Science.gov

Sample records for medical oncology basic

  1. Palliative medicine and medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Maltoni, M; Amadori, D

    2001-04-01

    Traditionally, medical oncology and palliative care have been considered two distinct and separate disciplines, both as regards treatment objectives and delivery times. Palliative care in terminal stages, aimed exclusively at evaluating and improving quality of life, followed antitumor therapies, which concentrated solely on quantitative results (cure, prolongation of life, tumoral mass shrinkage). Over the years, more modern concepts have developed on the subject. Medical oncology, dealing with the skills and strategic co-ordination of oncologic interventions from primary prevention to terminal phases, should also include assessment and treatment of patients' subjective needs. Anticancer therapies should be evaluated in terms of both the quantitative and qualititative impact on patients' lives. Hence, the traditional view of palliative care has to be modified: it constitutes a philosophical and methodological approach to be adopted from the early phases of illness. It is not the evident cultural necessity of integrating medical oncology with palliative medicine that may be a matter of argument, but rather the organizational models needed to put this combined care into practice: should continuous care be guaranteed by a single figure, the medical oncologist, or rather by an interdisciplinary providers' team, including full-time doctors well-equipped for palliative care? In this paper the needs of cancer patients and the part that a complete oncologist should play to deal with such difficult and far-reaching problems are firstly described. Then, as mild provocation, data and critical considerations on the ever increasing needs of palliative care, the present shortcomings in quality of life and pain assessment and management by medical oncologists, and the uncertain efficacy of interventional programmes to change clinical practice are described. Finally, a model of therapeutic continuity is presented. which in our view is realistic and feasible: an Oncologic

  2. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  3. Perceptions of Oncology as a Medical Specialty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassileth, Barrie R.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics and prestige associated with oncology and assessed shifts in medical students' perceptions as a result of participation in an oncology course are explored. Respondents were asked to rate the prestige of eight specialities and asked to select characteristics "that best describe each type of specialist." (MLW)

  4. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    PubMed

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  5. Radiation Oncology Physics and Medical Physics Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourland, Dan

    2011-10-01

    Medical physics, an applied field of physics, is the applications of physics in medicine. Medical physicists are essential professionals in contemporary healthcare, contributing primarily to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases through numerous inventions, advances, and improvements in medical imaging and cancer treatment. Clinical service, research, and teaching by medical physicists benefits thousands of patients and other individuals every day. This talk will cover three main topics. First, exciting current research and development areas in the medical physics sub-specialty of radiation oncology physics will be described, including advanced oncology imaging for treatment simulation, image-guided radiation therapy, and biologically-optimized radiation treatment. Challenges in patient safety in high-technology radiation treatments will be briefly reviewed. Second, the educational path to becoming a medical physicist will be reviewed, including undergraduate foundations, graduate training, residency, board certification, and career opportunities. Third, I will introduce the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), which is the professional society that represents, advocates, and advances the field of medical physics (www.aapm.org).

  6. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  7. Oncology Teaching: A Multidisciplinary Approach for Second-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkort, Richard; Mozden, Peter J.

    1975-01-01

    A Boston University School of Medicine course in oncology is described which covers basic science correlates, diagnostic approaches, treatment modalities, and psycho-social aspects. Based on five years experience, the course is considered a successful means of correlating basic and clinical information for second- and third-year medical students.…

  8. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, Kristopher E.B.; Duncan, Graeme

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  9. Urological medical oncology: land of opportunity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Robert Jones speaks to Francesca Lake, Managing Commissioning Editor. Robert completed his PhD in molecular biology at the Beatson Institute for Cancer Research (Glasgow, UK) and is currently the senior lecturer in medical oncology at the University of Glasgow (UK) and a consultant at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre (Glasgow, UK). He is involved in the management of prostate, bladder and kidney cancers in the clinic and performs collaborative translational research with researchers from the Beatson Institute. He also manages Phase I, II and III trials in the urological cancer field, and is Chief Investigator of the TOUCAN and PLUTO trials (urothelial cancer), SAPROCAN and MAdCaP trials (prostate cancer), and the UK component of the ASPEN trial (renal cell carcinoma). Recently, he has been involved in the COMPARZ trial, which compared pazopanib with sunitinib in renal cell carcinoma patients. He is director of the Glasgow Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit and is an active member of the UK National Cancer Research Institute Clinical Studies Groups in urology. PMID:23414465

  10. Use of electronic medical records in oncology outcomes research.

    PubMed

    Kanas, Gena; Morimoto, Libby; Mowat, Fionna; O'Malley, Cynthia; Fryzek, Jon; Nordyke, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Oncology outcomes research could benefit from the use of an oncology-specific electronic medical record (EMR) network. The benefits and challenges of using EMR in general health research have been investigated; however, the utility of EMR for oncology outcomes research has not been explored. Compared to current available oncology databases and registries, an oncology-specific EMR could provide comprehensive and accurate information on clinical diagnoses, personal and medical histories, planned and actual treatment regimens, and post-treatment outcomes, to address research questions from patients, policy makers, the pharmaceutical industry, and clinicians/researchers. Specific challenges related to structural (eg, interoperability, data format/entry), clinical (eg, maintenance and continuity of records, variety of coding schemes), and research-related (eg, missing data, generalizability, privacy) issues must be addressed when building an oncology-specific EMR system. Researchers should engage with medical professional groups to guide development of EMR systems that would ultimately help improve the quality of cancer care through oncology outcomes research.

  11. Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship: Implementation and Evaluation of a Bi-institutional Pilot Curriculum

    SciTech Connect

    Golden, Daniel W.; Spektor, Alexander; Rudra, Sonali; Ranck, Mark C.; Krishnan, Monica S.; Jimenez, Rachel B.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a structured didactic curriculum to complement clinical experiences during radiation oncology clerkships at 2 academic medical centers. Methods and Materials: A structured didactic curriculum was developed to teach fundamentals of radiation oncology and improve confidence in clinical competence. Curriculum lectures included: (1) an overview of radiation oncology (history, types of treatments, and basic clinic flow); (2) fundamentals of radiation biology and physics; and (3) practical aspects of radiation treatment simulation and planning. In addition, a hands-on dosimetry session taught students fundamentals of treatment planning. The curriculum was implemented at 2 academic departments in 2012. Students completed anonymous evaluations using a Likert scale to rate the usefulness of curriculum components (1 = not at all, 5 = extremely). Likert scores are reported as (median [interquartile range]). Results: Eighteen students completed the curriculum during their 4-week rotation (University of Chicago n=13, Harvard Longwood Campus n=5). All curriculum components were rated as extremely useful: introduction to radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); radiation biology and physics (5 [5-5]); practical aspects of radiation oncology (5 [4-5]); and the treatment planning session (5 [5-5]). Students rated the curriculum as “quite useful” to “extremely useful” (1) to help students understand radiation oncology as a specialty; (2) to increase student comfort with their specialty decision; and (3) to help students with their future transition to a radiation oncology residency. Conclusions: A standardized curriculum for medical students completing a 4-week radiation oncology clerkship was successfully implemented at 2 institutions. The curriculum was favorably reviewed. As a result of completing the curriculum, medical students felt more comfortable with their specialty decision and better prepared to begin radiation oncology residency.

  12. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Employment and Training Administration Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation... services. The notice was published in the Federal Register on April 18, 2012 (75 FR 23289). At the request of a company official, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm....

  13. Michigan Oncology Medical Home Demonstration Project: first-year results.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Gordon; Tozer, Jane M; Snegosky, Jeff; Fox, John; Neumann, Kurt

    2014-09-01

    Launched in May 2012, the Michigan Oncology Medical Home Demonstration Project is an innovative multipractice oncology medical home model supported by payment reform. In the first year of the project, four oncology practices (29 physicians) participated and enrolled 85 patients receiving chemotherapy for a cancer diagnosis (96 new chemotherapy starts). By creating an oncology medical home for patients, the project reduced costs associated with unnecessary emergency room visits and inpatient admissions, with an average estimated cost savings of $550 per patient, while also enhancing payments to providers. The total estimated cost savings for year 1 was $46,228. In addition to the financial savings realized through reductions in emergency room visits and hospitalizations, the program also demonstrated that participating practices had high adherence to national and practice-selected guidelines, instituted advance care planning, and provided effective and standardized symptom management. The results are promising and provide evidence that community oncology practices will embrace the transformation to a patient-centered model with properly aligned incentives and administrative assistance.

  14. [Treatment of anaemia in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Kullmann, Tamás; Culine, Stéphane

    2012-06-24

    Development of cytotoxic chemotherapy, which has several side effects, has resulted in the development in supportive care as well. Two families of novel drugs have spread in the care of chemotherapy induced anaemia: human recombinant erythropoietin and intravenous iron. They were praised for the decreased transfusion demand and the increased quality of life. However, if we read the literature critically, our enthusiasm should be decreased. New data show an unfavourable impact of erythropoietin on life expectancy. Furthermore, the health care policy has changed since the introduction of erythropoietin 25 years ago. Transfusion control has improved and cost awareness in health care has increased. Recommendations of the American Societies of Haematology and Clinical Oncology reflect on these considerations. Erythropoietin is not recommended in adjuvant settings. The choice between erythropoietin and transfusion is conferred to the clinician in case of the development of metastases. No sufficient scientific argument was found to support the use of intravenous iron supplementation.

  15. Scientific activity and needs among medical oncology units in sicily: a survey of the italian association of medical oncology.

    PubMed

    Amadio, P; Bordonaro, R; Borsellino, N; Butera, A; Caruso, M; Ferraù, F; Russello, R; Savio, G; Valenza, R; Zerilli, F; Gebbia, V

    2010-02-01

    In the era of targeted therapies and combined modalities of treatment, scientific research plays a role of paramount importance in improving knowledge of cancer treatment. The aim of this survey was to review the scientific activity of medical oncology units in Sicily and to analyze their needs and possible pitfalls in order to improve future scientific cooperation.The regional section of the Italian Association of medical Oncology (AIOM) approved this survey in November, 2007. A systematic review of scientific activity produced by medical oncology units in Sicily during the last 5 years has been reviewed. papers dealing with solid tumors reported in the pubmed web site have been included in the analysis. Data were reported as absolute number of published papers and impact factor per medical oncology unit and also as a ratio between global impact factor and the number of personnel working in each single unit to analyze scientific production according to the workforce of each institution.We identified a total of 283 papers reported in pubmed between 2004 and march, 2009. The mean number of publications/unit was 10.9 with a range of 0-50. The mean number of publications/year was 11.7 with a range of 0.2-10. The 15 units included in the impact factor evaluation published 252 papers with a total impact factor of 1014.6 points in 5 years with a mean of 63.4 points per institution and a mean of 4.02 points/paper. However only four medical oncology units reported a cumulative 5-year impact factor >100 points.This survey has shown that a minority of medical oncology units in Sicily is constantly involved in clinical research although at different levels of activity. Overall the percentage of patients enrolled in clinical trials is very low. The main reasons for lack of participation in clinical trials include insufficient medical personnel, the absence of a specifically dedicated research unit inside the medical oncology structures and in some cases lack of research

  16. Medical Student–Reported Outcomes of a Radiation Oncologist–Led Preclinical Course in Oncology: A Five-Year Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankit; Koottappillil, Brian; Shah, Bhartesh; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: There is a recognized need for more robust training in oncology for medical students. At our institution, we have offered a core dedicated oncology block, led by a radiation oncologist course director, during the second year of the medical school curriculum since the 2008-2009 academic year. Herein, we report the outcomes of the oncology block over the past 5 years through an analysis of student perceptions of the course, both immediately after completion of the block and in the third year. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 2 separate surveys. The first assessed student impressions of how well the course met each of the course's learning objectives through a survey that was administered to students immediately after the oncology block in 2012. The second was administered after students completed the oncology block during the required radiology clerkship in the third year. All questions used a 5-level Likert scale and were analyzed by use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Of the 169 students who took the oncology course in 2012, 127 (75.1%) completed the course feedback survey. Over 73% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the course met its 3 learning objectives. Of the 699 medical students who took the required radiology clerkship between 2010 and 2013, 538 participated in the second survey, for a total response rate of 77%. Of these students, 368 (68.4%) agreed or strongly agreed that the course was effective in contributing to their overall medical education. Conclusion: Student perceptions of the oncology block are favorable and have improved across multiple categories since the inception of the course. Students self-reported that a dedicated preclinical oncology block was effective in helping identify the basics of cancer therapy and laying the foundation for clinical electives in oncology, including radiation oncology.

  17. The radiation oncology workforce: A focus on medical dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Gregg F.; Mobile, Katherine; Yu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce survey was conducted to assess the current state of the entire workforce, predict its future needs and concerns, and evaluate quality improvement and safety within the field. This article describes the dosimetrist segment results. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Workforce Subcommittee, in conjunction with other specialty societies, conducted an online survey targeting all segments of the radiation oncology treatment team. The data from the dosimetrist respondents are presented in this article. Of the 2573 dosimetrists who were surveyed, 890 responded, which resulted in a 35% segment response rate. Most respondents were women (67%), whereas only a third were men (33%). More than half of the medical dosimetrists were older than 45 years (69.2%), whereas the 45 to 54 years age group represented the highest percentage of respondents (37%). Most medical dosimetrists stated that their workload was appropriate (52%), with respondents working a reported average of 41.7 ± 4 hours per week. Overall, 86% of medical dosimetrists indicated that they were satisfied with their career, and 69% were satisfied in their current position. Overall, 61% of respondents felt that there was an oversupply of medical dosimetrists in the field, 14% reported that supply and demand was balanced, and the remaining 25% felt that there was an undersupply. The medical dosimetrists' greatest concerns included documentation/paperwork (78%), uninsured patients (80%), and insufficient reimbursement rates (87%). This survey provided an insight into the dosimetrist perspective of the radiation oncology workforce. Though an overwhelming majority has conveyed satisfaction concerning their career, the study allowed a spotlight to be placed on the profession's current concerns, such as insufficient reimbursement rates and possible oversupply of dosimetrists within the field.

  18. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  19. Medical Student Knowledge of Oncology and Related Disciplines: a Targeted Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Oskvarek, Jonathan; Braunstein, Steve; Farnan, Jeanne; Ferguson, Mark K; Hahn, Olwen; Henderson, Tara; Hong, Susan; Levine, Stacie; Rosenberg, Carol A; Golden, Daniel W

    2016-09-01

    Despite increasing numbers of cancer survivors, non-oncology physicians report discomfort and little training regarding oncologic and survivorship care. This pilot study assesses medical student comfort with medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, hospice/palliative medicine, and survivorship care. A survey was developed with input from specialists in various fields of oncologic care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. The survey included respondent demographics, reports of experience with oncology, comfort ratings with oncologic care, and five clinical vignettes. Responses were yes/no, multiple choice, Likert scale, or free response. The survey was distributed via email to medical students (MS1-4) at two US medical schools. The 105 respondents were 34 MS1s (32 %), 15 MS2s and MD/PhDs (14 %), 26 MS3s (25 %), and 30 MS4s (29 %). Medical oncology, surgical oncology, and hospice/palliative medicine demonstrated a significant trend for increased comfort from MS1 to MS4, but radiation oncology and survivorship care did not. MS3s and MS4s reported the least experience with survivorship care and radiation oncology. In the clinical vignettes, students performed the worst on the long-term chemotherapy toxicity and hospice/palliative medicine questions. Medical students report learning about components of oncologic care, but lack overall comfort with oncologic care. Medical students also fail to develop an increased self-assessed level of comfort with radiation oncology and survivorship care. These pilot results support development of a formalized multidisciplinary medical school oncology curriculum at these two institutions. An expanded national survey is being developed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  20. An Increase in Medical Student Knowledge of Radiation Oncology: A Pre-Post Examination Analysis of the Oncology Education Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Ariel E. Mulleady Bishop, Pauline; Dad, Luqman; Singh, Deeptej; Slanetz, Priscilla J.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The Oncology Education Initiative was created to advance oncology and radiation oncology education by integrating structured didactics into the existing core radiology clerkship. We set out to determine whether the addition of structured didactics could lead to a significant increase in overall medical student knowledge about radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pre- and posttest examining concepts in general radiation oncology, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. The 15-question, multiple-choice exam was administered before and after a 1.5-hour didactic lecture by an attending physician in radiation oncology. Individual question changes, overall student changes, and overall categorical changes were analyzed. All hypothesis tests were two-tailed (significance level 0.05). Results: Of the 153 fourth-year students, 137 (90%) took the pre- and posttest and were present for the didactic lecture. The average test grade improved from 59% to 70% (p = 0.011). Improvement was seen in all questions except clinical vignettes involving correct identification of TNM staging. Statistically significant improvement (p {<=} 0.03) was seen in the questions regarding acute and late side effects of radiation, brachytherapy for prostate cancer, delivery of radiation treatment, and management of early-stage breast cancer. Conclusions: Addition of didactics in radiation oncology significantly improves medical students' knowledge of the topic. Despite perceived difficulty in teaching radiation oncology and the assumption that it is beyond the scope of reasonable knowledge for medical students, we have shown that even with one dedicated lecture, students can learn and absorb general principles regarding radiation oncology.

  1. Pharmacy Instruction in Medical Oncology: Results of a National Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cersosimo, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey concerning oncology instruction in pharmacy schools found it taught primarily as part of a course in medicinal chemistry/pharmacology or therapeutics. Twenty-one schools offer an oncology course, with others planning them. Oncology clerkships are currently available in 42 schools. Increased emphasis on oncology instruction is encouraged.…

  2. Preclinical Medical Student Hematology/Oncology Education Environment.

    PubMed

    Zumberg, Marc S; Broudy, Virginia C; Bengtson, Elizabeth M; Gitlin, Scott D

    2015-12-01

    To better prepare medical students to care for patients in today's changing health-care environment as they transition to continuing their education as residents, many US medical schools have been reviewing and modifying their curricula and are considering integration of newer adult learning techniques, including team-based learning, flipped classrooms, and other active learning approaches (Assoc Am Med Coll. 2014). Directors of hematology/oncology (H/O) courses requested an assessment of today's H/O education environment to help them respond to the ongoing changes in the education content and environment that will be necessary to meet this goal. Several recommendations for the improvement of cancer education resulted from American Association for Cancer Education's (ACCE's) "Cancer Education Survey II" including a call for medical schools to evaluate the effectiveness of current teaching methods in achieving cancer education objectives (Chamberlain et al. J Cancer Educ 7(2):105-114.2014). To understand the current environment and resources used in medical student preclinical H/O courses, an Internet-based, Survey Monkey®-formatted, questionnaire focusing on nine topic areas was distributed to 130 United States Hematology/Oncology Course Directors (HOCDs). HOCDs represent a diverse group of individuals who work in variably supportive environments and who are variably satisfied with their position. Several aspects of these courses remain relatively unchanged from previous assessments, including a predominance of traditional lectures, small group sessions, and examinations that are either written or computer-based. Newer technology, including web-based reproduction of lectures, virtual microscopes, and availability of additional web-based content has been introduced into these courses. A variety of learner evaluation and course assessment approaches are used. The ultimate effectiveness and impact of these changes needs to be determined.

  3. The oncology medical image database (OMI-DB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, P. T.; Patel, M. N.; Warren, L. M.; Mackenzie, A.; Young, K. C.

    2014-03-01

    Many projects to evaluate or conduct research in medical imaging require the large-scale collection of images (both unprocessed and processed) and associated data. This demand has led us to design and implement a flexible oncology image repository, which prospectively collects images and data from multiple sites throughout the UK. This Oncology Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) has been created to support research involving medical imaging and contains unprocessed and processed medical images, associated annotations and data, and where applicable expert-determined ground truths describing features of interest. The process of collection, annotation and storage is almost fully automated and is extremely adaptable, allowing for quick and easy expansion to disparate imaging sites and situations. Initially the database was developed as part of a large research project in digital mammography (OPTIMAM). Hence the initial focus has been digital mammography; as a result, much of the work described will focus on this field. However, the OMI -DB has been designed to support multiple modalities and is extensible and expandable to store any associated data with full anonymisation. Currently, the majority of associated data is made up of radiological, clinical and pathological annotations extracted from the UK's National Breast Screening System (NBSS). In addition to the data, software and systems have been created to allow expert radiologists to annotate the images with interesting clinical features and provide descriptors of these features. The data from OMI-DB has been used in several observer studies and more are planned. To date we have collected 34,104 2D mammography images from 2,623 individuals.

