Science.gov

Sample records for medical instruments development

  1. Sterilization of Medical Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-06

    possible use with medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is developing an...Project: DARPA - Sterilization of Medical Instruments Contract: # FA9550-06-C-0054 Principal Investigator: Joseph Birmingham Report: FINAL Report 1...as medical instruments and skin catheters. To address this challenge, MicroStructure Technologies (MicroST) is proposing a compact, low maintenance

  2. Development of an Instrument to Measure Medical Students' Attitudes toward People with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symons, Andrew B.; Fish, Reva; McGuigan, Denise; Fox, Jeffery; Akl, Elie A.

    2012-01-01

    As curricula to improve medical students' attitudes toward people with disabilities are developed, instruments are needed to guide the process and evaluate effectiveness. The authors developed an instrument to measure medical students' attitudes toward people with disabilities. A pilot instrument with 30 items in four sections was administered to…

  3. Cultural factors and medication compliance in Chinese immigrants who are taking antihypertensive medications: instrument development.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wen; Stewart, Anita L; Stotts, Nancy A; Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan

    2005-01-01

    Chinese immigrants in the United States have a moderate to high prevalence of hypertension, but little is known about antihypertensive medication compliance in Chinese immigrants. This study presents some first-generation measures of antihypertensive medication compliance in a sample of Chinese immigrants. A literature review and two qualitative pilot studies were conducted to generate culturally sensitive instruments. Items were developed to assess cultural factors and medication compliance in Chinese immigrants receiving antihypertensive medications. Cultural factors included measures of cultural health perception of hypertension, health perceptions of Chinese herbs, health perceptions of Western medications, beneficial self-care behaviors, and social support. Four medication compliance scales were developed. The applicability of these scales was tested in a Chinese immigrant population (n=200). Cronbach's alpha for the cultural factors scales ranged from .57 to .91. Two of the medication compliance scales had Cronbach's alphas above .60. Results showed that most of the scales are applicable and acceptable in a Chinese immigrant population and had good reliability. However, further testing with a larger sample in other regions of the country is indicated.

  4. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre-health majors…

  5. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre-health majors…

  6. Developing and Assessing Curriculum on the Physics of Medical Instruments

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K.; Van Ness, Grace R.; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C.; Anderson, Elizabeth A.; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre–health majors at Portland State University, we aim to teach fundamental physical concepts, such as light absorption and emission and atomic energy levels, through analysis of biological systems and medical devices. The activities address the properties of electromagnetic waves as they relate to the interaction with biological tissue and make links between physics and biomedical applications such as microscopy or laser eye surgery. We report on the effect that engaging students in tasks with actual medical equipment has had on their conceptual understanding of light and spectroscopy. These initial assessments indicate that students’ understanding improves in some areas as a result of taking the course, but gains are not uniform and are relatively low for other topics. We also find a promising “nonshift” in student attitudes toward learning science as a result of taking the course. A long-term goal of this work is to develop these materials to the extent that they can eventually be imported into an introductory curriculum for life sciences majors. PMID:23737632

  7. Developing and assessing curriculum on the physics of medical instruments.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Warren; Johnson, James K; Van Ness, Grace R; Mylott, Elliot; Dunlap, Justin C; Anderson, Elizabeth A; Widenhorn, Ralf

    2013-06-01

    Undergraduate educational settings often struggle to provide students with authentic biologically or medically relevant situations and problems that simultaneously improve their understanding of physics. Through exercises and laboratory activities developed in an elective Physics in Biomedicine course for upper-level biology or pre-health majors at Portland State University, we aim to teach fundamental physical concepts, such as light absorption and emission and atomic energy levels, through analysis of biological systems and medical devices. The activities address the properties of electromagnetic waves as they relate to the interaction with biological tissue and make links between physics and biomedical applications such as microscopy or laser eye surgery. We report on the effect that engaging students in tasks with actual medical equipment has had on their conceptual understanding of light and spectroscopy. These initial assessments indicate that students' understanding improves in some areas as a result of taking the course, but gains are not uniform and are relatively low for other topics. We also find a promising "nonshift" in student attitudes toward learning science as a result of taking the course. A long-term goal of this work is to develop these materials to the extent that they can eventually be imported into an introductory curriculum for life sciences majors.

  8. Instrumentation in medical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.

    1995-05-01

    The demand for clinical use of accelerated heavy charged-particle (proton and light-ion) beams for cancer treatment is now burgeoning worldwide. Clinical trials are underway at more than a dozen accelerators. Several hospital-based accelerator facilities dedicated to radiation treatment of human cancer have been constructed, and their number is growing. Many instruments in medical systems have been developed for modifying extracted particle beams for clinical application, monitoring the delivery of the treatment beams, and controlling the treatment processes to ensure patient safety. These in turn demand new developments of instruments in controlling beam extraction, beam tuning, and beam transportation at the medical systems.

  9. Development and Validation of a Test Instrument for Assessing Value Preferences in Medical Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolman, Cynthia J.; Doran, Rodney L.

    1982-01-01

    A test instrument for assessing the preferences medical students show for six value categories (aesthetic, economic, political, religious, social, and theoretical) was developed using a case-study approach. Validation was by comparison of medical ethics and general values in nonmedical students. Further research on the social values category is…

  10. Development and Validation of a Test Instrument for Assessing Value Preferences in Medical Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolman, Cynthia J.; Doran, Rodney L.

    1982-01-01

    A test instrument for assessing the preferences medical students show for six value categories (aesthetic, economic, political, religious, social, and theoretical) was developed using a case-study approach. Validation was by comparison of medical ethics and general values in nonmedical students. Further research on the social values category is…

  11. Medical instrument data exchange.

    PubMed

    Gumudavelli, Suman; McKneely, Paul K; Thongpithoonrat, Pongnarin; Gurkan, D; Chapman, Frank M

    2008-01-01

    Advances in medical devices and health care has been phenomenal during the recent years. Although medical device manufacturers have been improving their instruments, network connection of these instruments still rely on proprietary technologies. Even if the interface has been provided by the manufacturer (e.g., RS-232, USB, or Ethernet coupled with a proprietary API), there is no widely-accepted uniform data model to access data of various bedside instruments. There is a need for a common standard which allows for internetworking with the medical devices from different manufacturers. ISO/IEEE 11073 (X73) is a standard attempting to unify the interfaces of all medical devices. X73 defines a client access mechanism that would be implemented into the communication controllers (residing between an instrument and the network) in order to access/network patient data. On the other hand, MediCAN technology suite has been demonstrated with various medical instruments to achieve interfacing and networking with a similar goal in its open standardization approach. However, it provides a more generic definition for medical data to achieve flexibility for networking and client access mechanisms. In this paper, a comparison between the data model of X73 and MediCAN will be presented to encourage interoperability demonstrations of medical instruments.

  12. Development and validation of an instrument to assess the prescribing readiness of medical students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Sim, Si Mui; Chua, Siew Siang; Tan, Choo Hock; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Achike, Francis Ifejika; Teng, Cheong Lieng

    2015-09-21

    Prescribing incompetence is an important factor that contributes to prescribing error, and this is often due to inadequate training during medical schools. We therefore aimed to develop and validate an instrument to assess the prescribing readiness of medical students (PROMS) in Malaysia. The PROMS comprised of 26 items with four domains: undergraduate learning opportunities; hands-on clinical skills practice; information gathering behaviour; and factors affecting the learning of prescribing skills. The first three domains were adapted from an existing questionnaire, while items from the last domain were formulated based on findings from a nominal group discussion. Face and content validity was determined by an expert panel, pilot tested in a class of final year (Year 5) medical students, and assessed using the Flesch reading ease. To assess the reliability of the PROMS, the internal consistency and test-retest (at baseline and 2 weeks later) were assessed using the Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Spearman's rho. The discriminative validity of the PROMS was assessed using the Mann-Whitney U-test (to assess if the PROMS could discriminate between final year medical students from a public and a private university). A total of 119 medical students were recruited. Flesch reading ease was 46.9, indicating that the instrument was suitable for use in participants undergoing tertiary education. The overall Cronbach alpha value of the PROMS was 0.695, which was satisfactory. Test-retest showed no difference for 25/26 items, indicating that our instrument was reliable. Responses from the public and private university final year medical students were significantly different in 10/26 items, indicating that the PROMS was able to discriminate between these two groups. Medical students from the private university reported fewer learning opportunities and hands-on practice compared to those from the public university. On the other hand, medical students from the private university

  13. User involvement in the ergonomic development of a medical instrument: a longitudinal case study.

    PubMed

    Tóvölgyi, Sarolta

    2016-01-01

    In this study the focus is on the continuous ergonomic-focused development of a medical instrument that is capable of performing blood group serological tests. Primarily, a medical device must be clinically effective and safe. At the same time it must also meet the needs of its users. This calls for consideration of numerous ergonomic aspects. The development process of the product line in question was supported by a longitudinal series of carefully designed focus groups. Altogether, the 23 focus groups conducted included 245 participants from 72 laboratories. The aim of the empirical research was to collect users' experiences, ideas and needs as inputs for the following phase of the product development process. During the mentioned focus group analyses, around 100 development proposals were conceived. Besides presenting more of the mentioned development proposals, the focus group analysis was shown as a proper methodology to involve end-users in the development and implementation of new technology or devices.

  14. Development and evaluation of an instrument to assess medical students' cultural attitudes.

    PubMed

    Robins, L S; Alexander, G L; Wolf, F M; Fantone, J C; Davis, W K

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the development and psychometric evaluation of an instrument designed to assess medical students' comfort with a range of sociocultural issues and intercultural experiences. Each survey item obliged students to reflect on their own sociocultural identities and academic status in relation to others', and to judge how comfortable they would be interacting across perceived boundaries based on sociocultural identity and academic status. More than 90% of University of Michigan first-year medical students (n=153) completed the survey just before classes began. Principal components analysis of the survey's 26 items identified 7 interpretable factors or subscales; the Cronbach alpha reliability coefficients for the 7 subscales and the total scale ranged from .73 to .92. T-tests were used to investigate differences in average ratings among student subgroups (based on gender and ethnicity). To assess the magnitude of the effect of the differences between groups, effect size was computed for each of the means comparisons. Psychometric analyses indicated that this survey was both reliable and valid for assessing students' cultural attitudes. Further, analyses by gender and ethnic subgroup identified meaningful ratings differences in men's and women's reported comfort levels. Our findings suggest that this instrument is useful for assessing students' openness to developing cultural awareness and competence. Educators at other medical schools may find this instrument useful as a needs assessment tool for planning educational programs designed to increase students' cultural competence.

  15. Optomechanical medical devices (instruments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Roger S.

    2004-03-01

    Optomechanical Medical Devices (Instruments) use lightwaves (UV, Visible, IR) for one or more of the following functions; to observe, to measure, to record, to test (align) and or to cut/repair. The evolution of Optomechanical Medical Devices probably started when the first torch or candle or petrochemical lamp used a polished reflector (possibly with a concave configuration) to examine a part of a patient's body (possibly a wound).Once the glass lens was invented, light sources of any type could be forcussed to increase illuminating power on a selected area. Medical Devices have come a great distance since these early items. Skipping across time to three rather significant inventions and advancements, we are well into the era of Laser and Fiber Optics and Advanced Photodetectors, all being integrated into Medical Devices. The most notable fields have been Ophthalmology, Dermatology, and Surgery. All three fields have been able to incorporate both the use of the Laser and the use of Fiber Optics (and at times the use of Photodetectors), into a single device (instrument). Historical: Philipp Bozzini (a Doctor, maybe) in the early 1800's used a hollow tube (tube material not identified) to project the light of a candle through the tube to view a patient's 'what ever'. Only Philipp, the patient and G-d knows what was being viewed. This ws the first recorded information on what could be considered the very first 'Endoscope examination'

  16. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  17. The Development and Initial Validation of Social Cognitive Career Theory Instruments to Measure Choice of Medical Specialty and Practice Location

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mary E.; Creed, Peter A.; Searle, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Social cognitive career theory served as the basis for the instrument development for scales assessing self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and goals to predict medical career choice. Lent and Brown's conceptualization of social cognitive constructs guided the development of items to measure choice of medical specialty and practice location. Study…

  18. Factor analysis methods and validity evidence: A systematic review of instrument development across the continuum of medical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzel, Angela Payne

    Previous systematic reviews indicate a lack of reporting of reliability and validity evidence in subsets of the medical education literature. Psychology and general education reviews of factor analysis also indicate gaps between current and best practices; yet, a comprehensive review of exploratory factor analysis in instrument development across the continuum of medical education had not been previously identified. Therefore, the purpose for this study was critical review of instrument development articles employing exploratory factor or principal component analysis published in medical education (2006--2010) to describe and assess the reporting of methods and validity evidence based on the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing and factor analysis best practices. Data extraction of 64 articles measuring a variety of constructs that have been published throughout the peer-reviewed medical education literature indicate significant errors in the translation of exploratory factor analysis best practices to current practice. Further, techniques for establishing validity evidence tend to derive from a limited scope of methods including reliability statistics to support internal structure and support for test content. Instruments reviewed for this study lacked supporting evidence based on relationships with other variables and response process, and evidence based on consequences of testing was not evident. Findings suggest a need for further professional development within the medical education researcher community related to (1) appropriate factor analysis methodology and reporting and (2) the importance of pursuing multiple sources of reliability and validity evidence to construct a well-supported argument for the inferences made from the instrument. Medical education researchers and educators should be cautious in adopting instruments from the literature and carefully review available evidence. Finally, editors and reviewers are encouraged to recognize

  19. Factor Analysis Methods and Validity Evidence: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development across the Continuum of Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Angela Payne

    2011-01-01

    Previous systematic reviews indicate a lack of reporting of reliability and validity evidence in subsets of the medical education literature. Psychology and general education reviews of factor analysis also indicate gaps between current and best practices; yet, a comprehensive review of exploratory factor analysis in instrument development across…

  20. Factor Analysis Methods and Validity Evidence: A Systematic Review of Instrument Development across the Continuum of Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetzel, Angela Payne

    2011-01-01

    Previous systematic reviews indicate a lack of reporting of reliability and validity evidence in subsets of the medical education literature. Psychology and general education reviews of factor analysis also indicate gaps between current and best practices; yet, a comprehensive review of exploratory factor analysis in instrument development across…

  1. Recent development of radiation measurement instrument for industrial and medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Sueki; Ohmori, Koichi; Mito, Yoshio; Tanoue, Toshiya; Yano, Shigeki; Tokumori, Kenji; Toyofuku, Fukai; Kanda, Shigenobu

    2001-02-01

    Recently, computer imaging technology has developed very high-quality image and fast processing time. X-rays have been used for many purposes such as medical diagnosis and analyzing the structure of industrial materials. However, as X-rays are hazardous to the human body, it is desirable to reduce its exposed dose to a minimum. For this purpose, it is necessary to use a semiconductor radiation detector with a high efficiency for X-rays. We have developed photon-counting CdTe array detector system for medical and industrial use. The bone densitometer for Dual Energy X-ray Absorptometry (DEXA) has been developed to make diagnosis of osteoporosis, and it is developed to analyze a material element for industrial use. Recently, we have developed a monochromatic X-ray CT using a 256 ch CdTe array detector. We found that the array detector systems are very useful for medical and industrial applications.

  2. Assessing task importance and anxiety in medical school: an instrument development and initial validation study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Henry L; Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R

    2015-04-01

    Recent research in medical education suggests that students' motivational beliefs, such as their beliefs about the importance of a task, and their emotions are meaningful predictors of learning and performance. The primary purpose of this study was to develop a self-report measure of "task importance" and "anxiety" in relation to several medical education competencies and to collect validity evidence for the new measures. The secondary purpose was to evaluate differences in these measures by year of medical school. Exploratory factor analysis of scores from 368 medical school students suggested two task importance factors and three anxiety factors. The task importance and anxiety subscales were weakly related to each other and exhibited consistently negative and positive correlations, respectively, with three self-efficacy subscales. The task importance subscales were positively related to "metacognition," whereas "interpersonal skills anxiety" and "health knowledge anxiety" were positively related to "procrastination." All three anxiety factors were positively related to "avoidance of help seeking," whereas "interpersonal skills and professionalism importance" was negatively related to help avoidance behaviors. Finally, comparisons across the 4 years of medical school indicated that some aspects of task importance and anxiety varied significantly. Overall, findings from this study provide validity evidence for the psychometric quality of these scales, which capture task importance and anxiety in medical students. Limitations and implications for medical education research are discussed. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Development and Implementation of a Medication Adherence Training Instrument for Persons Living With HIV: The MATI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Jones, Deborah; Duran, Ron E.; Klimas, Nancy; Schneiderman, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the medical management of HIV offer the potential for increased longevity, improved quality of life, and the treatment of HIV as a chronic, rather than terminal, illness. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has required the necessity of strict adherence to complex medication regimens. As a vital factor in…

  4. Development and Implementation of a Medication Adherence Training Instrument for Persons Living With HIV: The MATI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Jones, Deborah; Duran, Ron E.; Klimas, Nancy; Schneiderman, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in the medical management of HIV offer the potential for increased longevity, improved quality of life, and the treatment of HIV as a chronic, rather than terminal, illness. The advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has required the necessity of strict adherence to complex medication regimens. As a vital factor in…

  5. Development of a hand- transmitted vibration measurement instrument to perform tests in medical equipment according to the international standard IEC 60601-1-2005 Ed.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima, F. F.; Moriya, H. T.; Moraes, J. C. T. B.

    2016-07-01

    According to the sub clause 9.6.3 of the international standard IEC 60601-1-2005, medical electrical equipment must provide means of protection against hazardous hand- transmitted vibrations. Compliance of this sub clause is checked by using a vibration measurement instrument in accordance with ISO 5349-1-2001 standard. The present article describes the development of a vibration measurement instrument to perform vibration measurements tests in medical equipments.

  6. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  7. Barriers to Accessing Emergency Medical Services in Accra, Ghana: Development of a Survey Instrument and Initial Application in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Rominski, Sarah D; Bogus, Joshua; Ginde, Adit A; Zakariah, Ahmed N; Boatemaah, Christiana A; Yancey, Arthur H; Akoriyea, Samuel Kaba; Campbell, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergency medical services (EMS) systems provide professional prehospital emergency medical care and transportation to help improve outcomes from emergency conditions. Ghana’s national ambulance service has relatively low public utilization in comparison with the large burden of acute disease. Methods: A survey instrument was developed using Pechansky and Thomas’s model of access covering 5 dimensions of availability, accessibility, accommodation, affordability, and acceptability. The instrument was used in a cross-sectional survey in 2013 in Accra, Ghana; eligible participants were those 18 years and older who spoke English, French, or Twi. Although the analysis was mainly descriptive, logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with reported intention to call for an ambulance in the case of a medical emergency. Results: 468 participants completed surveys, with a response rate of 78.4%. Few (4.5%) respondents had ever used an ambulance in prior emergency situations. A substantial proportion (43.8%) knew about the public access medical emergency telephone number, but of those only 37.1% knew it was a toll-free call. Most (54.7%) respondents believed EMTs offered high-quality care, but 78.0% believed taxis were faster than ambulances and 69.2% thought the number of ambulances in Accra insufficient. Many (23.4%) thought using ambulances to transport corpses would be appropriate. In two hypothetical emergency scenarios, respondents most commonly reported taxis as the preferred transportation (63.6% if a family member were burned in a house fire, 64.7% if a pedestrian were struck by a vehicle). About 1 in 5 respondents said they would call an ambulance in either scenario (20.7% if a family member were burned in a house fire, 23.3% if a pedestrian were struck by a vehicle) while 15.5% and 10.2%, respectively, would use any available vehicle. Those aged 18–35 years were more likely than older respondents to prefer an ambulance (odds

  8. Developments in analytical instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, G.

    The situation regarding photogrammetric instrumentation has changed quite dramatically over the last 2 or 3 years with the withdrawal of most analogue stereo-plotting machines from the market place and their replacement by analytically based instrumentation. While there have been few new developments in the field of comparators, there has been an explosive development in the area of small, relatively inexpensive analytical stereo-plotters based on the use of microcomputers. In particular, a number of new instruments have been introduced by manufacturers who mostly have not been associated previously with photogrammetry. Several innovative concepts have been introduced in these small but capable instruments, many of which are aimed at specialised applications, e.g. in close-range photogrammetry (using small-format cameras); for thematic mapping (by organisations engaged in environmental monitoring or resources exploitation); for map revision, etc. Another innovative and possibly significant development has been the production of conversion kits to convert suitable analogue stereo-plotting machines such as the Topocart, PG-2 and B-8 into fully fledged analytical plotters. The larger and more sophisticated analytical stereo-plotters are mostly being produced by the traditional mainstream photogrammetric systems suppliers with several new instruments and developments being introduced at the top end of the market. These include the use of enlarged photo stages to handle images up to 25 × 50 cm format; the complete integration of graphics workstations into the analytical plotter design; the introduction of graphics superimposition and stereo-superimposition; the addition of correlators for the automatic measurement of height, etc. The software associated with this new analytical instrumentation is now undergoing extensive re-development with the need to supply photogrammetric data as input to the more sophisticated G.I.S. systems now being installed by clients, instead

  9. Beam Instrument Development System

    SciTech Connect

    DOOLITTLE, LAWRENCE; HUANG, GANG; DU, QIANG; SERRANO, CARLOS

    2016-01-08

    Beam Instrumentation Development System (BIDS) is a collection of common support libraries and modules developed during a series of Low-Level Radio Frequency (LLRF) control and timing/synchronization projects. BIDS includes a collection of Hardware Description Language (HDL) libraries and software libraries. The BIDS can be used for the development of any FPGA-based system, such as LLRF controllers. HDL code in this library is generic and supports common Digital Signal Processing (DSP) functions, FPGA-specific drivers (high-speed serial link wrappers, clock generation, etc.), ADC/DAC drivers, Ethernet MAC implementation, etc.

  10. Development and Validation of the Scan of Postgraduate Educational Environment Domains (SPEED): A Brief Instrument to Assess the Educational Environment in Postgraduate Medical Education.

    PubMed

    Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Visscher, Maartje; Raat, A N Janet; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-01-01

    Current instruments to evaluate the postgraduate medical educational environment lack theoretical frameworks and are relatively long, which may reduce response rates. We aimed to develop and validate a brief instrument that, based on a solid theoretical framework for educational environments, solicits resident feedback to screen the postgraduate medical educational environment quality. Stepwise, we developed a screening instrument, using existing instruments to assess educational environment quality and adopting a theoretical framework that defines three educational environment domains: content, atmosphere and organization. First, items from relevant existing instruments were collected and, after deleting duplicates and items not specifically addressing educational environment, grouped into the three domains. In a Delphi procedure, the item list was reduced to a set of items considered most important and comprehensively covering the three domains. These items were triangulated against the results of semi-structured interviews with 26 residents from three teaching hospitals to achieve face validity. This draft version of the Scan of Postgraduate Educational Environment Domains (SPEED) was administered to residents in a general and university hospital and further reduced and validated based on the data collected. Two hundred twenty-three residents completed the 43-item draft SPEED. We used half of the dataset for item reduction, and the other half for validating the resulting SPEED (15 items, 5 per domain). Internal consistencies were high. Correlations between domain scores in the draft and brief versions of SPEED were high (>0.85) and highly significant (p<0.001). Domain score variance of the draft instrument was explained for ≥80% by the items representing the domains in the final SPEED. The SPEED comprehensively covers the three educational environment domains defined in the theoretical framework. Because of its validity and brevity, the SPEED is promising as

  11. Development and Validation of the Scan of Postgraduate Educational Environment Domains (SPEED): A Brief Instrument to Assess the Educational Environment in Postgraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Schönrock-Adema, Johanna; Visscher, Maartje; Raat, A. N. Janet; Brand, Paul L. P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current instruments to evaluate the postgraduate medical educational environment lack theoretical frameworks and are relatively long, which may reduce response rates. We aimed to develop and validate a brief instrument that, based on a solid theoretical framework for educational environments, solicits resident feedback to screen the postgraduate medical educational environment quality. Methods Stepwise, we developed a screening instrument, using existing instruments to assess educational environment quality and adopting a theoretical framework that defines three educational environment domains: content, atmosphere and organization. First, items from relevant existing instruments were collected and, after deleting duplicates and items not specifically addressing educational environment, grouped into the three domains. In a Delphi procedure, the item list was reduced to a set of items considered most important and comprehensively covering the three domains. These items were triangulated against the results of semi-structured interviews with 26 residents from three teaching hospitals to achieve face validity. This draft version of the Scan of Postgraduate Educational Environment Domains (SPEED) was administered to residents in a general and university hospital and further reduced and validated based on the data collected. Results Two hundred twenty-three residents completed the 43-item draft SPEED. We used half of the dataset for item reduction, and the other half for validating the resulting SPEED (15 items, 5 per domain). Internal consistencies were high. Correlations between domain scores in the draft and brief versions of SPEED were high (>0.85) and highly significant (p<0.001). Domain score variance of the draft instrument was explained for ≥80% by the items representing the domains in the final SPEED. Conclusions The SPEED comprehensively covers the three educational environment domains defined in the theoretical framework. Because of its validity

  12. [work motivation -- assessment instruments and their relevance for medical care].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Rolf G; Ranft, Andreas; Greitemann, Bernhard; Heuft, Gereon

    2005-11-01

    The relevance of work motivation for medical research and healthcare, in particular rehabilitation, is described. Four diagnostic instruments in the German language are introduced which can assess work motivation using a scale system: AVEM, JDS, LMI and FBTM. Their possible application and potential usage for the clinical area are discussed. Apart from the FBTM, none of these instruments can be directly used as a general instrument in a normal medical clinical setting. Finally, a current model for work motivation (compensatory model of work motivation and volition) is presented that contains basis concepts, which are judged as important for future research questions concerning the development of motivation diagnostic instruments.

  13. Development of an instrument (the COLT) to measure conceptions on learning and teaching of teachers, in student-centred medical education.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Johanna C G; Van Luijk, Scheltus J; Van Berkel, Henk; Van der Vleuten, Cees P M; Croiset, Gerda; Scheele, Fedde

    2012-01-01

    Conceptions of medical teachers regarding learning and teaching affect their teaching practice. Therefore conceptions should be addressed in faculty development. To facilitate this, we constructed the Conceptions Of Learning and Teaching (COLT) instrument. The COLT was adapted based on experts' comments during a meeting and interviews, followed by a Delphi procedure (Part I). It was administered to teachers from two Dutch medical schools with different traditions in student-centred education (Part II; N=646). The data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and reliability analysis. 324 Teachers (50.2%) completed the questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis did not confirm the underlying theoretical model, but an alternative model demonstrated a good fit. This led to an instrument with eighteen items reflecting three underlying factors: 'teacher centredness', 'appreciation of active learning', and 'orientation to professional practice'. We found significant differences in COLT scores between the faculty of the two medical schools. The COLT appears to be a construct valid tool resulting in reliable scores of teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching, in student-centred medical education. Two of the three factors are new and may be specific for student-centred medical education. The COLT may be a promising tool to improve faculty development.

  14. Can we use social media to support content validity of patient-reported outcome instruments in medical product development?

    PubMed

    Rothman, Margaret; Gnanaskathy, Ari; Wicks, Paul; Papadopoulos, Elektra J

    2015-01-01

    We report a panel designed to open a dialog between pharmaceutical sponsors, regulatory reviewers, and other stakeholders regarding the use of social media to collect data to support the content validity of patient-reported outcome instruments in the context of medical product labeling. Multiple stakeholder perspectives were brought together to better understand the issues encountered in pursuing social media as a form of data collection to support content validity. Presenters represented a pharmaceutical sponsor of clinical trials, a regulatory reviewer from the Food and Drug Administration, and an online data platform provider. Each presenter shared its perspective on the advantages and disadvantages of using social media to collect this type of information. There was consensus that there is great potential for using social media for this purpose. There remain, however, unanswered questions that need to be addressed such as identifying which type of social media is most appropriate for data collection and ensuring that participants are representative of the target population while maintaining the advantages of anonymity provided by online platforms. The use of social media to collect evidence of content validity holds much promise. Clarification of issues that need to be addressed and accumulation of empirical evidence to address these questions are essential to moving forward. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Probe into the virtual medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Liu, M J; Chen, J Z

    2001-07-01

    With the use of 3DSMAX and AUTO CAD 2000, we have practiced the dynamic simulation of the virtual medical instrument, which is very useful in design. The engineer and doctor can watch a product and change it before making so as to save the time of design and to improve the quality.

  16. Confocal Endomicroscopy: Instrumentation and Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Joey M.; Saldua, Meagan A.; Bixler, Joel N.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in fiber optic technology and miniaturized optics and mechanics have propelled confocal endomicroscopy into the clinical realm. This high resolution, non-invasive imaging technology provides the ability to microscopically evaluate cellular and sub-cellular features in tissue in vivo by optical sectioning. Because many cancers originate in epithelial tissues accessible by endoscopes, confocal endomicroscopy has been explored to detect regions of possible neoplasia at an earlier stage by imaging morphological features in vivo that are significant in histopathologic evaluation. This technique allows real-time assessment of tissue which may improve diagnostic yield by guiding biopsy. Research and development continues to reduce the overall size of the imaging probe, increase the image acquisition speed, and improve resolution and field of view of confocal endomicroscopes. Technical advances will continue to enable application to less accessible organs and more complex systems in the body. Lateral and axial resolutions down to 0.5 μm and 3 μm, respectively, field of view as large as 800×450 μm, and objective lens and total probe outer diameters down to 350 μm and 1.25 mm, respectively, have been achieved. We provide a review of the historical developments of confocal imaging in vivo, the evolution of endomicroscope instrumentation, and the medical applications of confocal endomicroscopy. PMID:21994069

  17. A clinical engineer's view of medical instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Hargest, T S

    1980-01-01

    Physicians and nurses frequently assume that a better level of patient care exists when instrumentation is involved. This is true only when the equipment applicable to the problem is knowledgeably selected, properly maintained, and used in a suitable setting by personnel who understand the product and know how to respond when the unexpected occurs. If any of thes components are missing, it may well jeopardize a patient's well-being. Only by the adoption of explicit policies, properly enforced, can these omissions be controlled and thus assure the medical staff that the use of instrumentation will indeed benefit patient care.

  18. [Research on medical instrument information integration technology based on IHE PCD].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianli; Liao, Yun; Yang, Yongyong

    2014-06-01

    Integrating medical instruments with medical information systems becomes more and more important in healthcare industry. To make medical instruments without standard communication interface possess the capability of interoperating and sharing information with medical information systems, we developed a medical instrument integration gateway based on Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise Patient Care Device (IHE PCD) integration profiles in this research. The core component is an integration engine which is implemented according to integration profiles and Health Level Seven (HL7) messages defined in IHE PCD. Working with instrument specific Javascripts, the engine transforms medical instrument data into HL7 ORU message. This research enables medical instruments to interoperate and exchange medical data with information systems in a standardized way, and is valuable for medical instrument integration, especially for traditional instruments.

  19. Development and clinical research of the He-Ne laser medical instrument with quasi-single beam in two ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuehui; Zhang, Zhong; Chen, Peishan

    1996-09-01

    Much research has been made into low-powered He-Ne laser radiating treatment. Our He-Ne laser treating instrument can transmit double beams in two ways, which is quite different from the old-typed He-Ne laser instrument having one single beam in one way. The power of 250mm-laser totals 2.8mw-3. 5mw, nearing the theoretical value. The invention not only increases the laser radiating power, with convenient treatment of patients, but also eliminates the technical prejudice against radiating beams in one way. Since 1994, three two-way He-Ne laser instruments have been used in the clinical experiments on the ophthalmology in Dalian Railway Hospital. After concentrated treatment of the period of 3 winter and 3 summer vacations, 951 near-sighted eyes in 679 cases of near-sightedness of teenagers were treated. The recent total efficiency is 94.4 percent. The efficiency investigated after half a year is up to 60 percent.

  20. Developing a workplace resilience instrument.

    PubMed

    Mallak, Larry A; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2016-05-27

    Resilience benefits from the use of protective factors, as opposed to risk factors, which are associated with vulnerability. Considerable research and instrument development has been conducted in clinical settings for patients. The need existed for an instrument to be developed in a workplace setting to measure resilience of employees. This study developed and tested a resilience instrument for employees in the workplace. The research instrument was distributed to executives and nurses working in the United States in hospital settings. Five-hundred-forty completed and usable responses were obtained. The instrument contained an inventory of workplace resilience, a job stress questionnaire, and relevant demographics. The resilience items were written based on previous work by the lead author and inspired by Weick's [1] sense-making theory. A four-factor model yielded an instrument having psychometric properties showing good model fit. Twenty items were retained for the resulting Workplace Resilience Instrument (WRI). Parallel analysis was conducted with successive iterations of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Respondents were classified based on their employment with either a rural or an urban hospital. Executives had significantly higher WRI scores than nurses, controlling for gender. WRI scores were positively and significantly correlated with years of experience and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. An instrument to measure individual resilience in the workplace (WRI) was developed. The WRI's four factors identify dimensions of workplace resilience for use in subsequent investigations: Active Problem-Solving, Team Efficacy, Confident Sense-Making, and Bricolage.

  1. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning...

  3. Ames Scientists Develop MSL Instrument

    NASA Image and Video Library

    David Blake, a research scientist at NASA Ames, led the development of CheMin, one of ten scientific instruments onboard Curiosity, the Mars Scientific Laboratory. The Powder X-Ray Diffraction tool...

  4. [Roman medical instruments from Lower Moesia].

    PubMed

    Aparaschivei, D; Matei, I

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the evolution of society over time, ancient medicine is a very interesting and important researching field. Archaeological discoveries, such as the objects described by this article, but other ancient sources, also, are able to provide a complex framework of medical practice in Roman times. The geographic area that we have like target in this material is the province of Lower Moesia, which includes the territory between Danube and Black Sea (Romanian Dobrodja) and northern Bulgaria. In the present study we present nine ancient medical instruments, from a private collection: two tweezers, two ear probes, a probe-spatula, a probe-spoon, a spoon for pharmacy and two fragments of some kind of hooks used in surgical operations. Most likely, we have a mixed medical kit with tools used in general medicine, surgery, in preparation of the pharmaceutical treatments, but very possible, also, in cosmetic practices. Publication of these archaeological materials is, in addition to an extra page in the history of ancient medicine, a pretext for stepping up in a research field that, in other regions of the former Roman Empire, it is a great interest for researchers.

  5. Development and validation of an instrument for measuring the quality of teamwork in teaching teams in postgraduate medical training (TeamQ).

    PubMed

    Slootweg, Irene A; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; Boerebach, Benjamin C M; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2014-01-01

    Teamwork between clinical teachers is a challenge in postgraduate medical training. Although there are several instruments available for measuring teamwork in health care, none of them are appropriate for teaching teams. The aim of this study is to develop an instrument (TeamQ) for measuring teamwork, to investigate its psychometric properties and to explore how clinical teachers assess their teamwork. To select the items to be included in the TeamQ questionnaire, we conducted a content validation in 2011, using a Delphi procedure in which 40 experts were invited. Next, for pilot testing the preliminary tool, 1446 clinical teachers from 116 teaching teams were requested to complete the TeamQ questionnaire. For data analyses we used statistical strategies: principal component analysis, internal consistency reliability coefficient, and the number of evaluations needed to obtain reliable estimates. Lastly, the median TeamQ scores were calculated for teams to explore the levels of teamwork. In total, 31 experts participated in the Delphi study. In total, 114 teams participated in the TeamQ pilot. The median team response was 7 evaluations per team. The principal component analysis revealed 11 factors; 8 were included. The reliability coefficients of the TeamQ scales ranged from 0.75 to 0.93. The generalizability analysis revealed that 5 to 7 evaluations were needed to obtain internal reliability coefficients of 0.70. In terms of teamwork, the clinical teachers scored residents' empowerment as the highest TeamQ scale and feedback culture as the area that would most benefit from improvement. This study provides initial evidence of the validity of an instrument for measuring teamwork in teaching teams. The high response rates and the low number of evaluations needed for reliably measuring teamwork indicate that TeamQ is feasible for use by teaching teams. Future research could explore the effectiveness of feedback on teamwork in follow up measurements.

  6. Development and Validation of an Instrument for Measuring the Quality of Teamwork in Teaching Teams in Postgraduate Medical Training (TeamQ)

    PubMed Central

    Slootweg, Irene A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Boerebach, Benjamin C. M.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Teamwork between clinical teachers is a challenge in postgraduate medical training. Although there are several instruments available for measuring teamwork in health care, none of them are appropriate for teaching teams. The aim of this study is to develop an instrument (TeamQ) for measuring teamwork, to investigate its psychometric properties and to explore how clinical teachers assess their teamwork. Method To select the items to be included in the TeamQ questionnaire, we conducted a content validation in 2011, using a Delphi procedure in which 40 experts were invited. Next, for pilot testing the preliminary tool, 1446 clinical teachers from 116 teaching teams were requested to complete the TeamQ questionnaire. For data analyses we used statistical strategies: principal component analysis, internal consistency reliability coefficient, and the number of evaluations needed to obtain reliable estimates. Lastly, the median TeamQ scores were calculated for teams to explore the levels of teamwork. Results In total, 31 experts participated in the Delphi study. In total, 114 teams participated in the TeamQ pilot. The median team response was 7 evaluations per team. The principal component analysis revealed 11 factors; 8 were included. The reliability coefficients of the TeamQ scales ranged from 0.75 to 0.93. The generalizability analysis revealed that 5 to 7 evaluations were needed to obtain internal reliability coefficients of 0.70. In terms of teamwork, the clinical teachers scored residents' empowerment as the highest TeamQ scale and feedback culture as the area that would most benefit from improvement. Conclusions This study provides initial evidence of the validity of an instrument for measuring teamwork in teaching teams. The high response rates and the low number of evaluations needed for reliably measuring teamwork indicate that TeamQ is feasible for use by teaching teams. Future research could explore the effectiveness of feedback on teamwork in

  7. Magnetic manipulation instrumentation for medical physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, G. T.; Ritter, R. C.; Broaddus, W. C.; Grady, M. S.; Howard, M. A., III; McNeil, R. G.

    1994-03-01

    The noncontact magnetic manipulation of probe masses within the body is an area of research that has received substantial attention from the medical physics community, especially during the past three decades. The therapeutic and diagnostic possibilities arising from such technology include site-specific drug delivery within the central nervous system, advancement of techniques for navigation and selective catheterization of vessels within the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems, and the nonsurgical exploration of the alimentary and respiratory tracts. In this review, we examine the physical principles underlying in vivo magnetic manipulation systems, and catalog the various types of instrumentation used for such purposes to date. Thereafter, we evaluate the different methods of image-based localization used to identify the position of the probe within the body. Finally, we appraise an emerging technology known as nonlinear magnetic stereotaxis, a technique that permits minimally invasive access to difficult-to-approach parts of the brain. We close the review with a few comments on the directions for future work within this field.

  8. Development and preliminary evidence for the validity of an instrument assessing implementation of human-factors principles in medication-related decision-support systems—I-MeDeSA

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Marianne; Seidling, Hanna M; Neri, Pamela M; Cresswell, Kathrin M; Duke, Jon; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Volk, Lynn A; Bates, David W

    2011-01-01

    Background Medication-related decision support can reduce the frequency of preventable adverse drug events. However, the design of current medication alerts often results in alert fatigue and high over-ride rates, thus reducing any potential benefits. Methods The authors previously reviewed human-factors principles for relevance to medication-related decision support alerts. In this study, instrument items were developed for assessing the appropriate implementation of these human-factors principles in drug–drug interaction (DDI) alerts. User feedback regarding nine electronic medical records was considered during the development process. Content validity, construct validity through correlation analysis, and inter-rater reliability were assessed. Results The final version of the instrument included 26 items associated with nine human-factors principles. Content validation on three systems resulted in the addition of one principle (Corrective Actions) to the instrument and the elimination of eight items. Additionally, the wording of eight items was altered. Correlation analysis suggests a direct relationship between system age and performance of DDI alerts (p=0.0016). Inter-rater reliability indicated substantial agreement between raters (κ=0.764). Conclusion The authors developed and gathered preliminary evidence for the validity of an instrument that measures the appropriate use of human-factors principles in the design and display of DDI alerts. Designers of DDI alerts may use the instrument to improve usability and increase user acceptance of medication alerts, and organizations selecting an electronic medical record may find the instrument helpful in meeting their clinicians' usability needs. PMID:21946241

  9. Recent developments in hydrologic instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latkovich, Vito J.; Futrell, James C.; Kane, Douglas L.

    1986-01-01

    The programs of the U.S. Geological Survey require instrumentation for collecting and monitoring hydrologic data in cold regions. The availability of space-age materials and implementation of modern electronics and mechanics is making possible the recent developments of hydrologic instrumentation, especially in the area of measuring streamflow under ice cover. Material developments include: synthetic-fiber sounding and tag lines; polymer (plastic) sheaves, pulleys, and sampler components; and polymer (plastic) current-meter bucket wheels. Electronic and mechanical developments include: a current-meter digitizer; a fiber-optic closure system for current-meters; non-contact water-level sensors; an adaptable hydrologic data acquisition system; a minimum data recorder; an ice rod; an ice foot; a handled sediment sampler; a light weight ice auger with improved cutter head and blades; and an ice chisel.

  10. Validation of A Trust In Medical Technology Instrument

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A patient’s trusting attitude towards technology used in their medical care may be a predictor of acceptance or rejection of the technology and, by extension, the physician. The aim of this study was to rigorously determine the validity of an instrument for measuring patients’ trust in medical technology. Instrument validity was established based on a framework, which included test and data evidence for validity assessment. The framework for validity assessment evaluates the instrument on content, substantive, structural, generalizability, external and consequential aspects of validity. The results of the current study show that the instrument is reliable and valid for assessing a patient’s trust in obstetric medical technology. PMID:20189163

  11. Evaluation of Medical Nurse Practitioner Program: Participant Instrument No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rott, Robert K.

    This instrument was designed to provide a goal-free evaluation of a pilot training program for Medical Nurse Practitioners. With minor modification, the instrument can be applied to programs at several educational levels: secondary, college, adult, and continuing. The instrument uses 5-point Likert-type scales (with positive and negative…

  12. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  13. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefited greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  14. High resolution tomographic instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Our recent work has concentrated on the development of high-resolution PET instrumentation reflecting in part the growing importance of PET in nuclear medicine imaging. We have developed a number of positron imaging instruments and have the distinction that every instrument has been placed in operation and has had an extensive history of application for basic research and clinical study. The present program is a logical continuation of these earlier successes. PCR-I, a single ring positron tomograph was the first demonstration of analog coding using BGO. It employed 4 mm detectors and is currently being used for a wide range of biological studies. These are of immense importance in guiding the direction for future instruments. In particular, PCR-II, a volume sensitive positron tomograph with 3 mm spatial resolution has benefitted greatly from the studies using PCR-I. PCR-II is currently in the final stages of assembly and testing and will shortly be placed in operation for imaging phantoms, animals and ultimately humans. Perhaps the most important finding resulting from our previous study is that resolution and sensitivity must be carefully balanced to achieve a practical high resolution system. PCR-II has been designed to have the detection characteristics required to achieve 3 mm resolution in human brain under practical imaging situations. The development of algorithms by the group headed by Dr. Chesler is based on a long history of prior study including his joint work with Drs. Pelc and Reiderer and Stearns. This body of expertise will be applied to the processing of data from PCR-II when it becomes operational.

  15. Prevention of medical accidents caused by defective surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Kazuhiko; Komatsu, Takami; Obayashi, Toshihiko; Saito, Yuhei; Uetera, Yushi

    2012-02-01

    The malfunctioning of surgical instruments may lead to serious medical accidents. Limited information is available on the risk of defective instruments. The purpose of these study is to demonstrate the features of defective surgical instruments, to establish a strategy to reduce the risk of medical accidents. We studied 19,474 consecutive operations during 2007 to 2009 at our hospital. The data on defective instruments were collected based on the orders for repair of broken instruments and reports of near-miss incidents. Adverse events caused by defective instruments were also identified from reports of near-miss incidents. A total of 1,775 nonfunctioning instruments were identified during the study period. Of these, 112 were found during operation. More than half of the defective instruments were tissue-grasping instruments, bone-boring/gnawing instruments, and instruments for endoscopic surgery. Wearing out and inappropriate use of instruments were 2 major causes of defects. The rest of the causes consisted of inadequate inspection and factory defects. Two near-miss incidents (incidence 10 per 100,000 operations) in endoscopic surgery were potentially critical, but the postoperative course was uneventful in each patient. The incidence of defects adjusted by the number of operations demonstrated that bone-boring/gnawing instruments and instruments for endoscopic surgery tend to be broken during surgery. Without inspection by the manufacturer, the incidence would be much higher for endoscopic instruments. Our data suggest that the appropriate use and adequate inspection of particular types of instruments are key for reducing the risk of medical accidents caused by defective surgical instruments. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN HYDROLOGIC INSTRUMENTATION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Latkovich, Vito J.

    1985-01-01

    The availability of space-age materials and implementation of state-of-the-art electronics is making possible the recent developments of hydrologic instrumentation. Material developments include: Synthetic-fiber sounding and tag lines; fiberglass wading rod; polymer (plastic) sheaves, pulleys and sampler components; and polymer (plastic) bucket wheels for current meters. These materials are very cost effective and efficient. Electromechanical and electronic developments and applications include: adaptable data acquisition system; downhole sampler for hazardous substances; current-meter digitizer; hydraulic power/drive system for discharge measurements and water-quality sampling; non-contact water-level sensors; minimum data recorder; acoustic velocity meters, and automated current meter discharge-measurement system.

  17. Recent development in PET instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Peng, By Hao; Levin, Craig S

    2010-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr(3), and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic.

  18. Recent Developments in PET Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is used in the clinic and in vivo small animal research to study molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurological disorders, and to guide the discovery and development of new treatments. This paper reviews current challenges of advancing PET technology and some of newly developed PET detectors and systems. The paper focuses on four aspects of PET instrumentation: high photon detection sensitivity; improved spatial resolution; depth-of-interaction (DOI) resolution and time-of-flight (TOF). Improved system geometry, novel non-scintillator based detectors, and tapered scintillation crystal arrays are able to enhance the photon detection sensitivity of a PET system. Several challenges for achieving high resolution with standard scintillator-based PET detectors are discussed. Novel detectors with 3-D positioning capability have great potential to be deployed in PET for achieving spatial resolution better than 1 mm, such as cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) and position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs). DOI capability enables a PET system to mitigate parallax error and achieve uniform spatial resolution across the field-of-view (FOV). Six common DOI designs, as well as advantages and limitations of each design, are discussed. The availability of fast scintillation crystals such as LaBr3, and the silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) greatly advances TOF-PET development. Recent instrumentation and initial results of clinical trials are briefly presented. If successful, these technology advances, together with new probe molecules, will substantially enhance the molecular sensitivity of PET and thus increase its role in preclinical and clinical research as well as evaluating and managing disease in the clinic. PMID:20497121

  19. Preparing patients for medical interventions: A systematic review of the psychometric qualities of published instruments.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, Kristy L; Carey, Mariko L; Hall, Alix E; Boyes, Allison W; Sanson-Fisher, Rob

    2016-06-01

    Preparing patients for medical interventions improves patient outcomes and is an ethical and legal imperative. This review examines the characteristics and psychometric properties of published instruments which assess patients' preparation for medical interventions. Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched from the date of their inception to November 2015. Data-based publications describing the development or validation of a self-report instrument designed to assess the quality of adult patients' perceived preparation for a medical intervention were included. Nine publications described the development or validation of seven instruments which met inclusion criteria. The psychometric qualities of the instruments varied. None met all of the accepted criteria for psychometric rigour. Although the Satisfaction with Cancer Information Profile met the highest number (n=5) of the defined psychometric properties, the study sample size was less than 100. Overall, content validity of the included instruments was the most frequently assessed criteria. Few instruments have been specifically developed to assess patients' self-reported preparation for medical interventions. Of the available instruments, none demonstrated adequate rigour across essential psychometric properties. The need to develop instruments examining patient preparation for medical interventions is apparent given the limitations of the instruments reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Standardised assessment of patients' capacity to manage medications: a systematic review of published instruments

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Rohan A; Marriott, Jennifer L

    2009-01-01

    Background Older people are commonly prescribed complex multi-drug regimens while also experiencing declines in the cognitive and physical abilities required for medication management, leading to increased risk of medication errors and need for assisted living. The purpose of this study was to review published instruments designed to assess patients' capacity to self-administer medications. Methods Searches of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, Google, and reference lists of identified publications were conducted to identify English-language articles describing development and validation of instruments designed to assess patients' capacity to self-administer medications. Methodological quality of validation studies was rated independently against published criteria by two reviewers and reliability and validity data were reviewed. Results Thirty-two instruments were identified, of which 14 met pre-defined inclusion criteria. Instruments fell into two categories: those that used patients' own medications as the basis for assessment and those that used a simulated medication regimen. The quality of validation studies was generally low to moderate and few instruments were subjected to reliability testing. Most instruments had some evidence of construct validity, through associations with tests of cognitive function, health literacy, activities of daily living or measures of medication management or adherence. Only one instrument had sensitivity and specificity data with respect to prediction of medication-related outcomes such as adherence to therapy. Only three instruments had validity data from more than one independent research group. Conclusion A number of performance-based instruments exist to assess patients' capacity to manage their own medications. These may be useful for identifying physical and cognitive barriers to successful medication management, but further studies are needed to

  1. Advanced ESPI-based medical instruments for otolaryngology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castracane, James; Conerty, M.; Cacace, Anthony T.; Gardner, Glendon M.; Miller, Mitchell B.; Parnes, Steven M.

