. On the image-understanding front, recent advances in machine learning, especially, in the way of deep learning, have made a big leap to help identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. Specifically, exploiting hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of handcrafted features mostly designed based on domain-specific knowledge, lies at the core of the advances. In that way, deep learning is rapidly proving to be the state-of-the-art foundation, achieving enhanced performances in various medical applications. In this article, we introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods; review their successes to image registration, anatomical/cell structures detection, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis or prognosis, and so on. We conclude by raising research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvements. PMID:28301734

  1. Research imaging in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Armato, Samuel G; Gruszauskas, Nicholas P; Macmahon, Heber; Torno, Michael D; Li, Feng; Engelmann, Roger M; Starkey, Adam; Pudela, Caileigh L; Marino, Jonathan S; Santiago, Faustino; Chang, Paul J; Giger, Maryellen L

    2012-06-01

    Managing and supervising the complex imaging examinations performed for clinical research in an academic medical center can be a daunting task. Coordinating with both radiology and research staff to ensure that the necessary imaging is performed, analyzed, and delivered in accordance with the research protocol is nontrivial. The purpose of this communication is to report on the establishment of a new Human Imaging Research Office (HIRO) at our institution that provides a dedicated infrastructure to assist with these issues and improve collaborations between radiology and research staff. The HIRO was created with three primary responsibilities: 1) coordinate the acquisition of images for clinical research per the study protocol, 2) facilitate reliable and consistent assessment of disease response for clinical research, and 3) manage and distribute clinical research images in a compliant manner. The HIRO currently provides assistance for 191 clinical research studies from 14 sections and departments within our medical center and performs quality assessment of image-based measurements for six clinical research studies. The HIRO has fulfilled 1806 requests for medical images, delivering 81,712 imaging examinations (more than 44.1 million images) and related reports to investigators for research purposes. The ultimate goal of the HIRO is to increase the level of satisfaction and interaction among investigators, research subjects, radiologists, and other imaging professionals. Clinical research studies that use the HIRO benefit from a more efficient and accurate imaging process. The HIRO model could be adopted by other academic medical centers to support their clinical research activities; the details of implementation may differ among institutions, but the need to support imaging in clinical research through a dedicated, centralized initiative should apply to most academic medical centers. Copyright © 2012 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A cloud-based medical image repository

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, Anthony J.; Planitz, Birgit M.; El Rifai, Diaa

    2012-02-01

    Many widely used digital medical image collections have been established but these are generally used as raw data sources without related image analysis toolsets. Providing associated functionality to allow specific types of operations to be performed on these images has proved beneficial in some cases (e.g. brain image registration and atlases). However, toolset development to provide generic image analysis functions on medical images has tended to be ad hoc, with Open Source options proliferating (e.g. ITK). Our Automated Medical Image Collection Annotation (AMICA) system is both an image repository, to which the research community can contribute image datasets, and a search/retrieval system that uses automated image annotation. AMICA was designed for the Windows Azure platform to leverage the flexibility and scalability of the cloud. It is intended that AMICA will expand beyond its initial pilot implementation (for brain CT, MR images) to accommodate a wide range of modalities and anatomical regions. This initiative aims to contribute to advances in clinical research by permitting a broader use and reuse of medical image data than is currently attainable. For example, cohort studies for cases with particular physiological or phenotypical profiles will be able to source and include enough cases to provide high statistical power, allowing more individualised risk factors to be assessed and thus allowing screening and staging processes to be optimised. Also, education, training and credentialing of clinicians in image interpretation, will be more effective because it will be possible to select instances of images with specific visual aspects, or correspond to types of cases where reading performance improvement is desirable.

  3. Overview of deep learning in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-07-08

    The use of machine learning (ML) has been increasing rapidly in the medical imaging field, including computer-aided diagnosis (CAD), radiomics, and medical image analysis. Recently, an ML area called deep learning emerged in the computer vision field and became very popular in many fields. It started from an event in late 2012, when a deep-learning approach based on a convolutional neural network (CNN) won an overwhelming victory in the best-known worldwide computer vision competition, ImageNet Classification. Since then, researchers in virtually all fields, including medical imaging, have started actively participating in the explosively growing field of deep learning. In this paper, the area of deep learning in medical imaging is overviewed, including (1) what was changed in machine learning before and after the introduction of deep learning, (2) what is the source of the power of deep learning, (3) two major deep-learning models: a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) and a convolutional neural network (CNN), (4) similarities and differences between the two models, and (5) their applications to medical imaging. This review shows that ML with feature input (or feature-based ML) was dominant before the introduction of deep learning, and that the major and essential difference between ML before and after deep learning is the learning of image data directly without object segmentation or feature extraction; thus, it is the source of the power of deep learning, although the depth of the model is an important attribute. The class of ML with image input (or image-based ML) including deep learning has a long history, but recently gained popularity due to the use of the new terminology, deep learning. There are two major models in this class of ML in medical imaging, MTANN and CNN, which have similarities as well as several differences. In our experience, MTANNs were substantially more efficient in their development, had a higher performance, and required a

  4. Medical applications of microwave imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Lim, Eng Gee; Tang, Yujun; Leach, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Ultrawide band (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for the detection of early stage breast cancer, based on the large contrast in electrical parameters between malignant tumour tissue and the surrounding normal breast-tissue. In this paper, the detection and imaging of a malignant tumour are performed through a tomographic based microwave system and signal processing. Simulations of the proposed system are performed and postimage processing is presented. Signal processing involves the extraction of tumour information from background information and then image reconstruction through the confocal method delay-and-sum algorithms. Ultimately, the revision of time-delay and the superposition of more tumour signals are applied to improve accuracy.

  5. Modeling interaction for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, Daniela G.; Vanderdonckt, Jean; Macq, Benoit M. M.; Raftopoulos, Christian

    2003-05-01

    Compared to conventional interfaces, image guided surgery (IGS) interfaces contain a richer variety and more complex objects and interaction types. The main interactive characteristics emering from systems like this is the interaction focus shared between physical space, where the surgeon interacts with the patient using surgical tools, and with the digital world, where the surgeon interacts with the system. This limitation results in two different interfaces likely inconsistent, thereby the interaction discontinuities do break the natuarl workflow forcing the user to switch between the operation modes. Our work addresses these features by focusing on the model, interaction and ergonomic integrity analysis considering the Augmented Reality paradigm applied to IGS procedures and more specifically applied to the Neurosurgery study case. We followed a methodology according to the model-based approach, including new extensions in order to support interaction technologies and to sensure continuity interaction according to the IGS system requirements. As a result, designers may as soon as possible discover errors in the development process and may perform an efficient interface design coherently integrating constraints favoring continuity instead of discrete interaction with possible inconsistencies.

  6. [Application of medical imaging to general thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Medical imaging technology is rapidly progressing. Positron emission tomography (PET) has played major role in the staging and choice of treatment modality in lung cancer patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now routinely used for mediastinal tumors and the use of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) may help in the diagnosis of malignancies including lung cancers. The benefits of medical imaging technology are not limited to diagnostics, and include simulation or navigation for complex lung resection and other procedures. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) shortens imaging time to obtain detailed and precise volume data, which improves diagnosis of small-sized lung cancers. 3-dimensional reconstruction of the volume data allows the safe performance of thoracoscopic surgery. For lung lobectomy, identification of the branching structures, diameter, and length of the arteries is useful in selecting the procedure for blood vessel treatment. For lung segmentectomy, visualization of venous branches in the affected segments and intersegmental veins has facilitated the preoperative determination of the anatomical intersegmental plane. Therefore, the application of medical imaging technology is useful in general thoracic surgery.

  7. Multispectral imaging for medical diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.

    1977-01-01

    Photography technique determines amount of morbidity present in tissue. Imaging apparatus incorporates numerical filtering. Overall system operates in near-real time. Information gained from this system enables physician to understand extent of injury and leads to accelerated treatment.

  8. Multispectral imaging for medical diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anselmo, V. J.

    1977-01-01

    Photography technique determines amount of morbidity present in tissue. Imaging apparatus incorporates numerical filtering. Overall system operates in near-real time. Information gained from this system enables physician to understand extent of injury and leads to accelerated treatment.

  9. Acoustic Waves in Medical Imaging and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Sarvazyan, Armen P.; Urban, Matthew W.; Greenleaf, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term “ultrasonography,” or its abbreviated version “sonography” meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Since the 1990s numerous acoustic imaging modalities started to emerge based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. It was demonstrated that imaging with these waves can provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We will discuss physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities, and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications will be presented. We will discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. PMID:23643056

  10. Acoustic waves in medical imaging and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Sarvazyan, Armen P; Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2013-07-01

    Up until about two decades ago acoustic imaging and ultrasound imaging were synonymous. The term ultrasonography, or its abbreviated version sonography, meant an imaging modality based on the use of ultrasonic compressional bulk waves. Beginning in the 1990s, there started to emerge numerous acoustic imaging modalities based on the use of a different mode of acoustic wave: shear waves. Imaging with these waves was shown to provide very useful and very different information about the biological tissue being examined. We discuss the physical basis for the differences between these two basic modes of acoustic waves used in medical imaging and analyze the advantages associated with shear acoustic imaging. A comprehensive analysis of the range of acoustic wavelengths, velocities and frequencies that have been used in different imaging applications is presented. We discuss the potential for future shear wave imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intuitionistic fuzzy segmentation of medical images.

    PubMed

    Chaira, Tamalika

    2010-06-01

    This paper proposes a novel and probably the first method, using Attanassov intuitionistic fuzzy set theory to segment blood vessels and also the blood cells in pathological images. This type of segmentation is very important in detecting different types of human diseases, e.g., an increase in the number of vessels may lead to cancer in prostates, mammary, etc. The medical images are not properly illuminated, and segmentation in that case becomes very difficult. A novel image segmentation approach using intuitionistic fuzzy set theory and a new membership function is proposed using restricted equivalence function from automorphisms, for finding the membership values of the pixels of the image. An intuitionistic fuzzy image is constructed using Sugeno type intuitionistic fuzzy generator. Local thresholding is applied to threshold medical images. The results showed a much better performance on poor contrast medical images, where almost all the blood vessels and blood cells are visible properly. There are several fuzzy and intuitionistic fuzzy thresholding methods, but these methods are not related to the medical images. To make a comparison with the proposed method with other thresholding methods, the method is compared with six nonfuzzy, fuzzy, and intuitionistic fuzzy methods.

  12. Automated medical image library creation for education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark; Feied, Craig; Gillam, Michael; Handler, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a method to create a medical teaching library that is automatically maintained, contains tens of thousands of radiologic images and is built using existing, internal, hospital dictations, radiologic images, and an off-the-shelf commercial search engine product (Google Inc.).

  13. Advanced medical life support procedures in vitally compromised children by a helicopter emergency medical service

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To determine the advanced life support procedures provided by an Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) for vitally compromised children. Incidence and success rate of several procedures were studied, with a distinction made between procedures restricted to the HEMS-physician and procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. Methods Prospective study of a consecutive group of children examined and treated by the HEMS of the eastern region of the Netherlands. Data regarding type of emergency, physiological parameters, NACA scores, treatment, and 24-hour survival were collected and subsequently analysed. Results Of the 558 children examined and treated by the HEMS on scene, 79% had a NACA score of IV-VII. 65% of the children had one or more advanced life support procedures restricted to the HEMS and 78% of the children had one or more procedures for which the HEMS is more experienced than the EMS. The HEMS intubated 38% of all children, and 23% of the children intubated and ventilated by the EMS needed emergency correction because of potentially lethal complications. The HEMS provided the greater part of intraosseous access, as the EMS paramedics almost exclusively reserved this procedure for children in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The EMS provided pain management only to children older than four years of age, but a larger group was in need of analgesia upon arrival of the HEMS, and was subsequently treated by the HEMS. Conclusions The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service of the eastern region of the Netherlands brings essential medical expertise in the field not provided by the emergency medical service. The Emergency Medical Service does not provide a significant quantity of procedures obviously needed by the paediatric patient. PMID:20211021

  14. Improved Interactive Medical-Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Twombly, Ian A.; Senger, Steven

    2003-01-01

    An improved computational-simulation system for interactive medical imaging has been invented. The system displays high-resolution, three-dimensional-appearing images of anatomical objects based on data acquired by such techniques as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). The system enables users to manipulate the data to obtain a variety of views for example, to display cross sections in specified planes or to rotate images about specified axes. Relative to prior such systems, this system offers enhanced capabilities for synthesizing images of surgical cuts and for collaboration by users at multiple, remote computing sites.

  15. Medical devices and procedures in the hyperbaric chamber.

    PubMed

    Kot, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present current controversies concerning the safety of medical devices and procedures under pressure in a hyperbaric chamber including: defibrillation in a multiplace chamber; implantable devices during hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) and the results of a recent European questionnaire on medical devices used inside hyperbaric chambers. Early electrical defibrillation is the only effective therapy for cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia. The procedure of defibrillation under hyperbaric conditions is inherently dangerous owing to the risk of fire, but it can be conducted safely if certain precautions are taken. Recently, new defibrillators have been introduced for hyperbaric medicine, which makes the procedure easier technically, but it must be noted that sparks and fire have been observed during defibrillation, even under normobaric conditions. Therefore, delivery of defibrillation shock in a hyperbaric environment must still be perceived as a hazardous procedure. Implantable devices are being seen with increasing frequency in patients referred for HBOT. These devices create a risk of malfunction when exposed to hyperbaric conditions. Some manufacturers support patients and medical practitioners with information on how their devices behave under increased pressure, but in some cases an individual risk-benefit analysis should be conducted on the patient and the specific implanted device, taking into consideration the patient's clinical condition, the indication for HBOT and the capability of the HBOT facility for monitoring and intervention in the chamber. The results of the recent survey on use of medical devices inside European hyperbaric chambers are also presented. A wide range of non-CE-certified equipment is used in European chambers.

  16. Sharing medical images: a proposal of a reference image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Furuie, Sérgio S.

    2006-03-01

    Due to increasing number of digital images used in medical diagnosis, the image processing and analysis are becoming essential for many tasks in medicine. One of the obstacles within the field of medical image processing is the lack of reference image datasets freely available for groups and/or individual users, in order to evaluate their new methods and applications. In order to improve this situation, this work presents the development of a framework to make available a free, online, multipurpose and multimodality medical image database for software and algorithm evaluation. The project is implemented as a distributed architecture for medical image database including a publishing workflow, authoring tools, and role-based access control. Our effort aims to offer a testbed and a set of resources including software, links to scientific papers, gold standards, reference and post-processed images, enabling the medical image processing community (scientists, physicians, students and industrials) to be more aware of evaluation issues. The proposed approach has been used as an electronic teaching system in Radiology as well.

  17. Medical imaging techniques: implications for nursing care.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Alison

    The four basic techniques of medical imaging are X-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance and radionuclide. This article describes imaging techniques that display anatomical structure and those that are better at showing the physiological function of organs and tissues. Safety and preparation relating to nursing practice are discussed. Understanding the purpose and limitations of the different imaging techniques is important for providing best patient care.

  18. Medical Applications of Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Lim, Eng Gee; Tang, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrawide band (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for the detection of early stage breast cancer, based on the large contrast in electrical parameters between malignant tumour tissue and the surrounding normal breast-tissue. In this paper, the detection and imaging of a malignant tumour are performed through a tomographic based microwave system and signal processing. Simulations of the proposed system are performed and postimage processing is presented. Signal processing involves the extraction of tumour information from background information and then image reconstruction through the confocal method delay-and-sum algorithms. Ultimately, the revision of time-delay and the superposition of more tumour signals are applied to improve accuracy. PMID:25379515

  19. A continuous available (CA) server for medical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, H K; Liu, Brent J; Zhou, Z

    2004-07-01

    The trend of medical imaging research and application is toward large database management and manipulation, which requires a robust image server to receive image data from sources and to deliver them to users reliably and in a timely fashion. This article describes the design, implementation, and clinical applications of a continuous available (CA) image server for these purposes. The design of the CA image server is based on the concept of a triple modular redundancy server with three redundant server modules. Coupled with a majority voting mechanism in the three modules and failover software, the triple modular redundancy server takes care of all single points of failure hardware components in the CA image server automatically to achieve fault tolerance. Methods and procedures of evaluating the fault tolerance system reliability caused by network connectivity, motherboard, and disk storage failures are described. Thorough experimental results in laboratory and clinical environments verify that the image server achieves 99.999% hardware up time (or 5 minutes/year down time), satisfying the industrial terminology of hardware continuous availability. Performance of failover of the CA image server is automatically tabulated during these procedures. Applications of CA image server are extensive. Two examples are given including Picture Archiving and Communication System, and off-site back-up archive using the Application Service Provider model. As designed, the CA image server is portable, scalable, affordable, easy to install, and requires no human intervention during failover and system recovery.

  20. Deep Learning in Medical Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dinggang; Wu, Guorong; Suk, Heung-Il

    2017-03-09

    This review covers computer-assisted analysis of images in the field of medical imaging. Recent advances in machine learning, especially with regard to deep learning, are helping to identify, classify, and quantify patterns in medical images. At the core of these advances is the ability to exploit hierarchical feature representations learned solely from data, instead of features designed by hand according to domain-specific knowledge. Deep learning is rapidly becoming the state of the art, leading to enhanced performance in various medical applications. We introduce the fundamentals of deep learning methods and review their successes in image registration, detection of anatomical and cellular structures, tissue segmentation, computer-aided disease diagnosis and prognosis, and so on. We conclude by discussing research issues and suggesting future directions for further improvement. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering Volume 19 is June 4, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations of medical imaging modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, G.P.

    1998-09-01

    Because continuous-energy Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations can be nearly exact simulations of physical reality (within data limitations, geometric approximations, transport algorithms, etc.), it follows that one should be able to closely approximate the results of many experiments from first-principles computations. This line of reasoning has led to various MCNP studies that involve simulations of medical imaging modalities and other visualization methods such as radiography, Anger camera, computerized tomography (CT) scans, and SABRINA particle track visualization. It is the intent of this paper to summarize some of these imaging simulations in the hope of stimulating further work, especially as computer power increases. Improved interpretation and prediction of medical images should ultimately lead to enhanced medical treatments. It is also reasonable to assume that such computations could be used to design new or more effective imaging instruments.

  2. Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX).

    PubMed

    Erdal, Barbaros S; Prevedello, Luciano M; Qian, Songyue; Demirer, Mutlu; Little, Kevin; Ryu, John; O'Donnell, Thomas; White, Richard D

    2017-08-24

    Radiology and Enterprise Medical Imaging Extensions (REMIX) is a platform originally designed to both support the medical imaging-driven clinical and clinical research operational needs of Department of Radiology of The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. REMIX accommodates the storage and handling of "big imaging data," as needed for large multi-disciplinary cancer-focused programs. The evolving REMIX platform contains an array of integrated tools/software packages for the following: (1) server and storage management; (2) image reconstruction; (3) digital pathology; (4) de-identification; (5) business intelligence; (6) texture analysis; and (7) artificial intelligence. These capabilities, along with documentation and guidance, explaining how to interact with a commercial system (e.g., PACS, EHR, commercial database) that currently exists in clinical environments, are to be made freely available.

  3. Photoacoustic imaging: opening new frontiers in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Chinni, Bhargava K; Rao, Navalgund A

    2011-01-01

    In today's world, technology is advancing at an exponential rate and medical imaging is no exception. During the last hundred years, the field of medical imaging has seen a tremendous technological growth with the invention of imaging modalities including but not limited to X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. These tools have led to better diagnosis and improved patient care. However, each of these modalities has its advantages as well as disadvantages and none of them can reveal all the information a physician would like to have. In the last decade, a new diagnostic technology called photoacoustic imaging has evolved which is moving rapidly from the research phase to the clinical trial phase. This article outlines the basics of photoacoustic imaging and describes our hands-on experience in developing a comprehensive photoacoustic imaging system to detect tissue abnormalities.

  4. Patterns of postoperative pain medication prescribing after invasive dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Barasch, Andrei; Safford, Monika M; McNeal, Sandre F; Robinson, Michelle; Grant, Vivian S; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2011-01-01

    We investigated disparities in the prescription of analgesics following dental procedures that were expected to cause acute postoperative pain. Patients over the age of 19 years who had been treated by surgical and/or endodontic dental procedures were included in this study. We reviewed 900 consecutive charts and abstracted data on procedures, patients, and providers. We used chi-square and logistic regression models for analyses. There were 485 White subjects, 357 African American subjects included in this review; 81% of the African American and 78% of White patients received a postoperative narcotic prescription (p = .56). In multivariate regression models, patients over age 45 (p = .003), those with insurance that covered medication and those with preexisting pain (p = .004) were more likely to receive narcotic analgesics. Students prescribed more narcotics than residents (p = .001). No differences were found by race in prescribing analgesics. ©2011 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. [Initial experience with selection procedures for admission to medical school].

    PubMed

    ten Cate, T J; Hendrix, H L

    2001-07-14

    Admittance to a medical school in the Netherlands has for decades been based on a grade point average weighted lottery system of secondary school leavers. Since 2000, the Dutch Higher Education and Scientific Research Act has given medical schools the option of selecting candidates. In 2000, two of the eight Dutch medical schools started selection experiments for 10 percent of their places. Leiden University Medical Center invited school leavers who had studied a more varied range of extra subjects to attend a 10-day summer school. All 54 candidates were ranked on the basis of assessments and tests; 24 of them were admitted. Utrecht University invited students with a higher education degree to a selection day. An application form, a structured interview and a questionnaire determined the ranking of 53 candidates; 24 of them were admitted. Both schools were satisfied with the manner in which the selection procedure worked. However, it is not yet possible to draw any definite conclusions about the effectiveness of the selection procedure.

  6. Use of mobile devices for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirschorn, David S; Choudhri, Asim F; Shih, George; Kim, Woojin

    2014-12-01

    Mobile devices have fundamentally changed personal computing, with many people forgoing the desktop and even laptop computer altogether in favor of a smaller, lighter, and cheaper device with a touch screen. Doctors and patients are beginning to expect medical images to be available on these devices for consultative viewing, if not actual diagnosis. However, this raises serious concerns with regard to the ability of existing mobile devices and networks to quickly and securely move these images. Medical images often come in large sets, which can bog down a network if not conveyed in an intelligent manner, and downloaded data on a mobile device are highly vulnerable to a breach of patient confidentiality should that device become lost or stolen. Some degree of regulation is needed to ensure that the software used to view these images allows all relevant medical information to be visible and manipulated in a clinically acceptable manner. There also needs to be a quality control mechanism to ensure that a device's display accurately conveys the image content without loss of contrast detail. Furthermore, not all mobile displays are appropriate for all types of images. The smaller displays of smart phones, for example, are not well suited for viewing entire chest radiographs, no matter how small and numerous the pixels of the display may be. All of these factors should be taken into account when deciding where, when, and how to use mobile devices for the display of medical images. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantitative imaging features: extension of the oncology medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P. T.; Young, K. C.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. With the advent of digital imaging modalities and the rapid growth in both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of data is of paramount importance. The Oncology Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) was created to provide a centralized, fully annotated dataset for research. The database contains both processed and unprocessed images, associated data, and annotations and where applicable expert determined ground truths describing features of interest. Medical imaging provides the ability to detect and localize many changes that are important to determine whether a disease is present or a therapy is effective by depicting alterations in anatomic, physiologic, biochemical or molecular processes. Quantitative imaging features are sensitive, specific, accurate and reproducible imaging measures of these changes. Here, we describe an extension to the OMI-DB whereby a range of imaging features and descriptors are pre-calculated using a high throughput approach. The ability to calculate multiple imaging features and data from the acquired images would be valuable and facilitate further research applications investigating detection, prognosis, and classification. The resultant data store contains more than 10 million quantitative features as well as features derived from CAD predictions. Theses data can be used to build predictive models to aid image classification, treatment response assessment as well as to identify prognostic imaging biomarkers.

  8. Deformable Medical Image Registration: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sotiras, Aristeidis; Davatzikos, Christos; Paragios, Nikos

    2013-01-01

    Deformable image registration is a fundamental task in medical image processing. Among its most important applications, one may cite: i) multi-modality fusion, where information acquired by different imaging devices or protocols is fused to facilitate diagnosis and treatment planning; ii) longitudinal studies, where temporal structural or anatomical changes are investigated; and iii) population modeling and statistical atlases used to study normal anatomical variability. In this paper, we attempt to give an overview of deformable registration methods, putting emphasis on the most recent advances in the domain. Additional emphasis has been given to techniques applied to medical images. In order to study image registration methods in depth, their main components are identified and studied independently. The most recent techniques are presented in a systematic fashion. The contribution of this paper is to provide an extensive account of registration techniques in a systematic manner. PMID:23739795

  9. Perspectives of medical X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenberger, J.; Hell, E.; Knüpfer, W.

    2001-06-01

    While X-ray image intensifiers (XII), storage phosphor screens and film-screen systems are still the work horses of medical imaging, large flat panel solid state detectors using either scintillators and amorphous silicon photo diode arrays (FD-Si), or direct X-ray conversion in amorphous selenium are reaching maturity. The main advantage with respect to image quality and low patient dose of the XII and FD-Si systems is caused by the rise of the Detector Quantum Efficiency originating from the application of thick needle-structured phosphor X-ray absorbers. With the detectors getting closer to an optimal state, further progress in medical X-ray imaging requires an improvement of the usable source characteristics. The development of clinical monochromatic X-ray sources of high power would not only allow an improved contrast-to-dose ratio by allowing smaller average photon energies in applications but would also lead to new imaging techniques.

  10. Bioresponsive nanosensors in medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberger, Eyk

    2010-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been established as sensitive probes for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While the majority of specific nanosensors are based on sterically stabilized iron oxide particles, the focus of this review is on the use of very small iron oxide particles (VSOPs) that are electrostatically stabilized by an anionic citrate acid shell. We used VSOPs to develop target-specific as well as protease-activatable nanosensors for molecular MRI. PMID:19846442

  11. Scale-Specific Multifractal Medical Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Braverman, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Fractal geometry has been applied widely in the analysis of medical images to characterize the irregular complex tissue structures that do not lend themselves to straightforward analysis with traditional Euclidean geometry. In this study, we treat the nonfractal behaviour of medical images over large-scale ranges by considering their box-counting fractal dimension as a scale-dependent parameter rather than a single number. We describe this approach in the context of the more generalized Rényi entropy, in which we can also compute the information and correlation dimensions of images. In addition, we describe and validate a computational improvement to box-counting fractal analysis. This improvement is based on integral images, which allows the speedup of any box-counting or similar fractal analysis algorithm, including estimation of scale-dependent dimensions. Finally, we applied our technique to images of invasive breast cancer tissue from 157 patients to show a relationship between the fractal analysis of these images over certain scale ranges and pathologic tumour grade (a standard prognosticator for breast cancer). Our approach is general and can be applied to any medical imaging application in which the complexity of pathological image structures may have clinical value. PMID:24023588

  12. Nanotechnology-supported THz medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements and progress in the field of medical imaging have dramatically enhanced the early detection and treatment of many pathological conditions. The development of new imaging modalities, especially non-ionising ones, which will improve prognosis, is of crucial importance. A number of novel imaging modalities have been developed but they are still in the initial stages of development and serious drawbacks obstruct them from offering their benefits to the medical field. In the 21 (st) century, it is believed that nanotechnology will highly influence our everyday life and dramatically change the world of medicine, including medical imaging. Here we discuss how nanotechnology, which is still in its infancy, can improve Terahertz (THz) imaging, an emerging imaging modality, and how it may find its way into real clinical applications. THz imaging is characterised by the use of non-ionising radiation and although it has the potential to be used in many biomedical fields, it remains in the field of basic research. An extensive review of the recent available literature shows how the current state of this emerging imaging modality can be transformed by nanotechnology. Innovative scientific concepts that use nanotechnology-based techniques to overcome some of the limitations of the use of THz imaging are discussed. We review a number of drawbacks, such as a low contrast mechanism, poor source performance and bulky THz systems, which characterise present THz medical imaging and suggest how they can be overcome through nanotechnology. Better resolution and higher detection sensitivity can also be achieved using nanotechnology techniques.