  4. [Challenges of basical sciences in medical education].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Carranza, Rodolfo

    2014-12-01

    The relevance of basic sciences in medical education has been recognized for centuries, and the importance of exposing medical students to science was acknowledged and reinforced by the recommendations of Flexner in 1910. Since then, traditional medical education has been divided into preclinical and clinical subjects; within this scheme, the first terms of undergraduate medical education usually concentrate on basic sciences, while subsequent ones focus on clinical sciences and clinical training. Since 1956, this educational scheme has been questioned and, in some schools, the medical curriculum has undergone significant structural changes; some of these reforms, especially integrated curricula, are associated with important reductions in the time allotted to individual basic science courses or even with their removal. The removal of basic science subjects from the medical curriculum is paradoxical because nowadays the value of biomedical knowledge and the scientific reasoning to make medical decisions is more appreciated than ever. To maintain its relevance in medical education, basic sciences have to confront three challenges: a) increasing its presence in clinical education; b) developing nuclear programs; and c) renewing laboratory instruction. PMID:25643888

  5. Mapping the Future: Towards Oncology Curriculum Reform in Undergraduate Medical Education at a Canadian Medical School

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Jennifer Y.Y.; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate (1) the quantity and quality of current undergraduate oncology teaching at a major Canadian medical school; and (2) curricular changes over the past decade, to enhance local oncology education and provide insight for other educators. Methods and Materials: Relevant 2011-2012 undergraduate curricular sessions were extracted from the University of Toronto curriculum mapping database using keywords and database identifiers. Educational sessions were analyzed according to Medical Council of Canada objectives, discussion topics, instructor qualifications, teaching format, program year, and course subject. Course-related oncology research projects performed by students during 2000 to 2012 were extracted from another internal database. Elective choices of clerks during 2008-2014 were retrieved from the institution. The 2011-2012 and 2000-2001 curricula were compared using common criteria. Results: The 2011-2012 curriculum covers 5 major themes (public health, cancer biology, diagnosis, principles of care, and therapy), which highlight 286 oncology teaching topics within 80 sessions. Genitourinary (10, 12.5%), gynecologic (8, 10.0%), and gastrointestinal cancers (7.9, 9.8%) were the most commonly taught cancers. A minority of sessions were taught by surgical oncologists (6.5, 8.1%), medical oncologists (2.5, 3.1%), and radiation oncologists (1, 1.2%). During 2000-2012, 9.0% of students (233 of 2578) opted to complete an oncology research project. During 2008-2014, oncology electives constituted 2.2% of all clerkship elective choices (209 of 9596). Compared with pre-2001 curricula, the 2012 oncology curriculum shows notable expansion in the coverage of epidemiology (6:1 increase), prevention (4:1), screening (3:1), and molecular biology (6:1). Conclusions: The scope of the oncology curriculum has grown over the past decade. Nevertheless, further work is needed to improve medical student knowledge of cancers, particularly those relevant to public health

  6. Grade Inflation in Medical Student Radiation Oncology Clerkships: Missed Opportunities for Feedback?

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Surbhi; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Sosnowicz, Stasha; Li, Jiaqi; Mitra, Nandita; Berman, Abigail T.; Baffic, Cordelia; Vapiwala, Neha; Freedman, Gary M.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that medical student radiation oncology elective rotation grades are inflated and cannot be used to distinguish residency applicants. Methods and Materials: The records of 196 applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program in 2011 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The grades for each rotation in radiation oncology were collected and converted to a standardized 4-point grading scale (honors, high pass, pass, fail). Pass/fail grades were scored as not applicable. The primary study endpoint was to compare the distribution of applicants' grades in radiation oncology with their grades in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology core clerkships. Results: The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score of the applicants was 237 (range, 188-269), 43% had additional Masters or PhD degrees, and 74% had at least 1 publication. Twenty-nine applicants were graded for radiation oncology rotations on a pass/fail basis and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the remaining applicants (n=167), 80% received the highest possible grade for their radiation oncology rotations. Grades in radiation oncology were significantly higher than each of the other 4 clerkships studied (P<.001). Of all applicants, 195 of 196 matched into a radiation oncology residency. Higher grades in radiation oncology were associated with significantly higher grades in the pediatrics core clerkship (P=.002). However, other medical school performance metrics were not significantly associated with higher grades in radiation oncology. Conclusions: Although our study group consists of a selected group of radiation oncology applicants, their grades in radiation oncology clerkships were highly skewed toward the highest grades when compared with grades in other core clerkships. Student grading in radiation oncology clerkships should be re-evaluated to incorporate more objective and detailed performance metrics to allow for

  7. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    PubMed

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  8. A BASIC CAMERA UNIT FOR MEDICAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    SMIALOWSKI, A; CURRIE, D J

    1964-08-22

    A camera unit suitable for most medical photographic purposes is described. The unit comprises a single-lens reflex camera, an electronic flash unit and supplementary lenses. Simple instructions for use of th's basic unit are presented. The unit is entirely suitable for taking fine-quality photographs of most medical subjects by persons who have had little photographic training.

  9. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  10. Quantitative imaging features: extension of the oncology medical image database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M. N.; Looney, P. T.; Young, K. C.; Halling-Brown, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Radiological imaging is fundamental within the healthcare industry and has become routinely adopted for diagnosis, disease monitoring and treatment planning. With the advent of digital imaging modalities and the rapid growth in both diagnostic and therapeutic imaging, the ability to be able to harness this large influx of data is of paramount importance. The Oncology Medical Image Database (OMI-DB) was created to provide a centralized, fully annotated dataset for research. The database contains both processed and unprocessed images, associated data, and annotations and where applicable expert determined ground truths describing features of interest. Medical imaging provides the ability to detect and localize many changes that are important to determine whether a disease is present or a therapy is effective by depicting alterations in anatomic, physiologic, biochemical or molecular processes. Quantitative imaging features are sensitive, specific, accurate and reproducible imaging measures of these changes. Here, we describe an extension to the OMI-DB whereby a range of imaging features and descriptors are pre-calculated using a high throughput approach. The ability to calculate multiple imaging features and data from the acquired images would be valuable and facilitate further research applications investigating detection, prognosis, and classification. The resultant data store contains more than 10 million quantitative features as well as features derived from CAD predictions. Theses data can be used to build predictive models to aid image classification, treatment response assessment as well as to identify prognostic imaging biomarkers.

  11. A real time Teleconsultation System for Sharing an Oncologic Web-based Electronic Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Forti, Stefano; Galvagni, Michele; Galligioni, Enzo; Eccher, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    This poster presents an innovative real-time Teleconsultation System for synchronized navigation of the pages of a web-based Oncological Electronic Medical Record, designed to provide clinicians a cooperative work tool supporting the oncologic patient management between different hospitals. The system embeds additional tools supporting the discussion: digital whiteboard, chat and a digital audio channel.

  12. The Impact of an Oncology Course on Attitudes of Freshman Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Marilyn H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A course in oncology for freshman medical students at the Medical College of Pennsylvania is discussed. It is thought that appropriate training of medical students appears to lead to more positive attitudes toward cancer, but many of these efforts have been directed to groups at later stages of medical education. (MLW)

  13. Basic Emergency Medical Technician Skills Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This manual was developed to help students preparing to become emergency medical technicians (EMTs) learn standardized basic skills in the field. The manual itemizes the steps and performance criteria of each required skill and uses an accompanying videotape series (not included) to enhance the educational experience. The five units of the manual,…

  14. Oncology and medical education—past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Oncologists should contribute to the undergraduate curriculum whenever they can, and should teach communication skills, acute oncology, prescribing, and other transferable skills. Newly qualified doctors will care for many patients with cancer in their first years of work, and all doctors need to know when an urgent oncology referral is required and to be aware of the pace of change in oncology. Oncologists should involve their patients in teaching whenever it is appropriate. We should aim to inspire junior doctors to consider a career in oncology. The oncology education community should adopt new teaching methods, for example simulation, mock MDTs and student led clinics. CPD provided by honorable organisations, including online learning, is becoming more important for oncologists to keep up to date. PMID:27350792

  15. Radiation oncology physicists will need to better understand medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, X Allen; Hendee, William R

    2007-01-01

    Imaging is affecting radiation oncology at a dramatically advancing pace and scale and is likely to create a transformation to individualized, biologically conformal radiation therapy. Deploying and improving imaging technologies and ensuring their correct uses in treatment planning and delivery are the responsibilities of radiation oncology physicists. The potential magnitude of errors arising from the incorrect use of imaging may be far greater than that resulting from typical errors in dose calibration. A major effort is required for radiation oncology physicists to raise the quality assurance of image guidance to a level comparable with that achieved in the maintenance of dosimetric performance. Most radiation oncology physicists lack adequate knowledge to assume this emerging responsibility. Their knowledge of imaging must be enhanced, in most cases through on-the-job training and self-learning. Effective learning strategies include routine interactions with diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine physicists and physicians and the use of educational opportunities provided by professional organizations and vendors. PMID:17412223

  16. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  17. Internet protection basics for the medical office.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Douglas F

    2004-01-01

    The increasingly frequent invasion of new computer viruses--some 500 new ones are discovered each month--has wreaked havoc in many large network systems. Medical office computers are vulnerable as well to significant corruption of files and interruption of access to important data. This article outlines basic steps that practices can follow to assure some minimum level of security. These include the importation and continuing use of scanning technologies and adherence to staff in-office protocols.

  18. Developing Canadian oncology education goals and objectives for medical students: a national modified Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Vincent C.; Ingledew, Paris-Ann; Berry, Scott; Verma, Sunil; Giuliani, Meredith E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that there is a deficiency in focused oncology teaching during medical school in Canada. This study aimed to develop oncology education goals and objectives for medical students through consensus of oncology educators from across Canada. Methods: In 2014 we created a comprehensive list of oncology education objectives using existing resources. Experts in oncology education and undergraduate medical education from all 17 Canadian medical schools were invited to participate in a 3-round modified Delphi process. In round 1, the participants scored the objectives on a 9-point Likert scale according to the degree to which they agreed an objective should be taught to medical students. Objectives with a mean score of 7.0 or greater were retained, those with a mean score of 1.0-3.9 were excluded, and those with a mean score of 4.0-6.9 were discussed at a round 2 Web meeting. In round 3, the participants voted on inclusion and exclusion of the round 2 objectives. Results: Thirty-four (92%) of the 37 invited oncology educators, representing 14 medical schools, participated in the study. They included oncologists, family physicians, members of undergraduate medical education curriculum committees and a psychologist. Of the 214 objectives reviewed in round 1, 146 received a mean score of 7.0 or greater, and 68 were scored 4.0-6.9; no objective received a mean score below 4.0. Nine new objectives were suggested. The main themes of participants' comments were to minimize the number of objectives and to aim objectives at the knowledge level required for family physicians. In round 2, the participants were able to combine 28 of the objectives with other existing objectives. In round 3, 7 of the 49 objectives received consensus of at least 75% for inclusion. The final Canadian Oncology Goals and Objectives for Medical Students contained 10 goals and 153 objectives. Interpretation: Through a systematic process, we created a comprehensive, consensus

  19. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  20. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part I: Health Systems Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Oncology patients with persistent pain treated in outpatient settings and their family caregivers have significant responsibility for managing pain medications. However, little is known about their practical, day-to-day experiences with pain medication management. Objective To describe day-to-day pain medication management from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self© Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management by patients and family caregivers in the context of multiple, complex health systems. Methods We qualitatively analyzed audio-recorded intervention sessions that included extensive dialogue between patients, family caregivers, and nurses about pain medication management during the 10-week intervention. Results The health systems context for pain medication management included multiple complex systems for clinical care, reimbursement, and regulation of analgesic prescriptions. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant to this context were getting prescriptions and obtaining medications. Responsibilities that fell primarily to patients and family caregivers included facilitating communication and coordination among multiple clinicians, overcoming barriers to access, and serving as a final safety checkpoint. Significant effort was required of patients and family caregivers to insure safe and effective pain medication management. Conclusion Health systems issues related to access to needed analgesics, medication safety in outpatient settings, and the effort expended by oncology patients and their family caregivers require more attention in future research and healthcare reform initiatives. PMID:24704800

  1. Medical Malpractice Claims in Radiation Oncology: A Population-Based Study 1985-2012

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Deborah C.; Punglia, Rinaa S.; Fox, Dov; Recht, Abram; Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona A.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine trends in radiation oncology malpractice claims and expenses during the last 28 years and to compare radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of other specialties. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis of closed malpractice claims filed from 1985 to 2012, collected by a nationwide medical liability insurance trade association. We analyzed characteristics and trends among closed claims, indemnity payments (payments to plaintiff), and litigation expenses. We also compared radiation oncology malpractice claims to those of 21 other medical specialties. Time series dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation (2012 was the index year). Results: There were 1517 closed claims involving radiation oncology, of which 342 (22.5%) were paid. Average and median indemnity payments were $276,792 and $122,500, respectively, ranking fifth and eighth, respectively, among the 22 specialty groups. Linear regression modeling of time trends showed decreasing total numbers of claims (β = −1.96 annually, P=.003), increasing average litigation expenses paid (β = +$1472 annually, P≤.001), and no significant changes in average indemnity payments (β = −$681, P=.89). Conclusions: Medical professional liability claims filed against radiation oncologists are not common and have declined in recent years. However, indemnity payments in radiation oncology are large relative to those of many other specialties. In recent years, the average indemnity payment has been stable, whereas litigation expenses have increased.

  2. Look-alike, sound-alike oncology medications.

    PubMed

    Schulmeister, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    Confusing medication names and packaging may cause or contribute to potentially harmful medication errors. The names of several chemotherapy and supportive agents can look or sound like the names of other chemotherapy agents or unrelated medications and can be inadvertently interchanged, or mixed up. Poor handwriting, abbreviations of medication names, unclear verbal medication orders, memory lapses, and the large volume of medications currently in use are risk factors for look-alike, sound-alike medication errors. Risk reduction strategies include being aware of medications that look or sound like other medications, installing pop-up alerts in computer systems, prescribing medications by their generic and trade names, placing eye-catching labels and warning stickers on storage bins, storing medications in nonadjacent areas, and advising patients to be alert for potential mix-ups with look-alike, sound-alike medications.

  3. [Burnout effect on academic progress of Oncology medical residents].

    PubMed

    González-Ávila, Gabriel; Bello-Villalobos, Herlinda

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: en el periodo formativo de los cursos de especializaciones médicas se asumen nuevas y grandes responsabilidades en el ámbito profesional y personal. La interacción de diferentes factores que envuelven el ejercicio de estos médicos puede llegar a sobrepasar su capacidad de afrontamiento y ocasionarles niveles elevados de estrés y desgaste profesional, lo cual afectará su desarrollo académico. El objetivo es determinar si el estrés laboral presente en los médicos residentes afecta su aprovechamiento académico. Métodos: se aplicó el cuestionario de Maslach a 52 médicos residentes de tres especialidades oncológicas que aceptaron participar voluntariamente el día que acudieron a su tercer examen ordinario del área cognoscitiva. Resultados: la prevalencia de burnout fue del 13.5 % con una frecuencia mayor en el primer año de la especialidad. En sus dimensiones, se encontró un mayor agotamiento emocional y baja realización personal en Oncología Médica. El aprovechamiento académico fue mayor para el tercer año de la residencia, con una diferencia significativa para Cirugía Oncológica y Oncología Médica (p = 0.026 y 0.015, respectivamente). No obstante, no se observó relación alguna con la presencia de burnout, ni tampoco con sexo (p = 0.437), estado civil (p = 0.329), número de hijos (p = 0.467) o escolaridad de la pareja (p = 0.784). Conclusión: la presencia de burnout no afecta el aprovechamiento académico de los médicos residentes en oncología.

  4. Oncological image analysis: medical and molecular image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Michael

    2007-03-01

    This paper summarises the work we have been doing on joint projects with GE Healthcare on colorectal and liver cancer, and with Siemens Molecular Imaging on dynamic PET. First, we recall the salient facts about cancer and oncological image analysis. Then we introduce some of the work that we have done on analysing clinical MRI images of colorectal and liver cancer, specifically the detection of lymph nodes and segmentation of the circumferential resection margin. In the second part of the paper, we shift attention to the complementary aspect of molecular image analysis, illustrating our approach with some recent work on: tumour acidosis, tumour hypoxia, and multiply drug resistant tumours.

  5. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    SciTech Connect

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  6. Difficult conversations: teaching medical oncology trainees communication skills one hour at a time.

    PubMed

    Epner, Daniel E; Baile, Walter F

    2014-04-01

    Difficult conversations about prognosis, end of life, and goals of care arise commonly in medical oncology practice. These conversations are often highly emotional. Medical oncologists need outstanding, patient-centered communication skills to build trust and rapport with their patients and help them make well-informed decisions. Key skills include exploring patients' perspectives, responding to emotion with empathy, and maintaining mindfulness during highly charged conversations. These skills can be taught and learned. Most previously described communication skills training curricula for oncology providers involve multiday retreats, which are costly and can disrupt busy clinical schedules. Many curricula involve a variety of oncology providers, such as physicians and nurses, at various stages of their careers. The authors developed a monthly, one-hour communication skills training seminar series exclusively for physicians in their first year of medical oncology subspecialty training. The curriculum involved a variety of interactive and engaging educational methods, including sociodramatic techniques, role-play, reflective writing, and Balint-type case discussion groups. Medical oncologists in their second and third years of training served as teaching assistants and peer mentors. Learners had the opportunity to practice skills during sessions and with patients between sessions. Learners acquired important skills and found the curriculum to be clinically relevant, judging by anonymous surveys and anonymous responses on reflective writing exercises. Results from the current curriculum are preliminary but lay the foundation for enhanced and expanded communication skills training programs in the future.

  7. Difficult Conversations: Teaching Medical Oncology Trainees Communication Skills One Hour at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Baile, Walter F.

    2014-01-01

    Difficult conversations about prognosis, end of life, and goals of care arise commonly in medical oncology practice. These conversations are often highly emotional. Medical oncologists need outstanding, patient-centered communication skills to build trust and rapport with their patients and help them make well-informed decisions. Key skills include exploring patients’ perspectives, responding to emotion with empathy, and maintaining mindfulness during highly charged conversations. These skills can be taught and learned. Most previously described communication skills training curricula for oncology providers involve multiday retreats, which are costly and can disrupt busy clinical schedules. Many curricula involve a variety of oncology providers, such as physicians and nurses, at various stages of their careers. The authors developed a monthly, one-hour communication skills training seminar series exclusively for physicians in their first year of medical oncology subspecialty training. The curriculum involved a variety of interactive and engaging educational methods, including sociodramatic techniques, role-play, reflective writing, and Balint-type case discussion groups. Medical oncologists in their second and third years of training served as teaching assistants and peer mentors. Learners had the opportunity to practice skills during sessions and with patients between sessions. Learners acquired important skills and found the curriculum to be clinically relevant, judging by anonymous surveys and anonymous responses on reflective writing exercises. Results from the current curriculum are preliminary but lay the foundation for enhanced and expanded communication skills training programs in the future. PMID:24556763

  8. Paediatric oncology in Argentina: medical and ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Scopinaro, Marcelo J; Casak, Sandra J

    2002-02-01

    The process of globalisation is affecting health and health care in Argentina, as it is in many other countries. The full extent of this effect is still unclear, but winners and losers in the world economy are emerging--not only different countries, but also sectors or populations within those countries. There are serious inequalities in health-care provision in Argentina, so that not all children with cancer receive the best possible therapy. What happens to those children who don't? How do staff feel when they have to turn away new patients? Only by asking these questions and examining and understanding the answers can we begin the process of improving the status of paediatric oncology in Argentina.