    1993-05-01

    Optical fibers have long been used for visual inspection inside the human body for medical diagnoses and treatment. By making use of sophisticated optical interferometric and ultra- small imaging techniques, combined with automated image processing, it is possible to extract significantly increased information for more accurate medical diagnoses. With support from NIH under the SBIR program, we have been developing a range of such instruments. One of these supported by the NIDCD is capable of providing detailed spatial information on the vibratory response of the tympanic membrane (TM). This instrument involves the examination of the TM by means of high speed electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI). This provides a real time view of the vibration patterns of the TM for clinical diagnosis. This Interferometric Otoscope consists of mode conserving fiber optics, miniature diode lasers and high speed solid state detector arrays. We present the current status of the research including holography and ESPI of TM models and excised temporal bone preparations. A second instrument, also developed with support from NIDCD, is for application to the larynx. This system is also ESPI based but will incorporate features for direct vocal cord (VC) examination. By careful examination of the vibratory response of the VC during phonation, the characteristics of the mucosal wave may be examined. Adynamic regions of the cords can signal the start of lesions or cysts. Results of surgery can be evaluated in a quantitative manner. The design of a clinical prototype and preliminary electro-optic experiments on excised larynges and VC models will be presented.

  2. Development of autonomous triggering instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Steve E.; Swift, Theresa M.; Fonda, James W.

    2008-03-01

    Triggering instrumentation for autonomous monitoring of load-induced strain is described for economical, fast bridge inspection. The development addresses one aspect for the management of transportation infrastructure - bridge monitoring and inspection. The objectives are to provide quantitative performance information from a load test, to minimize the setup time at the bridge, and to minimize the closure time to traffic. Multiple or networked measurements can be made for a prescribed loading sequence. The proposed smart system consists of in-situ strain sensors, an embedded data acquisition module, and a measurement triggering system. A companion control unit is mounted on the truck serving as the load. As the truck moves to the proper position, the desired measurement is automatically relayed back to the control unit. In this work, the testing protocol is developed and the performance parameters for the triggering and data acquisition are measured. The test system uses a dedicated wireless sensor mote and an infrared positioning system. The electronic procedure offers improvements in available information and economics.

  3. Instruments for evaluating shared medical decision making: a structured literature review.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney Morss

    2007-12-01

    The author conducted a structured literature review of instruments for evaluating shared medical decision making. She included relevant instruments that were generalizable beyond specific situations and had been formally evaluated and organized them by domains of values or preferences, information and communication in decision making, and other aspects of decision making. For values or preferences, the author identified 11 instruments, mostly on preferences for roles and information. For information and communication, she found a systematic review of instruments for observational assessment of decision making, 3 additional observational instruments, and 3 questionnaires. For other aspects of decision making, the author identified 3 instruments in domains such as decision self-efficacy and 4 multidimensional instruments. Although instrument development tended to cluster in several areas and there were clear gaps in the literature, the diversity of instruments demonstrates the broad range of constructs involved in assessing shared decision making.

  4. Creative writing as a medical instrument.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Jay M

    2013-12-01

    Listening and responding to patients' stories for over 20 years as an emergency physician has strengthened my appreciation for the many ways that the skills and principles drawn from writing fiction double as necessary clinical skills. The best medicine doesn't work on the wrong story, and the stories patients tell sometimes feel like first drafts-vital and fragile works-in-progress. Increasingly complex health challenges compounded by social, financial, and psychological burdens make for stories that are difficult to articulate and comprehend. In this essay, I argue that healthcare providers need to think like creative writers and the skills and sensitivities necessary to story construction deserve a vital space in medical education. A thorough understanding of story anatomy and the imaginative flexibility to work stories into open spaces serve as antidotes to the reductive nature of clinical decision making and have implications as patient safety and risk management strategies. The examples that I have selected demonstrate how thinking like a creative writer functions at the bedside, providing tools for clinical excellence and empathy. This approach asks that we re-imagine the importance of story in clinical care: from a vehicle to a diagnosis to its place as a critical destination.

  5. Development of a Workshop Evaluation Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William L.; Wiens, Scott A.; Johnson, Annabel M.

    This paper details the development and psychometric analysis of an instrument used for workshop evaluation. The instrument was designed to assess the effectiveness of the workshops, the instructors conducting the workshop training, and the training materials. The instrument used a Likert agree/disagree format. A psychometric analysis of scores…

  6. [Design and implementation of medical instrument standard information retrieval system based on APS.NET].

    PubMed

    Yu, Kaijun

    2010-07-01

    This paper Analys the design goals of Medical Instrumentation standard information retrieval system. Based on the B /S structure,we established a medical instrumentation standard retrieval system with ASP.NET C # programming language, IIS f Web server, SQL Server 2000 database, in the. NET environment. The paper also Introduces the system structure, retrieval system modules, system development environment and detailed design of the system.

  7. [External quality assurance in inpatient medical rehabilitation and prevention centers for mothers, fathers and children: development of instruments for assessing structural quality].

    PubMed

    Saupe-Heide, M; Gerlich, C; Lukasczik, M; Musekamp, G; Neuderth, S; Vogel, H

    2013-12-01

    As required by German law, inpatient institutions offering prevention and rehabilitation measures for mothers, fathers and children are obliged to implement external quality assurance measures. In 2 pilot projects funded by the German federal association of health insurance funds, external quality assurance procedures for in-hospital prevention and rehabilitation of mothers and fathers were analyzed with the aim of developing a set of instruments for the description of structural characteristics in this area of health care and to evaluate its appropriateness. Concerning structure-related quality, the project included a) designing and evaluating a questionnaire, b) the definition of assessment criteria for subsequent comparative data analyses, and c) the description and documentation of the current state in the field of rehabilitation and prevention for mothers, fathers and children. To document structural quality comprehensively, a modular questionnaire was developed and tested in a survey of 115 inpatient prevention and rehabilitation institutions for mothers, fathers and children. Involving an expert panel, preliminary basic and selection criteria were defined in order to assure a conducive assessment with regard to structural attributes. The majority of institutions had provider agreements for both prevention and rehabilitation. Measures for mothers/fathers with children were predominant; only 7 institutions exclusively treated mothers and fathers. Institution sizes varied strongly. Major indications included psychosomatics, dermatology, and pneumology. Overall, structural conditions of the institutions showed a high standard. Potential for development was found with regard to some aspects of the conceptual framework of institutional practice and the implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in diagnostics. In this article, the degrees of fulfillment with relation to the structural dimensions are presented

  8. Data logging technology in ambulatory medical instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Lyons, G M

    2001-05-01

    This paper reviews the advancements made in ambulatory data logging used in the study of human subjects since the inception of the analogue tape based data logger in the 1960s. Research into the area of ambulatory monitoring has been rejuvenated due to the development of novel storage technologies during the 1990s. Data logging systems that were previously impractical due to lack of processing power, practical size and cost are now available to the practitioner. An overview of the requirements of present day ambulatory data logging is presented and analogue tape, solid-state memory and disk drive storage recording systems that have been described in the literature are investigated in detail. It is proposed that digital based technology offers the best solution to the problems encountered during human based data logging. The appearance of novel digital storage media will continue the trend of increased recording durations, signal resolution and number of parameters thus allowing the momentum gained throughout the last several decades to continue.

  9. Novel Developments in Instrumentation for PET Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Joel

    2013-04-01

    Advances in medical imaging, in particular positron emission tomography (PET), have been based on technical developments in physics and instrumentation that have common foundations with detection systems used in other fields of physics. New detector materials are used in PET systems that maximize efficiency, timing characteristics and robustness, and which lead to improved image quality and quantitative accuracy for clinical imaging. Time of flight (TOF) techniques are now routinely used in commercial PET scanners that combine physiological imaging with anatomical imaging provided by x-ray computed tomography. Using new solid-state photo-sensors instead of traditional photo-multiplier tubes makes it possible to combine PET with magnetic resonance imaging which is a significant technical challenge, but one that is creating new opportunities for both research and clinical applications. An overview of recent advances in instrumentation, such as TOF and PET/MR will be presented, along with examples of imaging studies to demonstrate the impact on patient care and basic research of diseases.

  10. [Initiative management of medical instruments and equipments' operation and maintenance].

    PubMed

    Jia, Guo-Lliang; Ge, Yi; Deng, Hou-Bin

    2005-03-01

    We expatiate on an initiative management mode of medical instruments and equipments' operation and maintenace, which is different from the usual passive management. The application of this mode is helpful for keeping them in good condition and increasing the activity ratio, and thus to increase their economic and social benefits.

  11. Instrumentation development for the EUVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, D.

    1980-06-01

    The prototype mirror was successfully replated with a thick layer of nickel and diamond turned again. Optimization of the sensitivity of the instruments was studied with emphasis on the filter material, and on the available telemetry. The JHU Preliminary Project Definition Document was critically analyzed. Further studies of the electron cloud distribution produced by a channel plate were performed, and a wedge and strip anode with 17 quartets per inch was shown to image with better than 0.5% linearity. Half the microchannel plates being used in the lifetest completed initial processing and are in the lifetest vacuum chamber.

  12. [Basic assessment of trust level in medical apparatus and instruments sales systems by medical organization].

    PubMed

    Ge, Y; Wang, M; Li, X J

    2001-03-01

    Purchase of medical apparatus and instruments is a strict work of taking the patient as a consuming objection. To analyze the trust level in medical apparatus and instruments sales systems and to set up the method of trust level assessment before the purchase, is an important link of ensuring the reality of medical products and consumerism. According to the principle mentioned about, the present article analyses the basic content of assessing factors and their inter-relationship, summarizes their expressions, studies and sets up the mathematical modal and it method. All these are of some value to medical organization in choosing factory owners and their products while the purchasing.

  13. Searching for a written patient feedback instrument for patient–medical student consultations

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Nicola; Li, Henry; Pezaro, Carmel; Roberts, Noel; Schmidt, Erica; Martin, Jenepher

    2017-01-01

    Objective The Patient Teaching Associate (PTA) program at Eastern Health Clinical School uses volunteer patients with chronic illnesses in consultation-based medical student education. The PTA program aims to develop students’ patient-centeredness and associated skills. Our study aims, 1) to identify key desirable characteristics of written patient feedback to doctors and/or students that focuses on patient-centeredness in consultations, and 2) to critically evaluate existing instruments to identify any suitable instrument for use for medical student teaching. Methods We reviewed our experience with the PTA program and explored the literature on patient-centeredness and patient feedback to identify desirable characteristics of written feedback for our program. A systematic search was conducted to identify existing patient feedback instruments. These were then evaluated in light of criteria based on desirable characteristics. Results Eight instruments met the inclusion criteria. While all were designed for patient use, none were ideal for the PTA program. The Doctors’ Interpersonal Skills Questionnaire (DISQ), while not used with medical students, is the closest fit to criteria. Conclusion The lack of instruments specifically designed for written patient feedback to medical students highlights a gap in the current literature. Practice implications The DISQ provides a good basis for developing a new feedback instrument focused on patient-centeredness in medical students. PMID:28260962

  14. Searching for a written patient feedback instrument for patient-medical student consultations.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Nicola; Li, Henry; Pezaro, Carmel; Roberts, Noel; Schmidt, Erica; Martin, Jenepher

    2017-01-01

    The Patient Teaching Associate (PTA) program at Eastern Health Clinical School uses volunteer patients with chronic illnesses in consultation-based medical student education. The PTA program aims to develop students' patient-centeredness and associated skills. Our study aims, 1) to identify key desirable characteristics of written patient feedback to doctors and/or students that focuses on patient-centeredness in consultations, and 2) to critically evaluate existing instruments to identify any suitable instrument for use for medical student teaching. We reviewed our experience with the PTA program and explored the literature on patient-centeredness and patient feedback to identify desirable characteristics of written feedback for our program. A systematic search was conducted to identify existing patient feedback instruments. These were then evaluated in light of criteria based on desirable characteristics. Eight instruments met the inclusion criteria. While all were designed for patient use, none were ideal for the PTA program. The Doctors' Interpersonal Skills Questionnaire (DISQ), while not used with medical students, is the closest fit to criteria. The lack of instruments specifically designed for written patient feedback to medical students highlights a gap in the current literature. The DISQ provides a good basis for developing a new feedback instrument focused on patient-centeredness in medical students.

  15. Instrumentation development for real time brainwave monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Lawrence Frederick; Clough, Benjamin W.

    2005-12-01

    The human brain functions through a chemically-induced biological process which operates in a manner similar to electrical systems. The signal resulting from this biochemical process can actually be monitored and read using tools and having patterns similar to those found in electrical and electronics engineering. The primary signature of this electrical activity is the ''brain wave'', which looks remarkably similar to the output of many electrical systems. Likewise, the device currently used in medical arenas to read brain electrical activity is the electroencephalogram (EEG) which is synonymous with a multi-channel oscilloscope reading. Brain wave readings and recordings for medical purposes are traditionally taken in clinical settings such as hospitals, laboratories or diagnostic clinics. The signal is captured via externally applied scalp electrodes using semi-viscous gel to reduce impedance. The signal will be in the 10 to 100 microvolt range. In other instances, where surgeons are attempting to isolate particular types of minute brain signals, the electrodes may actually be temporarily implanted in the brain during a preliminary procedure. The current configurations of equipment required for EEGs involve large recording instruments, many electrodes, wires, and large amounts of hard disk space devoted to storing large files of brain wave data which are then eventually analyzed for patterns of concern. Advances in sensors, signal processing, data storage and microelectronics over the last decade would seem to have paved the way for the realization of devices capable of ''real time'' external monitoring, and possible assessment, of brain activity. A myriad of applications for such a capability are likewise presenting themselves, including the ability to assess brain functioning, level of functioning and malfunctioning. Our plan is to develop the sensors, signal processing, and portable instrumentation package which could capture, analyze, and communicate

  16. Recent Developments in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Instrumentation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Derenzo, S. E.; Budinger, T. F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors.

  17. Recent developments in positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1986-04-01

    This paper presents recent detector developments and perspectives for positron emission tomography (PET) instrumentation used for medical research, as well as the physical processes in positron annihilation, photon scattering and detection, tomograph design considerations, and the potentials for new advances in detectors. 117 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  19. An Atmospheric Instrument Development Outreach Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, David; Cordella, Nick; Bracy, Sue

    2002-04-01

    In an effort to cultivate the interest in atmospheric science of middle school students, we have established a long-term outreach program in which students become active participants in an instrument development study. This project was motivated by the low cost, $20.00, hand-held haze detector (HHHD) developed by Forrest Mims III and the capabilities of the instruments located 5 miles away as part of the Saint Anselm Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (SAASE). The focus of the project, for the past two academic years, has been the development and data collected with two different HHHDs, operated by eighth graders from Mountain View Middle School (MVMS). This data is then compared to the solar irradiance measurements made with SAASE's automated multifilter shadow band radiometer (MFSBR). This type of outreach project not only teaches students about the atmosphere but also the process of instrument development and the creative aspects of science.

  20. Laser light scattering instrument advanced technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this advanced technology development (ATD) project has been to provide sturdy, miniaturized laser light scattering (LLS) instrumentation for use in microgravity experiments. To do this, we assessed user requirements, explored the capabilities of existing and prospective laser light scattering hardware, and both coordinated and participated in the hardware and software advances needed for a flight hardware instrument. We have successfully breadboarded and evaluated an engineering version of a single-angle glove-box instrument which uses solid state detectors and lasers, along with fiber optics, for beam delivery and detection. Additionally, we have provided the specifications and written verification procedures necessary for procuring a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument which will be used by the flight hardware project which resulted from this work and from this project's interaction with the laser light scattering community.

  1. [A novel model of the medical instrumentation--an overview of wearable sensors and systems].

    PubMed

    Deng, Qin-kai

    2006-09-01

    The traditional medical instrumentation is now not suited for the transformation of the present healthcare model. It's an attempt to make a breakthrough on traditions to develop wearable sensors/systems. Five articles about wearable technology are selected by this special topic. And our aim is to inspire the designers of medical devices to grasp the chance and to take a vigorous action on innovatory developments, so as to satisfy the huge requirements of the healthcare market, and to open a new era of the medical device industry.

  2. Development in diagnostics, instrumentation and facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Clothiaux, E.J. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper an overview is given of plasma armature models and the important parameters needed for progress on the research and the development of electromagnetic launchers. The current state of diagnostics development and of its supporting instrumentation in progress at Eglin AFB, which impacts validation of armature models, is reviewed.

  3. [Bactericidal and biologically stable coatings for medical implants and instruments].

    PubMed

    Abdullin, I Sh; Mironov, M M; Garipova, G I

    2004-01-01

    The experimental research showed the fine-film coating based on hafnium nitride to inhibit the pathogenic microflora and to exert the bactericidal effect by far less versus that of antibiotics; at the same time, the concentration of hafnium ions in the solution is just within the sensitivity limit detectable by the most recent registration methods--it amounts to less than 10(-10) mol/l. Therefore, according to the research results, the use of such coatings based on hafnium nitride is promising in manufacturing the surgical metal implants and medical instruments.

  4. Large Instrument Development for Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J. Richard; Warnick, Karl F.; Jeffs, Brian D.; Norrod, Roger D.; Lockman, Felix J.; Cordes, James M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    This white paper offers cautionary observations about the planning and development of new, large radio astronomy instruments. Complexity is a strong cost driver so every effort should be made to assign differing science requirements to different instruments and probably different sites. The appeal of shared resources is generally not realized in practice and can often be counterproductive. Instrument optimization is much more difficult with longer lists of requirements, and the development process is longer and less efficient. More complex instruments are necessarily further behind the technology state of the art because of longer development times. Including technology R&D in the construction phase of projects is a growing trend that leads to higher risks, cost overruns, schedule delays, and project de-scoping. There are no technology breakthroughs just over the horizon that will suddenly bring down the cost of collecting area. Advances come largely through careful attention to detail in the adoption of new technology provided by industry and the commercial market. Radio astronomy instrumentation has a very bright future, but a vigorous long-term R&D program not tied directly to specific projects needs to be restored, fostered, and preserved.

  5. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of (235)U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  6. Development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin-guang; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Feng

    2015-03-15

    This article introduces a development of pulsed neutron uranium logging instrument. By analyzing the temporal distribution of epithermal neutrons generated from the thermal fission of {sup 235}U, we propose a new method with a uranium-bearing index to calculate the uranium content in the formation. An instrument employing a D-T neutron generator and two epithermal neutron detectors has been developed. The logging response is studied using Monte Carlo simulation and experiments in calibration wells. The simulation and experimental results show that the uranium-bearing index is linearly correlated with the uranium content, and the porosity and thermal neutron lifetime of the formation can be acquired simultaneously.

  7. Simple solution to the medical instrumentation software problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leif, Robert C.; Leif, Suzanne B.; Leif, Stephanie H.; Bingue, E.

    1995-04-01

    Medical devices now include a substantial software component, which is both difficult and expensive to produce and maintain. Medical software must be developed according to `Good Manufacturing Practices', GMP. Good Manufacturing Practices as specified by the FDA and ISO requires the definition and compliance to a software processes which ensures quality products by specifying a detailed method of software construction. The software process should be based on accepted standards. US Department of Defense software standards and technology can both facilitate the development and improve the quality of medical systems. We describe the advantages of employing Mil-Std-498, Software Development and Documentation, and the Ada programming language. Ada provides the very broad range of functionalities, from embedded real-time to management information systems required by many medical devices. It also includes advanced facilities for object oriented programming and software engineering.

  8. Evaluation of an Instrument To Predict Successful Medical Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekelman, Francine P.; And Others

    An instrument to measure the 13 personal characteristics of productive researchers described by C. J. Bland and others (1986, 1990) was developed and evaluated. The total eligible sample was 404 full-time assistant professor faculty members in the tenure track at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland (Ohio). A random sample of 100…

  9. Development of the TTF TPACK Survey Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson-Proctor, Romina; Albion, Peter; Finger, Glenn; Cavanagh, Rob; Fitzgerald, Robert; Bond, Trevor; Grimbeek, Peter

    2013-01-01

    One of the major outcomes from the national Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) Project in 2011 was the development and statistical validation of a survey instrument to measure the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) of pre-service teachers as a result of the TTF intervention implemented across all Australian Education…

  10. Development of the TTF TPACK Survey Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamieson-Proctor, Romina; Albion, Peter; Finger, Glenn; Cavanagh, Rob; Fitzgerald, Robert; Bond, Trevor; Grimbeek, Peter

    2013-01-01

    One of the major outcomes from the national Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) Project in 2011 was the development and statistical validation of a survey instrument to measure the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) of pre-service teachers as a result of the TTF intervention implemented across all Australian Education…

  11. Assessing medical professionalism: A systematic review of instruments and their measurement properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Honghe; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yang; Wen, Deliang

    2017-01-01

    Over the last three decades, various instruments were developed and employed to assess medical professionalism, but their measurement properties have yet to be fully evaluated. This study aimed to systematically evaluate these instruments' measurement properties and the methodological quality of their related studies within a universally acceptable standardized framework and then provide corresponding recommendations. A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycINFO was conducted to collect studies published from 1990-2015. After screening titles, abstracts, and full texts for eligibility, the articles included in this study were classified according to their respective instrument's usage. A two-phase assessment was conducted: 1) methodological quality was assessed by following the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist; and 2) the quality of measurement properties was assessed according to Terwee's criteria. Results were integrated using best-evidence synthesis to look for recommendable instruments. After screening 2,959 records, 74 instruments from 80 existing studies were included. The overall methodological quality of these studies was unsatisfactory, with reasons including but not limited to unknown missing data, inadequate sample sizes, and vague hypotheses. Content validity, cross-cultural validity, and criterion validity were either unreported or negative ratings in most studies. Based on best-evidence synthesis, three instruments were recommended: Hisar's instrument for nursing students, Nurse Practitioners' Roles and Competencies Scale, and Perceived Faculty Competency Inventory. Although instruments measuring medical professionalism are diverse, only a limited number of studies were methodologically sound. Future studies should give priority to systematically improving the performance of existing instruments and to longitudinal studies.

  12. Exploration Medical System Technical Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, K.; Middour, C.; Cerro, J.; Burba, T.; Hanson, A.; Reilly, J.; Mindock, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element systems engineering goals include defining the technical system needed to implement exploration medical capabilities for Mars. This past year, scenarios captured in the medical system concept of operations laid the foundation for systems engineering technical development work. The systems engineering team analyzed scenario content to identify interactions between the medical system, crewmembers, the exploration vehicle, and the ground system. This enabled the definition of functions the medical system must provide and interfaces to crewmembers and other systems. These analyses additionally lead to the development of a conceptual medical system architecture. The work supports the ExMC community-wide understanding of the functional exploration needs to be met by the medical system, the subsequent development of medical system requirements, and the system verification and validation approach utilizing terrestrial analogs and precursor exploration missions.

  13. [CEACLIN, an instrument suited to identify medical students' strategies to learn in pre-clerkship years].

    PubMed

    Bitran, Marcela; Padilla, Oslando; Zúñiga, Denisse; Leiva, Isabel; Calderón, Maribel; Riquelme, Arnoldo

    2015-10-01

    Upon the beginning of pre-clerkship years, medical students must develop strategies to learn from experience and to improve their relational skills to communicate with patients. To develop an instrument to identify the strategies used by medical students to learn in clinical contexts. Using a Delfi technique to reach consensus, a national panel of students and clinical teachers from 15 Chilean medical schools analyzed an 80-item questionnaire built from perceptions of Chilean students and teachers from one medical school. After two Delfi rounds and a pilot application, a 48-item questionnaire was obtained. Its reliability and construct validity were assessed by Cronbach alpha coefficient and factor analysis, respectively, on the base of an application to 336 medical students. The questionnaire developed, named CEACLIN, is highly reliable (α= 0.84). Its inner structure is made of eleven factors: Autonomy, Solving doubts and problems, Searching and organizing information, Proactivity, Reaching to others, Paying attention and emotions, Searching for trust, Evading burden, Coping with burden, Motivation and Postponing the personal life. All together, these factors account for 47.4 % of the variance. CEACLIN is a valid, reliable and easy to use instrument suited to identify students' strategies to learn in pre-clerkship years. Many of its items allude to concepts of theories of experiential learning and motivation. We hope that CEACLIN will be of value to medical students and clinical teachers to improve the learning and teaching of clinical reasoning and communication skills.

  14. CHEOPS: status summary of the instrument development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T.; Broeg, C.; Fortier, A.; Cessa, V.; Malvasio, L.; Piazza, D.; Benz, W.; Thomas, N.; Magrin, D.; Viotto, V.; Bergomi, M.; Ragazzoni, R.; Pagano, I.; Peter, G.; Buder, M.; Plesseria, J. Y.; Steller, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Ehrenreich, D.; Van Damme, C.; Isaak, K.; Ratti, F.; Rando, N.; Ngan, I.

    2016-07-01

    CHEOPS (CHaracterizing ExOPlanets Satellite) is the first ESA Small Mission as part of the ESA Cosmic Vision program 2015-2025. The mission was formally adopted in early February 2014 with a planned launch readiness end of 2017. The mission lead is performed in a partnership between Switzerland, led by the University of Bern, and the European Space Agency with important contributions from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The mission is dedicated to searching for exoplanetary transits by performing ultrahigh precision photometry on bright starts already known to host planets whose mass has been already estimated through ground based observations. The instrument is an optical Ritchey-Chretien telescope of 30 cm clear aperture using a single CCD detector. The optical system is designed to image a de-focused PSF onto the focal plane with very stringent stability and straylight rejection requirements providing a FoV of 0.32 degrees full cone. The system design is adapted to meet the top-level science requirements, which ask for a photometric precision of 20ppm, in 6 hours integration time, on transit measurements of G5 dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes in the range 6≤V≤9 mag. Additionally they ask for a photometric precision of 85 ppm in 3 hours integration time of Neptune-size planets transiting K-type dwarf stars with V-band magnitudes as faint as V=12 mag. Given the demanding schedule and cost constrains, the mission relies mostly on components with flight heritage for the platform as well as for the payload components. Nevertheless, several new developments are integrated into the design as for example the telescope structure and the very low noise, high stability CCD front end electronics. The instrument and mission have gone through critical design review in fall 2015 / spring 2016. This paper describes the current instrument and mission design with a focus on the instrument. It outlines the

  15. The Study on Virtual Medical Instrument based on LabVIEW.

    PubMed

    Chengwei, Li; Limei, Zhang; Xiaoming, Hu

    2005-01-01

    With the increasing performance of computer, the virtual instrument technology has greatly advanced over the years, and then virtual medical instrument technology becomes available. This paper presents the virtual medical instrument, and then as an example, an application of a signal acquisition, processing and analysis system using LabVIEW is also given.

  16. International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-09-01

    The International Conference on Bio-Medical Instrumentation and related Engineering and Physical Sciences (BIOMEP 2015) took place in the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Athens, Greece on June 18-20, 2015 and was organized by the Department of Biomedical Engineering. The scope of the conference was to provide a forum on the latest developments in Biomedical Instrumentation and related principles of Physical and Engineering sciences. Scientists and engineers from academic, industrial and health disciplines were invited to participate in the Conference and to contribute both in the promotion and dissemination of the scientific knowledge.

  17. Assessing medical professionalism: A systematic review of instruments and their measurement properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghe; Liu, Yang; Wen, Deliang

    2017-01-01

    Background Over the last three decades, various instruments were developed and employed to assess medical professionalism, but their measurement properties have yet to be fully evaluated. This study aimed to systematically evaluate these instruments’ measurement properties and the methodological quality of their related studies within a universally acceptable standardized framework and then provide corresponding recommendations. Methods A systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Web of Science, and PsycINFO was conducted to collect studies published from 1990–2015. After screening titles, abstracts, and full texts for eligibility, the articles included in this study were classified according to their respective instrument’s usage. A two-phase assessment was conducted: 1) methodological quality was assessed by following the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist; and 2) the quality of measurement properties was assessed according to Terwee’s criteria. Results were integrated using best-evidence synthesis to look for recommendable instruments. Results After screening 2,959 records, 74 instruments from 80 existing studies were included. The overall methodological quality of these studies was unsatisfactory, with reasons including but not limited to unknown missing data, inadequate sample sizes, and vague hypotheses. Content validity, cross-cultural validity, and criterion validity were either unreported or negative ratings in most studies. Based on best-evidence synthesis, three instruments were recommended: Hisar’s instrument for nursing students, Nurse Practitioners’ Roles and Competencies Scale, and Perceived Faculty Competency Inventory. Conclusion Although instruments measuring medical professionalism are diverse, only a limited number of studies were methodologically sound. Future studies should give priority to systematically improving the performance of existing

  18. Focus on: SUNY Health Center at Brooklyn Scientific & Medical Instrumentation Center.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zvi, S

    1988-01-01

    The Scientific and Medical Instrumentation Center (SMIC) is the clinical engineering program serving the State University of New York's Health Science Center at Brooklyn. SMIC is a separate department within the center's 354-bed University Hospital, and provides many instrumentation support services for the hospital and the center's Basic Sciences Division. Now in its 24th year, SMIC developed the nation's first mandatory initial checkout program for patient care equipment, and in 1973 published the results of a funded pilot preventive maintenance program; this served as a model for the start-up of other PM programs in hospitals across the country and overseas. Today, this 35-person department is primarily responsible for some 7,000 units used in over 60 University Hospital departments and clinics. With its interdisciplinary expertise, SMIC also provides the hospital with many other instrumentation services, including prepurchase evaluation and review, and on-site emergency instrumentation service. SMIC also develops unique devices and instruments for the center's researchers, from the prototype stage through to final construction, and may modify instruments for increased safety and efficacy.

  19. Development of instrumentation for magnetic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hariharan, S.

    1991-09-23

    The use of failure-prone components in critical applications has been traditionally governed by removing such components from service prior to the expiration of their predicted life expectancy. Such early retirement of materials does not guarantee that a particular sample will not fail in actual usage. The increasing cost of such life expectancy based operation and increased demand for improved reliability in industrial settings has necessitated an alternate form of quality control. Modern applications employ nondestructive evaluation (NDE), also known as nondestructive testing (NDT), as a means of monitoring the levels and growth of defects in a material throughout its operational life. This thesis describes the modifications made to existing instrumentation used for magnetic measurements at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation at Iowa State University. Development of a new portable instrument is also given. An overview of the structure and operation of this instrumentation is presented. This thesis discusses the application of the magnetic hysteresis and Barkhausen measurement techniques, described in Sections 1.3.1 and 1.3.2 respectively, to a number of ferromagnetic specimens. Specifically, measurements were made on a number of railroad steel specimens for fatigue characterization, and on specimens of Damascus steel and Terfenol-D for materials evaluation. 60 refs., 51 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Exhaled breath analysis: physical methods, instruments, and medical diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaks, V. L.; Domracheva, E. G.; Sobakinskaya, E. A.; Chernyaeva, M. B.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the analysis of exhaled breath, a rapidly growing field in noninvasive medical diagnostics that lies at the intersection of physics, chemistry, and medicine. Current data are presented on gas markers in human breath and their relation to human diseases. Various physical methods for breath analysis are described. It is shown how measurement precision and data volume requirements have stimulated technological developments and identified the problems that have to be solved to put this method into clinical practice.

  1. ECLSS instrumentation technology development for the Space Exploration Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamant, Bryce L.; Bao, Jinjun; Wieland, Paul; Humphries, William R.

    1991-07-01

    A study of ECLSS instrumentation technologies and an evaluation of SEI ECLSS mission requirements have identified several areas where instrumentation enhancements are required. Attention is given to the ECLSS instrument database fields including development potential, accuracy, cycle time, reliability, resolution, and selectivity. An initial list of instrumentation technologies is recommended for further development to correct each of the deficiencies identified.

  2. High-level disinfection, sterilization, and antisepsis: current issues in reprocessing medical and surgical instruments.

    PubMed

    Seavey, Rose

    2013-05-01

    Technology is rapidly changing many aspects of health care. The intricate design of instruments, the configuration of instrument trays, and evidence-based practice have resulted in the need for complicated and specific reprocessing recommendations from instrument manufacturers. Patient safety depends on instruments that are appropriately cared for and adequately reprocessed. This article covers current issues that sterile processing and operating room professionals must deal with regarding reprocessing of medical and surgical instruments.

  3. Medications Development for Opioid Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Negus, S. Stevens; Banks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe methods for preclinical evaluation of candidate medications to treat opioid abuse and dependence. Our perspective is founded on the propositions that (1) drug self-administration procedures provide the most direct method for assessment of medication effects, (2) procedures that assess choice between opioid and nondrug reinforcers are especially useful, and (3) the states of opioid dependence and withdrawal profoundly influence both opioid reinforcement and the effects of candidate medications. Effects of opioid medications on opioid choice in nondependent and opioid-dependent subjects are reviewed. Various nonopioid medications have also been examined, but none yet have been identified that safely and reliably reduce opioid choice. Future research will focus on (1) strategies for increasing safety and/or effectiveness of opioid medications, and (2) continued development of nonopioids such as inhibitors of endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes or inhibitors of opioid-induced glial activation. PMID:23125072

  4. Development of elasticity sensors for instrumented socks and wearable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh; Alexander, Lee; Sezen, Serdar A.

    2015-12-01

    Accumulation of fluid in the lower legs occurs due to acute decompensated heart failure, venous deficiency, lymphedema, and a number of other medical conditions. An instrumented sock using an elasticity sensor is developed for the purpose of monitoring lower leg fluid status. The design and sensing principles of the sock are introduced. Two generations of prototype elasticity sensors have been constructed to verify the sensing principles. Their performances are analyzed and compared. Both in vivo and in vitro tests using the fabricated sensor prototypes show promising results.

  5. Instruments to Identify Prescription Medication Misuse, Abuse, and Related Events in Clinical Trials: An ACTTION Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon M; Paillard, Florence; McKeown, Andrew; Burke, Laurie B; Edwards, Robert R; Katz, Nathaniel P; Papadopoulos, Elektra J; Rappaport, Bob A; Slagle, Ashley; Strain, Eric C; Wasan, Ajay D; Turk, Dennis C; Dworkin, Robert H

    2015-05-01

    Measurement of inappropriate medication use events (eg, abuse or misuse) in clinical trials is important in characterizing a medication's abuse potential. However, no gold standard assessment of inappropriate use events in clinical trials has been identified. In this systematic review, we examine the measurement properties (ie, content validity, cross-sectional reliability and construct validity, longitudinal construct validity, ability to detect change, and responder definitions) of instruments assessing inappropriate use of opioid and nonopioid prescription medications to identify any that meet U.S. and European regulatory agencies' rigorous standards for outcome measures in clinical trials. Sixteen published instruments were identified, most of which were not designed for the selected concept of interest and context of use. For this reason, many instruments were found to lack adequate content validity (or documentation of content validity) to evaluate current inappropriate medication use events; for example, evaluating inappropriate use across the life span rather than current use, including items that did not directly assess inappropriate use (eg, questions about anger), or failing to capture information pertinent to inappropriate use events (eg, intention and route of administration). In addition, the psychometric data across all instruments were generally limited in scope. A further limitation is the heterogeneous, nonstandardized use of inappropriate medication use terminology. These observations suggest that available instruments are not well suited for assessing current inappropriate medication use within the specific context of clinical trials. Further effort is needed to develop reliable and valid instruments to measure current inappropriate medication use events in clinical trials. This systematic review evaluates the measurement properties of inappropriate medication use (eg, abuse or misuse) instruments to determine whether any meet regulatory

  6. Risk management in technovigilance: construction and validation of a medical-hospital product evaluation instrument.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Cleuza Catsue Takeda; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; de Oliveira, Márcio Mattos Borges

    2010-01-01

    With the continuous incorporation of health technologies, hospital risk management should be implemented to systemize the monitoring of adverse effects, performing actions to control and eliminate their damage. As part of these actions, Technovigilance is active in the procedures of acquisition, use and quality control of health products and equipment. This study aimed to construct and validate an instrument to evaluate medical-hospital products. This is a quantitative, exploratory, longitudinal and methodological development study, based on the Six Sigma quality management model, which has as its principle basis the component stages of the DMAIC Cycle. For data collection and content validation, the Delphi technique was used with professionals from the Brazilian Sentinel Hospital Network. It was concluded that the instrument developed permitted the evaluation of the product, differentiating between the results of the tested brands, in line with the initial study goal of qualifying the evaluations performed.

  7. BRIEF REPORT: Brief Instrument to Assess Geriatrics Knowledge of Surgical and Medical Subspecialty House Officers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Brent C; Fitzgerald, James T

    2006-01-01

    PROBLEM Initiatives are underway to increase geriatrics training in nonprimary care disciplines. However, no validated instrument exists to measure geriatrics knowledge of house officers in surgical specialties and medical subspecialties. METHODS A 23-item multiple-choice test emphasizing inpatient care and common geriatric syndromes was developed through expert panels and pilot testing, and administered to 305 residents and fellows at 4 institutions in surgical disciplines (25% of respondents), emergency medicine (29%), medicine subspecialties (19%), internal medicine (12%), and other disciplines (15%). RESULTS Three items decreased internal reliability. The remaining 20 items covered 17 topic areas. Residents averaged 62% correct on the test. Internal consistency was appropriate (Cronbach's α coefficient = 0.60). Validity was supported by the use of expert panels to develop content, and by overall differences in scores by level of training (P<.0001) and graded improvement in test performance, with 58%, 63%, 62%, and 69% correct responses among HO1, HO2, HO3, and HO4s, respectively. CONCLUSIONS This reliable, valid measure of clinical geriatrics knowledge can be used by a wide variety of surgical and medical graduate medical education programs to guide curriculum reform or evaluate program performance to meet certification requirements. The instrument is now available on the web. PMID:16704394

  8. Development of TPS flight test and operational instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnahan, K. R.; Hartman, G. J.; Neuner, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    Thermal and flow sensor instrumentation was developed for use as an integral part of the space shuttle orbiter reusable thermal protection system. The effort was performed in three tasks: a study to determine the optimum instruments and instrument installations for the space shuttle orbiter RSI and RCC TPS; tests and/or analysis to determine the instrument installations to minimize measurement errors; and analysis using data from the test program for comparison to analytical methods. A detailed review of existing state of the art instrumentation in industry was performed to determine the baseline for the departure of the research effort. From this information, detailed criteria for thermal protection system instrumentation were developed.

  9. Developing an ELT Context-Specific Teacher Efficacy Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbari, Ramin; Tavassoli, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Teacher efficacy is a topic of significance in mainstream education and various instruments have been developed to measure this construct. The available instruments however, are general both in terms of their subject matter and context. To compensate for this generality, the present study aims to develop a new teacher efficacy instrument whose…

  10. Developing an ELT Context-Specific Teacher Efficacy Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akbari, Ramin; Tavassoli, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Teacher efficacy is a topic of significance in mainstream education and various instruments have been developed to measure this construct. The available instruments however, are general both in terms of their subject matter and context. To compensate for this generality, the present study aims to develop a new teacher efficacy instrument whose…

  11. New Developments at NASA's Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John; Herring, Ellen L.; Brown, Tammy L.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL) has developed new methods to provide an instrument study in one week's engineering time. The final product is recorded in oral presentations, models and the analyses which underlie the models.

  12. Developing instrumentation to characterize thermoelectric generator modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Qiming; Peng, Wenbo; Zhu, Lianjun; Gao, Hu; Meng, Qingsen; Jin, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Based on the law of physics, known as "Seebeck effect," a thermoelectric generator (TEG) produces electricity when the temperature differential is applied across the TEG. This article reports a precision method in characterizing TEG modules. A precision instrument is constructed to study thermoelectric conversion in terms of output power and efficiency of TEG modules. The maximum allowable TEG module size is 150 mm, and the preferred size is from 30 mm to 60 mm. During measurements, the highest hot side temperature is 500 °C and the cold side temperature can be adjusted from room temperature to 100 °C. A mechanical structure is developed to control the pressure and parallelism of the clamping force of the TEG on both its hot and cold sides. A heat flux measurement module is installed at its cold side, and the heat flux through TEGs can be measured in position. Finally, the energy conversion efficiency of TEGs is calculated from experimental data of both an output power and a heat flux.

  13. 77 FR 37409 - Request for Domains, Instruments, and Measures for Development of a Standardized Instrument for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Request for Domains, Instruments, and Measures for Development of a Standardized... domains, instruments, and measures is occurring now because of the multi-phased survey development and... consistency, test-retest, etc) and validity (content, construct, criterion-related). Results of...

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSTRUMENT FOR ELICITING AND EVALUATING VOCATIONAL IMAGERY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MATHEWSON, ROBERT H.; ORTON, JOHN W.

    THIS STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO (1) PRODUCE AN INSTRUMENT FOR ELICITING VOCATIONAL IMAGERY FOR USE IN THE EDUCATIONAL-VOCATIONAL ORIENTATION AND COUNSELING OF HIGH SCHOOL YOUTH, AND (2) DEVELOP A SCALE FOR EVALUATING THE MATURITY OF THE VOCATIONAL IMAGERY ELICITED BY THE INSTRUMENT. A PREVIOUSLY DESIGNED INSTRUMENT "WHAT I THINK OF MYSELF"…

  15. New Developments at NASA's Instrument Synthesis & Analysis Laboratory (ISAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John; Brown, Tammy L.; Herring, Ellen L.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the work of NASA's Instrument Synthesis and Analysis Laboratory (ISAL). The work of the ISAL has substantially reduced the time required to develop an instrument concept. The document reviews the design process in detail and planned interaction with the end user of the instrument.

  16. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Elder Care Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Åhsberg, Elizabeth; Fahlström, Gunilla; Rönnbäck, Eva; Granberg, Ann-Kristin; Almborg, Ann-Helene

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To construct a needs assessment instrument for older people using a standardized terminology (International classification of functioning, disability, and health [ICF]) and assess its psychometrical properties. Method: An instrument was developed comprising questions to older people regarding their perceived care needs. The instrument's…

  17. [Analysis of the market for medical instruments based on patent statistics].

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, E G

    2002-01-01

    The paper shows the role and value of patent statistics under the present conditions, analyzes the general economic situation in Russia and the structure of the medical instrument making market by using patent statistics.

  18. Academic Evaluation: Universal Instrument? Tool for Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianco, Mariela; Gras, Natalia; Sutz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Research agendas and academic evaluation are inevitably linked. By means of economic incentives, promotion, research funding, and reputation academic evaluation is a powerful influence on the production of knowledge; moreover, it is often conceived as a universal instrument without consideration of the context in which it is applied. Evaluation…

  19. Major developments in clinical chemical instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Caraway, W T

    1981-07-01

    The introduction of instrumentation into the clinical chemistry laboratory is reviewed for the period extending from about 1890 to 1960. Topics covered, from a historical point of view, include the microscope, analytical balance, and centrifuge, colorimetry and spectrophotometry, flame photometry, gasometric analysis, pH, electrophoresis, chromatography, radioisotopes, and automation.

  20. Academic Evaluation: Universal Instrument? Tool for Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianco, Mariela; Gras, Natalia; Sutz, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Research agendas and academic evaluation are inevitably linked. By means of economic incentives, promotion, research funding, and reputation academic evaluation is a powerful influence on the production of knowledge; moreover, it is often conceived as a universal instrument without consideration of the context in which it is applied. Evaluation…

  1. Measuring family physician identity: the development of a new instrument.

    PubMed

    Carney, Patricia A; Waller, Elaine; Eiff, M Patrice; Saultz, John W; Jones, Samuel; Fogarty, Colleen T; Corboy, Jane E; Green, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to describe the development and psychometric assessment of an instrument designed to assess family medicine identity in residency training sites and compare responses from physician faculty and residents. We conducted 28 focus groups between 2007--2008, 14 with faculty and 14 with residents who were part of the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P4) Project. The first 22 focus groups were exploratory, and the second six were confirmatory where we shared working variable statements scored using a 5-point Likert scale. We then administered the survey to 223 faculty and 147 residents who were part of the P4 Project, followed by a principal component (factor) analysis, retaining items that reflected domains with eigenvalues higher than 1.0. A total of 223 family physician faculty and 147 residents completed the identity survey. The item analysis extraction loadings ranged from 0.36 to 0.70. Based on item grouping patterns, five domains were reflected in the data: Patient/Family Relationships, Patient Advocacy, Career Flexibility, Balancing the Breadth and Depth in Practice, and Comprehensive Nature of Patient Care. Compared to residents, faculty conveyed stronger agreement about being comfortable balancing the breadth and depth of medical knowledge needed in practice and using a variety of approaches to supplement their medical knowledge about patient care compared to residents (90.6% versus 68.7% for breadth and depth, 95.9% versus 88.3 for using a variety of approaches). Compared to faculty, residents agreed more strongly that the ability to choose many options in how to build their practice appeals to them compared to faculty (89.1% versus 82.9%). We successfully developed and tested a survey designed to measure family medicine identity in residencies, with five domains. Survey item responses were different between residents and faculty, which indicates the instrument may be sensitive to important changes over time.

  2. Development of optical components for METIS instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardello, M.; Zuccon, S.; Corso, A. J.; Zuppella, P.; Naletto, G.; Fineschi, S.; Antonucci, E.; Pelizzo, M. G.

    2014-09-01

    The ESA mission Solar Orbiter (SOLO) is dedicated to the study of Solar Atmosphere and Heliosphere. As a part of the payload, the instrument METIS (Multi Element Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy) will provide images of the corona, both in the visible range and at the hydrogen Lyman-α emission line (121.6 nm). The realization of optical coatings, based on Al and MgF2, able to reflect/transmit such spectral component is therefore necessary. Since optical characteristics of materials in the VUV range are not well studied and greatly varying with realization process, we implemented a study of their properties in different deposition conditions. This is aimed to the realization of a custom designed filter, able to transmit the 121.6 nm while reflecting the visible light, and thus separate visible from UV light paths in the METIS instrument.

  3. Development of a Flight Instrument Package

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    where is the current field altitude in feet. This entry runs a word that provides a curve fit that nulls the effect of temperature. Once an <ok...results, see the report titled Inflight Evaluation of an Acoustic Orientation Instrument Final Report, March 1990. During the sensor testing phases of...material loss factor curves ). 4) Draw horizontal lines from these points to intersect the left-hand vertical axis. 5) The dynamic Young’s modulus value

  4. Censored Quantile Instrumental Variable Estimates of the Price Elasticity of Expenditure on Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Amanda

    2016-01-02

    Efforts to control medical care costs depend critically on how individuals respond to prices. I estimate the price elasticity of expenditure on medical care using a censored quantile instrumental variable (CQIV) estimator. CQIV allows estimates to vary across the conditional expenditure distribution, relaxes traditional censored model assumptions, and addresses endogeneity with an instrumental variable. My instrumental variable strategy uses a family member's injury to induce variation in an individual's own price. Across the conditional deciles of the expenditure distribution, I find elasticities that vary from -0.76 to -1.49, which are an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates.