  13. Nanotechnology-supported THz medical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, the achievements and progress in the field of medical imaging have dramatically enhanced the early detection and treatment of many pathological conditions. The development of new imaging modalities, especially non-ionising ones, which will improve prognosis, is of crucial importance. A number of novel imaging modalities have been developed but they are still in the initial stages of development and serious drawbacks obstruct them from offering their benefits to the medical field. In the 21 st century, it is believed that nanotechnology will highly influence our everyday life and dramatically change the world of medicine, including medical imaging. Here we discuss how nanotechnology, which is still in its infancy, can improve Terahertz (THz) imaging, an emerging imaging modality, and how it may find its way into real clinical applications. THz imaging is characterised by the use of non-ionising radiation and although it has the potential to be used in many biomedical fields, it remains in the field of basic research. An extensive review of the recent available literature shows how the current state of this emerging imaging modality can be transformed by nanotechnology. Innovative scientific concepts that use nanotechnology-based techniques to overcome some of the limitations of the use of THz imaging are discussed. We review a number of drawbacks, such as a low contrast mechanism, poor source performance and bulky THz systems, which characterise present THz medical imaging and suggest how they can be overcome through nanotechnology. Better resolution and higher detection sensitivity can also be achieved using nanotechnology techniques. PMID:24555052

  14. Multiscale Medical Image Fusion in Wavelet Domain

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Wavelet transforms have emerged as a powerful tool in image fusion. However, the study and analysis of medical image fusion is still a challenging area of research. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a multiscale fusion of multimodal medical images in wavelet domain. Fusion of medical images has been performed at multiple scales varying from minimum to maximum level using maximum selection rule which provides more flexibility and choice to select the relevant fused images. The experimental analysis of the proposed method has been performed with several sets of medical images. Fusion results have been evaluated subjectively and objectively with existing state-of-the-art fusion methods which include several pyramid- and wavelet-transform-based fusion methods and principal component analysis (PCA) fusion method. The comparative analysis of the fusion results has been performed with edge strength (Q), mutual information (MI), entropy (E), standard deviation (SD), blind structural similarity index metric (BSSIM), spatial frequency (SF), and average gradient (AG) metrics. The combined subjective and objective evaluations of the proposed fusion method at multiple scales showed the effectiveness and goodness of the proposed approach. PMID:24453868

  15. [Principles of medical liability and practice in medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Thibierge, M; Fournier, L; Cabanis, E A

    1999-07-01

    Radiologists are liable for all aspects of their practice, from the indication of an examination to the radiology report and follow-up, as well as for providing information and recommendations. They are liable for their decisions and actions. They are liable for their competence and continuous medical education. They are also liable for their own equipment and staff. In cases of litigation, the liability of a radiologist may be questioned. Four types of procedures must been known: penal, civil, administrative and disciplinary.

  16. A hybrid technique for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Nyma, Alamgir; Kang, Myeongsu; Kwon, Yung-Keun; Kim, Cheol-Hong; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2012-01-01

    Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR) image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  17. A computer driven photoscanner for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Hinshaw, W S; Holland, G N

    1978-03-01

    A novel and versatile instrument for producing high quality monochrome and colour hard-copy of medical images from an array of digital information is described. Images are produced on standard photographic print paper mounted on the bed of a conventional X-Y plotter by scanning a time-modulated light source over the paper using a computer driven raster. A matrix board gives control of both greyscale and colour attribution. Examples of NMR images produced by the system are presented. A refinement of the technique which allows two variables to be displayed on one image is also described.

  18. Diagnostic Medical Imaging in Pediatric Patients and Subsequent Cancer Risk.

    PubMed

    Mulvihill, David J; Jhawar, Sachin; Kostis, John B; Goyal, Sharad

    2017-06-20

    The use of diagnostic medical imaging is becoming increasingly more commonplace in the pediatric setting. However, many medical imaging modalities expose pediatric patients to ionizing radiation, which has been shown to increase the risk of cancer development in later life. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the available data regarding the risk of cancer development following exposure to ionizing radiation from diagnostic medical imaging. Attention is paid to modalities such as computed tomography scans and fluoroscopic procedures that can expose children to radiation doses orders of magnitude higher than standard diagnostic x-rays. Ongoing studies that seek to more precisely determine the relationship of diagnostic medical radiation in children and subsequent cancer development are discussed, as well as modern strategies to better quantify this risk. Finally, as cardiovascular imaging and intervention contribute substantially to medical radiation exposure, we discuss strategies to enhance radiation safety in these areas. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Medical imaging looks inside depression.

    PubMed

    Church, Elizabeth J

    2009-01-01

    Worldwide, depression affects 121 million people. It is the most common psychiatric disorder, and as the principal antecedent to suicide, depression can even be deadly. The World Health Organization reports that depression is the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of global disease burden. Although we are just beginning to comprehend the deleterious effects of this disorder, scientists are finding exciting and innovative ways to use technological advances in imaging to peer inside the brain and obtain a more refined understanding of depression. Research promises earlier diagnoses, more effective treatments and ultimately better prognoses.

  20. Radiation Dose from Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jesse G.A; Mills, Christopher N.; Mogensen, Monique A.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. Methods We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. Results The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Conclusion Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure. PMID:22900113

  1. Radiation dose from medical imaging: a primer for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jesse G A; Mills, Christopher N; Mogensen, Monique A; Lee, Christoph I

    2012-05-01

    Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population's exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articles pertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure. The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer in most clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified 3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer may outweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patient discussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted. Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients' exposure to ionizing radiation, should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medical imaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include the development of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  2. Medical image registration using fuzzy theory.

    PubMed

    Pan, Meisen; Tang, Jingtian; Xiong, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Mutual information (MI)-based registration, which uses MI as the similarity measure, is a representative method in medical image registration. It has an excellent robustness and accuracy, but with the disadvantages of a large amount of calculation and a long processing time. In this paper, by computing the medical image moments, the centroid is acquired. By applying fuzzy c-means clustering, the coordinates of the medical image are divided into two clusters to fit a straight line, and the rotation angles of the reference and floating images are computed, respectively. Thereby, the initial values for registering the images are determined. When searching the optimal geometric transformation parameters, we put forward the two new concepts of fuzzy distance and fuzzy signal-to-noise ratio (FSNR), and we select FSNR as the similarity measure between the reference and floating images. In the experiments, the Simplex method is chosen as multi-parameter optimisation. The experimental results show that this proposed method has a simple implementation, a low computational cost, a fast registration and good registration accuracy. Moreover, it can effectively avoid trapping into the local optima. It is adapted to both mono-modality and multi-modality image registrations.

  3. Hyperspectral imaging applied to medical diagnoses and food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, Oscar; Gomez, Richard B.; Chainani, Arun; Roper, William E.

    2003-08-01

    This paper analyzes the feasibility and performance of HSI systems for medical diagnosis as well as for food safety. Illness prevention and early disease detection are key elements for maintaining good health. Health care practitioners worldwide rely on innovative electronic devices to accurately identify disease. Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technique that may provide a less invasive procedure than conventional diagnostic imaging. By analyzing reflected and fluorescent light applied to the human body, a HSI system serves as a diagnostic tool as well as a method for evaluating the effectiveness of applied therapies. The safe supply and production of food is also of paramount importance to public health illness prevention. Although this paper will focus on imaging and spectroscopy in food inspection procedures -- the detection of contaminated food sources -- to ensure food quality, HSI also shows promise in detecting pesticide levels in food production (agriculture.)

  4. Effects of Sensory and Procedural Information on Coping with Stressful Medical Procedures and Pain: A Meta-Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suls, Jerry; Wan, Choi K.

    1989-01-01

    A meta-analysis of studies on preparation for medical procedures and pain examined the relative effects of sensory, procedural, and combined sensory-procedural preoperational information on coping outcomes. Results indicated that, in contrast to sensory information, procedural information provided no significant benefits over control group…

  5. Medical Imaging Inspired Vertex Reconstruction at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hageböck, S.; von Toerne, E.

    2012-12-01

    Three-dimensional image reconstruction in medical applications (PET or X-ray CT) utilizes sophisticated filter algorithms to linear trajectories of coincident photon pairs or x-rays. The goal is to reconstruct an image of an emitter density distribution. In a similar manner, tracks in particle physics originate from vertices that need to be distinguished from background track combinations. In this study it is investigated if vertex reconstruction in high energy proton collisions may benefit from medical imaging methods. A new method of vertex finding, the Medical Imaging Vertexer (MIV), is presented based on a three-dimensional filtered backprojection algorithm. It is compared to the open-source RAVE vertexing package. The performance of the vertex finding algorithms is evaluated as a function of instantaneous luminosity using simulated LHC collisions. Tracks in these collisions are described by a simplified detector model which is inspired by the tracking performance of the LHC experiments. At high luminosities (25 pileup vertices and more), the medical imaging approach finds vertices with a higher efficiency and purity than the RAVE “Adaptive Vertex Reconstructor” algorithm. It is also much faster if more than 25 vertices are to be reconstructed because the amount of CPU time rises linearly with the number of tracks whereas it rises quadratically for the adaptive vertex fitter AVR.

  6. A watershed approach for improving medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Zanaty, E A; Afifi, Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a novel watershed approach based on seed region growing and image entropy is presented which could improve the medical image segmentation. The proposed algorithm enables the prior information of seed region growing and image entropy in its calculation. The algorithm starts by partitioning the image into several levels of intensity using watershed multi-degree immersion process. The levels of intensity are the input to a computationally efficient seed region segmentation process which produces the initial partitioning of the image regions. These regions are fed to entropy procedure to carry out a suitable merging which produces the final segmentation. The latter process uses a region-based similarity representation of the image regions to decide whether regions can be merged. The region is isolated from the level and the residual pixels are uploaded to the next level and so on, we recall this process as multi-level process and the watershed is called multi-level watershed. The proposed algorithm is applied to challenging applications: grey matter-white matter segmentation in magnetic resonance images (MRIs). The established methods and the proposed approach are experimented by these applications to a variety of simulating immersion, multi-degree, multi-level seed region growing and multi-level seed region growing with entropy. It is shown that the proposed method achieves more accurate results for medical image oversegmentation.

  7. MRIdb: medical image management for biobank research.

    PubMed

    Woodbridge, Mark; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; O'Regan, Declan P

    2013-10-01

    Clinical picture archiving and communications systems provide convenient, efficient access to digital medical images from multiple modalities but can prove challenging to deploy, configure and use. MRIdb is a self-contained image database, particularly suited to the storage and management of magnetic resonance imaging data sets for population phenotyping. It integrates a mature image archival system with an intuitive web-based user interface that provides visualisation and export functionality. In addition, utilities for auditing, data migration and system monitoring are included in a virtual machine image that is easily deployed with minimal configuration. The result is a freely available turnkey solution, designed to support epidemiological and imaging genetics research. It allows the management of patient data sets in a secure, scalable manner without requiring the installation of any bespoke software on end users' workstations. MRIdb is an open-source software, available for download at http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioinfsupport/resources/software/mridb .

  8. Training the assessors for the General Medical Council's Performance Procedures.

    PubMed

    McAvoy, P A; McCrorie, P; Jolly, B; Ayers, A B; Cox, J; Howes, A D; Macdonald, E B; Slimmon, D J; Southgate, L

    2001-12-01

    From July 1997, the General Medical Council (GMC) has had the power to investigate doctors whose performance is considered to be seriously deficient. Assessment procedures have been developed for all medical specialties to include peer review of performance in practice and tests of competence. Peer review is conducted by teams of at least two medical assessors and one lay assessor. A comprehensive training programme for assessors has been developed that simulates the context of a typical practice-based assessment and has been tailored for 12 medical specialties. The training includes the principles of assessment, familiarization with the assessment instruments and supervised practice in assessment methods used during the peer review visit. High fidelity is achieved through the use of actors who simulate third party interviewees and trained doctors who role play the assessee. A subgroup of assessors, selected to lead the assessment teams, undergo training in handling group dynamics, report writing and in defending the assessment report against legal challenge. Debriefing of assessors following real assessments has been strongly positive with regard to their preparedness and confidence in undertaking the assessment.

  9. Medical image registration using sparse coding of image patches.

    PubMed

    Afzali, Maryam; Ghaffari, Aboozar; Fatemizadeh, Emad; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    Image registration is a basic task in medical image processing applications like group analysis and atlas construction. Similarity measure is a critical ingredient of image registration. Intensity distortion of medical images is not considered in most previous similarity measures. Therefore, in the presence of bias field distortions, they do not generate an acceptable registration. In this paper, we propose a sparse based similarity measure for mono-modal images that considers non-stationary intensity and spatially-varying distortions. The main idea behind this measure is that the aligned image is constructed by an analysis dictionary trained using the image patches. For this purpose, we use "Analysis K-SVD" to train the dictionary and find the sparse coefficients. We utilize image patches to construct the analysis dictionary and then we employ the proposed sparse similarity measure to find a non-rigid transformation using free form deformation (FFD). Experimental results show that the proposed approach is able to robustly register 2D and 3D images in both simulated and real cases. The proposed method outperforms other state-of-the-art similarity measures and decreases the transformation error compared to the previous methods. Even in the presence of bias field distortion, the proposed method aligns images without any preprocessing.

  10. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve

  11. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  12. Effectiveness of sucrose analgesia in newborns undergoing painful medical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; Hancock, Rebecca; Smith, Ryan W.; Stephens, Derek; Atenafu, Eshetu; Beyene, Joseph; Koren, Gideon; Stevens, Bonnie; Katz, Joel

    2008-01-01

    Background Sucrose is widely used to manage procedural pain in term newborns despite a lack of evidence of its effectiveness for different procedures and infant populations. Our objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of sucrose in newborns undergoing various medical procedures within 2 days of birth. Methods We performed a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. We included newborns (≥ 36 weeks gestation) of diabetic mothers and nondiabetic mothers. Each newborn received 2 mL of a 24%-sucrose or placebo solution before all procedures. We used the Premature Infant Pain Profile to assess pain during intramuscular injection of vitamin K, venipuncture for the newborn screening test and the first 3 heel lances for glucose monitoring (newborns of diabetic mothers only). Scores ranged from from 0 (no pain) to 18 (maximum pain). Results We included 240 newborns (120 from diabetic mothers, 120 from nondiabetic mothers). The overall mean pain score was lower among newborns who received sucrose than among those who received a placebo (mean difference –1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] –2.0 to –0.6). We found that pain scores during intramuscular injection did not differ significantly between the sucrose and placebo groups for newborns of diabetic or nondiabetic mothers (newborns of nondiabetic mothers: mean difference –1.1, 95% CI –2.4 to 0.2; newborns of diabetic mothers: mean difference –1.0, 95% CI –2.4 to 0.4). During venipuncture, newborns who received sucrose had lower pain scores compared with those who received a placebo (newborns of nondiabetic mothers: mean difference –3.2, 95% CI –4.6 to –1.8; newborns of diabetic mothers: mean difference –2.4, 95% CI –3.8 to –1.0). Among newborns of diabetic mothers, there was no difference in pain during the first 3 heel lances or mean glucose levels between the sucrose and placebo groups (p = 0.94 and p = 0.29 respectively). Interpretation We found a modest reduction of pain in

  13. The child's perspective on discomfort during medical research procedures: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Staphorst, Mira S; Benninga, Marc A; Bisschoff, Margriet; Bon, Irma; Busschbach, Jan J V; Diederen, Kay; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Haarman, Eric G; Hunfeld, Joke A M; Jaddoe, Vincent V W; de Jong, Karin J M; de Jongste, Johan C; Kindermann, Angelika; Königs, Marsh; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Passchier, Jan; Pijnenburg, Mariëlle W; Reneman, Liesbeth; Ridder, Lissy de; Tamminga, Hyke G; Tiemeier, Henning W; Timman, Reinier; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2017-08-01

    The evaluation of discomfort in paediatric research is scarcely evidence-based. In this study, we make a start in describing children's self-reported discomfort during common medical research procedures and compare this with discomfort during dental check-ups which can be considered as a reference level of a 'minimal discomfort' medical procedure. We exploratory study whether there are associations between age, anxiety-proneness, gender, medical condition, previous experiences and discomfort. We also describe children's suggestions for reducing discomfort. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Paediatric research at three academic hospitals. 357 children with and without illnesses (8-18 years, mean=10.6 years) were enrolled: 307 from paediatric research studies and 50 from dental care. We measured various generic forms of discomfort (nervousness, annoyance, pain, fright, boredom, tiredness) due to six common research procedures: buccal swabs, MRI scans, pulmonary function tests, skin prick tests, ultrasound imaging and venepunctures. Most children reported limited discomfort during the research procedures (means: 1-2.6 on a scale from 1 to 5). Compared with dental check-ups, buccal swab tests, skin prick tests and ultrasound imaging were less discomforting, while MRI scans, venepunctures and pulmonary function tests caused a similar degree of discomfort. 60.3% of the children suggested providing distraction by showing movies to reduce discomfort. The exploratory analyses suggested a positive association between anxiety-proneness and discomfort. The findings of this study support the acceptability of participation of children in the studied research procedures, which stimulates evidence-based research practice. Furthermore, the present study can be considered as a first step in providing benchmarks for discomfort of procedures in paediatric research. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved

  14. Model observers in medical imaging research.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Park, Subok

    2013-10-04

    Model observers play an important role in the optimization and assessment of imaging devices. In this review paper, we first discuss the basic concepts of model observers, which include the mathematical foundations and psychophysical considerations in designing both optimal observers for optimizing imaging systems and anthropomorphic observers for modeling human observers. Second, we survey a few state-of-the-art computational techniques for estimating model observers and the principles of implementing these techniques. Finally, we review a few applications of model observers in medical imaging research.

  15. [Promoting "well-treatment" in medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Renouf, Nicole; Llop, Marc

    2012-12-01

    A project to promote "well-treatment" has been initiated in the medical imaging department of a Parisian hospital. With the aim of promoting the well-being of the patient and developing shared values of empathy and respect, the members of this medico-technical team have undertaken to build a culture of "well-treatment" which respects the patient's dignity and rights.

  16. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  17. Visual Function Assessment in Medical Imaging Research.

    PubMed

    Lança, Carla; Thompson, John D; Lança, Luis; Hogg, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Medical image perception research relies on visual data to study the diagnostic relationship between observers and medical images. A consistent method to assess visual function for participants in medical imaging research has not been developed and represents a significant gap in existing research. Three visual assessment factors appropriate to observer studies were identified: visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and stereopsis. A test was designed for each, and 30 radiography observers (mean age 31.6 years) participated in each test. Mean binocular visual acuity for distance was 20/14 for all observers. The difference between observers who did and did not use corrective lenses was not statistically significant (P = .12). All subjects had a normal value for near visual acuity and stereoacuity. Contrast sensitivity was better than population norms. All observers had normal visual function and could participate in medical imaging visual analysis studies. Protocols of evaluation and populations norms are provided. Further studies are necessary to understand fully the relationship between visual performance on tests and diagnostic accuracy in practice.

  18. Beat-Frequency/Microsphere Medical Ultrasonic Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Pretlow, Robert A., III

    1995-01-01

    Medical ultrasonic imaging system designed to provide quantitative data on various flows of blood in chambers, blood vessels, muscles, and tissues of heart. Sensitive enough to yield readings on flows of blood in heart even when microspheres used as ultrasonic contrast agents injected far from heart and diluted by circulation of blood elsewhere in body.

  19. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  20. Nuclear imaging in the realm of medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Frank

    2003-08-01

    In medical imaging, information concerning the anatomy or biological processes of a patient is detected and presented on film or screen for interpretation by a reader. The information flow from patient to reader optimally implies: the emission, transmission or reflection of information carriers, typically photons or sound waves, which have to be correctly modulated by patient information through interactions in the patient; their detection by adequate imaging equipment preserving essential spectral, spatial and/or temporal information; the presentation of the information in the most perceivable way; the observation by an unbiased and trained expert. In reality, only an approximation to this optimal situation is achieved. It is the goal of R&D in the medical imaging field to approach the optimum as much as possible within societal constraints such as patient risk and comfort, economics, etc. First, the basic physical concepts underlying the imaging process will be introduced. Different imaging modalities will then be situated in the realm of medical imaging with some emphasis on nuclear imaging.

  1. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  2. Infant test/procedure preparation (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During any infant test or procedure a child will be more comforted if a parent is able to be present, although the child will probably still show anxiety and cry. A child may also find comfort in a favorite toy or blanket.

  3. HIPAA compliant auditing system for medical images.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng; Liu, Brent J

    2005-01-01

    As an official regulation for healthcare privacy and security, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) mandates health institutions to protect health information against unauthorized use or disclosure. One such method proposed by HIPAA Security Standards is audit trail, which records and examines health information access activities. HIPAA mandates healthcare providers to have the ability to generate audit trails on data access activities for any specific patient. Although current medical imaging systems generate activity logs, there is a lack of formal methodology to interpret these large volumes of log data and generate HIPAA compliant auditing trails. This paper outlines the design of a HIPAA compliant auditing system (HCAS) for medical images in imaging systems such as PACS and discusses the development of a security monitoring (SM) toolkit based on some of the partial components in HCAS.

  4. Neural networks: Application to medical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Laurence P.

    1994-01-01

    The research mission is the development of computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) methods for improved diagnosis of medical images including digital x-ray sensors and tomographic imaging modalities. The CAD algorithms include advanced methods for adaptive nonlinear filters for image noise suppression, hybrid wavelet methods for feature segmentation and enhancement, and high convergence neural networks for feature detection and VLSI implementation of neural networks for real time analysis. Other missions include (1) implementation of CAD methods on hospital based picture archiving computer systems (PACS) and information networks for central and remote diagnosis and (2) collaboration with defense and medical industry, NASA, and federal laboratories in the area of dual use technology conversion from defense or aerospace to medicine.

  5. Scientific evaluation and pricing of medical devices and associated procedures in France.

    PubMed

    Gilard, Martine; Debroucker, Frederique; Dubray, Claude; Allioux, Yves; Aper, Eliane; Barat-Leonhardt, Valérie; Brami, Michèle; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Coqueblin, Claire; Fare, Sandrine; Giri, Isabelle; Goehrs, Jean-Marie; Levesque, Karine; Maugendre, Philippe; Parquin, François; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Szwarcensztein, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices are many and various, ranging from tongue spatulas to implantable or invasive devices and imaging machines; their lifetimes are short, between 18 months and 5 years, due to incessant incremental innovation; and they are operator-dependent: in general, the clinical user performs a fitting procedure (hip implant or pacemaker), a therapeutic procedure using a non-implantable invasive device (arrhythmic site ablation probe, angioplasty balloon, extension spondyloplasty system, etc.) or follow-up of an active implanted device (long-term follow-up of an implanted cardiac defibrillator or of a deep brain stimulator in Parkinson's patients). A round-table held during the XXVIII(th) Giens Workshops meeting focused on the methodology of scientific evaluation of medical devices and the associated procedures with a view to their pricing and financing by the French National Health Insurance system. The working hypothesis was that the available data-set was sufficient for and compatible with scientific evaluation with clinical benefit. Post-registration studies, although contributing to the continuity of assessment, were not dealt with. Moreover, the focus was restricted to devices used in health establishments, where the association between devices and technical medical procedures is optimally representative. An update of the multiple regulatory protocols governing medical devices and procedures is provided. Issues more specifically related to procedures as such, to non-implantable devices and to innovative devices are then dealt with, and the proposals and discussion points raised at the round-table for each of these three areas are presented.

  6. Medical tourism: the trend toward outsourcing medical procedures to foreign countries.

    PubMed

    York, Diane

    2008-01-01

    The rising costs of medical treatment in the United States are fueling a movement to outsource medical treatment. Estimates of the number of Americans traveling overseas for treatment range from 50,000 to 500,000. Charges for common procedures such as heart bypass can be $11,000 in Thailand compared to $130,000 in the United States. Knee replacement in the United States can cost $40,000 compared to $13,000 in Singapore.A new industry, medical tourism, has been created to advise patients on the appropriate facility in the right country for their condition, handle all travel arrangements, teleconference with physicians, and send medical records. To respond to the growth in medical travel, the Joint Commission (formerly the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations) initiated the Joint Commission International (JCI) to accredit hospitals worldwide. Although outcome statistics from hospitals outside the United States are rare, first-person reports on quality are numerous. Making surgery possible for uninsured and underinsured individuals or self-insured state, municipal, and private entities is a major benefit of medical tourism. Mitigating against medical travel are the lack of legal remedies in place for malpractice and the possibility that travel itself can impose risk to patients. For example, lengthy air flights where the patient is in a fixed position for hours at a time can cause embolisms. If the trend toward medical tourism continues, continuing education, credentialing, and certification services may be required to help assure patient safety.

  7. Medical practice, procedure manuals and the standardisation of hospital death.

    PubMed

    Hadders, Hans

    2009-03-01

    This paper examines how death is managed in a larger regional hospital within the Norwegian health-care. The central focus of my paper concerns variations in how healthcare personnel enact death and handle the dead patient. Over several decades, modern standardised hospital death has come under critique in the western world. Such critique has resulted in changes in the standardisation of hospital deaths within Norwegian health-care. In the wake of the hospice movement and with greater focus on palliative care, doors have gradually been opened and relatives of the deceased are now more often invited to participate. I explore how the medical practice around death along with the procedure manual of post-mortem care at Trondheim University Hospital has changed. I argue that in the late-modern context, standardisation of hospital death is a multidimensional affair, embedded in a far more comprehensive framework than the depersonalized medico-legal. In the late-modern Norwegian hospital, interdisciplinary negotiation and co-operation has allowed a number of different agendas to co-exist, without any ensuing loss of the medical power holder's authority to broker death. I follow Mol's notion of praxiographic orientation of the actor-network approach while exploring this medical practice.

  8. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for making ...

  9. Imaging-related medications: a class overview

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Imaging-related medications (contrast agents) are commonly utilized to improve visualization of radiographic, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) images. While traditional medications are used specifically for their pharmacological actions, the ideal imaging agent provides enhanced contrast with little biological interaction. The radiopaque agents, barium sulfate and iodinated contrast agents, confer “contrast” to x-ray films by their physical ability to directly absorb x-rays. Gadolinium-based MR agents enhance visualization of tissues when exposed to a magnetic field. Ferrous-ferric oxide–based paramagnetic agents provide negative contrast for MR liver studies. This article provides an overview of clinically relevant information for the imaging-related medications commonly in use. It reviews the safety improvements in new generations of drugs; risk factors and precautions for the reduction of severe adverse reactions (i.e., extravasation, contrast-induced nephropathy, metformin-induced lactic acidosis, and nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy/nephrogenic systemic fibrosis); and the significance of diligent patient screening before contrast exposure and appropriate monitoring after exposure. PMID:17948119

  10. Medical Imaging Informatics: Towards a Personalized Computational Patient.

    PubMed

    Ayache, N

    2016-05-20

    Medical Imaging Informatics has become a fast evolving discipline at the crossing of Informatics, Computational Sciences, and Medicine that is profoundly changing medical practices, for the patients' benefit.

  11. Simplified labeling process for medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingchen; Huang, Junzhou; Huang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shaoting; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2012-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in many medical imaging applications by automatically locating the regions of interest. Typically supervised learning based segmentation methods require a large set of accurately labeled training data. However, thel labeling process is tedious, time consuming and sometimes not necessary. We propose a robust logistic regression algorithm to handle label outliers such that doctors do not need to waste time on precisely labeling images for training set. To validate its effectiveness and efficiency, we conduct carefully designed experiments on cervigram image segmentation while there exist label outliers. Experimental results show that the proposed robust logistic regression algorithms achieve superior performance compared to previous methods, which validates the benefits of the proposed algorithms.

  12. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    SciTech Connect

    Schueltke, Elisabeth; Nikkhah, Guido; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean

    2010-07-23

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP.Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naieve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source.Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  13. Bystander Effects During Synchrotron Imaging Procedures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schültke, Elisabeth; Bewer, Brian; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Chapman, Dean; Nikkhah, Guido

    2010-07-01

    Using monochromatic beam and synchrotron phase-contrast technique at the biomedical beamline of the Italian synchrotron facility Elettra (SYRMEP), we have shown in a small animal model of malignant brain tumor that it is possible to obtain high-resolution images of very small tumors when they have developed from implanted tumor cells loaded with colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP). All previous experiments were conducted in post-mortem samples. We have now designed a cell culture experiment to investigate the effects of synchrotron radiation with an energy and dose profile similar to that expected in our first in vivo imaging studies according to the protocol developed at SYRMEP. Materials and Methods: Culture flasks containing either gold-loaded or naïve C6 glioma cells were exposed to a dose of 0.5 Gy at 24 keV. The irradiated medium was aspirated and replaced with fresh growth medium. Twenty-four hours later this non-irradiated medium exposed to irradiated cells was aspirated, then added to non-irradiated C6 cells in order to investigate whether bystander effects are seen under the conditions of our image acquisition protocol. The irradiated medium was added to a number of other non-irradiated cell cultures. Cell counts were followed until 72 hrs after irradiation. Western blots were conducted with H2AX antibodies. This experiment was one of the first biomedical experiments conducted at BMIT, the new biomedical imaging and therapy beamline of the Canadian Light Source. Results: No significant differences in proliferation were seen between cells that were directly irradiated, exposed to irradiated medium or exposed to the non-irradiated 24-hr-medium from the irradiated cells. However, there was a tendency towards a higher number of double strand breaks in previously irradiated cells when they were exposed to non-irradiated medium that had been in contact with irradiated cells for 24 hrs.