  9. Using the hypertext software to develop computer-assisted instruction in oncology for medical students.

    PubMed

    Markou, S A; Koukouras, D; Pimenidis, T; Androulakis, J

    1995-01-01

    A new development in computer-assisted medical education has been the introduction of hypertext authoring systems. Authoring systems are computer programs that can allow an instructor to prepare computer-based medical educational materials without the need to know programming languages. Hypertext is a database management system that lets the user connect screens of information using associative links. The authors developed a hypertext authoring system for teaching their medical students the domain of oncology. The features of the system are hierarchical structure, index browsing, and nonsequential browsing. Moreover, the student may become a writer of a hyperdocument by typing a few script commands. In this way the hierarchical structure of a document meets the needs of the reader. Although hypertext brings with it a few difficulties for the student, the authors expect that the system will become a popular mean for organizing textual information for retrieval and browsing in oncology.

  10. Improving basic life support training for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Lami, Mariam; Nair, Pooja; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Questions have been raised about basic life support (BLS) training in medical education. This article addresses the research evidence behind why BLS training is inadequate and suggests recommendations for improving BLS training for medical students. PMID:27114720

  11. Integrated multimedia timeline of medical images and data for thoracic oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Aberle, D R; Dionisio, J D; McNitt-Gray, M F; Taira, R K; Cárdenas, A F; Goldin, J G; Brown, K; Figlin, R A; Chu, W W

    1996-05-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database has been developed to provide image and textual data for thoracic oncology patients undergoing treatment of advanced malignancies. The database integrates image data from the hospital picture archiving and communication system with textual reports from the radiology information system, alphanumeric data contained in the hospital information system, and other electronic medical data. The database presents information in a timeline format and also contains visualization programs that permit the user to view and annotate radiographic measurements in tabular or graphic form. The database provides an efficient and intuitive display of the changing status of oncology patients. The ability to integrate, manage, and access relevant multimedia information may substantially enhance communication among distributed multidisciplinary health care providers and may ensure greater consistency and completeness of patient-related data.

  12. Summary of the first annual Genitourinary Medical Oncology Conference Renal Cell Carcinoma Forum

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Lori A; Escudier, Bernard; Reaume, Neil

    2007-01-01

    The first annual Canadian Genitourinary Medical Oncology Conference was held in June 2006 before the Canadian Urology Association Annual Meeting. This article summarizes 3 presentations that took place as part of the Renal Cell Carcinoma Forum: “Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: 2006 and Beyond” was presented by Dr. Bernard Escudier; “Practical Experience with Targeted Therapy,” by Dr. Lori Wood; and “Sarcomatoid Renal Cell Carcinoma,” by Dr. Neil Reaume. PMID:18542786

  13. The patient-centered medical home in oncology: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Page, Ray D; Newcomer, Lee N; Sprandio, John D; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the cost of providing quality cancer care has been subject to an epic escalation causing concerns on the verge of a health care crisis. Innovative patient-management models in oncology based on patient-centered medical home (PCMH) principles, coupled with alternative payments to traditional fee for service (FFS), such as bundled and episodes payment are now showing evidence of effectiveness. These efforts have the potential to bend the cost curve while also improving quality of care and patient satisfaction. However, going forward with FFS alternatives, there are several performance-based payment options with an array of financial risks and rewards. Most novel payment options convey a greater financial risk and accountability on the provider. Therefore, the oncology medical home (OMH) can be a way to mitigate some financial risks by sharing savings with the payer through better global care of the patient, proactively preventing complications, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations. However, much of the medical home infrastructure that is required to reduced total costs of cancer care comes as an added expense to the provider. As best-of-practice quality standards are being elucidated and refined, we are now at a juncture where payers, providers, policymakers, and other stakeholders should work in concert to expand and implement the OMH framework into the variety of oncology practice environments to better equip them to assimilate into the new payment reform configurations of the future. PMID:25993243

  14. [Current status of palliative care in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsubasa; Ohta, Syuji; Seki, Nobuhiko; Eguchi, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    A team approach is efficient in palliative care for cancer patients. People suffered from cancer have a right to receive high-quality palliative care earlier in cancer treatment. In Japan the National Act for Strategy against Cancer was enacted in 2007. Systematic educational programs supported by the Ministry of Health Labor and Welfare has been conducted for medical staffs, home care staffs, local pharmacists, care managers etc. at core institutes in each district. Pain control is still major target for cancer palliative medicine. Recently various types of opioids can be used routinely in daily clinical setting for Japanese cancer patients. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may also effective in some patients but further study for proving scientific evidence in CAM should be warranted. Tailor-maid pain control will be established in the near future with molecular based pharmacogenomics.

  15. Teaching Toxicology as a Basic Medical Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gralla, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    A 4-year effort at Yale University School of Medicine to teach toxicology as an elective basic science from the standpoint of organ-specific toxic effects is described. The objective of the successful multidisciplinary program is to prepare physicians to understand, recognize, and manage adverse effects from drugs and other environmental…

  16. Basic medical implications of scuba diving.

    PubMed

    Crook, R A

    1977-12-01

    The rapid growth of scuba diving as a sport and the vast expansion of underwater exploration for energy has made it necessary for all physicians to become familiar with diving emergencies. The basic principles of scuba diving and related clinical implications are outlined to provide a more meaningful understanding of problems which may affect a diver.

  17. [Flipped classroom in basic medical education].

    PubMed

    Merenmies, Jussi; Niemi-Murola, Leila; Pyörälä, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is facing changes in order to improve young doctors' competency to respond better to current needs of the patients and the society. Both curriculum content and teaching methods are revised. In addition to vibrant research in academic medical education, teachers are supported by the improved web-based learning environments and novel technical tools. Flipped classroom, a new paradigm that benefits from technical development, provides many opportunities for medical education. This teaching method always consists of two mutually complementary parts. The first part of the learning action takes place independently off classroom with video lectures or other stimuli for learning. The second part takes place in conjunction with the teacher and other students, and requires student group interactions.

  18. "Green Oncology": the Italian medical oncologists' challenge to reduce the ecological impact of their clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Bretti, Sergio; Porcile, Gianfranco; Romizi, Roberto; Palazzo, Salvatore; Oliani, Cristina; Crispino, Sergio; Labianca, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    For decades Western medicine has followed a biomedical model based on linear thinking and an individualized, disease-oriented doctor-patient relationship. Today this framework must be replaced by a biopsychosocial model based on complexity theory and a person-oriented medical team-patient relationship, taking into account the psychological and social determinants of health and disease. However, the new model is already proving no longer adequate or appropriate, and current events are urging us to develop an ecological model in which the medical team takes into account both individual illness and population health as a whole, since we are all part of the biosphere. In recent years, the rising costs of cancer treatment have raised a serious issue of economic sustainability. As the population of our planet, we now need to rapidly address this issue, and everyone of us must try to reduce their ecological footprint, measured as CO2 production. Medical oncologists need to reduce the ecological footprint of their professional activity by lowering the consumption of economic resources and avoiding environmental damage as much as possible. This new paradigm is endorsed by the Italian College of Hospital Medical Oncology Directors (CIPOMO). A working group of this organization has drafted the "Green Oncology Position Paper": a proposal of Italian medical oncology (in accordance with international guidelines) that oncologists, while aiming for the same end results, make a commitment toward the more appropriate management of health care and the careful use of resources in order to protect the environment and the ecosphere during the daily exercise of their professional activities.

  19. [Medical rehabilitation. Basic function of the German pension insurance].

    PubMed

    Korsukéwitz, C; Irle, H

    2010-10-01

    Medical rehabilitation is an important part of the German health care system in addition to medical and nursing care. For people with impairments, especially with chronic diseases, rehabilitation aims at emancipated participation in social life. The German pension insurance carries out rehabilitation mainly for gainfully employed people. To be entitled to these benefits legal and personal (medical) requirements must be fulfilled. The rehabilitation concepts of the German pension insurance are interdisciplinary, following the bio-psycho-social model of health and illness. Concepts of rehabilitation are presented exemplarily for musculoskeletal, oncologic, heart/circulation, metabolic/gastrointestinal, and neurological diseases as well as mental disorders. Elements of structure, process, and outcome quality are illustrated. Research topics in rehabilitation are presented.

  20. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  1. Basic Reference Aids for Small Medical Libraries *

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Edith D.

    1967-01-01

    Selected primarily for the small medical library, this list is compiled to serve as a practical guide for the librarian in developing and utilizing an effective reference collection. Arrangement is by broad subject groups; titles chosen are chiefly in English with geographic coverage limited to the United States and Canada. Texts in subject fields have been omitted since these are adequately covered in several comprehensive guides to the literature. PMID:6041827

  2. Basic Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician Ambulance: Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fucigna, Joseph T.; And Others

    In an effort to upgrade or further develop the skills levels of all individuals involved in the emergency medical care service, this training program was developed for the National Highway Safety Bureau. This specific course is an attempt to organize, conduct, and standardize a basic training course for emergency medical technicians (EMTs). The…

  3. Patient participation in the medical decision-making process in haemato-oncology--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ernst, J; Berger, S; Weißflog, G; Schröder, C; Körner, A; Niederwieser, D; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-09-01

    Cancer patients are showing increased interest in shared decision-making. Patients with haematological illnesses, however, express considerably less desire for shared decision-making as compared with other oncological patient groups. The goal of the current project was to identify the reasons for the lower desire for shared decision-making among patients with haematological illness. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 11 haematological patients (39-70 years old) after the beginning of therapy concerning the course and evaluation of medical shared decision-making. The patients were often overwhelmed by the complexity of the illness and the therapy and did not want to assume any responsibility in medical decision-making. They reported a great deal of distress and very traditional paternalistic role expectations with regards to their health care providers, which limited the patients' ability to partake in the decision-making process. In contrast to the socio-cultural support for many other oncological diseases, haematological diseases are not as well supported, e.g. there is a lack of self-help materials, systematic provision of information and support groups for patients, which may be related to a lower empowerment of this patient population. Results show the limits of patient participation in the context of highly complicated medical conditions. In addition to already researched preferences of the physicians and patients for shared decision-making, future research should pay greater attention to the process and other variables relevant to this aspect of the doctor-patient relationship.

  4. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically Driven Electronic Medical Record for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, John P.; Light, Kim L.; Walker, Robyn M.; Georgas, Debra L.; Antoine, Phillip A.; Clough, Robert W.; Cozart, Heidi B.; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yoo, Sua; Willett, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR) eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality, or productivity. Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT) specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes. Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes, and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records, and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system, which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage “Radiation Oncology” data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems.) The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS) was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality, or confidentiality. However

  5. The Negative Impact of Stark Law Exemptions on Graduate Medical Education and Health Care Costs: The Example of Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Anscher, Mitchell S.; Anscher, Barbara M.; Bradley, Cathy J.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To survey radiation oncology training programs to determine the impact of ownership of radiation oncology facilities by non-radiation oncologists on these training programs and to place these findings in a health policy context based on data from the literature. Methods and Materials: A survey was designed and e-mailed to directors of all 81 U.S. radiation oncology training programs in this country. Also, the medical and health economic literature was reviewed to determine the impact that ownership of radiation oncology facilities by non-radiation oncologists may have on patient care and health care costs. Prostate cancer treatment is used to illustrate the primary findings. Results: Seventy-three percent of the surveyed programs responded. Ownership of radiation oncology facilities by non-radiation oncologists is a widespread phenomenon. More than 50% of survey respondents reported the existence of these arrangements in their communities, with a resultant reduction in patient volumes 87% of the time. Twenty-seven percent of programs in communities with these business arrangements reported a negative impact on residency training as a result of decreased referrals to their centers. Furthermore, the literature suggests that ownership of radiation oncology facilities by non-radiation oncologists is associated with both increased utilization and increased costs but is not associated with increased access to services in traditionally underserved areas. Conclusions: Ownership of radiation oncology facilities by non-radiation oncologists appears to have a negative impact on residency training by shifting patients away from training programs and into community practices. In addition, the literature supports the conclusion that self-referral results in overutilization of expensive services without benefit to patients. As a result of these findings, recommendations are made to study further how physician ownership of radiation oncology facilities influence graduate

  6. Voluntary Election of Basic Science Courses by Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosse, Cornelius; Swanson, August G.

    1975-01-01

    The curriculum at the University of Washington places responsibility on the student in planning his education. Four entering classes elected a high number of credits in anatomy and pharmacology. A need for basic science courses is perceived by the medical student, and their voluntary election is bound to facilitate learning. (Editor/PG)

  7. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  8. Demand for voluntary basic medical insurance in urban China: panel evidence from the Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance scheme.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Yan, Xiao

    2012-12-01

    This paper investigates the key factors associated with the demand for Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), which was established in 2007 and aims to cover all Chinese urban residents. Two waves of longitudinal household survey data are used, and a three-level random-intercept logit model is used for the analysis. Two different sets of explanatory variables were identified for adults and children, separately. Results suggest for both the adult and the child samples that income, health status, age and health risk behaviours are key influencing factors for basic medical insurance demand. The household head's characteristics are also significantly related to other household members' medical insurance demands. Specifically, household heads who are more educated or retired are more likely to purchase medical insurance for their children. These findings suggest that an expansion of the special subsidy to the poor or, probably more important, a risk-adjusted benefit package may be needed for voluntary basic medical insurance in China. In addition, adverse selection consistently exists and is a major challenge for the sustainability of medical insurance financing. To expand insurance coverage for children, especially those under school age, special efforts (possibly through health education or health promotion) should be focused on the household head, particularly those engaging in risky health behaviours.

  9. 76 FR 59167 - Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems Division, Concord, CA; Siemens Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ..., Concord, CA; Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management Including.../Supply Chain Management. These employees provided support for the supply of information technology...,158) and Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., Global Services/Supply Chain Management,...

  10. New advanced technologies to provide decentralised and secure access to medical records: case studies in oncology.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-08-07

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an "ephemeral electronic patient record". However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure "google-like" access to medical records.

  11. New Advanced Technologies to Provide Decentralised and Secure Access to Medical Records: Case Studies in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Bourquard, Karima; Boire, Jean-Yves; de Vlieger, Paul; Maigne, Lydia; Breton, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    The main problem for health professionals and patients in accessing information is that this information is very often distributed over many medical records and locations. This problem is particularly acute in cancerology because patients may be treated for many years and undergo a variety of examinations. Recent advances in technology make it feasible to gain access to medical records anywhere and anytime, allowing the physician or the patient to gather information from an “ephemeral electronic patient record”. However, this easy access to data is accompanied by the requirement for improved security (confidentiality, traceability, integrity, ...) and this issue needs to be addressed. In this paper we propose and discuss a decentralised approach based on recent advances in information sharing and protection: Grid technologies and watermarking methodologies. The potential impact of these technologies for oncology is illustrated by the examples of two experimental cases: a cancer surveillance network and a radiotherapy treatment plan. It is expected that the proposed approach will constitute the basis of a future secure “google-like” access to medical records. PMID:19718446

  12. Cancer stem cells in basic science and in translational oncology: can we translate into clinical application?

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Axel; Blatt, Katharina; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Sadovnik, Irina; Herrmann, Harald; Marian, Brigitte; Grunt, Thomas W; Zielinski, Christoph C; Valent, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Since their description and identification in leukemias and solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSC) have been the subject of intensive research in translational oncology. Indeed, recent advances have led to the identification of CSC markers, CSC targets, and the preclinical and clinical evaluation of the CSC-eradicating (curative) potential of various drugs. However, although diverse CSC markers and targets have been identified, several questions remain, such as the origin and evolution of CSC, mechanisms underlying resistance of CSC against various targeted drugs, and the biochemical basis and function of stroma cell-CSC interactions in the so-called 'stem cell niche.' Additional aspects that have to be taken into account when considering CSC elimination as primary treatment-goal are the genomic plasticity and extensive subclone formation of CSC. Notably, various cell fractions with different combinations of molecular aberrations and varying proliferative potential may display CSC function in a given neoplasm, and the related molecular complexity of the genome in CSC subsets is considered to contribute essentially to disease evolution and acquired drug resistance. In the current article, we discuss new developments in the field of CSC research and whether these new concepts can be exploited in clinical practice in the future.

  13. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    PubMed Central

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  14. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  15. [IAEA Training Course Series TCS-37 Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology].

    PubMed

    Imamura, Kiyonari

    2015-01-01

    Training program IAEA TCS-37 (Training course series No.37) "Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (2009)" was fixed to practical training syllabus at faculty and graduate course of medical physics of a university. TCS-47 for diagnostic radiology (2010) and TCS-50 for nuclear medicine (2011) were also involved in the syllabus. These training courses had been developed by IAEA RCA RAS6038 project since 2002. In this paper, first, comparison with other training programs in the world was made in terms of (1) Degree of extent of subject or field, (2) Concreteness or specificity, (3) Degree of completion, (4) Method of certification and (5) Practicability. IAEA TCS series got the most points among ten programs such as EMERALD/EMIT, AAPM rpt.No.90 and CAMPEP accredited programs. Second, TCS-37, TCS47 and TCS50 were broken down to 6, 5 and 6 subjects of training course respectively. Third, each subject was further broken down to 15 times of training schedule where every time was composed by 3 hours of training. Totally 45 hours of a subject were assigned to one semester for getting one unit of credit. Seventeen units should be credited up to three years in graduate course to finish the whole program. PMID:26882699

  16. Teaching of basic life support in the undergraduate medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Osman, A; Norsidah, A M

    1997-12-01

    There is now increased public awareness of the value and role of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It is therefore not surprising that the public expects a reasonable level of expertise of medical doctors in the application of the CPR techniques during emergency situations. Newly qualified doctors often lack confidence and are usually at a loss when faced with such situations as they have never had practical training before graduation. Most doctors are gradually introduced to CPR as part and parcel of their clinical experience. Many begin to attend formal CPR workshops later in their careers. Medical schools are expected to produce well trained doctors who are competent in clinical practice which include the techniques of basic resuscitation. By virtue of their expertise in airway management and clinical resuscitation, anaesthesiologists can significantly contribute to the teaching of CPR in the undergraduate medical curriculum. This is a retrospective review of Basic Life Support programmes conducted at the Department of Anaesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. PMID:10968117

  17. Pain Medication Management Processes Used by Oncology Outpatients and Family Caregivers Part II: Home and Lifestyle Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Karen L.; Plano Clark, Vicki L.; West, Claudia M.; Dodd, Marylin J.; Rabow, Michael W.; Miaskowski, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Context Despite the increasing complexity of medication regimens for persistent cancer pain, little is known about how oncology outpatients and their family caregivers manage pain medications at home. Objectives To describe the day-to-day management of pain medications from the perspectives of oncology outpatients and their family caregivers who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a psycho-educational intervention called the Pro-Self © Plus Pain Control Program. In this article, we focus on pain medication management in the context of highly individualized home environments and lifestyles. Methods This qualitative study was conducted as part of a RCT in which an embedded mixed methods research design was used. Audio-recorded dialogue among patients, family caregivers, and intervention nurses was analyzed using qualitative research methods. Results Home and lifestyle contexts for managing pain medications included highly individualized home environments, work and recreational activities, personal routines, and family characteristics. Pain medication management processes particularly relevant in these contexts included understanding, organizing, storing, scheduling, remembering, and taking the medications. With the exception of their interactions with the intervention nurses, most study participants had little involvement with clinicians as they worked through these processes. Conclusion Pain medication management is an ongoing multidimensional process, each step of which has to be mastered by patients and family caregivers when cancer treatment and supportive care is provided on an outpatient basis. Realistic patient- and family-centered skill-building interventions are needed to achieve effective and safe pain medication management in the contexts of individual home environments and lifestyles. PMID:24709364

  18. Relations between Policy for Medical Teaching and Basic Need Satisfaction in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R. M. G.; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Sluiter, Roderick; Stuyt, Paul M. J.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Policy initiatives that aim to elevate the position of medical teaching to that of medical research could influence the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs related to motivation for medical teaching. To explore relations between the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs towards medical teaching and two policy initiatives for…

  19. Medication double-checking procedures in clinical practice: a cross-sectional survey of oncology nurses' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Yvonne; Taxis, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Double-checking is widely recommended as an essential method to prevent medication errors. However, prior research has shown that the concept of double-checking is not clearly defined, and that little is known about actual practice in oncology, for example, what kind of checking procedures are applied. Objective To study the practice of different double-checking procedures in chemotherapy administration and to explore nurses' experiences, for example, how often they actually find errors using a certain procedure. General evaluations regarding double-checking, for example, frequency of interruptions during and caused by a check, or what is regarded as its essential feature was assessed. Methods In a cross-sectional survey, qualified nurses working in oncology departments of 3 hospitals were asked to rate 5 different scenarios of double-checking procedures regarding dimensions such as frequency of use in practice and appropriateness to prevent medication errors; they were also asked general questions about double-checking. Results Overall, 274 nurses (70% response rate) participated in the survey. The procedure of jointly double-checking (read-read back) was most commonly used (69% of respondents) and rated as very appropriate to prevent medication errors. Jointly checking medication was seen as the essential characteristic of double-checking—more frequently than ‘carrying out checks independently’ (54% vs 24%). Most nurses (78%) found the frequency of double-checking in their department appropriate. Being interrupted in one's own current activity for supporting a double-check was reported to occur frequently. Regression analysis revealed a strong preference towards checks that are currently implemented at the responders' workplace. Conclusions Double-checking is well regarded by oncology nurses as a procedure to help prevent errors, with jointly checking being used most frequently. Our results show that the notion of independent checking needs to be

  20. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    PubMed

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  1. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    PubMed Central

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  2. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    PubMed

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  3. Angina Treatment -- Medical Versus Interventional Therapy (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the progression of the disease and thereby prolong life. MEDICAL ANGINA TREATMENT — Medical treatment for coronary ... be recommended. Stenting has not been shown to prolong life compared with medical therapy. It is used ...