  5. Health insurance and the demand for medical care: Instrumental variable estimates using health insurer claims data.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Abe

    2016-07-01

    This paper takes a different approach to estimating demand for medical care that uses the negotiated prices between insurers and providers as an instrument. The instrument is viewed as a textbook "cost shifting" instrument that impacts plan offerings, but is unobserved by consumers. The paper finds a price elasticity of demand of around -0.20, matching the elasticity found in the RAND Health Insurance Experiment. The paper also studies within-market variation in demand for prescription drugs and other medical care services and obtains comparable price elasticity estimates. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Censored Quantile Instrumental Variable Estimates of the Price Elasticity of Expenditure on Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to control medical care costs depend critically on how individuals respond to prices. I estimate the price elasticity of expenditure on medical care using a censored quantile instrumental variable (CQIV) estimator. CQIV allows estimates to vary across the conditional expenditure distribution, relaxes traditional censored model assumptions, and addresses endogeneity with an instrumental variable. My instrumental variable strategy uses a family member’s injury to induce variation in an individual’s own price. Across the conditional deciles of the expenditure distribution, I find elasticities that vary from −0.76 to −1.49, which are an order of magnitude larger than previous estimates. PMID:26977117

  7. Development of Airblast and Soil Strength Instrumentation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    strength of the surrounding soil. Pre- shock and post-shock strengths are often assumed to describe the observed motions in cratering studies (Cherry...Due to HE Figure 50. Record of Load Cell utut from the Second Shocked Medium Experiment (=2 92.4 7AA0 2 STEMS SCIENCE AID SOFTWARE LA JOLLA CA F/6 14/2...Piezoelectric Bar Gauge to Shock Tube Studies ," Jnl. of Scientific Instruments 41, 609. 117 DISTRIBUTION LIST DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DEPARTMENT OF THE

  8. The Development of the Graphics-Decoding Proficiency Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Tom; Diezmann, Carmel M.; Kay, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The graphics-decoding proficiency (G-DP) instrument was developed as a screening test for the purpose of measuring students' (aged 8-11 years) capacity to solve graphics-based mathematics tasks. These tasks include number lines, column graphs, maps and pie charts. The instrument was developed within a theoretical framework which highlights the…

  9. The Development of the Graphics-Decoding Proficiency Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Tom; Diezmann, Carmel M.; Kay, Russell

    2011-01-01

    The graphics-decoding proficiency (G-DP) instrument was developed as a screening test for the purpose of measuring students' (aged 8-11 years) capacity to solve graphics-based mathematics tasks. These tasks include number lines, column graphs, maps and pie charts. The instrument was developed within a theoretical framework which highlights the…

  10. National Health Education Standards: Developing an "Exit Competencies" Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garman, J. F.; Hayduk, D. M.; Posey, N. L.; Teske, C. J.; Crider, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an evaluation instrument that assessed health literacy competencies, specific to the national health education standards, that would provide less variability in response interpretation and greater speed of scoring than available in existing instruments. Methodology: Content was developed by professional practitioners with…

  11. Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clinical risk management (CRM) plays a crucial role in enabling hospitals to identify, contain, and manage risks related to patient safety. So far, no instruments are available to measure and monitor the level of implementation of CRM. Therefore, our objective was to develop an instrument for assessing CRM in hospitals. Methods The instrument was developed based on a literature review, which identified key elements of CRM. These elements were then discussed with a panel of patient safety experts. A theoretical model was used to describe the level to which CRM elements have been implemented within the organization. Interviews with CRM practitioners and a pilot evaluation were conducted to revise the instrument. The first nationwide application of the instrument (138 participating Swiss hospitals) was complemented by in-depth interviews with 25 CRM practitioners in selected hospitals, for validation purposes. Results The monitoring instrument consists of 28 main questions organized in three sections: 1) Implementation and organizational integration of CRM, 2) Strategic objectives and operational implementation of CRM at hospital level, and 3) Overview of CRM in different services. The instrument is available in four languages (English, German, French, and Italian). It allows hospitals to gather comprehensive and systematic data on their CRM practice and to identify areas for further improvement. Conclusions We have developed an instrument for assessing development stages of CRM in hospitals that should be feasible for a continuous monitoring of developments in this important area of patient safety. PMID:21144039

  12. Assessing hospitals' clinical risk management: Development of a monitoring instrument.

    PubMed

    Briner, Matthias; Kessler, Oliver; Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Wehner, Theo; Manser, Tanja

    2010-12-13

    Clinical risk management (CRM) plays a crucial role in enabling hospitals to identify, contain, and manage risks related to patient safety. So far, no instruments are available to measure and monitor the level of implementation of CRM. Therefore, our objective was to develop an instrument for assessing CRM in hospitals. The instrument was developed based on a literature review, which identified key elements of CRM. These elements were then discussed with a panel of patient safety experts. A theoretical model was used to describe the level to which CRM elements have been implemented within the organization. Interviews with CRM practitioners and a pilot evaluation were conducted to revise the instrument. The first nationwide application of the instrument (138 participating Swiss hospitals) was complemented by in-depth interviews with 25 CRM practitioners in selected hospitals, for validation purposes. The monitoring instrument consists of 28 main questions organized in three sections: 1) Implementation and organizational integration of CRM, 2) Strategic objectives and operational implementation of CRM at hospital level, and 3) Overview of CRM in different services. The instrument is available in four languages (English, German, French, and Italian). It allows hospitals to gather comprehensive and systematic data on their CRM practice and to identify areas for further improvement. We have developed an instrument for assessing development stages of CRM in hospitals that should be feasible for a continuous monitoring of developments in this important area of patient safety.

  13. Development of the public health nursing competency instrument.

    PubMed

    Cross, Sharon; Block, Derryl; Josten, Lavohn; Reckinger, Dawn; Olson Keller, Linda; Strohschein, Sue; Rippke, Mary; Savik, Kay

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the development and initial testing of an instrument to measure population-based public health nursing competencies. Although multiple lists of public health competencies exist, literature review did not elicit a valid instrument that could measure changes in public health nursing competency over time. The public health nursing competency instrument, consisting of 195 measurable activities organized in the framework of the nursing process, was developed. Competency scores of practicing public health nurses significantly increased after a continuing education series, and the instrument was confirmed by experts to be a valid reflection of public health nursing practice. The time required for instrument development exceeded expectations because of the multiple stages of delineating competencies and validating data with national experts.

  14. The Process of Developing a Multi-Cell KEMS Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, E. H.; Auping, J. V.; Jacobson, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-cell KEMS offers many advantages over single cell instruments in regard to in-situ temperature calibration and studies on high temperature alloys and oxides of interest to NASA. The instrument at NASA Glenn is a 90 deg magnetic sector instrument originally designed for single cell operation. The conversion of this instrument to a multi-cell instrument with restricted collimation is discussed. For restricted collimation, the 'field aperture' is in the copper plate separating the Knudsen Cell region and the ionizer and the 'source aperture' is adjacent to the ionizer box. A computer controlled x-y table allows positioning of one of the three cells into the sampling region. Heating is accomplished via a Ta sheet element and temperature is measured via an automatic pyrometer from the bottom of the cells. The computer control and data system have been custom developed for this instrument and are discussed. Future improvements are also discussed.

  15. [General-purpose microcomputer for medical laboratory instruments].

    PubMed

    Vil'ner, G A; Dudareva, I E; Kurochkin, V E; Opalev, A A; Polek, A M

    1984-01-01

    Presented in the paper is the microcomputer based on the KP580 microprocessor set. Debugging of the hardware and the software by using the unique debugging stand developed on the basis of microcomputer "Electronica-60" is discussed.

  16. Student Evaluation of Teaching: An Instrument and a Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alok, Kumar

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the process of faculty-led development of a student evaluation of teaching instrument at Centurion School of Rural Enterprise Management, a management institute in India. The instrument was to focus on teacher behaviors that students get an opportunity to observe. Teachers and students jointly contributed a number of…

  17. Development of a Teacher Candidate Performance Self-Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Gary M.; Kinman, David

    2002-01-01

    Developed an instrument to assess preservice and beginning teachers' self-perceived knowledge and abilities corresponding to INTASC principles. It initially addressed competencies in light of opportunities to learn, practice, and demonstrate. Initial instruments were cumbersome and unproductive. A simplified version requested respondents'…

  18. Preliminary report of a Web-based instrument to assess and teach knowledge and clinical thinking to medical student

    PubMed Central

    Tokunaga, Hironobu; Ando, Hirotaka; Obika, Mikako; Miyoshi, Tomoko; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Bautista, Miho; Kataoka, Hitomi; Terasawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We report the preliminary development of a unique Web-based instrument for assessing and teaching knowledge and developing clinical thinking called the “Sequential Questions and Answers” (SQA) test. Included in this feasibility report are physicians’ answers to the Sequential Questions and Answers pre- and posttests and their brief questionnaire replies. Methods The authors refined the SQA test case scenario for content, ease of modifications of case scenarios, test uploading and answer retrieval. Eleven geographically distant physicians evaluated the SQA test, taking the pretest and posttest within two weeks. These physicians completed a brief questionnaire about the SQA test. Results Eleven physicians completed the SQA pre- and posttest; all answers were downloaded for analysis. They reported the ease of website login and navigating within the test module together with many helpful suggestions. Their average posttest score gain was 53% (p=0.012). Conclusions We report the successful launch of a unique Web-based instrument referred to as the Sequential Questions and Answers test. This distinctive test combines teaching organization of the clinical narrative into an assessment tool that promotes acquiring medical knowledge and clinical thinking. We successfully demonstrated the feasibility of geographically distant physicians to access the SQA instrument. The physicians’ helpful suggestions will be added to future SQA test versions. Medical schools might explore the integration of this multi-language-capable SQA assessment and teaching instrument into their undergraduate medical curriculum. PMID:25341203

  19. Adaptation and validation of the instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision for medical students in primary health care.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Eva; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Kaila, Päivi; Hult, Håkan; Nilsson, Gunnar H; Salminen, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Clinical learning takes place in complex socio-cultural environments that are workplaces for the staff and learning places for the students. In the clinical context, the students learn by active participation and in interaction with the rest of the community at the workplace. Clinical learning occurs outside the university, therefore is it important for both the university and the student that the student is given opportunities to evaluate the clinical placements with an instrument that allows evaluation from many perspectives. The instrument Clinical Learning Environment and Supervision (CLES) was originally developed for evaluation of nursing students' clinical learning environment. The aim of this study was to adapt and validate the CLES instrument to measure medical students' perceptions of their learning environment in primary health care. In the adaptation process the face validity was tested by an expert panel of primary care physicians, who were also active clinical supervisors. The adapted CLES instrument with 25 items and six background questions was sent electronically to 1,256 medical students from one university. Answers from 394 students were eligible for inclusion. Exploratory factor analysis based on principal component methods followed by oblique rotation was used to confirm the adequate number of factors in the data. Construct validity was assessed by factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to confirm the dimensions of CLES instrument. The construct validity showed a clearly indicated four-factor model. The cumulative variance explanation was 0.65, and the overall Cronbach's alpha was 0.95. All items loaded similarly with the dimensions in the non-adapted CLES except for one item that loaded to another dimension. The CLES instrument in its adapted form had high construct validity and high reliability and internal consistency. CLES, in its adapted form, appears to be a valid instrument to evaluate medical students' perceptions of

  20. [Use of corrosion inhibitors during the sterilization and disinfection of medical instruments].

    PubMed

    Talalina, A S; Kochanova, L G; Anan'eva, A I; Romanova, A A

    1984-01-01

    The search of corrosion inhibitors reducing the corrosive action of the sterilizing and disinfecting media has been performed in order to protect instruments made of metals against corrosion during these processes. The program of the investigations includes potentiodynamic and potentiostatic measurements and full-scale tests. The infection of the sodium benzoate or potassium gluconate into the disinfecting chloramine solution and sterilizing hydrogene peroxide solution has been shown to improve the resistance to the corrosion for medical instruments made of carbon steel.

  1. Developing a Customized Teaching Assessment Software Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanbrough, Mark; Stinson, Bill

    The goal of this project was to develop customized teaching analysis software that would accurately measure recorded teaching behaviors and communicate useful results quickly to the observed teacher with the goal of improving teacher performance. A computer software program, "The Evaluator," was developed that uses a Windows interface programmed…

  2. Polaris Instrument Development and PARI Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    At the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) in Rosman, NC I spent 8 weeks as the NC Space Grant/J. Donald Cline Astronomy Scholar. I developed multiple projects and assisted as a mentor to PARI Space Science Lab and Duke TIP high school gifted student program which both took place during my stay. My main focus was the development of the Polaris imaging telescope. This telescope is used to take images of the pulsating variable star Polaris. These readings are used to make seeing estimates for the air column above PARI. The system stores and archives images and analyzes them for magnitude change and movement of the stellar image. In addition to the Polaris project I developed a solar panel voltage and charge monitoring system which involved me working with charge controllers and photovoltaic technology. I developed a charging scheme using Flexmax 60 charge controller. Data is recorded and transmitted via optical fiber for analysis and correlation with solar zenith angle.

  3. Diode laser based photoacoustic gas measuring instruments intended for medical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Anna; Mohácsi, Árpád; Novák, Péter; Aladzic, Daniela; Turzó, Kinga; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Erős, Gábor; Boros, Mihály; Nagy, Katalin; Szabó, Gábor

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of breath and gases emanated from skin can be used for early and non-invasive diagnosis of various kinds of diseases. Two portable, compact, photoacoustic spectroscopy based trace gas sensors were developed for the detection of methane emanated from skin and ammonia emanated from oral cavity. The light sources were distributed feedback diode lasers emitting at the absorption lines of ammonia and methane, at 1.53 μm and 1.65 μm, respectively. Photoacoustic method ensures high selectivity, therefore cross-sensitivity was negligible even with large amount of water vapor and carbon dioxide in the gas sample. In case of ammonia a preconcentration unit was used to achieve lower minimum detectable concentration. Gas sample from the oral cavity was drawn through a glass tube to the preconcentration unit that chemically bonded ammonia and released it when heated. The minimum detectable concentration of ammonia was 10 ppb for 15 s gas sampling time (gas sample of 250 cm3). For methane minimum detectable concentration of 0.25 ppm was found with 12 s integration time, and it was proved to be adequate for the detection of methane emanated from human skin and from mice. Instruments measuring methane and ammonia are currently installed at two medical research laboratories at University of Szeged and tested as instruments for non-invasive clinical trials. The aim of the measurements is to determine correlations between diseases or metabolic processes and emanated gases.

  4. Assessing the Learning Environment for Medical Students: An Evaluation of a Novel Survey Instrument in Four Medical Schools.

    PubMed

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T; Nickell, Leslie; Reboli, Annette C; Coplit, Lisa D; Stuber, Margaret L; Vasiliou, Vasilia; Civian, Janet T; Brennan, Robert T

    2017-06-01

    A practical, reliable, and valid instrument is needed to measure the impact of the learning environment on medical students' well-being and educational experience and to meet medical school accreditation requirements. From 2012 to 2015, medical students were surveyed at the end of their first, second, and third year of studies at four medical schools. The survey assessed students' perceptions of the following nine dimensions of the school culture: vitality, self-efficacy, institutional support, relationships/inclusion, values alignment, ethical/moral distress, work-life integration, gender equity, and ethnic minority equity. The internal reliability of each of the nine dimensions was measured. Construct validity was evaluated by assessing relationships predicted by our conceptual model and prior research. Assessment was made of whether the measurements were sensitive to differences over time and across institutions. Six hundred and eighty-six students completed the survey (49 % women; 9 % underrepresented minorities), with a response rate of 89 % (range over the student cohorts 72-100 %). Internal consistency of each dimension was high (Cronbach's α 0.71-0.86). The instrument was able to detect significant differences in the learning environment across institutions and over time. Construct validity was supported by demonstrating several relationships predicted by our conceptual model. The C-Change Medical Student Survey is a practical, reliable, and valid instrument for assessing the learning environment of medical students. Because it is sensitive to changes over time and differences across institution, results could potentially be used to facilitate and monitor improvements in the learning environment of medical students.

  5. A review of instruments developed to measure food neophobia.

    PubMed

    Damsbo-Svendsen, Marie; Frøst, Michael Bom; Olsen, Annemarie

    2017-06-01

    Food choices are influenced by an individual's attitude towards foods. Food neophobia may be associated with less variety of diets, inadequate nutrient intake and high product failure rate for new food products entering the market. To quantify the extent of these challenges, instruments to measure the food neophobia in different target groups are needed. Several such instruments with significantly different measurement outcomes and procedures have been developed. This review provides an overview and discusses strengths and weaknesses of these instruments. We evaluate strengths and weaknesses of previously developed instruments to measure neophobia and willingness to try unfamiliar foods. Literature was searched through the databases Web of Science and Google Scholar. We identified 255 studies concerning neophobia and willingness to try unfamiliar foods. Of these, 13 studies encompassing 13 instruments to measure neophobia and willingness to try unfamiliar foods were included in the review. Results are summarized and evaluated with a narrative approach. In the 13 instruments to assess neophobia and willingness to try unfamiliar foods, 113 to 16.644 subjects aged 2-65 years were involved, scales with 3-7 response categories were used and behavioral validation tests were included in 6 studies. Several instruments to measure neophobia and willingness to try unfamiliar foods exist. We recommend selecting one or more among the 13 instruments reviewed in this paper to assess relevant aspects of neophobia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The Development of Computer-Based Piagetian Assessment Instruments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barman, Charles R.

    1986-01-01

    Described are the development and validation of two computer-based Piagetian assessment instruments, designed to assist teachers in identifying cognitive reasoning patterns. Implications for teachers are presented. (Author/MT)

  7. Project DIVIDE Instrument Development. Technical Report # 0810

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne; Jung, Eunju; Geller, Josh; Yovanoff, Paul

    2008-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe the development of cognitive diagnostic test items that form the basis of the diagnostic system for Project DIVIDE (Dynamic Instruction Via Individually Designed Environments). The construct underlying the diagnostic test is division of fractions. We include a description of the process we used to identify the…

  8. The Development of Commercial ESCA Instrumentation: A Personal Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Michael A.

    2004-12-01

    This article is a personal account of one person involved in ESCA development over these three decades at Hewlett-Packard, later at Surface Science Instruments, and finally as a research worker using ESCA at Stanford University. I discuss some of my experiences designing and marketing instruments in this emerging field, my thoughts about the key innovations responsible for the success ESCA has enjoyed, and some thoughts about its future development.

  9. MICROHOLE TECHNOLOGY PROGRESS ON BOREHOLE INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    J. ALBRIGHT

    2000-09-01

    Microhole technology development is based on the premise that with advances in electronics and sensors, large conventional-diameter wells are no longer necessary for obtaining subsurface information. Furthermore, microholes offer an environment for improved substance measurement. The combination of deep microholes having diameters of 1-3/8 in. at their terminal depth and 7/8-in. diameter logging tools will comprise a very low cost alternative to currently available technology for deep subsurface characterization and monitoring.

  10. Sensor and Instrumentation Development for Cryogenic Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Nicholas; Febbraro, Micheal; Pain, Steven; Aidala, Christine; Lesser, Ezra; White, Aaron

    2015-10-01

    In the study of nuclear science, there is an ever increasing need for better efficiency and resolution in In nuclear sciences, new detectors with improved detection efficiency and energy resolution are constantly needed to drive experimental discovery and accuracy. Certain cryogenic liquids, particularly liquid noble gases such as Argon and Xenon, are very sensitive to energy deposited by ionizing particles and have many other useful properties for detector development. Developing these cryogenic liquids to operate with known detection methods offers exciting opportunities for experimental setups and has a wide variety of uses with regards to nuclear studies, such as gamma ray, neutron, and neutrino detection. However, operating at such low temperatures presents many complications when trying to effectively control and maintain detectors. In this poster, I will present some of the equipment and systems developed for particular low temperature applications. This will include the use of platinum resistance thermometers, capacitance-based liquid level sensors, and various systems used to regulate fluid flow for cryogenic detector systems.

  11. Advanced CO2 removal process control and monitor instrumentation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Dalhausen, M. J.; Klimes, R.

    1982-01-01

    A progam to evaluate, design and demonstrate major advances in control and monitor instrumentation was undertaken. A carbon dioxide removal process, one whose maturity level makes it a prime candidate for early flight demonstration was investigated. The instrumentation design incorporates features which are compatible with anticipated flight requirements. Current electronics technology and projected advances are included. In addition, the program established commonality of components for all advanced life support subsystems. It was concluded from the studies and design activities conducted under this program that the next generation of instrumentation will be greatly smaller than the prior one. Not only physical size but weight, power and heat rejection requirements were reduced in the range of 80 to 85% from the former level of research and development instrumentation. Using a microprocessor based computer, a standard computer bus structure and nonvolatile memory, improved fabrication techniques and aerospace packaging this instrumentation will greatly enhance overall reliability and total system availability.

  12. The development of an instrument to assess chemistry perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Raymond R.

    The instrument, developed in this study, attempted to correct the deficiencies of previous instruments. Statements of belief and opinion can be validly included under the construct of chemistry perceptions. Further, statements that might be better characterized as science attitudes, math attitudes, or attitudes toward a specific course or program were not included. Eliminating statements of math anxiety and test anxiety insured that responses to statements of anxiety were perceptions of anxiety solely related to chemistry. The results of the expert judges' responses to the Validation of Proposed Perception Statements forms were detailed to establish construct and content validity. The nature of Likert scale construction and calculation of internal consistency also supported the validity of the instrument. A pilot Chemistry Perception Questionnaire (CPQ) was then constructed based on agreement of the appropriate subscale and mean importance of the perception statements. The pilot CPQ results were subjected to an item analysis based on three sets of statistics: the frequency of each response and the percentage of respondents making each response for each perception statement, the mean and standard deviations for each item, and the item discrimination index which correlated the item scores with the subscale scores. With no zero or negative correlations to the subscale scores, it was not necessary to replace any of the perception statements contained in the pilot instrument. Therefore, the piloted Chemistry Perception Questionnaire became the final instrument. Factor analysis confirmed the multidimensionality of the instrument. The instrument was administered twice with a separation interval of approximately one month in order to perform a test-retest reliability analysis. One hundred and forty-one pairs were matched and results detailed. The correlation between forms, for the total instrument, was 0.9342. The mean coefficient alpha, for the total instrument, was 0

  13. Instrumentation and Technology Development at the Anglo-Australian Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, S. C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.

    2005-12-01

    The Anglo-Australian Observatory (jointly funded by the UK and Australian governments) has an ongoing technology development and instrumentation program that has yielded forefront astronomical instruments used around the world (e.g. OzPoz on the VLT, 2dF on the AAT). An overview of the current instrumentation projects underway will be presented. This will cover the recently commissioned AAOmega spectrograph (a bench mounted, dual beam spectrograph fed by the fibers from the 2dF positioner), Echidna (a new technology fiber positioner for the FMOS instrument on Subaru), and WFMOS (a very wide-field MOS system for Subaru that was recently explored in a Feasibility Study for Gemini). The Instrument Science group at the AAO is actively involved in exploring and exploiting new technologies applicable to astronomical instrumentation. Studies including development of autonomous pickup relays for multi-object instruments (Starbugs), development of OH suppression in fiber optics, and continued evaluation of other ermging fiber optic technologies are presently underway. An overview of those activities will be given.

  14. Development of POINTS as a planetology instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasenberg, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    During the reporting period, we carried out investigations required to enhance our design of POINTS as a tool for the search for and characterization of extra-solar planetary systems. The results of that work were included in a paper on POINTS as well as one on Newcomb, which will soon appear in the proceedings of SPIE Conference 2200. (Newcomb is a spinoff of POINTS. It is a small astrometric interferometer now being developed jointly by SAO and the U.S. Navy. It could help establish some of the technology needed for POINTS.) These papers are appended.

  15. Satellite Instrument Development and Data Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-30

    topic a1 CMEs has been reviewed a number the P78-i satellite and is described by Sheeley of times over the past quadrennium. Dryer (1982) CL al.(1980...flare X-ray flux profiles, to drive the ejections ( Dryer , L982). The models are well developed in the sense that numerous images. Solwind CuEs are...numerical pressure pulse siders the ejection of material from the corona model presented in Dryer et ai.(1979) by claiming to be the normal situation and the

  16. Developing a central sterile surgical instrument technician program.

    PubMed

    Garner, Marie; Collins, Angela; Dunphy, Sallie; Bullock, Patricia; Wright, Deborah

    2004-08-01

    Many hospitals report high vacancy rates in their central sterile processing departments related to the lack of a workforce that is knowledgeable about instrument processing and medical terminology. Creating an education course that focused on the knowledge and skills necessary for success in this vocation provided a solution to this problem for one facility. Outcomes included a dramatic decrease in the number of vacancies in the central sterile processing department and an increase in community awareness of employment options available in perioperative services.

  17. [Design and implementation of an intellectualized measuring instrument for medical electricity security parameters].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong-rui; Xu, Yan; Geng, Yan

    2006-09-01

    An introduction of an intelligent testing instrument for medical electrical equipment security is given in this article. The realization of its testing functions is based on a single-chip processor, the high-voltage control circuit and the relay combination network technology. It can be used to test security parameters such as the continuous leakage current, patient auxiliary current, dielectric strength and protective earth impedance. It is suitable for the medical electricity security testing of Kind I, II and Type B, BF, CF (internal power supply) medical electrical equipments.

  18. Paranal Instrumentation Programme: 2013-2020 Development Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquini, L.; Casali, M.; Russell, A.

    2013-12-01

    The development plan for instrumentation at the Paranal Observatory was presented to the ESO Scientific Technical Committee (STC) in April 2013. Its overall goal is to keep Paranal at the forefront of ground-based astronomy. In addition to the completion of the current second generation instruments, the installation of the Adaptive Optics Facility with the imager and spectrometer ERIS, and execution of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLT/I) mid-term implementation plan, it will allow one new instrument, or instrument upgrade, to be initiated per year (provided current projects are completed). The plan is divided into two phases. Over 2013-2017, instruments are selected and developed with the criteria of filling the VLT capabilities and maintaining the balance between dedicated and general purpose facilities. Beyond 2018, the instruments will be deployed in the era of maturity of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). The strategy for the second phase derives from analysis of VLT science in the E-ELT era, to be fully shaped in the coming five years. One new instrument is also proposed for the New Technology Telescope at La Silla, fully funded by the community.

  19. Nurse codependency: instrument development and validation.

    PubMed

    Allison, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This study developed and evaluated the Nurse Codependency Questionnaire (NCQ) and generated initial estimates of the stability and internal consistency of responses for the questionnaire. An initial pool of 95 items, reflective of four domains of codependency, was generated from the codependency literature using a domain-referenced approach. Seven expert judges from the nursing and codependency fields calculated the content validity index (CVI) as > .80. Items were critiqued for relevance, clarity, and predicted direction of each item's correlation with the total codependency score. A convenience sample of 547 male and female nurses from Texas was recruited from a variety of professional settings to test the NCQ. Evidence of reliability and validity was sought through the use of principal factor analysis (PFA) techniques and correlation analysis. The specific domains of "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" represented two of the four hypothesized domains that were supported by factor analysis. Data screening and item analysis resulted in a final sample of 24 items. Test-retest reliability was .90 and internal consistency reliability was .80 for the entire scale. Reliability estimates for the "codependent caretaking" and "lack of voice" scales were .65 and .59, respectively for test-retest; and .81 and .64, respectively for internal consistency. Known groups validity was supported by each of the factors' ability to discriminate between binge and nonbinge eaters. The NCQ may be useful for identifying codependency within the nursing profession. Research is needed to determine the external factors that influence the overt expression of nurse codependency. Screening for nurse codependency may contribute to the health of the profession by providing a means for anticipatory guidance and early intervention.

  20. Development and Evaluation of a Rosacea Screening Instrument (Rosascreen)

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jerry; Leyden, James; Cribier, Bernard; Audibert, Fabien; Kerrouche, Nabil; Berg, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are no current instruments to facilitate population screening for rosacea. Objective: To develop and evaluate a screening instrument for rosacea applicable for population surveys. Methods: A rosacea-specific screening instrument (Rosascreen), consisting of a subject-completed questionnaire and screening algorithm, was developed based on current diagnostic criteria for rosacea. Three iterations were pilot tested and refined for clarity and sensitivity in adult outpatients with and without rosacea. Results: Three subject groups were consecutively evaluated with iterations of the questionnaire at each centre (overall N = 121). The final version had a sensitivity of 93% to 100% for key diagnostic criteria, and use of the algorithm had a sensitivity of 100% for detection of rosacea and specificity of 63% to 71%. Most subjects found the questionnaire easy to understand and complete. Conclusion: Rosascreen, a subject-completed questionnaire and diagnostic algorithm, is a highly sensitive screening instrument that may facilitate estimation of rosacea prevalence in general populations. PMID:26834119

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Rosacea Screening Instrument (Rosascreen).

    PubMed

    Tan, Jerry; Leyden, James; Cribier, Bernard; Audibert, Fabien; Kerrouche, Nabil; Berg, Mats

    2016-07-01

    There are no current instruments to facilitate population screening for rosacea. To develop and evaluate a screening instrument for rosacea applicable for population surveys. A rosacea-specific screening instrument (Rosascreen), consisting of a subject-completed questionnaire and screening algorithm, was developed based on current diagnostic criteria for rosacea. Three iterations were pilot tested and refined for clarity and sensitivity in adult outpatients with and without rosacea. Three subject groups were consecutively evaluated with iterations of the questionnaire at each centre (overall N = 121). The final version had a sensitivity of 93% to 100% for key diagnostic criteria, and use of the algorithm had a sensitivity of 100% for detection of rosacea and specificity of 63% to 71%. Most subjects found the questionnaire easy to understand and complete. Rosascreen, a subject-completed questionnaire and diagnostic algorithm, is a highly sensitive screening instrument that may facilitate estimation of rosacea prevalence in general populations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is providing and coordinating the technology for placing a compact Laser Light Scattering (LLS) instrument in a microgravity environment. This will be accomplished by defining and assessing user requirements for microgravity experiments, coordinating needed technological developments, and filling technical gaps. This effort is striving to brassboard and evaluate a miniature multi-angle LLS instrument. The progress of the program is reported.

  3. Instrumentation research and development in DOE health physics programs

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.; Swinth, K.L.

    1987-06-01

    Planning and control of exposure to ionizing radiation require the use of accurate, reliable instrumentation to establish dose rates, indicate high exposure rate areas, and control the spread of contamination. The Radiological Controls Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operates several programs under the technical direction of DOE's lead laboratory in health physics, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These programs involve the evaluation and development of instruments to measure dose rates.

  4. Medical sociology as a heuristic instrument for medical tourism and cross-border healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, we establish a relationship between medical sociology and the study of medical tourism and cross-border healthcare by introducing Ronald Andersen’s behavioral model of healthcare use, and linking this model to the recent empirical study of Kovacs et al. on patients travelling to Hungary for orthopedic treatment. Finally, we plead for more measurement in the field of patient mobility. PMID:25844386

  5. [Clinical Application of Analytical and Medical Instruments Mainly Using MS Techniques].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Analytical instruments for clinical use are commonly required to confirm the compounds and forms related to diseases with the highest possible sensitivity, quantitative performance, and specificity and minimal invasiveness within a short time, easily, and at a low cost. Advancements of technical innovation for Mass Spectrometer (MS) have led to techniques that meet such requirements. Besides confirming known substances, other purposes and advantages of MS that are not fully known to the public are using MS as a tool to discover unknown phenomena and compounds. An example is clarifying the mechanisms of human diseases. The human body has approximately 100 thousand types of protein, and there may be more than several million types of protein and their metabolites. Most of them have yet to be discovered, and their discovery may give birth to new academic fields and lead to the clarification of diseases, development of new medicines, etc. For example, using the MS system developed under "Contribution to drug discovery and diagnosis by next generation of advanced mass spectrometry system," one of the 30 projects of the "Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology" (FIRST program), and other individual basic technologies, we succeeded in discovering new disease biomarker candidates for Alzheimer's disease, cancer, etc. Further contribution of MS to clinical medicine can be expected through the development and improvement of new techniques, efforts to verify discoveries, and communications with the medical front.

  6. NASA Planetary Science Division's Instrument Development Programs, PICASSO and MatISSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2016-01-01

    The Planetary Science Division (PSD) has combined several legacy instrument development programs into just two. The Planetary Instrument Concepts Advancing Solar System Observations (PICASSO) program funds the development of low TRL instruments and components. The Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Observations (MatISSE) program funds the development of instruments in the mid-TRL range. The strategy of PSD instrument development is to develop instruments from PICASSO to MatISSE to proposing for mission development.

  7. Assessing Specific Sexual Behavior: Instrument Development and Validation Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Monica C.; Chaney, J. Don; Chen, W. William; Dodd, Virginia J.; Huang, I-Chan; Sanders, Sadie

    2015-01-01

    Through the use of multi-modal methods, the purpose of this study was to develop and assess measurement properties of an instrument evaluating specific sexual behaviors of college students and the role alcohol intoxication plays in one’s intention to participate in these behaviors. A modified version of N. Krause’s instrument development process was applied to create a behavior-specific instrument assessing oral, vaginal, and anal sex behaviors. The process included a review by expert scholars in relevant fields, cognitive interviews with the target population using screen-capture program Camtasia, piloting to assess measurement scales, and a formal investigation. The applied instrument development process employed screen capture software and web-based surveying in a cost-effective format suitable for mixed-method measurement development. The development and application of the instrument provides a clearer understanding of the relationship between alcohol use and sexual activity and aids in the development of effective public health interventions and policies. PMID:27066593

  8. Instrumentation development at the W.M. Keck Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Ian S.; Adkins, Sean M.

    2006-06-01

    The W.M. Keck Observatory is now in its 12th year of science operations, and the development of new instruments, and upgrades to existing ones, continues to be an important part of our science driven strategic plan, which emphasizes state of the art instrumentation, continued advances in high angular resolution astronomy and faint-object spectroscopy. Our program is starting to deliver the third generation of instruments. The first of these, OSIRIS, was delivered in February 2005 and is now in shared risk operation. OSIRIS is the second instrument at the Observatory to be routinely used with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS AO) on the Keck II telescope. LGS AO is now a regularly offered observing mode with a steadily increasing number of nights being made available to our community. AO developments underway at the Observatory include new wavefront controllers for the Keck I and Keck II AO systems, and the development of a solid state laser for the Keck I telescope (in collaboration with the Gemini Observatory). The development of Keck-Keck interferometry continues, with the V2 capability offered for routine observing and the Nuller in the commissioning process. Other developments include our next third generation instrument, a near-IR multi-object spectrograph (MOSFIRE), and a detector upgrade for the red channel of the LRIS instrument. Our atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC) for the Cassegrain focus of the Keck I telescope is nearing completion, and the detector upgrade for the HIRES spectrograph has been in routine operation for over a year. We are also developing a new acquisition, guiding and image quality monitoring system to replace all of the visible wavelength instrument guiders and acquisition cameras at the Observatory.

  9. Appraising the quality of medical education research methods: the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale-Education.

    PubMed

    Cook, David A; Reed, Darcy A

    2015-08-01

    The Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale-Education (NOS-E) were developed to appraise methodological quality in medical education research. The study objective was to evaluate the interrater reliability, normative scores, and between-instrument correlation for these two instruments. In 2014, the authors searched PubMed and Google for articles using the MERSQI or NOS-E. They obtained or extracted data for interrater reliability-using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC)-and normative scores. They calculated between-scale correlation using Spearman rho. Each instrument contains items concerning sampling, controlling for confounders, and integrity of outcomes. Interrater reliability for overall scores ranged from 0.68 to 0.95. Interrater reliability was "substantial" or better (ICC > 0.60) for nearly all domain-specific items on both instruments. Most instances of low interrater reliability were associated with restriction of range, and raw agreement was usually good. Across 26 studies evaluating published research, the median overall MERSQI score was 11.3 (range 8.9-15.1, of possible 18). Across six studies, the median overall NOS-E score was 3.22 (range 2.08-3.82, of possible 6). Overall MERSQI and NOS-E scores correlated reasonably well (rho 0.49-0.72). The MERSQI and NOS-E are useful, reliable, complementary tools for appraising methodological quality of medical education research. Interpretation and use of their scores should focus on item-specific codes rather than overall scores. Normative scores should be used for relative rather than absolute judgments because different research questions require different study designs.

  10. Actual curriculum development practices instrument: Testing for factorial validity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foi, Liew Yon; Bakar, Kamariah Abu; Hamzah, Mohd Sahandri Gani; Alwi, Nor Hayati

    2014-09-01

    The Actual Curriculum Development Practices Instrument (ACDP-I) was developed and the factorial validity of the ACDP-I was tested (n = 107) using exploratory factor analysis procedures in the earlier work of [1]. Despite the ACDP-I appears to be content and construct valid instrument with very high internal reliability qualities for using in Malaysia, the accumulated evidences are still needed to provide a sound scientific basis for the proposed score interpretations. Therefore, the present study addresses this concern by utilising the confirmatory factor analysis to further confirm the theoretical structure of the variable Actual Curriculum Development Practices (ACDP) and enrich the psychometrical properties of ACDP-I. Results of this study have practical implication to both researchers and educators whose concerns focus on teachers' classroom practices and the instrument development and validation process.

  11. Parents' childhood fever management: community survey and instrument development.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Anne; Edwards, Helen; Fraser, Jenny

    2008-08-01

    This paper is a report of a study to explore Australian parents' knowledge, beliefs, practices and information sources about fever management and develop a scale to measure parents' fever management practices. Parental fever phobia and overuse of antipyretics to reduce fever continue. No scales to measure parents' fever management practices are available. A community-based, postal survey was carried out in 2005 with 401 Australian parents of well children aged 6 months-5 years. Respondents were recruited through advertising (48.4%), face-to-face (26.4%) and snowball (24.4%) methods. A 33-item instrument was developed; construct and content validity were determined by an expert panel and item reliability by test-retest. Moderate fever (40.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C) was reported to be harmful (88%), causing febrile convulsions (77.7%). Usual practices targeted temperature reduction, antipyretic administration (87.8%), temperature monitoring (52.5%). Fewer evidence-based practices, such as encouraging fluids (49.0%) and light clothing (43.8%), were reported. Positive changes over time (36.4%) included less concern and delayed or reduced antipyretic use. Negative practice changes (22.7%) included greater concern and increased antipyretic use. Medical advice was sought for illness symptoms (48.7%) and high (37.4%) or persistent (41.5%) fevers. Fever management was learnt from doctors, family and friends and working experience, while receiving conflicting information (41.9%) increased concerns and created uncertainty about best practice. Parents need consistent evidence-based information about childhood fever management. The Parental Fever Management Scale requires further testing with different populations and in different cultures and healthcare systems to evaluate its usefulness in nursing practice and research.

  12. Engine component instrumentation development facility at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Buggele, Alvin E.; Lepicovsky, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The Engine Components Instrumentation Development Facility at NASA Lewis is a unique aeronautics facility dedicated to the development of innovative instrumentation for turbine engine component testing. Containing two separate wind tunnels, the facility is capable of simulating many flow conditions found in most turbine engine components. This facility's broad range of capabilities as well as its versatility provide an excellent location for the development of novel testing techniques. These capabilities thus allow a more efficient use of larger and more complex engine component test facilities.

  13. Medical professionalism development of oliver R. Avison.

    PubMed

    Ryue, Sook-Hee; Yang, Eun Bae

    2009-06-01

    How does professionalism develop while becoming a great doctor? This study based on the life of Avison, a great doctor, aims to identify the developmental features of an excellence and professionally ethical doctor. We chose Oliver R. Avison, who founded the first modern hospital and medical school in Korea, now known as Severance Hospital and Yonsei University College of Medicine. Sixteen pivotal events in Avison's life were extracted, based on 2 standards: self-memory and strong feeling. Further we analyzed Avison' life using a professional development analysis model. Oliver Avison's medical professionalism development was divided into 4 periods: 'Motivating in Medicine period', 'Medical Training period', 'Medical Doctor period', and 'Medical Educating period'. A hallmark of Oliver Avison's medical professionalism development was the growth of motivation and social responsibility, medical knowledge, medical creativity, intra-personal intelligence, and relationship forming abilities. To excel in medicine, a medical student should be encouraged to understand his unique intellectual potentials and interest as a medical worker, and try to understand problems in the established domain and field of medicine, to develop new medical symbol systems, and climates.

  14. Development of the instruments for the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, J. J.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is to be launched in 1988 by the STS. The GRO will feature four very large instruments: the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The instruments weigh from 900-1200 kg each, and required the development of specialized lifting and dolly devices to permit their assembly, manipulation and testing. The GRO is intended a{s a tool for studying discrete celestial objects such as black holes, neutron stars and other gamma-ray emitting objects, scanning for nucleosynthesis processes, mapping the Galaxy and other, high energy galaxies in terms of gamma rays, searching for cosmological effects and observing gamma ray bursts. The instruments will be sensitive from the upper end mof X-rya wavelengths to the highest energies possible. Details of the hardware and performance specifications of each of the instruments are discussed.

  15. Practical considerations in developing an instrument-maintenance plan--

    SciTech Connect

    Guth, M.A.S. )

    1989-06-01

    The author develops a general set of considerations to explain how a consistent, well-organized, prioritized, and adequate time-allowance program plan for routine maintenance can be constructed. The analysis is supplemented with experience from the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at US Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). After the preventive maintenance (PM) problem was defined, the instruments on the schedule were selected based on the manufacturer's design specifications, quality-assurance requirements, prior classifications, experiences with the incidence of breakdowns or calibration, and dependencies among instruments. The effects of repair error in PM should be also studied. The HFIR requires three full-time technicians to perform both PM and unscheduled maintenance. A review is presented of concepts from queuing theory to determine anticipated breakdown patterns. In practice, the pneumatic instruments have a much longer lifetime than the electric/electronic instruments on various reactors at ORNL. Some special considerations and risk aversion in choosing a maintenance schedule.

  16. Development of a Computerized Multifunctional Form and Position Measurement Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, P.; Tian, W. Y.

    2006-10-01

    A model machine of multifunctional form and position measurement instrument controlled by a personal computer has been successfully developed. The instrument is designed in rotary table type with a high precision air bearing and the radial rotation error of the rotary table is 0.08 μm. Since a high precision vertical sliding carriage supported by an air bearing is used for the instrument, the straightaway motion error of the carriage is 0.3 μm/200 mm and the parallelism error of the motion of the carriage relative to the rotation axis of the rotary table is 0.4 μm/200 mm. The mathematical models have been established for assessing planar and spatial straightness, flatness, roundness, cylindricity, and coaxality errors. By radial deviation measurement, the instrument can accurately measure form and position errors of such workpieces as shafts, round plates and sleeves of medium or small dimensions with the tolerance grades mostly used in industry.

  17. Developing the health, safety and environment excellence instrument

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Quality and efficiency are important issues in management systems. To increase quality, to reach best results, to move towards the continuous improvement of system and also to make the internal and external customers satisfied, it is necessary to consider the system performance measurement. In this study the Health, Safety and Environment Excellence Instrument was represented as a performance measurement tool for a wide range of health, safety and environment management systems. In this article the development of the instrument overall structure, its parts, and its test results in three organizations are presented. According to the results, the scores ranking was the managership organization, the manufacturing company and the powerhouse construction project, respectively. The results of the instrument test in three organizations show that, on the whole, the instrument has the ability to measure the performance of health, safety and environment management systems in a wide range of organizations. PMID:23369610

  18. Development of the instruments for the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, J. J.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is to be launched in 1988 by the STS. The GRO will feature four very large instruments: the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The instruments weigh from 900-1200 kg each, and required the development of specialized lifting and dolly devices to permit their assembly, manipulation and testing. The GRO is intended a{s a tool for studying discrete celestial objects such as black holes, neutron stars and other gamma-ray emitting objects, scanning for nucleosynthesis processes, mapping the Galaxy and other, high energy galaxies in terms of gamma rays, searching for cosmological effects and observing gamma ray bursts. The instruments will be sensitive from the upper end mof X-rya wavelengths to the highest energies possible. Details of the hardware and performance specifications of each of the instruments are discussed.

  19. Development of the instruments for the Gamma Ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, J. J.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) is to be launched in 1988 by the STS. The GRO will feature four very large instruments: the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) and the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The instruments weigh from 900-1200 kg each, and required the development of specialized lifting and dolly devices to permit their assembly, manipulation and testing. The GRO is intended as a tool for studying discrete celestial objects such as black holes, neutron stars and other gamma-ray emitting objects, scanning for nucleosynthesis processes, mapping the Galaxy and other, high energy galaxies in terms of gamma rays, searching for cosmological effects and observing gamma ray bursts. The instruments will be sensitive from the upper end mof X-rya wavelengths to the highest energies possible. Details of the hardware and performance specifications of each of the instruments are discussed.

  20. 3D shape tracking of minimally invasive medical instruments using optical frequency domain reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parent, Francois; Kanti Mandal, Koushik; Loranger, Sebastien; Watanabe Fernandes, Eric Hideki; Kashyap, Raman; Kadoury, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    We propose here a new alternative to provide real-time device tracking during minimally invasive interventions using a truly-distributed strain sensor based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) in optical fibers. The guidance of minimally invasive medical instruments such as needles or catheters (ex. by adding a piezoelectric coating) has been the focus of extensive research in the past decades. Real-time tracking of instruments in medical interventions facilitates image guidance and helps the user to reach a pre-localized target more precisely. Image-guided systems using ultrasound imaging and shape sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBG)-embedded optical fibers can provide retroactive feedback to the user in order to reach the targeted areas with even more precision. However, ultrasound imaging with electro-magnetic tracking cannot be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, while shape sensors based on FBG embedded in optical fibers provides discrete values of the instrument position, which requires approximations to be made to evaluate its global shape. This is why a truly-distributed strain sensor based on OFDR could enhance the tracking accuracy. In both cases, since the strain is proportional to the radius of curvature of the fiber, a strain sensor can provide the three-dimensional shape of medical instruments by simply inserting fibers inside the devices. To faithfully follow the shape of the needle in the tracking frame, 3 fibers glued in a specific geometry are used, providing 3 degrees of freedom along the fiber. Near real-time tracking of medical instruments is thus obtained offering clear advantages for clinical monitoring in remotely controlled catheter or needle guidance. We present results demonstrating the promising aspects of this approach as well the limitations of using the OFDR technique.

  1. A Plea for MERSQI: The Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roger P; Learman, Lee A

    2017-10-01

    To describe the quality of educational scholarship presented at a large national conference of obstetrics and gynecology educators. We reviewed Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology-Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics annual meeting abstracts from 2015 and 2016, published as supplements to Obstetrics & Gynecology. For this uncontrolled observational study, abstracts were reviewed and scored using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Comparisons between types of submissions (oral presentations or posters), origin of the report (academic or community), setting (undergraduate, graduate, postgraduate), and focus of the study (tool development or evaluation) were made. Abstracts from award-winning presentations and full manuscripts were compared with the remaining abstracts. One- and two-tailed Student t tests with a two-sample unequal variance (heteroscedastic) test were performed with a significance threshold of P≤.05. One hundred eighty-six abstracts and articles were available, with 101 posters and 77 oral presentations that could be scored in all six of the MERSQI domains. The average MERSQI score was 9.05 (±1.90) with scores ranging from 5 to 13.5 (median 9). Abstracts from full-text articles scored more than 1 point higher than other abstracts (10.2 compared with 9.0, P<.001, Cohen's d=0.72). Statistically significant smaller magnitude differences were found comparing tool development with evaluation, academic with community studies, and for award with nonaward winners. No differences were found comparing oral and poster presentations. The quality of educational scholarship presented at a national meeting of obstetrics and gynecology educators falls within the published range for other specialties. The MERSQI scoring system is a useful method for tracking and benchmarking the quality of medical education scholarship in obstetrics and gynecology.

  2. Development and Validation of a Multicultural Consciousness Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Shannon R.

    2017-01-01

    Developing multiculturally competent citizens is at the forefront of the espoused mission of higher education. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a self-report instrument to measure traditional-age (18-to 24-year-old) college students' multicultural consciousness (e.g., awareness of self, knowledge of difference, and…

  3. Development of an RDECOM Workforce Motivational Survey Instrument

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    factors. We developed a closed-loop survey instrument and analysis methodology to identify distinct generational workforce motivational factors. Nine...United States Army Research Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) supervisory engineers, General Schedule (GS) 14 and 15, reviewed the survey...compensation and workplace environment structure to motivate the target generational workforce demographic to improve productivity. The deliverables from this

  4. New developments in instrumentation at the W. M. Keck Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adkins, Sean M.; McLean, Ian S.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Larkin, James E.; Lewis, Hilton A.; Martin, Christopher; Mawet, Dimitri; Prochaska, J. X.; Wizinowich, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The W. M. Keck Observatory is committed to maintaining the scientific leadership of our observing community by matching our observers' skills and passions in their fields of astronomical science with a continuing dedication by the Observatory and its collaborators to the development of state of the art instrumentation and systems. Our science driven strategic plan guides these developments and informs our plans for the future. In this paper we describe the performance of recently completed new instruments, instrument upgrades, and infrastructure upgrade projects. We also describe the expected performance of projects currently in the development or construction phases. Projects recently completed include a new laser for the Keck II AO system, the upgrade of the spectrograph detector in the OSIRIS instrument, and the upgrade to the telescope control system on the Keck II telescope. Projects in development include an upgrade to the telescope control system on the Keck I telescope, the blue channel of the Keck Cosmic Web Imager, the red channel of the Keck Cosmic Web Imager, the Keck Planet Finder, a deployable tertiary mirror for the Keck I telescope, an upgrade to the imager of OSIRIS, a major upgrade to the NIRSPEC instrument, and a fiber feed from the Keck II AO system to NIRSPEC.

  5. An SOA developer framework for astronomical instrument control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwein, Juergen; Briegel, Florian; Gaessler, Wolfgang; Kittmann, Frank; Pavlov, Alexey

    2008-07-01

    We present a new and flexible developer framework for high performance service oriented architecture (SOA) based systems, using the middleware called ICE by ZeroC Inc. for interprocess communication. The framework was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy within the scope of the LBT interferometer LINC-NIRVANA control software, but may also be used, in respect of its flexibility, for other astronomical instruments. The systems architecture was designed to decrease the development effort of large SOA (Service Oriented Architecture) based systems like astronomical instrument control software. The advantages of this new framework are a combination of the online instrument data management, the validation and the ability to integrate user defined data manipulation.