  14. Medical imaging displays and their use in image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Kagadis, George C; Walz-Flannigan, Alisa; Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Nagy, Paul G; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Diamantopoulos, Athanasios; Langer, Steve G

    2013-01-01

    The adequate and repeatable performance of the image display system is a key element of information technology platforms in a modern radiology department. However, despite the wide availability of high-end computing platforms and advanced color and gray-scale monitors, the quality and properties of the final displayed medical image may often be inadequate for diagnostic purposes if the displays are not configured and maintained properly. In this article-an expanded version of the Radiological Society of North America educational module "Image Display"-the authors discuss fundamentals of image display hardware, quality control and quality assurance processes for optimal image interpretation settings, and parameters of the viewing environment that influence reader performance. Radiologists, medical physicists, and other allied professionals should strive to understand the role of display technology and proper usage for a quality radiology practice. The display settings and display quality control and quality assurance processes described in this article can help ensure high standards of perceived image quality and image interpretation accuracy.

  15. An Image Handling System For Medical Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubry, Florent; Kaplan, Herve; Di Paola, Robert

    1989-10-01

    The processing of medical images requires the handling of complex structured sets of elementary objects (images, curves,... and their associated parameters). Usually, an elementary object cannot be interpreted without information concerning the structure to which it belongs (e.g image sequences). Then it is necessary to consider the whole structure like an atomic semantic entity, object of an image data base. As specific tools are necessary to manage these objects, an object oriented handling system (OHS), part of our medical image data base project (BDIM), was developed to perform : i) the array storage management, ii) the interface between applications and the BDIM to have access to objects (create, update, delete...) and components (navigation inside object structures, access to arrays and parameters). The image handling system (IHS) decribed here is the user level part of the OHS. IHS allows the evolution of the data base environment by adding or updating acquisition and/or processing functionalities. To unify data access methods, the concept of logical file is introduced as a special class of BDIM objects. The logical file does not necessitate the use of a specific declaration for the different kinds of images because it is possible, for a desired processing , to have access to the only concerned data.

  16. Deep Learning in Medical Imaging: General Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lee, June-Goo; Jun, Sanghoon; Cho, Young-Won; Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Guk Bae

    2017-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN)–a machine learning technique inspired by the human neuronal synapse system–was introduced in the 1950s. However, the ANN was previously limited in its ability to solve actual problems, due to the vanishing gradient and overfitting problems with training of deep architecture, lack of computing power, and primarily the absence of sufficient data to train the computer system. Interest in this concept has lately resurfaced, due to the availability of big data, enhanced computing power with the current graphics processing units, and novel algorithms to train the deep neural network. Recent studies on this technology suggest its potentially to perform better than humans in some visual and auditory recognition tasks, which may portend its applications in medicine and healthcare, especially in medical imaging, in the foreseeable future. This review article offers perspectives on the history, development, and applications of deep learning technology, particularly regarding its applications in medical imaging. PMID:28670152

  17. Deep Learning in Medical Imaging: General Overview.

    PubMed

    Lee, June-Goo; Jun, Sanghoon; Cho, Young-Won; Lee, Hyunna; Kim, Guk Bae; Seo, Joon Beom; Kim, Namkug

    2017-01-01

    The artificial neural network (ANN)-a machine learning technique inspired by the human neuronal synapse system-was introduced in the 1950s. However, the ANN was previously limited in its ability to solve actual problems, due to the vanishing gradient and overfitting problems with training of deep architecture, lack of computing power, and primarily the absence of sufficient data to train the computer system. Interest in this concept has lately resurfaced, due to the availability of big data, enhanced computing power with the current graphics processing units, and novel algorithms to train the deep neural network. Recent studies on this technology suggest its potentially to perform better than humans in some visual and auditory recognition tasks, which may portend its applications in medicine and healthcare, especially in medical imaging, in the foreseeable future. This review article offers perspectives on the history, development, and applications of deep learning technology, particularly regarding its applications in medical imaging.

  18. Using formal methods for content validation of medical procedure documents.

    PubMed

    Cota, Érika; Ribeiro, Leila; Bezerra, Jonas Santos; Costa, Andrei; da Silva, Rosiana Estefane; Cota, Gláucia

    2017-08-01

    We propose the use of a formal approach to support content validation of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for a therapeutic intervention. Such an approach provides a useful tool to identify ambiguities, omissions and inconsistencies, and improves the applicability and efficacy of documents in the health settings. We apply and evaluate a methodology originally proposed for the verification of software specification documents to a specific SOP. The verification methodology uses the graph formalism to model the document. Semi-automatic analysis identifies possible problems in the model and in the original document. The verification is an iterative process that identifies possible faults in the original text that should be revised by its authors and/or specialists. The proposed method was able to identify 23 possible issues in the original document (ambiguities, omissions, redundant information, and inaccuracies, among others). The formal verification process aided the specialists to consider a wider range of usage scenarios and to identify which instructions form the kernel of the proposed SOP and which ones represent additional or required knowledge that are mandatory for the correct application of the medical document. By using the proposed verification process, a simpler and yet more complete SOP could be produced. As consequence, during the validation process the experts received a more mature document and could focus on the technical aspects of the procedure itself. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated synthesis of image processing procedures using AI planning techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve; Mortensen, Helen

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the Multimission VICAR (Video Image Communication and Retrieval) Planner (MVP) (Chien 1994) system, which uses artificial intelligence planning techniques (Iwasaki & Friedland, 1985, Pemberthy & Weld, 1992, Stefik, 1981) to automatically construct executable complex image processing procedures (using models of the smaller constituent image processing subprograms) in response to image processing requests made to the JPL Multimission Image Processing Laboratory (MIPL). The MVP system allows the user to specify the image processing requirements in terms of the various types of correction required. Given this information, MVP derives unspecified required processing steps and determines appropriate image processing programs and parameters to achieve the specified image processing goals. This information is output as an executable image processing program which can then be executed to fill the processing request.

  20. Towards new functional nanostructures for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Naomi; Rowlands, J. A.

    2008-10-15

    Nanostructures represent a promising new type of contrast agent for clinical medical imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, ultrasound, and nuclear imaging. Currently, most nanostructures are simple, single-purpose imaging agents based on spherical constructs (e.g., liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, macromolecules, dendrimers, and solid nanoparticle structures). In the next decade, new clinical imaging nanostructures will be designed as multi-functional constructs, to both amplify imaging signals at disease sites and deliver localized therapy. Proposals for nanostructures to fulfill these new functions will be outlined. New functional nanostructures are expected to develop in five main directions: Modular nanostructures with additive functionality; cooperative nanostructures with synergistic functionality; nanostructures activated by their in vivo environment; nanostructures activated by sources outside the patient; and novel, nonspherical nanostructures and components. The development and clinical translation of next-generation nanostructures will be facilitated by a combination of improved clarity of the in vivo imaging and biological challenges and the requirements to successfully overcome them; development of standardized characterization and validation systems tailored for the preclinical assessment of nanostructure agents; and development of streamlined commercialization strategies and pipelines tailored for nanostructure-based agents for their efficient translation to the clinic.

  1. Machine learning for medical images analysis.

    PubMed

    Criminisi, A

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses the application of machine learning for the analysis of medical images. Specifically: (i) We show how a special type of learning models can be thought of as automatically optimized, hierarchically-structured, rule-based algorithms, and (ii) We discuss how the issue of collecting large labelled datasets applies to both conventional algorithms as well as machine learning techniques. The size of the training database is a function of model complexity rather than a characteristic of machine learning methods.

  2. Learning curve estimation in medical devices and procedures: hierarchical modeling.

    PubMed

    Govindarajulu, Usha S; Stillo, Marco; Goldfarb, David; Matheny, Michael E; Resnic, Frederic S

    2017-07-30

    In the use of medical device procedures, learning effects have been shown to be a critical component of medical device safety surveillance. To support their estimation of these effects, we evaluated multiple methods for modeling these rates within a complex simulated dataset representing patients treated by physicians clustered within institutions. We employed unique modeling for the learning curves to incorporate the learning hierarchy between institution and physicians and then modeled them within established methods that work with hierarchical data such as generalized estimating equations (GEE) and generalized linear mixed effect models. We found that both methods performed well, but that the GEE may have some advantages over the generalized linear mixed effect models for ease of modeling and a substantially lower rate of model convergence failures. We then focused more on using GEE and performed a separate simulation to vary the shape of the learning curve as well as employed various smoothing methods to the plots. We concluded that while both hierarchical methods can be used with our mathematical modeling of the learning curve, the GEE tended to perform better across multiple simulated scenarios in order to accurately model the learning effect as a function of physician and hospital hierarchical data in the use of a novel medical device. We found that the choice of shape used to produce the 'learning-free' dataset would be dataset specific, while the choice of smoothing method was negligibly different from one another. This was an important application to understand how best to fit this unique learning curve function for hierarchical physician and hospital data. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Musculoskeletal interventional procedures: With or without imaging guidance?

    PubMed

    Kane, David; Koski, Juhani

    2016-08-01

    Aspiration and injection of joints and soft tissues is an indispensable skill used in everyday practice by the clinical rheumatologist. Most rheumatologists recognise that performing these procedures using anatomical landmarks is not always successful, particularly in the case of small or infrequently injected joints, bursae or tendon sheaths. Musculoskeletal ultrasound confirms the local pathological-anatomical diagnosis and is the most applicable and feasible imaging method that can be applied in clinical practice in guiding musculoskeletal interventional procedures. From 1993, there has been substantial examination of the accuracy of landmark- and imaging-guided procedures. We have searched the literature and ascertained whether imaging techniques improve the accuracy of musculoskeletal procedures and whether the accuracy of needle placement can be translated into improved clinical outcome (efficacy). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A RONI Based Visible Watermarking Approach for Medical Image Authentication.

    PubMed

    Thanki, Rohit; Borra, Surekha; Dwivedi, Vedvyas; Borisagar, Komal

    2017-08-09

    Nowadays medical data in terms of image files are often exchanged between different hospitals for use in telemedicine and diagnosis. Visible watermarking being extensively used for Intellectual Property identification of such medical images, leads to serious issues if failed to identify proper regions for watermark insertion. In this paper, the Region of Non-Interest (RONI) based visible watermarking for medical image authentication is proposed. In this technique, to RONI of the cover medical image is first identified using Human Visual System (HVS) model. Later, watermark logo is visibly inserted into RONI of the cover medical image to get watermarked medical image. Finally, the watermarked medical image is compared with the original medical image for measurement of imperceptibility and authenticity of proposed scheme. The experimental results showed that this proposed scheme reduces the computational complexity and improves the PSNR when compared to many existing schemes.

  5. A program for medical visualization and image processing.

    PubMed

    Zaffari, Carlos A; Zaffari, Paulo; de Azevedo, Dario F G; Russomano, Thais; Helegda, Sergio; Figueira, Marcio V

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a software program for visualization and processing of medical images. It provides an expansible set of techniques to help extracting visual information from medical images to be used in diagnosis support and in advanced scientific investigations.

  6. The masked educator-innovative simulation in an Australian undergraduate Medical Sonography and Medical Imaging program.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Bowman, Anita; McAllister, Margaret; Cowling, Cynthia; Spuur, Kelly

    2014-12-01

    Clinical learning experiences for sonography and medical imaging students can sometimes involve the practice of technical procedures with less of a focus on developing communication skills with patients. Whilst patient-based simulation scenarios have been widely reported in other health education programmes, there is a paucity of research in sonography and medical imaging. The aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) in the learning and teaching of clinical communication skills to undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students. Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) is a simulation technique where the educator is hidden behind wearable realistic silicone body props including masks. Focus group interviews were conducted with 11 undergraduate medical sonography and medical imaging students at CQUniversity, Australia. The number of participants was limited to the size of the cohort of students enrolled in the course. Prior to these interviews participants were engaged in learning activities that featured the use of the Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) method. Thematic analysis was employed to explore how the introduction of Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) contributed to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Key themes included: benefits of interacting with someone real rather than another student, learning made fun, awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection. Mask-Ed™ (KRS Simulation) combined with interactive sessions with an expert facilitator, contributed positively to students' learning in relation to clinical communication skills. Participants believed that interacting with someone real, as in the Mask-Ed characters was beneficial. In addition to the learning being described as fun, participants gained an awareness of empathy, therapeutic communication skills, engaged problem solving and purposeful reflection.

  7. [Sustainability of medical imaging in cardiology].

    PubMed

    Picano, Eugenio; Lombardi, Massimo; Neglia, Danilo; Lazzeri, Mauro

    2006-11-01

    Every year, 5 billion imaging testing are performed worldwide, and about 1 out of 2 are cardiovascular examinations. According to recent estimates, 30 to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. This represents a potential damage for patient undergoing imaging (who takes the acute risks of a stress procedure and/or a contrast study without a commensurable benefit), an exorbitant cost for the society and an excessive delay in the waiting lists for other patients needing the examination. Economic induction, medico-legal concern, and specialist guidelines, which do not quantitate the potential benefits against the risks of a given procedure, boost inappropriateness of all imaging techniques. In case of ionizing tests, the reduction of useless imaging testing would improve the quality of care also through abatement of long-term risks, which are linked to the dose employed. The radiation dose equivalent of common cardiological imaging examinations corresponds to more than 1000 chest x rays for a thallium scan and to more than 500 chest x-rays for a multislice computed tomography. Although a direct evaluation of incidence of cancer in patients submitted to these procedures is not available, the estimated risk (often ignored by cardiologists) of cancer according to the latest 2005 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee VII is about one in 500 exposed patients for a Thallium scintigraphy scan, and one in 750 for a CT scan. Such a risk is probably not acceptable when a scintigraphic or radiological procedure is applied for mass screening (when the risk side of the risk-benefit balance is not considered) or when a similar information can be obtained by other means. By contrast, it is fully acceptable in appropriately selected groups as a filter to more invasive, risky and costly procedures (for instance, coronary angiography and anatomy-driven revascularization). At this point, the cardiological community, that faces the reality of limited

  8. CAVASS: a framework for medical imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevera, George; Udupa, Jayaram; Odhner, Dewey

    2009-10-01

    Computer Aided Visualization and Analysis Software System (CAVASS) is an open-source software system that is being developed by the Medical Image Processing Group (MIPG) at the University of Pennsylvania. CAVASS is freely available, open source, integrated with popular toolkits, and runs on Windows, Unix, Linux, and Mac OS. It includes extremely efficient of the most commonly used image display, manipulation, and processing operations. Parallel implementations of computationally demanding tasks such as deformable registration are provided as well using the inexpensive COW (Cluster of Workstations) model. CAVASS also seamlessly integrates and interfaces with ITK and provides a graphical user interface for ITK as well. CAVASS can easily interface with a PACS by directly reading and writing medical images in the industry standard DICOM format and can also input and output other common image formats as well. We describe the key features, general software architecture, interface with ITK, parallel architecture, and the CAVASS build and test environment. New stereo rendering capabilities are described as well.

  9. Image 100 procedures manual development: Applications system library definition and Image 100 software definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Decell, H. P., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An outline for an Image 100 procedures manual for Earth Resources Program image analysis was developed which sets forth guidelines that provide a basis for the preparation and updating of an Image 100 Procedures Manual. The scope of the outline was limited to definition of general features of a procedures manual together with special features of an interactive system. Computer programs were identified which should be implemented as part of an applications oriented library for the system.

  10. The quest for standards in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Gibaud, Bernard

    2011-05-01

    This article focuses on standards supporting interoperability and system integration in the medical imaging domain. We introduce the basic concepts and actors and we review the most salient achievements in this domain, especially with the DICOM standard, and the definition of IHE integration profiles. We analyze and discuss what was successful, and what could still be more widely adopted by industry. We then sketch out a perspective of what should be done next, based on our vision of new requirements for the next decade. In particular, we discuss the challenges of a more explicit sharing of image and image processing semantics, and we discuss the help that semantic web technologies (and especially ontologies) may bring to achieving this goal.

  11. ICG fluorescence imaging and its medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Mitsuharu; Shikayama, Takahiro

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a novel optical angiography system, and introduces its medical applications. We developed the optical enhanced imaging system which can observe the blood and lymphatic vessels as the Indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence image. The imaging system consists of 760nm light emitted diode (LED) as excite light, CCD camera as a detector, a high-pass optical filter in front of the CCD and video processing system. The advantage of ICG fluorescence method is safe (radiation free), high sensitive, real time monitoring of blood and/or lymphatic flow, small size, easy to operate and cost effective compared to conventional X-ray angiography or scintigraphy. We have applied this method to several clinical applications such as breast cancer sentinel lymph node (SLN) navigation, lymph edema diagnostic and identification of liver segmentation. In each application, ICG fluorescence method shows useful result. It's indicated that this method is promising technique as optical angiography.

  12. Multiple digital watermarking applied to medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Giakoumaki, A; Pavlopoulos, S; Koutsouris, D

    2005-01-01

    Beyond its already established wide range of applications, digital watermarking has recently started to gain a foothold in the healthcare sector. The paper discusses the potential of multiple watermarking to address a number of health information management issues, such as protection of sensitive data, origin and data authentication, image archiving and retrieval. A wavelet-based multiple watermarking scheme focusing on these medical-oriented applications is presented; the scheme allows the physician to define a Region of Interest, whose diagnostic value is explicitly protected throughout the embedding process, since the only additional information inserted therein is for the purpose of integrity control. The rest part of the image casts multiple watermarks conveying the physician's digital signature, patient's sensitive data, and keywords allowing image retrieval. In order to increase data robustness, a form of hybrid coding is applied, which includes repetitive embedding of BCH encoded watermarks.

  13. Multiphase Systems for Medical Image Region Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garamendi, J. F.; Malpica, N.; Schiavi, E.

    2009-05-01

    Variational methods for region classification have shown very promising results in medical image analysis. The Chan-Vese model is one of the most popular methods, but its numerical resolution is slow and it has serious drawbacks for most multiphase applications. In this work, we extend the link, stablished by Chambolle, between the two classes binary Chan-Vese model and the Rudin-Osher-Fatemi (ROF) model to a multiphase four classes minimal partition problem. We solve the ROF image restoration model and then we threshold the image by means of a genetic algorithm. This strategy allows for a more efficient algorithm due to the fact that only one well posed elliptic problem is solved instead of solving the coupled parabolic equations arising in the original multiphase Chan-Vese model.

  14. Medical Imaging with Laser Polarized Noble Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Timothy

    2000-06-01

    In the past five years, techniques of magnetic resonance imaging with laser polarized ^3He and ^129Xe have emerged along with the promise of entirely new ways to use NMR information from gas in the lungs and of xenon dissolved in tissue. This marriage of laser/optical physics and medical imaging has the potential to provide new ways to study and map function in the brain, measure physiological parameters, and diagnose diseases of the lungs, heart, and brain. Static and dynamic images of the lung air spaces already provide much greater spatial resolution than standard nuclear medicine techniques, and preliminary clinical studies of various pulmonary diseases are underway. Imaging of ^129Xe dissolved in tissue of the vital organs has potential applications to medicine as well as basic research in physiology and neuroscience. The use of ^129Xe as a magnetic tracer provides a measure of blood flow to several types of tissue in the brain and can be used to map and study neural function. Though a great deal of AMO physics research is still needed to advance noble gas polarization techniques, the rapid emergence of noble gas imaging was made possible in large part by advances motivated by basic research in nuclear and high energy physics. I will describe this remarkable new field of noble gas imaging, its beginnings in fundamental physics research, and AMO physics research that will continue to advance the field.

  15. Blind forensics in medical imaging based on Tchebichef image moments.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Coatrieux, G; Shu, H Z; Luo, L M; Roux, Ch

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a blind forensic approach for the detection of global image modifications like filtering, lossy compression, scaling and so on. It is based on a new set of image features we proposed, called Histogram statistics of Reorganized Block-based Tchebichef moments (HRBT) features, and which are used as input of a set of classifiers we learned to discriminate tampered images from original ones. In this article, we compare the performances of our features with others proposed schemes from the literature in application to different medical image modalities (MRI, X-Ray …). Experimental results show that our HRBT features perform well and in some cases better than other features.

  16. Multimodality Image Fusion-Guided Procedures: Technique, Accuracy, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Kruecker, Jochen; Kadoury, Samuel; Kobeiter, Hicham; Venkatesan, Aradhana M. Levy, Elliot Wood, Bradford J.

    2012-10-15

    Personalized therapies play an increasingly critical role in cancer care: Image guidance with multimodality image fusion facilitates the targeting of specific tissue for tissue characterization and plays a role in drug discovery and optimization of tailored therapies. Positron-emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) may offer additional information not otherwise available to the operator during minimally invasive image-guided procedures, such as biopsy and ablation. With use of multimodality image fusion for image-guided interventions, navigation with advanced modalities does not require the physical presence of the PET, MRI, or CT imaging system. Several commercially available methods of image-fusion and device navigation are reviewed along with an explanation of common tracking hardware and software. An overview of current clinical applications for multimodality navigation is provided.

  17. An innovative multimodal/multispectral image registration method for medical images based on the Expectation-Maximization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Arce-Santana, Edgar; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U; Mejia-Rodriguez, Aldo; Reducindo, Isnardo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a methodology for multimodal/ multispectral image registration of medical images. This approach is formulated by using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) methodology, such that we estimate the parameters of a geometric transformation that aligns multimodal/multispectral images. In this framework, the hidden random variables are associated to the intensity relations between the studied images, which allow to compare multispectral intensity values between images of different modalities. The methodology is basically composed by an iterative two-step procedure, where at each step, a new estimation of the joint conditional multispectral intensity distribution and the geometric transformation is computed. The proposed algorithm was tested with different kinds of medical images, and the obtained results show that the proposed methodology can be used to efficiently align multimodal/multispectral medical images.

  18. Survey: interpolation methods in medical image processing.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, T M; Gönner, C; Spitzer, K

    1999-11-01

    Image interpolation techniques often are required in medical imaging for image generation (e.g., discrete back projection for inverse Radon transform) and processing such as compression or resampling. Since the ideal interpolation function spatially is unlimited, several interpolation kernels of finite size have been introduced. This paper compares 1) truncated and windowed sinc; 2) nearest neighbor; 3) linear; 4) quadratic; 5) cubic B-spline; 6) cubic; g) Lagrange; and 7) Gaussian interpolation and approximation techniques with kernel sizes from 1 x 1 up to 8 x 8. The comparison is done by: 1) spatial and Fourier analyses; 2) computational complexity as well as runtime evaluations; and 3) qualitative and quantitative interpolation error determinations for particular interpolation tasks which were taken from common situations in medical image processing. For local and Fourier analyses, a standardized notation is introduced and fundamental properties of interpolators are derived. Successful methods should be direct current (DC)-constant and interpolators rather than DC-inconstant or approximators. Each method's parameters are tuned with respect to those properties. This results in three novel kernels, which are introduced in this paper and proven to be within the best choices for medical image interpolation: the 6 x 6 Blackman-Harris windowed sinc interpolator, and the C2-continuous cubic kernels with N = 6 and N = 8 supporting points. For quantitative error evaluations, a set of 50 direct digital X rays was used. They have been selected arbitrarily from clinical routine. In general, large kernel sizes were found to be superior to small interpolation masks. Except for truncated sinc interpolators, all kernels with N = 6 or larger sizes perform significantly better than N = 2 or N = 3 point methods (p < 0.005). However, the differences within the group of large-sized kernels were not significant. Summarizing the results, the cubic 6 x 6 interpolator with continuous

  19. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: elbow imaging and procedures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G; Craig, Joseph G

    2010-09-01

    Elbow injuries, both acute and chronic sports-related cases, have increased over the last decade. With one in every four members of a household participating in sports, both clinics and radiology departments are seeing more patients with elbow pain. High-resolution ultrasound is well suited for evaluating the elbow. Ultrasound is growing in popularity and fast becoming another modality that the radiologist can use to help diagnose elbow pathology. With advancing transducer technology and accessibility, ultrasound offers focused and real-time high-resolution imaging of tendons, ligaments, and nerve structures. Its advantages include the use of safe nonionizing radiation, accessibility, and cost effectiveness. Another unique advantage is its ability for dynamic assessment of tendon and ligament structures such as in cases of partial tears of the medial ulnar collateral ligament or ulnar nerve dislocation. It is also easy to assess the contralateral side as a control. Ultrasound is also useful in therapeutic guided injections for its multiplanar capability and clear visualization of major vessels and nerves. We discuss the unique application of ultrasound in evaluating common elbow pathology and in advanced ultrasound-guided treatments such as dextrose prolotherapy and platelet-rich plasma.

  20. A study for watermark methods appropriate to medical images.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Ahn, B; Kim, J S; Kim, I Y; Kim, S I

    2001-06-01

    The network system, including the picture archiving and communication system (PACS), is essential in hospital and medical imaging fields these days. Many medical images are accessed and processed on the web, as well as in PACS. Therefore, any possible accidents caused by the illegal modification of medical images must be prevented. Digital image watermark techniques have been proposed as a method to protect against illegal copying or modification of copyrighted material. Invisible signatures made by a digital image watermarking technique can be a solution to these problems. However, medical images have some different characteristics from normal digital images in that one must not corrupt the information contained in the original medical images. In this study, we suggest modified watermark methods appropriate for medical image processing and communication system that prevent clinically important data contained in original images from being corrupted.

  1. Future Directions In Image Management: Medical And Practical Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, J. J.; Eikman, E. A.; Shaff, M. I.; James, A. E.

    1983-05-01

    The volume of data produced by new imaging modalities has far outstripped the ability of most departments to effectively utilize the images produced. The problem is further exacerbated by the fact that the diagnostic procedures have become progressively less invasive and traumatic and are being applied to an ever larger patient population. The decrease in cost and the rise in technological capability of computer systems in recent years has provided imaging specialists with the opportunity to create network systems for the storage and recall of diagnostic images. This paper examines the philosophy of image storage from the standpoint of the medical, legal, and practical questions. A proposal is made that not all images are equal and that some deserve to be archived for longer periods than others. The practical problem of using a video display for diagnostic readout, aside from the classical questions of resolution and response time, is discussed. A proposal is also made that two data bases might be created; one which provides rapid access to the clinically relevant images (i.e., the two or three that demonstrate pathology) and one which may require much longer to access, but which contains all the archived data.

  2. Medical Imaging In An Object Oriented Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, Daniel; Vannier, Michael W.

    1988-06-01

    A workstation has been developed to evaluate computed tomographic (CT) image data in 2 and 3 dimensions. The workstation consists of an independent image display station (Independent Viewing and Analysis Station or WAS, International Imaging Systems, Inc., Milpitas, Calif.) and a VAX host computer. The WAS has 1024 X 1024 X 24 bits of image memory plus 4 bits of graphics overlay. An independent VLSI graphics processor and 1024 X 1024 X 4 bit graphics memory, independent of the image memory, are included in the self-contained WAS unit. A local microprocessor host (Motorola 68000 microprocessor) controls the IVAS from directives obtained through a direct memory access channel to the VAX host. This facilitated the creation of an object oriented software enviroment for the IVAS under control of a VAX host program written in the C language. The workstation created has an interactive user interface consisting of a mouse and pull-down menus. The workstation enables loading multiple images, typically 256 x 256 or 512 x 512, into the 1024 X 1024 frame buffer. Once loaded, the images can be manipulated by applying gray scale transforms, editing them and performing 3-D reconstructions from serial sections. Algorithms for three dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were implemented in the VAX/VMS host computer environment and are available on the workstation through special menu functions for handling these reconstructions. The functions interactively combine depth and gradient shading of surfaces to suit specific applications in craniofacial surgical planning or orthopedics. This workstation is user friendly and is very easy to handle. A workstation of this type may become a popular tool for physicians and surgeons in evalution of medical images.

  3. Lossless wavelet compression on medical image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiuying; Wei, Jingyuan; Zhai, Linpei; Liu, Hong

    2006-09-01

    An increasing number of medical imagery is created directly in digital form. Such as Clinical image Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS), as well as telemedicine networks require the storage and transmission of this huge amount of medical image data. Efficient compression of these data is crucial. Several lossless and lossy techniques for the compression of the data have been proposed. Lossless techniques allow exact reconstruction of the original imagery, while lossy techniques aim to achieve high compression ratios by allowing some acceptable degradation in the image. Lossless compression does not degrade the image, thus facilitating accurate diagnosis, of course at the expense of higher bit rates, i.e. lower compression ratios. Various methods both for lossy (irreversible) and lossless (reversible) image compression are proposed in the literature. The recent advances in the lossy compression techniques include different methods such as vector quantization. Wavelet coding, neural networks, and fractal coding. Although these methods can achieve high compression ratios (of the order 50:1, or even more), they do not allow reconstructing exactly the original version of the input data. Lossless compression techniques permit the perfect reconstruction of the original image, but the achievable compression ratios are only of the order 2:1, up to 4:1. In our paper, we use a kind of lifting scheme to generate truly loss-less non-linear integer-to-integer wavelet transforms. At the same time, we exploit the coding algorithm producing an embedded code has the property that the bits in the bit stream are generated in order of importance, so that all the low rate codes are included at the beginning of the bit stream. Typically, the encoding process stops when the target bit rate is met. Similarly, the decoder can interrupt the decoding process at any point in the bit stream, and still reconstruct the image. Therefore, a compression scheme generating an embedded code can

  4. Procedure to detect anatomical structures in optical fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Lalonde, Marc; Beaulieu, Mario; Boucher, Marie-Carole

    2001-07-01

    We present an overview of the design and test of an image processing procedure for detecting all important anatomical structures in color fundus images. These structures are the optic disk, the macula and the retinal network. The algorithm proceeds through five main steps: (1) automatic mask generation using pixels value statistics and color threshold, (2) visual image quality assessment using histogram matching and Canny edge distribution modeling, (3) optic disk localization using pyramidal decomposition, Hausdorff-based template matching and confidence assignment, (4) macula localization using pyramidal decomposition and (5) bessel network tracking using recursive dual edge tracking and connectivity recovering. The procedure has been tested on a database of about 40 color fundus images acquired from a digital non-mydriatic fundus camera. The database is composed of images of various types (macula- and optic disk-centered) and of various visual quality (with or without abnormal bright or dark regions, blurred, etc).