  4. The Use of Art in the Medical Decision-Making Process of Oncology Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of written informed consent in the 1970s created expectations of shared decision making between doctors and patients that has led to decisional conflict for some patients. This study utilized a collaborative, intrinsic case study approach to the decision-making process of oncology patients who participated in an open art therapy…

  5. 20 CFR 10.300 - What are the basic rules for authorizing emergency medical care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... emergency medical care? 10.300 Section 10.300 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS...' COMPENSATION ACT, AS AMENDED Medical and Related Benefits Emergency Medical Care § 10.300 What are the basic rules for authorizing emergency medical care? (a) When an employee sustains a work-related...

  6. Does Cancer Literature Reflect Multidisciplinary Practice? A Systematic Review of Oncology Studies in the Medical Literature Over a 20-Year Period

    SciTech Connect

    Holliday, Emma B.; Ahmed, Awad A.; Yoo, Stella K.; Jagsi, Reshma; Hoffman, Karen E.

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Quality cancer care is best delivered through a multidisciplinary approach requiring awareness of current evidence for all oncologic specialties. The highest impact journals often disseminate such information, so the distribution and characteristics of oncology studies by primary intervention (local therapies, systemic therapies, and targeted agents) were evaluated in 10 high-impact journals over a 20-year period. Methods and Materials: Articles published in 1994, 2004, and 2014 in New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Radiotherapy and Oncology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, Annals of Surgical Oncology, and European Journal of Surgical Oncology were identified. Included studies were prospectively conducted and evaluated a therapeutic intervention. Results: A total of 960 studies were included: 240 (25%) investigated local therapies, 551 (57.4%) investigated systemic therapies, and 169 (17.6%) investigated targeted therapies. More local therapy trials (n=185 [77.1%]) evaluated definitive, primary treatment than systemic (n=178 [32.3%]) or targeted therapy trials (n=38 [22.5%]; P<.001). Local therapy trials (n=16 [6.7%]) also had significantly lower rates of industry funding than systemic (n=207 [37.6%]) and targeted therapy trials (n=129 [76.3%]; P<.001). Targeted therapy trials represented 5 (2%), 38 (10.2%), and 126 (38%) of those published in 1994, 2004, and 2014, respectively (P<.001), and industry-funded 48 (18.9%), 122 (32.6%), and 182 (54.8%) trials, respectively (P<.001). Compared to publication of systemic therapy trial articles, articles investigating local therapy (odds ratio: 0.025 [95% confidence interval: 0.012-0.048]; P<.001) were less likely to be found in high-impact general medical journals. Conclusions: Fewer studies evaluating local therapies, such as surgery and radiation, are published in

  7. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  8. Non-blood medical care in gynecologic oncology: a review and update of blood conservation management schemes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review attempts to outline the alternative measures and interventions used in bloodless surgery in the field of gynecologic oncology and demonstrate their effectiveness. Nowadays, as increasingly more patients are expressing their fears concerning the potential risks accompanying allogenic transfusion of blood products, putting the theory of bloodless surgery into practice seems to gaining greater acceptance. An increasing number of institutions appear to be successfully adopting approaches that minimize blood usage for all patients treated for gynecologic malignancies. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative measures are required, such as optimization of red blood cell mass, adequate preoperative plan and invasive hemostatic procedures, assisting anesthetic techniques, individualization of anemia tolerance, autologous blood donation, normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperative cell salvage and pharmacologic agents for controlling blood loss. An individualised management plan of experienced personnel adopting a multidisciplinary team approach should be available to establish non-blood management strategies, and not only on demand of the patient, in the field of gynecologic oncology with the use of drugs, devices and surgical-medical techniques. PMID:22051161

  9. 20 CFR 10.310 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the basic rules for obtaining... are the basic rules for obtaining medical care? (a) The employee is entitled to receive all medical... considers necessary to treat the work-related injury. The employee need not be disabled to receive...

  10. "Burnout in Medical Oncology Fellows: a Prospective Multicenter Cohort Study in Brazilian Institutions".

    PubMed

    Cubero, Daniel I G; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; de Sá, Thiago Hérick; Dettino, Aldo; Costa, Felipe Osório; Van Eyll, Brigitte M R H Adam; Beato, Carlos; Peria, Fernanda Maris; Mota, Augusto; Altino, José; Azevedo, Sérgio Jobim; da Rocha Filho, Duílio Reis; Moura, Melba; Lessa, Álvaro Edson Ramos; Del Giglio, Auro

    2016-09-01

    Burnout syndrome is a common occurrence among oncologists. Doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology are exposed to similar risk factors; however, few data are available in this population. This study assessed the occurrence of burnout and associated factors among first-year residents at Brazilian institutions. The present prospective, multicenter, cohort study was conducted with doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology at Brazilian institutions affiliated with the public health system. The participants answered a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Lipp's Stress Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), upon admission to the program and 6 and 12 months later. Of 37 eligible residency programs in 2009, 11 (30.6 %) agreed to participate in the study. Fifty-four residents, representing 100 % of new admissions to the participating institutions, were included. Most of the participants met the criteria for severe burnout upon admission to the residency programs (emotional exhaustion in 49.0 % and depersonalization in 64.7 %). The scores on MBI domains emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased significantly (p < 0.01) during the first year of residency, and the prevalence of burnout increased to 88 % at the end of that first year. The present study found a high prevalence of burnout among doctors enrolled in residency programs in clinical oncology at Brazilian institutions. A large fraction of the participants met the criteria for burnout syndrome upon admission to the program, which suggests that the problem began during the course of the previous residency program in internal medicine.

  11. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  12. [CROATIAN SOCIETY FOR MEDICAL ONCOLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, TREATMENT AND FOLLOW-UP OF PATIENTS WITH MELANOMA].

    PubMed

    Herceg, Davorin; Buzina, Daska Stulhofer; Ceović, Romana; Dotlić, Snjezana; Ilić, Ivana; Orehovec, Sanda Smuđ; Herceg, Gordana Horvatić; Mijatović, Davor; Separović, Robert; Silovski, Tajana; Vrbanec, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma in the Western world has an increasing incidence. One of the most important factor for the increase in incidence is sporadic, uncontrolled exposure to the sun. The basis for the treatment of primary melanoma is surgical treatment. Treatment of metastatic disease of melanoma in recent years experienced significant changes. BRAF and MEK inhibitors, immunotherapy with programmed cell-death immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-PD-1-antibodies) are new options for the treatment of metastatic disease. A mulitidisiplinary team of Croatian Society for Medical Oncology provides recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of melanoma primarily driven to the discovery of new drugs and therapeutic options, that change the prognosis of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:27290810

  13. Pilot study on workload estimate in breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer in a Medical Oncology Service at Valme hospital.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Javier; Grávalos, Cristina; Albanell, Joan; Barnadas, Agustin; Borrega, Pablo; García-Mata, Jesús; Garrido, Pilar; Gonzalez-Flores, Encarnación; Isla, Dolores; Lomas, María; Rodríguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Cruz, Juan Jesus; Alba, Emilio

    2012-11-01

    New advances in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and the increased incidence and prevalence of this disease have led to an increase in the number and duration of visits in Medical Oncology in the last few years. Based on the functions of a medical oncologist and the time recommended for each work activity established by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), we carried out a pilot study on the three most frequent neoplasias in our country [breast cancer (BC), lung cancer (LC) and colorectal cancer (CRC)], in order to determine the real time each patient requires from a physician and thus establish a recommendation on the number of medical oncologists necessary. Using the actual itinerary of the first 20 patients of 2009 in each of the three neoplasias seen at the Medical Oncology Service of the Virgen de Valme University Hospital, we measured the number of visits, the antineoplastic treatments received, the number of hospital admissions and average length of stay. During the years following the study, these data were estimated based on the natural history of each neoplasia. During the first year, the average time spent by the medical oncologist was 235, 390 and 265 min on each outpatient with BC, LC and CRC, respectively. In hospitalisation, the average oncologist/patient minutes were 40, 360 and 118 for BC, LC and CRC, respectively. Finally, the time spent on each visit or day of hospitalisation was that recommended by the SEOM, achieving an ultimate ratio of 1 oncologist for every 83 first visits.

  14. Neonatal Medical Exposures and Characteristics of Low Birth Weight Hepatoblastoma Cases: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Turcotte, Lucie M.; Georgieff, Michael K.; Ross, Julie A.; Feusner, James H.; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Malogolowkin, Marcio H.; Krailo, Mark D.; Miller, Nicole; Fonstad, Rachel; Spector, Logan G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatoblastoma is a malignancy of young children. Low birth weight is associated with significantly increased risk of hepatoblastoma and neonatal medical exposures are hypothesized as contributors. This study represents the largest case–control study of hepatoblastoma to date and aimed to define the role of neonatal exposures in hepatoblastoma risk among low birth weight children. Procedure Incident hepatoblastoma cases who were born <2,500 g (N = 60), diagnosed between 2000 and 2008, were identified through the Children's Oncology Group. Controls were recruited through state birth registries (N = 51). Neonatal medical exposures were abstracted from medical records. Subjects from the Vermont Oxford Network were used for further comparisons, as were existing reports on neonatal medical exposures. Results Case–control comparisons were hindered by poor matching within birth weight strata. Cases were smaller and received more aggressive neonatal treatment compared to controls, and reflected high correlation levels between birth weight and treatments. Similar difficulty was encountered when comparing cases to Vermont Oxford Network subjects; cases were smaller and required more aggressive neonatal therapy. Furthermore, it appears hepatoblastoma cases were exposed to a greater number of diagnostic X-rays than in case series previously reported in the neonatal literature. Conclusions This study presents the largest case series of hepatoblastoma in <2,500 g birth weight infants with accompanying neonatal medical exposure data. Findings confirm that birth weight is highly correlated with exposure intensity, and neonatal exposures are themselves highly correlated, which hampers the identification of a causal exposure among hepatoblastoma cases. Experimental models or genetic susceptibility testing may be more revealing of etiology. PMID:25044669

  15. New Technologies in Radiation Oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, Wolfgang; Bortfeld, Thomas; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in radiation oncology, many of which have originated from physics and engineering sciences. After an introductory section on basic aspects of 3D medical imaging, the role of 3D imaging in the context of radiotherapy is explored in a series of chapters on the various modern imaging techniques. A further major section addresses 3D treatment planning for conformal radiotherapy, with consideration of both external radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Subsequently the modern techniques of 3D conformal radiotherapy are described, including stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided and adaptive radiotherapy, and radiotherapy with charged particles.

  16. Impact of an Oncology Course on the Attitudes of Freshman Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Marilyn H.; And Others

    Previous attempts to change the prevailing negative attitudes of health professionals toward cancer and cancer patients have consisted mainly of elective courses for small groups of students at advanced levels of medical training. In order to develop more positive attitudes, the Cancer Coordinating Committee at the Medical College of Pennsylvania…

  17. [The strategy of the Czech Society for Oncology of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně for the organisation of oncological care in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Vorlíček, J

    2013-08-01

    The Czech Society for Oncology of the Czech Medical Association of J. E. Purkyně (ČOS ČLS JEP) builds on intensive collaboration at all levels of medical care during the organisation of oncological care. Over 77,000 malignant neoplasms are diagnosed in the Czech Republic annually. Every year, over 27,000 patients with a malignant tumour die in the Czech Republic. A total of over 450,000 patients with malignant tumours or patients with a history of an oncological disease are living in the Czech Republic. The specialised society analyses available data about the treatment history and offers them to the individual regions; it also plans population based treatment costs which are then discussed with the healthcare payers. The Czech National Cancer Control Programme (NOP) presents a strategic outline for the management and development of the treatment, and facilitates the communication with all stakeholders and the public. The ČOS ČLS JEP Society includes a specialised section responsible for data analysis, which provides a complex agenda of population based data, estimated numbers of treated patients, standards for reference of survival analysis and a system of collecting required clinical data. Even with a growing incidence, the Czech Republic shows a stabilised mortality in all cancer diagnoses. Screening programmes for breast, colorectal and cervical carcinoma are ongoing. We have a consolidated and cooperating network of oncology centres. We are able to actively plan diagnostic and treatment needs and we have a system of data collection that is able to respond to the needs of evaluation of cost efficiency. We are currently introducing a hospital care quality assessment.

  18. The fate of medical students with different levels of knowledge: Are the basic medical sciences relevant to physician competence?

    PubMed

    Hojat, M; Gonnella, J S; Erdmann, J B; Veloski, J J

    1996-01-01

    Purpose - This study was designed to test the hypothesis that an early gap in knowledge of sciences basic to medicine could have a sustained negative effect throughout medical school and beyond.Method - A longitudinal prospective study of 4,437 students who entered Jefferson Medical College between 1972 and 1991 was conducted in which the students were divided into three groups. Group I consisted of 392 who failed at least one of the basic sciences courses in the first year of medical school, Group II was comprised of 398 who did not fail but had low first-year grade-point averages; and 3,647 of the remaining sample were included in Group III. The groups were compared on retention and dismissal rates, medical school assessment measures, scores on medical licensing examinations, ratings of clinical competency in residency, board certification rates, and faculty appointments.Results - Significant differences were observed among the three groups confirming the hypothesis that students' level of knowledge in sciences basic to medicine early in medical school could predict later performance during medical school and beyond. Implications for early diagnosis of academic deficiencies, in better preparation of medical students, and in the assessment of clinical competency are discussed. PMID:24179018

  19. Some Basic Determinants of Medical Care and Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Anne R.

    1966-01-01

    Long-term trends in our economy and social structure are radically affecting the supply and demand for health services. Population increases, both generally and in the over-65-years-of-age bracket, growing ratio of nonwhites to whites, increasing proportion of women, increasing urbanization, industrialization, educational levels and per capita income are only some of the major factors affecting the demand for health services. Major developments in the science, technology and organization of medical care are and will continue breaking traditional patterns in rendering such care, and definitely point in the direction of multidisciplinary and institutional makeup in the delivery of health services. Changes in the financing of medical care are bringing in a foray of public programs sponsored by all levels of the government, contributing to the unique American pluralistic health care economy with its “mix” of public and private activities. Questions, intended to point up some of the more far-reaching issues, are appended to each section of the paper. PMID:5971547

  20. The Reorganization of Basic Science Departments in U.S. Medical Schools, 1980-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, William T.; Biebuyck, Julien F.; Jones, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    Constructed a longitudinal database to examine how basic science departments have been reorganized at U.S. medical schools. Found that there were fewer basic science departments in the traditional disciplines of anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacology, and physiology in 1999 than in 1980. But as biomedical science has developed in an…

  1. Refresher Training Program for the Basic Emergency Medical Technician. Course Guide, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This guide for a refresher training program for basic Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) is designed to assure continuance of a uniformly high level of knowledge and skills among EMTs who have completed the U.S. Department of Transportation's basic training for EMTs. The first of four sections presents the purposes of the course, the role of the…

  2. Asthma Medications: Basic Pharmacology and Use in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Houglum, Joel E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Asthma is a chronic disease that affects athletes at all levels of sport. Several categories of drugs, including relatively new agents, are available to treat the asthmatic patient. By understanding the appropriate uses and effects of these drugs, the athletic trainer can assist the asthmatic athlete in improving therapeutic outcomes from the asthma therapy. The appropriate use of these medications includes not only the use of the appropriate drug(s), but also appropriate technique for administration, compliance with the prescribed dosing intervals, and sufficient care to avoid side effects. Data Sources: I searched MEDLINE and CINAHL from 1982 to 1999 and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts from 1990 to 1999. Terms searched were “asthma,” “athlete,”“athletic,” “exercise-induced,” “exercise,” “performance,” “therapy,” and “treatment.” Data Synthesis: Bronchodilators include β2 agonists, anticholinergics, and methylxanthines. Of these, the β2 agonists used by inhalation are the drugs of choice to treat an acute asthma attack or to prevent an anticipated attack (such as before exercise). Anti-inflammatory agents include corticosteroids mast cell-stabilizing agents, and antileukotrienes. Corticosteroids by inhalation are the drugs of choice for long-term treatment to curb the inflammatory process in the lung. Each of these drug categories has a unique mechanism of action. The athletic trainer who understands the appropriate use of these medications can help the athlete to obtain optimal results from drug therapy. Encouraging the athlete to comply with appropriate therapy, monitoring the effectiveness of the therapy, and recognizing the stimuli that initiate asthmatic attacks can improve the patient's therapeutic outcomes. Conclusions/Recommendations: The athletic trainer has an opportunity to play a key role in ensuring that the asthmatic athlete achieves the desired outcomes from treatment. The athletic trainer can help

  3. Patients’ Non-Medical Characteristics Contribute to Collective Medical Decision-Making at Multidisciplinary Oncological Team Meetings

    PubMed Central

    Restivo, Léa; Apostolidis, Thémis; Bouhnik, Anne-Déborah; Garciaz, Sylvain; Aurran, Thérèse; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of patients’ non-medical characteristics to individual physicians’ decision-making has attracted considerable attention, but little information is available on this topic in the context of collective decision-making. Medical decision-making at cancer centres is currently carried out using a collective approach, at MultiDisciplinary Team (MDT) meetings. The aim of this study was to determine how patients’ non-medical characteristics are presented at MDT meetings and how this information may affect the team’s final medical decisions. Design Observations were conducted at a French Cancer Centre during MDT meetings at which non-standard cases involving some uncertainty were discussed from March to May 2014. Physicians’ verbal statements and predefined contextual parameters were collected with a non-participant observational approach. Non numerical data collected in the form of open notes were then coded for quantitative analysis. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. Results In the final sample of patients’ records included and discussed (N = 290), non-medical characteristics were mentioned in 32.8% (n = 95) of the cases. These characteristics corresponded to demographics in 22.8% (n = 66) of the cases, psychological data in 11.7% (n = 34), and relational data in 6.2% (n = 18). The patient’s age and his/her “likeability” were the most frequently mentioned characteristics. In 17.9% of the cases discussed, the final decision was deferred: this outcome was positively associated with the patients’ non-medical characteristics and with uncertainty about the outcome of the therapeutic options available. Limitations The design of the study made it difficult to draw definite cause-and-effect conclusions. Conclusion The Social Representations approach suggests that patients’ non-medical characteristics constitute a kind of tacit professional knowledge that may be frequently mobilised in physicians

  4. ['Do not worry, it hurts!'--psychological preparation for medical procedures in pediatric oncology].

    PubMed

    Schepper, F; Schachtschabel, S; Christiansen, H

    2012-04-01

    In the last decades the chances of surviving childhood cancer have increased. Nowadays psychological and psychosocial long term side effects become more spotlighted. Especially the posttraumatic stress disorder is focused at the moment as a possible side effect of childhood cancer. Cancer as a life-threatening illness is unpredictable and associated with repeating loads, such as medical procedures or treatment. Most of the patients report anxiety, especially young children have an increased risk of making a traumatic experience while undergoing medical treatment. A psychological support before, meanwhile and after can ensure compliance as well as reducing emotional and behavioral disorders. Even preventive impact is conceivable. Therefore psychological support has become a standard in pediatric cancer treatment. The current case report of the 10 year old Tom is a practical example how to support has undergoing medical procedures. The interventions described have the aim of stabilizing the patient and reducing his anxiety and discomfort. They also show an effect on self-efficacy.