  6. Instrumentation to Monitor Transient Developing Periodic Flow in Newtonian Slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.

    2014-08-03

    This paper describes measurement techniques developed and applied to characterize solids mobilization and mixing of Newtonian slurries that are subjected to transient, periodic, developing flows. Metrics to characterize mobilization and mixing are the just suspended velocity (UJS) and the cloud height (HC). Two ultrasonic instruments to characterize pulse jet mixing of slurries were developed and deployed to measure related metrics: the thickness of the settled bed (used to determine mobilization) and the concentration within the cloud as a function of elevation [C(Z)]. A second method, continuous sample extraction, characterization, and reinsertion was successfully used to measure average density and characterize the concentration within the cloud. Testing focused on mixing vessels using intermitent jet mixers oriented vertically downward. Descriptions of the instruments and instrument performance are presented. These techniques were an effective approach to characterize mixing phenomena, determine mixing energy required to fully mobilize vessel contents, and to determine mixing times for process evaluation.

  7. Developing medical ethics in China's reform era.

    PubMed

    Ip, Po-Keung

    2005-05-01

    The paper gives an analytical synopsis of the problem of developing medical ethics in the early half of the 1990s in China, as perceived by Chinese scholars and medical professionals interested in medical ethics. The views captured and analyzed here were expressed in one of the two major journals on medical ethics in China: Chinese Medical Ethics. The economic reform unleashed profound changes in Chinese society, including in the medical field, creating irregularities and improprieties in the profession. Furthermore, the market reform also created new values that were in tension with existing values. In this transitional period, Chinese medical ethicists saw the need to rebuild medical morality for the new era. Using the code of conduct promulgated by the Chinese Ministry of Health in 1989 as a basis, assessment and education aspects of the institutionalization of medical ethics are discussed. In addition to institutional problems of institutionalising ethics, there are philosophical and methodological issues that are not easy to solve. After all, to institutionalize medical ethics is no easy task for a country as old and as big as China. Chinese medical ethicists seem ready to confront these difficulties in their effort to develop medical ethics in Reform China.

  8. Development and evaluation of a sickle cell assessment instrument.

    PubMed

    Day, Sara W

    2004-01-01

    The current ability to predict very young children with sickle cell disease who are likely to have severe complications later in life permits accurate tailoring of therapy to match disease-related risks. A valid and reliable instrument is essential to accurately assess these children prior to referring them to therapies that are not without risk. This study was designed to develop a Sickle Cell Disease Assessment Instrument with two domains-high-risk identification and disease severity classification-and to evaluate instrument validity and reliability. Instrument development involved identification and definition of critical attributes, assignment of numerical values to critical attributes, and development of a scoring system. Content validity was measured using a panel of five experts in the field of sickle cell disease. Registered nurses using the equivalence approach determined interrater reliability and using test-retest design determined stability. Nurses are often the first persons to identify sickle cell patients that need additional intervention. This instrument will allow them to accurately and objectively assess their patients for high-risk indicators and disease severity classification.

  9. Development of a surface scanning soil analysis instrument.

    PubMed

    Falahat, S; Köble, T; Schumann, O; Waring, C; Watt, G

    2012-07-01

    ANSTO is developing a nuclear field instrument for measurement of soil composition; particularly carbon. The instrument utilises the neutron activation approach with clear advantages over existing soil sampling and laboratory analysis. A field portable compact pulsed neutron generator and γ-ray detector are used for PGNAA and INS techniques simultaneously. Many elements can be quantified from a homogenised soil volume equivalent to the top soil layers. Results from first test experiments and current developments are reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Instrument development for a toxic level hypergolic vapor detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, P. M.; Stetter, J. R.; Lau, Y. K.; Cromer, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The development and deployment of technology applicable to the field measurement of hypergolic propellants is discussed. The propellants include hydrazine (H) monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) at the parts per billion (PPB) level in air or a diluent gas. Four major areas are reviewed: (1) development of an improved electrochemical sensor for the measurement of hydrazines (H, MMH and UDMH) in air; (2) prototype instrument fabrication and subsequent laboratory evaluation; (3) initial instrument field test results; and (4) future requirements and applications.

  11. Instrumentation research and development in DOE health physics programs

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.; Swinth, K.L.

    1986-10-01

    Planning and control of exposure to ionizing radiation require the use of accurate, reliable instrumentation to establish dose rates, indicate high exposure rate areas, and control the spread of contamination. The Radiological Controls Division of US Department of Energy (DOE) operates several programs under the technical direction of DOE's lead laboratory in health physics, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These programs involve the evaluation and development of instruments to measure dose rates, internal depositions, and airborne and surface contamination. Several important developments, including the total dose meter, the laser-heated dosimeter reader, and a beta survey meter will be described. 17 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Instrument development for a toxic level hypergolic vapor detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, P. M.; Stetter, J. R.; Lau, Y. K.; Cromer, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    The development and deployment of technology applicable to the field measurement of hypergolic propellants is discussed. The propellants include hydrazine (H) monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) at the parts per billion (PPB) level in air or a diluent gas. Four major areas are reviewed: (1) development of an improved electrochemical sensor for the measurement of hydrazines (H, MMH and UDMH) in air; (2) prototype instrument fabrication and subsequent laboratory evaluation; (3) initial instrument field test results; and (4) future requirements and applications.

  13. Multiregional medical device development: regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsushi; Kutsumi, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    There are difficulties in conducting worldwide medical device development simultaneously because each country and/or region has their own medical device regulations. However, to aid globalization of the medical device market, and to quickly provide innovative medical devices to patients, attempts have been made to encourage harmonization and convergence of medical device regulations. 'Harmonization by doing' is a bilateral effort from the United States and Japan to develop global clinical trials and address regulatory barriers that may be impediments to timely device approval. The Global Harmonization Task Force (GHTF) was conceived in 1992 in an effort to achieve greater uniformity between national medical device regulatory systems. Since 2012, the GHTF has been replaced by the International Medical Device Regulators Forum.

  14. Perspective: Medical education in medical ethics and humanities as the foundation for developing medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; McCullough, Laurence B; Wear, Stephen

    2012-03-01

    Medical education accreditation organizations require medical ethics and humanities education to develop professionalism in medical learners, yet there has never been a comprehensive critical appraisal of medical education in ethics and humanities. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) I Workshop, convened in May 2010, undertook the first critical appraisal of the definitions, goals, and objectives of medical ethics and humanities teaching. The authors describe assembling a national expert panel of educators representing the disciplines of ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This panel was tasked with describing the major pedagogical goals of art, ethics, history, and literature in medical education, how these disciplines should be integrated with one another in medical education, and how they could be best integrated into undergraduate and graduate medical education. The authors present the recommendations resulting from the PRIME I discussion, centered on three main themes. The major goal of medical education in ethics and humanities is to promote humanistic skills and professional conduct in physicians. Patient-centered skills enable learners to become medical professionals, whereas critical thinking skills assist learners to critically appraise the concept and implementation of medical professionalism. Implementation of a comprehensive medical ethics and humanities curriculum in medical school and residency requires clear direction and academic support and should be based on clear goals and objectives that can be reliably assessed. The PRIME expert panel concurred that medical ethics and humanities education is essential for professional development in medicine.

  15. Development of an Instrument to Examine Nursing Attitudes Toward Fertility Preservation in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Maria C; Spitzer, Deborah A; Stutzman, Sonja E; Olson, DaiWai M

    2017-07-01

    To develop an instrument to measure staff nurse perceptions of the barriers to and benefits of addressing fertility preservation (FP) with patients newly diagnosed with cancer. 
. A prospective, nonrandomized instrument development approach. 
. Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. 
. 224 RNs who care for patients with cancer. 
. The instrument was developed with content experts and field-tested with oncology staff nurses. Responses to a web-based survey were used in exploratory factor analysis. After refining the instrument, the authors conducted a confirmatory factor analysis with 230 web-based survey responses. 
. Self-perceived barriers to providing FP options to patients newly diagnosed with cancer.
. The results supported a 15-item instrument with five domains. This instrument can be used to explore oncology nurses' attitudes toward FP in newly diagnosed people with cancer in their reproductive years. 
. A more comprehensive understanding of attitudes and barriers related to FP will guide the building of optimal systems that support effective FP options, resources, and programs for individuals with cancer.

  16. Research and development of network virtual instrument laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Hongmei; Pei, Xichun; Ma, Hongyue; Ma, Shuoshi

    2006-11-01

    A software platform of the network virtual instrument test laboratory has been developed to realize the network function of the test and signal analysis as well as the share of the hardware based on the data transmission theory and the study of the present technologies of the network virtual instrument. The whole design procedure was also presented in this paper. The main work of the research is as follows. 1. A suitable scheme of the test system with B/S mode and the virtual instrument laboratory with BSDA (Browser/Server/Database/Application) mode was determined. 2. The functions were classified and integrated by adopting the multilayer structure. The application for the virtual instruments running in the client terminal and the network management server managing the multiuser in the test laboratory according to the "Concurrent receival, sequential implementation" strategy in Java as well as the code of the test server application responding the client's requests of test and signal analysis in LabWindows/CVI were developed. As the extending part of network function of the original virtual test and analysis instruments, a software platform of network virtual instrument test laboratory was built as well. 3. The communication of the network data between Java and the LabWindows/CVI was realized. 4. The database was imported to store the data as well as the correlative information acquired by the server and help the network management server to manage the multiuser in the test laboratory. 5. A website embedding Java Applet of virtual instrument laboratory with the on-line help files was designed.

  17. Making sure. A comparative micro-analysis of diagnostic instruments in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Cornelius

    2011-09-01

    This article conceptualises diagnosis as ongoing practical judgement in medical care. Based on pragmatist and phenomenological considerations of tools in use, it uses a comparative approach to analyse similarities and differences in the use of diagnostic technologies. In the first part of the paper, a historical perspective on the innovation of the stethoscope is used to highlight the transformations in diagnostic practices occasioned by novel diagnostic instruments. In the second part of the paper, ethnographic accounts of contemporary anaesthesia are presented in order to sketch out the manifold variations of using diagnostic instruments in daily practice. Both cases are analysed on a micro-analytical level, emphasising the interrelations of bodies, tools and knowledge in concrete situations. The analysis shows how diagnostic instruments become embodied in the perceptual habits of physicians and how diagnosing becomes an ongoing activity in the course of managing an illness trajectory.

  18. Development of medical data information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    Computerized storage and retrieval of medical information is discussed. Tasks which were performed in support of the project are: (1) flight crew health stabilization computer system, (2) medical data input system, (3) graphic software development, (4) lunar receiving laboratory support, and (5) Statos V printer/plotter software development.

  19. Developing Sight-Reading Skills on Mallet Percussion Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Sight-reading while playing a mallet instrument can present serious obstacles for the developing percussionist. Many young players who have solid snare drum technique usually cite fear of playing the wrong note as the number-one hurdle to overcome in order to begin making real progress. Greg Byrne, associate director of bands at the University of…

  20. The Development of Commercial ESCA Instrumentation: A Personal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A study of the development of commercial electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA) instrumentation over a span of three decades is presented. The field has also been extended significantly by use of synchrotron radiation as a bright X-ray source, which has opened new areas of research in solid-state physics, molecular biology, and many…

  1. Research and Development on a Public Attitude Instrument for Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes research associated with the development of the "Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Stuttering" ("POSHA-S"), a survey instrument designed to provide a worldwide standard measure of public attitudes toward stuttering. Pilot studies with early experimental prototypes of the "POSHA-S" are summarized that relate to…

  2. Individual Entrepreneurial Orientation: Development of a Measurement Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Dawn Langkamp; Lane, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement instrument for individual entrepreneurial orientation to be used to measure the entrepreneurial orientation of students and other individuals. Design/methodology/approach: A measure of Individual Entrepreneurial Orientation (IEO) was generated, validated, and then tested on 1,100…

  3. Planetary instrument definition and development program: 'Miniature Monochromatic Imager'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadfoot, A. L.

    1991-01-01

    The miniature monochromatic imager (MMI) development work became the basis for the preparation of several instruments which were built and flown on the shuttle STS-39 as well as being used in ground based experiments. The following subject areas are covered: (1) applications of the ICCD to airglow and auroral measurements and (2) a panchromatic spectrograph with supporting monochromatic imagers.

  4. Individual Entrepreneurial Orientation: Development of a Measurement Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Dawn Langkamp; Lane, Michelle D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a measurement instrument for individual entrepreneurial orientation to be used to measure the entrepreneurial orientation of students and other individuals. Design/methodology/approach: A measure of Individual Entrepreneurial Orientation (IEO) was generated, validated, and then tested on 1,100…

  5. Developing Sight-Reading Skills on Mallet Percussion Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidyk, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Sight-reading while playing a mallet instrument can present serious obstacles for the developing percussionist. Many young players who have solid snare drum technique usually cite fear of playing the wrong note as the number-one hurdle to overcome in order to begin making real progress. Greg Byrne, associate director of bands at the University of…

  6. Research and Development on a Public Attitude Instrument for Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Louis, Kenneth O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes research associated with the development of the "Public Opinion Survey of Human Attributes-Stuttering" ("POSHA-S"), a survey instrument designed to provide a worldwide standard measure of public attitudes toward stuttering. Pilot studies with early experimental prototypes of the "POSHA-S" are summarized that relate to…

  7. The Development of Commercial ESCA Instrumentation: A Personal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A study of the development of commercial electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA) instrumentation over a span of three decades is presented. The field has also been extended significantly by use of synchrotron radiation as a bright X-ray source, which has opened new areas of research in solid-state physics, molecular biology, and many…

  8. Psychometric Properties of Characteristics of Teacher Professional Development Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soine, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    This primary purpose of the study was to expand the work of Garet, Porter, Desimone, Birman, and Yoon (2001) by creating and psychometrically testing an instrument designed to measure teachers' perceptions of characteristics of professional development. Elementary teachers (n = 406) from five school districts in Washington State participating in a…

  9. Instrumental Music Educators' Experiences in a Professional Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draves, Tami J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the experiences of instrumental music teachers in Designing Arts Instruction, a 4-day professional development course in a large urban school district. Specifically, I was interested in which activities participants (a) found most relevant and applicable to their current teaching situation, (b)…

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Fidelity Instrument for PEARLS.

    PubMed

    Farren, Laura; Snowden, Mark; Steinman, Lesley; Monroe-DeVita, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the development and the preliminary evaluation of a fidelity instrument for the Program for Encouraging Active and Rewarding Lives (PEARLS), an evidence-based depression care management (DCM) program. The objective of the study was to find an effective, practical, multidimensional approach to measure fidelity of PEARLS programs to the original, research-driven PEARLS protocol in order to inform program implementation at various settings nationwide. We conducted key informant interviews with PEARLS stakeholders, and held focus groups with former PEARLS clients, to identify core program components. These components were then ranked using a Q-sort process, and incorporated into a brief instrument. We tested the instrument at two time points with PEARLS counselors, other DCM program counselors, and non-DCM program counselors (n = 56) in six states. Known-groups method was used to compare findings from PEARLS programs, other DCM programs, and non-DCM programs. We asked supervisors of the counselors to complete the fidelity instrument on behalf of their counselors to affirm the validity of the results. We examined the association of PEARLS program fidelity with individual client outcomes. Program for Encouraging Active and Rewarding Lives providers reported the highest fidelity scores compared to DCM program providers and non-DCM program providers. The sample size was too small to yield significant results on the comparison between counselor experience and fidelity. Scores varied between PEARLS counselors and their supervisors. PEARLS program fidelity was not significantly correlated with client outcomes, suggesting that other implementation factors may have influenced the outcomes and/or that the instrument needs refinement. Our findings suggest that providers may be able to use the instrument to assess PEARLS program fidelity in various settings across the country. However, more rigorous research is needed to evaluate instrument

  11. Mesospheric imaging Michelson interferometer instrument development and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babcock, David D.

    This dissertation demonstrated the capability of the Mesospheric Imaging Michelson Interferometer (MIMI) instrument to passively measure wind velocities from Doppler-shifted atmospheric airglow emissions. The work consisted of two parts, (i) laboratory work focused on the measurement of simulated atmospheric winds with both Doppler-shifted visible and near-IR wavelengths and (ii) the development of a field instrument based on a lab prototype to investigate the potential of measuring Mesospheric winds from the ground. The primary component of the MIMI instrument was a custom built Michelson interferometer which was field widened, chromatically compensated, thermally compensated, and monolithic with no moving parts. The Michelson interferometer, used together with a novel four-point wind retrieval algorithm, provides simultaneous emission rate and wind velocity data over a single integration time. Simultaneously measuring the emission rate over the FOV and measuring wind velocity relative to the observer, of an air parcel containing an emitting chemical species, is a unique feature of the MIMI instrument. Eliminating sequential scanning of the Michelson to measure wind velocities (or being able to take a 'snapshot' of the atmosphere) and provide data on the emission rates and wind velocities, renders the instrument insensitive to scene changes over the integration time, which is an advantage over traditional scanning Michelson interferometers. Spectral lines from visible and near-IR sources were Doppler shifted in a controllable procedure to provide known velocities which were compared to the velocities measured by the interferometer. Wind simulations completed in the visible wavelength region retrieved velocities to within a standard deviation of +/-1ms-1. Wind simulations in the near-IR retrieved wind velocities to within a standard deviation of +/-2ms -1. These standard deviations are acceptable when compared to typical Mesospheric winds of 10 to 100ms-1 and when

  12. Development and Validation of an Instrument to Assess Youth Motivation to Participate in Career Development Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Neil A.; Brady, Colleen M.; Orvis, Kathryn S.; Carroll, Natalie J.

    2016-01-01

    Career development events develop career and life skills in youth, but limited work has been done to assess the motivation of students who participate in these events. The purpose of this study was to validate an instrument developed to measure youth motivation to participate in career development events. An instrument grounded in expectancy-value…

  13. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-01-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  14. The design and development of a third generation OSEE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perey, D. F.; Yost, W. T.; Stone, F. D.; Welch, C. S.; Scales, E.; Gasser, E. S.; Joe, E.; Goodman, T.; Pascual, X.; Hefner, B.

    1995-03-01

    Optically Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE) has been used to quantify surface contamination in the aerospace community. As advances are made towards the understanding of OSEE, it is desirable to incorporate technological advances with succeeding generations of instrumentation, so that improvements in the practical application of OSEE may be disseminated among the user community. Several studies undertaken by Yost, Welch, Abedin and others have expanded the knowledge base related to the underlying principles of OSEE. The conclusions of these studies, together with inputs from the user community were the foundation upon which the development of a third generation OSEE instrument was based. This manuscript describes the significant improvements incorporated into a third generation OSEE instrument as well as the elements unique to its design.

  15. The design and development of a third generation OSEE instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, D. F.; Yost, W. T.; Stone, F. D.; Welch, C. S.; Scales, E.; Gasser, E. S.; Joe, E.; Goodman, T.; Pascual, X.; Hefner, B.

    1995-01-01

    Optically Stimulated Electron Emission (OSEE) has been used to quantify surface contamination in the aerospace community. As advances are made towards the understanding of OSEE, it is desirable to incorporate technological advances with succeeding generations of instrumentation, so that improvements in the practical application of OSEE may be disseminated among the user community. Several studies undertaken by Yost, Welch, Abedin and others have expanded the knowledge base related to the underlying principles of OSEE. The conclusions of these studies, together with inputs from the user community were the foundation upon which the development of a third generation OSEE instrument was based. This manuscript describes the significant improvements incorporated into a third generation OSEE instrument as well as the elements unique to its design.

  16. [Medical care unit -- a suitable instrument for ambulatory patient-adequate care and performance-related remuneration].

    PubMed

    Rudolph, P; Isensee, D; Gerlach, E; Gross, H

    2013-02-01

    The question of whether a medical care unit is an appropriate tool for outpatient care has been discussed for a long time. Our aim is to investigate whether the MCU is an effective instrument for outpatient care and adequate performance-related remuneration. This retro- and prospective overview of the work included statements on legal foundations for medical care units, for reimbursement of services in medical care units, the development of medical care centres in Germany and a listing of the specific advantages and disadvantages of an MCU. This article focuses on the generally applicable facts and complements them with examples from general, visceral and vascular surgery. The main quantitative data on medical centre statistics come from different publications of the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance for Physicians. From a legal point of view the instrument MCU allows the participating of ambulatory and stationary care in the framework of medical care contracts. This has been especially extended for stationary applications, including the spectrum of possibilities that can contribute under certain circumstances for the provision of medical care in underdeveloped regions. Freelancers can benefit primarily from financial risk and minimising bureaucratic routine. The remuneration for services performed in the MCU is analogous to that of other ambulatory care providers. Basically, there are no disadvantages, but a greater design freedom and opportunities for the generation of aggregates are visible. The number of MCU in Germany has quadrupled in the last five years, indicating an establishment of an outpatient care landscape. MCU offers from the patient's perspective, providers and policy specific advantages and disadvantages. Indeed the benefits outweigh the disadvantages, but this is not yet verified by qualitative studies. The question of the appropriateness of medical care units as outpatient care instrumentation must be considered differentially

  17. The Mood Rhythm Instrument: development and preliminary report.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Camila M; Carissimi, Alicia; Costa, Daniele; Francisco, Ana Paula; Medeiros, Madeleine S; Ilgenfritz, Carlos A; de Oliveira, Melissa A; Frey, Benicio N; Hidalgo, Maria Paz

    2016-01-01

    To describe the initial steps in the development and validation of a new self-reported instrument designed to assess daily rhythms of mood symptoms, namely, the Mood Rhythm Instrument. A multidisciplinary group of experts took part in systematic meetings to plan the construction of the instrument. Clarity of items, their relevance to evaluation of mood states, and the consistency of findings in relation to the available evidence on the biological basis of mood disorders were investigated. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was evaluated through Cronbach's alpha. All of the items proposed in a first version were well rated in terms of clarity. The items more frequently rated as "rhythmic" were related to the somatic symptoms of mood. Their peaks in 24 hours were more frequent in the morning. The items associated with affective symptoms of mood were rated as less rhythmic, and their peak in 24 hours occurred more frequently in the afternoon and evening. Males and females behaved more similarly with respect to somatic than behavioral-affective items. The second version of the Mood Rhythm Instrument had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.73. The proposed Mood Rhythm Instrument may be able to detect individual rhythms of cognitive and behavioral measures associated with mood states. Validation in larger samples and against objective measures of rhythms, such as actigraphy, is warranted.

  18. Smart Payload Development for High Data Rate Instrument Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Norton, Charles D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of smart payloads instruments systems with high data rates. On-board computation has become a bottleneck for advanced science instrument and engineering capabilities. In order to improve the computation capability on board, smart payloads have been proposed. A smart payload is a Localized instrument, that can offload the flight processor of extensive computing cycles, simplify the interfaces, and minimize the dependency of the instrument on the flight system. This has been proposed for the Mars mission, Mars Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (MATMOS). The design of this system is discussed; the features of the Virtex-4, are discussed, and the technical approach is reviewed. The proposed Hybrid Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology has been shown to deliver breakthrough performance by tightly coupling hardware and software. Smart Payload designs for instruments such as MATMOS can meet science data return requirements with more competitive use of available on-board resources and can provide algorithm acceleration in hardware leading to implementation of better (more advanced) algorithms in on-board systems for improved science data return

  19. Development of the Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) for Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jack; Christensen, John L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Electron Drift Instrument (EDI) is a new technique for measuring electric fields in space by detecting the effect on weak beams of test electrons. This U.S. portions of the technique, flight hardware, and flight software were developed for the Cluster mission under this contract. Dr. Goetz Paschmann of the Max Planck Institute in Garching, Germany, was the Principle Investigator for Cluster EDI. Hardware for Cluster was developed in the U.S. at the University of New Hampshire, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, and University of California, San Diego. The Cluster satellites carrying the original EDI instruments were lost in the catastrophic launch failure of first flight of the Arianne-V rocket in 1996. Following that loss, NASA and ESA approved a rebuild of the Cluster mission, for which all four satellites were successfully launched in the Summer of 2000. Limited operations of EDI were also obtained on the Equator-S satellite, which was launched in December, 1997. A satellite failure caused a loss of the Equator-S mission after only 5 months, but these operations were extremely valuable in learning about the characteristics and operations of the complex EDI instrument. The Cluster mission, satellites, and instruments underwent an extensive on-orbit commissioning phase in the Fall of 2000, carrying over through January 2001. During this period all elements of the instruments were checked and careful measurements of inter-experiments interferences were made. EDI is currently working exceptionally well in orbit. Initial results verify that all aspects of the instrument are working as planned, and returning highly valuable scientific information. The first two papers describing EDI on-orbit results have been submitted for publication in April, 2001. The principles of the EDI technique, and its implementation on Cluster are described in two papers by Paschmann et al., attached as Appendices A and B. The EDI presentation at the formal Cluster Commissioning

  20. Characterizing explanatory models of illness in healthcare: development and validation of the CONNECT instrument.

    PubMed

    Haidet, Paul; O'Malley, Kimberly J; Sharf, Barbara F; Gladney, Alicia P; Greisinger, Anthony J; Street, Richard L

    2008-11-01

    A growing body of qualitative and quantitative research suggests that individual patients and physicians often have differing perspectives, or 'explanatory models,' regarding the patient's health condition or illness. Discordance between explanatory models may lead to difficulties in communication and poor disease outcomes. However, due to a lack of tools to systematically measure concordance in patient and physician explanatory models, a large-scale study of explanatory models of illness has not been previously possible. The objective of this project was to develop and pilot-test a survey-based tool (the CONNECT Instrument) that measures salient aspects of explanatory models of illness. We conducted a multi-method survey development project that included qualitative and quantitative item development, refinement, pilot testing, and psychometric evaluation. We evaluated the instrument in two unique, consecutive cohorts of primary care patients in a variety of private and public settings in Houston, TX. We also used the instrument to examine concordance between patient and physician explanatory models in the second cohort. The final version of the CONNECT Instrument contains nineteen items that focus on six dimensions of explanatory models. Cronbach alphas ranged from 0.65 to 0.89 for the six CONNECT dimensions. The instrument demonstrated evidence of criterion-related validity when individual CONNECT dimension scores were compared with scores from previously published instruments, and demonstrated expected differences between patients 'and physicians' explanatory models of illness. The CONNECT instrument is a tool with good psychometric properties that enables researchers to measure important aspects of patients 'and physicians' explanatory models of illness. Our continuing work will focus on gathering additional validity evidence and evaluating associations between explanatory model concordance and health outcomes. The CONNECT instrument can be used to improve

  1. Instrumentation Development: The Multiple Subsystem Timing Meter (MSTM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    developed to record operational times for the turret drive, turret power, infrared sight unit and the Stabe system on the Bradley Fighting vehicle... RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL 22b TELEPHONE (Include Area Code) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL Bruce Buzzo (602)-328-3131) STEYP-MT-TS DD Form 1473, JUN 86 Previous editions are...development of instrumention currently in use that displays and maintain accurate operational time of critical components in the Bradley Fighting Vehicle(s

  2. Instrumentation for propulsion systems development. [high speed fans and turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus and techniques developed or used by NASA-Lewis to make steady state or dynamic measurements of gas temperature, pressure, and velocity and of the temperature, tip clearance, and vibration of the blades of high-speed fans or turbines are described. The advantages and limitations of each instrument and technique are discussed and the possibility of modifying them for use in developing various propulsion systems is suggested.

  3. Assessing patient experiences in the pediatric patient-centered medical home: a comparison of two instruments.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Chakravorty, Shourjo; Madden, Vanessa; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Gubernick, Ruth; Kairys, Steven; Pelaez-Velez, Cristina; Sanders, Lee M; Thompson, Lindsay

    2014-11-01

    The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a model of care that has been promoted as a way to transform a broken primary care system in the US. However, in order to convince more practices to make the transformation and to properly reimburse practices who are PCMHs, valid and reliable data are needed. Data that capture patient experiences in a PCMH is valuable, but which instrument should be used remains unclear. Our study aims to compare the validity and reliability of two national PCMH instruments. Telephone surveys were conducted with children who receive care from 20 pediatric practices across Florida (n = 990). All of the children are eligible for Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program. Analyses were conducted to compare the Consumer Assessment of Health Plan Survey-Patient-Centered Medical Home (CAHPS-PCMH) and the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) medical home domain. Respondents were mainly White non-Hispanic, female, under 35 years old, and from a two-parent household. The NS-CSHCN outperformed the CAHPS-PCMH in regard to scale reliability (Cronbach's alpha coefficients all ≥0.81 vs. 0.56-0.85, respectively). In regard to item-domain convergence and discriminant validity the CAHPS-PCMH fared better than the NS-CSHCN (range of convergence 0.66-0.93 vs. 0.32-1.00). The CAHPS-PCMH did not correspond to the scale structure in construct validity testing. Neither instrument performed well in the known-groups validity tests. No clear best instrument was determined. Further revision and calibration may be needed to accurately assess patient experiences in the PCMH.

  4. Five Periods in Development of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2014-01-01

    Medical informatics, as scientific discipline, has to do with all aspects of understanding and promoting the effective organization, analysis, management, and use of information in health care. While the field of Medical informatics shares the general scope of these interests with some other health care specialities and disciplines, Medical (Health) informatics has developed its own areas of emphasis and approaches that have set it apart from other disciplines and specialities. For the last fifties of 20th century and some more years of 21st century, Medical informatics had the five time periods of characteristic development. In this paper author shortly described main scientific innovations and inventors who created development of Medical informatics. PMID:24648619

  5. Instrumentation and Motivations for Organised Cycling: The Development of the Cyclist Motivation Instrument (CMI)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Trent D.; O’Connor, Justen P.; Barkatsas, Anastasios N.

    2009-01-01

    ‘Serious leisure’ cycling has developed as a reinterpretation of the traditional form of the sport. This short term, informal, unstructured and unconventional conceptualisation represents a challenge to participant numbers in the mainstream sport. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to ascertain the cultural, subcultural and ecological factors of participation in this new conceptualised form enabling clubs, associations and governments to a deeper understanding about participants practices and (ii) as an ongoing validation to previous qualitative work (see O’Connor and Brown, 2005). This study reports on the development and psychometric properties (principal components analysis, confirmatory factor analysis) of the Cyclists’ Motivation Instrument. Four hundred and twenty two cyclists (371 males, 51 females) who were registered members of the state competitive cycling body completed a fifty-one item instrument. Five factors were identified: social, embodiment, self-presentation, exploring environments and physical health outcomes and these accounted for 47.2% of the variance. Factor alpha coefficients ranged from .63 to .88, overall scale reliability was .92, suggesting moderate to high reliability for each of the factors and the overall scale. Key points Serious leisure’ cyclists’ are fitness seeking enthusiasts that attach different meanings to the act of cycling and participate in different physical, social and natural environments in comparison to other cyclists. This study develops and validates a new tool, the Cyclists Motivation Instrument (CMI), and presents the initial psychometric properties (principal components analysis, confirmatory factor analysis). Five factors were identified: social, embodiment, self-presentation, exploring environments and physical health outcomes. The scale demonstrates adequate reliability (total scale, α = 0.92) and validity. PMID:24149528

  6. Assessing Clinical Reasoning (ASCLIRE): Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunina-Habenicht, Olga; Hautz, Wolf E.; Knigge, Michel; Spies, Claudia; Ahlers, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is an essential competency in medical education. This study aimed at developing and validating a test to assess diagnostic accuracy, collected information, and diagnostic decision time in clinical reasoning. A norm-referenced computer-based test for the assessment of clinical reasoning (ASCLIRE) was developed, integrating the…

  7. Assessing Clinical Reasoning (ASCLIRE): Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunina-Habenicht, Olga; Hautz, Wolf E.; Knigge, Michel; Spies, Claudia; Ahlers, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Clinical reasoning is an essential competency in medical education. This study aimed at developing and validating a test to assess diagnostic accuracy, collected information, and diagnostic decision time in clinical reasoning. A norm-referenced computer-based test for the assessment of clinical reasoning (ASCLIRE) was developed, integrating the…

  8. The development of education for medical librarians.

    PubMed

    Hill, B

    1972-01-01

    Formal education for medical library specialization was initiated only thirty-two years ago despite the fact that medical libraries received special treatment for many years before that time. The philosophy of specialized education was developed as early as 1925, and this theory was finally put into practice beginning with the medical reference and bibliography course given at Columbia in 1939. In the late 1940s the requisites for medical librarians were formalized into a certification code by the Medical Library Association, and since that time specialized education for medical librarians has grown stronger using this code as a guideline. This education consists basically of two types-formal library school courses and internship programs which offer a working-while-learning situation. Now that the established programs have a few years of history, there is a need for evaluation and restatement of goals and methods.

  9. The Development of Education for Medical Librarians

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Barbarie

    1972-01-01

    Formal education for medical library specialization was initiated only thirty-two years ago despite the fact that medical libraries received special treatment for many years before that time. The philosophy of specialized education was developed as early as 1925, and this theory was finally put into practice beginning with the medical reference and bibliography course given at Columbia in 1939. In the late 1940s the requisites for medical librarians were formalized into a certification code by the Medical Library Association, and since that time specialized education for medical librarians has grown stronger using this code as a guideline. This education consists basically of two types—formal library school courses and internship programs which offer a working-while-learning situation. Now that the established programs have a few years of history, there is a need for evaluation and restatement of goals and methods. PMID:4554214

  10. Developing an Instrument for Identifying Secondary Teachers' Beliefs about Education for Sustainable Development in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Guang; Lam, Chi-Chung; Wong, Ngai-Ying

    2010-01-01

    Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) has been recently recognized as an important area in the new Chinese educational reform. As teachers play a pivotal role, knowing and developing an effective and easy-to-use instrument for tapping teachers' beliefs is essential. This article reports an attempt to develop an instrument with mixed methods.…

  11. A dual-energy medical instrument for measurement of x-ray source voltage and dose rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, V. D.; Naydenov, S. V.; Volkov, V. G.; Opolonin, O. D.; Makhota, S.; Pochet, T.; Smith, C. F.

    2016-03-01

    An original dual-energy detector and medical instrument have been developed to measure the output voltages and dose rates of X-ray sources. Theoretical and experimental studies were carried out to characterize the parameters of a new scintillator-photodiode sandwich-detector based on specially-prepared zinc selenide crystals in which the low-energy detector (LED) works both as the detector of the low-energy radiation and as an absorption filter allowing the highenergy fraction of the radiation to pass through to the high-energy detector (HED). The use of the LED as a low-energy filter in combination with a separate HED opens broad possibilities for such sandwich structures. In particular, it becomes possible to analyze and process the sum, difference and ratio of signals coming from these detectors, ensuring a broad (up to 106) measurement range of X-ray intensity from the source and a leveling of the energy dependence. We have chosen an optimum design of the detector and the geometry of the component LED and HED parts that allow energy-dependence leveling to within specified limits. The deviation in energy dependence of the detector does not exceed about 5% in the energy range from 30 to 120 keV. The developed detector and instrument allow contactless measurement of the anode voltage of an X-ray emitter from 40 to 140 kV with an error no greater than 3%. The dose rate measurement range is from 1 to 200 R/min. An original medical instrument has passed clinical testing and was recommended for use in medical institutions for X-ray diagnostics.

  12. Flow karyotyping and flow instrumentation development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    GEngh, G.J. van den

    1997-11-01

    The project had three major aims: improvement of technology for high-speed cell and chromosome sorting; the use of such instrumentation in genome analysis; applying the principles developed and the lessons learned to automated processes for the genome program. The work was a continuation of studies that were started at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory before the PI moved to the University of Washington. At Livermore, a high-speed sorter for the selection of human chromosomes was built. The instrument incorporated Livermore`s advanced sorter technology. The engineering focused on improving robustness and reliability so that the full potential of high-speed sorting would become available to the biological research laboratory. The new instrument, dubbed MoFlo for modular flow cytometer, proved to be a very practical and efficient tool during the chromosome isolation phase of the gene-library project. Its reliability and ease of operation exceeded that of the commercial instruments. The technology was licensed to two companies.

  13. A demedicalized view of maternal distress: conceptualization and instrument development.

    PubMed

    Arditti, Joyce A; Grzywacz, Jospeh G; Gallimore, Sara Wang

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this article was to describe instrument development of a demedicalized, multidomain view of maternal distress, with psychological, relational, and situational manifestations. We developed a pilot instrument derived from our previous grounded theory conceptualization of maternal distress and administered it to a purposive sample of 100 low-income single mothers. Analyses testing the relationship between maternal distress and depressive symptoms, guilt, child rearing stress, and community needs variables suggested that the maternal distress inventory had convergent, discriminant, and concurrent validity. Not only was maternal distress distinct from depressive symptomology and generalized child rearing stress, it appeared to be more meaningfully associated with "real world" outcomes of interest to psychological service providers than purely psychological measures of the distress.

  14. Development of a new haptic perception instrument: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Leonardo Penteado; Martini, Joyce; Voos, Mariana Callil; Chien, Hsin Fen; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Hand sensory tests do not consider distinct physiological receptors, nor detect normal range variations concerning developmental or pathological changes. We developed an instrument with a set of tests with timing and scoring for assessing haptic perception, which is the interaction between sensory and motor systems, in surfaces exploration, by moving hands. Firstly, group meetings were set for test/manual conception and materials testing. The test/manual were submitted to 30 reviewers in 3 stages (10 reviewers on each stage). The Hand Haptic Perception Instrument (HHPI) evaluates hand sensorimotor performance on six domains: depression, elevation, texture, compressibility, weight (barognosis) and form perception. Each domain requires specific materials. Score ranges from 0 to 57, being 0 the worst rating. This methodological process allowed the development of six domains and instructions to assess haptic perception. This version of HHPI is a pilot model. Further studies will determine reliability and normality ranges.

  15. Validation of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy and Medical Students’ Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Van Winkle, Lon J.; Fjortoft, Nancy; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity and reliability of an instrument to measure pharmacy students’ attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaboration, and compare those attitudes to the attitudes of medical students. Methods. One hundred sixty-six first-year pharmacy students and 77 first-year medical students at Midwestern University completed the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration. Results. Findings confirmed the validity and reliability of the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration in pharmacy students, as observed previously for medical students. Pharmacy students’ mean score was significantly higher (56.6 ± 7.2) than that of medical students (52.0 ± 6.1). Maximum likelihood factoring confirmed the 3-factor solution of responsibility and accountability, shared authority, and interdisciplinary education for pharmacy students. Conclusions. The Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration can be used for the assessment of interdisciplinary educational programs, for patient outcome assessment of interprofessional collaboration, and for group comparisons. Findings that pharmacy students expressed more positive attitudes toward collaboration than medical students have implications for interdisciplinary education. PMID:22171106

  16. Validation of an instrument to measure pharmacy and medical students' attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaboration.

    PubMed

    Van Winkle, Lon J; Fjortoft, Nancy; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2011-11-10

    To assess the validity and reliability of an instrument to measure pharmacy students' attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaboration, and compare those attitudes to the attitudes of medical students. One hundred sixty-six first-year pharmacy students and 77 first-year medical students at Midwestern University completed the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration. Findings confirmed the validity and reliability of the Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration in pharmacy students, as observed previously for medical students. Pharmacy students' mean score was significantly higher (56.6 ± 7.2) than that of medical students (52.0 ± 6.1). Maximum likelihood factoring confirmed the 3-factor solution of responsibility and accountability, shared authority, and interdisciplinary education for pharmacy students. The Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration can be used for the assessment of interdisciplinary educational programs, for patient outcome assessment of interprofessional collaboration, and for group comparisons. Findings that pharmacy students expressed more positive attitudes toward collaboration than medical students have implications for interdisciplinary education.

  17. [Development of an automatic ultrasonic cleaning machine for surgical instruments].

    PubMed

    Geng, Shu-qing; He, Wei; Tao, Ren-hai; Ma, Bao-Qiu; Lu, Hai-long; Li, Li-hua; Feng, Hui-zhi; Zheng, Jin-zhi

    2005-11-01

    The automatic cleaning machine we have developed, adopts a SCM system in automatic cleaning. The machine has five functions: ultrasonic cleaning, cold or hot water spraying, drying and greasing. The clinical applications show that the machine with a good effectiveness is suitable for the cleaning of many surgical instruments. It also raises working efficiency, cuts down on the cost of repair and maintenance and reduces the injury and infection to nurses caused by manual cleaning, satisfying the needs of clinical applications.

  18. Development of a rotary instrumentation system, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, A.; Skidmore, W.

    1982-01-01

    A rotary instrumentation system which consists of ruggedized miniature telemetry transmitters installed on the rotating shaft of a gas turbine engine to telemeter the outputs of sensors (strain gages, thermocouples, etc.) on rotating engine components was designed. A small prototype system, which demonstrates the capabilities of performing in the intended environment and demonstrates that the system is expandable to handle about 100 data channels was developed.

  19. Development of a rotary instrumentation system, phase 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, A.; Skidmore, W.

    1982-12-01

    A rotary instrumentation system which consists of ruggedized miniature telemetry transmitters installed on the rotating shaft of a gas turbine engine to telemeter the outputs of sensors (strain gages, thermocouples, etc.) on rotating engine components was designed. A small prototype system, which demonstrates the capabilities of performing in the intended environment and demonstrates that the system is expandable to handle about 100 data channels was developed.

  20. Using a Data-Driven Model for Instrument Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, D. A.; Allen, S. L.

    In a data-driven approach to the development of instrument control software, we attempt to abstract from the code as many repetitive data structures and operational parameters as possible, storing these data in a relational database instead of in hard coding. Documentation and source code can then be generated from a single authoritative source: the database engine. In order to pursue this approach, we made significant changes in our software development process. We report on the degree to which the data-driven model (in which the database engine is an essential component in code development and deployment) has succeeded.

  1. Medical policy development for human spaceflight at NASA: an evolution.

    PubMed

    Doarn, Charles R

    2011-11-01

    Codification of medical policy for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) did not occur until 1977. Policy development was based on NASA's human spaceflight efforts from 1958, and the need to support the operational aspects of the upcoming Space Shuttle Program as well as other future activities. In 1958, the Space Task Group (STG), a part of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA), became the focal point for astronaut selection, medical support, and instrumentation development in support of Project Mercury. NACA transitioned into NASA in 1958. The STG moved to Houston, TX, in 1961 and became the Manned Spacecraft Center. During these early years, medical support for astronaut selection and healthcare was provided through arrangements with the U.S. military, specifically the United States Air Force, which had the largest group of subject matter experts in aerospace medicine. Through most of the 1960s, the military worked very closely with NASA in developing the foundations of bioastronautics and space medicine. This work was complemented by select individuals from outside the government. From 1958 to 1977, there was no standard approach to medical policy formulation within NASA. During this time, it was individualized and subjected to political pressures. This manuscript documents the evolution of medical policy in the NASA, and provides a historical account of the individuals, processes, and needs to develop policy.

  2. Client perceptions of satisfaction with AIDS services: an instrument development.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Joe; Vance, David

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) can develop their own instruments to assess client satisfaction by using support from academic partners. The Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ) is an example of this process. The initial 12-item CSQ was piloted using a sample of 46 HIV-infected men and women, resulting in a revised 8-item CSQ that was assessed by using a sample of 121 HIV-infected men and women. The initial CSQ (12-item) yielded three factors, volunteer's skill/access, volunteer's attitude, and volunteer's caring, accounting for 74.6% of the explained variance (Cronbach's alpha = 0.84). The revised CSQ (8-item) resulted in one factor accounting for 67% of the explained variance (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92). Findings indicated acceptable reliability and validity of the CSQ to assess client satisfaction as an outcome of ASO client-agency interaction. Guidelines for instrument development by ASOs are proposed. Strategies to collaborate with the academic community to facilitate instrument development are discussed.

  3. [Upgrading the corrosion resistance of medical instruments made of chromium steel of the martensite class with electrochemical polishing].

    PubMed

    Chirkov, V K; Talalina, A S; Ermakova, V E; Kochanova, L G; Gal'perina, L I

    1983-01-01

    An electrolyte with surfactant admixtures has been specially designed for finish electrochemical polishing of medical instruments. It enables reducing in requirements for surface roughness and the size of labor-consuming operations when grinding and polishing.

  4. The Teamwork Assessment Scale: A Novel Instrument to Assess Quality of Undergraduate Medical Students' Teamwork Using the Example of Simulation-based Ward-Rounds

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Fischer, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simulation-based teamwork trainings are considered a powerful training method to advance teamwork, which becomes more relevant in medical education. The measurement of teamwork is of high importance and several instruments have been developed for various medical domains to meet this need. To our knowledge, no theoretically-based and easy-to-use measurement instrument has been published nor developed specifically for simulation-based teamwork trainings of medical students. Internist ward-rounds function as an important example of teamwork in medicine. Purposes: The purpose of this study was to provide a validated, theoretically-based instrument that is easy-to-use. Furthermore, this study aimed to identify if and when rater scores relate to performance. Methods: Based on a theoretical framework for teamwork behaviour, items regarding four teamwork components (Team Coordination, Team Cooperation, Information Exchange, Team Adjustment Behaviours) were developed. In study one, three ward-round scenarios, simulated by 69 students, were videotaped and rated independently by four trained raters. The instrument was tested for the embedded psychometric properties and factorial structure. In study two, the instrument was tested for construct validity with an external criterion with a second set of 100 students and four raters. Results: In study one, the factorial structure matched the theoretical components but was unable to separate Information Exchange and Team Cooperation. The preliminary version showed adequate psychometric properties (Cronbach’s α=.75). In study two, the instrument showed physician rater scores were more reliable in measurement than those of student raters. Furthermore, a close correlation between the scale and clinical performance as an external criteria was shown (r=.64) and the sufficient psychometric properties were replicated (Cronbach’s α=.78). Conclusions: The validation allows for use of the simulated teamwork assessment scale

  5. Development of administrative roles for medical technologists.

    PubMed

    Vittetoe, M C

    1982-09-01

    Highlights in the development of administrative roles for medical technologists have been reviewed. The profession of medical technology advanced through successive increments of education, responsibility, and authority. At the national level the active participation on Boards and agencies led to recognition and respect for the profession. Early in their history, medical technologists were given responsibility for teaching, then for educational administration. Not until the 1940s were medical technologists given roles as laboratory supervisors. After World War II, technology burgeoned, and in the 1950s and 60s articles indicated the extent to which medical technologists were delegated administrative roles at all levels. In the 1960s bachelor's degree and advanced degree programs recognized the need to prepare graduates for roles in management. This preparation in turn set the stage for greater participation in administrative activities.

  6. Recent developments in photodetection for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llosá, Gabriela

    2015-07-01

    The use of the most advanced technology in medical imaging results in the development of high performance detectors that can significantly improve the performance of the medical devices employed in hospitals. Scintillator crystals coupled to photodetectors remain to be essential detectors in terms of performance and cost for medical imaging applications in different imaging modalities. Recent advances in photodetectors result in an increase of the performance of the medical scanners. Solid state detectors can provide substantial performance improvement, but are more complex to integrate into clinical detectors due mainly to their higher cost. Solid state photodetectors (APDs, SiPMs) have made new detector concepts possible and have led to improvements in different imaging modalities. Recent advances in detectors for medical imaging are revised.

  7. Validation of a Performance Assessment Instrument in Problem-Based Learning Tutorials Using Two Cohorts of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ming; Wimmers, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has been widely used in medical schools, few studies have attended to the assessment of PBL processes using validated instruments. This study examined reliability and validity for an instrument assessing PBL performance in four domains: Problem Solving, Use of Information, Group Process, and Professionalism.…

  8. Validation of a Performance Assessment Instrument in Problem-Based Learning Tutorials Using Two Cohorts of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Ming; Wimmers, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has been widely used in medical schools, few studies have attended to the assessment of PBL processes using validated instruments. This study examined reliability and validity for an instrument assessing PBL performance in four domains: Problem Solving, Use of Information, Group Process, and Professionalism.…

  9. [Development of Nanotechnology for X-Ray Astronomy Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    This Research Grant provides support for development of nanotechnology for x-ray astronomy instrumentation. MIT has made significant progress in several development areas. In the last year we have made considerable progress in demonstrating the high-fidelity patterning and replication of x-ray reflection gratings. We developed a process for fabricating blazed gratings in silicon with extremely smooth and sharp sawtooth profiles, and developed a nanoimprint process for replication. We also developed sophisticated new fixturing for holding thin optics during metrology without causing distortion. We developed a new image processing algorithm for our Shack-Hartmann tool that uses Zernike polynomials. This has resulted in much more accurate and repeatable measurements on thin optics.