  5. Surrogate motherhood as a medical treatment procedure for women's infertility.

    PubMed

    Jovic, Olga S

    2011-03-01

    The content of this work is conceived on the research of the consequences of surrogate motherhood as a process of assisted procreation, which represent a way of parenthood in cases when it is not possible to realize parenthood through a natural way. Surrogate motherhood is a process in which a woman (surrogate mother) agrees to carry a pregnancy with the intent to give the child to the couple with whom she has made a contract on surrogate maternity after the birth. This process of conception and birth makes the determination of the child's origin on its mother's side hard to determine, because of the distinction of the genetic and gestation phases of the two women. The concept of surrogate motherhood is to appear in two forms, depending on the existence or the non-existence of the genetic link between the surrogate mother and the child she gives birth to. There are gestation (full) and genetic (partial) surrogates each with different modalities and legal and ethical implications. In Serbia, Infertility Treatment and the Bio-medically Assisted Procreation Act from 2009 explicitly forbids surrogate motherhood, despite the fact that an infertile couple decides to use it, as a rule, after having tried all other treatment procedures, in cases when there is a diagnosis but the conventional treatment applied has not produced the desired results. Given the fact that no one has the right to ignore the sufferings of people who cannot procreate naturally, the medical practice and legal science in our country plead for a formulation of a legal framework in which to apply surrogate motherhood as an infertility treatment, under particular conditions.

  6. 29 CFR 2400.7 - Special procedures for requesting medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures for requesting medical records. 2400.7... COMMISSION REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING THE PRIVACY ACT § 2400.7 Special procedures for requesting medical records. (a) Upon an individual's request for access to his medical records, including...

  7. 32 CFR 1901.31 - Special procedures for medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Special procedures for medical and psychological records. (a) In general. When a request for access or amendment involves medical or psychological records and when the originator determines that such records are... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special procedures for medical and...

  8. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Special procedures for medical/psychiatric... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  9. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Special procedures for medical/psychiatric... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  10. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special procedures for medical/psychiatric... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  11. Novel gaseous detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, M.; Fonte, P.; Francke, T.; Iacobaeus, C.; Ostling, J.; Peskov, V.

    2004-02-01

    We have developed and successfully tested prototypes of two new types of gaseous detectors for medical imaging purposes. The first one is called the Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID). It is oriented on monitoring and the precise alignment of the therapeutic cancer treatment beam (pulsed gamma radiation) with respect to the patient's tumor position. The latest will be determined from an X-ray image of the patient obtained in the time intervals between the gamma pulses. The detector is based on a "sandwich" of hole-type gaseous detectors (GEM and glass microcapillary plates) with metallic gamma and X-ray converters coated with CsI layers. The second detector is an X-ray image scanner oriented on mammography and other radiographic applications. It is based on specially developed by us high rate RPCs that are able to operate at rates of 10 5 Hz/mm 2 with a position resolution better than 50 μm at 1 atm. The quality of the images obtained with the latest version of this device were in most cases more superior than those obtained from commercially available detectors.

  12. Adaptive textural segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklinski, Walter S.; Frost, Gordon S.; MacLaughlin, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    A number of important problems in medical imaging can be described as segmentation problems. Previous fractal-based image segmentation algorithms have used either the local fractal dimension alone or the local fractal dimension and the corresponding image intensity as features for subsequent pattern recognition algorithms. An image segmentation algorithm that utilized the local fractal dimension, image intensity, and the correlation coefficient of the local fractal dimension regression analysis computation, to produce a three-dimension feature space that was partitioned to identify specific pixels of dental radiographs as being either bone, teeth, or a boundary between bone and teeth also has been reported. In this work we formulated the segmentation process as a configurational optimization problem and discuss the application of simulated annealing optimization methods to the solution of this specific optimization problem. The configurational optimization method allows information about both, the degree of correspondence between a candidate segment and an assumed textural model, and morphological information about the candidate segment to be used in the segmentation process. To apply this configurational optimization technique with a fractal textural model however, requires the estimation of the fractal dimension of an irregularly shaped candidate segment. The potential utility of a discrete Gerchberg-Papoulis bandlimited extrapolation algorithm to the estimation of the fractal dimension of an irregularly shaped candidate segment is also discussed.

  13. Boundary overlap for medical image segmentation evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeghiazaryan, Varduhi; Voiculescu, Irina

    2017-03-01

    All medical image segmentation algorithms need to be validated and compared, and yet no evaluation framework is widely accepted within the imaging community. Collections of segmentation results often need to be compared and ranked by their effectiveness. Evaluation measures which are popular in the literature are based on region overlap or boundary distance. None of these are consistent in the way they rank segmentation results: they tend to be sensitive to one or another type of segmentation error (size, location, shape) but no single measure covers all error types. We introduce a new family of measures, with hybrid characteristics. These measures quantify similarity/difference of segmented regions by considering their overlap around the region boundaries. This family is more sensitive than other measures in the literature to combinations of segmentation error types. We compare measure performance on collections of segmentation results sourced from carefully compiled 2D synthetic data, and also on 3D medical image volumes. We show that our new measure: (1) penalises errors successfully, especially those around region boundaries; (2) gives a low similarity score when existing measures disagree, thus avoiding overly inflated scores; and (3) scores segmentation results over a wider range of values. We consider a representative measure from this family and the effect of its only free parameter on error sensitivity, typical value range, and running time.

  14. [Tattoos and medical imaging: issues and myths].

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Tattooing is characterized by the introduction in the dermis of exogenous pigments to obtain a permanent design. Whether it is a traditional tattoo applied on the skin or a cosmetic one (permanent make-up), its prevalence has boomed for the past 20 years. The increased prevalence of tattooed patients along with medical progresses, in the field of therapeutics or diagnostic means have lead to the discovery of "new" complications and unexpected issues. Medical imaging world has also been affected by the tattoo craze. It has been approximately 20 years when the first issues related to tattooing and permanent make-up aroused. However, cautions and questions as well as anecdotal severe case reports have sometimes led to an over-exaggerated response by some physicians such as the systematic avoidance of RMN imaging for tattooed individuals. This review is intended to summarize the risks but also the "myths" associated with tattoo in the daily practice of the radiologist for RMN, CT scan, mammography, Pet-scan and ultrasound imaging.

  15. Mining knowledge in medical image databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perner, Petra

    2000-04-01

    Availability of digital data within picture archiving and communication systems raises a possibility of health care and research enhancement associated with manipulation, processing and handling of data by computers. That is the basis for computer-assisted radiology development. Further development of computer-assisted radiology is associated with the use of new intelligent capabilities such as multimedia support and data mining in order to discover the relevant knowledge for diagnosis. In this paper, we present our work on data mining in medical picture archiving systems. We use decision tree induction in order to learn the knowledge for computer- assisted image analysis. We are applying our method to interpretation of x-ray images for lung cancer diagnosis. We are describing our methodology on how to perform data mining on picture archiving systems and our tool for data mining. Results are given. The method has shown very good results so that we are going on to apply it to other medical image diagnosis tasks such as lymph node diagnosis in MRI and investigation of breast MRI.

  16. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. Methods In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters 18F, 64Cu, 89Zr, and 124I; β-emitter 131I; and α-particle emitter 225Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 89Zr-desferrioxamine B-[DFO-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Results Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-,β-, and α-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of 89Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. Conclusion These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  17. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  18. [Parents' and medical employees' accuracy in the estimation of fees for consultations and frequent medical procedures].

    PubMed

    Sztulman, L; Szternberg, A; Grouteau, E; Claudet, I

    2011-11-01

    To analyze the accuracy of estimates made by medical staff and parents regarding fees for consultations and frequently prescribed medical exams. The questionnaire focused on the value in euros for the following: day and night consultation in the pediatric emergency department, blood and urine analysis, electrocardiogram, chest and abdominal x-ray, abdominal ultrasound, upper digestive endoscopy, CT scan, cerebral MRI (without anesthesia), an arm cast, and superficial wound repair. Medical staff belonged to different units of the childrens' hospital. The parents interviewed had consulted at the pediatric emergency unit. Neither of the two investigators was familiar with the fee structure. To avoid inducing a gradation in estimates, questions were asked with no pre-established order. To limit the possibility of participants discussing the questionnaire with their colleagues or searching for the real value, all medical staff members were assessed within a 48-h period. The responses of 185 medical employees (23 pediatricians, 28 interns, 81 nurses, 45 childcare assistants, seven nurse supervisors) and 187 parents were analyzed and compared. Less than 25% of the population gave an answer with an accepted error of ± 30%. Parents and hospital staff overestimated costs, parents and childcare assistants overestimated more than other medical employees. Radiological exams were the most overestimated procedures with the largest proportion of the average deviation from normal value: CT scan 850 ± 1100%, cerebral MRI 370 ± 590%, abdominal x-ray 240 ± 390%, and chest x-ray 190 ± 320%. Part of our societal culture and now a requirement, the right to healthcare has a cost. This cost is often overestimated by caregivers and the general population. Global understanding of the costs related to medical care requires educating the population and medical professionals. Medical staff should be informed of the real costs of treatment to enable them to manage unnecessary costs. There

  19. Meta-analysis of the technical performance of an imaging procedure: Guidelines and statistical methodology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Erich P; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; McShane, Lisa M; Gönen, Mithat; Ye, Jingjing; Buckler, Andrew J; Kinahan, Paul E; Reeves, Anthony P; Jackson, Edward F; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Zahlmann, Gudrun

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging serves many roles in patient care and the drug approval process, including assessing treatment response and guiding treatment decisions. These roles often involve a quantitative imaging biomarker, an objectively measured characteristic of the underlying anatomic structure or biochemical process derived from medical images. Before a quantitative imaging biomarker is accepted for use in such roles, the imaging procedure to acquire it must undergo evaluation of its technical performance, which entails assessment of performance metrics such as repeatability and reproducibility of the quantitative imaging biomarker. Ideally, this evaluation will involve quantitative summaries of results from multiple studies to overcome limitations due to the typically small sample sizes of technical performance studies and/or to include a broader range of clinical settings and patient populations. This paper is a review of meta-analysis procedures for such an evaluation, including identification of suitable studies, statistical methodology to evaluate and summarize the performance metrics, and complete and transparent reporting of the results. This review addresses challenges typical of meta-analyses of technical performance, particularly small study sizes, which often causes violations of assumptions underlying standard meta-analysis techniques. Alternative approaches to address these difficulties are also presented; simulation studies indicate that they outperform standard techniques when some studies are small. The meta-analysis procedures presented are also applied to actual [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) test–retest repeatability data for illustrative purposes. PMID:24872353

  20. Lossy image compression for digital medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Paul S.; Haynor, David R.; Kim, Yongmin; Nelson, Alan C.; Riskin, Eve A.

    1990-07-01

    Image compression at rates of 10:1 or greater could make PACS much more responsive and economically attractive. This paper describes a protocol for subjective and objective evaluation of the fidelity of compressed/decompressed images to the originals and presents the results ofits application to four representative and promising compression methods. The methods examined are predictive pruned tree-structured vector quantization, fractal compression, the discrete cosine transform with equal weighting of block bit allocation, and the discrete cosine transform with human visual system weighting of block bit allocation. Vector quantization is theoretically capable of producing the best compressed images, but has proven to be difficult to effectively implement. It has the advantage that it can reconstruct images quickly through a simple lookup table. Disadvantages are that codebook training is required, the method is computationally intensive, and achieving the optimum performance would require prohibitively long vector dimensions. Fractal compression is a relatively new compression technique, but has produced satisfactory results while being computationally simple. It is fast at both image compression and image reconstruction. Discrete cosine iransform techniques reproduce images well, but have traditionally been hampered by the need for intensive computing to compress and decompress images. A protocol was developed for side-by-side observer comparison of reconstructed images with originals. Three 1024 X 1024 CR (Computed Radiography) images and two 512 X 512 X-ray CT images were viewed at six bit rates (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, and 1.5 bpp for CR, and 1.0, 1.3, 1.6, 1.9, 2.2, 2.5 bpp for X-ray CT) by nine radiologists at the University of Washington Medical Center. The CR images were viewed on a Pixar II Megascan (2560 X 2048) monitor and the CT images on a Sony (1280 X 1024) monitor. The radiologists' subjective evaluations of image fidelity were compared to

  1. Fingerprint verification on medical image reporting system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Tsai, Ming-Dar; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Chiu, Jainn-Shiun; Chong, Chee-Fah

    2008-03-01

    The healthcare industry is recently going through extensive changes, through adoption of robust, interoperable healthcare information technology by means of electronic medical records (EMR). However, a major concern of EMR is adequate confidentiality of the individual records being managed electronically. Multiple access points over an open network like the Internet increases possible patient data interception. The obligation is on healthcare providers to procure information security solutions that do not hamper patient care while still providing the confidentiality of patient information. Medical images are also part of the EMR which need to be protected from unauthorized users. This study integrates the techniques of fingerprint verification, DICOM object, digital signature and digital envelope in order to ensure that access to the hospital Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) or radiology information system (RIS) is only by certified parties.

  2. An Intelligent Cloud Storage Gateway for Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Guerra, António; Silva, João F; Matos, Sérgio; Costa, Carlos

    2017-09-01

    Historically, medical imaging repositories have been supported by indoor infrastructures. However, the amount of diagnostic imaging procedures has continuously increased over the last decades, imposing several challenges associated with the storage volume, data redundancy and availability. Cloud platforms are focused on delivering hardware and software services over the Internet, becoming an appealing solution for repository outsourcing. Although this option may bring financial and technological benefits, it also presents new challenges. In medical imaging scenarios, communication latency is a critical issue that still hinders the adoption of this paradigm. This paper proposes an intelligent Cloud storage gateway that optimizes data access times. This is achieved through a new cache architecture that combines static rules and pattern recognition for eviction and prefetching. The evaluation results, obtained from experiments over a real-world dataset, show that cache hit ratios can reach around 80%, leading to reductions of image retrieval times by over 60%. The combined use of eviction and prefetching policies proposed can significantly reduce communication latency, even when using a small cache in comparison to the total size of the repository. Apart from the performance gains, the proposed system is capable of adjusting to specific workflows of different institutions.

  3. Viewpoints on Medical Image Processing: From Science to Application

    PubMed Central

    Deserno (né Lehmann), Thomas M.; Handels, Heinz; Maier-Hein (né Fritzsche), Klaus H.; Mersmann, Sven; Palm, Christoph; Tolxdorff, Thomas; Wagenknecht, Gudrun; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Medical image processing provides core innovation for medical imaging. This paper is focused on recent developments from science to applications analyzing the past fifteen years of history of the proceedings of the German annual meeting on medical image processing (BVM). Furthermore, some members of the program committee present their personal points of views: (i) multi-modality for imaging and diagnosis, (ii) analysis of diffusion-weighted imaging, (iii) model-based image analysis, (iv) registration of section images, (v) from images to information in digital endoscopy, and (vi) virtual reality and robotics. Medical imaging and medical image computing is seen as field of rapid development with clear trends to integrated applications in diagnostics, treatment planning and treatment. PMID:24078804

  4. A monthly quality assurance procedure for 3D surface imaging.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Klein, Eric E; Gokhroo, Garima; Santanam, Lakshmi

    2010-12-21

    A procedure for periodic quality assurance of a video surface imaging system is introduced. AlignRT is a video camera-based patient localization system that captures and compares images of a patient's topography to a DICOM-formatted external contour, then calculates shifts required to accurately reposition the patient. This technical note describes the tools and methods implemented in our department to verify correct and accurate operation of the AlignRT hardware and software components. The procedure described is performed monthly and complements a daily calibration of the system.

  5. Peri-procedural imaging for transcatheter mitral valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Navin; Patel, Parag; Bartel, Thomas; Kapadia, Samir; Navia, Jose; Stewart, William; Tuzcu, E. Murat

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) has a high prevalence in older patient populations of industrialized nations. Common etiologies are structural, degenerative MR and functional MR secondary to myocardial remodeling. Because of co-morbidities and associated high surgical risk, open surgical mitral repair/replacement is deferred in a significant percentage of patients. For these patients transcatheter repair/replacement are emerging as treatment options. Because of the lack of direct visualization, pre- and intra-procedural imaging is critical for these procedures. In this review, we summarize mitral valve anatomy, trans-catheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) options, and imaging in the context of TMVR. PMID:27054104

  6. [The role of medical imaging in paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Vidal, P

    2008-04-01

    Study of the health status of ancient populations relies on the detection and analysis of bone or dental lesions from skeletons. In the absence of clinical or biological data, the identification of a pathology relies on anatomic and radiographic findings. Three paleopathological cases are presented and macroscopic and imaging findings are discussed. These include one case of eosinophilic granuloma, one case of Ewing sarcoma, and one case of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. Each case illustrates the value and limitations of retrospective diagnosis; an etiologic diagnosis can either be possible, suggested or unknown. Multiple biases, related to specimen preservation and the frequent non-specific nature of bony changes, make paleopathological diagnosis challenging. As such, the use of medical imaging seems valuable in the evaluation of such lesions. It allows non-invasive evaluation of the bone, underlying pathology, and lesion comparison to finally narrow the differential diagnosis.

  7. Analyzing the medical image by using clustering algorithms through segmentation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Papendra; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-12-01

    Basic aim of our study is to analyze the medical image. In computer vision, segmentationRefers to the process of partitioning a digital image into multiple regions. The goal ofSegmentation is to simplify and/or change the representation of an image into something thatIs more meaningful and easier to analyze. Image segmentation is typically used to locateObjects and boundaries (lines, curves, etc.) in images.There is a lot of scope of the analysis that we have done in our project; our analysis couldBe used for the purpose of monitoring the medical image. Medical imaging refers to theTechniques and processes used to create images of the human body (or parts thereof) forClinical purposes (medical procedures seeking to reveal, diagnose or examine disease) orMedical science (including the study of normal anatomy and function).As a discipline and in its widest sense, it is part of biological imaging and incorporatesRadiology (in the wider sense), radiological sciences, endoscopy, (medical) thermography, Medical photography and microscopy (e.g. for human pathological investigations).Measurement and recording techniques which are not primarily designed to produce images.

  8. The conversion of synchrotron radiation biomedical and medical images into DICOM images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunling; Sun, Jianyong; Sun, Jianqi; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-03-01

    With Synchrotron Radiation light source, there was a lot of imaging methods being developed to perform biomedical and medical imaging researches such as X-ray absorption imaging, phase-contrast imaging and micro-CT imaging. In this presentation, we present an approach to transform a various kinds of SR images into proper DICOM images so that to use a rich of medical processing display software to process and display SR biomedical and medical images. The new generated SR DICOM images can be transferred, stored, processed and displayed by using most of commercial medical imaging software.

  9. Automating the segmentation of medical images for the production of voxel tomographic computational models.

    PubMed

    Caon, M; Mohyla, J

    2001-12-01

    Radiation dosimetry for the diagnostic medical imaging procedures performed on humans requires anatomically accurate, computational models. These may be constructed from medical images as voxel-based tomographic models. However, they are time consuming to produce and as a consequence, there are few available. This paper discusses the emergence of semi-automatic segmentation techniques and describes an application (iRAD) written in Microsoft Visual Basic that allows the bitmap of a medical image to be segmented interactively and semi-automatically while displayed in Microsoft Excel. iRAD will decrease the time required to construct voxel models.

  10. An interventional multispectral photoacoustic imaging platform for the guidance of minimally invasive procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenfeng; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon J.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2015-07-01

    Precise and efficient guidance of medical devices is of paramount importance for many minimally invasive procedures. These procedures include fetal interventions, tumor biopsies and treatments, central venous catheterisations and peripheral nerve blocks. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used for guidance, but it often provides insufficient contrast with which to identify soft tissue structures such as vessels, tumors, and nerves. In this study, a hybrid interventional imaging system that combines ultrasound imaging and multispectral photoacoustic imaging for guiding minimally invasive procedures was developed and characterized. The system provides both structural information from ultrasound imaging and molecular information from multispectral photoacoustic imaging. It uses a commercial linear-array ultrasound imaging probe as the ultrasound receiver, with a multimode optical fiber embedded in a needle to deliver pulsed excitation light to tissue. Co-registration of ultrasound and photoacoustic images is achieved with the use of the same ultrasound receiver for both modalities. Using tissue ex vivo, the system successfully discriminated deep-located fat tissue from the surrounding muscle tissue. The measured photoacoustic spectrum of the fat tissue had good agreement with the lipid spectrum in literature.

  11. Electronic photography: a new age of medical imaging?

    PubMed

    Tübergen, D; Manegold, B C

    1993-07-01

    This is a critical overview of present conceptions of the introduction of electronic photography in medicine. It is not a complete list of products, rather it is a description of how the requirements of the physician have influenced medical illustration in the past and will continue to do so in the future. Video systems are widely used in medicine. Besides the learning and teaching of effects of television, minimal invasive surgery (MIS) has become reality through endoscopy, rapidly accepted worldwide. Documentation of endoscopic procedures and their effects is becoming routine. Therefore, the conversion of complex optical information into binary units is a logical development to save space for storage. The reproduction, storage and transfer of detailed images is already realized by digital camera systems, photo CD, scanners and picture archiving and communicating system (PACS). Now electronic imaging in medicine has to be regarded as a matter of routine. The real impact of accelerated editing will be shown in the future.

  12. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation

    PubMed Central

    DeLisi, Michael P.; Mawn, Louise A.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. Methods: A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. Results: The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z = −2.044, p = 0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z = 2.456, p = 0.014) when augmentation was used. Conclusions: Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize

  13. Image-guided transorbital procedures with endoscopic video augmentation.

    PubMed

    DeLisi, Michael P; Mawn, Louise A; Galloway, Robert L

    2014-09-01

    Surgical interventions to the orbital space behind the eyeball are limited to highly invasive procedures due to the confined nature of the region along with the presence of several intricate soft tissue structures. A minimally invasive approach to orbital surgery would enable several therapeutic options, particularly new treatment protocols for optic neuropathies such as glaucoma. The authors have developed an image-guided system for the purpose of navigating a thin flexible endoscope to a specified target region behind the eyeball. Navigation within the orbit is particularly challenging despite its small volume, as the presence of fat tissue occludes the endoscopic visual field while the surgeon must constantly be aware of optic nerve position. This research investigates the impact of endoscopic video augmentation to targeted image-guided navigation in a series of anthropomorphic phantom experiments. A group of 16 surgeons performed a target identification task within the orbits of four skull phantoms. The task consisted of identifying the correct target, indicated by the augmented video and the preoperative imaging frames, out of four possibilities. For each skull, one orbital intervention was performed with video augmentation, while the other was done with the standard image guidance technique, in random order. The authors measured a target identification accuracy of 95.3% and 85.9% for the augmented and standard cases, respectively, with statistically significant improvement in procedure time (Z=-2.044, p=0.041) and intraoperator mean procedure time (Z=2.456, p=0.014) when augmentation was used. Improvements in both target identification accuracy and interventional procedure time suggest that endoscopic video augmentation provides valuable additional orientation and trajectory information in an image-guided procedure. Utilization of video augmentation in transorbital interventions could further minimize complication risk and enhance surgeon comfort and

  14. TOPICAL REVIEW: Image-guidance for surgical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Terry M.

    2006-07-01

    Contemporary imaging modalities can now provide the surgeon with high quality three- and four-dimensional images depicting not only normal anatomy and pathology, but also vascularity and function. A key component of image-guided surgery (IGS) is the ability to register multi-modal pre-operative images to each other and to the patient. The other important component of IGS is the ability to track instruments in real time during the procedure and to display them as part of a realistic model of the operative volume. Stereoscopic, virtual- and augmented-reality techniques have been implemented to enhance the visualization and guidance process. For the most part, IGS relies on the assumption that the pre-operatively acquired images used to guide the surgery accurately represent the morphology of the tissue during the procedure. This assumption may not necessarily be valid, and so intra-operative real-time imaging using interventional MRI, ultrasound, video and electrophysiological recordings are often employed to ameliorate this situation. Although IGS is now in extensive routine clinical use in neurosurgery and is gaining ground in other surgical disciplines, there remain many drawbacks that must be overcome before it can be employed in more general minimally-invasive procedures. This review overviews the roots of IGS in neurosurgery, provides examples of its use outside the brain, discusses the infrastructure required for successful implementation of IGS approaches and outlines the challenges that must be overcome for IGS to advance further.

  15. 18 CFR 701.306 - Special procedure: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... doctor or other person to act as his agent as described in § 701.310(a). Records containing medical or... request. (b) If the individual has not named a medical doctor as agent, the Council may determine, after consultation with a medical doctor, that disclosure of the information would have an adverse effect on...

  16. Machine Learning Interface for Medical Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi C; Kagen, Alexander C

    2016-10-11

    TensorFlow is a second-generation open-source machine learning software library with a built-in framework for implementing neural networks in wide variety of perceptual tasks. Although TensorFlow usage is well established with computer vision datasets, the TensorFlow interface with DICOM formats for medical imaging remains to be established. Our goal is to extend the TensorFlow API to accept raw DICOM images as input; 1513 DaTscan DICOM images were obtained from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) database. DICOM pixel intensities were extracted and shaped into tensors, or n-dimensional arrays, to populate the training, validation, and test input datasets for machine learning. A simple neural network was constructed in TensorFlow to classify images into normal or Parkinson's disease groups. Training was executed over 1000 iterations for each cross-validation set. The gradient descent optimization and Adagrad optimization algorithms were used to minimize cross-entropy between the predicted and ground-truth labels. Cross-validation was performed ten times to produce a mean accuracy of 0.938 ± 0.047 (95 % CI 0.908-0.967). The mean sensitivity was 0.974 ± 0.043 (95 % CI 0.947-1.00) and mean specificity was 0.822 ± 0.207 (95 % CI 0.694-0.950). We extended the TensorFlow API to enable DICOM compatibility in the context of DaTscan image analysis. We implemented a neural network classifier that produces diagnostic accuracies on par with excellent results from previous machine learning models. These results indicate the potential role of TensorFlow as a useful adjunct diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  17. The fuzzy Hough transform-feature extraction in medical images.

    PubMed

    Philip, K P; Dove, E L; McPherson, D D; Gotteiner, N L; Stanford, W; Chandran, K B

    1994-01-01

    Identification of anatomical features is a necessary step for medical image analysis. Automatic methods for feature identification using conventional pattern recognition techniques typically classify an object as a member of a predefined class of objects, but do not attempt to recover the exact or approximate shape of that object. For this reason, such techniques are usually not sufficient to identify the borders of organs when individual geometry varies in local detail, even though the general geometrical shape is similar. The authors present an algorithm that detects features in an image based on approximate geometrical models. The algorithm is based on the traditional and generalized Hough Transforms but includes notions from fuzzy set theory. The authors use the new algorithm to roughly estimate the actual locations of boundaries of an internal organ, and from this estimate, to determine a region of interest around the organ. Based on this rough estimate of the border location, and the derived region of interest, the authors find the final (improved) estimate of the true borders with other (subsequently used) image processing techniques. They present results that demonstrate that the algorithm was successfully used to estimate the approximate location of the chest wall in humans, and of the left ventricular contours of a dog heart obtained from cine-computed tomographic images. The authors use this fuzzy Hough transform algorithm as part of a larger procedure to automatically identify the myocardial contours of the heart. This algorithm may also allow for more rapid image processing and clinical decision making in other medical imaging applications.

  18. [Medical tele-imaging: a good chance for the future].