  5. Course Guide and Course Coordinator Orientation Program. Basic Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician. Ambulance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap and Associates, Inc., Darien, CT.

    To assist the States in implementing Federal standards for emergency medical services (under the Highway Safety Act of 1966), this guide has been prepared to aid in organizing, conducting, and standardizing a basic training course for emergency medical technicians (EMT's). Part I is a guide for a course designed to develop or upgrade the skill…

  6. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician (Second Edition). Instructor's Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This document containing instructor lesson plans is one of three prepared to update a basic training program for emergency medical technicians (EMTs). (A course guide containing planning and management information and a study guide are available separately.) Material covers all emergency medical techniques currently considered to be within the…

  7. Basic Training Program for Emergency Medical Technician: Ambulance Concepts and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fucigna, Joseph T.; And Others

    The main objective was to develop and pilot test a basic course for ambulance personnel with emphasis on the medical aspect of training. This included the identification of a medically acceptable text or manual, and determining the prerequisites for selecting students and instructors. Secondary objectives were to outline the requirements for…

  8. 42 CFR 410.12 - Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical and other health services: Basic conditions and limitations. 410.12 Section 410.12 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...

  9. Using peer-assisted learning to teach basic surgical skills: medical students' experiences.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mahdi; Sinha, Yashashwi; Weinberg, Daniel

    2013-08-22

    Standard medical curricula in the United Kingdom (UK) typically provide basic surgical-skills teaching before medical students are introduced into the clinical environment. However, these sessions are often led by clinical teaching fellows and/or consultants. Depending on the roles undertaken (e.g., session organizers, peer tutors), a peer-assisted learning (PAL) approach may afford many benefits to teaching surgical skills. At the University of Keele's School of Medicine, informal PAL is used by the Surgical Society to teach basic surgical skills to pre-clinical students. As medical students who assumed different roles within this peer-assisted model, we present our experiences and discuss the possible implications of incorporating such sessions into UK medical curricula. Our anecdotal evidence suggests that a combination of PAL sessions--used as an adjunct to faculty-led sessions--may provide optimal learning opportunities in delivering a basic surgical skills session for pre-clinical students.

  10. The development of audio-visual materials to prepare patients for medical procedures: an oncology application.

    PubMed

    Carey, M; Schofield, P; Jefford, M; Krishnasamy, M; Aranda, S

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a systematic process for the development of educational audio-visual materials that are designed to prepare patients for potentially threatening procedures. Literature relating to the preparation of patients for potentially threatening medical procedures, psychological theory, theory of diffusion of innovations and patient information was examined. Four key principles were identified as being important: (1) stakeholder consultation, (2) provision of information to prepare patients for the medical procedure, (3) evidence-based content, and (4) promotion of patient confidence. These principles are described along with an example of the development of an audio-visual resource to prepare patients for chemotherapy treatment. Using this example, practical strategies for the application of each of the principles are described. The principles and strategies described may provide a practical, evidence-based guide to the development of other types of patient audio-visual materials.

  11. Relations between policy for medical teaching and basic need satisfaction in teaching.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Sluiter, Roderick; Stuyt, Paul M J; Laan, Roland F J M

    2015-10-01

    Policy initiatives that aim to elevate the position of medical teaching to that of medical research could influence the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs related to motivation for medical teaching. To explore relations between the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs towards medical teaching and two policy initiatives for medical teaching: (Junior) Principal Lecturer positions [(J)PL positions] and Subsidized Innovation and Research Projects in Medical Education (SIRPMEs). An online questionnaire was used to collect data about medical teaching in the setting of a university hospital. We adapted the Work-related Basic Need Satisfaction scale (Van den Broeck et al. in J Occup Organ Psychol, 83(4):981-1002, 2010), in order to measure feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in teaching. We examined the relations between (J)PL positions and SIRPMEs and the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs. A total of 767 medical teachers participated. The initiatives appear to be related to different beneficial outcomes in terms of feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in medical teaching. Either a (J)PL position is obtained by teachers who feel competent and related towards medical teaching, or obtaining a (J)PL position makes teachers feel more competent and related towards teaching, or these relations could be interacting. Also, either a SIRPME is obtained by teachers who feel competent and autonomous towards medical teaching, or obtaining a SIRPME makes teachers feel more competent and autonomous towards teaching, or these relations could be interacting. Additional research needs to scrutinize the causal or interacting relations further and to determine optimal conditions for these policy initiatives more specifically. Implications for future research are discussed.

  12. Relations between policy for medical teaching and basic need satisfaction in teaching.

    PubMed

    Engbers, Rik; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Sluiter, Roderick; Stuyt, Paul M J; Laan, Roland F J M

    2015-10-01

    Policy initiatives that aim to elevate the position of medical teaching to that of medical research could influence the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs related to motivation for medical teaching. To explore relations between the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs towards medical teaching and two policy initiatives for medical teaching: (Junior) Principal Lecturer positions [(J)PL positions] and Subsidized Innovation and Research Projects in Medical Education (SIRPMEs). An online questionnaire was used to collect data about medical teaching in the setting of a university hospital. We adapted the Work-related Basic Need Satisfaction scale (Van den Broeck et al. in J Occup Organ Psychol, 83(4):981-1002, 2010), in order to measure feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in teaching. We examined the relations between (J)PL positions and SIRPMEs and the satisfaction of three basic psychological needs. A total of 767 medical teachers participated. The initiatives appear to be related to different beneficial outcomes in terms of feelings of autonomy, competence, and relatedness in medical teaching. Either a (J)PL position is obtained by teachers who feel competent and related towards medical teaching, or obtaining a (J)PL position makes teachers feel more competent and related towards teaching, or these relations could be interacting. Also, either a SIRPME is obtained by teachers who feel competent and autonomous towards medical teaching, or obtaining a SIRPME makes teachers feel more competent and autonomous towards teaching, or these relations could be interacting. Additional research needs to scrutinize the causal or interacting relations further and to determine optimal conditions for these policy initiatives more specifically. Implications for future research are discussed. PMID:25503924

  13. Medical physics staffing for radiation oncology: a decade of experience in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Battista, Jerry J; Clark, Brenda G; Patterson, Michael S; Beaulieu, Luc; Sharpe, Michael B; Schreiner, L John; MacPherson, Miller S; Van Dyk, Jacob

    2012-01-05

    The January 2010 articles in The New York Times generated intense focus on patient safety in radiation treatment, with physics staffing identified frequently as a critical factor for consistent quality assurance. The purpose of this work is to review our experience with medical physics staffing, and to propose a transparent and flexible staffing algorithm for general use. Guided by documented times required per routine procedure, we have developed a robust algorithm to estimate physics staffing needs according to center-specific workload for medical physicists and associated support staff, in a manner we believe is adaptable to an evolving radiotherapy practice. We calculate requirements for each staffing type based on caseload, equipment inventory, quality assurance, educational programs, and administration. Average per-case staffing ratios were also determined for larger-scale human resource planning and used to model staffing needs for Ontario, Canada over the next 10 years. The workload specific algorithm was tested through a survey of Canadian cancer centers. For center-specific human resource planning, we propose a grid of coefficients addressing specific workload factors for each staff group. For larger scale forecasting of human resource requirements, values of 260, 700, 300, 600, 1200, and 2000 treated cases per full-time equivalent (FTE) were determined for medical physicists, physics assistants, dosimetrists, electronics technologists, mechanical technologists, and information technology specialists, respectively.

  14. Flexner revisited: the role and value of the basic sciences in medical education.

    PubMed

    Finnerty, Edward P; Chauvin, Sheila; Bonaminio, Giulia; Andrews, Mark; Carroll, Robert G; Pangaro, Louis N

    2010-02-01

    A central tenet of Flexner's report was the fundamental role of science in medical education. Today, there is tension between the time needed to teach an ever-expanding knowledge base in science and the time needed for increased instruction in clinical application and in the behavioral, ethical, and managerial knowledge and skills needed to prepare for clinical experiences. One result has been at least a perceived reduction in time and focus on the foundational sciences. In this context, the International Association of Medical Science Educators initiated a study to address the role and value of the basic sciences in medical education by seeking perspectives from various groups of medical educators to five questions: (1) What are the sciences that constitute the foundation for medical practice? (2) What is the value and role of the foundational sciences in medical education? (3) When and how should these foundational sciences be incorporated into the medical education curriculum? (4) What sciences should be prerequisite to entering the undergraduate medical curriculum? (5) What are examples of the best practices for incorporating the foundational sciences into the medical education curriculum? The results suggest a broad group of experts believes that an understanding of basic science content remains essential to clinical practice and that teaching should be accomplished across the entire undergraduate medical education experience and integrated with clinical applications. Learning the sciences also plays a foundational role in developing discipline and rigor in learners' thinking skills, including logical reasoning, critical appraisal, problem solving, decision making, and creativity.

  15. Assessing Medication Adherence as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ahna L H; McGrady, Meghan E

    2015-12-01

    Poor adherence to pediatric cancer treatment protocols may prevent children and adolescents from realizing the potential benefits of therapy. This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for supporting medication adherence. Databases were reviewed for articles examining adherence and including children and/or adolescents with cancer. Fourteen articles (i.e., qualitative, quantitative, review, and randomized clinical trials) were evaluated for rigor. There is moderate-quality evidence to support a strong recommendation for adherence to be assessed routinely and monitored throughout the treatment. Integrating the proposed clinical procedures into standard clinical care may improve outcomes for children and adolescents with cancer.

  16. Oncologic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis.

  17. [The principles of oncologic medical care provided to workers of mining and smelting complex in city of Navoi].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the main results of study of morbidity, prevalence and mortality of population in Navoi oblast of the Republic of Uzbekistan and Navoi mining and smelting complex in 1992-2004. It is demonstrated that in Navoi oblast the oncologic neoplasm morbidity took one of the first places in the Republic of Uzbekistan due to the additional carcinogenic risk factors produced by mining and smelting complex. The results of the first stage of the target comprehensive anti-oncologic program implemented in the mining and smelting complex in city of Navoi permitted to elaborate the major directions of improvement of population oncologic health, including more healthy and safe workplaces.

  18. Oncology legislative update.

    PubMed

    Holmes, H

    2000-11-01

    This article reviews current legislative and regulatory issues of importance to the oncology community. Topics include patient protection, Medicare support of clinical trials, research data protection, the Medical Innovation Tax Credit, National Cancer Institute appropriations, and medical record privacy issues. Other topics discussed included funding for stem-cell research, genetic therapy oversight, and coverage for uninsured patients.

  19. Analysis of medical-decision making and the use of standards of care in oncology.

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, S.; Fremgen, A. M.; Hundahl, S. A.; Dudeck, J.

    2000-01-01

    Guidelines in medicine have been proposed as a way to assist physicians in the clinical decision-making process. Increasingly, they form the basis for assessing accountability in the delivery of healthcare services. However, experiences with their evaluation, as the most important step in the continuous guidelines process, are rare. Patient Care Evaluation Studies have been developed by the Commission on Cancer in the United States. As they reflect the "real-world" medical practice they are helpful in evaluating the quality of diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of tumor diseases in hospitals and cancer center and the compliance with current standards of care. In this context, they can provide an infrastructure for the analysis of the decision-making process. PMID:11079906

  20. Basic practical skills teaching and learning in undergraduate medical education – a review on methodological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Daniela; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Practical skills are an essential part of physicians’ daily routine. Nevertheless, medical graduates’ performance of basic skills is often below the expected level. This review aims to identify and summarize teaching approaches of basic practical skills in undergraduate medical education which provide evidence with respect to effective students’ learning of these skills. Methods: Basic practical skills were defined as basic physical examination skills, routine skills which get better with practice, and skills which are also performed by nurses. We searched PubMed with different terms describing these basic practical skills. In total, 3467 identified publications were screened and 205 articles were eventually reviewed for eligibility. Results: 43 studies that included at least one basic practical skill, a comparison of two groups of undergraduate medical students and effects on students’ performance were analyzed. Seven basic practical skills and 15 different teaching methods could be identified. The most consistent results with respect to effective teaching and acquisition of basic practical skills were found for structured skills training, feedback, and self-directed learning. Simulation was effective with specific teaching methods and in several studies no differences in teaching effects were detected between expert or peer instructors. Multimedia instruction, when used in the right setting, also showed beneficial effects for basic practical skills learning. Conclusion: A combination of voluntary or obligatory self-study with multimedia applications like video clips in combination with a structured program including the possibility for individual exercise with personal feedback by peers or teachers might provide a good learning opportunity for basic practical skills. PMID:27579364

  1. Necessity of Accreditation Standards for Quality Assurance of Medical Basic Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeian, M; Jalili, Z; Nakhaee, N; Shirazi, J Jahroomi; Jafari, AR

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present article reviews the significance of accreditation standards while emphasizing the necessity of implementation of such standards by basic medical science council, with an eye on such international standards as those published by WFME. This review article had to decide on the key words and expressions, data bases, to review relevant literature, review higher and medical education journals at GOOGLE, ELSEVIER, PUBMED, and such web sites as those of WFME and WMA’s. Accreditation is a powerful leverage for institutional change and improvement and must be actively supported by academic and national health authorities worldwide. Considering the mission of the Basic Medical Science, Health and Post grad. Education, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran as accountable medical education, all specialists of the spectrum of disciplines agreed on the necessity of formulating the medical education standards for all disciplines of their interest. It is important that all efforts be joined in the endeavor to create effective and reliable instruments for quality assurance of Basic Medical Sciences Education. PMID:23865033

  2. Global radiation oncology waybill

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Garzón, Victor; Rovirosa, Ángeles; Ramos, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Background/aim Radiation oncology covers many different fields of knowledge and skills. Indeed, this medical specialty links physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even rehabilitation and aesthetics. The current socio-economic situation and professional competences affect the development and future or this specialty. The aim of this article was to analyze and highlight the underlying pillars and foundations of radiation oncology, indicating the steps implicated in the future developments or competences of each. Methods This study has collected data from the literature and includes highlights from discussions carried out during the XVII Congress of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) held in Vigo in June, 2013. Most of the aspects and domains of radiation oncology were analyzed, achieving recommendations for the many skills and knowledge related to physics, biology, research, and formation as well as surgical and clinical procedures and even supportive care and management. Results Considering the data from the literature and the discussions of the XVII SEOR Meeting, the “waybill” for the forthcoming years has been described in this article including all the aspects related to the needs of radiation oncology. Conclusions Professional competences affect the development and future of this specialty. All the types of radio-modulation are competences of radiation oncologists. On the other hand, the pillars of Radiation Oncology are based on experience and research in every area of Radiation Oncology. PMID:24416572

  3. Is basic science disappearing from medicine? The decline of biomedical research in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Benjamin E; Goldenberg, Neil M; Fairn, Gregory D; Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Slutsky, Arthur S; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Explosive growth in our understanding of genomics and molecular biology have fueled calls for the pursuit of personalized medicine, the notion of harnessing biologic variability to provide patient-specific care. This vision will necessitate a deep understanding of the underlying pathophysiology in each patient. Medical journals play a pivotal role in the education of trainees and clinicians, yet we suspected that the amount of basic science in the top medical journals has been in decline. We conducted an automated search strategy in PubMed to identify basic science articles and calculated the proportion of articles dealing with basic science in the highest impact journals for 8 different medical specialties from 1994 to 2013. We observed a steep decline (40-60%) in such articles over time in almost all of the journals examined. This rapid decline in basic science from medical journals is likely to affect practitioners' understanding of and interest in the basic mechanisms of disease and therapy. In this Life Sciences Forum, we discuss why this decline may be occurring and what it means for the future of science and medicine.

  4. Venous thromboembolism and cancer: guidelines of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM).

    PubMed

    Mandalà, M; Falanga, A; Piccioli, A; Prandoni, P; Pogliani, E M; Labianca, R; Barni, S

    2006-09-01

    Thromboembolic complications represent one of the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer patients. Although several data have been published demonstrating the strong association between cancer and venous thromboembolism (VTE), there is poor perception, among oncologists, of the level of risk of thrombosis and of relevance of managing VTE in these patients. The Associazione Italiana di Oncologia Medica (AIOM) has provided some recommendations to direct clinical practice according to evidence-based data concerning cancer and VTE. In fact, we conducted an extensive literature review (1996-2005) to produce evidence-based recommendations to improve perceptions of the magnitude of this risk among Italian medical and surgical oncologists and alert on the new approaches to prophylaxis and treatment of VTE in cancer patients. Levels of evidence are given according to a five-point rating system, and similarly for each key recommendation a five-point rating system suggests if the evidence is strong and indicate that the benefits do, or do not, outweigh risks and burden. PMID:16837209

  5. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician. (1977 Edition). Student Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Developed to aid students enrolled in an emergency medical technician (EMT) training course, this document accompanies a course guide and a set of instructor lesson plans which update a basic training program for EMTs. The course consists of twenty-five lessons involving a minimum of seventy-one hours of classroom and field training plus ten hours…

  6. Basic Training Course/Emergency Medical Technician (Second Edition). Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Intended to aid the course coordinator in planning and managing a basic training program for emergency medical technicians (EMTs), this course guide is divided into four sections. The introductory section provides a brief overview of the coordinator's responsibilities and identifies the twenty-five lessons included in the course. Section 2…

  7. Downsizing of Basic Science Departments in U.S. Medical Schools: Perceptions of Their Chairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandel, H. George

    1997-01-01

    The National Caucus of Biomedical Science Chairs administered a 35-item questionnaire concerning department downsizing to medical school basic science department heads (n=400). Results indicate significant loss of faculty positions in one-third of the schools, with a 10% overall reduction from 1985-95. Department restructuring, with merging of…

  8. An international basic science and clinical research summer program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2012-03-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to understand and grasp translational research as an important concept today. In addition, since medical training is often an international affair whereby a medical student/resident/fellow will likely train in many different countries during his/her early training years, it is important to provide a learning environment whereby a young medical student experiences the unique challenges and value of an international educational experience. This article describes a program that bridges the gap between the basic and clinical research concepts in a unique international educational experience. After completing two semester curricula at Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, six medical students undertook a summer program at St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. The program lasted for 2 mo and addressed advanced training in basic science research topics in medicine such as cell isolation, functional assessment, and molecular techniques of analysis and manipulation as well as sessions on the conduct of clinical research trials, ethics, and intellectual property management. Programs such as these are essential to provide a base from which medical students can decide if research is an attractive career choice for them during their clinical practice in subsequent years. An innovative international summer research course for medical students is necessary to cater to the needs of the medical students in the 21st century.

  9. An international basic science and clinical research summer program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; Alkukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K

    2012-03-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to understand and grasp translational research as an important concept today. In addition, since medical training is often an international affair whereby a medical student/resident/fellow will likely train in many different countries during his/her early training years, it is important to provide a learning environment whereby a young medical student experiences the unique challenges and value of an international educational experience. This article describes a program that bridges the gap between the basic and clinical research concepts in a unique international educational experience. After completing two semester curricula at Alfaisal University in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, six medical students undertook a summer program at St. Boniface Hospital Research Centre, in Winnipeg, MB, Canada. The program lasted for 2 mo and addressed advanced training in basic science research topics in medicine such as cell isolation, functional assessment, and molecular techniques of analysis and manipulation as well as sessions on the conduct of clinical research trials, ethics, and intellectual property management. Programs such as these are essential to provide a base from which medical students can decide if research is an attractive career choice for them during their clinical practice in subsequent years. An innovative international summer research course for medical students is necessary to cater to the needs of the medical students in the 21st century. PMID:22383409

  10. Use of complementary and alternative medical interventions for the management of procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Landier, Wendy; Tse, Alice M

    2010-12-01

    This integrative review aims to identify evidence in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyINFO, and COCHRANE) regarding the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medical interventions, either alone or as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy, in alleviating procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in children and adolescents with cancer. A total of 32 articles met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that mind-body interventions, including hypnosis, distraction, and imagery, may be effective, alone or as adjuncts to pharmacological interventions, in managing procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology.

  11. Use of Complementary and Alternative Medical Interventions for the Management of Procedure-Related Pain, Anxiety, and Distress in Pediatric Oncology: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Landier, Wendy; Tse, Alice M.