  10. Quality of prenatal care questionnaire: instrument development and testing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Utilization indices exist to measure quantity of prenatal care, but currently there is no published instrument to assess quality of prenatal care. The purpose of this study was to develop and test a new instrument, the Quality of Prenatal Care Questionnaire (QPCQ). Methods Data for this instrument development study were collected in five Canadian cities. Items for the QPCQ were generated through interviews with 40 pregnant women and 40 health care providers and a review of prenatal care guidelines, followed by assessment of content validity and rating of importance of items. The preliminary 100-item QPCQ was administered to 422 postpartum women to conduct item reduction using exploratory factor analysis. The final 46-item version of the QPCQ was then administered to another 422 postpartum women to establish its construct validity, and internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Results Exploratory factor analysis reduced the QPCQ to 46 items, factored into 6 subscales, which subsequently were validated by confirmatory factor analysis. Construct validity was also demonstrated using a hypothesis testing approach; there was a significant positive association between women’s ratings of the quality of prenatal care and their satisfaction with care (r = 0.81). Convergent validity was demonstrated by a significant positive correlation (r = 0.63) between the “Support and Respect” subscale of the QPCQ and the “Respectfulness/Emotional Support” subscale of the Prenatal Interpersonal Processes of Care instrument. The overall QPCQ had acceptable internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.96), as did each of the subscales. The test-retest reliability result (Intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.88) indicated stability of the instrument on repeat administration approximately one week later. Temporal stability testing confirmed that women’s ratings of their quality of prenatal care did not change as a result of giving

  11. Development of a nursing workload measurement instrument in burn care.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Alette E E; Leeman, Jolan; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-11-01

    Existing workload measurement instruments fail to represent specific nursing activities in a setting where patients are characterized by a diversity of cause, location, extent and depth of burns, of age and of history. They also do not include educational levels and appropriate time standards. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable measurement instrument for nursing workload in burn care, in order to match quality of patient care with staffing needs. In the first phase, a time study by semi-structured interviews and observations was used to assess direct and indirect care activities. A total of 34 nursing activities were identified, defined, connected to educational levels and attached to time standards. Two independent raters completed a test computer program by assessing performed nursing activities in 36 patients. This yielded intra-class correlations of 0.82, indicating good reliability. In the second phase, a computer program was developed to process quantity and quality of available staff and the sum of time standards of nursing activities per patient per day and to calculate the balance. After 1 year of running this program, the database was used to distinguish patients' care demand into five care categories. This instrument justifies the investment of time by nursing staff needed for daily activities in the burn unit. It provides quick insight into the balance between care demand and staffing needs and can be used to optimise resource planning.

  12. A permittivity probe instrument developed for the Martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargl, Günter; Stiegler, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    We report on the development and first results from a bore-hole permittivity probe to be used on the surface of Mars. The HP3-PP instrument was initially a part of the HP3 sensor suite intended to be on board of the ExoMars Humbold surface station. After the cancelation and postponement of the original ExoMars mission it was decided to continue with the sensor development until a sufficient maturity for a flight instrument was achieved. We will present the design of a permittivity probe covering the frequency range of 4 - 20 000 Hz with a 1 Hz resolution suitable for subsurface measurements on a mole or drill rod. Thus we can cover a larger frequency domain than with usual mutual impedance probes. In general the instrument indicates a high sensitivity to ambient H2O deposits within the samples or the variable air humidity. First laboratory calibration measurements in a temperature and humidity controlled environment will be shown. For calibration, several measurements were performed with three different environmental stable polymers, namely polyethylene, poly-methyl methacrylate and polytetrafluoroethylene. In comparison to common literature values, an accuracy of better than 10% can be achieved already with the uncalibrated sensor. Additional calibration values for the sample permittivity are gained from a high precision impedance spectrometer. Further laboratory measurements using natural materials like granite, basalt and, assorted Martian analogue materials will be shown.

  13. Development of a wideband wattmeter as a laboratory instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, L. G.; Liu, Y. Y.

    1971-01-01

    A portable, solid state, wideband wattmeter has been developed as a general purpose type of laboratory instrument. Its circuit and component investigations and evaluation data are presented. A prototype unit was used extensively, and served as the basis for a second instrument incorporating refined circuitry and improved packaging. The wattmeter provides true four quadrant operation which permits instantaneous indication of real power as an oscilloscope display. Major performance factors are: frequency bandwidth DC to 1 MHz plus or minus 1 db; current range 10 mA to 100 amperes peak; voltage range 1 volt to 1000 volts peak; accuracy plus or minus 2% of full scale reading. Oscilloscope data for typical switching transients in a transistor inverter circuit are included.

  14. The FASES instrument development and experiment preparation for the ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picker, Gerold; Gollinger, Klaus; Greger, Ralf; Dettmann, Jan; Winter, Josef; Dewandre, Thierry; Castiglione, Luigi; Vincent-Bonnieu, Sebastien; Liggieri, Libero; Clausse, Daniele; Antoni, Mickael

    The FASES experiments target the investigation of the stability of emulsions. The main objec-tives are the study of the surfactant adsorption at the liquid / liquid interfaces, the interaction of the droplets as well as the behaviour of the liquid film between nearby drops. Particular focus is given to the dynamic droplet evolution during emulsion destabilisation. The results of the experiments shall support development of methods for the modelling of droplet size distri-butions, which are important to many industries using stable emulsions like food production, cosmetics and pharmaceutics or unstable emulsions as required for applications in waste water treatment or crude oil recovery. The development of the experimental instrumentation was initiated in 2002. The flight instru-ment hardware development was started in 2004 and finally the flight unit was completed in 2009. Currently the final flight preparation is proceeding targeting a launch to the International Space Station (ISS) with Progress 39P in September 2010. The experiment setup of the instrument is accommodated in a box type insert called Experiment Container (EC), which will be installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory part of the European Columbus module of the ISS. The EC is composed of two diagnostics instruments for the investigation of transparent and opaque liquid emulsion. The transparent emulsions will be subject to the experiment called "Investigations on drop/drop interactions in Transparent Emulsions" (ITEM). The opaque emulsion samples will be studied in the experiment called "Investigations on concentrated or opaque Emulsions and on Phase Inversions" (EMPI). The thermal conditioning unit (TCU) allows performing homogeneous thermalization, tem-perature sweeps, emulsion preparation by stirrer, and optical diagnostics with a scanning mi-croscope. The objective of the instrument is the 3D reconstruction of the emulsion droplet distribution in the liquid matrix in terms of the droplet sizes

  15. Development and testing of nurses information systems use instrument.

    PubMed

    Abdrbo, Amany A; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Hudak, Christine A

    2010-01-01

    Information systems provide nurses with a variety of resources to facilitate their work. Nurses' use of information systems changes the way they collect assessment data, and plan and implement patient care. However, a reliable and valid instrument for measuring nurse's use of information systems does not currently exist. This study examined the development and psychometric testing of a measure of nurses' information systems use, the Information Systems Use Instrument (ISUI). A random sample of 570 nurses working in hospitals, providing direct patient care and using at least one information system completed the study questionnaire. The internal consistency reliability was .82. Exploratory factor analysis, using principal components extraction and varimax rotation, revealed that all seven items loaded cleanly and strongly on a single factor. The ISUI showed sufficient evidence for its psychometric properties to encourage its use.

  16. The neutron instrument Monte Carlo library MCLIB: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Daemen, L.L.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Thelliez, T.G.

    1998-12-31

    A brief review is given of the developments since the ICANS-XIII meeting made in the neutron instrument design codes using the Monte Carlo library MCLIB. Much of the effort has been to assure that the library and the executing code MC{_}RUN connect efficiently with the World Wide Web application MC-WEB as part of the Los Alamos Neutron Instrument Simulation Package (NISP). Since one of the most important features of MCLIB is its open structure and capability to incorporate any possible neutron transport or scattering algorithm, this document describes the current procedure that would be used by an outside user to add a feature to MCLIB. Details of the calling sequence of the core subroutine OPERATE are discussed, and questions of style are considered and additional guidelines given. Suggestions for standardization are solicited, as well as code for new algorithms.

  17. Analysis and development of multiprofessional teams in medical rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Mirjam

    2008-01-01

    Team analysis and team development are important instruments of organizational development and quality management. They contribute to team optimization in medical rehabilitation. Team analysis allows assessment of strengths and weaknesses of teams, resulting in possible recommendations for team development. So far there are only a few empirical studies and little practical experience analyzing multiprofessional teams in the health care field and inpatient medical rehabilitation in particular. This article presents team analyses performed on twelve multiprofessional medical rehabilitation teams in Germany and corresponding recommendations for team development. A heuristic model of team analysis and team development was designed for this purpose. The model comprises the following parameters: input (team structure), process (teamwork) and output (team success). Variables to measure these parameters were derived from team performance models and known weaknesses of teams in medical care. Team analyses were conducted by administering a semi-standardized interview form and a short questionnaire to the head physicians of participating clinics while a survey was administered to all members of the rehabilitation team. The results of the team analyses suggested the use of team development measures on each team. The teams were classified into three categories by their need for team development (low, medium and high). Furthermore five modules of team development could be generated from the results of the team analyses: (1) executive coaching, (2) communication training, (3) changing attitude towards teamwork, (4) task-oriented team development, and (5) training on socio-integrative aspects of teamwork. Some of these modules are important constituents of quality management programs. Team development can facilitate quality management programs, particularly with regard to process and output relating to leadership and staff. The study shows, that there is a basic, yet variable need

  18. NASA Planetary Science Division's Instrument Development Programs, PICASSO and MatISSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaier, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Planetary Science Division's instrument development programs, Planetary Instrument Concept Advancing Solar System Observations (PICASSO), and Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration Program (MatISSE), are described.

  19. Prediction of sickness absence: development of a screening instrument

    PubMed Central

    Duijts, S F A; Kant, IJ; Landeweerd, J A; Swaen, G M H

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To develop a concise screening instrument for early identification of employees at risk for sickness absence due to psychosocial health complaints. Methods Data from the Maastricht Cohort Study on “Fatigue at Work” were used to identify items to be associated with an increased risk of sickness absence. The analytical procedures univariate logistic regression, backward stepwise linear regression, and multiple logistic regression were successively applied. For both men and women, sum scores were calculated, and sensitivity and specificity rates of different cut‐off points on the screening instrument were defined. Results In women, results suggested that feeling depressed, having a burnout, being tired, being less interested in work, experiencing obligatory change in working days, and living alone, were strong predictors of sickness absence due to psychosocial health complaints. In men, statistically significant predictors were having a history of sickness absence, compulsive thinking, being mentally fatigued, finding it hard to relax, lack of supervisor support, and having no hobbies. A potential cut‐off point of 10 on the screening instrument resulted in a sensitivity score of 41.7% for women and 38.9% for men, and a specificity score of 91.3% for women and 90.6% for men. Conclusions This study shows that it is possible to identify predictive factors for sickness absence and to develop an instrument for early identification of employees at risk for sickness absence. The results of this study increase the possibility for both employers and policymakers to implement interventions directed at the prevention of sickness absence. PMID:16698807

  20. Development and evaluation of a genetics literacy assessment instrument for undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Bethany Vice; Acra, Erin E; Wang, Lihshing; Myers, Melanie F; Dean, Gary E; Markle, Glenn C; Moskalik, Christine L; Huether, Carl A

    2008-01-01

    There is continued emphasis on increasing and improving genetics education for grades K-12, for medical professionals, and for the general public. Another critical audience is undergraduate students in introductory biology and genetics courses. To improve the learning of genetics, there is a need to first assess students' understanding of genetics concepts and their level of genetics literacy (i.e., genetics knowledge as it relates to, and affects, their lives). We have developed and evaluated a new instrument to assess the genetics literacy of undergraduate students taking introductory biology or genetics courses. The Genetics Literacy Assessment Instrument is a 31-item multiple-choice test that addresses 17 concepts identified as central to genetics literacy. The items were selected and modified on the basis of reviews by 25 genetics professionals and educators. The instrument underwent additional analysis in student focus groups and pilot testing. It has been evaluated using approximately 400 students in eight introductory nonmajor biology and genetics courses. The content validity, discriminant validity, internal reliability, and stability of the instrument have been considered. This project directly enhances genetics education research by providing a valid and reliable instrument for assessing the genetics literacy of undergraduate students.

  1. Development and Evaluation of a Genetics Literacy Assessment Instrument for Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Bowling, Bethany Vice; Acra, Erin E.; Wang, Lihshing; Myers, Melanie F.; Dean, Gary E.; Markle, Glenn C.; Moskalik, Christine L.; Huether, Carl A.

    2008-01-01

    There is continued emphasis on increasing and improving genetics education for grades K–12, for medical professionals, and for the general public. Another critical audience is undergraduate students in introductory biology and genetics courses. To improve the learning of genetics, there is a need to first assess students' understanding of genetics concepts and their level of genetics literacy (i.e., genetics knowledge as it relates to, and affects, their lives). We have developed and evaluated a new instrument to assess the genetics literacy of undergraduate students taking introductory biology or genetics courses. The Genetics Literacy Assessment Instrument is a 31-item multiple-choice test that addresses 17 concepts identified as central to genetics literacy. The items were selected and modified on the basis of reviews by 25 genetics professionals and educators. The instrument underwent additional analysis in student focus groups and pilot testing. It has been evaluated using ∼400 students in eight introductory nonmajor biology and genetics courses. The content validity, discriminant validity, internal reliability, and stability of the instrument have been considered. This project directly enhances genetics education research by providing a valid and reliable instrument for assessing the genetics literacy of undergraduate students. PMID:18202354

  2. Emergency room volunteer internship: an instrument for quality in medical training.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Adonis; Talini, Carolina; Neves, Giana Carolina Strack; Krieger, João Guilherme Cavalcanti; Collaço, Iwan Augusto; Domingos, Micheli Fortunato

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the influence of medical student's voluntary internship at the Emergency Room of the Workers Hospital (ER-HT) in the choice of medical specialty and its importance during graduation. A questionnaire was given to doctors and medical students that performed internships at ER-HT for e" 500 hours, from March 2000 until March 2012. A total of 765 medical students and doctors performed e" 500 hours of practical activities at ER-HT and 390 answered the questionnaire - 37,9% chose surgical specialties and 24,1% clinical. Internship was crucial in choosing a career for 82,3%, and was a positive influence for 83,8%. Regarding the increment in interpersonal relationship, grade e" 8 was given by 61% of the participants for relationship with other professionals, 71% for relationship with colleagues and 63% for relationship with patients. The internship increased self-confidence for 92% and 75% reported an increase in technical knowledge. The training was considered useful and necessary for medical education to 80% of participants. Contribution provided by ER internships is undeniable for medical education and often influences students on choosing their medical specialties. The situations faced by students during these activities enable the development of intelligence in areas other than purely technical, which reflects in their medical practice.

  3. Developing a self-administered CKD symptom assessment instrument.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    Current disease-centred therapies for CKD focus on preserving the GFR but often ignore patient-reported symptoms. This purpose of this report is to describe the development of an instrument to measure the presence and severity of a wide range of symptoms commonly attributable to CKD. A 37-item questionnaire was administered along with the Kidney Disease Quality of Life instrument to 92 patients with CKD not on dialysis (24% black, 5% women, mean age 68 years, 68% with diabetes mellitus). To discover groups of symptoms, agglomerative cluster analysis followed by exploratory common factor analysis was performed. Construct validity, internal reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, test-retest reliability and finally the association of various symptom domains with objective measurements such as estimated GFR and haemoglobin were tested. The top five symptoms of at least moderate severity in decreasing order of prevalence were 'tire easily', limited physical activity, nocturia, joint pain and 'stop and rest often'. Four common factors emerged that could be broadly classified into neuropsychiatric, cardiovascular, uraemia and anaemia symptoms accounting for 73% of the total variance in the sample. The coefficient alpha for each of these factors approached 0.9. The test-retest reliability in 41 patients over 8 weeks was likewise high. There was good convergent and divergent validity. However, there was little relationship between estimated GFR and symptom scores. The assessment of symptom burden among patients with CKD may be facilitated by incorporating this instrument in routine practice and clinical trials.

  4. Development of a Conceptual Model and Survey Instrument to Measure Conscientious Objection to Abortion Provision

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Laura Florence; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Gerdts, Caitlin; Gil Urbano, Laura; González Vélez, Ana Cristina; Halpern, Jodi; Prata, Ndola; Baffoe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Conscientious objection to abortion, clinicians’ refusal to perform legal abortions because of their religious or moral beliefs, has been the subject of increasing debate among bioethicists, policymakers, and public health advocates in recent years. Conscientious objection policies are intended to balance reproductive rights and clinicians’ beliefs. However, in practice, clinician objection can act as a barrier to abortion access–impinging on reproductive rights, and increasing unsafe abortion and related morbidity and mortality. There is little information about conscientious objection from a medical or public health perspective. A quantitative instrument is needed to assess prevalence of conscientious objection and to provide insight on its practice. This paper describes the development of a survey instrument to measure conscientious objection to abortion provision. Methods A literature review, and in-depth formative interviews with stakeholders in Colombia were used to develop a conceptual model of conscientious objection. This model led to the development of a survey, which was piloted, and then administered, in Ghana. Results The model posits three domains of conscientious objection that form the basis for the survey instrument: 1) beliefs about abortion and conscientious objection; 2) actions related to conscientious objection and abortion; and 3) self-identification as a conscientious objector. Conclusions The instrument is intended to be used to assess prevalence among clinicians trained to provide abortions, and to gain insight on how conscientious objection is practiced in a variety of settings. Its results can inform more effective and appropriate strategies to regulate conscientious objection. PMID:27736992

  5. Development of a Conceptual Model and Survey Instrument to Measure Conscientious Objection to Abortion Provision.

    PubMed

    Harris, Laura Florence; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Gerdts, Caitlin; Gil Urbano, Laura; González Vélez, Ana Cristina; Halpern, Jodi; Prata, Ndola; Baffoe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Conscientious objection to abortion, clinicians' refusal to perform legal abortions because of their religious or moral beliefs, has been the subject of increasing debate among bioethicists, policymakers, and public health advocates in recent years. Conscientious objection policies are intended to balance reproductive rights and clinicians' beliefs. However, in practice, clinician objection can act as a barrier to abortion access-impinging on reproductive rights, and increasing unsafe abortion and related morbidity and mortality. There is little information about conscientious objection from a medical or public health perspective. A quantitative instrument is needed to assess prevalence of conscientious objection and to provide insight on its practice. This paper describes the development of a survey instrument to measure conscientious objection to abortion provision. A literature review, and in-depth formative interviews with stakeholders in Colombia were used to develop a conceptual model of conscientious objection. This model led to the development of a survey, which was piloted, and then administered, in Ghana. The model posits three domains of conscientious objection that form the basis for the survey instrument: 1) beliefs about abortion and conscientious objection; 2) actions related to conscientious objection and abortion; and 3) self-identification as a conscientious objector. The instrument is intended to be used to assess prevalence among clinicians trained to provide abortions, and to gain insight on how conscientious objection is practiced in a variety of settings. Its results can inform more effective and appropriate strategies to regulate conscientious objection.

  6. Instrument development in the Italy-USA Collaborative Spectrum Project.

    PubMed

    Rucci, P; Maser, J D

    2000-01-01

    The Collaborative Spectrum Project aims to define subthreshold and atyical conditions not sufficiently characterized in the current diagnostic nomenclature and for which adequate assessment instruments are not available. This paper reports on the development and validation of new instruments to assess the spectrum of five psychiatric disorders. Three multicenter studies and one single-site study were conducted in Italy to assess the validity and reliability of the five spectrum interviews. Another cross-sectional study to validate the panic-agoraphobia spectrum has been conducted in Pittsburgh. Outpatients attending various university clinics, university students and, in one Italian study, gym attenders were recruited for the studies. Five structured clinical interview to assess the spectrum of panic-agoraphobia (SCI-PAS), mood (SCI-MOODS), social phobia (SCI-SHY), and the obsessive-compulsive (SCI-OBS) and eating disorder spectra (SCI-ABS) were administered along with a diagnostic interview and a number of self-report and interviewer-rated instruments. All the domains of the interview showed high test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.61) and satisfactory internal consistency. Mean domain scores were significantly higher in cases than in controls and in patients with the disorder of interest than in patients with other disorders. Convergent validity was satisfactory for panic-agoraphobia, social phobia and obsessive-compulsive spectrum domains. Differences emerged between SCI-ABS and self-report instruments assessing eating disorders. A cut-off score for the panic-agoraphobia spectrum was defined and its clinical validity was tested. The psychometric properties of the five spectrum interviews are very satisfactory, and studies are currently ongoing to test the clinical validity of all the spectra. Subthreshold and atypical symptoms deserve attention in epidemiological investigation.

  7. Electro-optic transient imaging instrumentation development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Implications for SSC instrumentation development

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.; Jacoby, B.; Schulte, H.

    1990-12-01

    Over the last decade, the underground weapons physics laboratories fielded by LLNL's Nuclear Test and Experimental Sciences (NTES) program have experienced marked change. This change is characterized by a phenomenal growth in the amount of data returned per event. These techniques have been developed as a result of the severe demands placed upon transient instrumentation by the physics requirements of our underground nuclear laboratories. The detector front-ends must quickly detect, process and transmit a large volume of data to recording stations located approximately 1 km from the event. In a recent event, the detector front-ends successfully handled data at a prompt rate of approximately 13 Terabits/sec. Largely, this advance can be attributed directly to the increased use of electro-optic techniques. These highly-parallel high-bandwidth imaging instrumentation systems developed for the test program may have a lot to offer the high-energy physics community tackling the challenge of the unprecedented luminosity and fidelity demands at the SSC. In what follows, we discuss details of a few of our prompt instrumentation techniques and compare these capabilities to the detector requirements for the challenging physics at the SSC. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Medical imaging in new drug clinical development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Xiang; Deng, Min

    2010-12-01

    Medical imaging can help answer key questions that arise during the drug development process. The role of medical imaging in new drug clinical trials includes identification of likely responders; detection and diagnosis of lesions and evaluation of their severity; and therapy monitoring and follow-up. Nuclear imaging techniques such as PET can be used to monitor drug pharmacokinetics and distribution and study specific molecular endpoints. In assessing drug efficacy, imaging biomarkers and imaging surrogate endpoints can be more objective and faster to measure than clinical outcomes, and allow small group sizes, quick results and good statistical power. Imaging also has important role in drug safety monitoring, particularly when there is no other suitable biomarkers available. Despite the long history of radiological sciences, its application to the drug development process is relatively recent. This review highlights the processes, opportunities, and challenges of medical imaging in new drug development.

  9. Theory development and application in medical education.

    PubMed

    Cianciolo, Anna T; Eva, Kevin W; Colliver, Jerry A

    2013-01-01

    The role and status of theory is by no means a new topic in medical education. Yet summarizing where we have been and where we are going with respect to theory development and application is difficult because our community has not yet fully elucidated what constitutes medical education theory. In this article, we explore the idea of conceptualizing theory as an effect on scholarly dialogue among medical educators. We describe theory-enabled conversation as argumentation, which frames inquiry, permits the evaluation of evidence, and enables the acquisition of community understanding that has utility beyond investigators' local circumstances. We present ideas for assessing argumentation quality and suggest approaches to increasing the frequency and quality of argumentation in the exchange among diverse medical education scholars.

  10. Theater Nuclear Force Survivability and Security Instrumentation. Engineering Development Phase.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-15

    THIS SHEET LINVENTORY o - Aproved I oi ;~ziTic :~ o |. .. Distiibutio,-; ni ,t, DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT ACCESSION FOR NTIS GRA&I DTIC T"A D UNANNOUNCED...H 81 2 O 01 " DATE KECEIVED IN DTIC PHOTOGRAPH THIS SHEET AND RETURN TO DTIC-DDA-2 FORM DOCUMENT PROCESSING SHEET DTIC OCT 79 70A h-10( 4.c DNA 5158F...THEATER NUCLEAR FORCE SURVIVABILITY SAND SECURITY INSTRUMENTATION ’ Engineering Development Phase o rhe BDM Corporation ’.0. Box 9274 kibuquerque

  11. Natural Language Processing Based Instrument for Classification of Free Text Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    According to the Ministry of Labor, Health and Social Affairs of Georgia a new health management system has to be introduced in the nearest future. In this context arises the problem of structuring and classifying documents containing all the history of medical services provided. The present work introduces the instrument for classification of medical records based on the Georgian language. It is the first attempt of such classification of the Georgian language based medical records. On the whole 24.855 examination records have been studied. The documents were classified into three main groups (ultrasonography, endoscopy, and X-ray) and 13 subgroups using two well-known methods: Support Vector Machine (SVM) and K-Nearest Neighbor (KNN). The results obtained demonstrated that both machine learning methods performed successfully, with a little supremacy of SVM. In the process of classification a “shrink” method, based on features selection, was introduced and applied. At the first stage of classification the results of the “shrink” case were better; however, on the second stage of classification into subclasses 23% of all documents could not be linked to only one definite individual subclass (liver or binary system) due to common features characterizing these subclasses. The overall results of the study were successful. PMID:27668260

  12. Simulation to develop tomorrow's medical registrar.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anand; Carter, Thomas; Kuwani, Thungo; Sharpe, Roger

    2013-02-01

     Critical incident analysis reveals that poor performance in 'human-factor' or non-technical skills, such as decision making, leadership, teamwork and situational awareness, are frequently identified as key underlying features leading to adverse events. Simulation technology is a rapidly emerging modality used to develop technical and non-technical skills within specialist training as increasing shift-pattern work reduces work-based exposure and learning opportunities. To date, however, there is little literature regarding its use within core medical training to develop crisis resource management skills and medical registrar competency. We present results from a pilot in situ high-fidelity, multidisciplinary, simulation training course in which core medical trainees practised the role of a medical registrar within challenging crisis scenarios. Twenty-one trainees completed the simulation course. All trainees agreed that the course improved their clinical skills and knowledge, concentrated on key non-technical skills that are important in crisis management and, importantly, would change their clinical practice and improve patient safety. Trainee overall performance strongly correlated with assessment of non-technical skills during the simulation scenario. Trainees invited to return for a repeat session after previous concerns and specific feedback showed a visible improvement in performance, with an objective improvement in self-assessed performance. This pilot programme shows the benefits of a high-fidelity, in situ, multidisciplinary simulation training course for core medical trainees in developing the key crisis resource management skills necessary at medical registrar level. As a historical apprenticeship model of training becomes increasingly variable and absent, we present a novel complimentary training strategy for tomorrow's medical registrars. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  13. Faculty development in medical education research.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Joseph; Hamstra, Stanley J; Martin, Daniel R; Searle, Nancy; Love, Jeffrey; Castaneda, Jill; Aziz-Bose, Rahela; Smith, Michael; Griswold-Therodorson, Sharon; Leuck, JoAnna

    2012-12-01

    This 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference breakout session was devoted to the task of identifying the history and current state of faculty development in education research in emergency medicine (EM). The participants set a future agenda for successful faculty development in education research. A number of education research and content experts collaborated during the session. This article summarizes existing academic and medical literature, expert opinions, and audience consensus to report our agreement and findings related to the promotion of faculty development.

  14. [Development and Validation of a Screening Instrument for Complex PTSD].

    PubMed

    Dorr, Florence; Firus, Christian; Kramer, Rolf; Bengel, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Chronic interpersonal traumata systematically result in psychological impairments referred to as complex post-traumatic stress disorder (cPTSD or DESNOS). This diagnosis will be newly established in the ICD-11 system. However, there is need for diagnostic instruments to assess cPTSD. The aim was to develop a screening form to identify patients at risk for cPTSD. The Screening for complex PTSD (SkPTBS) tests a) experience of potential traumatic events, b) related influential features and risk factors, and c) symptoms of cPTSD. 325 patients (mean age 51.5±8.7 years; 62.1% female) filled out the screening instrument at the beginning of their inpatient psychotherapy. The primary criterion for testing SkPTBS validity was the diagnosis of complex PTSD at the end of the inpatient treatment. The proportion of patients with cPTSD was 8.9% (n=29). SkPTBS items were selective, and the scale showed very good reliability (α=0.91). Factor analysis revealed a one-dimensional structure. SkPTBS total values predicted having cPTSD diagnosis and were correlated with global symptom severity (SCL-90-R) and depressive symptoms (BDI-II). There is evidence for high clinical utility of SkPTBS. A revised version was developed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Combining instrumental and contextual approaches: nanotechnology and sustainable development.

    PubMed

    Liao, Nina

    2009-01-01

    Billions of people live in poverty, with no access to safe drinking water or solutions for other critical health and medical needs. Nanotechnology is poised to create workable solutions for large-scale public health needs in developing countries, including improving water quality and providing life-saving pharmaceuticals. There are two views on how emerging technologies such as nanotechnology can influence and affect developing countries. Instrumentalists believe that the international community can transfer nanotechnology from one context to another and use it to assist the poor. Contextualists warn that nanotechnology can increase inequality in underdeveloped regions. Because of inadequacies in both positions, the international community must adopt a mixed strategy. This article argues that this mixed strategy should target the bottom of the pyramid, develop native capability, implement emergency protocols in projects, create accountability, and engage the public. Managed well, this strategy can propel developing countries toward sustainable development.

  16. Veterinary Medical Genetics: A Developing Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Womack, James E.; Templeton, Joe W.

    1978-01-01

    Areas that will influence the development of veterinary medical genetics as a clinical discipline are discussed, some critical research areas of immediate concern are suggested, and misconceptions held by many practicing veterinarians which must be corrected at the level of veterinary education are identified. (JMD)

  17. Developing virtual patients for medical microbiology education.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, David; O'Gorman, Ciaran; Gormley, Gerry J

    2013-12-01

    The landscape of medical education is changing as students embrace the accessibility and interactivity of e-learning. Virtual patients are e-learning resources that may be used to advance microbiology education. Although the development of virtual patients has been widely considered, here we aim to provide a coherent approach for clinical educators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of test methodology for dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation was used for the development of specific test methodology in the determination of engineering parameters of selected materials, esp. plastics and elastomers, over a broad range of temperature with selected environment. The methodology for routine procedures was established with specific attention given to sample geometry, sample size, and mounting techniques. The basic software of the duPont 1090 thermal analyzer was used for data reduction which simplify the theoretical interpretation. Clamps were developed which allowed 'relative' damping during the cure cycle to be measured for the fiber-glass supported resin. The correlation of fracture energy 'toughness' (or impact strength) with the low temperature (glassy) relaxation responses for a 'rubber-modified' epoxy system was negative in result because the low-temperature dispersion mode (-80 C) of the modifier coincided with that of the epoxy matrix, making quantitative comparison unrealistic.

  19. Rasch Analysis for Instrument Development: Why, When, and How?

    PubMed Central

    Boone, William J.

    2016-01-01

    This essay describes Rasch analysis psychometric techniques and how such techniques can be used by life sciences education researchers to guide the development and use of surveys and tests. Specifically, Rasch techniques can be used to document and evaluate the measurement functioning of such instruments. Rasch techniques also allow researchers to construct “Wright maps” to explain the meaning of a test score or survey score and develop alternative forms of tests and surveys. Rasch techniques provide a mechanism by which the quality of life sciences–related tests and surveys can be optimized and the techniques can be used to provide a context (e.g., what topics a student has mastered) when explaining test and survey results. PMID:27856555

  20. Sounding Rocket Instrument Development at UAHuntsville/NASA MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Savage, Sabrina; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Podgorski, William; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Trujillo-Bueno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    We present an overview of solar sounding rocket instruments developed jointly by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) is an EUV (19.3 nm) imaging telescope which was flown successfully in July 2012. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) is a Lyman Alpha (121.6 nm) spectropolarimeter developed jointly with the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan and scheduled for launch in 2015. The Marshall Grazing Incidence X-ray Spectrograph is a soft X-ray (0.5-1.2 keV) stigmatic spectrograph designed to achieve 5 arcsecond spatial resolution along the slit.

  1. Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART -XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module provides an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. We will present a status of the ART x-ray module development at MSFC.

  2. Instrumentation Development for Large Scale Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Gregory T.; Cassell, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) technology is currently being considered for multiple atmospheric entry applications as the limitations of traditional entry vehicles have been reached. The Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) has successfully demonstrated this technology as a viable candidate with a 3.0 m diameter vehicle sub-orbital flight. To further this technology, large scale HIADs (6.0 8.5 m) must be developed and tested. To characterize the performance of large scale HIAD technology new instrumentation concepts must be developed to accommodate the flexible nature inflatable aeroshell. Many of the concepts that are under consideration for the HIAD FY12 subsonic wind tunnel test series are discussed below.

  3. Fast Fluorescence Laser Tracking Microrheometry, I: Instrument Development

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, Maxine; Huang, Hayden; Kamm, Roger D.; So, Peter T. C.

    2008-01-01

    To gain insight into cellular mechanotransduction pathways, we have developed a fluorescence laser tracking microrheometer (FLTM) to measure material rheological features on micrometer length scales using fluorescent microspheres as tracer particles. The statistical analysis of the Brownian motion of a particle quantifies the viscoelastic properties of the probe's environment, parameterized by the frequency-dependent complex shear modulus G*(ω). This FLTM has nanometer spatial resolution over a frequency range extending from 1 Hz to 50 kHz. In this work, we first describe the consecutive stages of instrument design, development, and optimization. We subsequently demonstrate the accuracy of the FLTM by reproducing satisfactorily the known rheological characteristics of purely viscous glycerol solutions and cross-linked polyacrylamide polymer networks. An upcoming companion article will illustrate the use of FLTM in studying the solid-like versus liquid-like rheological properties of fibroblast cytoskeletons in living biological samples. PMID:17965137

  4. [Benzalkonium chloride: unacceptable to sterilize or disinfect medical or dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Acosta-Gío, E; Herrero-Farías, A; Mata-Portuguez, V H

    2001-01-01

    To compare the sporicidal activity of benzalkonium chloride (BKC) with that of glutaraldehyde. A comparative study was conducted at the microbiology laboratory of Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Bacillus subtilis ATCC 9372 spores were exposed to these germicides (1 spore x mL) on a 0.22 mm filter. After completing the contact time the spores were washed and the filters were incubated on nutrient agar for 72 h at 37 degrees C. BKC did not eliminate B. subtilis spores at the concentration used, not even after increasing contact time to 15 h (900-fold the recommended time). Two percent glutaraldehyde destroyed spores only after 10 h of contact. Urea and sodium chloride showed no sporicidal activity. The results confirm that BKC lacks sporicidal activity and confirm that this quaternary ammonium compound is not able to "sterilize" or "disinfect" medical and dental instruments.

  5. Leadership in graduate medical education: eleven steps instrumental in recovering residency programs after a disaster.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Jeffrey G

    2008-08-01

    A disaster such as Hurricane Katrina can result in extensive devastation to graduate medical education programs. While clinical services largely determine the recovery of each residency program, program director leadership is important. A qualitative survey of program directors was conducted to determine the leadership lessons most instrumental after a disaster. Gaining control, establishing communication, designing a vision for the recovery, maintaining physical accessibility, and identifying leaders within the program were identified as critical leadership attributes associated with a residency program's recovery. Understanding the logistics and finances of resident placement was also important. Preparing for a disaster is the best approach, but where a disaster policy is incomplete or inadequate, it will be the leadership skills of the program's director that will define the success of failure of the residency program.

  6. Development of an instrument to measure caring behaviors in nursing students in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee-Hsieh, Jane; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Tseng, Hung-Fu; Turton, Michael A

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a culturally sensitive instrument to measure caring behaviors in nursing students in Taiwan from the patient perspective. The study, involving expert assessment of content validity and face validity, a first test (n = 196), and a second test (n = 192) in medical-surgical patients, and the generation of descriptive statistics, resulted in a 28-item questionnaire, the caring behavior measurement (CBM). The findings suggest the CBM is a valid and reliable assessment tool of caring behaviors in students and practicing professional nurses, as well as offering a descriptive answer to "what is caring in nursing in Taiwan".

  7. Development and testing of the GNSS Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) airborne instrument.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, J. L.; Ventre, B. D.; Haase, J.; Boehme, M. H.

    2006-12-01

    The GNSS Instrument System for Multistatic and Occultation Sensing (GISMOS) is a new remote sensing system being developed for the HIAPER Gulfstream V aircraft, under support of the National Science Foundation. This system is designed to use occulted and reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals to retrieve tropospheric water vapor, ocean surface roughness and soil moisture during long duration, high altitude, flights. This presentation will summarize the preliminary design and engineering testing of the GISMOS instruments. Applications of this system to ocean and land reflection measurements and calibration/validation activities for satellite missions, will be emphasized. GISMOS will use five GNSS antennas on the aircraft fuselage. One will be used for precision navigation. Two antennas, one mounted in the window blanks on each side of the fuselage, will be used to track occulting GPS signals. A pair of antennas will be mounted on the bottom of the fuselage to record both the right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized components of the reflected GNSS signal. A GNSS recorder will also sample and record the intermediate frequency (IF) signal from up to three dual- frequency antennas. This would allow simultaneous recording of RHCP and LHCP reflected signals, at both L1 and L2 frequencies, and the direct signal for power and delay calibration. Occultation measurements could also be collected in conjunction with reflection measurements. The automatic gain control (AGC) gain is sampled at 1 Hz, and stored in the data stream, to allow an absolute calibration of power measurements. A software receiver will be used to generate delay-Doppler waveforms from the reflected signals, which can be inverted using a scattering model to estimate the statistics of the reflecting surface. Waveform generation at L2 will be done using the L2C code on the modernized GPS satellites. The software receiver will also allow open-loop tracking of occulted GPS signals

  8. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  9. Survey of Hospitals and Manufacturers of Biomedical Instrumentation Concerning Variables Related to the Development and Implementation of a Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaumberg, Gary F.

    The Bio-Med Instrumentation Technologist Questionnaire was sent to 105 hospitals in the Southern California area that had electronic instrumentation for patient monitoring purposes. Sixty completed questionnaires were returned. Twenty manufacturers of bio-medical instrumentation were sent the questionnaires and seven responded. Some of the…

  10. Developing Medical Geology in Uruguay: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Mañay, Nelly

    2010-01-01

    Several disciplines like Environmental Toxicology, Epidemiology, Public Health and Geology have been the basis of the development of Medical Geology in Uruguay during the last decade. The knowledge and performance in environmental and health issues have been improved by joining similar aims research teams and experts from different institutions to face environmental problems dealing with the population’s exposure to metals and metalloids and their health impacts. Some of the Uruguayan Medical Geology examples are reviewed focusing on their multidisciplinary approach: Lead pollution and exposed children, selenium in critically ill patients, copper deficiency in cattle and arsenic risk assessment in ground water. Future actions are also presented. PMID:20623004

  11. Developing medical geology in Uruguay: a review.

    PubMed

    Mañay, Nelly

    2010-05-01

    Several disciplines like Environmental Toxicology, Epidemiology, Public Health and Geology have been the basis of the development of Medical Geology in Uruguay during the last decade. The knowledge and performance in environmental and health issues have been improved by joining similar aims research teams and experts from different institutions to face environmental problems dealing with the population's exposure to metals and metalloids and their health impacts. Some of the Uruguayan Medical Geology examples are reviewed focusing on their multidisciplinary approach: Lead pollution and exposed children, selenium in critically ill patients, copper deficiency in cattle and arsenic risk assessment in ground water. Future actions are also presented.

  12. INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT, MEASUREMENT AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-31

    Many DOE applications would significantly benefit from the availability of robust and convenient instrumentation for trace-level actinide monitoring and analysis. This project focuses on developing new instrumentation for on-line or at-line monitoring for actinides with isotopic analysis capability. In addition, analytical protocols for a novel concentration method for actinides are being investigated. These efforts focus on demonstrating these techniques using uranium. In addition to its value in the analytical laboratory, the combination of a simple concentration technique with a robust isotopic monitor could provide a powerful method for addressing a number of outstanding DOE needs. Potential applications include monitors for waste water and sewage treatment systems influent and effluent, and the ability to determine the isotopic content of transuranic species in low-activity waste fractions for waste classification and product acceptance. For example, the need for improved monitoring for uranium, plutonium, and americium in treatment plant influent is clearly identified in need RF-ER11. With some additional sample pretreatment, such technology could also impact materials characterization needs by providing on-site isotopic analyses in a system that is smaller and significantly less complex than inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS).

  13. The development and application of an instrument for assessing resident competence during preanesthesia consultation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Filho, Getúlio Rodrigues; Schonhorst, Leonardo

    2004-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to construct, validate, and apply an instrument for assessing resident performance at outpatient preanesthesia consultation (PAC). A focus group and a Delphi panel of experts defined component items of a typical outpatient PAC, which could be used as indicators of competence. Items were incorporated in a checklist, which was further validated in a sample of consultations performed by board-certified anesthesiologists. The resulting instrument contained 37 items, grouped into five domains (physician-patient relationship, medical history, physical examination, patient education, and preanesthesia records), with high construct validity, high discriminant validity, moderate internal consistency, and high probability of inter-raters agreement. The instrument was applied to evaluate the performance of seven first-year residents at 317 consecutive PAC. Data were analyzed by constructing exponentially weighted moving average charts for domain and total scores. Statistically significant differing levels of performance could be consistently detected. Applying exponentially weighted moving average charts to the sequential analysis of the developed checklist scores can reliably assess resident performance at the devised criteria. The Preanesthesia Consultation Scoring Checklist is a potentially useful instrument for both formative and summative assessment of residents during their training in processes involved in outpatient preanesthesia evaluation.

  14. Development of an alpha scattering instrument for heavy element detection in surface materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkevich, A. L.; Economou, T.; Blume, E.; Anderson, W.

    1974-01-01

    The development and characteristics of a portable instrument for detecting and measuring the amounts of lead in painted surfaces are discussed. The instrument is based on the ones used with the alpha scattering experiment on the Surveyor lunar missions. The principles underlying the instrument are described. It is stated that the performance tests of the instrument were satisfactory.

  15. Adaptation of WHOQOL as health-related quality of life instrument to develop a vision-specific instrument.

    PubMed

    Dandona, R; Dandona, L; McCarty, C A; Rao, G N

    2000-03-01

    The WHOQOL instrument was adapted as a health-related QOL instrument for a population-based epidemiologic study of eye diseases in southern India, the Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS). A follow-up question was added to each item in WHOQOL to determine whether the decrease in QOL was due to any health reasons including eye-related reasons. Modifications in WHOQOL and translation in local language were done through the use of the focus groups including health professionals and people not related to health care. The modified instrument has 28 items across 6 domains of the WHOQOL and was translated into the local language, Telugu, using the pragmatic approach. It takes 10-20 minutes to be administered by a trained interviewer. Reliability was within acceptable range. This health-related QOL instrument is being used in the population-based study APEDS to develop a vision-specific QOL instrument which could potentially be used to assess the impact of visual impairment on QOL across different cultures and for use in evaluating eye-care interventions. This health-related QOL instrument could also be used to develop other disease-specific instruments as it allows assessment of the extent to which various aspects of QOL are affected by a variety of health problems.

  16. Developing a New Instrument for Assessing Acceptance of Change.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the usefulness of going beyond the concept of resistance to change and capitalizing on the use of a model that includes positivity and acceptance of change. We first discuss the theoretical background of this new construct in the work and organizational fields and then evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure for assessing acceptance of change. The results of exploratory factor analysis indicated a factor structure with five principal dimensions; besides confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) goodness of fit indices indicated a good fit of the model to the data. All the dimensions showed good values of internal consistency. The results of the present study indicate that the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS) is a brief and easily administered instrument with good psychometric properties that can promote the development of clients' strengths and the growth of a sense of Self, thereby helping them choose their own way without losing any opportunities in their lives and their work.

  17. Developing a New Instrument for Assessing Acceptance of Change

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Gori, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the usefulness of going beyond the concept of resistance to change and capitalizing on the use of a model that includes positivity and acceptance of change. We first discuss the theoretical background of this new construct in the work and organizational fields and then evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure for assessing acceptance of change. The results of exploratory factor analysis indicated a factor structure with five principal dimensions; besides confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) goodness of fit indices indicated a good fit of the model to the data. All the dimensions showed good values of internal consistency. The results of the present study indicate that the Acceptance of Change Scale (ACS) is a brief and easily administered instrument with good psychometric properties that can promote the development of clients' strengths and the growth of a sense of Self, thereby helping them choose their own way without losing any opportunities in their lives and their work. PMID:27303356

  18. The process of developing an instrument: the JPL electronic nose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, M. A.

    2012-06-01

    An electronic nose is a sensing array designed to monitor for targeted chemical species or mixtures. From 1995 to 2008, an electronic nose was developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to monitor the environment in human occupied spacecraft for the sudden release, such as leaks or spills, of targeted chemical species. The JPL ENose was taken through three generations of device, from basic exploratory research into polymer-carbon composite chemiresistive sensors to a fully operating instrument which was demonstrated on the International Space Station for several months. The Third Generation JPL ENose ran continuously in the U.S. Lab on the International Space Station to monitor for sudden releases of a targeted group of chemical species. It is capable of detecting, identifying and quantifying targeted species in the parts-per-million range in air, and of operating at a range of temperatures, humidities and pressures.

  19. Development of a luminescence planetary surface dating instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Lapp, T.; Andersen, M. T.; Hannemann, S.; Murray, A. S.; Duller, G. A. T.; Merrrisen, J.

    2012-04-01

    Luminescence dating (LD) is uniquely positioned for absolute, in-situ, dating of recent (< 1Ma) events on Mars such as the formation of sedimentary landforms, volcanic rocks and salt precipitates. These data can in turn help understand and predict the impact of climate-driven changes on Mars, for example, atmosphere-land interactions, global sand and dust movements and redistribution of volatiles (H2O and CO2). This understanding is critical for any manned mission to Mars and for our understanding of the planetary surface evolution. Despite this potential, the technology transfer from terrestrial to in-situ Martian dating is not trivial. Here we first provide a brief overview of the scientific issues involved in luminescence dating on Mars (e.g. dosimetric characteristics of Martian materials and modelling of cosmic-ray dose rate) and then the technical constraints on an instrument design appropriate for remotely-programmable mobile use on the Martian surface. The challenge is to develop a miniaturised portable luminescence reader that is as sensitive as a laboratory-based instrument and at the same time has sufficient flexibility for fully automated performance. Such an instrument could provide stratigraphic ages if deployed on a rover with a sub-surface drilling capability, or provide a survey of surface chronologies over extensive areas. To this end we have designed and manufactured an 'elegant breadboard' Planetary Surface Dating Instrument (PSDI) in a project supported by ESA. The PSDI is light weight and compact (~1 kg, ~1.4 litres) and has 3 different reloadable sample positions which can be rotated to sit under 3 different optical subunits or an x-ray irradiator. The optical subunits consists of three different detection channels (one red and two UV/blue) each based on a miniature photomultiplier tube, and three types of laser light stimulation sources (two 915 nm, one 530 nm and one 405 nm) that can be operated in continuous-wave or pulsed mode. The

  20. Development of the Scientific Instruments for the PICASSO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranvier, Sylvain; Pieroux, Didier; Cardoen, Pepijn; Demoulin, Philippe; Fussen, Didier; De Keyser, Johan

    2015-04-01

    The Pico-Satellite for Atmospheric and Space Science Observations (PICASSO) is an ESA mission initiated to join the QB50 project as scientific in-orbit demonstrator. The orbit is expected to be 380x700 km altitude with 98° inclination. PICASSO is a triple unit CubeSat of dimensions 300x100x100 mm with four two-unit long deployable solar panels and a mass of less than 4 kg. The payload consists in two scientific instruments: a sweeping Langmuir probe (SLP) and a miniaturised hyper-spectral imager (VISION). The total average power consumption is about 6.5 W. The communication will be ensured by VHF/UHF links for housekeeping data and an S-band link for the scientific data. By using magneto-torquers and dynamical wheels PICASSO is 3-axis stabilised with a pointing accuracy of about 1° (knowledge: 0.2°). The SLP instrument includes four thin cylindrical probes whose electrical potential is swept to measure both plasma density and electron temperature together with the spacecraft potential. The plasma density is expected to fluctuate over a wide range, from about 1e8/m³ at high latitude and high altitude up to 1e12/m³ at low/mid latitude and low altitude. The electron temperature is expected to lie between approximately 1000 K and 3000 K. Given the high inclination of the orbit, the SLP instrument will allow a global monitoring of the ionosphere with a maximum spatial resolution of the order of 150 m. The main goals are to study 1) the ionosphere-plasmasphere coupling, 2) the subauroral ionosphere and corresponding magnetospheric features, 3) auroral structures, and 4) polar caps. The main issue implied by the use of a pico-satellite platform for a Langmuir probe instrument is the limited conducting area of the spacecraft which can lead to spacecraft charging and drift of the instrument's potential during the sweep (unusable data). In order to avoid this problem, the probes are swept in a particular way and a mitigation technic has been developed. VISION is a Fabry

  1. Lab-on-a-Chip Instrument Development for Titan Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, P. A.; Greer, F.; Fisher, A.; Hodyss, R. P.; Grunthaner, F.; Jiao, H.; Mair, D.; Harrison, J.