    PubMed

    Bonnin, A

    1999-01-01

    Tele-imaging is an important part of telemedicine: it includes the transmission of medical digital images and plays a role in all fields of telemedicine, such as expertise, consultation, teaching and research. Tele-imaging has been made possible through the digitalization of medical imaging. There are two possibilities: either digitalization of conventional radiological film or direct acquisition of digital images. The transmission of medical imaging requires a high data rate so as to obtain a good quality transmission of the initial images in a reasonable delay. In order to deal with the great amount of information to be stocked and transmitted, a compression of the data, without loss of information, is usually necessary. Interactivity is very important in all these types of transmissions. These tele-transmission techniques are already used world wide, especially in Japan and in the United States, to help in therapeutic or diagnostic decisions. In France, we have been performing real time interactive tele-imaging sessions between radiology and endocrinology departments of Hotel Dieu in Montréal and Hôpital Cochin in Paris. This experimental device includes a visual-conference link between the medical teams and a real time link between two CT scanners. The CT scanner slices appear simultaneously both CT scanner screens; it is even possible to guide a CT scanner examination using remote control from the other hospital. We have successfully repeated the experiment between Cochin and a private hospital in Paris. In the case of the "Prison de la Santé", we have been using telemedicine in order to reduce problematic transfers of prison inmates. Moreover, access to doctors in the prison is sometimes difficult. The system ensures the daily transmission of X-rays, which are immediately read by radiologists at Cochin. In the past, 50 to 70 X-rays had to be read during one weekly visit. Medical tele-imaging raises certain legal, ethical and economic issues, such as

  19. Image Quality Characteristics of Handheld Display Devices for Medical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Liu, Peter; Cheng, Wei-Chung; Badano, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices such as mobile phones and tablet computers have become widespread with thousands of available software applications. Recently, handhelds are being proposed as part of medical imaging solutions, especially in emergency medicine, where immediate consultation is required. However, handheld devices differ significantly from medical workstation displays in terms of display characteristics. Moreover, the characteristics vary significantly among device types. We investigate the image quality characteristics of various handheld devices with respect to luminance response, spatial resolution, spatial noise, and reflectance. We show that the luminance characteristics of the handheld displays are different from those of workstation displays complying with grayscale standard target response suggesting that luminance calibration might be needed. Our results also demonstrate that the spatial characteristics of handhelds can surpass those of medical workstation displays particularly for recent generation devices. While a 5 mega-pixel monochrome workstation display has horizontal and vertical modulation transfer factors of 0.52 and 0.47 at the Nyquist frequency, the handheld displays released after 2011 can have values higher than 0.63 at the respective Nyquist frequencies. The noise power spectra for workstation displays are higher than 1.2×10−5 mm2 at 1 mm−1, while handheld displays have values lower than 3.7×10−6 mm2. Reflectance measurements on some of the handheld displays are consistent with measurements for workstation displays with, in some cases, low specular and diffuse reflectance coefficients. The variability of the characterization results among devices due to the different technological features indicates that image quality varies greatly among handheld display devices. PMID:24236113

  20. Non-Intravenous Sedatives and Analgesics for Procedural Sedation for Imaging Procedures in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Amber; Miller, Jamie L.; Couloures, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe the method of delivery, dosage regimens, and outcomes of sedatives administered by extravascular route for imaging procedures in children. METHODS: Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched using keywords “child”, “midazolam”, “ketamine”, dexmedetomidine”, “fentanyl”, “nitrous oxide”, and “imaging.” Articles evaluating the use of extravascular sedation in children for imaging procedures published in English between 1946 and March 2015 were included. Two authors independently screened each article for inclusion. Reports were excluded if they did not contain sufficient details on dosage regimens and outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty reports representing 1,412 patients ranging in age from 0.33 to 19 years of age were included for analysis. Due to discrepancies in doses and types of analyses, statistical analyses were not performed. Oral midazolam was the most common agent evaluated; other agents included intranasal (IN) ketamine, IN midazolam, IN fentanyl, IN and transmucosal dexmedetomidine, and N2O. Most agents were considered efficacious compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Most agents showed efficacy for sedation during imaging when delivered through an extra-vascular route. Selection of agents should be based on onset time, duration, patient acceptability, recovery time, and adverse events. More robust studies are necessary to determine the optimal agent and route to utilize for imaging procedures when sedation is needed. PMID:26766932

  1. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  2. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device....

  3. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device....

  4. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device....

  5. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device....

  6. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device....

  7. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  8. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device....

  9. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  10. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  11. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device....

  12. 21 CFR 892.2010 - Medical image storage device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image storage device. 892.2010 Section 892.2010 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2010 Medical image storage device....

  13. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  14. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  15. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical image digitizer. 892.2030 Section 892.2030 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2030 Medical image digitizer....

  16. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  17. 21 CFR 892.2020 - Medical image communications device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image communications device. 892.2020 Section 892.2020 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2020 Medical image...

  18. 21 CFR 892.2040 - Medical image hardcopy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical image hardcopy device. 892.2040 Section 892.2040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.2040 Medical image hardcopy device....

  19. [Consistent presentation of medical images based on CPI integration profile].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; An, Ji-ye; Chen, Zhong-yong; Lu, Xu-dong; Duan, Hui-long

    2007-11-01

    Because of different display parameters and other factors, digital medical images present different display states in different section offices of a hospital. Based on CPI integration profile of IHE, this paper implements the consistent presentation of medical images, and it is helpful for doctors to carry out medical treatments of teamwork.

  20. Adjunct processors in embedded medical imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trepanier, Marc; Goddard, Iain

    2002-05-01

    Adjunct processors have traditionally been used for certain tasks in medical imaging systems. Often based on application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), these processors formed X-ray image-processing pipelines or constituted the backprojectors in computed tomography (CT) systems. We examine appropriate functions to perform with adjunct processing and draw some conclusions about system design trade-offs. These trade-offs have traditionally focused on the required performance and flexibility of individual system components, with increasing emphasis on time-to-market impact. Typically, front-end processing close to the sensor has the most intensive processing requirements. However, the performance capabilities of each level are dynamic and the system architect must keep abreast of the current capabilities of all options to remain competitive. Designers are searching for the most efficient implementation of their particular system requirements. We cite algorithm characteristics that point to effective solutions by adjunct processors. We have developed a field- programmable gate array (FPGA) adjunct-processor solution for a Cone-Beam Reconstruction (CBR) algorithm that offers significant performance improvements over a general-purpose processor implementation. The same hardware could efficiently perform other image processing functions such as two-dimensional (2D) convolution. The potential performance, price, operating power, and flexibility advantages of an FPGA adjunct processor over an ASIC, DSP or general-purpose processing solutions are compelling.

  1. Crystal diffraction lens for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smither, Robert K.; Roa, Dante E.

    2000-04-01

    A crystal diffraction lens for focusing energetic gamma rays has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory for use in medical imaging of radioactivity in the human body. A common method for locating possible cancerous growths in the body is to inject radioactivity into the blood stream of the patient and then look for any concentration of radioactivity that could be associated with the fast growing cancer cells. Often there are borderline indications of possible cancers that could be due to statistical functions in the measured counting rates. In order to determine if these indications are false or real, one must resort to surgical means and take tissue samples in the suspect area. We are developing a system of crystal diffraction lenses that will be incorporated into a 3- D imaging system with better sensitivity (factors of 10 to 20) and better spatial resolution (a few mm in both vertical and horizontal directions) than most systems presently in use. The use of this new imaging system will allow one to eliminate 90 percent of the false indications and both locate and determine the size of the cancer with mm precision. The lens consists of 900 single crystals of copper, 4 mm X 4 mm on a side and 2 - 4 mm thick, mounted in 13 concentric rings.

  2. A new database for medical images and information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, Dave; Samet, Hanan

    2007-03-01

    We present a medical image and medical record database for the storage, research, transmission, and evaluation of medical images, as well as tele-medicine applications. Any medical image from a source that supports the DICOM standard can be stored and accessed, as well as associated analysis and annotations. Information and image retrieval can be done based on patient info, date, doctor's annotations, features in the images, or a spatial combination of features. Secure access and transmission is addressed for tele-medicine applications. This database application follows all HIPPA regulations.

  3. Rough sets and near sets in medical imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Aboul Ella; Abraham, Ajith; Peters, James F; Schaefer, Gerald; Henry, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the current literature on rough-set- and near-set-based approaches to solving various problems in medical imaging such as medical image segmentation, object extraction, and image classification. Rough set frameworks hybridized with other computational intelligence technologies that include neural networks, particle swarm optimization, support vector machines, and fuzzy sets are also presented. In addition, a brief introduction to near sets and near images with an application to MRI images is given. Near sets offer a generalization of traditional rough set theory and a promising approach to solving the medical image correspondence problem as well as an approach to classifying perceptual objects by means of features in solving medical imaging problems. Other generalizations of rough sets such as neighborhood systems, shadowed sets, and tolerance spaces are also briefly considered in solving a variety of medical imaging problems. Challenges to be addressed and future directions of research are identified and an extensive bibliography is also included.

  4. An interactive medical image segmentation framework using iterative refinement.

    PubMed

    Kalshetti, Pratik; Bundele, Manas; Rahangdale, Parag; Jangra, Dinesh; Chattopadhyay, Chiranjoy; Harit, Gaurav; Elhence, Abhay

    2017-02-13

    Segmentation is often performed on medical images for identifying diseases in clinical evaluation. Hence it has become one of the major research areas. Conventional image segmentation techniques are unable to provide satisfactory segmentation results for medical images as they contain irregularities. They need to be pre-processed before segmentation. In order to obtain the most suitable method for medical image segmentation, we propose MIST (Medical Image Segmentation Tool), a two stage algorithm. The first stage automatically generates a binary marker image of the region of interest using mathematical morphology. This marker serves as the mask image for the second stage which uses GrabCut to yield an efficient segmented result. The obtained result can be further refined by user interaction, which can be done using the proposed Graphical User Interface (GUI). Experimental results show that the proposed method is accurate and provides satisfactory segmentation results with minimum user interaction on medical as well as natural images.

  5. Family medicine residency program director expectations of procedural skills of medical school graduates.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Gretchen M; Chesser, Amy K; Woods, Nikki Keene; Krug, Nathan R; Kellerman, Rick D

    2013-06-01

    Mismatch between program directors' expectations of medical school graduates and the experience of students in medical school has important implications for patient safety and medical education. We sought to define family medicine residency program directors' expectations of medical school graduates to independently perform various procedural skills and medical school graduates' self-reported competence to perform those skills at residency outset. In July of 2011, a paper-based survey was distributed nationwide by mail to 441 family medicine residency program directors and 3,287 medical school graduates enrolled as postgraduate year 1 (PGY-1) residents in family medicine residency programs. Program director expectation of independent performance and recent medical school graduate self-reported ability to independently perform each of 40 procedures was assessed. Surveys were completed and returned from 186 program directors (response rate 42%) and 681 medical school graduates (response rate 21%). At least 66% of program directors expected interns to enter residency able to independently perform 15 of 40 procedures. More than 80% of new interns reported they were able to independently perform five of the 15 procedures expected by program directors. Incongruity exists between program director expectations and intern self-reported ability to perform common procedures. Both patient safety and medical education may be jeopardized by a mismatch of expectation and experience. Assessment of medical students prior to medical school graduation or at the start of residency training may help detect procedural skill gaps and protect patient safety.

  6. A web service for enabling medical image retrieval integrated into a social medical image sharing platform.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Marko; Zhou, Xin; de la Vega, Enrique; Cabrer, Miguel; Müller, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Content-based visual image access is in the process from a research domain towards real applications. So far, most image retrieval applications have been in one specialized domain such as lung CTs as diagnosis aid or for classification of general images based on anatomic region, modality, and view. This article describes the use of a content-based image retrieval system in connection with the medical image sharing platform MEDTING, so a data set with a very large variety. Similarity retrieval is possible for all cases of the social image sharing platform, so cases can be linked by either visual similarity or similarity in keywords. The visual retrieval search is based on the GIFT (GNU Image Finding Tool). The technology for updating the index with new images added by users employs RSS (Really Simple Syndication) feeds. The ARC (Advanced Resource Connector) middleware is used for the implementation of a web service for similarity retrieval, simplifying the integration of this service. Novelty of this article is the application/integration and image updating strategy. Retrieval methods themselves employ existing techniques that are all open source and can easily be reproduced.

  7. 21 CFR 892.2030 - Medical image digitizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. A medical image digitizer is a device intended to convert an analog medical image into a digital...-coupled devices. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls; voluntary standards—Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) Std., Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG) Std.)....

  8. [Study on the image file conformance to DICOM standard about medical imaging device].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Minghui

    2013-09-01

    The format of medical image file conformance to DICOM standard have important influence on users of the PACS. This paper summarized the results of the writer's study on the image file conformance to DICOM standard about medical imaging device for many years. The questions of medical image file no conformance to DICOM standard are pointed in detail and the questions resulted from the troubled image files are analyzed. Finally, the methods of avoiding image file no conformance to DICOM standard are presented.

  9. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education.

    PubMed

    Dikshit, Aditya; Wu, Dawei; Wu, Chunyan; Zhao, Weizhao

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging modalities, such as X-ray, MRI, CT, ultrasound and PET, forms an essential component of such an education. Internet technologies provide a vehicle to carry medical imaging education online. There exist a number of internet-based medical imaging hyper-books or online documentations. However, there are few providing interactive computational simulations. We focus on delivering knowledge of the physical principles and engineering implementation of medical imaging techniques through an interactive website environment. The online medical imaging simulation system presented in this report outlines basic principles underlying different imaging techniques and image processing algorithms and offers trainees an interactive virtual laboratory. For education purposes, this system aims to provide general understanding of each imaging modality with comprehensive explanations, ample illustrations and copious references as its thrust, rather than complex physics or detailed math. This report specifically describes the development of the tutorial for commonly used medical imaging modalities. An internet-accessible interface is used to simulate various imaging algorithms with user-adjustable parameters. The tutorial is under the MATLAB Web Server environment. Macromedia Director MX is used to develop interactive animations integrating theory with graphic-oriented simulations. HTML and JavaScript are used to enable a user to explore these modules online in a web browser. Numerous multiple choice questions, links and references for advanced study are

  10. Medical image database for software and algorithm evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Marcelo; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2005-04-01

    This work presents the development of a framework to make available a free, online, multipurpose and multimodality medical image database for software and algorithm evaluation. We have implemented a distributed architecture for medical image database, including authoring, storage, and repository for documents and image processing software. The system aims to offer a complete test bed and a set of resources including software, link to scientific papers, gold standards, reference images and post-processed images, enabling medical image processing community (scientists, physicians, students and industrials) to be more aware of evaluation issues. Our focus of development was on convenience and easy of use of a generic system adaptable to different contexts.

  11. Do medical images aid understanding and recall of medical information? An experimental study comparing the experience of viewing no image, a 2D medical image and a 3D medical image alongside a diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Emma Elizabeth; Wellings, Richard; Griffiths, Frances; Hutchinson, Charles; Kunar, Melina

    2017-06-01

    This study compared the experience of viewing 3D medical images, 2D medical images and no image presented alongside a diagnosis. We conducted two laboratory experiments, each with 126 healthy participants. Participants heard three diagnoses; one accompanied by 3D medical images, one accompanied by 2D medical images and one with no image. Participants completed a questionnaire after each diagnosis rating their experience. In Experiment 2, half of the participants were informed that image interpretation can be susceptible to errors. Participants preferred to view 3D images alongside a diagnosis (p<0.001) and reported greater understanding (p<0.001), perceived accuracy (p<0.001) and increased trust (p<0.001) when the diagnosis was accompanied by an image compared to no image. There was no significant difference in trust between participants who were informed of errors within image interpretation and those who were not. When presented alongside a diagnosis, medical images may aid patient understanding, recall and trust in medical information. Medical images may be a powerful resource for patients that could be utilised by clinicians during consultations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Algorithms in radiology and medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Athanasoulis, C A; Lee, A K

    1987-08-01

    As a tool in clinical decision making, algorithms deserve careful consideration. The potential use or abuse of algorithms in rationing health care renders such consideration essential. In radiology and medical imaging, algorithms have been applied as teaching tools in the conference room setting. These teaching decision trees, however, may not be applicable in the clinical situation. If an algorithmic approach to clinical radiology is pursued, several issues should be considered. Specifically, the application, design, designer, economics, and universality of the algorithms must be addressed. As an alternative to the wide dissemination of clinical algorithms, the authors propose the development of consensus opinions among specialists and the promulgation of the principle of radiologist-consultant-decision maker. A decision team is preferable to a decision tree.

  13. Medical Image Analysis by Cognitive Information Systems - a Review.

    PubMed

    Ogiela, Lidia; Takizawa, Makoto

    2016-10-01

    This publication presents a review of medical image analysis systems. The paradigms of cognitive information systems will be presented by examples of medical image analysis systems. The semantic processes present as it is applied to different types of medical images. Cognitive information systems were defined on the basis of methods for the semantic analysis and interpretation of information - medical images - applied to cognitive meaning of medical images contained in analyzed data sets. Semantic analysis was proposed to analyzed the meaning of data. Meaning is included in information, for example in medical images. Medical image analysis will be presented and discussed as they are applied to various types of medical images, presented selected human organs, with different pathologies. Those images were analyzed using different classes of cognitive information systems. Cognitive information systems dedicated to medical image analysis was also defined for the decision supporting tasks. This process is very important for example in diagnostic and therapy processes, in the selection of semantic aspects/features, from analyzed data sets. Those features allow to create a new way of analysis.

  14. Application of Stereo-Imaging Technology to Medical Field

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young

    2012-01-01

    Objectives There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. Methods We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Results Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. Conclusions The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices. PMID:23115737

  15. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  16. 45 CFR 5b.6 - Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records. 5b.6 Section 5b.6 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PRIVACY ACT REGULATIONS § 5b.6 Special procedures for notification of or access to medical records. (a) General. An individual...

  17. A Review on Medical Image Registration as an Optimization Problem.

    PubMed

    Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Zhao, Yiwen; Wang, Zheng; Du, Huibin

    2017-08-01

    In the course of clinical treatment, several medical media are required by a phy-sician in order to provide accurate and complete information about a patient. Medical image registra-tion techniques can provide a richer diagnosis and treatment information to doctors and to provide a comprehensive reference source for the researchers involved in image registration as an optimization problem. The essence of image registration is associating two or more different images spatial asso-ciation, and getting the translation of their spatial relationship. For medical image registration, its pro-cess is not absolute. Its core purpose is finding the conversion relationship between different images. The major step of image registration includes the change of geometrical dimensions, and change of the image of the combination, image similarity measure, iterative optimization and interpo-lation process. The contribution of this review is sort of related image registration research methods, can provide a brief reference for researchers about image registration.

  18. Procedural learning in schizophrenia investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zedkova, Lenka; Woodward, Neil D; Harding, Ian; Tibbo, Phil G; Purdon, Scot E

    2006-12-01

    A cerebral basis for the acquisition and retention of procedural knowledge in schizophrenia was examined with 1.5 T functional MRI during an embedded sequence Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT) in 10 chronic medicated patients and 15 healthy controls. Comparable procedural learning was observed in both groups, suggesting that the impairment reported in previous schizophrenia samples may not be robust. Consistent with previous fMRI reports, procedural learning in the control group was associated with activity in the dorsal striatum, anterior cingulate, parietal cortex and frontal cortex. Greater procedural learning related activity was observed in the control relative to the schizophrenia group in the bilateral frontal, left parietal and bilateral caudate regions. Patients did not activate frontal or parietal areas while responding to the embedded sequence within the SRTT, but greater activation during procedural learning was observed relative to the control sample in the right anterior cingulate, left globus pallidus and the right superior temporal gyrus. Thus, despite comparable instantiation of procedural learning in schizophrenia, the cerebral activation associated with this cognitive skill was abnormal. The paucity of activity in bilateral frontal cortex, left parietal cortex and bilateral caudate nucleus may represent cerebral dysfunction associated with schizophrenia, whereas the hyperactivation of the right superior temporal gyrus, the right anterior cingulate cortex and the left globus pallidus may represent a compensatory cerebral action capable of facilitating near-normal task performance. The results are thus consistent with a neurodevelopmental pathology impinging on fronto-subcortical circuitry.

  19. A Semi-automated Approach to Improve the Efficiency of Medical Imaging Segmentation for Haptic Rendering.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pat; Hu, Mengqi; Kannan, Rahul; Krishnaswamy, Srinivasan

    2017-08-01

    The Sensimmer platform represents our ongoing research on simultaneous haptics and graphics rendering of 3D models. For simulation of medical and surgical procedures using Sensimmer, 3D models must be obtained from medical imaging data, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Image segmentation techniques are used to determine the anatomies of interest from the images. 3D models are obtained from segmentation and their triangle reduction is required for graphics and haptics rendering. This paper focuses on creating 3D models by automating the segmentation of CT images based on the pixel contrast for integrating the interface between Sensimmer and medical imaging devices, using the volumetric approach, Hough transform method, and manual centering method. Hence, automating the process has reduced the segmentation time by 56.35% while maintaining the same accuracy of the output at ±2 voxels.

  20. Survey on Neural Networks Used for Medical Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenghao; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    2009-02-01

    This paper aims to present a review of neural networks used in medical image processing. We classify neural networks by its processing goals and the nature of medical images. Main contributions, advantages, and drawbacks of the methods are mentioned in the paper. Problematic issues of neural network application for medical image processing and an outlook for the future research are also discussed. By this survey, we try to answer the following two important questions: (1) What are the major applications of neural networks in medical image processing now and in the nearby future? (2) What are the major strengths and weakness of applying neural networks for solving medical image processing tasks? We believe that this would be very helpful researchers who are involved in medical image processing with neural network techniques.

  1. Region quad-tree decomposition based edge detection for medical images.

    PubMed

    Dua, Sumeet; Kandiraju, Naveen; Chowriappa, Pradeep

    2010-05-28

    Edge detection in medical images has generated significant interest in the medical informatics community, especially in recent years. With the advent of imaging technology in biomedical and clinical domains, the growth in medical digital images has exceeded our capacity to analyze and store them for efficient representation and retrieval, especially for data mining applications. Medical decision support applications frequently demand the ability to identify and locate sharp discontinuities in an image for feature extraction and interpretation of image content, which can then be exploited for decision support analysis. However, due to the inherent high dimensional nature of the image content and the presence of ill-defined edges, edge detection using classical procedures is difficult, if not impossible, for sensitive and specific medical informatics-based discovery. In this paper, we propose a new edge detection technique based on the regional recursive hierarchical decomposition using quadtree and post-filtration of edges using a finite difference operator. We show that in medical images of common origin, focal and/or penumbral blurred edges can be characterized by an estimable intensity gradient. This gradient can further be used for dismissing false alarms. A detailed validation and comparison with related works on diabetic retinopathy images and CT scan images show that the proposed approach is efficient and accurate.

  2. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special treatment because of the possibility that disclosure will have an adverse physical or psychological effect... medical and/or psychological records which pertain to him or her, he or she shall, in his or her...

  3. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special treatment because of the possibility that disclosure will have an adverse physical or psychological effect... medical and/or psychological records which pertain to him or her, he or she shall, in his or her...

  4. 19 CFR 201.27 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... maintained by the Commission which pertain to him or her, medical and psychological records merit special treatment because of the possibility that disclosure will have an adverse physical or psychological effect... medical and/or psychological records which pertain to him or her, he or she shall, in his or her...

  5. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  6. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  7. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  8. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  9. 32 CFR 564.40 - Procedures for obtaining medical care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... facilities utilized: Estimated cost and duration of treatment: Summary of incident: (32 U.S.C. 318-320 and... benefits. (b) Authorization for care in civilian facility. (1) An individual who desires medical or dental care in civilian medical treatment facilities at Federal expense is not authorized such care...

  10. Comparison of Two Distance Based Alignment Method in Medical Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    very helpful to register large datasets of contours or surfaces, commonly encountered in medical imaging . They do not require special ordering or...COMPARISON OF TWO DISTANCE BASED ALIGNMENT METHOD IN MEDICAL IMAGING G. Bulan, C. Ozturk Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Bogazici University...Two Distance Based Alignment Method in Medical Imaging Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task Number

  11. Using GOMS models and hypertext to create representations of medical procedures for online display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugerty, Leo; Halgren, Shannon; Gosbee, John; Rudisill, Marianne

    1991-01-01

    This study investigated two methods to improve organization and presentation of computer-based medical procedures. A literature review suggested that the GOMS (goals, operators, methods, and selecton rules) model can assist in rigorous task analysis, which can then help generate initial design ideas for the human-computer interface. GOMS model are hierarchical in nature, so this study also investigated the effect of hierarchical, hypertext interfaces. We used a 2 x 2 between subjects design, including the following independent variables: procedure organization - GOMS model based vs. medical-textbook based; navigation type - hierarchical vs. linear (booklike). After naive subjects studies the online procedures, measures were taken of their memory for the content and the organization of the procedures. This design was repeated for two medical procedures. For one procedure, subjects who studied GOMS-based and hierarchical procedures remembered more about the procedures than other subjects. The results for the other procedure were less clear. However, data for both procedures showed a 'GOMSification effect'. That is, when asked to do a free recall of a procedure, subjects who had studies a textbook procedure often recalled key information in a location inconsistent with the procedure they actually studied, but consistent with the GOMS-based procedure.

  12. High resolution x-ray medical sequential image acquisition and processing system based on PCI interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dongming; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua

    2003-11-01

    In the field of medical application, it is of great importance to adopt digital image processing technique. Based on the characteristics of medical image, we introduced the digital image processing method to the X-ray imaging system, and developed a high resolution x-ray medical sequential image acquisition and processing system that employs image enhancer and CCD. This system consists of three basic modules, namely sequential image acquisition, data transfer and system control, and image processing. Under the control of FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), images acquired by the front-end circuit are transmitted to a PC through high speed PCI bus, and then optimized by the image processing program. The software kits, which include PCI Device Driver and Image Processing Package, are developed with Visual C++ Language based on Windows OS. In this paper, we present a general introduction to the principle and the operating procedure of X-ray Sequential Image Acquisition and Processing System, with special emphasis on the key issues of the hardware design. In addition, the context, principle, status quo and the digitizing trend of X-ray Imaging are explained succinctly. Finally, the preliminary experimental results are shown to demonstrate that the system is capable of achieving high quality X-ray sequential images.

  13. Impact of Interruptions, Distractions, and Cognitive Load on Procedure Failures and Medication Administration Errors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lily; Donohue-Porter, Patricia; Stein Fishbein, Joanna

    Medication administration errors are difficult to intercept since they occur at the end of the process. The study describes interruptions, distractions, and cognitive load experienced by registered nurses during medication administration and explores their impact on procedure failures and medication administration errors. The focus of this study was unique as it investigated how known individual and environmental factors interacted and culminated in errors.

  14. 20 CFR 702.415 - Fees for medical services; unresolved disputes on charges; procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fees for medical services; unresolved... ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.415 Fees for medical services; unresolved... seek a hearing pursuant to section 556 of title 5, United States Code. Upon written request for such...

  15. 20 CFR 702.415 - Fees for medical services; unresolved disputes on charges; procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fees for medical services; unresolved... ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.415 Fees for medical services; unresolved... seek a hearing pursuant to section 556 of title 5, United States Code. Upon written request for such...

  16. 20 CFR 702.415 - Fees for medical services; unresolved disputes on charges; procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fees for medical services; unresolved... ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Medical Care and Supervision § 702.415 Fees for medical services; unresolved... seek a hearing pursuant to section 556 of title 5, United States Code. Upon written request for such...

  17. Medical imaging and consent: when is an X-ray assault?

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrea N

    2016-06-01

    New Zealand patients have rights in relation to their healthcare including the right to consent to medical treatment. Medical imaging is the third largest category of hospital procedure in New Zealand and it constitutes a circumstance where examination without consent could be assault. New Zealand assault law is unique, and medical radiation technologists (MRTs) must be educated about their responsibilities. A literature review was conducted focusing on the medicolegal aspects of consent as it relates to medical imaging. This was compared to the practical realities of practicing radiography as experienced by the author. Finally, the guidance given by the professional bodies for MRTs in New Zealand was examined to determine whether it adequately informs MRTs of the responsibilities and provides them with a framework to guide their practice. Medical imaging is a diverse area presenting a range of challenging circumstances for consent. Currently, the consent framework and guidance provided by professional bodies is insufficient and in need of updating.

  18. Integrating the Radiology Information System with Computerised Provider Order Entry: The Impact on Repeat Medical Imaging Investigations.

    PubMed

    Vecellio, Elia; Georgiou, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Repeat and redundant procedures in medical imaging are associated with increases in resource utilisation and labour costs. Unnecessary medical imaging in some modalities, such as X-Ray (XR) and Computed Tomography (CT) is an important safety issue because it exposes patients to ionising radiation which can be carcinogenic and is associated with higher rates of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of implementing an integrated Computerised Provider Order Entry (CPOE)/Radiology Information System (RIS)/Picture Archiving and Communications System (PACS) system on the number of XR and CT imaging procedures (including repeat imaging requests) for inpatients at a large metropolitan hospital. The study found that patients had an average 0.47 fewer XR procedures and 0.07 fewer CT procedures after the implementation of the integrated system. Part of this reduction was driven by a lower rate of repeat procedures: the average inpatient had 0.13 fewer repeat XR procedures within 24-hours of the previous identical XR procedure. A similar decrease was not evident for repeat CT procedures. Reduced utilisation of imaging procedures (especially those within very short intervals from the previous identical procedure, which are more likely to be redundant) has implications for the safety of patients and the cost of medical imaging services.

  19. [Orbit: Part 1: anatomy, imaging procedures and retrobulbar lesions].