    2016-01-01

    This integrative review aims to identify evidence in four electronic databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsyINFO, and COCHRANE) regarding the effectiveness of complementary and alternative medical interventions, either alone or as an adjunct to pharmacological therapy, in alleviating procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in children and adolescents with cancer. A total of 32 articles met inclusion criteria. Results suggest that mind–body interventions, including hypnosis, distraction, and imagery, may be effective, alone or as adjuncts to pharmacological interventions, in managing procedure-related pain, anxiety, and distress in pediatric oncology. PMID:21035021

  12. Oncological image analysis.

    PubMed

    Brady, Sir Michael; Highnam, Ralph; Irving, Benjamin; Schnabel, Julia A

    2016-10-01

    Cancer is one of the world's major healthcare challenges and, as such, an important application of medical image analysis. After a brief introduction to cancer, we summarise some of the major developments in oncological image analysis over the past 20 years, but concentrating those in the authors' laboratories, and then outline opportunities and challenges for the next decade.

  13. [Factitious diseases in oncology].

    PubMed

    Reich, Michel; Clermont, Amélie; Amela, Éric; Kotecki, Nuria

    2015-12-01

    Factitious diseases and pathomimias and particularly Munchausen's syndrome, due to their rarity, are poorly diagnosed by medical teams working in oncology. Consequences can be serious and result in unadapted surgery or non justified implementation of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. These patients simulate diseases in order to attract medical attention. They might become belligerent and are likely to promptly discharge themselves from hospital if they do not get the desired attention or are unmasked. With two following case reports and literature review, we would like to alert clinicians about difficulties encountered in diagnosis and management of factitious disorders. When faced with this diagnosis, the patient will tend to deny reality and break contact with the medical team who exposed him. Medical peregrinating behavior surrounded by conflicts with medical team, past psychiatric illness, history of working in the medical and paramedical field and social isolation can guide the diagnosis. Somaticians and especially surgeons working in the oncologic field must remain vigilant about this diagnosis and collaborate with either the psycho-oncologic team or the consultation-liaison psychiatric team. Some recommendations for medical professionals how to cope with these patients will be suggested. PMID:26597474

  14. Quality of Basic Life Support – A Comparison between Medical Students and Paramedics

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Thomas; Weiss, Verena; Pfister, Roman; Michels, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Poor survival rates after cardiac arrest can partly be explained by poor basic life support skills in medical professionals. Aim This study aimed to assess quality of basic life support in medical students and paramedics. Materials and Methods We conducted a prospective observational study with 100 early medical students (group A), 100 late medical students (group B) and 100 paramedics (group C), performing a 20-minute basic life support simulation in teams of two. Average frequency and absolute number of chest compressions per minute (mean (±SD)), chest decompression (millimetres of compression remaining, mean (±SD)), hands-off-time (seconds/minute, mean (±SD)), frequency of switching positions between ventilation and chest compression (per 20 minutes) and rate of sufficient compressions (depth ≥50mm) were assessed as quality parameters of CPR. Results In groups A, B and C the rates of sufficiently deep chest compressions were 56%, 42% and 52%, respectively, without significant differences. Male gender and real-life CPR experience were significantly associated with deeper chest compression. Frequency and number of chest compressions were within recommended goals in at least 96% of all groups. Remaining chest compressions were 6 mm (±2), 6 mm (±2) and 5 mm (±2) with a significant difference between group A and C (p=0.017). Hands-off times were 6s/min (±1), 5s/min (±1) and 4s/min (±1), which was significantly different across all three groups. Conclusion Overall, paramedics tended to show better quality of CPR compared to medical students. Though, chest compression depth as an important quality characteristic of CPR was insufficient in almost 50% of participants, even in well trained paramedics. Therefore, we suggest that an effort should be made to find better ways to educate health care professionals in BLS. PMID:27630885

  15. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  16. A prescription that addresses the decline of basic science education in medical school.

    PubMed

    Miller, Daniel; Thornton, Christina S; Keough, Michael B; Roberts, Jodie I; Yipp, Bryan; Hollenberg, Morley; Bau, Jason T; Peplowski, Michael A; Beck, Paul L

    2014-10-04

    Over 30 years ago a cry rang out through the proverbial halls of academia; "The clinician scientist is an endangered species." These prophetic words have been reverberated in the ears of every specialty and every general medical organization in deafening tones. Why is the role of the clinician scientist or clinician investigator so important that this phrase has been repeated subsequently in medical and educational journals? Simply put, the clinician scientist bridges the ravine between the ever-growing mountain of scientific knowledge and the demanding patient centered clinical care. Here, we describe the current educational model established by the University of Calgary, Leaders in Medicine Program. Our program seeks to train future physicians and clinician scientists by incorporating training in basic science, translational and clinical research with clinical and medical education in a longitudinal program to students of traditional MD/PhD, MD/MSc or MD/MBA stream as well as interested Doctor of Medicine students.

  17. Peer-assisted learning: filling the gaps in basic science education for preclinical medical students.

    PubMed

    Sammaraiee, Yezen; Mistry, Ravi D; Lim, Julian; Wittner, Liora; Deepak, Shantal; Lim, Gareth

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to peer-assisted learning (PAL) in clinical training, there is scant literature on the efficacy of PAL during basic medical sciences teaching for preclinical students. A group of senior medical students aimed to design and deliver clinically oriented small-group tutorials after every module in the preclinical curriculum at a United Kingdom medical school. Twenty tutorials were delivered by senior students throughout the year to first- and second-year students. A baseline questionnaire was delivered to inform the development of the program followed by an end-point questionnaire the next year (n = 122). Quizzes were administered before and after five separate tutorials to assess changes in mean student scores. Additionally, each tutorial was evaluated via a questionnaire for participants (n = 949). All five posttutorial quizzes showed a significant improvement in mean student score (P < 0.05). Questionnaires showed students found the program to be relevant and useful for revision purposes and appreciated how tutorials contextualized basic science to clinical medicine. Students appreciated the interactive nature of the sessions and found receiving personalized feedback about their learning and consolidating information with someone familiar with the material to be useful. With the inclusion of the program, students felt there were now an adequate number of tutorials during the year. In conclusion, this study shows that senior medical students can design and deliver a program that adds value to the mostly lecture-based formal preclinical curriculum. We hope that our study can prompt further work to explore the effect of PAL on the teaching of basic sciences during preclinical studies.

  18. Peer-assisted learning: filling the gaps in basic science education for preclinical medical students.

    PubMed

    Sammaraiee, Yezen; Mistry, Ravi D; Lim, Julian; Wittner, Liora; Deepak, Shantal; Lim, Gareth

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to peer-assisted learning (PAL) in clinical training, there is scant literature on the efficacy of PAL during basic medical sciences teaching for preclinical students. A group of senior medical students aimed to design and deliver clinically oriented small-group tutorials after every module in the preclinical curriculum at a United Kingdom medical school. Twenty tutorials were delivered by senior students throughout the year to first- and second-year students. A baseline questionnaire was delivered to inform the development of the program followed by an end-point questionnaire the next year (n = 122). Quizzes were administered before and after five separate tutorials to assess changes in mean student scores. Additionally, each tutorial was evaluated via a questionnaire for participants (n = 949). All five posttutorial quizzes showed a significant improvement in mean student score (P < 0.05). Questionnaires showed students found the program to be relevant and useful for revision purposes and appreciated how tutorials contextualized basic science to clinical medicine. Students appreciated the interactive nature of the sessions and found receiving personalized feedback about their learning and consolidating information with someone familiar with the material to be useful. With the inclusion of the program, students felt there were now an adequate number of tutorials during the year. In conclusion, this study shows that senior medical students can design and deliver a program that adds value to the mostly lecture-based formal preclinical curriculum. We hope that our study can prompt further work to explore the effect of PAL on the teaching of basic sciences during preclinical studies. PMID:27445276

  19. Medical Individualism or Medical Familism? A Critical Analysis of China's New Guidelines for Informed Consent: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China's 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible with the character of Chinese familism that is deeply rooted in the Chinese ethical tradition. It also contradicts family-based patterns of health care in China. Moreover, the requirement for individual informed consent is incompatible with numerous medical regulations promulgated in the past two decades. This essay argues that while Chinese medical legislation should learn from relevant Western ideas, it should not simply copy such practices by importing medical individualism into Chinese health care. Chinese healthcare policy is properly based on Chinese medical familist resources. PMID:26070661

  20. Medical Individualism or Medical Familism? A Critical Analysis of China's New Guidelines for Informed Consent: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record.

    PubMed

    Bian, Lin

    2015-08-01

    Modern Western medical individualism has had a significant impact on health care in China. This essay demonstrates the ways in which such Western-style individualism has been explicitly endorsed in China's 2010 directive: The Basic Norms of the Documentation of the Medical Record. The Norms require that the patient himself, rather than a member of his family, sign each informed consent form. This change in clinical practice indicates a shift toward medical individualism in Chinese healthcare legislation. Such individualism, however, is incompatible with the character of Chinese familism that is deeply rooted in the Chinese ethical tradition. It also contradicts family-based patterns of health care in China. Moreover, the requirement for individual informed consent is incompatible with numerous medical regulations promulgated in the past two decades. This essay argues that while Chinese medical legislation should learn from relevant Western ideas, it should not simply copy such practices by importing medical individualism into Chinese health care. Chinese healthcare policy is properly based on Chinese medical familist resources.

  1. Conducting correlation seminars in basic sciences at KIST Medical College, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P Ravi

    2011-01-01

    KIST Medical College is a new medical school in Lalitpur, Nepal. In Nepal, six basic science subjects are taught together in an integrated organ system-based manner with early clinical exposure and community medicine. Correlation seminars are conducted at the end of covering each organ system. The topics are decided by the core academic group (consisting of members from each basic science department, the Department of Community Medicine, the academic director, and the clinical and program coordinators) considering the public health importance of the condition and its ability to include learning objectives from a maximum number of subjects. The learning objectives are decided by individual departments and finalized after the meeting of the core group. There are two student coordinators for each seminar and an evaluation group evaluates each seminar and presenter. Correlation seminars help students revise the organ system covered and understand its clinical importance, promote teamwork and organization, and supports active learning. Correlation seminars should be considered as a learning modality by other medical schools.

  2. [Gann-chiryou Ninnteii--education of a fundamental (junior) oncology specialist].

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masahiko

    2008-04-01

    The development of new active agents, along with rapid progress in biomedical technology in recent decades, has resulted in major progress in cancer treatment, but at the same time it has made cancer management much more complex: Medical treatment must now be supplemented by various other types of care. Cancer patients and their families require the best care and support through the entire process, and optimal treatment for patients cannot be provided without an oncology health care team that includes various specialists such as medical-, radiation-, and surgical oncologists, and other professionals. The oncology education system in Japan, however, is unable to comply with this demand at present, although educational programs for highly trained and dedicated oncology experts are rapidly developing. Oncologists, whether subspecialized in medical, pediatric, radiation, or surgical oncology, must comprehend a formidable knowledge base and then effectively interact with medical colleagues in a wide range of disciplines in cancer care. Since the rapid improvement of this poor oncology environment is urgently required, the Japanese Board of Cancer Therapy has made a proposal to develop a primary certification system for oncology, Gannchiryou Ninnteii: This system provides education for candidates in basic principles common to management and treatment of malignant diseases, which can enhance the quality of oncology care and also maintain the standards for certification of various oncology specialists who are now developing in Japan. Candidates are required to pass the certifying examination after satisfactory completion of graduate education in a specialty and the following training programs as a fundamental oncologist. The first certifying examination is scheduled in January, 2008. The details for certification were reviewed.

  3. Quality Assessment in Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2012-07-01

    The movement to improve healthcare quality has led to a need for carefully designed quality indicators that accurately reflect the quality of care. Many different measures have been proposed and continue to be developed by governmental agencies and accrediting bodies. However, given the inherent differences in the delivery of care among medical specialties, the same indicators will not be valid across all of them. Specifically, oncology is a field in which it can be difficult to develop quality indicators, because the effectiveness of an oncologic intervention is often not immediately apparent, and the multidisciplinary nature of the field necessarily involves many different specialties. Existing and emerging comparative effectiveness data are helping to guide evidence-based practice, and the increasing availability of these data provides the opportunity to identify key structure and process measures that predict for quality outcomes. The increasing emphasis on quality and efficiency will continue to compel the medical profession to identify appropriate quality measures to facilitate quality improvement efforts and to guide accreditation, credentialing, and reimbursement. Given the wide-reaching implications of quality metrics, it is essential that they be developed and implemented with scientific rigor. The aims of the present report were to review the current state of quality assessment in oncology, identify existing indicators with the best evidence to support their implementation, and propose a framework for identifying and refining measures most indicative of true quality in oncologic care.

  4. Vertical integration of basic science in final year of medical education

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Sudha Jasmine; Jacob, Tripti Meriel; Sathyendra, Sowmya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Development of health professionals with ability to integrate, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through medical college is greatly hampered by the system of delivery that is compartmentalized and piecemeal. There is a need to integrate basic sciences with clinical teaching to enable application in clinical care. Aim: To study the benefit and acceptance of vertical integration of basic science in final year MBBS undergraduate curriculum. Materials and Methods: After Institutional Ethics Clearance, neuroanatomy refresher classes with clinical application to neurological diseases were held as part of the final year posting in two medical units. Feedback was collected. Pre- and post-tests which tested application and synthesis were conducted. Summative assessment was compared with the control group of students who had standard teaching in other two medical units. In-depth interview was conducted on 2 willing participants and 2 teachers who did neurology bedside teaching. Results: Majority (>80%) found the classes useful and interesting. There was statistically significant improvement in the post-test scores. There was a statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups' scores during summative assessment (76.2 vs. 61.8 P < 0.01). Students felt that it reinforced, motivated self-directed learning, enabled correlations, improved understanding, put things in perspective, gave confidence, aided application, and enabled them to follow discussions during clinical teaching. Conclusion: Vertical integration of basic science in final year was beneficial and resulted in knowledge gain and improved summative scores. The classes were found to be useful, interesting and thought to help in clinical care and application by majority of students. PMID:27563584

  5. The inequalities of medical pluralism: Hierarchies of health, the politics of tradition and the economies of care in Indian oncology.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Doron, Assa; Tovey, Philip

    2009-09-01

    India has an eclectic health system that incorporates biomedical as well as traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM). Our understanding of the co-existence of these therapeutic modalities in this diverse, postcolonial and developing nation is extremely limited, and in the context of cancer care, to our knowledge no sociological work has been carried out. Contemporary Indian oncology represents a fascinating site for examining the interplay and articulation of forms of tradition/modernity, economic progress/structural constraint and individual beliefs/cultural norms. In a context of an increase in the prevalence and impact of cancer in an ageing Indian population, this paper reports on a qualitative investigation of a group of oncology clinicians' accounts of 'pluralism' in India. The results illustrate the embeddedness of patient disease and therapeutic trajectories in vast social inequalities and, indeed, the intermingling of therapeutic pluralism and the politics of social value. We conclude that notions of pluralism, so often espoused by global health organisations, may conceal important forms of social inequality and cultural divides, and that sociologists should play a critical role in highlighting these issues.

  6. Updated guidelines for biomarker testing in colorectal carcinoma: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Alfonso, P; García-Foncillas, J; Salazar, R; Pérez-Segura, P; García-Carbonero, R; Musulén-Palet, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Landolfi, S; Ramón Y Cajal, S; Navarro, S

    2015-04-01

    Publication of this consensus statement is a joint initiative of the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM), intended to revise and update the diagnostic and treatment recommendations published 2 years ago on biomarker use and the management of patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC), thereby providing an opportunity to improve healthcare efficiency and resource use in these patients. This expert group recommends testing for KRAS and NRAS status in all patients with metastatic CRC being considered for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy, as this type of treatment should only be used in patients not harbouring mutations in these genes. In contrast, testing for BRAF, EGFR, PI3K and PTEN mutation status is not necessary for therapeutic decision making, so does not need to be done routinely.

  7. Obesity as a risk factor in cancer: A national consensus of the Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Goday, A; Barneto, I; García-Almeida, J M; Blasco, A; Lecube, A; Grávalos, C; Martínez de Icaya, P; de las Peñas, R; Monereo, S; Vázquez, L; Palacio, J E; Pérez-Segura, P

    2015-10-01

    In the last few years, many prospective studies have demonstrated a clear association between obesity and cancers of the colon and rectum, breast in post-menopausal women, endometrium, kidney, oesophagus and pancreas. Obesity is also associated with a high risk of recurrence and cancer-related death. The pathophysiology of obesity involves various changes that may be implicated in the relationship between obesity and cancer, such as excess inflammatory cytokines and chronic inflammation, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, and raised leptin and oestrogens. The Spanish Society for the Study of Obesity and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology have signed a cooperation agreement to work together towards reducing the impact of obesity in cancer. Preventing obesity prevents cancer.

  8. Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Paul E.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Barker, Christopher A.; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G.; Dicker, Adam P.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Graves, Edward E.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Hei, Tom K.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Kirsch, David G.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Marples, Brian; and others

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  9. Current status and recommendations for the future of research, teaching, and testing in the biological sciences of radiation oncology: report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, executive summary.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Paul E; Anscher, Mitchell S; Barker, Christopher A; Bassetti, Michael; Bristow, Robert G; Cha, Yong I; Dicker, Adam P; Formenti, Silvia C; Graves, Edward E; Hahn, Stephen M; Hei, Tom K; Kimmelman, Alec C; Kirsch, David G; Kozak, Kevin R; Lawrence, Theodore S; Marples, Brian; McBride, William H; Mikkelsen, Ross B; Park, Catherine C; Weidhaas, Joanne B; Zietman, Anthony L; Steinberg, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

  10. Recent advances of basic materials to obtain electrospun polymeric nanofibers for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.; Leon, A. L.; Popa, A.

    2016-08-01

    The most important applications of electrospun polymeric nanofibers are by far those from biomedical field. From the biological point of view, almost all the human tissues and organs consist of nanofibroas structures. The examples include the bone, dentine, cartilage, tendons and skin. All these are characterized through different fibrous structures, hierarchically organized at nanometer scale. Electrospinning represents one of the nanotechnologies that permit to obtain such structures for cell cultures, besides other technologies, such as selfassembling and phase separation technologies. The basic materials used to produce electrospun nanofibers can be natural or synthetic, having polymeric, ceramic or composite nature. These materials are selected depending of the nature and structure of the tissue meant to be regenerated, namely: for the regeneration of smooth tissues regeneration one needs to process through electrospinning polymeric basic materials, while in order to obtain the supports for the regeneration of hard tissues one must mainly use ceramic materials or composite structures that permit imbedding the bioactive substances in distinctive zones of the matrix. This work presents recent studies concerning basic materials used to obtain electrospun polymeric nanofibers, and real possibilities to produce and implement these nanofibers in medical bioengineering applications.

  11. Retention of first aid and basic life support skills in undergraduate medical students

    PubMed Central

    de Ruijter, Pim A.; Biersteker, Heleen A.; Biert, Jan; van Goor, Harry; Tan, Edward C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Undergraduate medical students follow a compulsory first aid (FA) and basic life support (BLS) course. Retention of BLS seems poor and only little information is provided on the retention of FA skills. This study aims at evaluating 1- and 2-year retention of FA and BLS training in undergraduate medical students. Methods One hundred and twenty students were randomly selected from first year (n=349) medical students who successfully followed a compulsory FA and BLS course. From these 120 students, 94 (78%) and 69 (58%) participated in retention tests of FA and BLS skills after 1 and 2 years, respectively. The assessment consisted of two FA stations and one BLS station. Results After 1 year, only 2% passed both FA and BLS stations and 68% failed both FA and BLS stations. After 2 years, 5% passed and 50% failed both FA and BLS stations. Despite the high failure rate at the stations, 90% adequately checked vital signs and started cardiopulmonary resuscitation appropriately. Conclusions The long-term retention of FA and BLS skills after a compulsory course in the first year is poor. Adequate check of vital signs and commencing cardiopulmonary resuscitation retained longer. PMID:25382803

  12. A prospective controlled trial of teaching basic surgical skills with 4th year medical students.

    PubMed

    Lossing, A; Groetzsch, G

    1992-01-01

    Scrubbing, gowning, gloving and aseptic technique are currently the only formal teaching 4th year medical students receive at the beginning of an 8-week surgery rotation. Teaching is often delegated to junior house staff and early bad habits are difficult to unlearn in post-graduate training. A study population of 4th year medical students from three hospitals were examined. At the beginning of an 8-week surgery rotation technical skills were tested with a simulation appendectomy model at the beginning and end of the surgery rotation. On day one, after a pre-test, a teaching intervention was alternated between two hospitals. A control group received only a post-test. The outcome measure was a cumulative score of the students' performance in technical stations in the simulation model. A comparison was made of the mean post-test scores in the teaching, non-teaching and control groups. An analysis of variance of all post-test scores rejected the null hypothesis at the 0.05 level. Duncan's multiple range test demonstrated a significant difference between the teaching and non-teaching group. Feedback from 25 students indicated the teaching model was practical and relevant. A formal teaching intervention of basic technical skills with 4th year medical students improved their performance on a simulated appendectomy model.