    2009-12-01

    This contribution will describe the initial stages of a new ASTID-funded research program initiated in Fall 2009 aimed at lab-on-a-chip system development for astrobiological investigations on Titan. This technology development builds off related work at JPL and Berkeley [1-3] on the ultrasensitive compositional and chiral analysis of amino acids on Mars in order to search for signatures of past or present life. The Mars-focused instrument system utilizes a microcapillary electrophoresis (μCE) system integrated with on-chip perfluoropolyether (PFPE) membrane valves and pumps for automated liquid sample handling, on-chip derivitization of samples with fluorescent tags, dilution, and mixing with standards for data calibration. It utilizes a four-layer wafer stack design with CE channels patterned in glass, along with a PFPE membrane, a pneumatic manifold layer, and a fluidic bus layer. Three pneumatically driven on-chip diaphragm valves placed in series are used to peristaltically pump reagents, buffers, and samples to and from capillary electrophoresis electrode well positions. Electrophoretic separation occurs in the all-glass channels near the base of the structure. The Titan specific lab-on-a-chip system under development here focuses its attention on the unique organic chemistry of Titan. In order to chromatographically separate mixtures of neutral organics such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the Titan-specific microfluidic platform utilizes the related technique of microcapillary electrochromatography (μCEC). This technique differs from conventional μCE in that microchannels are filled with a porous stationary phase that presents surfaces upon which analyte species can adsorb/desorb. It is this additional surface interaction that enables separations of species critical to the understanding of the astrobiological potential of Titan that are not readily separated by the μCE technique. We have developed two different approaches for the integration

  2. Instrumental Aid by Japanese Official Development Assistance for Astronomy in Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Masatoshi

    In order to promote education and research in developing countries, the Japanese Government has been providing developing countries with high-grade equipment under the framework of the Official Development Assistance (ODA) cooperation programme since 1982. Under this successful cooperation programme, 24 astronomical instruments have been donated to 19 developing countries up to the end of the Japanese fiscal year 2003. The instruments donated included university-level reflecting telescopes, as well as modern planetaria used for educational purposes, together with various accessories. This paper describes a continuation of the previous ODA donations (Astronomical Herald 1997) and the subsequent follow-up programmes provided with the assistance of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

  3. A comparison of outpatient healthcare expenditures between public and private medical institutions in urban China: an instrumental variable approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Judy; Liu, Gordon; Deng, Guoying; Li, Lin; Xiong, Xianjun; Basu, Kisalaya

    2015-03-01

    The growth of healthcare expenditure provokes constant comments and discussions, as countries battle the issues on cost containment and cost effectiveness. Prior to 1978, medical institutions in China were either state-owned or were collective public hospitals. Since 1978, China has been trying to rebuild its healthcare system, which was destroyed during the 'cultural revolution', allowing private medical institutions to deliver healthcare services. As a result, private medical institutions have grown from 0% to 28.57% between 1978 and 2010. In this context, we compare outpatient healthcare expenditures between public and private medical institutions. The central problem of this comparison is that the choice of medical institution is endogenous. So we apply an instrumental variable (IV) framework utilizing geographic information (whether the closest medical institution is private) as the instrument while controlling for severity of health and other relevant confounding factors. Using China's Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance Survey 2008-2010, we found that there is no difference in expenditure between public and private medical institutions when IV framework is used. Our econometric tests suggest that our IV model is specified appropriately. However, the ordinary least square model, which is inconsistent in the presence of endogenous regressor(s), reveals that public medical institutions are more expensive. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Developing and sharing medical effectiveness information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmaurice, J. M.

    1995-10-01

    In our health care environment, managed care, capitated payments, and a growing national information infrastructure are becoming major forces that shape decisions about how medical resources are organized and used. Health care decision makers prize medical effectiveness information based on patient care data that are linked with other data, such as costs. Obtaining uniform, accurate patient care data requires determining conditions of access to the data and standards. Under the National Information Infrastructure Initiative, principles have been developed to guide users and providers of individually identifiable data, and U.S. standards developers are at work to improve the definitions and electronic transmission of patient care data. When aggregated, these data can serve many uses, including improving quality of care. Their use for computing clinical performance measures, such as the Health Plan Employer Data Set (HEDIS), and a study that classifies such sets are highlighted.

  5. Developing an instrument to measure effective factors on Clinical Learning

    PubMed Central

    DADGARAN, IDEH; SHIRAZI, MANDANA; MOHAMMADI, AEEN; RAVARI, ALI

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although nursing students spend a large part of their learning period in the clinical environment, clinical learning has not been perceived by its nature yet. To develop an instrument to measure effective factors on clinical learning in nursing students. Methods This is a mixed methods study performed in 2 steps. First, the researchers defined “clinical learning” in nursing students through qualitative content analysis and designed items of the questionnaire based on semi-structured individual interviews with nursing students. Then, as the second step, psychometric properties of the questionnaire were evaluated using the face validity, content validity, construct validity, and internal consistency evaluated on 227 students from fourth or higher semesters. All the interviews were recorded and transcribed, and then, they were analyzed using Max Qualitative Data Analysis and all of qualitative data were analyzed using SPSS 14. Results To do the study, we constructed the preliminary questionnaire containing 102 expressions. After determination of face and content validities by qualitative and quantitative approaches, the expressions of the questionnaire were reduced to 45. To determine the construct validity, exploratory factor analysis was applied. The results indicated that the maximum variance percentage (40.55%) was defined by the first 3 factors while the rest of the total variance percentage (59.45%) was determined by the other 42 factors. Results of exploratory factor analysis of this questionnaire indicated the presence of 3 instructor-staff, students, and educational related factors. Finally, 41 expressions were kept in 3 factor groups. The α-Cronbach coefficient (0.93) confirmed the high internal consistency of the questionnaire. Conclusion Results indicated that the prepared questionnaire was an efficient instrument in the study of the effective factors on clinical learning as viewed by nursing students since it involves 41 expressions and

  6. Development of an instrument to measure deliberate practice in professional nurses.

    PubMed

    Bathish, Melissa; Aebersold, Michelle; Fogg, Louis; Potempa, Kathleen

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development of the Deliberate Practice in Nursing Questionnaire (DPNQ) and the reliability and validity characteristics of the instrument. A cross-sectional, descriptive study assessed the DPNQ in a sample of critical care registered nurses (RN). It was conducted at one large Midwestern teaching hospital. A medical intensive care unit (ICU), a surgical ICU, and a trauma/burn ICU participated. Instrument construction involved item development based on a literature review, an existing deliberate practice questionnaire and existing parameters of deliberate practice in nursing. Content reliability and validity were established by expert panel review and survey testing. Probit analysis of survey data was used to develop a composite score for the DPNQ. Expert panel review revealed an inter-rater agreement (80% reliability) of .92-.96 and a content validity index of 0.94. The final DPNQ consists of 24 items with six subcategories and a composite score of 96. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the DPNQ in this study was .660 (standardized, .703). The instrument was further validated with the Nurse Competence Scale. Deliberate practice was significantly, positively correlated with competence (rs=.366, p=001). Findings from the expert panel provided guidance for development and revision of the DPNQ. Survey testing of the instrument revealed a promising measure of deliberate practice with good reliability and validity characteristics. Identification of a relationship between deliberate practice and competence confirms existing evidence in other domains, providing further validation. Understanding deliberate practice provides a unique way to examine nursing expertise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The APEX-SZ instrument: Development, performance and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, Daniel

    This thesis describes the development, design, instrument performance and observations of the APEX-SZ receiver. APEX-SZ is a millimeter-wave cryogenic receiver designed to observe galaxy clusters via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect from the 12 m APEX telescope on the Atacama plateau in Chile. The receiver consists of a focal plane of 280 superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers cooled to 280 mK via a three stage He sorption fridge and mechanical pulse tube cooler. The detectors are instrumented with a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system. A horn array, 4 K lenses and tertiary mirrors couple the TES bolometers to the telescope. APEX-SZ observes in a single frequency band at 150 GHz with 59" angular resolution and a 22' field-of-view, well suited for cluster mapping. The receiver represents a leap forward in millimeter wave detector technology. Initial observations with APEX-SZ were early demonstrations of a fielded imaging TES array, frequency multiplexed readout and cryocooled bolometer receiver. These technologies have already been applied to receivers with thousands of detectors. APEX-SZ typically observes with 180 optically active detectors with an optical efficiency of 0.33 and median NET per channel of 860 muKCMB s . The per channel sensitivity is limited by a bandwidth 40% narrower than expected, and cavity absorption efficiency of 0.74. New detector wafers with wider bandwidth have been fabricated and tested at the telescope on a limited run last spring. With improved bandwidth and lower thermal conductivity, newly fabricated wafers can achieve background noise limited performance. We plan to upgrade the focal plane with a full array of new wafers in December 2009. The receiver has successfully completed 9 weeks of science observation since its installation in April 2007. We have made over a dozen SZE maps from targeted observations of known clusters. We present SZE temperature maps of the Bullet cluster (1E 0657--56) and Abell 2163.

  8. Development of a new instrument for evaluating individuals' dietary intakes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Hong; Kogashiwa, Michiko; Kira, Shohei

    2006-10-01

    With the aim of developing a new dietary instrument for assessing an individual's usual intakes, we evaluated a hand-held personal digital assistant with camera and mobile telephone card, called Wellnavi (Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Twenty-eight college students majoring in food and nutrition in Okayama University of Japan voluntarily participated in this study. Applying a cross-sectional study design, participants were asked to keep 1-day weighed food records. Digital images of all recorded foods were obtained simultaneously and sent to registered dietitians by a mobile telephone card. The following day, a 24-hour recall was obtained. These procedures were repeated after 6 months. Participants' opinions about the three methods were determined using a questionnaire. Differences in estimated median nutrient intake among the three methods were compared by Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. Relationships among the nutrient estimates by each method were evaluated using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. We found no significant differences between the Wellnavi method when compared with food records for most nutrients, except zinc, manganese, vitamin E, saturated fatty acid, polyunsaturated fatty acid, and dietary fiber. The median correlation coefficients for the nutrient estimates were 0.66 between the Wellnavi method and the food records. The survey showed that 57.1% of subjects considered the Wellnavi method the least burdensome of the three methods and the least time consuming (16 minutes) to record daily diet. About half of participants indicated that they would be willing to use the Wellnavi for 1 month to record their diet. This study suggests that a hand-held digital assistant may be a valid and convenient instrument for evaluating dietary intake.

  9. Enhancing Medical Decision-Making Evaluations: Introduction of Normative Data for the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument.

    PubMed

    Gerstenecker, Adam; Niccolai, Lindsay; Marson, Daniel; Triebel, Kristen L

    2016-04-01

    A number of measures have been developed to assess medical decision-making capacity (MDC) in adults. However, their clinical utility is limited by a lack of available normative data. In the current study, we introduce age-independent and age-adjusted normative data for a measure of MDC: the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument. The sample consisted of 308 cognitively normal, community-dwelling adults ranging in age from 19 to 86 years. For age-adjusted norms, individual raw scores were first converted to age-corrected scaled scores based on position within a cumulative frequency distribution and then grouped according to empirically supported age ranges. For age-independent norms, the same method was utilized but without age-corrections being applied or participants being grouped into age ranges. This study has the potential to enhance MDC evaluations by allowing clinicians to compare a patient's performance on the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument with that of adults regardless of age as well as to same age peers. Tables containing normative corrections are supplementary material available online at http://asm.sagepub.com/supplemental.

  10. The chronic kidney disease self-efficacy (CKD-SE) instrument: development and psychometric evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Anderson, Robert M; Chang, Chao-Sung; Chang, Shu-Chen; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2012-10-01

    Self-management has been associated with positive health outcomes among adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Perceived disease-related self-efficacy (DSE) is considered a critical component in the successful self-management of chronic disease. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring CKD patients' self-efficacy is needed. This study aims to develop and test a new instrument to measure the DSE of patients with early stage CKD. A total of 594 Taiwanese patients with early stage CKD recruited from two medical centers and one regional hospital in southern Taiwan completed the questionnaire. The CKD self-efficacy (CKD-SE) was evaluated using exploratory factor analyses (EFA) and measures of reliability. EFA identified four distinct factors with loadings ranging from 0.557 to 0.970: autonomy, self-integration, problem solving and seeking social support, accounting for 64.348% of the total variance. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the subscales ranged from 0.843 to 0.901. This promising 25-item CKD-SE instrument can be used for the early identification of patients with low DSE, thus allowing the development of interventions to help these patients attain an appropriate level of DSE.

  11. Development of the strontium iodide coded aperture (SICA) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Grove, J. Eric; Cordes, Ryan

    2015-08-01

    The work reports on the development of a Strontium Iodide Coded Aperture (SICA) instrument for use in space-based astrophysics, solar physics, and high-energy atmospheric physics. The Naval Research Laboratory is developing a prototype coded aperture imager that will consist of an 8 x 8 array of SrI2:Eu detectors, each read out by a silicon photomultiplier. The array would be used to demonstrate SrI2:Eu detector performance for space-based missions. Europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) detectors have recently become available, and the material is a strong candidate to replace existing detector technology currently used for space-based gamma-ray astrophysics research. The detectors have a typical energy resolution of 3.2% at 662 keV, a significant improvement over the 6.5% energy resolution of thallium-doped sodium iodide. With a density of 4.59 g/cm and a Zeff of 49, SrI2:Eu has a high efficiency for MeV gamma-ray detection. Coupling this with recent improvements in silicon photomultiplier technology (i.e., no bulky photomultiplier tubes) creates high-density, large-area, low-power detector arrays with good energy resolution. Also, the energy resolution of SrI2:Eu makes it ideal for use as the back plane of a Compton telescope.

  12. The development of an instrument for measuring healing.

    PubMed

    Meza, James Peter; Fahoome, Gail F

    2008-01-01

    Our lack of ability to measure healing attributes impairs our ability to research the topic. The specific aim of this project is to describe the psychological and social construct of healing and to create a valid and reliable measurement scale for attributes of healing. A content expert conducted a domain analysis examining the existing literature of midrange theories of healing. Theme saturation of content sampling was ensured by brainstorming more than 220 potential items. Selection of items was sequential: pile sorting and data reduction, with factor analysis of a mailed 54-item questionnaire. Criterion validity (convergent and divergent) and temporal reliability were established using a second mailing of the development version of the instrument. Construct validity was judged with structural equation modeling for goodness of fit. Cronbach's alpha of the original questionnaire was .869 and the final scale was .862. The test-retest reliability was .849. Eigenvalues for the 2 factors were 8 and 4, respectively. Divergent and convergent validity using the Spann-Fischer Codependency Scale and SF-36 mental health and emotional subscales were consistent with predictions. The root mean square error of approximation was 0.066 and Bentler's Comparative Fit Index was 0.871. Root mean square residual was 0.102. We developed a valid and reliable measurement scale for attributes of healing, which we named the Self-Integration Scale v 2.1. By creating a new variable, new areas of research in humanistic health care are possible.

  13. Design and Development of the Aircraft Instrument Comprehension Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Norman C.

    The Aircraft Instrument Comprehension (AIC) Program is a self-instructional program designed to teach undergraduate student pilots to read instruments that indicate the position of the aircraft in flight, based on sequential instructional stages of information, prompted practice, and unprompted practice. The program includes a 36-item multiple…

  14. Development of Real-Time Coal Monitoring Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan Gurjar, Ph.D.

    2010-06-17

    Relying on coal for energy requires optimizing the extraction of heat content from various blends of coal fuel and reducing harmful constituents and byproducts. Having a real-time measurement instrument provides relevant information about toxic constituents released in the atmosphere from burning coal and optimizes the performance of a power plant. A few commercial instruments exist and have been in operation for more than a decade. However, most of these instruments are based on radioactive sources and are bulky, expensive and time-consuming. The proposed instrument is based on the Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). The advantage of LIBS is that it is a standoff instrument, does not require sample preparation and provides precise information about sample constituents.

  15. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Robert W.; Homan, Jane; Callahan, Michael V.; Glasspool-Malone, Jill; Damodaran, Lambodhar; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Zimler, Rebecca; Talton, James; Cobb, Ronald R.; Ruzic, Ivan; Smith-Gagen, Julie; Janies, Daniel; Wilson, James

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain–Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs) available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment. Methods Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials. PMID:26934531

  16. Zika Virus: Medical Countermeasure Development Challenges.

    PubMed

    Malone, Robert W; Homan, Jane; Callahan, Michael V; Glasspool-Malone, Jill; Damodaran, Lambodhar; Schneider, Adriano De Bernardi; Zimler, Rebecca; Talton, James; Cobb, Ronald R; Ruzic, Ivan; Smith-Gagen, Julie; Janies, Daniel; Wilson, James

    2016-03-01

    Reports of high rates of primary microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia and Brazil have raised concerns that the virus circulating in these regions is a rapidly developing neuropathic, teratogenic, emerging infectious public health threat. There are no licensed medical countermeasures (vaccines, therapies or preventive drugs) available for Zika virus infection and disease. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) predicts that Zika virus will continue to spread and eventually reach all countries and territories in the Americas with endemic Aedes mosquitoes. This paper reviews the status of the Zika virus outbreak, including medical countermeasure options, with a focus on how the epidemiology, insect vectors, neuropathology, virology and immunology inform options and strategies available for medical countermeasure development and deployment. Multiple information sources were employed to support the review. These included publically available literature, patents, official communications, English and Lusophone lay press. Online surveys were distributed to physicians in the US, Mexico and Argentina and responses analyzed. Computational epitope analysis as well as infectious disease outbreak modeling and forecasting were implemented. Field observations in Brazil were compiled and interviews conducted with public health officials.

  17. Developing seamless shaped woven medical products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, K; Seyam, A M

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the cutting and sewing process is utilized to produce medical products with tailored shape, which leads to a number of adverse consequences due to seams. These drawbacks have prompted us to undertake research to develop new methods by which seamless tubular woven products with inherent shape could be produced. The methods could potentially lead to the design and production of seamless shaped textiles that might be used in a wide variety of medical applications. Three variables were tested, specifically yarn shrinkage, weave designs, and thread density. A variety of samples were woven using different combinations of these variables to create structures with different shrinkage properties. Upon finishing in a solution containing a surfactant and soda ash, the structures experience different degrees of shrinkage resulting in desired shapes. Length and width dimensions of each sample were taken before and after finishing. The change in sample shape due to differential shrinkage in terms of yarn shrinkage, weave, and thread density is reported.

  18. Mathematics Screening: The Development and Pilot Study of a Mathematics Screening Instrument for K-2 Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes an action research project to develop a math screening instrument that would be effective (valid and reliable) and efficient (time for administration). An instrument was developed after review of the mathematics assessment and mathematics disabilities literature. The instrument was administered to kindergarten, first, and…

  19. Bioecological Theory, Early Child Development and the Validation of the Population-Level Early Development Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhn, Martin; Goelman, Hillel

    2011-01-01

    The Early Development Instrument (EDI; Janus and Offord in "Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science" 39:1-22, 2007) project is a Canadian population-level, longitudinal research project, in which teacher ratings of Kindergarten children's early development and wellbeing are linked to health and academic achievement variables at the…

  20. Partnering with patients using social media to develop a hypertension management instrument.

    PubMed

    Kear, Tamara; Harrington, Magdalena; Bhattacharya, Anand

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension is a lifelong condition; thus, long-term adherence to lifestyle modification, self-monitoring, and medication regimens remains a challenge for patients. The aim of this study was to develop a patient-reported hypertension instrument that measured attitudes, lifestyle behaviors, adherence, and barriers to hypertension management using patient-reported outcome data. The study was conducted using the Open Research Exchange software platform created by PatientsLikeMe. A total of 360 participants completed the psychometric phase of the study; incomplete responses were obtained from 147 patients, and 150 patients opted out. Principal component analysis with orthogonal (varimax) rotation was executed on a data set with all completed responses (N = 249) and applied to 43 items. Based on the review of the factor solution, eigenvalues, and item loadings, 16 items were eliminated and model with 29 items was tested. The process was repeated two more times until final model with 14 items was established. In interpreting the rotated factor pattern, an item was said to load on any given component if the factor loading was ≥0.40 for that component and was <0.40 for the other. In addition to the newly generated instrument, demographic and self-reported clinical characteristics of the study participants such as the type of prescribed hypertension medications, frequency of blood pressure monitoring, and comorbid conditions were examined. The Open Research Exchange platform allowed for ongoing input from patients through each stage of the 14-item instrument development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Qualitative adaptation of child behaviour problem instruments in a developing-country setting.

    PubMed

    Khan, B; Avan, B I

    2014-07-08

    A key barrier to epidemiological research on child behaviour problems in developing countries is the lack of culturally relevant, internationally recognized psychometric instruments. This paper proposes a model for the qualitative adaptation of psychometric instruments in developing-country settings and presents a case study of the adaptation of 3 internationally recognized instruments in Pakistan: the Child Behavior Checklist, the Youth Self-Report and the Teacher's Report Form. This model encompassed a systematic procedure with 6 distinct phases to minimize bias and ensure equivalence with the original instruments: selection, deliberation, alteration, feasibility, testing and formal approval. The process was conducted in collaboration with the instruments' developer. A multidisciplinary working group of experts identified equivalence issues and suggested modifications. Focus group discussions with informants highlighted comprehension issues. Subsequently modified instruments were thoroughly tested. Finally, the instruments' developer approval further validated the qualitative adaptation. The study proposes a rigorous and systematic model to effectively achieve cultural adaptation of psychometric instruments.

  2. Recent developments and future trends in nuclear medicine instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Habib

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced elegantly and has steadily gained importance in the clinical and research arenas. Continuous efforts to integrate recent research findings for the design of different geometries and various detector technologies of SPECT and PET cameras have become the goal of both the academic comcameras have become the goal of both the academic community and nuclear medicine industry. As PET has recently become of more interest for clinical practice, several different design trends seem to have developed. Systems are being designed for "low cost" clinical applications, very high-resolution research applications (including small-animal imaging), and just about everywhere in-between. The development of dual-modality imaging systems has revolutionized the practice of nuclear medicine. The major advantage being that SPECT/PET data are intrinsically aligned to anatomical information from the X-ray computed tomography (CT), without the use of external markers or internal landmarks. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology is scientifically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of a prototype small animal PET scanner coupled to three multichannel photomultipliers via optical fibers, so that the PET detector can be operated within a conventional MR system. Thus, many different design paths are being pursued--which ones are likely to be the main stream of future commercial systems? It will be interesting, indeed, to see which technologies become the most popular in the future. This paper briefly summarizes state-of-the art developments in nuclear medicine instrumentation. Future prospects will also be discussed.

  3. Developments in cardiovascular ultrasound: Part 1: Signal processing and instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Fish, P J; Hoskins, P R; Moran, C; McDicken, W N

    1997-11-01

    One of the major contributions to the improvement of spectral Doppler and colour flow imaging instruments has been the development of advanced signal-processing techniques made possible by increasing computing power. Model-based or parametric spectral estimators, time-frequency transforms, station-arising algorithms and spectral width correction techniques have been investigated as possible improvements on the FFT-based estimators currently used for real-time spectral estimation of Doppler signals. In colour flow imaging some improvement on velocity estimation accuracy has been achieved by the use of new algorithms but at the expense of increased computational complexity compared with the conventional autocorrelation method. Polynomial filters have been demonstrated to have some advantages over IIR filters for stationary echo cancellation. Several methods of velocity vector estimation to overcome the problem of angle dependence have been studied, including 2D feature tracking, two and three beam approaches and the use of spectral width in addition to mean frequency. 3D data acquisition and display and Doppler power imaging have also been investigated. The use of harmonic imaging, using the second harmonic generated by encapsulated bubble contrast media, seems promising particularly for imaging slow flow. Parallel image data acquisition using non-sequential scanning or broad beam transmission, followed by simultaneous reception along a number of beams, has been studied to speed up 'real-time' imaging.

  4. Development of a new instrument for direct skin friction measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vakili, A. D.; Wu, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A device developed for the direct measurement of wall shear stress generated by flows is described. Simple and symmetric in design with optional small moving mass and no internal friction, the features employed in the design eliminate most of the difficulties associated with the traditional floating element balances. The device is basically small and can be made in various sizes. Vibration problems associated with the floating element skin friction balances were found to be minimized due to the design symmetry and optional damping provided. The design eliminates or reduces the errors associated with conventional floating element devices: such as errors due to gaps, pressure gradient, acceleration, heat transfer, and temperature change. The instrument is equipped with various sensing systems and the output signal is a linear function of the wall shear stress. Dynamic measurements could be made in a limited range and measurements in liquids could be performed readily. Measurement made in the three different tunnels show excellent agreement with data obtained by the floating element devices and other techniques.

  5. Development of electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turko, B.T.; Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.; Sun, R.K.

    1980-11-01

    The development of new electro-optical instrumentation for reactor safety studies is described. The system measures the thickness of the water film and droplet size and velocity distributions which would be encountered in the annular two-phase flow in a reactor cooling system. The water film thickness is measured by a specially designed capacitance system with a short time constant. Water droplet size and velocity are measured by a subsystem consisting of a continuously pulsed laser light source, a vidicon camera, a video recorder, and an automatic image analyzer. An endoscope system attached to the video camera is used to image the droplets. Each frame is strobed with two accurately spaced uv light pulses, from two sequentially fired nitrogen lasers. The images are stored in the video disk recorder. The modified automatic image analyzer is programmed to digitize the droplet size and velocity distributions. Many special optical, mechanical and electronic system components were designed and fabricated. They are described in detail, together with calibration charts and experimental results.

  6. Development of perceived instrumentality for mathematics, reading and science curricula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Steve L.

    Perceptions of instrumentality (PI) are the connections one sees between a current activity and a future goal. With high PI, one is motivated to persist with quality effort because the current activity, even when difficult, is perceived as aligned with, and progress toward, the goal. Conversely, with low PI, one is motivated to relinquish effort in pursuit of other, more meaningful goals. In view of the alarming dropout rates in this country, it appears that PI research has much to offer in understanding students' motivations to stay in school and hence to become employed in their field of choice. Because academic achievement motivation can be affected by gender and ethnicity, particularly for specific components of the curriculum, and because curricular content varies across grade levels and school settings, this line of research offers significant potential for understanding and improving student outcomes. This research examined the development of PI among suburban 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th graders from a school district in the southwestern United States. Twelve hundred students completed a one-time paper and pencil survey measuring the perceived instrumentality of mathematics, literacy and science courses in terms of the students' occupational choices. MANOVA was used to determine factors that may affect students' overall PI and individual subject PI. Grade, gender, ethnicity, occupational choice, expectancy and value were the independent variables. A school setting variable was examined for effects on 12th graders. For the 8th through 12th grade sample, significant main effects were observed for grade, gender, minority status, occupational choice and expectancy on PI. Results show that PI is highest in the 6 th grade. Males reported higher Math PI than females. Females reported higher Reading PI and Science PI than males. Minority students reported lower overall PI and Science PI than non-minority students. Students who aspire to professional careers report the

  7. Development and validation of an instrument to assess treatment adherence for each individual drug taken by a patient

    PubMed Central

    Sidorkiewicz, Stéphanie; Tran, Viet-Thi; Cousyn, Cécile; Perrodeau, Elodie; Ravaud, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate an instrument to assess adherence to each individual drug taken by patients undergoing long-term treatment. Design Multicentre prospective observational validation study. Setting Six general practitioners' clinics and 6 university hospitals in Paris, France. Participants Patients 18 years and older receiving at least one long-term treatment. Methods The instrument was developed from a literature search and interviews with experts. Clarity and wording were assessed during pilot testing with 51 patients. The tool was validated in a sample of consecutive patients. We assessed agreement between adherence measured with our tool and drug diaries and compared measurements from our instrument with (1) the Lu instrument; (2) the Adherence Estimator (AE); (3) patient's adherence assessed by physicians; (4) the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items (MMAS-4); and (5) the Treatment Burden Questionnaire (TBQ). Reliability was assessed by a test–retest method. Results A total of 243 patients taking 961 drugs were recruited in 2014. We found good agreement between adherence measured by our tool and drug diaries (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.69, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.91) and a linear relationship between measurement with our tool and (1) the Lu instrument (p<0.01); (2) 2 items of the AE (perceived need for medication (p<0.01) and concerns about medication (p<0.01)); (3) patients' adherence assessed by their physicians (p<0.01); (4) the MMAS-4 (p<0.01) and (5) the TBQ (p<0.01). Reliability of the retest was good (ICC 0.67, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.85). Conclusions We developed an instrument with acceptable validity and reliability to assess adherence for each drug taken by patients, usable in hospital and primary care settings. PMID:27165645

  8. Development and validation of a survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction alerts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kai; Fear, Kathleen; Chaffee, Bruce W; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Karls, Edward M; Gatwood, Justin D; Stevenson, James G; Pearlman, Mark D

    2011-12-01

    To develop a theoretically informed and empirically validated survey instrument for assessing prescribers' perception of computerized drug-drug interaction (DDI) alerts. The survey is grounded in the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology and an adapted accident causation model. Development of the instrument was also informed by a review of the extant literature on prescribers' attitude toward computerized medication safety alerts and common prescriber-provided reasons for overriding. To refine and validate the survey, we conducted a two-stage empirical validation study consisting of a pretest with a panel of domain experts followed by a field test among all eligible prescribers at our institution. The resulting survey instrument contains 28 questionnaire items assessing six theoretical dimensions: performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence, facilitating conditions, perceived fatigue, and perceived use behavior. Satisfactory results were obtained from the field validation; however, a few potential issues were also identified. We analyzed these issues accordingly and the results led to the final survey instrument as well as usage recommendations. High override rates of computerized medication safety alerts have been a prevalent problem. They are usually caused by, or manifested in, issues of poor end user acceptance. However, standardized research tools for assessing and understanding end users' perception are currently lacking, which inhibits knowledge accumulation and consequently forgoes improvement opportunities. The survey instrument presented in this paper may help fill this methodological gap. We developed and empirically validated a survey instrument that may be useful for future research on DDI alerts and other types of computerized medication safety alerts more generally.

  9. [Development and usage of the along-meridian treatment instrument].

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuan-Shi

    2009-04-01

    The points stimulated by output pulse of the electroacupuncture instrument are fixed, and this stimulation model makes Deqi sense of the distal point unable to reach the affected parts, only limiting around the point for most patients, so the therapeutic effects are influenced to a certain extent. From design, usage and other aspects, it is described that joint the output conducting wires to the acupuncture needles from the distal point to the proximal point in turn. When the output ports of the electroacupuncture instrument export the pulse wave one port by one port, the sense of Deqi of the patient propagates towards the affected area one point by one point. Finally, the sense of Deqi of the patient propagates and reaches to the affected area. The along-meridian treatment instrument overcomes the shortcomings of the existing electroacupuncture instrument, and obviously increases therapeutic effects.

  10. Developing Multiple Language Versions of Instruments for Intercultural Research

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Sumru

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the strengths and weaknesses of several translation techniques currently in use through the lens of emerging opinions on the science and ethics of intercultural research. Broad scientific and ethical dimensions relevant to translating instruments and a distinction between generating multiple language forms of two kinds of instruments are introduced: those in which wording in the source language cannot be altered and those in which constraints of the target language can lead to changes in the original instrument's wording. Developmental psychologists engaged in intercultural research can consider techniques for minimizing the influence of Western perspectives while pursuing conceptual equivalence in order to satisfy science's concern for internal validity of translated instruments. PMID:21423824

  11. Design Considerations for a Launch Vehicle Development Flight Instrumentation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Martin L.; Crawford, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    When embarking into the design of a new launch vehicle, engineering models of expected vehicle performance are always generated. While many models are well established and understood, some models contain design features that are only marginally known. Unfortunately, these analytical models produce uncertainties in design margins. The best way to answer these analytical issues is with vehicle level testing. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration respond to these uncertainties by using a vehicle level system called the Development Flight Instrumentation, or DFI. This DFI system can be simple to implement, with only a few measurements, or it may be a sophisticated system with hundreds of measurement and video, without a recording capability. From experience with DFI systems, DFI never goes away. The system is renamed and allowed to continue, in most cases. Proper system design can aid the transition to future data requirements. This paper will discuss design features that need to be considered when developing a DFI system for a launch vehicle. It will briefly review the data acquisition units, sensors, multiplexers and recorders, telemetry components and harnessing. It will present a reasonable set of requirements which should be implemented in the beginning of the program in order to start the design. It will discuss a simplistic DFI architecture that could be the basis for the next NASA launch vehicle. This will be followed by a discussion of the "experiences gained" from a past DFI system implementation, such as the very successful Ares I-X test flight. Application of these design considerations may not work for every situation, but they may direct a path toward success or at least make one pause and ask the right questions.

  12. The Development of an Instrument for Measuring Healing

    PubMed Central

    Meza, James Peter; Fahoome, Gail F.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Our lack of ability to measure healing attributes impairs our ability to research the topic. The specific aim of this project is to describe the psychological and social construct of healing and to create a valid and reliable measurement scale for attributes of healing. METHODS A content expert conducted a domain analysis examining the existing literature of midrange theories of healing. Theme saturation of content sampling was ensured by brainstorming more than 220 potential items. Selection of items was sequential: pile sorting and data reduction, with factor analysis of a mailed 54-item questionnaire. Criterion validity (convergent and divergent) and temporal reliability were established using a second mailing of the development version of the instrument. Construct validity was judged with structural equation modeling for goodness of fit. RESULTS Cronbach’s α of the original questionnaire was .869 and the final scale was .862. The test-retest reliability was .849. Eigenvalues for the 2 factors were 8 and 4, respectively. Divergent and convergent validity using the Spann-Fischer Codependency Scale and SF-36 mental health and emotional subscales were consistent with predictions. The root mean square error of approximation was 0.066 and Bentler’s Comparative Fit Index was 0.871. Root mean square residual was 0.102. CONCLUSIONS We developed a valid and reliable measurement scale for attributes of healing, which we named the Self-Integration Scale v 2.1. By creating a new variable, new areas of research in humanistic health care are possible. PMID:18626036

  13. [Cost dynamics, demographic development and medical progress].

    PubMed

    Breyer, F

    1995-01-01

    The drastic increase in the proportion of the elderly in the Germany population in the coming 30 to 40 years and the rapid technological progress in medicine form a vast potential for a rise of health care expenditures as a fraction of gross national product. Three possible strategies to cope with this development are discussed. It is shown that the predominant strategy of stabilizing the rate of contribution to the sickness funds will soon lead to a sharp rationing even of life-prolonging medical services. As an alternative, a strategy of "freedom of choice" is presented.

  14. Early medical abortion: legal and medical developments in Australia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Kerry A

    2010-07-05

    Mifepristone is a safe, effective and relatively cheap drug that plays an important role in women's health care and is widely used for early medical abortion in many countries. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) can authorise mifepristone to be imported into and marketed in Australia. To date, no pharmaceutical company has applied to register mifepristone in Australia. The TGA can also permit medical practitioners to prescribe medicine that is not approved for marketing in Australia under the Authorised Prescribers scheme. The number of approvals for mifepristone has gradually increased, in spite of a complicated and protracted application process. Approval under the Authorised Prescribers scheme requires medical practitioners to comply with state or territory legislation. Abortion laws in Australia vary between jurisdictions, and in some states the law is unclear and confusing. The decriminalisation of abortion in all Australian jurisdictions would protect medical practitioners from criminal liability, promote the health interests of Australian women, and discourage the illegal importation of abortifacients that are being used without quality controls or medical supervision. The Victorian Abortion Law Reform Act 2008 is one legislative model for this.

  15. Survey Instrument Validity Part I: Principles of Survey Instrument Development and Validation in Athletic Training Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Instrument validation is an important facet of survey research methods and athletic trainers must be aware of the important underlying principles. Objective: To discuss the process of survey development and validation, specifically the process of construct validation. Background: Athletic training researchers frequently employ the use of…

  16. Perceived experiences of atheist discrimination: Instrument development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Melanie E; Hammer, Joseph; Sawyer, Jacob S; Eklund, Austin; Palamar, Joseph

    2016-10-01

    The present 2 studies describe the development and initial psychometric evaluation of a new instrument, the Measure of Atheist Discrimination Experiences (MADE), which may be used to examine the minority stress experiences of atheist people. Items were created from prior literature, revised by a panel of expert researchers, and assessed psychometrically. In Study 1 (N = 1,341 atheist-identified people), an exploratory factor analysis with 665 participants suggested the presence of 5 related dimensions of perceived discrimination. However, bifactor modeling via confirmatory factor analysis and model-based reliability estimates with data from the remaining 676 participants affirmed the presence of a strong "general" factor of discrimination and mixed to poor support for substantive subdimensions. In Study 2 (N = 1,057 atheist-identified people), another confirmatory factor analysis and model-based reliability estimates strongly supported the bifactor model from Study 1 (i.e., 1 strong "general" discrimination factor) and poor support for subdimensions. Across both studies, the MADE general factor score demonstrated evidence of good reliability (i.e., Cronbach's alphas of .94 and .95; omega hierarchical coefficients of .90 and .92), convergent validity (i.e., with stigma consciousness, β = .56; with awareness of public devaluation, β = .37), and preliminary evidence for concurrent validity (i.e., with loneliness β = .18; with psychological distress β = .27). Reliability and validity evidence for the MADE subscale scores was not sufficient to warrant future use of the subscales. Limitations and implications for future research and clinical work with atheist individuals are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. But Does It Work? Reflective Activities, Learning Outcomes and Instrumental Learning in Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessger, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between reflective practice and instrumental learning within the context of continuing professional development (CPD). It is argued that instrumental learning is a unique process of adult learning, and reflective practice's impact on learning outcomes in instrumental learning contexts remains unclear. A…

  18. Development of an Instrument To Assess Student Perceptions of the Quality of Pharmaceutical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdford, David; Reinders, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    Developed a 41-item instrument to assess educational service quality in pharmacy schools, defined as student perceptions of school service performance. The instrument assessed both perceptions of educational process (functional quality) and outcome (technical quality). Fourth-year pharmacy students completed the instrument, and its validity and…

  19. Perception of Competence in Middle School Physical Education: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrabis-Fletcher, Kristin; Silverman, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perception of Competence (POC) has been studied extensively in physical activity (PA) research with similar instruments adapted for physical education (PE) research. Such instruments do not account for the unique PE learning environment. Therefore, an instrument was developed and the scores validated to measure POC in middle school PE. A…

  20. Perception of Competence in Middle School Physical Education: Instrument Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrabis-Fletcher, Kristin; Silverman, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Perception of Competence (POC) has been studied extensively in physical activity (PA) research with similar instruments adapted for physical education (PE) research. Such instruments do not account for the unique PE learning environment. Therefore, an instrument was developed and the scores validated to measure POC in middle school PE. A…

  1. Students' Attitudes toward STEM: Development of an Instrument for High School STEM-Based Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Mark Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The intent of this study was to develop an instrument to measure the current level of attitude that students' exhibit toward STEM education. "The Concerns-Based Adoption Model, Taxonomy of Education Objectives-Handbook II," and other pertinent instruments were utilized as sources of inspiration for the instrument. The selected items were submitted…

  2. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-26

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  3. Development of a Medical Cyclotron Production Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Danny R.

    2003-08-01

    Development of a Cyclotron manufacturing facility begins with a business plan. Geographics, the size and activity of the medical community, the growth potential of the modality being served, and other business connections are all considered. This business used the customer base established by NuTech, Inc., an independent centralized nuclear pharmacy founded by Danny Allen. With two pharmacies in operation in Tyler and College Station and a customer base of 47 hospitals and clinics the existing delivery system and pharmacist staff is used for the cyclotron facility. We then added cyclotron products to contracts with these customers to guarantee a supply. We partnered with a company in the process of developing PET imaging centers. We then built an independent imaging center attached to the cyclotron facility to allow for the use of short-lived isotopes.

  4. Development of an Instrument to Measure Higher Order Thinking Skills in Senior High School Mathematics Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanujaya, Benidiktus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an instrument that can be used to measure higher-order thinking skills (HOTS) in mathematics instruction of high school students. This research was conducted using a standard procedure of instrument development, from the development of conceptual definitions, development of operational definitions,…

  5. Development and design of three monitoring instruments for spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A set of instruments which provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions and monitor the spacecraft response are discussed. The set consists of a sensor that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from + 100 to - 20,000 V, a logarithmic current density sensor that measures local electron flux and a transient events counter that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that couple into the spacecraft wiring harness. Design details and performance characteristics of the three instruments are given. Size, weight, and power requirements are minimized.

  6. Development and design of three monitoring instruments for spacecraft charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturman, J. C.

    1981-09-01

    A set of instruments which provide early detection of potentially dangerous geomagnetic substorm conditions and monitor the spacecraft response are discussed. The set consists of a sensor that measures the characteristic energy of collected electrons or ions from + 100 to - 20,000 V, a logarithmic current density sensor that measures local electron flux and a transient events counter that counts the spurious pulses from electrostatic discharges that couple into the spacecraft wiring harness. Design details and performance characteristics of the three instruments are given. Size, weight, and power requirements are minimized.

  7. Measuring Medical Students' Empathy: Exploring the Underlying Constructs of and Associations Between Two Widely Used Self-Report Instruments in Five Countries.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patrício; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio; Schweller, Marcelo; Thiemann, Pia; Salgueira, Ana; Benson, John; Costa, Manuel João; Quince, Thelma

    2017-06-01

    Understanding medical student empathy is important to future patient care; however, the definition and development of clinical empathy remain unclear. The authors sought to examine the underlying constructs of two of the most widely used self-report instruments-Davis's Interpersonal Reactivity Index (IRI) and the Jefferson Scale of Empathy version for medical students (JSE-S)-plus, the distinctions and associations between these instruments. Between 2007 and 2014, the authors administered the IRI and JSE-S in three separate studies in five countries, (Brazil, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, and the United Kingdom). They collected data from 3,069 undergraduate medical students and performed exploratory factor analyses, correlation analyses, and multiple linear regression analyses. Exploratory factor analysis yielded identical results in each country, confirming the subscale structures of each instrument. Results of correlation analyses indicated significant but weak correlations (r = 0.313) between the total IRI and JSE-S scores. All intercorrelations of IRI and JSE-S subscale scores were statistically significant but weak (range r = -0.040 to 0.306). Multiple linear regression models revealed that the IRI subscales were weak predictors of all JSE-S subscale and total scores. The IRI subscales explained between 9.0% and 15.3% of variance for JSE-S subscales and 19.5% for JSE-S total score. The IRI and JSE-S are only weakly related, suggesting that they may measure different constructs. To better understand this distinction, more studies using both instruments and involving students at different stages in their medical education, as well as more longitudinal and qualitative studies, are needed.

  8. Developing Tomorrows Engineers: A Case Study in Instrument Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Liam; O'Neill, Donal

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to outline the challenges facing industry and educational institutions in educating and training instrument engineers against a backdrop of declining interest by secondary school students in mathematics and physics. This case study cites the experience and strategies of the Kentz Group and Cork Institute…

  9. Developments in Sampling and Analysis Instrumentation for Stationary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nader, John S.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumentation for the measurement of pollutant emissions is considered including sample-site selection, sample transport, sample treatment, sample analysis, and data reduction, display, and interpretation. Measurement approaches discussed involve sample extraction from within the stack and electro-optical methods. (BL)

  10. Development of Perceived Instrumentality for Mathematics, Reading and Science Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Steve L.

    2010-01-01

    Perceptions of instrumentality (PI) are the connections one sees between a current activity and a future goal. With high PI, one is motivated to persist with quality effort because the current activity, even when difficult, is perceived as aligned with, and progress toward, the goal. Conversely, with low PI, one is motivated to relinquish effort…

  11. Development and Validation of the Basketball Offensive Game Performance Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Weiyun; Hendricks, Kristin; Zhu, Weimo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and validate the Basketball Offensive Game Performance Instrument (BOGPI) that assesses an individual player's offensive game performance competency in basketball. Twelve physical education teacher education (PETE) students playing two 10-minute, 3 vs. 3 basketball games were videotaped at end of a…

  12. School Climate: Historical Review, Instrument Development, and School Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zullig, Keith J.; Koopman, Tommy M.; Patton, Jon M.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2010-01-01

    This study's purpose is to examine the existing school climate literature in an attempt to constitute its definition from a historical context and to create a valid and reliable student-reported school climate instrument. Five historically common school climate domains and five measurement tools were identified, combined, and previewed by the…

  13. Developing Tomorrows Engineers: A Case Study in Instrument Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonnell, Liam; O'Neill, Donal

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to outline the challenges facing industry and educational institutions in educating and training instrument engineers against a backdrop of declining interest by secondary school students in mathematics and physics. This case study cites the experience and strategies of the Kentz Group and Cork Institute…

  14. Development of a medical robot system for minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mei; Fu, Yili; Pan, Bo; Liu, Chang

    2012-03-01

    Robot-assisted systems have been widely used in minimally invasive surgery (MIS) practice, and with them the precision and accuracy of surgical procedures can be significantly improved. Promoting the development of robot technology in MIS will improve robot performance and help in tackling problems from complex surgical procedures. A medical robot system with a new mechanism for MIS was proposed to achieve a two-dimensional (2D) remote centre of motion (RCM). An improved surgical instrument was designed to enhance manipulability and eliminate the coupling motion between the wrist and the grippers. The control subsystem adopted a master-slave control mode, upon which a new method with error compensation of repetitive feedback can be based for the inverse kinematics solution. A unique solution with less computation and higher satisfactory accuracy was also obtained. Tremor filtration and trajectory planning were also addressed with regard to the smoothness of the surgical instrument movement. The robot system was tested on pigs weighing 30-45 kg. The experimental results show that the robot can successfully complete a cholecystectomy and meet the demands of MIS. The results of the animal experiments were excellent, indicating a promising clinical application of the robot with high manipulability. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Development of an Asset Map of Medical Education Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiaanse, Mary E.; Russell, Eleanor L.; Crandall, Sonia J.; Lambros, Ann; Manuel, Janeen C.; Kirk, Julienne K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical education research is gaining recognition as scholarship within academic medical centers. This survey was conducted at a medium-sized academic medical center in the United States. The purpose of the study was to learn faculty interest in research in medical education, so assets could be used to develop educational scholarship…

  16. Promoting Medical Students' Ethical Development: A Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Janet

    This guide compiles information reported by medical schools on their efforts to help students develop a sound code of professional ethics. The introduction opens with background information on an Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) 1992 survey of medical schools and on why it is imperative that schools assist medical students' ethical…

  17. Development of an Asset Map of Medical Education Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christiaanse, Mary E.; Russell, Eleanor L.; Crandall, Sonia J.; Lambros, Ann; Manuel, Janeen C.; Kirk, Julienne K.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Medical education research is gaining recognition as scholarship within academic medical centers. This survey was conducted at a medium-sized academic medical center in the United States. The purpose of the study was to learn faculty interest in research in medical education, so assets could be used to develop educational scholarship…

  18. Development of NO Generator for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namihira, Takao; Wang, Douyan; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Okamoto, Kazufumi

    Since NO was identified as effective in treatments involving endothelium-derived relaxing factor in 1987, inhalation of NO (iNO) has been widely used in the medical treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute lung injury, high blood pressure, and other related illnesses. Current iNO systems usually include a gas cylinder of N2 with a high concentration of NO. This system has an inherent risk of generating nitric dioxide (NO2) if leaked NO mixes with air. NO2 is thought to be toxic to the lungs. Therefore, a system that does not include storage of NO is very desirable for administering iNO. In this paper, Prototype of On-site NO generator, which includes a discharge reactor, a NO2-NO catalyst, a charcoal and a particle filter, is developed for animal experiments.

  19. Narrative and knowledge development in medical ethics.

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, P

    1998-01-01

    The role of individual life accounts has been promoted--largely through what has come to be described as narrative ethics-as important to the practice of medical ethics for a number of years. Beyond this the apparent incompatibility of personal stories with scientific procedure has limited their use. In this article I will argue that this represents a serious under-utilisation of a valuable method for researching ethical dilemmas and the settings in which these dilemmas are played out. Life stories need not simply provide a stimulus to scientific research but can in themselves yield intellectually robust evidence on the general as well as the particular. By drawing on the rigorous methods developed elsewhere, personal accounts not only allow us to "enter the world of the sick person" but allow us to do so in such a way as to contribute to empirical and theoretical knowledge. PMID:9650112

  20. Medical instrument based on a heat pipe for local cavity hypothermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'Ev, L. L.; Zhuraviyov, A. S.; Molodkin, F. F.; Khrolenok, V. V.; Zhdanov, V. L.; Vasil'Ev, V. L.; Adamov, S. I.; Tyurin, A. A.

    1996-05-01

    The design and results of tests of an instrument based on a heat pipe for local cavity hypothermia are presented. The instrument is a part of a device for noninvasive nonmedical treatment of inflammatory diseases of the organs of the small pelvis, pathologies of alimentary canal, etc.

  1. Development of an Instrument to Measure Student Use of Academic Success Skills: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Harrington, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills instrument including item development and exploratory factor analysis. The instrument was developed to measure student use of the skills and strategies identified as most critical for long-term school success that are typically taught by school counselors.