    PubMed

    Reith, W; Yilmaz, U

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this 2-part review article on diseases of the orbit is to give the reader an insight into the anatomical structure and an overview of the most important diseases in the area of the eye socket. The main focus is on a description of the imaging procedures and their individual advantages and disadvantages. The most important tumors, trauma and degenerative alterations of the orbit are also described.

  20. Physical And Medical Attributes Of Six Contemporary Noninvasive Imaging Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    1981-11-01

    Digital subtraction angiography(DSA)is compared to five other noninvasive imaging methods with respect to physical attributes and medical applications. 1) Digital subtraction angiography measures flow channel (vessel) anatomy and vascular leaks in regions where signals from under and overlying vascular pools do not conflict in strength with the vessel or tissue of interest. 2) X-ray computed tomography, in principle, can separate the under and overlying signals, yet presently it is limited in speed, axial coverage, and computational burden for tasks DSA can efficiently perform. Possible exceptions are the dynamic spatial reconstructor (DSR) of Mayo Clinic and the system under construction at the University of California, San Francisco. 3) Heavy ion imaging measures electron density and is less sensitive to injected contrast than x-ray imaging which has the advantage of the photoelectric effect. A unique attribute of heavy ion imaging is its potential for treatment planning and the fact that beam hardening is not a physical problem. 4) Ultrasound detects surfaces, bulk tissue characteristics, and blood velocity. Doppler ultrasound competes with DSA in some regions of the body and generally involves less equipment and patient procedures. Ultrasound vessel imaging and range-gated Doppler have limitations due to sound absorption by atheromatous tissue and available imaging windows. 5) Emission tomography measures receptor site distribution, metabolism, permeability, and tissue perfusion. Resolution is limited to 7mm full width half maximum (FWHM) in the near future, and extraction of metabolic and perfusion information usually requires kinetic analyses with statistically poor data. The ability of positron tomography to measure metabolism (sugar, fatty acid, and oxygen utilization) and the ability to measure tissue perfusion with single photon tomography (17 mm FWHM) or PET (7 mm FWHM) using non-cyclotron produced radionuclides are the major unique features of emission

  1. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework. PMID:27584732

  2. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Megumi; Endo, Shota; Nakao, Shinichi; Yoshida, Munehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework.

  3. Metadata requirements for results of diagnostic imaging procedures: a BIIF profile to support user applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas J.; Lloyd, David S.; Reynolds, Melvin I.; Plummer, David L.

    2002-05-01

    A visible digital image is rendered from a set of digital image data. Medical digital image data can be stored as either: (a) pre-rendered format, corresponding to a photographic print, or (b) un-rendered format, corresponding to a photographic negative. The appropriate image data storage format and associated header data (metadata) required by a user of the results of a diagnostic procedure recorded electronically depends on the task(s) to be performed. The DICOM standard provides a rich set of metadata that supports the needs of complex applications. Many end user applications, such as simple report text viewing and display of a selected image, are not so demanding and generic image formats such as JPEG are sometimes used. However, these are lacking some basic identification requirements. In this paper we make specific proposals for minimal extensions to generic image metadata of value in various domains, which enable safe use in the case of two simple healthcare end user scenarios: (a) viewing of text and a selected JPEG image activated by a hyperlink and (b) viewing of one or more JPEG images together with superimposed text and graphics annotation using a file specified by a profile of the ISO/IEC Basic Image Interchange Format (BIIF).

  4. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Staggs, Michael C.

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  5. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOEpatents

    Demos; Stavros , Staggs; Michael C.

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  6. An interface terminology for medical imaging ordering purposes.

    PubMed

    Griffon, Nicolas; Savoye-Collet, Céline; Massari, Philippe; Daniel, Christel; Darmoni, Stéfan J

    2012-01-01

    The need for structured data in electronic health records has not been fully addressed by reference terminologies (RT) due to difficulties of use for end-users. Interface terminologies (IT), built for specific usage and users, and linked to RT, may solve this issue. We propose an IT for medical imaging prescription, based on the French nomenclature for procedure (CCAM), and its qualitative evaluation. The creation and evaluation processes were adapted from published guidelines. Prescription IT is available on the web (http://pts.chu-rouen.fr). It contains 290 orderable terms linked to 249 CCAM codes. The synonymy of prescription IT is significantly richer than the CCAM one and labels are significantly shorter. The main problem came from the CCAM, which is dedicated to billing purposes. We are planning to map prescription IT to other international RT such as RadLex or SNOMED. Prescription IT might quicken the adoption of computerized ordering processes in France.

  7. An interface terminology for medical imaging ordering purposes.

    PubMed Central

    GRIFFON, Nicolas; SAVOYE-COLLET, Céline; MASSARI, Philippe; DANIEL, Christel; DARMONI, Stéfan J.

    2012-01-01

    The need for structured data in electronic health records has not been fully addressed by reference terminologies (RT) due to difficulties of use for end-users. Interface terminologies (IT), built for specific usage and users, and linked to RT, may solve this issue. We propose an IT for medical imaging prescription, based on the French nomenclature for procedure (CCAM), and its qualitative evaluation. The creation and evaluation processes were adapted from published guidelines. Prescription IT is available on the web (http://pts.chu-rouen.fr). It contains 290 orderable terms linked to 249 CCAM codes. The synonymy of prescription IT is significantly richer than the CCAM one and labels are significantly shorter. The main problem came from the CCAM, which is dedicated to billing purposes. We are planning to map prescription IT to other international RT such as RadLex or SNOMED. Prescription IT might quicken the adoption of computerized ordering processes in France. PMID:23304401

  8. Medical image compression with embedded-wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Po-Yuen; Lin, Freddie S.; Jannson, Tomasz

    1997-10-01

    The need for effective medical image compression and transmission techniques continues to grow because of the huge volume of radiological images captured each year. The limited bandwidth and efficiency of current networking systems cannot meet this need. In response, Physical Optics Corporation devised an efficient medical image management system to significantly reduce the storage space and transmission bandwidth required for digitized medical images. The major functions of this system are: (1) compressing medical imagery, using a visual-lossless coder, to reduce the storage space required; (2) transmitting image data progressively, to use the transmission bandwidth efficiently; and (3) indexing medical imagery according to image characteristics, to enable automatic content-based retrieval. A novel scalable wavelet-based image coder was developed to implement the system. In addition to its high compression, this approach is scalable in both image size and quality. The system provides dramatic solutions to many medical image handling problems. One application is the efficient storage and fast transmission of medical images over picture archiving and communication systems. In addition to reducing costs, the potential impact on improving the quality and responsiveness of health care delivery in the US is significant.

  9. Shaping the future through innovations: From medical imaging to precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Comaniciu, Dorin; Engel, Klaus; Georgescu, Bogdan; Mansi, Tommaso

    2016-10-01

    Medical images constitute a source of information essential for disease diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. In addition, due to its patient-specific nature, imaging information represents a critical component required for advancing precision medicine into clinical practice. This manuscript describes recently developed technologies for better handling of image information: photorealistic visualization of medical images with Cinematic Rendering, artificial agents for in-depth image understanding, support for minimally invasive procedures, and patient-specific computational models with enhanced predictive power. Throughout the manuscript we will analyze the capabilities of such technologies and extrapolate on their potential impact to advance the quality of medical care, while reducing its cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Gallium arsenide pixel detectors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Via, C.; Bates, R.; Bertolucci, E.; Bottigli, U.; Campbell, M.; Chesi, E.; Conti, M.; D'Auria, S.; DelPapa, C.; Fantacci, M. E.; Grossi, G.; Heijne, E.; Mancini, E.; Middelkamp, P.; Raine, C.; Russo, P.; O'Shea, V.; Scharfetter, L.; Smith, K.; Snoeys, W.; Stefanini, A.

    1997-08-01

    Gallium arsenide pixel detectors processed on a 200 μm Semi-Insulating (SI) Hitachi substrate were bump-bonded to the Omega3 electronics developed at CERN for high energy physics [1]. The pixel dimensions are 50 μm × 500 μm for a total of 2048 cells and an active area of ˜0.5 cm 2. Our aim is to use this system for medical imaging. We report the results obtained after irradiation of the detector with different X-ray sources on phantoms with different contrasts. The system showed good sensitivity to X-rays from 241Am (60 keV) and 109Cd (22.1 keV). It is also sensitive to β- particles from 90Sr as well as from 32P which is used as a tracer for autoradiography applications. The inherent high absorption efficiency of GaAs associated with the self-triggering capabilities of the pixel readout system reduced considerably the acquisition time compared with traditional systems based on silicon or emulsions. The present configuration is not optimised for X-ray imaging. The reduction of the pixel dimensions to 200 μm × 200 μm together with the integration of a counter in the pixel electronics would make the detector competitive for applications like mammography or dental radiology. For certain applications in biochemistry, such as DNA sequencing, where good spatial resolution is required only in one direction, the present setup should allow the best spatial resolution available up to now with respect to other digital autoradiographic systems. DNA sequencing tests are now under way.

  11. An improved FCM medical image segmentation algorithm based on MMTD.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningning; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Shaobai

    2014-01-01

    Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. Fuzzy c-means (FCM) is one of the popular clustering algorithms for medical image segmentation. But FCM is highly vulnerable to noise due to not considering the spatial information in image segmentation. This paper introduces medium mathematics system which is employed to process fuzzy information for image segmentation. It establishes the medium similarity measure based on the measure of medium truth degree (MMTD) and uses the correlation of the pixel and its neighbors to define the medium membership function. An improved FCM medical image segmentation algorithm based on MMTD which takes some spatial features into account is proposed in this paper. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is more antinoise than the standard FCM, with more certainty and less fuzziness. This will lead to its practicable and effective applications in medical image segmentation.

  12. General Structure of Regularization Procedures in Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titterington, D. M.

    1985-03-01

    Regularization procedures are portrayed as compromises between the conflicting aims of fidelity with the observed image and perfect smoothness. The selection of an estimated image involves the choice of a prescription, indicating the manner of smoothing, and of a smoothing parameter, which defines the degree of smoothing. Prescriptions of the minimum-penalized- distance type are considered and are shown to be equivalent to maximum-penalized-smoothness prescriptions. These include, therefore, constrained least-squares and constrained maximum entropy methods. The formal link with Bayesian statistical analysis is pointed out. Two important methods of choosing the degree of smoothing are described, one based on criteria of consistency with the data and one based on minimizing a risk function. The latter includes minimum mean-squared error criteria. Although the maximum entropy method has some practical advantages, there seems no case for it to hold a special place on philosophical grounds, in the context of image reconstruction.

  13. Web hospital information system for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiying; Tsai, Weu-Tek; Canessa, Gino; Canessa, John C.

    2002-05-01

    A complete Web based hospital information system, which can allow medical doctors to access and modify patient information and records anywhere in the world via the Internet, was developed. More specifically, this Web information system can be linked seamlessly to our fully computerized MR image-guided neurosurgery suite. This information system, which utilizes the unprecedented Internet infrastructure and adopts the most updated software technologies, addresses the urgent need for handling today's hospital information flow and management. With this new information system in our surgery suite, images and records that have been transferred directly from a diagnostic system such as MR, CT, etc. to the DICOM archive are accessible via a secured Internet connection. When data is accessed via the Web, it can be retrieved in several formats, including raw DICOM and binary, which are extremely useful for various research and development purposes, as well as new applications that require access to the original image data. The Internet-based Web Hospital Information System (WHIS) can easily match the existing standards for this type of information system in a hospital and can accommodate any anticipated requirements for image-guided minimally invasive surgery in the future. A practical and potentially low cost Web Hospital information system, which is functionality- driven, will be presented in this paper. It provides an extremely intuitive interactive environment, as well as a very user-friendly interface for use by both medical doctors and patients.

  14. Meta-analysis of the technical performance of an imaging procedure: guidelines and statistical methodology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Erich P; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; McShane, Lisa M; Gönen, Mithat; Ye, Jingjing; Buckler, Andrew J; Kinahan, Paul E; Reeves, Anthony P; Jackson, Edward F; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Zahlmann, Gudrun

    2015-02-01

    Medical imaging serves many roles in patient care and the drug approval process, including assessing treatment response and guiding treatment decisions. These roles often involve a quantitative imaging biomarker, an objectively measured characteristic of the underlying anatomic structure or biochemical process derived from medical images. Before a quantitative imaging biomarker is accepted for use in such roles, the imaging procedure to acquire it must undergo evaluation of its technical performance, which entails assessment of performance metrics such as repeatability and reproducibility of the quantitative imaging biomarker. Ideally, this evaluation will involve quantitative summaries of results from multiple studies to overcome limitations due to the typically small sample sizes of technical performance studies and/or to include a broader range of clinical settings and patient populations. This paper is a review of meta-analysis procedures for such an evaluation, including identification of suitable studies, statistical methodology to evaluate and summarize the performance metrics, and complete and transparent reporting of the results. This review addresses challenges typical of meta-analyses of technical performance, particularly small study sizes, which often causes violations of assumptions underlying standard meta-analysis techniques. Alternative approaches to address these difficulties are also presented; simulation studies indicate that they outperform standard techniques when some studies are small. The meta-analysis procedures presented are also applied to actual [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) test-retest repeatability data for illustrative purposes. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. [Medical image retrieval by high level semantic features and low level content features of image].

    PubMed

    Xie, Tianwen; Tang, Weijun; Zhao, Qiufeng; Zhao, Jiaao

    2009-12-01

    Content-based image retrieval aims at searching the similar images using low level features,and medical image retrieval needs it for the retrieval of similar images. Medical images contain not only a lot of content data, but also a lot of semantic information. This paper presents an approach by combining digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) features and low level features to perform retrieval on medical image databases. At the first step, the semantic information is extracted from DICOM header for the pre-filtering of the images, and then dual-tree complex wavelet transfrom(DT-CWT) features of pre-filtered images and example images are extracted to retrieve similar images. Experimental results show that by combining the high level semantics (DICOM features) and low level content features (texture) the retrieval time is reduced and the performance of medical image retrieval is increased.

  16. I-SPINE: a software package for advances in image-guided and minimally invasive spine procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Cleary, Kevin R.; Zeng, Jianchao; Gary, Kevin A.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Watson, Vance; Lindisch, David; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-05-01

    While image guidance is now routinely used in the brain in the form of frameless stereotaxy, it is beginning to be more widely used in other clinical areas such as the spine. At Georgetown University Medical Center, we are developing a program to provide advanced visualization and image guidance for minimally invasive spine procedures. This is a collaboration between an engineering-based research group and physicians from the radiology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedics departments. A major component of this work is the ISIS Center Spine Procedures Imaging and Navigation Engine, which is a software package under development as the base platform for technical advances.

  17. Glasses-free 3D viewing systems for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Daniel S. F.; Serra, Rolando L.; Vannucci, André L.; Moreno, Alfredo B.; Li, Li M.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we show two different glasses-free 3D viewing systems for medical imaging: a stereoscopic system that employs a vertically dispersive holographic screen (VDHS) and a multi-autostereoscopic system, both used to produce 3D MRI/CT images. We describe how to obtain a VDHS in holographic plates optimized for this application, with field of view of 7 cm to each eye and focal length of 25 cm, showing images done with the system. We also describe a multi-autostereoscopic system, presenting how it can generate 3D medical imaging from viewpoints of a MRI or CT image, showing results of a 3D angioresonance image.

  18. A virtual laboratory for medical image analysis.

    PubMed

    Olabarriaga, Sílvia D; Glatard, Tristan; de Boer, Piter T

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the design, implementation, and usage of a virtual laboratory for medical image analysis. It is fully based on the Dutch grid, which is part of the Enabling Grids for E-sciencE (EGEE) production infrastructure and driven by the gLite middleware. The adopted service-oriented architecture enables decoupling the user-friendly clients running on the user's workstation from the complexity of the grid applications and infrastructure. Data are stored on grid resources and can be browsed/viewed interactively by the user with the Virtual Resource Browser (VBrowser). Data analysis pipelines are described as Scufl workflows and enacted on the grid infrastructure transparently using the MOTEUR workflow management system. VBrowser plug-ins allow for easy experiment monitoring and error detection. Because of the strict compliance to the grid authentication model, all operations are performed on behalf of the user, ensuring basic security and facilitating collaboration across organizations. The system has been operational and in daily use for eight months (December 2008), with six users, leading to the submission of 9000 jobs/month in average and the production of several terabytes of data.

  19. A Framework for Integration of Heterogeneous Medical Imaging Networks

    PubMed Central

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Ribeiro, Luís S; Costa, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is increasing its importance in matters of medical diagnosis and in treatment support. Much is due to computers that have revolutionized medical imaging not only in acquisition process but also in the way it is visualized, stored, exchanged and managed. Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) is an example of how medical imaging takes advantage of computers. To solve problems of interoperability of PACS and medical imaging equipment, the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard was defined and widely implemented in current solutions. More recently, the need to exchange medical data between distinct institutions resulted in Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative that contains a content profile especially conceived for medical imaging exchange: Cross Enterprise Document Sharing for imaging (XDS-i). Moreover, due to application requirements, many solutions developed private networks to support their services. For instance, some applications support enhanced query and retrieve over DICOM objects metadata. This paper proposes anintegration framework to medical imaging networks that provides protocols interoperability and data federation services. It is an extensible plugin system that supports standard approaches (DICOM and XDS-I), but is also capable of supporting private protocols. The framework is being used in the Dicoogle Open Source PACS. PMID:25279021

  20. High Bit-Depth Medical Image Compression with HEVC.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Saurin; Ruiz, Damian; Kalva, Hari; Fernandez-Escribano, Gerardo; Adzic, Velibor

    2017-01-27

    Efficient storing and retrieval of medical images has direct impact on reducing costs and improving access in cloud based health care services. JPEG 2000 is currently the commonly used compression format for medical images shared using the DICOM standard. However, new formats such as HEVC can provide better compression efficiency compared to JPEG 2000. Furthermore, JPEG 2000 is not suitable for efficiently storing image series and 3D imagery. Using HEVC, a single format can support all forms of medical images. This paper presents the use of HEVC for diagnostically acceptable medical image compression, focusing on compression efficiency compared to JPEG 2000. Diagnostically acceptable lossy compression and complexity of high bit-depth medical image compression are studied. Based on an established medically acceptable compression range for JPEG 2000, this paper establishes acceptable HEVC compression range for medical imaging applications. Experimental results show that using HEVC can increase the compression performance, compared to JPEG 2000, by over 54%. Along with this, new method for reducing computational complexity of HEVC encoding for medical images is proposed. Results show that HEVC intra encoding complexity can be reduced by over 55% with negligible increase in file size.

  1. Numerical Inversion of Integral Equations for Medical Imaging and Geophysics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-13

    Equations for Medical Imaging and Geophysics (Unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Frank Stenger 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT...9r~S NUMERICAL INVERSION OF INTEGRAL EQUATIONS FOR MEDICAL IMAGING AND GEOPHYSICS FINAL REPORT AUTHOR OF REPORT: Frank Stenger December 13, 1988

  2. A framework for integration of heterogeneous medical imaging networks.

    PubMed

    Viana-Ferreira, Carlos; Ribeiro, Luís S; Costa, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging is increasing its importance in matters of medical diagnosis and in treatment support. Much is due to computers that have revolutionized medical imaging not only in acquisition process but also in the way it is visualized, stored, exchanged and managed. Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) is an example of how medical imaging takes advantage of computers. To solve problems of interoperability of PACS and medical imaging equipment, the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard was defined and widely implemented in current solutions. More recently, the need to exchange medical data between distinct institutions resulted in Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) initiative that contains a content profile especially conceived for medical imaging exchange: Cross Enterprise Document Sharing for imaging (XDS-i). Moreover, due to application requirements, many solutions developed private networks to support their services. For instance, some applications support enhanced query and retrieve over DICOM objects metadata. This paper proposes anintegration framework to medical imaging networks that provides protocols interoperability and data federation services. It is an extensible plugin system that supports standard approaches (DICOM and XDS-I), but is also capable of supporting private protocols. The framework is being used in the Dicoogle Open Source PACS.

  3. Distress Behavior in Children With Leukemia Undergoing Medical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Ernest R.

    Improving prognosis for many forms of childhood cancer has resulted in increased attention on the quality-of-life experience. Conditioned anxiety and pain associated with recurrent diagnostic and treatment procedures have been identified as major sources of distress in children with malignant disease. To evaluate the efficacy of various…

  4. Cavitational Iron Microparticles Generation By Plasma Procedures For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bica, Ioan; Bunoiu, Madalin; Chirigiu, Liviu; Spunei, Marius; Juganaru, Iulius

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents the experimental installation for the production, in argon plasma, of cavitational iron microparticles (pore microspheres, microtubes and octopus-shaped microparticles). Experimental results are presented and discussed and it is shown that absorbant particles with a minimum iron content are obtained by the plasma procedures

  5. A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

  6. A User-Centered Cooperative Information System for Medical Imaging Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Enrique J.; Quiles, Jose A.; Sanz, Marcos F.; del Pozo, Francisco

    1998-01-01

    Presents a cooperative information system for remote medical imaging diagnosis. General computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) problems addressed are definition of a procedure for the design of user-centered cooperative systems (conceptual level); and improvement of user feedback and optimization of the communication bandwidth in highly…

  7. Image acquisition context: procedure description attributes for clinically relevant indexing and selective retrieval of biomedical images.

    PubMed

    Bidgood, W D; Bray, B; Brown, N; Mori, A R; Spackman, K A; Golichowski, A; Jones, R H; Korman, L; Dove, B; Hildebrand, L; Berg, M

    1999-01-01

    To support clinically relevant indexing of biomedical images and image-related information based on the attributes of image acquisition procedures and the judgments (observations) expressed by observers in the process of image interpretation. The authors introduce the notion of "image acquisition context," the set of attributes that describe image acquisition procedures, and present a standards-based strategy for utilizing the attributes of image acquisition context as indexing and retrieval keys for digital image libraries. The authors' indexing strategy is based on an interdependent message/terminology architecture that combines the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, the SNOMED (Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine) vocabulary, and the SNOMED DICOM microglossary. The SNOMED DICOM microglossary provides context-dependent mapping of terminology to DICOM data elements. The capability of embedding standard coded descriptors in DICOM image headers and image-interpretation reports improves the potential for selective retrieval of image-related information. This favorably affects information management in digital libraries.

  8. 15 CFR 4.26 - Special procedures: Medical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from the individual the name and address of the individual's physician and/or psychologist; (3) Seek... psychologist, if the Department believes such consultation is advisable; (4) Seek written consent from the individual for the Department to provide the medical records to the individual's physician or...

  9. On the development of expertise in interpreting medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupinsky, Elizabeth A.

    2012-03-01

    Medical images represent a core portion of the information clinicians utilize to render diagnostic and treatment decisions. Fundamentally, viewing a medical image involves two basic processes - visually inspecting the image (visual perception) and rendering an interpretation (cognition). The interpretation is often followed by a recommendation. The likelihood of error in the interpretation of medical images is unfortunately not negligible. Errors occur and patients' lives are impacted. Thus we need to understand how clinicians interact with the information in an image during the interpretation process. We also need to understand how clinicians develop expertise throughout their careers and why some people are better at interpreting medical images than others. If we can better understand how expertise develops, perhaps we can develop better training programs, incorporate more effective ways of teaching image interpretation into the medical school and residency curriculums, and create new tools that would enhance and perhaps speed up the learning process. With improved understanding we can also develop ways to further improve decision-making in general and at every level of the medical imaging profession, thus improving patient care. The science of medical image perception is dedicated to understanding and improving the clinical interpretation process.

  10. Data Hiding Scheme on Medical Image using Graph Coloring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astuti, Widi; Adiwijaya; Novia Wisety, Untari

    2015-06-01

    The utilization of digital medical images is now widely spread[4]. The medical images is supposed to get protection since it has probability to pass through unsecure network. Several watermarking techniques have been developed so that the digital medical images can be guaranteed in terms of its originality. In watermarking, the medical images becomes a protected object. Nevertheless, the medical images can actually be a medium of hiding secret data such as patient medical record. The data hiding is done by inserting data into image - usually called steganography in images. Because the medical images can influence the diagnose change, steganography will only be applied to non-interest region. Vector Quantization (VQ) is one of lossydata compression technique which is sufficiently prominent and frequently used. Generally, the VQ based steganography scheme still has limitation in terms of the data capacity which can be inserted. This research is aimed to make a Vector Quantization-based steganography scheme and graph coloring. The test result shows that the scheme can insert 28768 byte data which equals to 10077 characters for images area of 3696 pixels.

  11. Wavelet Packets-Based Blind Watermarking for Medical Image Management

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Salwa A.K.; El-sheimy, Naser; Tolba, A.S.; Abdelkader, F.M.; Elhindy, Hisham M.

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosive use of medical images and Electronics Patient Record (EPR) in the healthcare sector for facilitating the sharing of patient information and exchange between networked hospitals and healthcare centers. To guarantee the security, authenticity and management of medical images and information through storage and distribution, the watermarking techniques are growing to protect the medical healthcare information. This paper presents a technique for embedding the EPR information in the medical image to save storage space and transmission overheads and to guarantee security of the shared data. In this paper a new method for protecting the patient information in which the information is embedded as a watermark in the discrete wavelet packet transform (DWPT) of the medical image using the hospital logo as a reference image. The patient information is coded by an error correcting code (ECC), BCH code, to enhance the robustness of the proposed method. The scheme is blind so that the EPR can be extracted from the medical image without the need of the original image. Therefore, this proposed technique is useful in telemedicine applications. Performance of the proposed method was tested using four modalities of medical images; MRA, MRI, Radiological, and CT. Experimental results showed no visible difference between the watermarked and the original image. Moreover, the proposed watermarking method is robust against a wide range of attacks such as JPEG coding, Gaussian noise addition, histogram equalization, gamma correction, contrast adjustment, and sharpen filter and rotation. PMID:20700520

  12. [Managing digital medical imaging projects in healthcare services: lessons learned].

    PubMed

    Rojas de la Escalera, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical imaging is one of the most important diagnostic instruments in clinical practice. The technological development of digital medical imaging has enabled healthcare services to undertake large scale projects that require the participation and collaboration of many professionals of varied backgrounds and interests as well as substantial investments in infrastructures. Rather than focusing on systems for dealing with digital medical images, this article deals with the management of projects for implementing these systems, reviewing various organizational, technological, and human factors that are critical to ensure the success of these projects and to guarantee the compatibility and integration of digital medical imaging systems with other health information systems. To this end, the author relates several lessons learned from a review of the literature and the author's own experience in the technical coordination of digital medical imaging projects. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Medical image processing on the GPU - past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Anders; Dufort, Paul; Forsberg, Daniel; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-12-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) are used today in a wide range of applications, mainly because they can dramatically accelerate parallel computing, are affordable and energy efficient. In the field of medical imaging, GPUs are in some cases crucial for enabling practical use of computationally demanding algorithms. This review presents the past and present work on GPU accelerated medical image processing, and is meant to serve as an overview and introduction to existing GPU implementations. The review covers GPU acceleration of basic image processing operations (filtering, interpolation, histogram estimation and distance transforms), the most commonly used algorithms in medical imaging (image registration, image segmentation and image denoising) and algorithms that are specific to individual modalities (CT, PET, SPECT, MRI, fMRI, DTI, ultrasound, optical imaging and microscopy). The review ends by highlighting some future possibilities and challenges.

  14. Radiology Physician Extenders: A Literature Review of the History and Current Roles of Physician Extenders in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Vicki L; Flanagan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the literature review was to assess the origins of radiology physician extenders and examine the current roles found in the literature of advanced practice physician extenders within medical imaging. Twenty-six articles relating to physician assistants (PAs), nurse practitioners (NPs), radiologist assistants (RAs), and nuclear medicine advanced associates (NMAAs) were reviewed to discern similarities and differences in history, scope of practice, and roles in the medical imaging field. The literature showed PAs and NPs are working mostly in interventional radiology. PAs, NPs, and RAs perform similar tasks in radiology, including history and physicals, evaluation and management, preprocedure work-up, obtaining informed consent, initial observations/reports, and post-procedure follow-up. NPs and PAs perform a variety of procedures but most commonly vascular access, paracentesis, and thoracentesis. RAs perform gastrointestinal, genitourinary, nonvascular invasive fluoroscopy procedures, and vascular access procedures. The review revealed NMAAs are working in an advanced role, but no specific performances of procedures was found in the literature, only suggested tasks and clinical competencies. PAs, NPs, and RAs are currently the three main midlevel providers used in medical imaging. These midlevel providers are being used in a variety of ways to increase the efficiency of the radiologist and provide diagnostic and therapeutic radiologic procedures to patients. NMAAs are being used in medical imaging but little literature is available on current roles in clinical practice. More research is needed to assess the exact procedures and duties being performed by these medical imaging physician extenders.