  13. [Recommendations for radiological diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in lung cancer: a national consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology].

    PubMed

    Ferreirós, J; Cabeza, B; Gayete, Á; Sánchez, M; Torres, M I; Cobo, M; Isla, D; Puente, J; Reguart, N; de Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen substantial progress in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to lung cancer, thus meaning that its prognosis has improved. The Spanish Society of Medical Radiology (SERAM) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) have therefore produced a national consensus statement in order to make recommendations for radiological diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in patients with lung cancer. This expert group recommends multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as the technique of choice for investigating this disease. The radiology report should include a full assessment by the TNM staging system. Lastly, when the patient is on immunotherapy, response evaluation should employ not only Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST 1.1) but also Immune-Related Response Criteria (irRC). PMID:25530188

  14. [Recommendations for radiological diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in lung cancer: a national consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Medical Radiology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology].

    PubMed

    Ferreirós, J; Cabeza, B; Gayete, Á; Sánchez, M; Torres, M I; Cobo, M; Isla, D; Puente, J; Reguart, N; de Castro, J

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has seen substantial progress in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to lung cancer, thus meaning that its prognosis has improved. The Spanish Society of Medical Radiology (SERAM) and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) have therefore produced a national consensus statement in order to make recommendations for radiological diagnosis and assessment of treatment response in patients with lung cancer. This expert group recommends multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) as the technique of choice for investigating this disease. The radiology report should include a full assessment by the TNM staging system. Lastly, when the patient is on immunotherapy, response evaluation should employ not only Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST 1.1) but also Immune-Related Response Criteria (irRC).

  15. From precision medicine to cancer care through the immunome: highlights from the European Society of Medical Oncology Congress, Madrid, 26–30th September 2014

    PubMed Central

    Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The recognition that cancer is a ‘spectrum’ of diseases, and that medical oncologists should achieve ‘convergence’ from ‘divergence’ to treat cancer patients was the main theme of the 2014 European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress. The meeting assembled 19,859 participants from nearly 134 countries worldwide. The educational content was centered on precision medicine in cancer care, from mutational burden to the immunome, through the epigenome and the proteome. Precision medicine has been defined as the tailoring of medical treatment to the characteristics of an individual patient. Knowing an individual’s genomics has created a remarkable and unprecedented opportunity to improve medical treatment and develop preventative strategies to preserve health. Clinical oncologists across the range of diseases recognise that for precision medicine to take hold, it will require intensive, rigorous validation that these new approaches do indeed improve patient outcomes. Not all molecular alterations are predictive of response to a specific targeted treatment nor are they all druggable, raising issues of cost–benefit, validation of specific biomarkers, and of managing patient expectations. Addressing all these issues will be essential for the medical community to embrace any given opportunities. Along with it, it will also require educational programmes that squarely address the knowledge chasm that currently exists for practicing physicians. The promise of genomic and precision medicine has created greater demands for both those providing the scientific expertise—bioinformatics, statisticians, molecular biologists—and those delivering clinical care—physicians, nurses, psychologists—to the patients. This ESMO 2014 report will highlight the major findings of this outstanding meeting. PMID:25374620

  16. Motivating medical students to learn basic science concepts using chronic myeloid leukemia as an integration theme

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Sara Teresinha Olalla; Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report on the use of chronic myeloid leukemia as a theme of basic clinical integration for first year medical students to motivate and enable in-depth understanding of the basic sciences of the future physician. Methods During the past thirteen years we have reviewed and updated the curriculum of the medical school of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas. The main objective of the new curriculum is to teach the students how to learn to learn. Since then, a case of chronic myeloid leukemia has been introduced to first year medical students and discussed in horizontal integration with all themes taught during a molecular and cell biology course. Cell structure and components, protein, chromosomes, gene organization, proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, signaling and so on are all themes approached during this course. At the end of every topic approached, the students prepare in advance the corresponding topic of clinical cases chosen randomly during the class, which are then presented by them. During the final class, a paper regarding mutations in the abl gene that cause resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors is discussed. After each class, three tests are solved in an interactive evaluation. Results The course has been successful since its beginning, 13 years ago. Great motivation of those who participated in the course was observed. There were less than 20% absences in the classes. At least three (and as many as nine) students every year were interested in starting research training in the field of hematology. At the end of each class, an interactive evaluation was performed and more than 70% of the answers were correct in each evaluation. Moreover, for the final evaluation, the students summarized, in a written report, the molecular and therapeutic basis of chronic myeloid leukemia, with scores ranging from 0 to 10. Considering all 13 years, a median of 78% of the class scored above 5 (min 74%–max 85%), and a median of 67% scored above 7

  17. Benefit distribution of social health insurance: evidence from china's urban resident basic medical insurance.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jay; Tian, Sen; Zhou, Qin; Han, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Equity is one of the essential objectives of the social health insurance. This article evaluates the benefit distribution of the China's Urban Residents' Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI), covering 300 million urban populations. Using the URBMI Household Survey data fielded between 2007 and 2011, we estimate the benefit distribution by the two-part model, and find that the URBMI beneficiaries from lower income groups benefited less than that of higher income groups. In other words, government subsidy that was supposed to promote the universal coverage of health care flew more to the rich. Our study provides new evidence on China's health insurance system reform, and it bears meaningful policy implication for other developing countries facing similar challenges on the way to universal coverage of health insurance. PMID:26936094

  18. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker's review article on "Laser Acceleration and its future" [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],(1)) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated.

  19. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    PubMed Central

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma in central Sydney: a 10 year review of patients seen in a medical oncology department

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Desmond; Findlay, Michael; Boyer, Michael; Tattersall, Martin H.

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To report a single Australian oncology unit’s experience with the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in the context of a literature review of the current management issues. METHODS: Retrospective case record review of 76 patients with diagnosis of HCC referred to the unit between 1984 and 1995. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients had adequate records for analysis. Thirty-six (56%) were migrants with half from Southeast Asia. Twenty-four p atients had a documented viral aetiology. Nine (14%) of 51 patients with pathological confirmation of HCC had normal alpha-fetoprotein levels. Median survival of the 20 patients managed palliatively was 5 weeks compared to 16 weeks for the cohort overall. Surgery in 16 patients rendered all initially disease free with a median survival of 88 weeks. Chemoembolisation induced tumor responses in 5 of the 11 patients so treated. Systemic chemotherapy and tamoxifen treatment caused tumor response in two of 12 and one of 25 respectively. CONCLUSION: Prolonged survival of patients with HCC depends on early detection of small tumors suitable for surgical resection. Other active t reatments are palliative in intent and have limited success. In addition to tumor response and survival duration, the toxicities of therapies and the overall quality of life of patients need to be considered as important outcomes. Viral hepatitis prevention and screening of individuals at risk are strategies that are important for HCC management in communities where the disease is endemic. PMID:11819496

  1. Pilot program to assess proposed basic quality assurance requirements in the medical use of byproduct materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, E.; Nelson, K.; Meinhold, C.B. )

    1991-10-01

    In January 1990, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) proposed amendments to 10 CFR Part 35 that would require medical licensees using byproduct material to establish and implement a basic quality assurance program. A 60-day real-world trial of the proposed rules was initiated to obtain information beyond that generally found through standard public comment procedures. Volunteers from randomly selected institutions had opportunities to review the details of the proposed regulations and to implement these rules on a daily basis during the trial. The participating institutions were then asked to evaluate the proposed regulations based on their personal experiences. The pilot project sought to determine whether medical institutions could develop written quality assurance programs that would meet the eight performance-based objectives of proposed Section 35.35. In addition, the NRC wanted to learn from these volunteers if they had any recommendations on how the rule could be revised to minimized its cost and to clarify its objectives without decreasing its effectiveness. It was found that licensees could develop acceptable QA programs under a performance-based approach, that most licensee programs did meet the proposed objectives, and that most written QA plans would require consultations with NRC or Agreement State personnel before they would fully meet all objectives of proposed Section 35.35. This report describes the overall pilot program. The methodology used to select and assemble the group of participating licensees is presented. The various workshops and evaluation questionnaires are discussed, and detailed findings are presented. 7 refs.

  2. [Biosimilars in oncology].

    PubMed

    Barroso, Sérgio; Coutinho, Jorge; Damasceno, Margarida; Dinis, José; Forjaz de Lacerda, João; Gervásio, Helena; Leal da Costa, Fernando; Marques Pereira, Ana; Parreira, António; Principe, Fernando; Rodrigues, Helena; Sá, Anabela; Teixeira, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    The development of biotechnology drugs represents one of the great advances in medical therapy and it was observed an exponential growth in its use. The resource to these drugs in Oncology and Hematology is no exception and it soon became an essential element of an integrated and directed therapy strategy. The expiry of the first biotechnology drugs patents has opened the door for the development and marketing of biosimilars, which entry in the Portuguese market was recently approved. This article was built on the analysis of the available state-of-the-art information on biotechnology drugs, biosimilars and current legislation and it expresses the opinion of Oncology and Hematology experts about the substituition of biological drugs by biosimilars in clinical practice.

  3. A study to examine whether the basic sciences are appropriately organized to meet the future needs of medical education.

    PubMed

    Crown, V

    1991-04-01

    There is a growing divergence between the content of research activities in the basic sciences and that of the traditional preclinical courses for medical students. A 1977 study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (Penn) examined the organization of the school's basic sciences, including surveying the research interests and departmental affiliations of 101 basic science faculty at Penn and interviewing the basic science departments chairmen there and at five other research-intensive schools of medicine. The findings demonstrated overlapping interests among basic science investigators, significant blurring of departmental boundaries, and a divergence between the faculty members' research interests and the disciplines represented by the departments in which these faculty held appointments. A second study a decade later documented that this divergence had increased. This paper also addresses the mounting concern among medical educators in response to these kinds of developments, the effect of such developments on medical education, and issues concerning the teaching of basic sciences, course content, the responsibility of schools of medicine for effecting change, and a possible model for basic science instruction. PMID:2012655

  4. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  5. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  6. Dunno if you've any plans for the future: medical student indirect questioning in simulated oncology interviews

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This exploratory study investigated the motives of medical students (N = 63) for using indirect questions of the type I don't know if [you have already heard about chemotherapies], I don't know how [you are], or I don't know what [you do for a living] in simulated patient interviews during a communication skills course. Methods I don't know questions (IDK-Qs) were observed during the initial evaluation of students' communication skills; they were systematically identified through video screening and subjected to a qualitative content and discourse analysis considering their context, their content, their intent and their effect on the simulated patients. To evaluate the specificity of medical students' IDK-Qs, the data were compared with a data set of oncologists (N = 31) conducting simulated patient interviews in the context of a Communication Skills Training (CST). Results During the interviews, 41.3% of the students asked 1-6 IDK-Qs. The IDK-Qs were attributed to three content categories: medical/treatment questions (N = 24); lifestyle/psychosocial questions (N = 18); and "inviting questions" questions (N = 11). Most of the IDK-Qs had an exploratory function (46/53), with simulated patients providing detailed responses or asking for more information (36/53). IDK-Qs were rare in the oncologist sample compared to the student sample (5 vs. 53 occurrences). Conclusions IDK-Qs showed a question design difference between medical students and oncologists in simulated patient interviews. Among other reasons for this difference, the possible function of IDK-Qs as a protective linguistic strategy and marker for psychological discomfort is discussed. PMID:22385555

  7. The Effect of Urban Basic Medical Insurance on Health Service Utilisation in Shaanxi Province, China: A Comparison of Two Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianmin; Yang, Xiaowei; Yan, Ju'e; Xue, Qinxiang; Chen, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Background Urban population in China is mainly covered by two medical insurance schemes: the Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) for urban employees in formal sector and the Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) for the left urban residents, mainly the unemployed, the elderly and children. This paper studies the effects of UEBMI and URBMI on health services utilisation in Shaanxi Province, Western China. Methods Cross-sectional data from the 4th National Health Services Survey - Shaanxi Province was studied. The propensity score matching and the coarsened exact matching methods have been used to estimate the average medical insurance effect on the insured. Results Compared to the uninsured, robust results suggest that UEBMI had significantly increased the outpatient health services utilisation in the last two weeks (p<0.10), whilst the significant effect on hospitalisation was evident in the CEM method (p<0.10). The effect of URBMI was limited in that although being insured was associated with higher health services utilisation, compared with the uninsured, none of the improvement was statistically significant (p>0.10). It was also found that compared with the uninsured, basic medical insurance enrollees were more likely to purchase inpatient treatments in lower levels of hospitals, consistent with the incentive of the benefit package design. Conclusion Basic Medical insurance schemes have shown a positive but limited effect on increasing health services utilisation in Shaanxi Province. The benefit package design of higher reimbursement rates for lower level hospitals has induced the insured to use medical services in lower level hospitals for inpatient services. PMID:24740282

  8. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented. PMID:12722411

  9. The National Practice Benchmark for oncology, 2014 report on 2013 data.

    PubMed

    Towle, Elaine L; Barr, Thomas R; Senese, James L

    2014-11-01

    The National Practice Benchmark (NPB) is a unique tool to measure oncology practices against others across the country in a way that allows meaningful comparisons despite differences in practice size or setting. In today's economic environment every oncology practice, regardless of business structure or affiliation, should be able to produce, monitor, and benchmark basic metrics to meet current business pressures for increased efficiency and efficacy of care. Although we recognize that the NPB survey results do not capture the experience of all oncology practices, practices that can and do participate demonstrate exceptional managerial capability, and this year those practices are recognized for their participation. In this report, we continue to emphasize the methodology introduced last year in which we reported medical revenue net of the cost of the drugs as net medical revenue for the hematology/oncology product line. The effect of this is to capture only the gross margin attributable to drugs as revenue. New this year, we introduce six measures of clinical data density and expand the radiation oncology benchmarks. PMID:25398959

  10. The National Practice Benchmark for oncology, 2014 report on 2013 data.

    PubMed

    Towle, Elaine L; Barr, Thomas R; Senese, James L

    2014-11-01

    The National Practice Benchmark (NPB) is a unique tool to measure oncology practices against others across the country in a way that allows meaningful comparisons despite differences in practice size or setting. In today's economic environment every oncology practice, regardless of business structure or affiliation, should be able to produce, monitor, and benchmark basic metrics to meet current business pressures for increased efficiency and efficacy of care. Although we recognize that the NPB survey results do not capture the experience of all oncology practices, practices that can and do participate demonstrate exceptional managerial capability, and this year those practices are recognized for their participation. In this report, we continue to emphasize the methodology introduced last year in which we reported medical revenue net of the cost of the drugs as net medical revenue for the hematology/oncology product line. The effect of this is to capture only the gross margin attributable to drugs as revenue. New this year, we introduce six measures of clinical data density and expand the radiation oncology benchmarks.

  11. The Use of Self-Learning Modules to Facilitate Learning of Basic Science Concepts in an Integrated Medical Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalil, Mohammed K.; Nelson, Loren D.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2010-01-01

    This study used qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluate the effectiveness of self-learning modules (SLMs) developed to facilitate and individualize students' learning of basic medical sciences. Twenty physiology and nineteen microanatomy SLMs were designed with interactive images, animations, narrations, and self-assessments. Of 41…

  12. 20 CFR 30.400 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical treatment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... secondary cancer, such treatment may include treatment of the underlying primary cancer when it is medically necessary or related to treatment of the secondary cancer; however, payment for medical treatment of the... medical treatment? 30.400 Section 30.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION...

  13. An International Basic Science and Clinical Research Summer Program for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramjiawan, Bram; Pierce, Grant N.; Anindo, Mohammad Iffat Kabir; AlKukhun, Abedalrazaq; Alshammari, Abdullah; Chamsi, Ahmad Talal; Abousaleh, Mohannad; Alkhani, Anas; Ganguly, Pallab K.

    2012-01-01

    An important part of training the next generation of physicians is ensuring that they are exposed to the integral role that research plays in improving medical treatment. However, medical students often do not have sufficient time to be trained to carry out any projects in biomedical and clinical research. Many medical students also fail to…

  14. What basic clinical procedures should be mastered by junior clerkship students? Experience at a single medical school in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Konje, Eveline T; Kabangila, Rodrick; Manyama, Mange; van Wyk, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical training in most medical schools, including the Catholic University of Health and Allied Sciences (CUHAS), is offered in the form of junior and senior rotations. During these clinical rotations, students are expected to acquire and master the basic procedural skills. However, students’ learning process should be evaluated for quality improvement. Objectives This study was conducted to identify the basic medical procedural skills that third-year medical students should acquire and master and determine the level of students’ exposure on these procedures at the end of junior rotation in internal medicine. Identification of the gap between clinicians’ opinions, skills practiced by students, and third-year students’ curriculum in the medical department at CUHAS was also done. Methods The descriptive cross-sectional study was used to collect data through a self-administered, structured questionnaire from clinicians in medicine. A review of logbooks was considered to determine level of students’ exposure, and a document analysis was done using existing medical curriculum. Results The response of 71% (n=22) was obtained. Clinicians agreed on basic procedures that students should perform independently (ie, Foley catheter insertion, venipuncture, and intravenous drip insertion). Clinicians thought that lumbar punctures, abdominal paracentesis, and nasogastric tube insertion should be done under minimal supervision. A considerable number of students (25%, n=75) did not practice any procedure throughout their rotation. The majority of the students performed venipuncture independently (82.14%, n=56) and lumbar punctures (73.21%, n=56) under supervision. Less than 25% (n=56) of the students met the required number of exposures on the basic procedures. The procedures to be performed and the level of competency in the procedures are not specified in the current curriculum. Conclusion The study identified the procedures that should be taught and

  15. [Basic requirements for the development of medical education in Latin America and the Caribbean. Final report].

    PubMed

    1976-01-01

    This is the Final Report of this meeting, which was held in Caracas in January 1976 and sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization and the Pan American Federation of Associations of Medical Schools. The meeting included discussions on fundamental aspects of medical manpower development and recommendations on professional training in health policies, medical practice and care , student enrollment, and the establishment and operation of medical schools. The first part of the Report is a review of international activities in medical education in Latin America and the Caribbean area; standards and minimum requirements of new medical schools; present trends in medical education; influences on professional training; interdisciplinary education and education by fields; preparation of the specialist and the multiprofessional; on-the-scene training in hospitals and elsewhere; institucional structures; and student requests.