  2. Development of an Instrument to Measure Student Use of Academic Success Skills: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John; Brigman, Greg; Webb, Linda; Villares, Elizabeth; Harrington, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Student Engagement in School Success Skills instrument including item development and exploratory factor analysis. The instrument was developed to measure student use of the skills and strategies identified as most critical for long-term school success that are typically taught by school counselors.

  3. Validation of the Efficacy of a Solar-Thermal Powered Autoclave System for Off-Grid Medical Instrument Wet Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization. PMID:22848098

  4. Validation of the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave system for off-grid medical instrument wet sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kaseman, Tremayne; Boubour, Jean; Schuler, Douglas A

    2012-10-01

    This work describes the efficacy of a solar-thermal powered autoclave used for the wet sterilization of medical instruments in off-grid settings where electrical power is not readily available. Twenty-seven trials of the solar-thermal powered system were run using an unmodified non-electric autoclave loaded with a simulated bundle of medical instruments and biological test agents. Results showed that in 100% of the trials the autoclave achieved temperatures in excess of 121°C for 30 minutes, indicator tape displayed visible reactions to steam sterilization, and biological tests showed that microbial agents had been eliminated, in compliance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements for efficacious wet sterilization.

  5. The development of an integrated assessment instrument for measuring analytical thinking and science process skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwanto, Rohaeti, Eli; LFX, Endang Widjajanti; Suyanta

    2017-05-01

    This research aims to develop instrument and determine the characteristics of an integrated assessment instrument. This research uses 4-D model, which includes define, design, develop, and disseminate. The primary product is validated by expert judgment, tested it's readability by students, and assessed it's feasibility by chemistry teachers. This research involved 246 students of grade XI of four senior high schools in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Data collection techniques include interview, questionnaire, and test. Data collection instruments include interview guideline, item validation sheet, users' response questionnaire, instrument readability questionnaire, and essay test. The results show that the integrated assessment instrument has Aiken validity value of 0.95. Item reliability was 0.99 and person reliability was 0.69. Teachers' response to the integrated assessment instrument is very good. Therefore, the integrated assessment instrument is feasible to be applied to measure the students' analytical thinking and science process skills.

  6. Development and preliminary testing of a self-rating instrument to measure self-directed learning ability of nursing students.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su-Fen; Kuo, Chien-Lin; Lin, Kuan-Chia; Lee-Hsieh, Jane

    2010-09-01

    With the growing trend of preparing students for lifelong learning, the theory of self-directed learning (SDL) has been increasingly applied in the context of higher education. In order to foster lifelong learning, abilities among nursing students, faculties need to have an appropriate instrument to measure the SDL abilities of nursing students. The objectives of this study were to develop an instrument to measure the SDL abilities of nursing students and to test the validity and reliability of this instrument. This study was conducted in 4 phases. In Phase 1, based on a review of the literature, the researchers developed an instrument to measure SDL. In Phase 2, two rounds of the Delphi study were conducted, to determine the content validity of the instrument. In Phase 3, a convenience sample of 1072 nursing students from two representative schools across three different types of nursing programs were recruited to test the construct validity of the Self-Directed Learning Instrument (SDLI). Finally, in Phase 4, the internal consistency and reliability of the instrument were tested. The resulting SDLI consists of 20 items across the following four domains: learning motivation, planning and implementing, self-monitoring, and interpersonal, communication. The final model in confirmatory factor analysis revealed that this 20-item SDLI indicated a good fit of the model. The value of Cronbach's alpha for the total scale was .916 and for the four domains were .801, .861, .785, and .765, respectively. The SDLI is a valid and reliable instrument for identifying student SDL abilities. It is available to students in nursing and similar medical programs to evaluate their own SDL. This scale may also enable nursing faculty to assess students' SDL status, design better lesson plans and curricula, and, implement appropriate teaching strategies for nursing students in order to foster the growth of lifelong learning abilities. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of an Instrument to Assess Cross-Cultural Competence of Healthcare Professionals (CCCHP).

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Gerda; Knibbe, Ronald A; von Wolff, Alessa; Dingoyan, Demet; Schulz, Holger; Mösko, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence of healthcare professionals (HCPs) is recognized as a strategy to reduce cultural disparities in healthcare. However, standardised, valid and reliable instruments to assess HCPs' cultural competence are notably lacking. The present study aims to 1) identify the core components of cultural competence from a healthcare perspective, 2) to develop a self-report instrument to assess cultural competence of HCPs and 3) to evaluate the psychometric properties of the new instrument. The conceptual model and initial item pool, which were applied to the cross-cultural competence instrument for the healthcare profession (CCCHP), were derived from an expert survey (n = 23), interviews with HCPs (n = 12), and a broad narrative review on assessment instruments and conceptual models of cultural competence. The item pool was reduced systematically, which resulted in a 59-item instrument. A sample of 336 psychologists, in advanced psychotherapeutic training, and 409 medical students participated, in order to evaluate the construct validity and reliability of the CCCHP. Construct validity was supported by principal component analysis, which led to a 32-item six-component solution with 50% of the total variance explained. The different dimensions of HCPs' cultural competence are: Cross-Cultural Motivation/Curiosity, Cross-Cultural Attitudes, Cross-Cultural Skills, Cross-Cultural Knowledge/Awareness and Cross-Cultural Emotions/Empathy. For the total instrument, the internal consistency reliability was .87 and the dimension's Cronbach's α ranged from .54 to .84. The discriminating power of the CCCHP was indicated by statistically significant mean differences in CCCHP subscale scores between predefined groups. The 32-item CCCHP exhibits acceptable psychometric properties, particularly content and construct validity to examine HCPs' cultural competence. The CCCHP with its five dimensions offers a comprehensive assessment of HCPs' cultural competence, and has the

  8. Development, validity and reliability of the short multidimensional positive mental health instrument.

    PubMed

    Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Picco, Louisa; Chua, Boon Yiang; Eng, Goi Khia; Sambasivam, Rajeswari; Shafie, Saleha; Zhang, Yunjue; Chong, Siow Ann

    2014-06-01

    The 47-item positive mental health (PMH) instrument measures the level of PMH in multiethnic adult Asian populations. This study aimed to (1) develop a short PMH instrument and (2) establish its validity and reliability among the adult Singapore population. Two separate studies were conducted among adult community-dwelling Singapore residents of Chinese, Malay or Indian ethnicity where participants completed self-administered questionnaires. In the first study, secondary data analysis was conducted using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to shorten the PMH instrument. In the second study, the newly developed short PMH instrument and other scales were administered to 201 residents to establish its factor structure, validity and reliability. A 20-item short PMH instrument fulfilling a higher-order six-factor structure was developed following secondary analysis. The mean age of the participants in the second study was 41 years and about 53% were women. One item with poor factor loading was further removed to generate a 19-item version of the PMH instrument. CFA demonstrated a first-order six-factor model of the short PMH instrument. The PMH-19 instrument and its subscales fulfilled criterion validity hypotheses. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability of the PMH-19 instrument were high (Cronbach's α coefficient = 0.87; intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93, respectively). The 19-item PMH instrument is multidimensional, valid and reliable, and most importantly, with its reduced administration time, the short PMH instrument can be used to measure and evaluate PMH in Asian communities.

  9. 20 CFR 725.405 - Development of medical evidence; scheduling of medical examinations and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Development of medical evidence; scheduling of medical examinations and tests. 725.405 Section 725.405 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS... Adjudication of Claims by the District Director § 725.405 Development of medical evidence; scheduling of...

  10. INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT, MEASUREMENT AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Plodinec

    2001-04-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU), in accordance with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40395, will undertake four tasks for DOE EM during the period April 1, 2000 through March 31, 2001. (1) Characterization of Heavy Metals, Radionuclides and Organics in Heterogeneous Media; (2) Environmental Control Device Testing; (3) Waste Treatment and D&D Support: Process Monitoring and Control; and (4) Diagnostic Field Applications Coordination and Testing Support (DFACTS).

  11. Statistical Methods Used to Test for Agreement of Medical Instruments Measuring Continuous Variables in Method Comparison Studies: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Rafdzah; Bulgiba, Awang; Ismail, Roshidi; Ismail, Noor Azina

    2012-01-01

    Background Accurate values are a must in medicine. An important parameter in determining the quality of a medical instrument is agreement with a gold standard. Various statistical methods have been used to test for agreement. Some of these methods have been shown to be inappropriate. This can result in misleading conclusions about the validity of an instrument. The Bland-Altman method is the most popular method judging by the many citations of the article proposing this method. However, the number of citations does not necessarily mean that this method has been applied in agreement research. No previous study has been conducted to look into this. This is the first systematic review to identify statistical methods used to test for agreement of medical instruments. The proportion of various statistical methods found in this review will also reflect the proportion of medical instruments that have been validated using those particular methods in current clinical practice. Methodology/Findings Five electronic databases were searched between 2007 and 2009 to look for agreement studies. A total of 3,260 titles were initially identified. Only 412 titles were potentially related, and finally 210 fitted the inclusion criteria. The Bland-Altman method is the most popular method with 178 (85%) studies having used this method, followed by the correlation coefficient (27%) and means comparison (18%). Some of the inappropriate methods highlighted by Altman and Bland since the 1980s are still in use. Conclusions This study finds that the Bland-Altman method is the most popular method used in agreement research. There are still inappropriate applications of statistical methods in some studies. It is important for a clinician or medical researcher to be aware of this issue because misleading conclusions from inappropriate analyses will jeopardize the quality of the evidence, which in turn will influence quality of care given to patients in the future. PMID:22662248

  12. Teaching child development to medical students.

    PubMed

    Clark, Brenda; Andrews, Debra; Taghaddos, Soreh; Dinu, Irina

    2012-12-01

    Several published strategies on teaching the screening of normal child development were integrated into a small group learning experience for second-year medical students to address practical and logistical problems of approaches used individually. This study examines the effectiveness of this integrated approach using student evaluations. A total of 191 second-year university medical and dental students were invited to participate. Well-described learning objectives, the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), live parent-child dyads and video backup were used. Students rotated through three small group stations. Feedback was provided using a Likert scale (from 1, low, to 5, high) and written comments. Consent was obtained. Live parent-child dyads versus video clip groups were analysed by averaging overall scores. Generalised estimating equation (GEE) analysis in stata (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas) was used for comparing the two groups. A total of 178 students (93%) agreed to participate and filled out the evaluation forms. The overall score on the Likert scale was 4.6 (range 4-5). On two occasions video clips were substituted for live parent-child dyad presentations in one of the three stations. These students (n=43, rating 4.61/5) rated their experience as comparable with those who had three live family stations (n=135, rating 4.56/5). Student comments were grouped into broad themes, with most being positive about their learning experience. This integrated approach is highly acceptable. Video clip usage, live dyads, clear written objectives and use of a standardised screening tool preserved the interaction and immediacy of a clinical encounter, while maintaining consistency in content. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  13. [Characteristics of occupational medical service development at JSC "Kamaz"].

    PubMed

    Nagimzianov, A A; Zakirova, A B; Glushkov, G N

    2011-01-01

    The authors formulated concept on development of occupational medical service of JSC Medical Society "Salvation" for its accomplishment on enterprises of JSC "Kamaz" Group. The concept is based on united technologic line of diagnosis and treatment, including primary care, establishments for specialized medical care and rehabilitation. Within the concept, medical departments, occupational safety protection, staff management and trade union organizing health centers on industrial enterprizes are organized for cooperation, and partnerships between medical professionals and the enterprise staffers are established.

  14. NASA SMD Airborne Science Capabilities for Development and Testing of New Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fladeland, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The SMD NASA Airborne Science Program operates and maintains a fleet of highly modified aircraft to support instrument development, satellite instrument calibration, data product validation and earth science process studies. This poster will provide an overview of aircraft available to NASA researchers including performance specifications and modifications for instrument support, processes for requesting aircraft time and developing cost estimates for proposals, and policies and procedures required to ensure safety of flight.

  15. Developing a New Medical Augmented Reality System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-01

    Augmented reality is a technique for combining supplementary imagery such that it appears as part of the scene and can be used for guidance, training...and locational aids. In the medical domain, augmented reality can be used to combine medical imagery to the physician’s view of a patient to help...the physician establish a direct relation between the imagery and the patient. This project report will examine medical augmented reality systems for

  16. Developing an Instrument to Measure Bias in CME

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takhar, Jatinder; Dixon, Dave; Donahue, Jill; Marlow, Bernard; Campbell, Craig; Silver, Ivan; Eadie, Jason; Monette, Celine; Rohan, Ivan; Sriharan, Abi; Raymond, Kathryn; Macnab, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The pharmaceutical industry, by funding over 60% of programs in the United States and Canada, plays a major role in continuing medical education (CME), but there are concerns about bias in such CME programs. Bias is difficult to define, and currently no tool is available to measure it. Methods: Representatives from industry and…

  17. Development and evaluation of a computer-based medical work assessment programme

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Scutaru, Cristian; Vitzthum, Karin; Gerber, Alexander; Quarcoo, David; Welte, Tobias; Bauer, Torsten T; Spallek, Michael; Seidler, Andreas; Nienhaus, Albert; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background There are several ways to conduct a job task analysis in medical work environments including pencil-paper observations, interviews and questionnaires. However these methods implicate bias problems such as high inter-individual deviations and risks of misjudgement. Computer-based observation helps to reduce these problems. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the development process of a computer-based job task analysis instrument for real-time observations to quantify the job tasks performed by physicians working in different medical settings. In addition reliability and validity data of this instrument will be demonstrated. Methods This instrument was developed in consequential steps. First, lists comprising tasks performed by physicians in different care settings were classified. Afterwards content validity of task lists was proved. After establishing the final task categories, computer software was programmed and implemented in a mobile personal computer. At least inter-observer reliability was evaluated. Two trained observers recorded simultaneously tasks of the same physician. Results Content validity of the task lists was confirmed by observations and experienced specialists of each medical area. Development process of the job task analysis instrument was completed successfully. Simultaneous records showed adequate interrater reliability. Conclusion Initial results of this analysis supported the validity and reliability of this developed method for assessing physicians' working routines as well as organizational context factors. Based on results using this method, possible improvements for health professionals' work organisation can be identified. PMID:19094213

  18. Developing an instrument to measure heart failure disease management program intensity and complexity.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Barbara; Lee, Christopher S; Sochalski, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Comparing disease management programs and their effects is difficult because of wide variability in program intensity and complexity. The purpose of this effort was to develop an instrument that can be used to describe the intensity and complexity of heart failure (HF) disease management programs. Specific composition criteria were taken from the American Heart Association (AHA) taxonomy of disease management and hierarchically scored to allow users to describe the intensity and complexity of the domains and subdomains of HF disease management programs. The HF Disease Management Scoring Instrument (HF-DMSI) incorporates 6 of the 8 domains from the taxonomy: recipient, intervention content, delivery personnel, method of communication, intensity/complexity, and environment. The 3 intervention content subdomains (education/counseling, medication management, and peer support) are described separately. In this first test of the HF-DMSI, overall intensity (measured as duration) and complexity were rated using an ordinal scoring system. Possible scores reflect a clinical rationale and differ by category, with zero given only if the element could potentially be missing (eg, surveillance by remote monitoring). Content validity was evident as the instrument matches the existing AHA taxonomy. After revision and refinement, 2 authors obtained an inter-rater reliability intraclass correlation coefficient score of 0.918 (confidence interval, 0.880 to 0.944, P<0.001) in their rating of 12 studies. The areas with most variability among programs were delivery personnel and method of communication. The HF-DMSI is useful for describing the intensity and complexity of HF disease management programs.

  19. Astrophysics on the Edge: New Instrumental Developments at the ING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santander-García, M.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Tulloch, S.; Rutten, R. G. M.

    Present and future key instruments at the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes (ING) are introduced, and their corresponding latest scientific highlights are presented. GLAS (Ground-layer Laser Adaptive optics System): The recently installed 515 nm laser, mounted on the WHT (William Herschel Telescope), produces a bright artificial star at a height of 15 km. This enables almost full-sky access to Adaptive Optics observations. Recent commissioning observations with the NAOMI+GLAS system showed that very significant improvement in image quality can be obtained, e.g. down to 0.16 arcsec in the H band. QUCAM2 and QUCAM3: Two Low Light Level (L3) CCD cameras for fast or faint-object spectroscopy with the twin-armed ISIS spectrograph at the WHT. Their use opens a new window of high time-frequency observations, as well as access to fainter objects. They are powerful instruments for research on compact objects such as white dwarfs, neutron stars or black holes, stellar pulsations, and compact binaries.HARPS-NEF (High-Accuracy Radial-velocity Planet Searcher of the New Earths Facility): An extremely stable, high-resolution (R ˜ 120, 000) spectrograph for the WHT which is being constructed for commissioning in 2009-2010. Its radial velocity stability of < 1 m s- 1 may in the future be even further improved by using a Fabry-Perot laser-comb, a wavelength calibration unit capable of achieving an accuracy of 1 cm s- 1. This instrument will effectively allow to search for earth-like exoplanets.

  20. Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of the Magnetic Surgical Instrument System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Magnetic Surgical Instrument System into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to the device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the magnetic surgical instrument system's classification. The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  1. Instrumentation development for the EUVE. [Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, D.

    1980-01-01

    The prototype mirror was successfully replated with a thick layer of nickel and diamond turned again. Optimization of the sensitivity of the instruments was studied with emphasis on the filter material, and on the available telemetry. The JHU Preliminary Project Definition Document was critically analyzed. Further studies of the electron cloud distribution produced by a channel plate were performed, and a wedge and strip anode with 17 quartets per inch was shown to image with better than 0.5% linearity. Half the microchannel plates being used in the lifetest completed initial processing and are in the lifetest vacuum chamber.

  2. Vocational Education Students' Generic Working Life Competencies: Developing a Self-Assessment Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyndt, Eva; Janssens, Ine; Coertjens, Liesje; Gijbels, David; Donche, Vincent; Van Petegem, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The current study reports on the process of developing a self-assessment instrument for vocational education students' generic working life competencies. The instrument was developed based on a competence framework and in close collaboration with several vocational education teachers and intermediary organisations offering various human…

  3. Development of a Student Self-Reported Instrument to Assess Course Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, R. C.; Parker, Loran Carleton; Nelson, David; Pistilli, Matthew D.; Hagen, Adam; Levesque-Bristol, Chantal; Weaver, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the development and implementation of a survey-based instrument assessing the effectiveness of a course redesign initiative focused on student centeredness at a large midwestern university in the United States. Given the scope of the reform initiative under investigation in this study, researchers developed an instrument called…

  4. Development of an Instrument to Assess Fourth and Fifth Grade Students' Attitudes toward Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Sharon R.; Silverman, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to develop an instrument to assess fourth and fifth grade students' attitudes toward physical education. The methods for validation included (a) an elicitation study and instrument question development, (b) a pilot study, and (c) a series of analyses to assess, construct, and content validity and to…

  5. Development and Initial Validation of an Instrument for Human Capital Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zula, Kenneth J.; Chermack, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on development and validation of an instrument for use in human capital approaches for organizational planning. The article describes use of a team of subject matter experts in developing a measure of human capital planning, and use of exploratory factor analysis techniques to validate the resulting instrument. These data were…

  6. Development and Initial Validation of an Instrument for Human Capital Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zula, Kenneth J.; Chermack, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on development and validation of an instrument for use in human capital approaches for organizational planning. The article describes use of a team of subject matter experts in developing a measure of human capital planning, and use of exploratory factor analysis techniques to validate the resulting instrument. These data were…

  7. Development of an Instrument to Assess Fourth and Fifth Grade Students' Attitudes toward Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Sharon R.; Silverman, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the authors in this study was to develop an instrument to assess fourth and fifth grade students' attitudes toward physical education. The methods for validation included (a) an elicitation study and instrument question development, (b) a pilot study, and (c) a series of analyses to assess, construct, and content validity and to…

  8. Instrumentation in Developing Chlorophyll Fluorescence Biosensing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Jaramillo, Arturo A.; Duarte-Galvan, Carlos; Contreras-Medina, Luis M.; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; de J. Romero-Troncoso, Rene; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramon G.; Millan-Almaraz, Jesus R.

    2012-01-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence can be defined as the red and far-red light emitted by photosynthetic tissue when it is excited by a light source. This is an important phenomenon which permits investigators to obtain important information about the state of health of a photosynthetic sample. This article reviews the current state of the art knowledge regarding the design of new chlorophyll fluorescence sensing systems, providing appropriate information about processes, instrumentation and electronic devices. These types of systems and applications can be created to determine both comfort conditions and current problems within a given subject. The procedure to measure chlorophyll fluorescence is commonly split into two main parts; the first involves chlorophyll excitation, for which there are passive or active methods. The second part of the procedure is to closely measure the chlorophyll fluorescence response with specialized instrumentation systems. Such systems utilize several methods, each with different characteristics regarding to cost, resolution, ease of processing or portability. These methods for the most part include cameras, photodiodes and satellite images. PMID:23112686

  9. [Development of an instrument for the surveillance of quality indicators in specialized training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health].

    PubMed

    Gil-Borrelli, Christian Carlo; Latasa, Pello; Reques, Laura; Alemán, Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the process of developing an instrument intended for use in assessing satisfaction with the quality of training in preventive medicine and public health for resident physicians. To develop this instrument, the National Survey of Satisfaction with Medical Residency was adapted by an expert panel consisting of 23 resident physicians in preventive medicine and public health belonging to 9 autonomous communities in Spain. The adaptation of the survey to the specialty rotations included new dimensions and items and was evaluated with a 5-point Likert scale. The most important dimensions were planning and the achievement of specific objectives, supervision, delegation of responsibilities, resources and work environment, personal assessment, encouragement, support, and whether the rotation resulted in a publication or research project, etc. The development and utilization of this tool will enable future trainees in preventive medicine and public health to make an informed choice about their training itineraries.

  10. Infrared Development and Testing Laboratory with Development of Atmospheric CO Imaging Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Alan (Technical Monitor); Miles, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center provided support to the Infrared Development and Thermal Testing Laboratory (IDTTL) to enhance its capabilities with new instrumentation and offer new professional activities. The IDTTL offers an undergraduate research environment that focuses on precision noncontact measurement techniques. The IDTTL supports senior project activities and both funded and non-funded projects that enhance the educational mission of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology. During the term of this support fifteen students benefited directly, several of these students participated in an international conference and were published in conference proceedings. The IDTTL was also successful in proposals to NASA for further support and to NSF for new instrumentation and imaging equipment.

  11. Infrared Development and Testing Laboratory with Development of Atmospheric CO Imaging Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, Alan (Technical Monitor); Miles, Jonathan J.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center provided support to the Infrared Development and Thermal Testing Laboratory (IDTTL) to enhance its capabilities with new instrumentation and offer new professional activities. The IDTTL offers an undergraduate research environment that focuses on precision noncontact measurement techniques. The IDTTL supports senior project activities and both funded and non-funded projects that enhance the educational mission of the Department of Integrated Science and Technology. During the term of this support fifteen students benefited directly, several of these students participated in an international conference and were published in conference proceedings. The IDTTL was also successful in proposals to NASA for further support and to NSF for new instrumentation and imaging equipment.

  12. Measuring Participants' Attitudes Toward Mobile Device Conference Applications in Continuing Medical Education: Validation of an Instrument.

    PubMed

    Wittich, Christopher M; Wang, Amy T; Fiala, Justin A; Mauck, Karen F; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Ratelle, John T; Beckman, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Mobile device applications (apps) may enhance live CME courses. We aimed to (1) validate a measure of participant attitudes toward using a conference app and (2) determine associations between participant characteristics and attitudes toward CME apps with conference app usage. We conducted a cross-sectional validation study of participants at the Mayo Clinic Selected Topics in Internal Medicine Course. A conference app was developed that included presentation slides, note-taking features, search functions, social networking with other attendees, and access to presenter information. The CME app attitudes survey instrument (CMEAPP-10) was designed to determine participant attitudes toward conference apps. Of the 602 participants, 498 (82.7%) returned surveys. Factor analysis revealed a two-dimensional model for CMEAPP-10 scores (Cronbach α, 0.97). Mean (SD) CMEAPP-10 scores (maximum possible score of five) were higher for women than for men (4.06 [0.91] versus 3.85 [0.92]; P = .04). CMEAPP-10 scores (mean [SD]) were significantly associated (P = .02) with previous app usage as follows: less than once per month, 3.73 (1.05); monthly, 3.41 (1.16); weekly, 4.03 (0.69); and daily or more, 4.06 (0.89). Scores were unrelated to participant age, specialty, practice characteristics, or previous app use. This is the first validated measure of attitudes toward CME apps among course participants. App usage was higher among younger participants who had previously used educational or professional apps. Additionally, attitudes were more favorable among women and those who had previously used apps. These findings have important implications regarding efforts to engage participants with portable and accessible technology.

  13. Development and Testing of a New Instrument for Measuring Concerns about Dying in Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Schwartz, Carolyn E.; Rogers, H. Jane

    2004-01-01

    A new measure of concerns about dying was investigated in this psychometric study. The Concerns About Dying instrument (CAD) was administered to medical students, nursing students, hospice nurses, and life sciences graduate students ( N = 207) on two occasions; on one occasion they also completed three related measures. Analyses included…

  14. Development and Testing of a New Instrument for Measuring Concerns about Dying in Health Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Schwartz, Carolyn E.; Rogers, H. Jane

    2004-01-01

    A new measure of concerns about dying was investigated in this psychometric study. The Concerns About Dying instrument (CAD) was administered to medical students, nursing students, hospice nurses, and life sciences graduate students ( N = 207) on two occasions; on one occasion they also completed three related measures. Analyses included…

  15. GOSAT-2:Development Status of the mission instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masakatsu; Suto, Hiroshi; Yotsumoto, Kazuhiko; Miyakawa, Takehiro; Shiomi, Kei

    2015-04-01

    Over five years operational periods of GOSAT, the useful scientific data sets and interesting articles for carbon source/sink evaluation were produced and published. On the other hand, although the geenhouse gases measuremetn data are expected to contribute to the efforts to address global warming, the accurasy of GOSAT data is not enough for the political use. Through the GOSAT operation, we had learned a lot of things on the instrument, software, processing algorithm and operation; what should be improved in the following mission. To elucidate the carbon cycle more precisely, our experiences regarding observation performances as well as hardware design were summarized and reflected on the mission requirements on GOSAT-2 which is for a good understanding of CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks and the underlying carbon cycle was defined. Based on the mission requirements, the hardware system requirements were defined and the design was started. Recently we had completed the preliminary design and shifted to the critical design phase, that is the phase C. In the preliminary design phase, the design of the TANSO-FTS-2 which is the primary mission instrument had been almost fixed as well as the one of the TANSO-CAI-2 which is the secondary mission instrument. The results of the preliminary design of GOSAT-2 meet all of the requirements set by the mission requirements. To improve the measurement accuracy, the signal to noise ration will be increased by the extention of the aperture size from 64mm to 73mm and cooling the after optics as well as the thermal detectors. And to increase the number of the useful data, GOSAT-2 will equip the function to avoid the clouds during the observation using the images obtained by the monitor camera in FTS. To observe the carbon monoxide, the 2.3m observation channel will be added. This function will be realized by the extention of the 2.0m observation band to 2.3m. The pointing angle in the along track direction will be extend from

  16. Development of instrumentation for differential spectroscopic measurements at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Masi, S.; Schillaci, A.

    2016-07-01

    The study of the spectral-spatial anisotropy of the high-latitude mm-wave sky is a powerful tool of cosmology. It can be used to provide deep insight in the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, the Cosmic Infrared Background, the anisotropy of the CMB, using the spectral dimension to provide substantially increased information with respect to what is achievable by means of standard multiband photometry. Here we focus on spectral measurements of the SZ effect. Large mm-wave telescopes are now routinely mapping photometrically the SZ effect in a number of clusters, estimating the comptonisation parameter and using them as cosmological probes. Low-resolution spectroscopic measurements of the SZ effect would be very effective in removing the degeneracy between parameters inevitable in photometric measurements. We describe a real-world implementation of this measurement strategy, based on an imaging, efficient, differential Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The instrument is based on a Martin-Puplett interferometer (MPI) configuration. We combined two MPIs working synchronously to use the entire input power. In our implementation the observed sky field is divided into two halves along the meridian. Each half-field corresponds to one of the two input ports of the MPI. Each detector in the FTS focal planes measures the difference in brightness between two sky pixels, symmetrically located with respect to the meridian. Exploiting the high common mode rejection of the MPI, tiny sky brightness gradients embedded in an overwhelming isotropic background might be measured. We investigate experimentally the common-mode rejection achievable in the MPI at mm wavelengths, and discuss the use of such an instrument to measure the spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy and the SZ effect.

  17. The development of a high-capacity instrument module heat transport system, appendixes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Data sheets provide temperature requirements for 82 individual instruments that are under development or planned for grouping on a space platform or pallet. The scientific objectives of these instrument packages are related to solar physics, space plasma physics, astronomy, high energy astrophysics, resources observations, environmental observations, materials processing, and life sciences. System specifications are given for a high capacity instrument module heat transport system to be used with future payloads.

  18. Development of national competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, R; Stausberg, J; Dugas, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a catalogue of competency-based learning objectives "Medical Informatics" for undergraduate medical education (abbreviated NKLM-MI in German). The development followed a multi-level annotation and consensus process. For each learning objective a reason why a physician needs this competence was required. In addition, each objective was categorized according to the competence context (A = covered by medical informatics, B = core subject of medical informatics, C = optional subject of medical informatics), the competence level (1 = referenced knowledge, 2 = applied knowledge, 3 = routine knowledge) and a CanMEDS competence role (medical expert, communicator, collaborator, manager, health advocate, professional, scholar). Overall 42 objectives in seven areas (medical documentation and information processing, medical classifications and terminologies, information systems in healthcare, health telematics and telemedicine, data protection and security, access to medical knowledge and medical signal-/image processing) were identified, defined and consented. With the NKLM-MI the competences in the field of medical informatics vital to a first year resident physician are identified, defined and operationalized. These competencies are consistent with the recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA). The NKLM-MI will be submitted to the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education. The next step is implementation of these objectives by the faculties.

  19. Strategies for developing innovative programs in international medical education. A viewpoint from Latin America.

    PubMed

    Pulido, P A

    1989-05-01

    Problems affecting the quality of medical education and health services in Latin America include variable standards of medical education, geographic maldistribution of physicians, a shortage of nurses and allied health workers, overtraining of physicians in high technology, government control of health and education systems, and economic problems. The Panamerican Federation of Associations of Medical Schools (PAFAMS) was founded for the purpose of addressing such problems in Latin American medical education. PAFAMS has promoted the exchange of ideas and experience among its member associations and schools by establishing a data base of information on medical education and developing mechanisms to disseminate such information. Other PAFAMS initiatives include a program to integrate professional health education and health care services within individual communities, and the linkage of medical education programs with health care institutions as a means of improving the quality of health care. A crucial next step in Latin America is the development of a leadership program to identify and nurture leaders in individual countries who will be instrumental in developing community-based health services by means of medical education oriented to such purpose. Thus, the key issue is to develop healthcare-oriented medical education.

  20. Development of the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Shirley S.; Bernard, Marie A.; McAuley, William J.; Thornton, Megan; Kole, Tristen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: "Medication administration hassles" are the minor daily irritants that family caregivers experience when they assist a dependent family member with medication regimens. This study was designed to develop and test a multidimensional measure of the hassles in family caregiver medication administration. Design and Method: The authors…

  1. Development of the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Shirley S.; Bernard, Marie A.; McAuley, William J.; Thornton, Megan; Kole, Tristen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: "Medication administration hassles" are the minor daily irritants that family caregivers experience when they assist a dependent family member with medication regimens. This study was designed to develop and test a multidimensional measure of the hassles in family caregiver medication administration. Design and Method: The authors…

  2. A Systematic Review of Statistical Methods Used to Test for Reliability of Medical Instruments Measuring Continuous Variables

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Rafdzah; Bulgiba, Awang; Nordin, Noorhaire; Azina Ismail, Noor

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Reliability measures precision or the extent to which test results can be replicated. This is the first ever systematic review to identify statistical methods used to measure reliability of equipment measuring continuous variables. This studyalso aims to highlight the inappropriate statistical method used in the reliability analysis and its implication in the medical practice. Materials and Methods: In 2010, five electronic databases were searched between 2007 and 2009 to look for reliability studies. A total of 5,795 titles were initially identified. Only 282 titles were potentially related, and finally 42 fitted the inclusion criteria. Results: The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) is the most popular method with 25 (60%) studies having used this method followed by the comparing means (8 or 19%). Out of 25 studies using the ICC, only 7 (28%) reported the confidence intervals and types of ICC used. Most studies (71%) also tested the agreement of instruments. Conclusion: This study finds that the Intra-class Correlation Coefficient is the most popular method used to assess the reliability of medical instruments measuring continuous outcomes. There are also inappropriate applications and interpretations of statistical methods in some studies. It is important for medical researchers to be aware of this issue, and be able to correctly perform analysis in reliability studies. PMID:23997908

  3. Development of an Instrument to Measure Undergraduates' Nanotechnology Awareness, Exposure, Motivation, and Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyehouse, Melissa A.; Diefes-Dux, Heidi A.; Bennett, Deborah E.; Imbrie, P. K.

    2008-10-01

    There are many educational interventions being implemented to address workforce issues in the field of nanotechnology. However, there is no instrument to assess the impact of these interventions on student awareness of, exposure to, and motivation for nanotechnology. To address this need, the Nanotechnology Awareness Instrument was conceptualized. This paper is a progress report of the instrument development process. Version 1 of the instrument was administered to 335 first-year students majoring in food and agriculture fields in a pre-post fashion relative to a brief exposure to nanotechnology in the classroom. Following item analysis of Version 1 responses, a revision of the instrument was completed. Version 2 was administered to 1,426 first-year engineering students for the purpose of conducting item and factor analyses. Results indicate that the Nanotechnology Awareness Instrument shows potential to provide valid information about student awareness of, exposure to, and motivation for nanotechnology. The instrument is not a valid measure of nano-knowledge and this subscale was dropped from the final version of the instrument. Implications include the use of the instrument to evaluate programs, interventions, or courses that attempt to increase student awareness of nanotechnology. Further study is necessary to determine how the Nanotechnology Awareness Instrument functions as a pre-post measure.

  4. Towards organizational development for sustainable high-quality medical teaching.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Rik; de Caluwé, Léon I A; Stuyt, Paul M J; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke

    2013-02-01

    Literature shows that faculty development programmes are not organizationally embedded in academic hospitals. This leaves medical teaching a low and informal status. The purpose of this article is to explore how organizational literature can strengthen our understanding of embedding faculty development in organizational development, and to provide a useful example of organizational development with regards to medical teaching and faculty development. Constructing a framework for organizational development from the literature, based on expert brainstorming. This framework is applied to a case study. A framework for organizational development is described. Applied in a context of medical teaching, these organizational insights show the process (and progress) of embedding faculty development in organizational development. Organizational development is a necessary condition for assuring sustainable faculty development for high-quality medical teaching. Organizational policies can only work in an organization that is developing. Recommendations for further development and future research are discussed.

  5. Development of a structural model explaining medication compliance of persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seo, Mi A; Min, Sung Kil

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this study was to develop and test a structural model explaining medication compliance of schizophrenia. From a review of the literature, a hypothetical model was developed based on the conceptual framework of the Health Belief Model with medication knowledge, symptom severity and social support as the exogenous variables, and perceived benefits, perceived barriers, substance use and medication compliance as the endogenous variables. Data was collected at various mental health facilities, including psychiatric outpatient clinics of general hospitals and community mental health centers, between March and May, 2001. A structured questionnaire was used by one- on- one interviews to collect data on 208 schizophrenic patients. Well established measurement instruments, with confirmed reliability, were used to assess each method variable. As a result of covariance structural analysis, the hypothetical model was found not to fit the empirical data well, so a parsimonious model was adopted after modifying the model. The final model was able to explain the 33 % medication compliance. Medication knowledge, social support and perceived benefits had significant effects on medication compliance. The findings of this study address the importance of medication education and social support to promote medication compliance. It is also suggested that various education programs and support groups are needed to enhance medication compliance.

  6. Evaluating the effectiveness of rating instruments for a communication skills assessment of medical residents.

    PubMed

    Iramaneerat, Cherdsak; Myford, Carol M; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Lowenstein, Tali

    2009-10-01

    The investigators used evidence based on response processes to evaluate and improve the validity of scores on the Patient-Centered Communication and Interpersonal Skills (CIS) Scale for the assessment of residents' communication competence. The investigators retrospectively analyzed the communication skills ratings of 68 residents at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Each resident encountered six standardized patients (SPs) portraying six cases. SPs rated the performance of each resident using the CIS Scale--an 18-item rating instrument asking for level of agreement on a 5-category scale. A many-faceted Rasch measurement model was used to determine how effectively each item and scale on the rating instrument performed. The analyses revealed that items were too easy for the residents. The SPs underutilized the lowest rating category, making the scale function as a 4-category rating scale. Some SPs were inconsistent when assigning ratings in the middle categories. The investigators modified the rating instrument based on the findings, creating the Revised UIC Communication and Interpersonal Skills (RUCIS) Scale--a 13-item rating instrument that employs a 4-category behaviorally anchored rating scale for each item. The investigators implemented the RUCIS Scale in a subsequent communication skills OSCE for 85 residents. The analyses revealed that the RUCIS Scale functioned more effectively than the CIS Scale in several respects (e.g., a more uniform distribution of ratings across categories, and better fit of the items to the measurement model). However, SPs still rarely assigned ratings in the lowest rating category of each scale.

  7. The research and development of platform of process instrument and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dong; Xu, Xin; Yin, Jianjin; Zhang, Hongyu; Zhang, Beike

    2017-09-01

    Process instrument and control experiment platform was researched, designed and developed. The controlled object was extracted from typical unit of process industry. In the platform the water and air were used for heat exchanging and recycling. The water and air can be recycled. The platform is easy to maintain. The real industrial instruments and distribute control system were used. The platform is close to the real industry. Many experiments about instrument and control can be supported. Good teaching and experiment environment can be supplied by the platform for the courses of process control and measuring instrument. The teaching standard can be improved.

  8. The Development of a Resource Identification Instrument. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluative Research Associates, Inc., St. Louis Mo.

    As part of the development of a statewide system for retrieving, coordinating, and disseminating resource information within the state of Illinois, a methodology was developed to determine the resources available in each of the existing resource units in the state. The Resource Identification Survey (RIS) was developed to meet this need. A total…

  9. Development of bacterial colony phenotyping instrument using reflected scatter light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Iyll-Joon

    Bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology (BARDOT) involves in differentiating elastic scattering pattern of bacterial colony. This elastic light scatter technology has shown promising label-free classification rate. However, there is limited success in certain circumstances where either a growth media or a colony has higher opacity. This situation is due to the physical principles of the current BARDOT which mainly relies on optical patterns generated by transmitted signals. Incoming light is obstructed and cannot be transmitted through the dense bacterial colonies, such as Lactobacillus, Yeast, mold and soil bacteria. Moreover, a blood agar, widely used in clinical field, is an example of an opaque media that does not allow light to be transmitted through. Therefore, in this research, a newly designed reflection type scatterometer is presented. The reflection type scatterometer measures the elastic scattering pattern generated by reflected signal. A theoretical model to study the optical pattern characteristic with respect to bacterial colony morphology is presented. Both theoretical and experiment results show good agreement that the size of backward scattering pattern has positive correlation to colony aspect ratio, a colony elevation to diameter ratio. Four pathogenic bacteria on blood agar, Escherichia coli K12, Listeria innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus, are tested and measured with proposed instrument. The measured patterns are analyzed with a classification software, and high classification rate can be achieved.

  10. Racial Identity Invalidation With Multiracial Individuals: An Instrument Development Study.

    PubMed

    Franco, Marisa G; O'Brien, Karen M

    2017-06-26

    Racial identity invalidation, others' denial of an individual's racial identity, is a salient racial stressor with harmful effects on the mental health and well-being of Multiracial individuals. The purpose of this study was to create a psychometrically sound measure to assess racial identity invalidation for use with Multiracial individuals (N = 497). The present sample was mostly female (75%) with a mean age of 26.52 years (SD = 9.60). The most common racial backgrounds represented were Asian/White (33.4%) and Black/White (23.7%). Participants completed several online measures via Qualtrics. Exploratory factor analyses revealed 3 racial identity invalidation factors: behavior invalidation, phenotype invalidation, and identity incongruent discrimination. A confirmatory factor analysis provided support for the initial factor structure. Alternative model testing indicated that the bifactor model was superior to the 3-factor model. Thus, a total score and/or 3 subscale scores can be used when administering this instrument. Support was found for the reliability and validity of the total scale and subscales. In line with the minority stress theory, challenges with racial identity mediated relationships between racial identity invalidation and mental health and well-being outcomes. The findings highlight the different dimensions of racial identity invalidation and indicate their negative associations with connectedness and psychological well-being. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. [Development of an inventory assessing medical students' attitudes towards academic misconduct].

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyo Jin; Lee, Young-Mee; Lee, Young Hee

    2013-09-01

    Identifying medical students' perceptions of and experiences with unprofessional behavior in school can help them develop and maintain higher standards of professional ethics. The aim of this study was to develop an instrument that assesses medical students' attitudes toward academic misconduct. A draft version of the questionnaire form was developed, based on an extensive literature review and iterative discussions. The validity of the content of this draft form was evaluated by medical students, physicians, and education specialists. A total of 803 medical students answered the questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis was performed using principal axis factoring and Varimax rotation. A confirmatory factor analysis was also conducted by root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) and comparative fit index (CFI). The internal consistency of the scales was calculated using the Cronbach alpha statistic. The exploratory factor analysis generated 6 factors with 29 items: scientific misconduct (8 items); irresponsibility in the class (6 items); disrespectful behavior in patient care (5 items); dishonesty in clerkship tasks (4 items); free-riding on group assignments (4 items); and irresponsibility during clerkship (2 items). After adding a single item that addressed cheating on examinations, a 30-item inventory was developed. A confirmatory factor analysis demonstrated a favorable RMSEA (0.082) and reasonable fit (CFI, 0.844). The coefficient alpha for each factor varied between 0.80 and 0.90. Our instrument is useful in identifying students' ethical standards with regard to academics and examining the prevalence of unprofessional behavior in medical students.

  12. Developing competencies for medical librarians in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Midrar; Anwar, Mumtaz A

    2013-03-01

    To identify competencies for medical librarians and get these validated from head librarians and employers. The survey method was used. A structured questionnaire, listing 84 competency statements, covering eight areas, prepared after extensive literature review, expert scrutiny and pilot testing, using a 5-point Likert scale was distributed among the head librarians and chairpersons of library committees (CLC) in 115 medical libraries. Sixty seven (58%) useable responses were received from head librarians and 63 (55%) from CLC. Of the 84 competency statements 83 were validated by the head librarians, 44 receiving four or higher mean score while the other 39 statements getting mean scores in the range of 3.97 and 3.06. The CLC validated 80 statements. Only 27 statements received four or higher mean score from CLC while the other 53 got mean scores in the range of 3.97 and 3.22. Medical librarians are required to be well versed with all those competencies which are needed for general librarianship. In addition, they are expected to have adequate knowledge of health sciences environment including medical terminologies and concepts. Sound knowledge of some competencies specific for medical libraries is an additional requirement for library personnel. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  13. Development of the Levey-Nowak Embedded Librarian Presence Instrument: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Janet A.; Nowak, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to examine the initial psychometric properties and feasibility of the newly developed Levey-Nowak Embedded Librarian Presence Instrument. The instrument was structured by a literature review identifying reoccurring concepts of presence, helpfulness, confidence, and collaboration within the embedded…

  14. Development of a Student-Centered Instrument to Assess Middle School Students' Conceptual Understanding of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and field test of the Sound Concept Inventory Instrument (SCII), designed to measure middle school students' concepts of sound. The instrument was designed based on known students' difficulties in understanding sound and the history of science related to sound and focuses on two main aspects of sound: sound…

  15. The Development of a Classroom Observation Instrument Relevant to the Earth Science Curriculum Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John P.

    A classroom observation instrument was developed for investigating teacher and student behaviors associated with the maintenance of an inquiry atmosphere where Earth Science Curriculum Project materials are used as a course of study. This instrument was later used in ESCP classrooms to determine its reliability and usefulness in describing teacher…

  16. Assessing Life Skills in Young Working Adults--Part 1: The Development of an Alternative Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Wal, Rachel Jacoba; van der Wal, Ruurd

    2003-01-01

    A collage with pictorial and verbal stimuli to assess life skills of young workers was developed using a framework for alternative assessment and stimuli instruments. The instrument was evaluated using Bloom's taxonomy for the cognitive domain and Krathwohl et al.'s taxonomy for the affective domain. (Contains 16 references.) (SK)

  17. Career Assessment: Recently Developed Instruments Useful for School-to-Work Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapes, Jerome T.; Martinez, Linda

    This document describes 32 recently developed career assessment instruments that have been deemed useful for school-to-work programs. The following instruments are among those profiled: Ability Explorer; Adult Measure of Essential Skills; Aptitude Interest Inventory; Ashland Interest Assessment; Barriers to Employment Success Inventory; Basic…

  18. Developing an Instrument for Measuring Attitudes toward and Perceptions of Workplace Diversity: An Initial Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Meuse, Kenneth P.; Hostager, Todd J.

    2001-01-01

    Three studies were conducted to (1) identify emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses to diversity; (2) develop an instrument; and (3) test the instrument with 110 students and 66 workers. The Reaction-to-Diversity Inventory was deemed useful for assessing attitudes and perceptions prior to diversity training. (Contains 24 references.) (SK)

  19. Personal-Interpersonal Competence Assessment: A Self-Report Instrument for Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Craig R.; Miguel, Krystal; Alzamil, Abdulaziz; Naumann, Stefanie E.; Royce-Davis, Joanna; Drost, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the internal consistency of a revised instrument, the Personal-Interpersonal Competence Assessment (PICA); derived from the earlier Social Emotional Development Instrument (SED-I). There were three primary rationales for the revision. First, and most importantly, to better align the operational factors with…

  20. Validation of a Self-Report Instrument to Assess Social and Emotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seal, Craig R.; Beauchamp, Kenneth L.; Miguel, Krystal; Scott, Amy N.; Naumann, Stefanie E.; Dong, Qingwen; Galal, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    The current study, using a factor level analysis approach, provides evidence of the validity of the Social Emotional Development Instrument (SED-I) for students in higher education. Although there are a multitude of models and measures that borrow from the premise of emotional intelligence (EI), very few current instruments focus exclusively on a…

  1. From Qualitative Data to Instrument Development: The Women's Breast Conflict Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the initial development of the Women's Breast Conflict Scale, a predictive instrument designed to identify women who may be least likely to follow recommended mammography screening guidelines. This new instrument incorporates self/body image, teasing, family norms and values, and societal/media…

  2. Development and Validation of the Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljahni, Areej; Al-Begain, Khalid; Skinner, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Part of ongoing research into the efficacy of blended learning in higher education within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The need for, and development of, a Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) are explained. This new instrument assesses student perceptions across five core aspects of blended learning environments: Infrastructure,…

  3. Classroom Social Capital: Development of a Measure of Instrumental Social Support within Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shecter, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Many universities implement programs and interventions to increase students' perceived instrumental social support within the classroom setting, yet to date, no measures exist to adequately assess such perceptions. In response to this need, the current research developed an operational definition of instrumental classroom social support and also…

  4. The Development of a Multirater Instrument for Assessing Employee Problem-Solving Skill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lohman, Margaret C.

    2004-01-01

    This study was an exploratory investigation of the development of a multirater instrument to measure employee problem-solving skill. The instrument consisted of two parallel forms: an employee self-assessment and a supervisory assessment. For the self-assessment, twenty employees rated the degree to which they engage in activities commonly…

  5. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were included…

  6. Development and Validation of Teaching Practice Evaluation Instrument for Assessing Chemistry Students' Teaching Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezeudu, F. O.; Chiaha, G. T. U.; Eze, J. U.

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed to develop and factorially validate an instrument for measuring teaching practice skills of chemistry student-teachers in University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Two research questions guided the study. The design of the study was instrumentation. All the chemistry student-teachers in the Department of Science Education, University…

  7. Development of a Measurement Instrument to Assess Students' Electrolyte Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Shanshan; Bi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    To assess students' conceptual understanding levels and diagnose alternative frameworks of the electrolyte concept, a measurement instrument was developed using the Rasch model. This paper reports the use of the measurement instrument to assess 559 students from grade 10 to grade 12 in two cities. The results provided both diagnostic and summative…

  8. Curvature morphology of the mandibular dentition and the development of concave-convex vertical stripping instruments.

    PubMed

    Ihlow, Dankmar; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Hunze, Justus; Dathe, Henning; Planert, Jens; Schwestka-Polly, Rainer; Nägerl, Hans

    2002-07-01

    Radii for concave-convex vertical stripping instruments can be derived from measurements of the natural curvature morphology in the horizontal contact area of the mandibular dentition. The concave-convex adjustment of contacts in the anterior dental arch with a newly developed set of concave-convex stripping instruments should enable orthodontic crowding problems to be alleviated biomechanically.