  15. Reducing Patient Radiation Dose With Image Noise Reduction Technology in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Procedures.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Michael; Hauptmann, Karl Eugen

    2016-03-01

    X-ray radiation exposure is of great concern for patients undergoing structural heart interventions. In addition, a larger group of medical staff is required and exposed to radiation compared with percutaneous coronary interventions. This study aimed at quantifying radiation dose reduction with implementation of specific image noise reduction technology (NRT) in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures. We retrospectively analyzed 104 consecutive patients with TAVI procedures, 52 patients before and 52 after optimization of x-ray radiation chain, and implementation of NRT. Patients with 1-step TAVI and complex coronary intervention, or complex TAVI procedures, were excluded. Before the procedure, all patients received a multislice computed tomography scan, which was used to size aortic annulus, select the optimal implantation plane, valve type and size, and guide valve implantation using a software tool. Air kerma and kerma-area product were compared in both groups to determine patient radiation dose reduction. Baseline parameters, co-morbidity, or procedural data were comparable between groups. Mean kerma-area product was significantly lower (p <0.001) in the NRT group compared with the standard group (60 ± 39 vs 203 ± 106 Gy × cm(2), p <0.001), which corresponds to a reduction of 70%. Mean air kerma was reduced by 64% (494 ± 360 vs 1,355 ± 657 mGy, p <0.001). In conclusion, using optimized x-ray chain combined with specific image noise reduction technology has the potential to significantly reduce by 2/3 radiation dose in standard TAVI procedures without worsening image quality or prolonging procedure time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [3D display of sequential 2D medical images].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yisong; Chen, Yazhu

    2003-12-01

    A detailed review is given in this paper on various current 3D display methods for sequential 2D medical images and the new development in 3D medical image display. True 3D display, surface rendering, volume rendering, 3D texture mapping and distributed collaborative rendering are discussed in depth. For two kinds of medical applications: Real-time navigation system and high-fidelity diagnosis in computer aided surgery, different 3D display methods are presented.

  17. Cosmetic procedures among youths: a survey of junior college and medical students in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jia Hui; Yeak, Seth; Phoon, Natalie; Lo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although cosmetic procedures have become increasingly popular among the younger population in recent years, limited research on this subject has been done in the Asian context. We aimed to explore the views and knowledge regarding cosmetic procedures among junior college (JC) and medical students in Singapore. METHODS In the first phase of the study, a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of 1,500 JC students aged 16–21 years from six JCs was conducted in 2010. The same survey was then conducted on a random sample of Year 2–5 medical students from an undergraduate medical school in 2011. RESULTS In total, 1,164 JC and 241 medical students responded to the surveys. There was an overall female to male ratio of 1.3:1. Of all the respondents, 2.5% of the JC students and 3.0% of the medical students admitted to having undergone cosmetic procedures. Among those who claimed to have never had cosmetic procedures done, 9.0% and 44.0% of the JC and medical students, respectively, responded that they would consider such procedures in the future. Those who disapproved of their peers undergoing cosmetic surgery comprised 35.0% of JC students and 56.8% of medical students. Among the JC and medical students, 52.0% and 36.1%, respectively, were unaware of any risks associated with cosmetic procedures. CONCLUSION The younger population is increasingly accepting of cosmetic procedures. However, there is a general lack of understanding of the risks associated with such procedures. Education of both the general public and medical students may help prevent potential medicolegal issues. PMID:25189303

  18. A backscattered x-ray imager for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Eric Jude L.; Dibianca, Frank A.; Shukla, Hemant; Gulabani, Daya

    2005-04-01

    Conventional X-ray radiographic systems rely on transmitted photons for the production of images. Backscatter imaging makes use of the more abundant scattered photons for image formation. Specifically, incoherently (Compton) scattered X-ray photons are detected and used for image formation in this modality of medical imaging. However, additional information is obtained when the transmitted X-ray photons are also detected and used. Transmission radiography produces a two-dimensional image of a three dimensional system, therefore image information from a shallower object is often contaminated by image information from underlying objects. Backscattered x-ray imaging largely overcomes this deficiency by imaging depth selectively, which reduces corruption of shallow imaging information by information from deeper objects lying under it. Backscattered x-ray imaging may be particularly useful for examining anatomical structures at shallow depths beneath the skin. Some typical applications for such imaging might be breast imaging, middle ear imaging, imaging of skin melanomas, etc. Previous investigations, by way of theoretical calculations and computational simulations into the feasibility of this kind of imaging have uncovered high-contrast and SNR parameters. Simulations indicate that this method can be used for imaging relatively high-density objects at depths of up to approximately five centimeters below the surface. This paper presents both theoretical and experimental SNR results on this new medical imaging modality.

  19. The Latarjet Procedure at the National Football League Scouting Combine: An Imaging and Outcome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, Matthew T.; Lebus, George; Chahla, Jorge; Sanchez, George; Ferrari, Marcio Balbinotti; Moatshe, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The Latarjet procedure is commonly implemented in the treatment of shoulder instability in the setting of glenoid bone loss, particularly in contact athletes such as American football players; however, little is known regarding the outcomes and failures rates of this procedure in collegiate football players prior to participating in the National Football League (NFL). The purposes of this study were to 1) determine the prevalence, clinical features, and imaging findings of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) football athletes who presented to the NFL scouting Combine having undergone the Latarjet procedure and 2) to evaluate the impact of this procedure, including imaging findings on these athletes’ performance as they entered the NFL. Methods: All NFL football players at the NFL Combine from 2009 to 2016 were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were any player who had a documented Latarjet procedure in the past and participated in medical and performance testing at the NFL Combine. Medical records, imaging, games and position played, and draft position of each player who had undergone a Latarjet procedure was then analyzed. In addition, radiographic features of each players with a Latarjet were evaluated including type of fixation, hardware complications, position of the bone block, degenerative changes, and healing/union/bony resorption were all assessed. NFL performance outcomes (draft position and number of games played and started within first two years) were assessed. Results: Of the 2285 players who participated in the NFL combine between 2009 and 2016, there were 13 athletes (0.6%) who had undergone a Latarjet procedure. Six patients had a two-screw fixation of the bone block while 7 had only one screw, with two patients evidencing a broken hardware (one with one screw and one with 2 screws) and two patients with bent screws (one with one screw and one with 2 screws). Screw prominence was observed in 1 patient. Eight of the 13 patients

  20. A fully automatic image-to-world registration method for image-guided procedure with intraoperative imaging updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Senhu; Sarment, David

    2016-03-01

    Image-guided procedure with intraoperative imaging updates has made a big impact on minimally invasive surgery. Compact and mobile CT imaging device combining with current commercial available image guided navigation system is a legitimate and cost-efficient solution for a typical operating room setup. However, the process of manual fiducial-based registration between image and physical spaces (image-to-world) is troublesome for surgeons during the procedure, which results in much procedure interruptions and is the main source of registration errors. In this study, we developed a novel method to eliminate the manual registration process. Instead of using probe to manually localize the fiducials during the surgery, a tracking plate with known fiducial positions relative to the reference coordinates is designed and fabricated through 3D printing technique. The workflow and feasibility of this method has been studied through a phantom experiment.

  1. A new programming metaphor for image processing procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smirnov, O. M.; Piskunov, N. E.

    1992-01-01

    Most image processing systems, besides an Application Program Interface (API) which lets users write their own image processing programs, also feature a higher level of programmability. Traditionally, this is a command or macro language, which can be used to build large procedures (scripts) out of simple programs or commands. This approach, a legacy of the teletypewriter has serious drawbacks. A command language is clumsy when (and if! it attempts to utilize the capabilities of a multitasking or multiprocessor environment, it is but adequate for real-time data acquisition and processing, it has a fairly steep learning curve, and the user interface is very inefficient,. especially when compared to a graphical user interface (GUI) that systems running under Xll or Windows should otherwise be able to provide. ll these difficulties stem from one basic problem: a command language is not a natural metaphor for an image processing procedure. A more natural metaphor - an image processing factory is described in detail. A factory is a set of programs (applications) that execute separate operations on images, connected by pipes that carry data (images and parameters) between them. The programs function concurrently, processing images as they arrive along pipes, and querying the user for whatever other input they need. From the user's point of view, programming (constructing) factories is a lot like playing with LEGO blocks - much more intuitive than writing scripts. Focus is on some of the difficulties of implementing factory support, most notably the design of an appropriate API. It also shows that factories retain all the functionality of a command language (including loops and conditional branches), while suffering from none of the drawbacks outlined above. Other benefits of factory programming include self-tuning factories and the process of encapsulation, which lets a factory take the shape of a standard application both from the system and the user's point of view, and

  2. Multiview Locally Linear Embedding for Effective Medical Image Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hualei; Tao, Dacheng; Ma, Dianfu

    2013-01-01

    Content-based medical image retrieval continues to gain attention for its potential to assist radiological image interpretation and decision making. Many approaches have been proposed to improve the performance of medical image retrieval system, among which visual features such as SIFT, LBP, and intensity histogram play a critical role. Typically, these features are concatenated into a long vector to represent medical images, and thus traditional dimension reduction techniques such as locally linear embedding (LLE), principal component analysis (PCA), or laplacian eigenmaps (LE) can be employed to reduce the “curse of dimensionality”. Though these approaches show promising performance for medical image retrieval, the feature-concatenating method ignores the fact that different features have distinct physical meanings. In this paper, we propose a new method called multiview locally linear embedding (MLLE) for medical image retrieval. Following the patch alignment framework, MLLE preserves the geometric structure of the local patch in each feature space according to the LLE criterion. To explore complementary properties among a range of features, MLLE assigns different weights to local patches from different feature spaces. Finally, MLLE employs global coordinate alignment and alternating optimization techniques to learn a smooth low-dimensional embedding from different features. To justify the effectiveness of MLLE for medical image retrieval, we compare it with conventional spectral embedding methods. We conduct experiments on a subset of the IRMA medical image data set. Evaluation results show that MLLE outperforms state-of-the-art dimension reduction methods. PMID:24349277

  3. Recent changes in Criminal Procedure Code and Indian Penal Code relevant to medical profession.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Swapnil S; Kumar, Lavlesh; Mestri, S C

    2010-02-01

    Some sections in Criminal Procedure Code and Indian Penal Code have a direct binding on medical practitioner. With changing times, few of them have been revised and these changes are presented in this article.

  4. The 2017 EULAR standardised procedures for ultrasound imaging in rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Möller, Ingrid; Janta, Iustina; Backhaus, Marina; Ohrndorf, Sarah; Bong, David A; Martinoli, Carlo; Filippucci, Emilio; Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Terslev, Lene; Damjanov, Nemanja; Hammer, Hilde Berner; Sudol-Szopinska, Iwona; Grassi, Walter; Balint, Peter; Bruyn, George A W; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Hollander, Diana; Siddle, Heidi J; Supp, Gabriela; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Iagnocco, Annamaria; Koski, Juhani; Kane, David; Fodor, Daniela; Bruns, Alessandra; Mandl, Peter; Kaeley, Gurjit S; Micu, Mihaela; Ho, Carmen; Vlad, Violeta; Chávez-López, Mario; Filippou, Georgios; Cerón, Carmen Elena; Nestorova, Rodina; Quintero, Maritza; Wakefield, Richard; Carmona, Loreto; Naredo, Esperanza

    2017-08-16

    In 2001, the European League Against Rheumatism developed and disseminated the first guidelines for musculoskeletal (MS) ultrasound (US) in rheumatology. Fifteen years later, the dramatic expansion of new data on MSUS in the literature coupled with technological developments in US imaging has necessitated an update of these guidelines. To update the existing MSUS guidelines in rheumatology as well as to extend their scope to other anatomic structures relevant for rheumatology. The project consisted of the following steps: (1) a systematic literature review of MSUS evaluable structures; (2) a Delphi survey among rheumatologist and radiologist experts in MSUS to select MS and non-MS anatomic structures evaluable by US that are relevant to rheumatology, to select abnormalities evaluable by US and to prioritise these pathologies for rheumatology and (3) a nominal group technique to achieve consensus on the US scanning procedures and to produce an electronic illustrated manual (ie, App of these procedures). Structures from nine MS and non-MS areas (ie, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand, hip, knee, ankle and foot, peripheral nerves, salivary glands and vessels) were selected for MSUS in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMD) and their detailed scanning procedures (ie, patient position, probe placement, scanning method and bony/other landmarks) were used to produce the App. In addition, US evaluable abnormalities present in RMD for each anatomic structure and their relevance for rheumatology were agreed on by the MSUS experts. This task force has produced a consensus-based comprehensive and practical framework on standardised procedures for MSUS imaging in rheumatology. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Adaptive MOEMS mirrors for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayek, Reda; Ibrahim, Hany

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) optical elements with high angular deflection arranged in arrays to perform dynamic laser beam focusing and scanning. Each element selectively addresses a portion of the laser beam. These devices are useful in medical and research applications including laser-scanning microscopy, confocal microscopes, and laser capture micro-dissection. Such laser-based imaging and diagnostic instruments involve complex laser beam manipulations. These often require compound lenses and mirrors that introduce misalignment, attenuation, distortion and light scatter. Instead of using expensive spherical and aspherical lenses and/or mirrors for sophisticated laser beam manipulations, we propose scalable adaptive micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems (MOEMS) arrays to recapture optical performance and compensate for aberrations, distortions and imperfections introduced by inexpensive optics. A high-density array of small, individually addressable, MOEMS elements is similar to a Fresnel mirror. A scalable 2D array of micro-mirrors approximates spherical or arbitrary surface mirrors of different apertures. A proof of concept prototype was built using PolyMUMP TM due to its reliability, low cost and limited post processing requirements. Low-density arrays (2x2 arrays of square elements, 250x250μm each) were designed, fabricated, and tested. Electrostatic comb fingers actuate the edges of the square mirrors with a low actuation voltage of 20 V - 50 V. CoventorWare TM was used for the design, 3D modeling and motion simulations. Initial results are encouraging. The array is adaptive, configurable and scalable with low actuation voltage and a large tuning range. Individual element addressability would allow versatile uses. Future research will increase deflection angles and maximize reflective area.

  6. Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Hester; Brazeau, Paulette; Stermac, Lana; Addison, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.

  7. Medical image compression algorithm based on wavelet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghong; Zhang, Guoping; Wan, Wei; Liu, Minmin

    2005-02-01

    With rapid development of electronic imaging and multimedia technology, the telemedicine is applied to modern medical servings in the hospital. Digital medical image is characterized by high resolution, high precision and vast data. The optimized compression algorithm can alleviate restriction in the transmission speed and data storage. This paper describes the characteristics of human vision system based on the physiology structure, and analyses the characteristics of medical image in the telemedicine, then it brings forward an optimized compression algorithm based on wavelet zerotree. After the image is smoothed, it is decomposed with the haar filters. Then the wavelet coefficients are quantified adaptively. Therefore, we can maximize efficiency of compression and achieve better subjective visual image. This algorithm can be applied to image transmission in the telemedicine. In the end, we examined the feasibility of this algorithm with an image transmission experiment in the network.

  8. Medical image watermarking with tamper detection and recovery.

    PubMed

    Zain, Jasni M; Fauzi, Abdul M

    2006-01-01

    This paper discussed security of medical images and reviewed some work done regarding them. A fragile watermarking scheme was then proposed that could detect tamper and subsequently recover the image. Our scheme required a secret key and a public chaotic mixing algorithm to embed and recover a tampered image. The scheme was also resilient to VQ attack. The purposes were to verify the integrity and authenticity of medical images. We used 800 x 600 x 8 bits ultrasound (US) greyscale images in our experiment. We tested our algorithm for up to 50% tampered block and obtained 100% recovery for spread-tampered block.

  9. A software tool for automatic classification and segmentation of 2D/3D medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, Michal; Szczypinski, Piotr; Materka, Andrzej; Klepaczko, Artur

    2013-02-01

    Modern medical diagnosis utilizes techniques of visualization of human internal organs (CT, MRI) or of its metabolism (PET). However, evaluation of acquired images made by human experts is usually subjective and qualitative only. Quantitative analysis of MR data, including tissue classification and segmentation, is necessary to perform e.g. attenuation compensation, motion detection, and correction of partial volume effect in PET images, acquired with PET/MR scanners. This article presents briefly a MaZda software package, which supports 2D and 3D medical image analysis aiming at quantification of image texture. MaZda implements procedures for evaluation, selection and extraction of highly discriminative texture attributes combined with various classification, visualization and segmentation tools. Examples of MaZda application in medical studies are also provided.

  10. Rotating Interns' Images of Practitioners of Five Medical Specialties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sangal, Rahul

    1979-01-01

    A study of rotating interns' images of medical practitioners focuses on what images the interns have of obstetrician-gynecologists, pediatricians, internists, psychiatrists, and surgeons, and seeks to determine whether these images differ according to choice of specialty for postgraduate work. (JMD)

  11. Use Of Medical Images In Today's Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ralph G.

    1982-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated diagnostic imaging systems are being acquired by hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to identify the sources and types of clinical images in an academic, tertiary, acute-care, general hospital servicing a 600 to 700 bed population. An estimate is provided of the digital image information data that is being generated by these hospitals. The problems of digital archiving and area networks for successfully managing this large amount of image information will be difficult to achieve.

  12. A new approach to ultrahigh resolution endoscopic medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bongsoo

    Existing fiber-optic imaging systems such as the medical endoscope, boroscope, fused image faceplate, image conduit, and image converter are made from glass step index (SI) fibers. These fiber-optic imaging systems have limitations in both image quality and mechanical properties. In particular, the image resolution of the SI image guide is limited to 5 μm, and the image brightness rapidly diminishes as the microfiber diameter decreases below 5 μm. Thus, it is impossible to develop bright ultrahigh resolution (below 5 μm) fiber-optic image guides with conventional SI fibers. In this study, ultrahigh resolution image guides and fused fiber-optic faceplates with pixel size between 5 μm and 2.5 μm were fabricated with plastic graded index (GRIN) fibers. The image brightness and image resolution were measured and compared with those of existing glass SI image guides. The image brightness of plastic GRIN image guides was more than a factor of two higher than that of glass SI image guides with the same numerical aperture and the same microfiber diameter. There is an improvement in resolution of the plastic GRIN image guides as the microfiber diameter is reduced from 5 μm to 2.5 μm. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the GRIN image faceplates also improved as the diameter of microfibers decreases below 5 μm. Through this feasibility study, it has been shown that fiber-optic image guides made from polymeric graded index fibers can achieve ultrahigh image resolution, i.e., below 5 μm with better image brightness than that of SI image guides. The fundamental limitation on the resolution of all previous fiber-optic image guides imposed by the thickness of step index cladding materials can be overcome. This new design of optical systems could have a major impact on a wide array of future optical systems used in defense, industrial, and medical applications.

  13. Client-side Medical Image Colorization in a Collaborative Environment.

    PubMed

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an application related to collaborative medicine using a browser based medical visualization system with focus on the medical image colorization process and the underlying open source web development technologies involved. Browser based systems allow physicians to share medical data with their remotely located counterparts or medical students, assisting them during patient diagnosis, treatment monitoring, surgery planning or for educational purposes. This approach brings forth the advantage of ubiquity. The system can be accessed from a any device, in order to process the images, assuring the independence towards having a specific proprietary operating system. The current work starts with processing of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and ends with the rendering of the resulting bitmap images on a HTML5 (fifth revision of the HyperText Markup Language) canvas element. The application improves the image visualization emphasizing different tissue densities.

  14. Streamlining medical image sharing for continuity of care.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Ken H

    2013-01-01

    Sharing patient medical history can be inconvenient and unreliable. Massive strides have been made to address the wasteful aspects of healthcare today, but hospitals and healthcare providers are still searching for ways to improve the efficiency of medical image sharing. To ensure that a patient's historical medical images can be promptly accessed by all caregivers, a solution architecture is needed that anticipates and supports the need for images to be available along with the rest of the patient's required medical history. Healthcare facilities can quickly and affordably use existing technologies, combined with a unified approach for sharing images to greatly improve transitions of care for their patients. Images would no longer need to be burned on to CDs and transported.

  15. 49 CFR 390.115 - Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedure for removal from the National Registry... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.115 Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified...

  16. 49 CFR 390.115 - Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Procedure for removal from the National Registry... MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS; GENERAL National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners § 390.115 Procedure for removal from the National Registry of Certified...

  17. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .../psychological records. 1701.13 Section 1701.13 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information and...

  18. 32 CFR 326.11 - Special procedures for disclosure of medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... psychological records. 326.11 Section 326.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE... Special procedures for disclosure of medical and psychological records. When requested medical and psychological records are not exempt from disclosure, the PA Coordinator may determine which non-exempt...

  19. 32 CFR 1701.13 - Special procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .../psychological records. 1701.13 Section 1701.13 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense... procedures for medical/psychiatric/psychological records. Current and former ODNI employees, including... access to their medical, psychiatric or psychological testing records by writing to: Information...

  20. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; OQuinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI's patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  1. Developing Physiologic Models for Emergency Medical Procedures Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Nigel; O'Quinn, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    Several technological enhancements have been made to METI's commercial Emergency Care Simulator (ECS) with regard to how microgravity affects human physiology. The ECS uses both a software-only lung simulation, and an integrated mannequin lung that uses a physical lung bag for creating chest excursions, and a digital simulation of lung mechanics and gas exchange. METI s patient simulators incorporate models of human physiology that simulate lung and chest wall mechanics, as well as pulmonary gas exchange. Microgravity affects how O2 and CO2 are exchanged in the lungs. Procedures were also developed to take into affect the Glasgow Coma Scale for determining levels of consciousness by varying the ECS eye-blinking function to partially indicate the level of consciousness of the patient. In addition, the ECS was modified to provide various levels of pulses from weak and thready to hyper-dynamic to assist in assessing patient conditions from the femoral, carotid, brachial, and pedal pulse locations.

  2. Medications and therapeutic apheresis procedures: are we doing our best?

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Rami B; Balogun, Rasheed Abiodun

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic apheresis refers to a group of extracorporeal therapies commonly used in the treatment of a variety of neurological, renal, hematological, and other systemic diseases caused by circulating "toxic agents" that cannot be cleared by other means. This article presents an overview of the concepts underlying the effect of therapeutic apheresis procedures on prescription drugs taken by patients and describes key drug-related and procedure-related factors that may impact drug disposition during therapeutic apheresis. Therapeutic apheresis, and specifically therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), is the process involving the extracorporeal separation of plasma from the cellular components of blood, discarding the plasma and exchanging it with replacement physiologic fluids such as albumin or fresh frozen plasma to maintain oncotic pressure and blood volume, and then returning this and the original cellular components of blood back to the patient's circulatory system (Ibrahim and Balogun, Semin Dial 2012;25:176-189). Over the last 4 decades, modern therapeutic apheresis has been used clinically for the treatment of a host of renal, hematological, and neurological diseases such as Goodpasture's syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and myasthenia gravis to name a few (Ibrahim et al., Pharmacotherapy 2007;27:1529-1549). Because of its ability to remove plasma, TPE can extract circulating drugs residing in this compartment, thereby affecting their disposition and potentially their therapeutic action (Ibrahim and Balogun, Semin Dial 2012;25:176-189; Ibrahim et al., Pharmacotherapy 2007;27:1529-1549; Kale-Pradhan and Woo, Pharmacotherapy 1997;17:684-695; Kintzel et al., J Clin Apher 2003;18:194-205). The aim of this article is to shed light on drug-related and TPE-related factors that may influence drug removal by TPE. Emphasis is put on areas needing improvement in the way of assessing drug removal by TPE. In addition, a call for an expanded investigation of TPEs

  3. Informatics-based Medical Procedure Assistance during Space Missions

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, M S; Carruth, T N; Florez-Arango, J; Dunn, K

    2008-01-01

    Currently, paper-based and/or electronic together with telecommunications links to Earth-based physicians are used to assist astronaut crews perform diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions during space travel. However, these have limitations, especially during long duration missions in which telecommunications to earth-based physicians can be delayed. We describe an experimental technology called GuideView in which clinical guidelines are presented in a structured, interactive, multi-modal format and, in each step, clinical instructions are provided simultaneously in voice, text, pictures video or animations. An example application of the system to diagnosis and treatment of space Decompression Sickness is presented. Astronauts performing space walks from the International Space Station are at risk for decompression sickness because the atmospheric pressure of the Extra-vehicular Activity space- suit is significantly less that that of the interior of the Station. PMID:19048089

  4. An information gathering system for medical image inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young-Jin; Bajcsy, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We present an information gathering system for medical image inspection that consists of software tools for capturing computer-centric and human-centric information. Computer-centric information includes (1) static annotations, such as (a) image drawings enclosing any selected area, a set of areas with similar colors, a set of salient points, and (b) textual descriptions associated with either image drawings or links between pairs of image drawings, and (2) dynamic (or temporal) information, such as mouse movements, zoom level changes, image panning and frame selections from an image stack. Human-centric information is represented by video and audio signals that are acquired by computer-mounted cameras and microphones. The short-term goal of the presented system is to facilitate learning of medical novices from medical experts, while the long-term goal is to data mine all information about image inspection for assisting in making diagnoses. In this work, we built basic software functionality for gathering computer-centric and human-centric information of the aforementioned variables. Next, we developed the information playback capabilities of all gathered information for educational purposes. Finally, we prototyped text-based and image template-based search engines to retrieve information from recorded annotations, for example, (a) find all annotations containing the word "blood vessels", or (b) search for similar areas to a selected image area. The information gathering system for medical image inspection reported here has been tested with images from the Histology Atlas database.

  5. Population Pharmacokinetics of Tracers: A New Tool for Medical Imaging?

    PubMed

    Gandia, Peggy; Jaudet, Cyril; Chatelut, Etienne; Concordet, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is a medical imaging method measuring the activity of a radiotracer chosen to accumulate in cancer cells. A recent trend of medical imaging analysis is to account for the radiotracer's pharmacokinetic properties at a voxel (three-dimensional-pixel) level to separate the different tissues. These analyses are closely linked to population pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modelling. Kineticists possess the cultural background to improve medical imaging analysis. This article stresses the common points with population pharmacokinetics and highlights the methodological locks that need to be lifted.

  6. Content-based retrieval of medical images with relative entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshfeghi, Mehran; Saiz, Craig; Yu, Hua

    2004-04-01

    Medical image databases are growing at a rapid rate because of the increase in digital medical imaging modalities and the deployment of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS), Electronic Medical Records (EMR) and telemedicine applications. There is growing research interest in Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) of medical images from such digital archives. A new distance function for CBIR is presented for measuring the similarity between two images. The distance function is a variant of relative entropy, or the Kullback-Liebler distance. The new distance is the sum of the relative entropy of the two images to each other. The latter is a symmetric non-negative function and is only zero when the two images have identical probability distributions. This method has been implemented in a prototype system and has been applied to a database of medical images. Initial results demonstrate improvements over L1-norm and L2-norm histogram matching. The method is computationally simple since it does not require image segmentation. It is invariant to translation, rotation and scaling. The method has also been extended to support retrieval based on Region-Of-Interest (ROI) queries.

  7. A method for modeling noise in medical images.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Pierre; Beaudoin, Gilles; De Guise, Jacques A

    2004-10-01

    We have developed a method to study the statistical properties of the noise found in various medical images. The method is specifically designed for types of noise with uncorrelated fluctuations. Such signal fluctuations generally originate in the physical processes of imaging rather than in the tissue textures. Various types of noise (e.g., photon, electronics, and quantization) often contribute to degrade medical images; the overall noise is generally assumed to be additive with a zero-mean, constant-variance Gaussian distribution. However, statistical analysis suggests that the noise variance could be better modeled by a nonlinear function of the image intensity depending on external parameters related to the image acquisition protocol. We present a method to extract the relationship between an image intensity and the noise variance and to evaluate the corresponding parameters. The method was applied successfully to magnetic resonance images with different acquisition sequences and to several types of X-ray images.

  8. New image-processing and noise-reduction software reduces radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Melissa L; Guild, Jeffrey B; Arbique, Gary M; Tsai, Shirling; Modrall, J Gregory; Anderson, Jon A; Rectenwald, John; Timaran, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    A new proprietary image-processing system known as AlluraClarity, developed by Philips Healthcare (Best, The Netherlands) for radiation-based interventional procedures, claims to lower radiation dose while preserving image quality using noise-reduction algorithms. This study determined whether the surgeon and patient radiation dose during complex endovascular procedures (CEPs) is decreased after the implementation of this new operating system. Radiation dose to operators, procedure type, reference air kerma, kerma area product, and patient body mass index were recorded during CEPs on two Philips Allura FD 20 fluoroscopy systems with and without Clarity. Operator dose during CEPs was measured using optically stimulable, luminescent nanoDot (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, Ill) detectors placed outside the lead apron at the left upper chest position. nanoDots were read using a microStar ii (Landauer Inc) medical dosimetry system. For the CEPs in the Clarity group, the radiation dose to surgeons was also measured by the DoseAware (Philips Healthcare) personal dosimetry system. Side-by-side measurements of DoseAware and nanoDots allowed for cross-calibration between systems. Operator effective dose was determined using a modified Niklason algorithm. To control for patient size and case complexity, the average fluoroscopy dose rate and the dose per radiographic frame were adjusted for body mass index differences and then compared between the groups with and without Clarity by procedure. Additional factors, for example, physician practice patterns, that may have affected operator dose were inferred by comparing the ratio of the operator dose to procedural kerma area product with and without Clarity. A one-sided Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare groups for radiation doses, reference air kermas, and operating practices for each procedure type. The analysis included 234 CEPs; 95 performed without Clarity and 139 with Clarity. Practice patterns of operators during

  9. Support vector machines for microscopic medical images compression.

    PubMed

    Bentaouza, Chahinez Mérièm; Benyettou, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    This study presents the compression of microscopic medical images by Support Vector Machines using machine learning. The visual cortex is the largest system in the human brain and is responsible for image processing such as compression, because the eye does not necessarily perceive all the details of an image. Medical images are a valuable means of decision support. However, they provide a large number of images per examination that can be transmitted over a network or stored for several years under the law imposed by the country. To apply the reasoning of biological intelligence, this study uses Support Vector Machines for compression to reduce the pixels of medical images in order to transmit data in less time and store information in less space. The results found by using this method are satisfactory for compression though the time must be improved.