  9. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Senior High School Students' Preferred and Perceived Laboratory Classroom Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Wu, Ying-Tien; Lin, Chung-Yen; Wong, Terrence William; Fu, Hsieh-Hai; Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Chang, Chung-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop an instrument, named the inquiry-based laboratory classroom environment instrument (ILEI), for assessing senior high-school science students' preferred and perceived laboratory environment. A total of 262 second-year students, from a senior-high school in Taiwan, were recruited for this study. Four stages were included…

  10. Developing Policy Instruments for Education in the EU: The European Qualifications Framework for Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elken, Mari

    2015-01-01

    The European Qualifications Framework (EQF) for lifelong learning has been characterized as a policy instrument with a number of contested ideas, raising questions about the process through which such instruments are developed at European level. The introduction of the EQF is in this article examined through variations of neo-institutional theory:…

  11. Classroom Social Capital: Development of a Measure of Instrumental Social Support within Academic Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shecter, Julie

    2009-01-01

    Many universities implement programs and interventions to increase students' perceived instrumental social support within the classroom setting, yet to date, no measures exist to adequately assess such perceptions. In response to this need, the current research developed an operational definition of instrumental classroom social support and also…

  12. The Conceptual Framework for the Development of a Mathematics Performance Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Suzanne

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual framework is presented for the development of the Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reasoning (QUASAR) Cognitive Assessment Instrument (QCAI) that focuses on the ability of middle-school students to problem solve, reason, and communicate mathematically. The instrument will provide programatic rather than…

  13. Using and Developing Measurement Instruments in Science Education: A Rasch Modeling Approach. Science & Engineering Education Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiufeng

    2010-01-01

    This book meets a demand in the science education community for a comprehensive and introductory measurement book in science education. It describes measurement instruments reported in refereed science education research journals, and introduces the Rasch modeling approach to developing measurement instruments in common science assessment domains,…

  14. Development of a Measurement Instrument to Assess Students' Electrolyte Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Shanshan; Bi, Hualin

    2016-01-01

    To assess students' conceptual understanding levels and diagnose alternative frameworks of the electrolyte concept, a measurement instrument was developed using the Rasch model. This paper reports the use of the measurement instrument to assess 559 students from grade 10 to grade 12 in two cities. The results provided both diagnostic and summative…

  15. The Development of an Instrument for Evaluating Residential Outdoor Education Centres in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelba, Nestor N.

    The study's purpose was to develop a valid instrument for evaluating residential outdoor education centres in Canada. Using published and unpublished literature, a preliminary instrument consisting of 206 criteria was constructed. Twenty-five recognized Canadian experts in residential outdoor education were randomly selected from 3 subsample areas…

  16. Development and Validation of the Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aljahni, Areej; Al-Begain, Khalid; Skinner, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Part of ongoing research into the efficacy of blended learning in higher education within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The need for, and development of, a Blended Learning Environment Instrument (BLEI) are explained. This new instrument assesses student perceptions across five core aspects of blended learning environments: Infrastructure,…

  17. What Are They Thinking? The Development and Use of an Instrument that Identifies Common Science Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mary; Barman, Charles R.; Larrabee, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for, and development of, an online instrument that helps identify commonly held science misconceptions. Science Beliefs is a 47-item instrument that targets topics in chemistry, physics, biology, earth science, and astronomy. It utilizes a true or false, along with a written-explanation, format. The true or…

  18. The Conceptual Framework for the Development of a Mathematics Performance Assessment Instrument.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Suzanne

    1993-01-01

    A conceptual framework is presented for the development of the Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reasoning (QUASAR) Cognitive Assessment Instrument (QCAI) that focuses on the ability of middle-school students to problem solve, reason, and communicate mathematically. The instrument will provide programatic rather than…

  19. Development of a Student-Centered Instrument to Assess Middle School Students' Conceptual Understanding of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshach, Haim

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and field test of the Sound Concept Inventory Instrument (SCII), designed to measure middle school students' concepts of sound. The instrument was designed based on known students' difficulties in understanding sound and the history of science related to sound and focuses on two main aspects of sound: sound…

  20. Development of an instrument to measure student attitudes toward science fairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huddleston, Claudia A.

    Science fairs are woven into the very fabric of science instruction in the United States and in other countries. Even though thousands of students participate in science fairs every year, no instrument to measure student attitudes toward partaking in this hands-on learning experience has been fully developed and available for school administrators and teachers to assess the perceived value that current students attribute to participation in science fairs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to continue the development and refinement of an instrument that measured student attitudes towards science fairs based on an unpublished instrument created by Michael (2005). The instrument developed and tested using 110 students at two different middle schools in southwest Virginia. The instrument consisted of 45 questions. After applying a principal component factor analysis, the instrument was reduced to two domains, enjoyment and value. The internal consistency of the instrument was calculated using Cronbach's alpha and showed good internal consistency of .89 between the two domains. Further analysis was conducted using a Pearson product-moment test and showed a significant positive correlation between enjoyment and value (r = .78). Demographic information was explored concerning the domains using a series of statistical tests, and results revealed no significant differences among race and science fair category. However, a significant difference was found among gender and students who won awards and those who did not. The conclusion was that further development and refinement of the instrument should be conducted.

  1. Development of the Levey-Nowak Embedded Librarian Presence Instrument: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levey, Janet A.; Nowak, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to examine the initial psychometric properties and feasibility of the newly developed Levey-Nowak Embedded Librarian Presence Instrument. The instrument was structured by a literature review identifying reoccurring concepts of presence, helpfulness, confidence, and collaboration within the embedded…

  2. A Parsimonious Instrument for Predicting Students' Intent to Pursue a Sales Career: Scale Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Cummins, Shannon; Pomirleanu, Nadia; Cross, James; Simon, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Students' desire and intention to pursue a career in sales continue to lag behind industry demand for sales professionals. This article develops and validates a reliable and parsimonious scale for measuring and predicting student intention to pursue a selling career. The instrument advances previous scales in three ways. The instrument is…

  3. Development of the Online Assessment of Athletic Training Education (OAATE) Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Frey, Bruce B.; Swann, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To establish the validity and reliability of an online assessment instrument's items developed to track educational outcomes over time. Design and Setting: A descriptive study of the validation arguments and reliability testing of the assessment items. The instrument is available to graduating students enrolled in entry-level Athletic…

  4. Developing a Scale for Strategies Used during the Practice and Learning of Instrumental Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uygun, Mehtap Aydiner; Kilinçer, Özlem

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a valid and reliable scale to identify the strategies students who study instrumental music use during the practice and learning of instrumental music based on their own responses. The study group comprised of 358 students studying music education in five universities in the academic year of 2015 to 2016.…

  5. The Development, Validity, and Reliability of a Psychometric Instrument Measuring Competencies in Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sriram, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The study of competencies in student affairs began more than 4 decades ago, but no instrument currently exists to measure competencies broadly. This study builds upon previous research by developing an instrument to measure student affairs competencies. Results not only validate the competencies espoused by NASPA and ACPA, but also suggest adding…

  6. Further Development and Validation of the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smolleck, Lori A.; Yoder, Edgar P.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further develop and validate the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) Instrument, an instrument designed to measure the self-efficacy beliefs of preservice teachers in regards to the teaching of science as inquiry. Based on the validation processes and the associated data analysis, the TSI demonstrates continued…

  7. A Parsimonious Instrument for Predicting Students' Intent to Pursue a Sales Career: Scale Development and Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Cummins, Shannon; Pomirleanu, Nadia; Cross, James; Simon, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Students' desire and intention to pursue a career in sales continue to lag behind industry demand for sales professionals. This article develops and validates a reliable and parsimonious scale for measuring and predicting student intention to pursue a selling career. The instrument advances previous scales in three ways. The instrument is…

  8. Validity of a stage of change instrument in assessing medication adherence in indigent patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Rathbun, R Chris; Farmer, Kevin C; Lockhart, Staci M; Stephens, Johnny R

    2007-02-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is vital to achieve durable suppression of viral replication. Effective mechanisms to predict adherence can be difficult to implement in clinical practice settings. Self-administered questionnaires are a practical option for assessing patient adherence but may lack validation with objective measures of adherence. To examine the ability of a 2 item stage of change (SOC) questionnaire to predict medication adherence in indigent patients receiving ART. Patients participating in an ongoing study to examine adherence interventions were administered a 2 item SOC instrument to assess readiness for adherence behavior. The SOC instrument was given to patients prior to beginning ART and readministered after they had received 16 weeks of treatment. Electronic monitoring was used to examine the validity of the SOC instrument to predict patient readiness for adherence behavior. Thirty-one patients completed the SOC questionnaire prior to beginning a new ART regimen. Most (87%) patients were male, had previously received antiretroviral therapy (77%), and had an AIDS diagnosis (77%). The SOC category determined at baseline was a poor predictor of adherence at 4 and 16 weeks; however, the SOC category determined after treatment onset (week 16) was a strong predictor of adherence at both time points (p < 0.001 for 4 and 16 weeks; one way ANOVA). The SOC category determined at baseline correlated poorly with subsequent medication adherence in our indigent, HIV-infected patient population. Prediction of adherence based on SOC after treatment initiation may provide a better estimate of adherence behavior. Recognition of this limitation may help clinicians more accurately interpret predicted adherence behavior from self-report instruments.

  9. Utilization of a UAV platform for instrument development and flight-testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axisa, D.; Dawson, W.

    2015-12-01

    Flight-testing of new instruments using conventional aircraft is expensive. The process of integrating a flight ready instrument on an aircraft is lengthy and could pause further development of sensor technology. In this work we discuss the utilization of a UAV platform to develop and test a 5-hole gust probe, temperature sensor and relative humidity sensor. This group of sensors is part of an instrument development project originally planned for conventional aircraft. Challenges with flight-testing resulted in the deployment of this sensor suite on a UAV platform. Results from the first UAV flight tests will be presented.

  10. Assessment of Computer Self-Efficacy: Instrument Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christine A.; And Others

    A 32-item Computer Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE) was developed to measure perceptions of capability regarding specific computer-related knowledge and skills. Bandura's theory of self-efficacy (1986) and Schunk's model of classroom learning (1985) guided the development of the CSE. Each of the skill-related items is preceded by the phrase "I feel…

  11. Using a Research Instrument for Developing Quality at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parpala, Anna; Lindblom-Ylanne, Sari

    2012-01-01

    The University of Helsinki, along with the other European universities, is facing challenges for enhancing the quality of teaching and developing quality assurance systems with comparable criteria. To tackle these aims the university started to develop a student feedback system with a solid theoretical feedback and valuable practical implications.…

  12. [Preventive home visits for elderly patients: development and pilot testing of a multidimensional assessment instrument].

    PubMed

    Peter-Wüest, I; Stuck, A E; Dapp, U; Nikolaus, T; Goetz, S M; Gillmann, G; Minder, C E; Beck, J C

    2000-02-01

    Preventive home visits with multidimensional geriatric assessment have been shown to delay or prevent the onset of disability and reduce nursing home admissions in older people. The purpose of the present study was to develop and test a multidimensional instrument for in-home preventive assessments in older persons. In developing the instrument, we conducted a systematic literature review of risk factors for functional status decline and of appropriate instruments for measuring these risk factors. Based on an Expert Panel using a modified Delphi process [1] the risk factor domains for functional status decline were chosen, [2] the instruments for evaluating each of the included risk factor domains were selected, and [3] the individual instruments were combined into one comprehensive assessment instrument. A German language version of the original English version of the instrument was developed based on translation, backtranslation, and cultural adaptation. The feasibility of use of the new instrument was evaluated in a field test in 150 people aged 75 years and older in Hamburg, Ulm, Germany, and Bern, Switzerland. The instrument was well accepted by the older persons. The prevalence of risk factors for functional status decline in these populations (e.g., physical inactivity, urinary incontinence, vision impairment) was high. There was also a high prevalence of underuse of preventive care measures (e.g., no pneumococcal vaccination in over 95 percent of persons). These preliminary results support the possible usefulness of this instrument for conducting preventive home visits or for epidemiological purposes (e.g., prevention surveillance). In a next phase, the test-retest reliability of the instrument, and the feasibility and reliability of self-administration as compared to interviewer administration will be described in a separate paper.

  13. Developing evaluation instrument based on CIPP models on the implementation of portfolio assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurnia, Feni; Rosana, Dadan; Supahar

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to develop an evaluation instrument constructed by CIPP model on the implementation of portfolio assessment in science learning. This study used research and development (R & D) method; adapting 4-D by the development of non-test instrument, and the evaluation instrument constructed by CIPP model. CIPP is the abbreviation of Context, Input, Process, and Product. The techniques of data collection were interviews, questionnaires, and observations. Data collection instruments were: 1) the interview guidelines for the analysis of the problems and the needs, 2) questionnaire to see level of accomplishment of portfolio assessment instrument, and 3) observation sheets for teacher and student to dig up responses to the portfolio assessment instrument. The data obtained was quantitative data obtained from several validators. The validators consist of two lecturers as the evaluation experts, two practitioners (science teachers), and three colleagues. This paper shows the results of content validity obtained from the validators and the analysis result of the data obtained by using Aikens' V formula. The results of this study shows that the evaluation instrument based on CIPP models is proper to evaluate the implementation of portfolio assessment instruments. Based on the experts' judgments, practitioners, and colleagues, the Aikens' V coefficient was between 0.86-1,00 which means that it is valid and can be used in the limited trial and operational field trial.

  14. Development status of the life marker chip instrument for ExoMars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Mark R.; Cullen, David C.; Rix, Catherine S.; Buckley, Alan; Derveni, Mariliza; Evans, Daniel; Miguel García-Con, Luis; Rhodes, Andrew; Rato, Carla C.; Stefinovic, Marijan; Sephton, Mark A.; Court, Richard W.; Bulloch, Christopher; Kitchingman, Ian; Ali, Zeshan; Pullan, Derek; Holt, John; Blake, Oliver; Sykes, Jonathan; Samara-Ratna, Piyal; Canali, Massimiliano; Borst, Guus; Leeuwis, Henk; Prak, Albert; Norfini, Aleandro; Geraci, Ennio; Tavanti, Marco; Brucato, John; Holm, Nils

    2012-11-01

    The Life Marker Chip (LMC) is one of the instruments being developed for possible flight on the 2018 ExoMars mission. The instrument uses solvents to extract organic compounds from samples of martian regolith and to transfer the extracts to dedicated detectors based around the use of antibodies. The scientific aims of the instrument are to detect organics in the form of biomarkers that might be associated with extinct life, extant life or abiotic sources of organics. The instrument relies on a novel surfactant-based solvent system and bespoke, commercial and research-developed antibodies against a number of distinct biomarkers or molecular types. The LMC comprises of a number of subsystems designed to accept up to four discrete samples of martian regolith or crushed rock, implement the solvent extraction, perform microfluidic-based multiplexed antibody-assays for biomarkers and other targets, optically detect the fluorescent output of the assays, control the internal instrument pressure and temperature, in addition to the associated instrument control electronics and software. The principle of operation, the design and the instrument development status as of December 2011 are reported here. The instrument principle can be extended to other configurations and missions as needed.

  15. Developments in medical care costs: an update.

    PubMed

    Vincenzino, J V

    1993-01-01

    The nation spent roughly $830 billion on all categories of medical care in 1992. Available data for personal health care expenditures and prices indicate that their increases slightly slowed last year, but the burden placed on the economy by the total health care sector continues to mount. Although the uncertainty of the Presidential election is over, the debate on health care reform will continue.

  16. Medical foods: guidelines for development and usage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recognition and management of a change in nutritional requirements associated with disease is an integral part of the medical management. The nutritional needs associated with a disease reflect the amount needed in health to support life, adjusted for the distinctive changes in the nutritional needs...

  17. Development of microchannel plates in advanced wind-tunnel instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, W. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) electron multiplier dynamic range has been increased 3 to 4 orders of magnitude at ambient temperatures, through enhanced input count rate capability and reduced background or 'dark' noise. The previous upper limit of roughly 10(exp 7) - 10(exp 8) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) at ambient has been extended to levels approach 10(exp 10) cm(exp -2)s(exp -1) under continuous dc operation. The lower limit, previously set by an irreducible background component (approximately 0.6 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1)), has been lowered to the cosmic ray limit of .01 cm(exp -2)s(exp -1). The high end improvement was achieved by conductively cooling a very low resistance MCP by bonding it to a heat sink, while maintaining pulse-counting operation with multianode readouts. The low-end improvement was achieved by removing all radioisotopes from the MCP matrix glass. The detectors will benefit optical and mass spectrometry, flow visualization, plasma diagnostics, magnetometry, and other high signal flux applications. Very low MCP background noise will benefit X-ray and UV astronomy, medical imaging, trace isotope mass spectrometry, and other applications where the signal flux is often extremely low.

  18. Development of a New Approach to Instrument Model Design Used by Team X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, Shanna E.

    2005-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Advanced Design Team was formed in April 1995 to improve the quality and reduce the cost of JPL proposals and advanced mission studies. Currently a consolidation attempt is underway to develop a Model Library for use by JPL's Advanced Projects Design Team by collecting existing instrument models for inclusion in the library. This will allow users to readily find models of interest. In addition to this, there is also an attempt underway to develop a new approach to instrument model design used by the Advanced Design Team (Team X). This new approach consists of splitting up the different model parts such as orbital parameters, instrument parameters and instrument outputs into separate searchable parts. The user can then decide between design trades and use the different pieces to construct a model that will fit their needs. As well, this will lead to the opportunity for the large variety of usable instrument models.

  19. The effect of root preparation technique and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks.

    PubMed

    Adorno, Carlos G; Yoshioka, Takatomo; Suda, Hideaki

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of root canal preparation techniques and instrumentation length on the development of apical root cracks. Forty extracted mandibular premolars with straight roots were randomly selected and mounted on resin blocks with simulated periodontal ligaments, and the apex was exposed. The teeth were divided into four groups of 10 teeth each for different canal preparation techniques and instrumentation lengths: group A: step-back preparation (SB) with stainless steel files (SF) using root canal length (RCL) to guide instrumentation length; group B: SB using RCL - 1 mm; group C: crown-down preparation (CD) with Profile using RCL; and group D: CD with PF using RCL - 1 mm. Digital images of the instrumentation sequence were compared for each tooth. Statistical analysis revealed a significant effect of instrumentation length (p < 0.05) but no significant effect of preparation technique (p > 0.05) on the development of apical cracks.

  20. A new instrument for measuring anticoagulation-related quality of life: development and preliminary validation

    PubMed Central

    Samsa, Greg; Matchar, David B; Dolor, Rowena J; Wiklund, Ingela; Hedner, Ewa; Wygant, Gail; Hauch, Ole; Marple, Cheryl Beadle; Edwards, Roger

    2004-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation can reduce quality of life, and different models of anticoagulation management might have different impacts on satisfaction with this component of medical care. Yet, to our knowledge, there are no scales measuring quality of life and satisfaction with anticoagulation that can be generalized across different models of anticoagulation management. We describe the development and preliminary validation of such an instrument – the Duke Anticoagulation Satisfaction Scale (DASS). Methods The DASS is a 25-item scale addressing the (a) negative impacts of anticoagulation (limitations, hassles and burdens); and (b) positive impacts of anticoagulation (confidence, reassurance, satisfaction). Each item has 7 possible responses. The DASS was administered to 262 patients currently receiving oral anticoagulation. Scales measuring generic quality of life, satisfaction with medical care, and tendency to provide socially desirable responses were also administered. Statistical analysis included assessment of item variability, internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), scale structure (factor analysis), and correlations between the DASS and demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and scores on the above scales. A follow-up study of 105 additional patients assessed test-retest reliability. Results 220 subjects answered all items. Ceiling and floor effects were modest, and 25 of the 27 proposed items grouped into 2 factors (positive impacts, negative impacts, this latter factor being potentially subdivided into limitations versus hassles and burdens). Each factor had a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.78–0.91). The limitations and hassles factors consistently correlated with the SF-36 scales measuring generic quality of life, while the positive psychological impact scale correlated with age and time on anticoagulation. The intra-class correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.80. Conclusions The DASS has

  1. Faculty development programs for medical teachers in India.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, Sanjay; Sharma, Anjali; Zahiruddin, Quazi Syed; Gaidhane, Abhay; Shrikhande, Sunanda

    2016-04-01

    India has the highest number of medical colleges in the world and subsequently the higher number of medical teachers. There is a dire need of adopting a systematic approach to faculty development to enhance quality education to meet health challenges for 21st Century. This manuscript provides a landscape of faculty development programs in India, identifying gaps and opportunities for reforms in faculty development. Conventionally, FDPs are organized by medical colleges and universities through Basic Courses and Advanced Courses focusing on pedagogy. Medical Council of India is facilitating FDPs through 18 selected regional centers to enable medical teachers to avail modern education technology for teaching from July 2009. Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research has three Regional Institutes in India. Recommendations include the need for formulating a national strategy for faculty development to not only enhance the quantity of medical teachers but also the quality of medical education; providing support for Departments of Medical Education/Regional Centers in terms of finance and staffing and incorporation of teaching skills in postgraduate training. Distance learning courses focusing on educational leadership and pedagogy for medical teachers can be an option to reach a wider audience. FDPs can be an asset in recruiting and retaining teachers as they offer valued professional development opportunities.

  2. Faculty development in medical education research: a cooperative model.

    PubMed

    Coates, Wendy C; Love, Jeffrey N; Santen, Sally A; Hobgood, Cherri D; Mavis, Brian E; Maggio, Lauren A; Farrell, Susan E

    2010-05-01

    As the definition of scholarship is clarified, each specialty should develop a cadre of medical education researchers who can design, test, and optimize educational interventions. In 2004, the Association for American Medical Colleges' Group on Educational Affairs developed the Medical Education Research Certificate (MERC) program to provide a curriculum to help medical educators acquire or enhance skills in medical education research, to promote effective collaboration with seasoned researchers, and to create better consumers of medical education scholarship. MERC courses are offered to individuals during educational meetings. Educational leaders in emergency medicine (EM) identified a disparity between the "scholarship of teaching" and medical education research skills, and they collaborated with the MERC steering committee to develop a mentored faculty development program in medical education research. A planning committee comprising experienced medical education researchers who are also board-certified, full-time EM faculty members designed a novel approach to the MERC curriculum: a mentored team approach to learning, grounded in collaborative medical education research projects. The planning committee identified areas of research interest among participants and formed working groups to collaborate on research projects during standard MERC workshops. Rather than focusing on individual questions during the course, each mentored group identified a single study hypothesis. After completing the first three workshops, group members worked under their mentors' guidance on their multiinstitutional research projects. The expected benefits of this approach to MERC include establishing a research community network, creating projects whose enrollments offer a multiinstitutional dimension, and developing a cadre of trained education researchers in EM.

  3. Medical students as medical educators: opportunities for skill development in the absence of formal training programs.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Michael J; Hafler, Janet P

    2011-09-01

    All physicians, at some point in their career, are responsible for the education of their peers and junior colleagues. Although medical students are expected to develop clinical and research skills in preparation for residency, it is becoming clear that a student should also be expected to develop abilities as a teacher. A handful of institutions have student-as-teacher programs to train medical students in education, but most students graduate from medical school without formal training in this area. When such a program does not exist, medical students can gain experience in education through participation in peer teaching, course design, educational committees, and medical education scholarship. In doing so, they attain important skills in the development, implementation, and evaluation of educational programs. These skills will serve them in their capacity as medical educators as they advance in their careers and gain increasing teaching responsibility as residents, fellows, and attending physicians.

  4. INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT, MEASUREMENT AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John Plodinec

    2002-08-01

    This report covers the following topics: Characterization of Heavy Metals and Radionuclides; Development of Tools for Long-term Monitoring; Hanford Tank Waste Chemistry; Environmental Control Device Testing; and Process Monitoring and Control of Toxic Organics.

  5. Development of a Thermal Isolation Structure for Aerospace Cryogenic Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, A.; Robeck, L.

    1999-01-01

    A proof of concept prototype cryostat has been developed to demonstrate the ability to accommodate low temperature science investigations within the constraints of the Hitchhiker siderail carrier on the space shuttle.

  6. Development of Instrumental ORAM System for Radiation Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.; Cullum, B.M.; Mobley, J.; Moscovitch, M.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-09-01

    The development of an optical-based dosimeter for neutrons and heavy charged particles is described. It is based on the use of three dimensional (3-D) optical memory materials, used in optical computing applications, and multiphoton fluorescence of photochromic dyes. Development and characterization of various types of dosimeter materials are described as well as the optical readout system. In addition, various excitation geometries for ''reading'' and ''writing'' to the optical memories are also discussed.

  7. Development and assessment of learning objects about intramuscular medication administration

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Lilian Mayumi Chinen; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to develop and assess a learning object about intramuscular medication administration for nursing undergraduates and nurses. METHOD: a random, intentional and non-probabilistic sample was selected of nurses from a Brazilian social network of nursing and students from the Undergraduate Program at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing to serve as research subjects and assess the object. RESULTS: the participants, 8 nurses and 8 students, studied the object and answered an assessment instrument that included the following criteria: educational aspects (relevance of the theme, objectives and texts/hypertexts), interface of the environment (navigation, accessibility and screen design) and didactic resources (interactivity and presentation of resources). In total, 128 significant answers were obtained, 124 (97%) of which were positive, assessed as excellent and satisfactory, considered as a flexible, dynamic, objective resources that is appropriate to the nursing learning process. CONCLUSION: the educational technology shows a clear and easily understandable language and the teaching method could be applied in other themes, contributing to the education and training of nursing professionals, positively affecting nursing teaching, stimulating the knowledge, autonomous and independent learning, aligned with the new professional education requirements. PMID:25493665

  8. Validation of the guidelines for portable meteorological instrument packages. Task IV. Development of an insolation handbook and instrumentation package

    SciTech Connect

    1980-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to show how the objective of developing guidelines for a solar energy related portable meteorology instrument package, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA), was carried out and preliminarily demonstrated and validated. A project to develop guidelines for such packages was initiated at IEA's Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings Program Expert's Meeting held in Norrkoping, Sweden in February 1976. An international comparison of resultant devices was conducted on behalf of the IEA at a conference held in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, in 1978. Results of the 1978 Hamburg comparison of two devices and the Swiss Mobile Solar Radiation System, using German meteorological standards, are discussed. The consensus of the IEA Task Group is that the objective of the subtask has been accomplished.

  9. Patient Evaluation of Emotional Comfort Experienced (PEECE): developing and testing a measurement instrument

    PubMed Central

    Lester, L; Bulsara, C; Petterson, A; Bennett, K; Allen, E; Joske, D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The Patient Evaluation of Emotional Comfort Experienced (PEECE) is a 12-item questionnaire which measures the mental well-being state of emotional comfort in patients. The instrument was developed using previous qualitative work and published literature. Design Instrument development. Setting Acute Care Public Hospital, Western Australia. Participants Sample of 374 patients. Interventions A multidisciplinary expert panel assessed the face and content validity of the instrument and following a pilot study, the psychometric properties of the instrument were explored. Main outcome measures Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis assessed the underlying dimensions of the PEECE instrument; Cronbach's α was used to determine the reliability; κ was used for test–retest reliability of the ordinal items. Results 2 factors were identified in the instrument and named ‘positive emotions’ and ‘perceived meaning’. A greater proportion of male patients were found to report positive emotions compared with female patients. The instrument was found to be feasible, reliable and valid for use with inpatients and outpatients. Conclusions PEECE was found to be a feasible instrument for use with inpatient and outpatients, being easily understood and completed. Further psychometric testing is recommended. PMID:28122833

  10. COCOA: A New Validated Instrument to Assess Medical Students' Attitudes towards Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollar, David; Roberts, Ellen; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the reliability and validity of the Carolina Opinions on Care of Older Adults (COCOA) survey compared with the Geriatric Assessment Survey (GAS). Participants were first year medical students (n = 160). A Linear Structural Relations (LISREL) measurement model for COCOA had a moderately strong fit that was significantly better…

  11. Development of new scintillators for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, Paul

    2016-02-01

    For a long time the discovery of new scintillators has been more serendipitous than driven by a deep understanding of the mechanisms at the origin of the scintillation process. This situation has dramatically changed since the 1990's with an increased demand for scintillators of better performance for large particle physics experiments as well as for medical imaging. It is now possible to design a scintillator for a specific purpose. The bandgap can be adjusted, the traps energy levels and their concentration can be finely tuned and their influence can be damped or on the contrary enhanced by specific doping for an optimization of the performance of the scintillator. Several examples are given in this paper of such crystal engineering attempts to improve the performance of crystal scintillators used in medical imaging devices. An attention is also given to spectacular progress in crystal production technologies, which open new perspectives for large scale and cost effective crystal production with consistent quality.

  12. High Speed Photography, Videography, And Photonic Instrumentation Development At The Air Force Armament Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Donald R.; Powell, Rodney M.

    1989-02-01

    The Instrumentation Technology Branch of the Air Force Armament Laboratory is currently involved in the development of several high speed photographic, videographic, and photonic instrumentation systems to support the testing and analysis of developmental weapons and test items under dynamic conditions. These projects include development of a large format (14 inch by 17 inch) laser illuminated Cranz-Schardin shadowgraph system for materials research, development of a solid state imager based shadowgraph system for aeroballistic studies, experiments with gated imagers for a variety of test applications, and experiments with high speed video imagers and illuminators for airborne and range tracking instrumentation. An additional issue discussed is the development of a timing and annotation standard for video imaging instrumentation systems operating at higher than NTSC standard rates.

  13. 36. ARAIII Instrument development building ARA621 interior. Laboratory room. Windows ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. ARA-III Instrument development building ARA-621 interior. Laboratory room. Windows are on west side of building. Ineel photo no. 3-25. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-10

    environment, biting insects), or acquired by deliberate exposure to aerosols . Product Managers exploit domestic and foreign medical technology to remedy...Japanese encephalitis; hemorrhagic fevers and other diseases spread by aerosol (and rapid methods to identify the cause of illness); schistosomiasis...Center is contrasting for the first production run. 19 /, I • I 0 Rift Valley Fever Vaccine was prepared by growing the virus in cultured monkey kidney

  15. Concept And Development Of Instruments For ITER Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Reichle, R.; Balorin, C.; Carpentier, S.; Corre, Y.; Davi, M.; Delchambre, E.; Desgrange, C.; Escourbiac, F.; Fougerolle, S.; Gardarein, J. L.; Gauthier, E.; Guilhem, D.; Jouve, M.; Loarer, Th.; Martins, J. P.; Patterlini, J. C.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Salasca, S.; Travere, J. M.

    2008-03-12

    We give here a short overview of the status of the development for ITER thermography as performed by the CEA-Cadarache and some of its collaboration partners. The topics that have been included in this synthesis are the status of the optical design, the role of multi-wavelength mesurements, multicolour pyroreflectometry, photothermal methods, and reflection simulations and measurements.

  16. Teaching Analytical Method Development in an Undergraduate Instrumental Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanigan, Katherine C.

    2008-01-01

    Method development and assessment, central components of carrying out chemical research, require problem-solving skills. This article describes a pedagogical approach for teaching these skills through the adaptation of published experiments and application of group-meeting style discussions to the curriculum of an undergraduate instrumental…

  17. Developing and Validating an Instrument for Student Ratings of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Gary; Baldwin, Lyn; Tsui, Ernest; Matthews, Les

    2013-01-01

    In May 2007, the Thompson Rivers University Faculty of Science established an ad hoc subcommittee to develop a new student ratings of teaching survey. The final survey, approved by the Faculty in February 2011, includes statements categorized in the dimensions of teaching shown in previous studies to be correlated with student achievement. The…

  18. INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT, MEASUREMENT AND PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-10-01

    This report covers the following 5 tasks: (1) Characterization of Heavy Metals and Radionuclides; (2) Development of Tools for Long-term Monitoring; (3) Hanford Tank Waste Chemistry; (4) Environmental Control Device Testing; and (5) Process Monitoring and Control of Toxic Organics.

  19. Development and Implementation of a Food Safety Knowledge Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wheatley, Virginia; Schaffner, Donald; Bruhn, Christine; Blalock, Lydia; Maurer, Jaclyn

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the food safety knowledge of young adults. In addition, few knowledge questionnaires and no comprehensive, criterion-referenced measure that assesses the full range of food safety knowledge could be identified. Without appropriate, valid, and reliable measures and baseline data, it is difficult to develop and implement…

  20. Religious Occupations and Stress Questionnaire (ROS): Instrument Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birk, Janice M.; Rayburn, Carole A.; Richmond, Lee J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of the Religious Occupations and Stress Questionnaire (ROS), which attempts to fill the need for an appropriate measure of the stress experienced by individuals in religious occupations. Results of reliability and validity studies indicate high internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity.…

  1. Professional Development School Partnerships: An Instrument for Teacher Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Brittany D.; Sherretz, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Professional development school (PDS) partnerships have the potential for great impact on the field of education. This study examined one PDS partnership school's activities in promoting teacher leadership. The study adds a new dimension to prospective outcomes of the NAPDS essentials related to establishing ongoing and reciprocal professional…

  2. Development of an Instrument for Assessing Addict Rehabilitation Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddox, Victor; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to develop a psychometric evaluation technique which could be used to efficiently assess individual features of addiction treatment subjects which bear upon success of treatment. Previous administration of personality measures in two addiction treatment programs had revealed that successful and unsuccessful treatment…

  3. Development and Implementation of a Food Safety Knowledge Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol; Wheatley, Virginia; Schaffner, Donald; Bruhn, Christine; Blalock, Lydia; Maurer, Jaclyn

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the food safety knowledge of young adults. In addition, few knowledge questionnaires and no comprehensive, criterion-referenced measure that assesses the full range of food safety knowledge could be identified. Without appropriate, valid, and reliable measures and baseline data, it is difficult to develop and implement…

  4. New Concepts in Instrumentation Development to Measure the Perry Scheme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Marcia

    The Perry scheme of intellectual and ethical development has become widely used in a range of academic disciplines and such areas as career training and faculty consultation. However, current measurement techniques for the scheme, whether interview format or paper and pencil measures, do not adequately address issues related to assessing cognitive…

  5. Faculty development and medical education units in India: a survey.

    PubMed

    Adkoli, B V; Sood, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Faculty development in medical education is gaining momentum in India. While planning a National Conference on Medical Education (NCME 2007), we did a survey of principals and faculty of medical colleges to understand the status of faculty development programmes and medical education units in medical colleges in India. Questionnaires were sent to principals of medical colleges by surface mail and to faculty through a web-based programme to elicit information on various aspects of faculty development programmes and medical education units. The responses of both groups were analysed. The number of medical education units has increased rapidly after regulations have been revised in 1997 by the Medical Council of India. The main activities of medical education units were to conduct workshops targeted at medical teachers. The frequently covered topics were teaching-learning, media and student assessment. Lectures dominated the methodology of imparting information. Evaluation was done mainly by feedback questionnaires and pre-test/post-test questionnaires. Projects and follow up were rarely used. The responses from both groups were strikingly similar. The major strengths of medical education units were perceived as availability of trained and motivated faculty, good infrastructure and supportive leadership. The shortcomings were lack of infrastructure, funding and full-time faculty, besides time constraints and resistance to change. The respondents suggested strengthening of infrastructure, appointment of full-time faculty and staff, incentives and recognition of contributions to faculty development, making participation a mandatory requirement, extending the scope of faculty development programmes to include research and networking at the national level. Conclusion. The study reveals the need for policy decisions that support functioning of medical education units in India besides active participation of the faculty.

  6. Cybersecurity and the Medical Device Product Development Lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard W; Katzis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Protecting connected medical devices from evolving cyber related threats, requires a continuous lifecycle approach whereby cybersecurity is integrated within the product development lifecycle and both complements and re-enforces the safety risk management processes therein. This contribution reviews the guidance relating to medical device cybersecurity within the product development lifecycle.

  7. Developing a Community Based Pre-College Medical Science Collaborative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shagam, Janet Yagoda

    Designed to assist secondary and post-secondary educators develop community interactive science programs, this manual describes steps undertaken at New Mexico's Albuquerque Technical Vocational Institute to develop pre-college medical science programs that encourage local high school students to consider the college's medical technology program.…

  8. A Decade of Developing Radio-Astronomy Instrumentation using CASPER Open-Source Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickish, Jack; Abdurashidova, Zuhra; Ali, Zaki; Buch, Kaushal D.; Chaudhari, Sandeep C.; Chen, Hong; Dexter, Matthew; Domagalski, Rachel Simone; Ford, John; Foster, Griffin; George, David; Greenberg, Joe; Greenhill, Lincoln; Isaacson, Adam; Jiang, Homin; Jones, Glenn; Kapp, Francois; Kriel, Henno; Lacasse, Rich; Lutomirski, Andrew; MacMahon, David; Manley, Jason; Martens, Andrew; McCullough, Randy; Muley, Mekhala V.; New, Wesley; Parsons, Aaron; Price, Daniel C.; Primiani, Rurik A.; Ray, Jason; Siemion, Andrew; van Tonder, Vereesé; Vertatschitsch, Laura; Wagner, Mark; Weintroub, Jonathan; Werthimer, Dan

    The Collaboration for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research (CASPER) has been working for a decade to reduce the time and cost of designing, building and deploying new digital radio-astronomy instruments. Today, CASPER open-source technology powers over 45 scientific instruments worldwide, and is used by scientists and engineers at dozens of academic institutions. In this paper, we catalog the current offerings of the CASPER collaboration, and instruments past and present built by CASPER users and developers. We describe the ongoing state of software development, as CASPER looks to support a broader range of programming environments and hardware and ensure compatibility with the latest vendor tools.

  9. Developing a Survey Instrument for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Data Management Training Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, C. Y.; Soyka, H.; Hutchison, V.; Budden, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Education and training resources that focus on best practices and guidelines for working with data such as: data management, data sharing, quality metadata creation, and maintenance for reuse, have vital importance not only to the users of Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE), but also to the broader scientific, research, and academic communities. However, creating and maintaining relevant training/educational materials that remain sensitive and responsive to community needs is dependent upon careful evaluations of the current landscape in order to promote and support thoughtful development of new resources. Using DataONE's existing training/educational resources as the basis for this project, the authors have worked to develop an evaluation instrument that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of data management training/education resources. The evaluation instrument is in the form of a digital questionnaire/survey. The evaluation instrument also includes the structure and content as recommended by the best practices/guidelines of questionnaire/survey design, based on a review of the literature. Additionally, the evaluation instrument can be customized to evaluate various training/education modalities and be implemented using a web-based questionnaire/survey platform. Finally, the evaluation instrument can be used for site-wide evaluation of DataONE teaching materials and resources, and once made publicly available and openly accessible, other organizations may also utilize the instrument. One key outcome of developing the evaluation instrument is to help in increasing the effectiveness of data management training/education resources across the Earth/Geoscience community. Through this presentation, the authors will provide the full background and motivations for creating an instrument for evaluating the effectiveness of data management training/education resources. The presentation will also discuss in detail the process and results of the current

  10. The Need to Apply Medical Device Informatics in Developing Standards for Safe Interoperable Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Weininger, Sandy; Jaffe, Michael B; Goldman, Julian M

    2017-01-01

    Medical device and health information technology systems are increasingly interdependent with users demanding increased interoperability. Related safety standards must be developed taking into account these systems' perspective. In this article, we describe the current development of medical device standards and the need for these standards to address medical device informatics. Medical device information should be gathered from a broad range of clinical scenarios to lay the foundation for safe medical device interoperability. Five clinical examples show how medical device informatics principles, if applied in the development of medical device standards, could help facilitate the development of safe interoperable medical device systems. These examples illustrate the clinical implications of the failure to capture important signals and device attributes. We provide recommendations relating to the coordination between historically separate standards development groups, some of which focus on safety and effectiveness and others focus on health informatics. We identify the need for a shared understanding among stakeholders and describe organizational structures to promote cooperation such that device-to-device interactions and related safety information are considered during standards development.

  11. [Primary health care as an instrument of development in Mexico].

    PubMed

    José, M V; Kumate, J; Barnard, A

    1989-01-01

    A Primary Health Care (PHC) score is obtained by averaging thirteen indicators of PHC of each state of Mexico with data of 1985. Some correlations between the PHC score with other indicators of development, such as education and urbanism, are analyzed. The socioeconomic and educational status of women impinge directly in the processes of PHC. Based upon results of basic research some features of coverage and selectivity of PHC strategies are analyzed.

  12. [Research and development for next generation PET instrumentations].

    PubMed

    Yamaya, Taiga

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) plays important roles in cancer diagnosis and molecular imaging research; but potential points remain for which big improvements could be made, including resolution, sensitivity and costs. For example, the sensitivity of present PET scanners does not exceed 10%. This means that more than 90% of the gamma-rays emitted from a subject are not utilized for imaging. Therefore, research on next generation PET technologies remains a hot topic worldwide. In this paper, we introduce some research trends by describing PET physics research in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector, for which various methods have been studied, will be a key device to get any significant improvement in sensitivity while maintaining high spatial resolution. DOI measurement also has a potential to expand PET application fields because it allows for more flexible detector arrangement. As an example, we are developing the world's first, open-type PET geometry "OpenPET", which is expected to lead to PET imaging during treatment. The DOI detector itself continues to evolve with the help of recently developed semiconductor photodetectors, often referred to as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). We are developing a SiPM-based DOI detector to achieve sub-mm spatial resolution, which is reaching the theoretical limitation of PET imaging.

  13. Development and validation of the ACE tool: assessing medical trainees’ competency in evidence based medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background While a variety of instruments have been developed to assess knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine (EBM), few assess all aspects of EBM - including knowledge, skills attitudes and behaviour - or have been psychometrically evaluated. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument that evaluates medical trainees’ competency in EBM across knowledge, skills and attitude. Methods The ‘Assessing Competency in EBM’ (ACE) tool was developed by the authors, with content and face validity assessed by expert opinion. A cross-sectional sample of 342 medical trainees representing ‘novice’, ‘intermediate’ and ‘advanced’ EBM trainees were recruited to complete the ACE tool. Construct validity, item difficulty, internal reliability and item discrimination were analysed. Results We recruited 98 EBM-novice, 108 EBM-intermediate and 136 EBM-advanced participants. A statistically significant difference in the total ACE score was observed and corresponded to the level of training: on a 0-15-point test, the mean ACE scores were 8.6 for EBM-novice; 9.5 for EBM-intermediate; and 10.4 for EBM-advanced (p < 0.0001). Individual item discrimination was excellent (Item Discrimination Index ranging from 0.37 to 0.84), with internal reliability consistent across all but three items (Item Total Correlations were all positive ranging from 0.14 to 0.20). Conclusion The 15-item ACE tool is a reliable and valid instrument to assess medical trainees’ competency in EBM. The ACE tool provides a novel assessment that measures user performance across the four main steps of EBM. To provide a complete suite of instruments to assess EBM competency across various patient scenarios, future refinement of the ACE instrument should include further scenarios across harm, diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24909434

  14. SWOT Analysis on Medical Informatics and Development Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xiaoyan; Han, Zhongdong; Ma, Hua

    2015-01-01

    This article aims at clarifying the strategic significance of developing medical informatics, conducting SWOT analysis on this discipline and hence establishing the strategic objectives and focal points for its development.

  15. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  16. [The history of medical bibliography and the development of the idea of infectious disease between sixteenth and seventeenth century].

    PubMed

    Serrani, Alfredo; Zurlini, Fabiola

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to underline the importance of the main medical bibliographies printed during the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century, as instrument of transmission and information of the most important medical ideas. The history of medical bibliography is like a mirror where it is possible to recognize the main features of the medical knowledge and of its development during the centuries. The paper analyzes how the idea of infectious disease is documented in the main medical bibliography of the Sixteenth and the Seventeenth centuries and how it developed in relationship with the structure of the medical bibliographies. The study offers a concrete example of the importance and usefulness of the history of medical bibliography to the historians of medicine in their research.

  17. Advanced earthquake monitoring system for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs medical buildings--instrumentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Banga, Krishna; Ulusoy, Hasan S.; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Leith, William S.; Reza, Shahneam; Cheng, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    In collaboration with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the National Strong Motion Project (NSMP; http://nsmp.wr.usgs.gov/) of the U.S. Geological Survey has been installing sophisticated seismic systems that will monitor the structural integrity of 28 VA hospital buildings located in seismically active regions of the conterminous United States, Alaska, and Puerto Rico during earthquake shaking. These advanced monitoring systems, which combine the use of sensitive accelerometers and real-time computer calculations, are designed to determine the structural health of each hospital building rapidly after an event, helping the VA to ensure the safety of patients and staff. This report presents the instrumentation component of this project by providing details of each hospital building, including a summary of its structural, geotechnical, and seismic hazard information, as well as instrumentation objectives and design. The structural-health monitoring component of the project, including data retrieval and processing, damage detection and localization, automated alerting system, and finally data dissemination, will be presented in a separate report.

  18. Instrument development of the CMB polarization POLARBEAR-2 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siritanasak, Praween; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    We present the status of the development of the Polarbear-2 (PB-2) and Simons Array experiments. PB-2 is a ground-based Cosmic Microwave Back- ground (CMB) polarization experiment located at the James Ax observatory in the Atacama desert of Northern Chile. The Simons Array will consist of three PB-2 receivers on three Huan Tran-style telescopes, each containing a multi-chroic detector array. The first new Simons Array receiver, Polarbear- 2A(PB-2A), will be deployed in 2017. The PB-2A focal plane consists of 1,897 lenslet-coupled, dual-polarization, sinuous-antenna-coupled pixels operating at 95 and 150 GHz, making a total of 7,588 polarization-sensitive transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. In the order to cover both frequencies, we developed broadband two layer anti-reflection (AR) coating for 5.345 mm diameter lenslets using two types of epoxy: Stycast2850FT and Stycast1090. We developed a mass production AR coating methodology that can control the uniformity and shape to within 25 μm error from the designed value. The second (PB-2B) and third (PB-2C) receivers will employ similar technologies and will cover 95, 150, 220 and 280 GHz. The Simons Array will survey 80% of the sky with broad frequency coverage and high resolution, making it a powerful tool to constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio through measurements of primordial B-modes and the sum of the neutrino masses through measurements of B-modes produced by gravitational lensing.

  19. Development and Validation of a Bilingual Stroke Preparedness Assessment Instrument.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Lesli E; Mazor, Kathleen M; Sánchez, Brisa N; Dome, Mackenzie; Biller, José; Morgenstern, Lewis B

    2017-04-01

    Stroke preparedness interventions are limited by the lack of psychometrically sound intermediate end points. We sought to develop and assess the reliability and validity of the video-Stroke Action Test (video-STAT) an English and a Spanish video-based test to assess people's ability to recognize and react to stroke signs. Video-STAT development and testing was divided into 4 phases: (1) video development and community-generated response options, (2) pilot testing in community health centers, (3) administration in a national sample, bilingual sample, and neurologist sample, and (4) administration before and after a stroke preparedness intervention. The final version of the video-STAT included 8 videos: 4 acute stroke/emergency, 2 prior stroke/nonemergency, 1 nonstroke/emergency, and 1 nonstroke/nonemergency. Acute stroke recognition and action response were queried after each vignette. Video-STAT scoring was based on the acute stroke vignettes only (score range 0-12 best). The national sample consisted of 598 participants, 438 who took the video-STAT in English and 160 who took the video-STAT in Spanish. There was adequate internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.72). The average video-STAT score was 5.6 (SD=3.6), whereas the average neurologist score was 11.4 (SD=1.3). There was no difference in video-STAT scores between the 116 bilingual video-STAT participants who took the video-STAT in English or Spanish. Compared with baseline scores, the video-STAT scores increased after a stroke preparedness intervention (6.2 versus 8.9, P<0.01) among a sample of 101 black adults and youth. The video-STAT yields reliable scores that seem to be valid measures of stroke preparedness. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. [Disabled person's satisfaction with health and social care--an internationally developed instrument].

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Lajos; Paulik, Edit

    2011-02-01

    Quality of health and social care is being assessed by largely different methods. Obtaining comparable and valuable data is difficult. Thus, internationally developed instruments have special value. A set of instruments has been developed simultaneously using World Health Organization's instrument development method. One of these is the instrument "Quality of Care and Support for People with Disabilities". Response scales contain five options for physically and three for intellectually disabled persons. Psychometric analysis of the Hungarian instrument version was based on interviews with 151 physically and 166 intellectually disabled persons. Answering rate was high, above 95% with the exception of one item. Internal consistency of the two instrument versions by Cronbach's alpha is 0.845 and 0.745 respectively. Lowest satisfaction was found in the domain "information" in both groups that correlates significantly with health conditions at p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 level respectively. The field trial confirms validity and reliability of the instrument. Its wider use may help the evaluation of satisfaction concerning different components of quality of care, consequently better tailoring of services to needs.