  10. Dynamic illumination based system to remove the glare and improve the quality of medical images.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipin; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Venkatesan, Shankar; Seth, Subhendu; Keswarpu, Payal; Nalam, Asish; Sathpathy, Akash

    2013-01-01

    Medical images taken from camera based devices (e.g. laparoscope, colposcope, retinoscope, etc) are greatly affected by numerous bright reflection spots (called glare or specular reflections). This may affect the visibility of the abnormal features (if present in the glare locations). We have developed a novel solution to overcome this problem by incorporating a multi-LED lighting solution. This will intelligently and rapidly switch on and off the LED's in a pattern that dynamically and geometrically shifts/shuffles these glare spots back and forth in the image such that every glare-affected area of a single image frame can be reconstructed from a few adjacent time-frame images. We have built the prototype that successfully demonstrates how the glare problem in the medical video/image can be satisfactorily solved, significantly enhancing the accuracy of this vital procedure in the diagnosis of diseases. We achieve 65-95% reduction in specularity on phantom model using the proposed approach.

  11. Medical imaging with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, James G.

    2010-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging modality which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional and three dimensional images of microstructure in biological systems. OCT is analogous to ultrasound B mode imaging, except that it uses light instead of sound. Imaging is performed by measuring the echo time delay of optical backscattering in the tissue as a function of transverse position. The penetration depth of OCT imaging is limited by attenuation from optical scattering to ˜ 2 to 3 mm in most tissues, however image resolutions of 1-10 um may be achieved. OCT functions as a type of ``optical biopsy" enabling in situ visualization of tissue microstructure with resolutions approaching that of conventional histopathology. Imaging can be performed in real time without the need to remove and process a specimen as in conventional biopsy. OCT technology utilizes advances in photonics and fiber optics such as femtosecond broadband lasers, high speed wavelength swept lasers and line scan camera technologies. Recent developments using Fourier domain detection achieve dramatic improvements in resolution and imaging speed. Three dimensional, volumetric imaging with extremely high voxel density is now possible, enabling microstructure and pathology to be visualized and rendered in a manner analogous to MR imaging. OCT is now widely accepted as a standard diagnostic in clinical ophthalmology, where it can image retinal pathology with unprecedented resolution improving the sensitivity of diagnosis and monitoring response to treatment. OCT is also being developed for other applications ranging from intravascular imaging in cardiology to endoscopic imaging for cancer detection. This presentation will discuss OCT technology and its applications.

  12. Developing a medical image content repository for e-learning.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Hsu, Tien-Cheng; Chang, Jing Ning; Yang, Stephen J H; Young, Shuenn-Tsong; Chu, Woei Chyn

    2006-09-01

    The integration of medical informatics and e-learning systems could provide many advanced applications including training, knowledge management, telemedicine, etc. Currently, both the domains of e-learning and medical image have sophisticated specifications and standards. It is a great challenge to bring about integration. In this paper, we describe the development of a Web interface for searching and viewing medical images that are stored in standard medical image servers. With the creation of a Web solution, we have reduced the overheads of integration. We have packaged Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) network services as a component that can be used via a Web server. The Web server constitutes a content repository for searching, editing, and storing Web-based medical image content. This is a simple method by which the use of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) can be extended. We show that the content repository can easily interact and integrate with a learning system. With the integration, the user can easily generate and assign medical image content for e-learning. A Web solution might be the simplest way for system integration. The demonstration in this paper should be useful as a method of expanding the usage of medical information. The construction of a Web-based repository and integrated with a learning system may be also applicable to other domains.

  13. Globus MEDICUS - federation of DICOM medical imaging devices into healthcare Grids.

    PubMed

    Erberich, Stephan G; Silverstein, Jonathan C; Chervenak, Ann; Schuler, Robert; Nelson, Marvin D; Kesselman, Carl

    2007-01-01

    The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) standard defines Radiology medical device interoperability and image data exchange between modalities, image databases - Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) - and image review end-points. However the scope of DICOM and PACS technology is currently limited to the trusted and static environment of the hospital. In order to meet the demand for ad-hoc tele-radiology and image guided medical procedures within the global healthcare enterprise, a new technology must provide mobility, security, flexible scale of operations, and rapid responsiveness for DICOM medical devices and subsequently medical image data. Grid technology, an informatics approach to securely federate independently operated computing, storage, and data management resources at the global scale over public networks, meets these core requirements. Here we present an approach to federate DICOM and PACS devices for large-scale medical image workflows within a global healthcare enterprise. The Globus MEDICUS (Medical Imaging and Computing for Unified Information Sharing) project uses the standards-based Globus Toolkit Grid infrastructure to vertically integrate a new service for DICOM devices - the DICOM Grid Interface Service (DGIS). This new service translates between DICOM and Grid operations and thus transparently extends DICOM to Globus based Grid infrastructure. This Grid image workflow paradigm has been designed to provide not only solutions for global image communication, but fault-tolerance and disaster recovery using Grid data replication technology. Actual use-case of 40 MEDICUS Grid connected international hospitals of the Childerns Oncology Group and the Neuroblastoma Cancer Foundation and further clinical applications are discussed. The open-source Globus MEDICU http://dev.globus.org/wiki/Incubator/MEDICUS.

  14. Pairwise Latent Semantic Association for Similarity Computation in Medical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Yang; Cai, Weidong; Liu, Sidong; Liu, Siqi; Pujol, Sonia; Kikinis, Ron; Xia, Yong; Fulham, Michael J; Feng, David Dagan; Alzheimers Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2016-05-01

    Retrieving medical images that present similar diseases is an active research area for diagnostics and therapy. However, it can be problematic given the visual variations between anatomical structures. In this paper, we propose a new feature extraction method for similarity computation in medical imaging. Instead of the low-level visual appearance, we design a CCA-PairLDA feature representation method to capture the similarity between images with high-level semantics. First, we extract the PairLDA topics to represent an image as a mixture of latent semantic topics in an image pair context. Second, we generate a CCA-correlation model to represent the semantic association between an image pair for similarity computation. While PairLDA adjusts the latent topics for all image pairs, CCA-correlation helps to associate an individual image pair. In this way, the semantic descriptions of an image pair are closely correlated, and naturally correspond to similarity computation between images. We evaluated our method on two public medical imaging datasets for image retrieval and showed improved performance.

  15. Medical image fusion using the convolution of Meridian distributions.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mayank; Tsakalides, Panagiotis; Achim, Alin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a novel non-Gaussian statistical model-based approach for medical image fusion based on the Meridian distribution. The paper also includes a new approach to estimate the parameters of generalized Cauchy distribution. The input images are first decomposed using the Dual-Tree Complex Wavelet Transform (DT-CWT) with the subband coefficients modelled as Meridian random variables. Then, the convolution of Meridian distributions is applied as a probabilistic prior to model the fused coefficients, and the weights used to combine the source images are optimised via Maximum Likelihood (ML) estimation. The superior performance of the proposed method is demonstrated using medical images.

  16. Active edge maps for medical image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerwin, William; Yuan, Chun

    2001-07-01

    Applying edge detection prior to performing image registration yields several advantages over raw intensity- based registration. Advantages include the ability to register multicontrast or multimodality images, immunity to intensity variations, and the potential for computationally efficient algorithms. In this work, a common framework for edge-based image registration is formulated as an adaptation of snakes used in boundary detection. Called active edge maps, the new formulation finds a one-to-one transformation T(x) that maps points in a source image to corresponding locations in a target image using an energy minimization approach. The energy consists of an image component that is small when edge features are well matched in the two images, and an internal term that restricts T(x) to allowable configurations. The active edge map formulation is illustrated here with a specific example developed for affine registration of carotid artery magnetic resonance images. In this example, edges are identified using a magnitude of gradient operator, image energy is determined using a Gaussian weighted distance function, and the internal energy includes separate, adjustable components that control volume preservation and rigidity.

  17. Four challenges in medical image analysis from an industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Weese, Jürgen; Lorenz, Cristian

    2016-10-01

    Today's medical imaging systems produce a huge amount of images containing a wealth of information. However, the information is hidden in the data and image analysis algorithms are needed to extract it, to make it readily available for medical decisions and to enable an efficient work flow. Advances in medical image analysis over the past 20 years mean there are now many algorithms and ideas available that allow to address medical image analysis tasks in commercial solutions with sufficient performance in terms of accuracy, reliability and speed. At the same time new challenges have arisen. Firstly, there is a need for more generic image analysis technologies that can be efficiently adapted for a specific clinical task. Secondly, efficient approaches for ground truth generation are needed to match the increasing demands regarding validation and machine learning. Thirdly, algorithms for analyzing heterogeneous image data are needed. Finally, anatomical and organ models play a crucial role in many applications, and algorithms to construct patient-specific models from medical images with a minimum of user interaction are needed. These challenges are complementary to the on-going need for more accurate, more reliable and faster algorithms, and dedicated algorithmic solutions for specific applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A cloud collaborative medical image platform oriented by social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz, Frederico B.; Araújo, Luciano V.; Nunes, Fátima L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis systems using medical images and three-dimensional models as input data have greatly expanded and developed, but in terms of building suitable image databases to assess them, the challenge remains. Although there are some image databases available for this purpose, they are generally limited to certain types of exams or contain a limited number of medical cases. The objective of this work is to present the concepts and the development of a collaborative platform for sharing medical images and three-dimensional models, providing a resource to share and increase the number of images available for researchers. The collaborative cloud platform, called CATALYZER, aims to increase the availability and sharing of graphic objects, including 3D images, and their reports that are essential for research related to medical images. A survey conducted with researchers and health professionals indicated that this could be an innovative approach in the creation of medical image databases, providing a wider variety of cases together with a considerable amount of shared information among its users.

  19. Tele-medical imaging conference system based on the Web.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heung-Kook; Park, Se-Myung; Kang, Jae-Hyo; Kim, Sang-Kyoon; Choi, Hang-Mook

    2002-06-01

    In this paper, a medical imaging conference system is presented, which is carried out in the Web environment using the distributed object technique, CORBA. Independent of platforms and different developing languages, the CORBA-based medical imaging conference system is very powerful for system development, extension and maintenance. With this Web client/server, one could easily execute a medical imaging conference using Applets on the Web. The Java language, which is object-oriented and independent of platforms, has the advantage of free usage wherever the Web browser is. By using the proposed system, we envisage being able to open a tele-conference using medical images, e.g. CT, MRI, X-ray etc., easily and effectively among remote hospitals.

  20. Mixed reversible and RONI watermarking for medical image reliability protection.

    PubMed

    Coatrieux, G; Montagner, J; Huang, H; Roux, Ch

    2007-01-01

    By attaching image authenticity and integrity proofs directly at the pixels level of an image, watermarking can help to raise up medical image protection. However, because of the induced distortions, specific schemes like lossless data hiding or watermarking Regions of Non Interest (RONI) have been proposed to guarantee the preservation of the image interpretation. In this article, we propose an image reliability protection mechanism which combines advantages of both lossless and RONI approaches in order to provide a better and continuous protection. The proposed system was applied to magnetic resonance images of the head. Experimental results illustrate the overall functionality of the system.

  1. Multimodality medical image registration and fusion techniques using mutual information and genetic algorithm-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Mahua; Das, Arpita

    2011-01-01

    Medical image fusion has been used to derive the useful complimentary information from multimodal images. The prior step of fusion is registration or proper alignment of test images for accurate extraction of detail information. For this purpose, the images to be fused are geometrically aligned using mutual information (MI) as similarity measuring metric followed by genetic algorithm to maximize MI. The proposed fusion strategy incorporating multi-resolution approach extracts more fine details from the test images and improves the quality of composite fused image. The proposed fusion approach is independent of any manual marking or knowledge of fiducial points and starts the procedure automatically. The performance of proposed genetic-based fusion methodology is compared with fuzzy clustering algorithm-based fusion approach, and the experimental results show that genetic-based fusion technique improves the quality of the fused image significantly over the fuzzy approaches.

  2. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  3. An introduction to medical imaging with coherent terahertz frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, A J; Berry, E; Zinovev, N N; Walker, G C; Smith, M A; Chamberlain, J M

    2002-04-07

    Methods have recently been developed that make use of electromagnetic radiation at terahertz (THz) frequencies, the region of the spectrum between millimetre wavelengths and the infrared, for imaging purposes. Radiation at these wavelengths is non-ionizing and subject to far less Rayleigh scatter than visible or infrared wavelengths, making it suitable for medical applications. This paper introduces THz pulsed imaging and discusses its potential for in vivo medical applications in comparison with existing modalities.

  4. The role of the medical examiner in the euthanasia notification procedure in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Cuperus-Bosma, J M; van der Wal, G; Kostense, P J; van der Maas, P J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to provide an insight into the role of the medical examiner in the euthanasia notification procedure in The Netherlands. At the beginning of 1996 a representative group of 116 medical examiners was interviewed. The study found that there was a considerable variation in the way in which the medical examiners fulfilled their tasks. In all cases, after the physician-assisted death had taken place, the medical examiner investigated whether the attending physician had met the requirements for prudent practice, and in approximately 75% of the cases he reported his findings to the Public Prosecutor. In 78% of cases the attending physician was well known to the medical examiners, who were general practitioners, and in a third of the cases this influenced their assessment. Seventy-six per cent of the medical examiners, 61% of the members of the public prosecution and 47% of the physicians thought that it is the task to the medical examiner to review whether the requirements for prudent practice have been met by the attending physician. In conclusion further specification of the task of the medical examiner would appear to be beneficial to increase uniformity in the procedure. In particular, it should be determined whether it is the medical examiner's responsibility to review whether the requirements for prudent practice have been met. It should also be taken into consideration whether the position of the general practitioner medical examiner is sufficiently independent to make an objective report.

  5. EXIT procedure: technique and indications with prenatal imaging parameters for assessment of airway patency.

    PubMed

    Dighe, Manjiri K; Peterson, Suzanne E; Dubinsky, Theodore J; Perkins, Jonathan; Cheng, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Successful management of fetal conditions in which airway obstruction is anticipated is now possible because of advances in prenatal imaging and the development of innovative techniques to secure the fetal airway before complete separation of the fetus from the maternal circulation. Fetal ultrasonography and fetal magnetic resonance imaging are complementary imaging modalities in the assessment of fetuses with potential airway obstruction. The ex utero intrapartum therapy (EXIT) procedure is used to secure the fetal airway before complete delivery of the fetus. However, successful intrapartum treatment of fetuses who may need prolonged placental support depends on a multidisciplinary assessment in which the benefits of the EXIT procedure for the fetus are weighed against the risk of maternal complications that may occur during prolongation of the intrapartum period to secure the fetal airway. This multidisciplinary approach requires an understanding of the types of lesions in which intrapartum fetal airway access would be beneficial, a knowledge of the prenatal images that would best delineate the anatomic defect and thus help guide the best approach to securing the airway, and consensus and coordination among medical ethicists, radiologists, obstetric anesthesiologists and obstetricians, pediatric surgeons and anesthesiologists, and neonatologists.

  6. A similarity-based data warehousing environment for medical images.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jefferson William; Annibal, Luana Peixoto; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar; Ciferri, Ricardo Rodrigues; Ciferri, Cristina Dutra de Aguiar

    2015-11-01

    A core issue of the decision-making process in the medical field is to support the execution of analytical (OLAP) similarity queries over images in data warehousing environments. In this paper, we focus on this issue. We propose imageDWE, a non-conventional data warehousing environment that enables the storage of intrinsic features taken from medical images in a data warehouse and supports OLAP similarity queries over them. To comply with this goal, we introduce the concept of perceptual layer, which is an abstraction used to represent an image dataset according to a given feature descriptor in order to enable similarity search. Based on this concept, we propose the imageDW, an extended data warehouse with dimension tables specifically designed to support one or more perceptual layers. We also detail how to build an imageDW and how to load image data into it. Furthermore, we show how to process OLAP similarity queries composed of a conventional predicate and a similarity search predicate that encompasses the specification of one or more perceptual layers. Moreover, we introduce an index technique to improve the OLAP query processing over images. We carried out performance tests over a data warehouse environment that consolidated medical images from exams of several modalities. The results demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of our proposed imageDWE to manage images and to process OLAP similarity queries. The results also demonstrated that the use of the proposed index technique guaranteed a great improvement in query processing.

  7. A Review on Medical Image Registration as an Optimization Problem

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Zhao, Yiwen; Wang, Zheng; Du, Huibin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In the course of clinical treatment, several medical media are required by a phy-sician in order to provide accurate and complete information about a patient. Medical image registra-tion techniques can provide a richer diagnosis and treatment information to doctors and to provide a comprehensive reference source for the researchers involved in image registration as an optimization problem. Methods: The essence of image registration is associating two or more different images spatial asso-ciation, and getting the translation of their spatial relationship. For medical image registration, its pro-cess is not absolute. Its core purpose is finding the conversion relationship between different images. Result: The major step of image registration includes the change of geometrical dimensions, and change of the image of the combination, image similarity measure, iterative optimization and interpo-lation process. Conclusion: The contribution of this review is sort of related image registration research methods, can provide a brief reference for researchers about image registration. PMID:28845149

  8. Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance

  9. A survey of medical image registration - under review.

    PubMed

    Viergever, Max A; Maintz, J B Antoine; Klein, Stefan; Murphy, Keelin; Staring, Marius; Pluim, Josien P W

    2016-10-01

    A retrospective view on the past two decades of the field of medical image registration is presented, guided by the article "A survey of medical image registration" (Maintz and Viergever, 1998). It shows that the classification of the field introduced in that article is still usable, although some modifications to do justice to advances in the field would be due. The main changes over the last twenty years are the shift from extrinsic to intrinsic registration, the primacy of intensity-based registration, the breakthrough of nonlinear registration, the progress of inter-subject registration, and the availability of generic image registration software packages. Two problems that were called urgent already 20 years ago, are even more urgent nowadays: Validation of registration methods, and translation of results of image registration research to clinical practice. It may be concluded that the field of medical image registration has evolved, but still is in need of further development in various aspects.

  10. From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Bücking, Thore M; Hill, Emma R; Robertson, James L; Maneas, Efthymios; Plumb, Andrew A; Nikitichev, Daniil I

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D) printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT)) to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer.

  11. From medical imaging data to 3D printed anatomical models

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Emma R.; Robertson, James L.; Maneas, Efthymios; Plumb, Andrew A.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.

    2017-01-01

    Anatomical models are important training and teaching tools in the clinical environment and are routinely used in medical imaging research. Advances in segmentation algorithms and increased availability of three-dimensional (3D) printers have made it possible to create cost-efficient patient-specific models without expert knowledge. We introduce a general workflow that can be used to convert volumetric medical imaging data (as generated by Computer Tomography (CT)) to 3D printed physical models. This process is broken up into three steps: image segmentation, mesh refinement and 3D printing. To lower the barrier to entry and provide the best options when aiming to 3D print an anatomical model from medical images, we provide an overview of relevant free and open-source image segmentation tools as well as 3D printing technologies. We demonstrate the utility of this streamlined workflow by creating models of ribs, liver, and lung using a Fused Deposition Modelling 3D printer. PMID:28562693

  12. A review of m-health in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Perera, Chandrashan Mahendra; Chakrabarti, Rahul

    2015-02-01

    The increasing capabilities of camera-equipped mobile phones have led to a growing body of evidence regarding their use in medical imaging across a broad range of medical specialties. This article reviews the current evidence for the use of mobile health (m-health) in medical imaging. We performed a structured review of the published literature regarding m-health in medical imaging using the Medline, PubMed, and Web of Science databases (January 2002-August 2013). The two authors independently extracted data regarding type of specialty, purpose, and study design of publications. In total, 235 articles were identified. The majority of studies were case reports or noncomparative product validation studies. The greatest volume of publications originated in the fields of radiology (21%), dermatology (15%), laboratory techniques (15%), and plastic surgery (12%). Among these studies, m-health was used as diagnostic aids, for patient monitoring, and to improve communication between health practitioners. With the growing use of mobile phones for medical imaging, considerations need to be given to informed consent, privacy, image storage and transfer, and guidelines for healthcare workers and patients. There are several novel uses of mobile devices for medical imaging that show promise across a variety of areas and subspecialties of healthcare. Currently, studies are mostly exploratory in nature. To validate these devices, studies with higher methodological rigor are required.

  13. Medical image registration algorithms assesment: Bronze Standard application enactment on grids using the MOTEUR workflow engine.

    PubMed

    Glatard, Tristan; Montagnat, Johan; Pennec, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    Medical image registration is pre-processing needed for many medical image analysis procedures. A very large number of registration algorithms are available today, but their performance is often not known and very difficult to assess due to the lack of gold standard. The Bronze Standard algorithm is a very data and compute intensive statistical approach for quantifying registration algorithms accuracy. In this paper, we describe the Bronze Standard application and we discuss the need for grids to tackle such computations on medical image databases. We demonstrate MOTEUR, a service-based workflow engine optimized for dealing with data intensive applications. MOTEUR eases the enactment of the Bronze Standard and similar applications on the EGEE production grid infrastructure. It is a generic workflow engine, based on current standards and freely available, that can be used to instrument legacy application code at low cost.

  14. Compressive Deconvolution in Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhouye; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2016-03-01

    The interest of compressive sampling in ultrasound imaging has been recently extensively evaluated by several research teams. Following the different application setups, it has been shown that the RF data may be reconstructed from a small number of measurements and/or using a reduced number of ultrasound pulse emissions. Nevertheless, RF image spatial resolution, contrast and signal to noise ratio are affected by the limited bandwidth of the imaging transducer and the physical phenomenon related to US wave propagation. To overcome these limitations, several deconvolution-based image processing techniques have been proposed to enhance the ultrasound images. In this paper, we propose a novel framework, named compressive deconvolution, that reconstructs enhanced RF images from compressed measurements. Exploiting an unified formulation of the direct acquisition model, combining random projections and 2D convolution with a spatially invariant point spread function, the benefit of our approach is the joint data volume reduction and image quality improvement. The proposed optimization method, based on the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers, is evaluated on both simulated and in vivo data.

  15. Tongue Tumor Detection in Medical Hyperspectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hongjun; Li, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system to measure and analyze the reflectance spectra of the human tongue with high spatial resolution is proposed for tongue tumor detection. To achieve fast and accurate performance for detecting tongue tumors, reflectance data were collected using spectral acousto-optic tunable filters and a spectral adapter, and sparse representation was used for the data analysis algorithm. Based on the tumor image database, a recognition rate of 96.5% was achieved. The experimental results show that hyperspectral imaging for tongue tumor diagnosis, together with the spectroscopic classification method provide a new approach for the noninvasive computer-aided diagnosis of tongue tumors. PMID:22368462

  16. Improved elastic medical image registration using mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ens, Konstantin; Schumacher, Hanno; Franz, Astrid; Fischer, Bernd

    2007-03-01

    One of the future-oriented areas of medical image processing is to develop fast and exact algorithms for image registration. By joining multi-modal images we are able to compensate the disadvantages of one imaging modality with the advantages of another modality. For instance, a Computed Tomography (CT) image containing the anatomy can be combined with metabolic information of a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) image. It is quite conceivable that a patient will not have the same position in both imaging systems. Furthermore some regions for instance in the abdomen can vary in shape and position due to different filling of the rectum. So a multi-modal image registration is needed to calculate a deformation field for one image in order to maximize the similarity between the two images, described by a so-called distance measure. In this work, we present a method to adapt a multi-modal distance measure, here mutual information (MI), with weighting masks. These masks are used to enhance relevant image structures and suppress image regions which otherwise would disturb the registration process. The performance of our method is tested on phantom data and real medical images.

  17. Visualization and model building in medical imaging.

    PubMed

    McDonald, J P; Siebert, J P; Fryer, R J; Urquhart, C W

    1994-01-01

    We present technologies and ideas, developed from the JFIT 'Active Stereo Probe Project', which are applicable to problems within medical measurement and monitoring. Two related areas are considered. The first concerns patient body surface modelling. During the project two state-of-the-art non-contact surface measurement techniques have been developed which are applicable to medical situations requiring dense and accurate body surface modelling. Such applications include, for example, prosthetic appliance fabrication, presurgical planning and non-invasive deformity analysis. The second is concerned with overlay projection. Using this enabling technology the information content of a scene can be enhanced as an aid to medical personnel. Results and illustrative applications of the newly developed technology are presented.

  18. Lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster: in minor dermatological and needle puncture procedures.

    PubMed

    Croxtall, Jamie D

    2010-11-12

    The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster comprises a lidocaine/tetracaine 70 mg/70 mg patch and a controlled heat-assisted drug delivery pod that increases the diffusion of lidocaine and tetracaine into the dermis. Following a 1-hour application period, systemic absorption of lidocaine or tetracaine from the plaster was minimal. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster provided effective pain relief for adult (including elderly) patients undergoing minor dermatological procedures and for adult and paediatric patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In randomized, double-blind clinical trials, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with an identical plaster containing placebo in patients undergoing minor dermatological or vascular access procedures. Furthermore, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine cream in patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In a large, randomized, double-blind trial in paediatric patients undergoing venipuncture, the overall incidence of pain was significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine plaster. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster was well tolerated, with the most frequent treatment-related adverse events resolving spontaneously.

  19. Student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G Z; Wong, D D; Nguyen, L K; Mendelson, R M

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to evaluate medical student and intern awareness of ionising radiation exposure from common diagnostic imaging procedures and to suggest how education could be improved. Fourth to sixth year medical students enrolled at a Western Australian university and interns from three teaching hospitals in Perth were recruited. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire consisting of 26 questions on their background, knowledge of ionising radiation doses and learning preferences for future teaching on this subject. A total of 331 completed questionnaires were received (95.9%). Of the 17 questions assessing knowledge of ionising radiation, a mean score of 6.0 was obtained by respondents (95% CI 5.8-6.2). Up to 54.8% of respondents underestimated the radiation dose from commonly requested radiological procedures. Respondents (11.3 and 25.5%) incorrectly believed that ultrasound and MRI emit ionising radiation, respectively. Of the four subgroups of respondents, the intern doctor subgroup performed significantly better (mean score 6.9, P < 0.0001, 95% CI 6.5-7.3) than each of the three medical student subgroups. When asked for the preferred method of teaching for future radiation awareness, a combination of lectures, tutorials and workshops was preferred. This study has clearly shown that awareness of ionising radiation from diagnostic imaging is lacking among senior medical students and interns. The results highlight the need for improved education to minimise unnecessary exposure of patients and the community to radiation. Further studies are required to determine the most effective form of education.

  20. Ionizing radiation exposure among kidney transplant recipients due to medical imaging during the pretransplant evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim N; Patel, Anup M; Weng, Francis L

    2013-05-01

    Kidney transplant recipients are at increased risk for malignancies. One recognized risk for malignancy is ionizing radiation. The purpose of this study was to determine, among kidney transplant recipients, the medical imaging procedures that contribute to radiation exposure and their cumulative radiation exposure, as a result of their pretransplant evaluation. Medical records of patients who received a first, kidney-alone transplant during 2008 at a single transplant center were examined. This study identified medical imaging procedures that were performed as prerequisites for deceased donor wait-listing or receipt of live donor kidney transplants and to maintain active status on the wait list. Frequencies of medical imaging procedures and cumulative effective doses of radiation were calculated. Among the 172 kidney transplant recipients, 905 procedures were performed. Seventy patients (40.7%) were exposed to low dose (0-20 mSv), 51 (29.7%) were exposed to moderate dose (>20-50 mSv), 28 (16.3%) were exposed to high dose (>50-100 mSv), and 23 (13.4%) were exposed to very high dose (>100 mSv) cumulative effective radiation. Nuclear stress tests accounted for 82.9% of the total radiation exposure. In multivariate analysis, older age, diabetes, and black race were associated with exposure to >20 mSv radiation during the pretransplant evaluation. Kidney transplant recipients are exposed to large amounts of ionizing radiation from medical imaging during the pretransplant evaluation. The effects of radiation upon malignancy risk and strategies to reduce this radiation exposure warrant further investigation.