  16. Thermal and resonance neutrons generated by various electron and X-ray therapeutic beams from medical linacs installed in polish oncological centers

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Adam; Orlef, Andrzej; Łaciak, Marcin; Ciba, Aleksander; Szewczuk, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Background High-energy photon and electron therapeutic beams generated in medical linear accelerators can cause the electronuclear and photonuclear reactions in which neutrons with a broad energy spectrum are produced. A low-energy component of this neutron radiation induces simple capture reactions from which various radioisotopes originate and in which the radioactivity of a linac head and various objects in the treatment room appear. Aim The aim of this paper is to present the results of the thermal/resonance neutron fluence measurements during therapeutic beam emission and exemplary spectra of gamma radiation emitted by medical linac components activated in neutron reactions for four X-ray beams and for four electron beams generated by various manufacturers’ accelerators installed in typical concrete bunkers in Polish oncological centers. Materials and methods The measurements of neutron fluence were performed with the use of the induced activity method, whereas the spectra of gamma radiation from decays of the resulting radioisotopes were measured by means of a portable high-purity germanium detector set for field spectroscopy. Results The fluence of thermal neutrons as well as resonance neutrons connected with the emission of a 20 MV X-ray beam is ∼106 neutrons/cm2 per 1 Gy of a dose in water at a reference depth. It is about one order of magnitude greater than that for the 15 MV X-ray beams and about two orders of magnitude greater than for the 18–22 MeV electron beams regardless of the type of an accelerator. Conclusion The thermal as well as resonance neutron fluence depends strongly on the type and the nominal potential of a therapeutic beam. It is greater for X-ray beams than for electrons. The accelerator accessories and other large objects should not be stored in a treatment room during high-energy therapeutic beam emission to avoid their activation caused by thermal and resonance neutrons. Half-lives of the radioisotopes originating from

  17. Basic results of medical studies during prolonged manned flights on-board the Salyut-7/Soyuz-T orbital complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    From 1982 through 1986 six extended flights (from 65 to 237 days) were carried out in the Salyut-7/Soyuz-T orbital complex by the principal crews, and five short-term flights (8 to 12 days) by visiting crews. During these flights, a broad series of medical studies was performed, their greatest extent during the longest flight (237 days), with the participation of a cosmonaut-doctor. The medical studies were aimed at obtaining additional information and new data on the reactions of the body's basic systems during a prolonged state of weightlessness.

  18. Medical theses as part of the scientific training in basic medical and dental education: experiences from Finland

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Pentti; Sipilä, Kirsi; Takkinen, Hanna-Mari; Renko, Marjo; Risteli, Leila

    2007-01-01

    Background Teaching the principles of scientific research in a comprehensive way is important at medical and dental schools. In many countries medical and dental training is not complete until the candidate has presented a diploma thesis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the nature, quality, publication pattern and visibility of Finnish medical diploma theses. Methods A total of 256 diploma theses presented at the University of Oulu from 2001 to 2003 were analysed. Using a standardised questionnaire, we extracted several characteristics from each thesis. We used the name of the student to assess whether the thesis resulted in a scientific publication indexed in medical article databases. The number of citations received by each published thesis was also recorded. Results A high proportion of the theses (69.5%) were essentially statistical in character, often combined with an extensive literature review or the development of a laboratory method. Most of them were supervised by clinical departments (55.9%). Only 61 theses (23.8%) had been published in indexed scientific journals. Theses in the fields of biomedicine and diagnostics were published in more widely cited journals. The median number of citations received per year was 2.7 and the range from 0 to 14.7. Conclusion The theses were seldom written according to the principles of scientific communication and the proportion of actually published was small. The visibility of these theses and their dissemination to the scientific community should be improved. PMID:18053247

  19. Evaluation of doctors’ performance as facilitators in basic medical science lecture classes in a new Malaysian medical school

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Salwani; Salam, Abdus; Alattraqchi, Ahmed G; Annamalai, Lakshmi; Chockalingam, Annamalai; Elena, Wan Putri; Rahman, Nor Iza A; Abubakar, Abdullahi Rabiu; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background Didactic lecture is the oldest and most commonly used method of teaching. In addition, it is considered one of the most efficient ways to disseminate theories, ideas, and facts. Many critics feel that lectures are an obsolete method to use when students need to perform hands-on activities, which is an everyday need in the study of medicine. This study evaluates students’ perceptions regarding lecture quality in a new medical school. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted of the medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin. The study population was 468 preclinical medical students from years 1 and 2 of academic year 2012–2013. Data were collected using a validated instrument. There were six different sections of questions using a 5-point Likert scale. The data were then compiled and analyzed, using SPSS version 20. Results The response rate was 73%. Among 341 respondents, 30% were male and 70% were female. Eighty-five percent of respondents agree or strongly agree that the lectures had met the criteria with regard to organization of lecture materials. Similarly, 97% of students agree or strongly agree that lecturers maintained adequate voices and gestures. Conclusion Medical students are quite satisfied with the lecture classes and the lectures. However, further research is required to identify student-centered teaching and learning methods to promote active learning. PMID:25878516

  20. 20 CFR 30.400 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical treatment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... treatment may include treatment of the underlying primary cancer when it is medically necessary or related to treatment of the secondary cancer; however, payment for medical treatment of the underlying... treatment? 30.400 Section 30.400 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT...

  1. 20 CFR 30.400 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical treatment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... secondary cancer, such treatment may include treatment of the underlying primary cancer when it is medically necessary or related to treatment of the secondary cancer; however, payment for medical treatment of the underlying primary cancer under these circumstances does not constitute a determination by OWCP that...

  2. 20 CFR 30.400 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical treatment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... was filed. In situations where the occupational illness or covered illness is a secondary cancer, such treatment may include treatment of the underlying primary cancer when it is medically necessary or related to treatment of the secondary cancer; however, payment for medical treatment of the...

  3. 20 CFR 30.400 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical treatment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... secondary cancer, such treatment may include treatment of the underlying primary cancer when it is medically necessary or related to treatment of the secondary cancer; however, payment for medical treatment of the underlying primary cancer under these circumstances does not constitute a determination by OWCP that...

  4. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Alcohol, Exercise, and Medical Care (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and women, colon cancer screening is recommended after age 50 years. (See "Patient education: Colon and rectal cancer screening (Beyond the Basics)" .) WHERE TO GET MORE INFORMATION — Your healthcare provider is the best source of ...

  5. In defense of basic science funding: today's scientific discovery is tomorrow's medical advance.

    PubMed

    Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2013-06-01

    In this address, I will discuss the importance of basic science in tackling our health problems. I will also describe how the funding cuts are damaging our economic competitiveness and turning our young people away from science.

  6. [The national union for private hospital oncology].

    PubMed

    Parmentier, Gérard

    2013-06-01

    In the French health system, social security is the same for both public and private hospitals regardless of their status. In terms of number of patients screened, diagnosed, or treated, independant medicine is the most important sector in the French oncology. The multitude of organizations representing private hospitals or independant oncologists, physicians, radiologists or pathologists have a common organization, the National Union for Private Hospital Oncology (UNHPC). It bases its action on two founding postulates to ensure the quality of the oncology practice : the medical and managerial cultures are complementary and should be articulated ; the quality of organizations is as important as professional competence.

  7. [Study on correction of data bias caused by different missing mechanisms in survey of medical expenditure among students enrolling in Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haixia; Zhao, Junkang; Gu, Caijiao; Cui, Yan; Rong, Huiying; Meng, Fanlong; Wang, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The study of the medical expenditure and its influencing factors among the students enrolling in Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance (URBMI) in Taiyuan indicated that non response bias and selection bias coexist in dependent variable of the survey data. Unlike previous studies only focused on one missing mechanism, a two-stage method to deal with two missing mechanisms simultaneously was suggested in this study, combining multiple imputation with sample selection model. A total of 1 190 questionnaires were returned by the students (or their parents) selected in child care settings, schools and universities in Taiyuan by stratified cluster random sampling in 2012. In the returned questionnaires, 2.52% existed not missing at random (NMAR) of dependent variable and 7.14% existed missing at random (MAR) of dependent variable. First, multiple imputation was conducted for MAR by using completed data, then sample selection model was used to correct NMAR in multiple imputation, and a multi influencing factor analysis model was established. Based on 1 000 times resampling, the best scheme of filling the random missing values is the predictive mean matching (PMM) method under the missing proportion. With this optimal scheme, a two stage survey was conducted. Finally, it was found that the influencing factors on annual medical expenditure among the students enrolling in URBMI in Taiyuan included population group, annual household gross income, affordability of medical insurance expenditure, chronic disease, seeking medical care in hospital, seeking medical care in community health center or private clinic, hospitalization, hospitalization canceled due to certain reason, self medication and acceptable proportion of self-paid medical expenditure. The two-stage method combining multiple imputation with sample selection model can deal with non response bias and selection bias effectively in dependent variable of the survey data.

  8. Review of basic medical results of the Salyut-7-Soyuz-T 8-month manned flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Schulzhenko, E. B.; Grigoriev, A. I.; Atkov, O. Yu.; Egorov, A. D.

    This paper presents the results of medical investigations performed in the Salyut-7 8-month mission in which a professional physician took part. The paper contains anthropometric measurements, results of investigating the vestibular function, cardiovascular function at rest and in response to multi-step tests (with emphasis on echocardiographic measurements), metabolic parameters and hormonal status. It also discusses medical aspects of the extravehicular activity. The medical investigations, although some new methods were applied, provided the continuity of methodical approaches and data accumulated in previous missions.

  9. Oncology in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  10. 20 CFR 10.310 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... physicians' assistants, nurse practitioners and physical therapists may also provide authorized services for... § 10.800. OWCP may also utilize the services of a field nurse to facilitate and coordinate medical...

  11. 20 CFR 10.310 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... physicians' assistants, nurse practitioners and physical therapists may also provide authorized services for... § 10.800. OWCP may also utilize the services of a field nurse to facilitate and coordinate medical...

  12. 20 CFR 10.310 - What are the basic rules for obtaining medical care?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... physicians' assistants, nurse practitioners and physical therapists may also provide authorized services for... § 10.800. OWCP may also utilize the services of a field nurse to facilitate and coordinate medical...

  13. Student Failures on First-Year Medical Basic Science Courses and the USMLE Step 1: A Retrospective Study over a 20-Year Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, E. Robert; Garrett, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Correlates of achievement in the basic science years in medical school and on the Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE®), (Step 1) in relation to preadmission variables have been the subject of considerable study. Preadmissions variables such as the undergraduate grade point average (uGPA) and Medical College Admission…

  14. Recombinant human basic-fibroblastic growth factor: different medical dressings for clinical application in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Finetti, G; Farina, M

    1992-06-01

    Recombinant human basic-Fibroblastic Growth Factor (rhb-FGF) is a basic single-chain protein showing high activity as mitogenetic and angiogenetic agent. The application of rhb-FGF in wound healing as stimulator of the tissue repair process is strictly connected with the covering of the wound by means of a proper dressing. A wide number of synthetic occlusive or non-occlusive wound dressings has been developed. Owing to the delicate proteic structure of rhb-FGF, and generally of all the Growth Factors, compatibility with the dressings has to be every time tested, to avoid its inactivation and consequent loss of tissue repair properties.

  15. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  16. Impact of Modernising Medical Careers on basic surgical training and experience of oral and maxillofacial higher surgical trainees.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, Jagtar; Opie, Niel; Webster, Keith; Tanday, Ajit; Mumtaz, Shadaab; Visram, Semina

    2011-01-01

    Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) is a programme for change that aims to improve the quality of patients' care through improvement in postgraduate medical education and training. Its introduction had far reaching affects and many shortcoming due to its failure to take into account the craft specialties. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the impact of MMC on oral and maxillofacial surgical (OMFS) training. An online questionnaire was distributed to OMFS trainees, and data were gathered about current position, year of training, duration and specialties worked during basic surgical training, stage of completion of examinations and courses, and overall satisfaction with training. Comparisons were made between those who had been trained before and after MMC was introduced. Ninety-five trainees (68%) responded. Of these 66 (69%) had basic surgical training before the introduction of MMC and 29 (31%) afterwards. MMC shortened overall time spent on basic surgical training of OMFS trainees by half, to only 1 year. There were similarities between the two groups in terms of the range of specialties experienced. MMC also resulted in more trainees starting higher surgical training without their Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons. There was greater satisfaction with BST for the pre-MMC group than the post-MMC group. It is hoped that the recent changes to training that were implemented after this study will address some of the shortcomings that we have identified.

  17. Integrating Basic Science and Clinical Teaching for Third-Year Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croen, Lila G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A 2-month program for third-year students at Yeshiva's Albert Einstein College of Medicine that provides a model for integrating basic sciences and clinical training is described. It demonstrates the importance of lifelong learning in a field that constantly changes. (Author/MLW)

  18. A Role for Clinical Case Simulations in Basic Medical Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchaer, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    Simulations can help students apply basic science knowledge (which they are acquiring concurrently) to the identification and management of the physiological, metabolic, and/or anatomic problem(s) underlying the signs and the symptoms of a specific "simulated patient." The design, development, and production of these simulations are described. (JN)

  19. Bioethical aspects of basic research and medical applications of human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santos, Manuel J; Ventura-Juncá, Patricio

    2012-01-01

    The new discoveries, the extraordinary dynamism in human stem cell (SC) research, and the great expectations of the benefits in clinical treatment of many diseases are on the edge of unparalleled advances in both: 1) the understanding of basic mechanisms of cell differentiation and development and 2) the translation from basic research to new clinical therapies. Human stem cells are obtained from different sources, such as embryo, fetal, and adult tissues, in vitro induction (iPS cells) or transdifferentiation. The evidence that these cells are pluripotent (or multipotent), meaning they have the ability to differentiate into all body tissues or tissues of the same lineage, raises the possibility that they could regenerate diseased or damaged tissue in diseases that until now have had no effective treatments. Human stem cell research and therapy raise important bioethical considerations because of the human nature of these cells and their peculiar characteristics. Here we discuss the bioethical aspects of basic human SC research and the conditions necessary for the translation of basic preclinical research into clinical use of SC.

  20. Basic list of veterinary medical serials, third edition: using a decision matrix to update the core list of veterinary journals

    PubMed Central

    Ugaz, Ana G; Boyd, C. Trenton; Croft, Vicki F; Carrigan, Esther E; Anderson, Katherine M

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This paper presents the methods and results of a study designed to produce the third edition of the “Basic List of Veterinary Medical Serials,” which was established by the Veterinary Medical Libraries Section in 1976 and last updated in 1986. Methods: A set of 238 titles were evaluated using a decision matrix in order to systematically assign points for both objective and subjective criteria and determine an overall score for each journal. Criteria included: coverage in four major indexes, scholarly impact rank as tracked in two sources, identification as a recommended journal in preparing for specialty board examinations, and a veterinary librarian survey rating. Results: Of the 238 titles considered, a minimum scoring threshold determined the 123 (52%) journals that constituted the final list. The 36 subject categories represented on the list include general and specialty disciplines in veterinary medicine. A ranked list of journals and a list by subject category were produced. Conclusion: Serials appearing on the third edition of the “Basic List of Veterinary Medical Serials” met expanded objective measures of quality and impact as well as subjective perceptions of value by both librarians and veterinary practitioners. PMID:20936066

  1. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, J.

    1996-12-31

    Radioactivity was discovered in the late 1890s, and as early as 1903, Alexander Graham Bell advocated that radioactivity be used to treat tumors. In 1913, the first paper describing therapeutic uses of radium was published; in 1936, {sup 24}Na was administered as a therapy to a leukemia patient. Three years later, uptake of {sup 89}Sr was noted in bone metastases. During the 1940s, there was increasing use of iodine therapy for thyroid diseases, including thyroid cancer. Diagnostic {open_quotes}imaging{close_quotes} with radioisotopes was increasingly employed in the 1930s and 40s using probes and grew in importance and utility with the development of scintillation detectors with photorecording systems. Although coincidence counting to detect positron emissions was developed in 1953, the first medical center cyclotron was not installed until 1961. The 1960s saw the development of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, emission reconstruction tomography [giving rise to single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)], and {sup 64}Ga tumor imaging. Nuclear medicine was recognized as a medical specialty in 1971. Radiolabeled antibodies targeting human tumors in animals was reported in 1973; antibody tumor imaging in humans was reported in 1978. Technology has continued to advance, including the development of SPECT cameras with coincidence detection able to perform FDG/PET imaging. With this overview as as backdrop, this paper focuses on the role of nuclear medicine in oncology from three perspectives: nonspecific tumor imaging agents, specific tumor imaging agents, and radioisotopes for tumor therapy. In summary, while tumor diagnosis and treatment were among the first uses explored for radioactivity, these areas have yet to reach their full potential. Development of new radioisotopes and new radiopharmaceuticals, coupled with improvements in technology, make nuclear oncology an area of growth for nuclear medicine.

  2. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part I, 10-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction, lesson plans, and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the first of…

  3. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Medical Laboratory Specialist (Basic) Part II, 10-15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    These instructor plans of instruction and lesson plans and student text and review materials for a secondary-postsecondary-level course for medical laboratory specialist are one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. It is the second…

  4. Key steps for integrating a basic science throughout a medical school curriculum using an e-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Eline Agnès; Franson, Kari Lanette

    2009-09-01

    Basic sciences can be integrated into the medical school curriculum via e-learning. The process of integrating a basic science in this manner resembles a curricular change. The change usually begins with an idea for using e-learning to teach a basic science and establishing the need for the innovation. In the planning phase, learning outcomes are formulated and a prototype of the program is developed based on the desired requirements. A realistic concept is formed after considering the limitations of the current institute. Next, a project team is assembled to develop the program and plan its integration. Incorporation of the e-learning program is facilitated by a well-developed and communicated integration plan. Various course coordinators are contacted to determine content of the e-learning program as well as establish assessment. Linking the e-learning program to existing course activities and thereby applying the basic science into the clinical context enhances the degree of integration. The success of the integration is demonstrated by a positive assessment of the program including favourable cost-benefit analysis and improved student performance. Lastly, when the program becomes institutionalised, continuously updating content and technology (when appropriate), and evaluating the integration contribute to the prolonged survival of the e-learning program.

  5. The use of self-learning modules to facilitate learning of basic science concepts in an integrated medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Nelson, Loren D; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2010-01-01

    This study used qualitative and quantitative approaches to evaluate the effectiveness of self-learning modules (SLMs) developed to facilitate and individualize students' learning of basic medical sciences. Twenty physiology and nineteen microanatomy SLMs were designed with interactive images, animations, narrations, and self-assessments. Of 41 medical students, 40 students voluntarily completed a questionnaire with open-ended and closed-ended items to evaluate students' attitudes and perspectives on the learning value of SLMs. Closed-ended items were assessed on a five-point Likert scale (5 = high score) and the data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Open-ended questions further evaluated students' perspectives on the effectiveness of SLMs; student responses to open-ended questions were analyzed to identify shared patterns or themes in their experience using SLMs. The results of the midterm examination were also analyzed to compare student performance on items related to SLMs and traditional sessions. Students positively evaluated their experience using the SLMs with an overall mean score of 4.25 (SD ± 0.84). Most students (97%) indicated that the SLMs improved understanding and facilitated learning basic science concepts. SLMs were reported to allow learner control, to help in preparation for subsequent in-class discussion, and to improve understanding and retention. A significant difference in students' performance was observed when comparing SLM-related items with non-SLM items in the midterm examination (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the use of SLMs in an integrated basic science curriculum has the potential to individualize the teaching and improve the learning of basic sciences.

  6. Changing educational needs of psychologists: do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science?

    PubMed

    Belar, Cynthia D

    2008-03-01

    Psychologists of the 21st century must be highly skilled and versatile to function effectively in academic health centers (AHCs). Thus, the current paper focuses on the training psychologists receive to prepare them for their diverse roles in AHCs. The paper is framed around the question: Do we need more medical knowledge, basic science and more psychological science? posed to the author by the conference organizers of the 3rd National Association of Psychologists in Academic Health Centers (APAHC) Conference and is based on the perspective of the author.

  7. SU-A-210-01: Why Should We Learn Radiation Oncology Billing?

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the

  8. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology.

  9. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  10. [The second opinion in oncology].

    PubMed

    Cifaldi, Luciano; Felicetti, Viviana; Cristina, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    The medical second opinion (MSO) means the process through which it is possible to consult any available medical institution or a single physician, to compare, confirm and/or review a first diagnosis and/or a proposed treatment. The MSO is of the utmost importance when patients are suffering serious and disabling diseases or when risking their lives. Oncology is a really complex discipline in which, daily, doctors and patients have to deal with new clinical, managerial and sociological problems. Most patients are now better informed-often having gathered information from the Web, newspapers, magazines.This information is often very mixed and confusing and the number of MSO is increasing.

  11. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for basic wound management in the austere environment.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Wedmore, Ian; Johnson, Eric; Islas, Arthur; Anglim, Anne; Zafren, Ken; Bitter, Cindy; Mazzorana, Vicki

    2014-09-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for wound management in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for the management of wounds sustained in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made about several parameters related to wound management. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians.

  12. Wilderness Medical Society practice guidelines for basic wound management in the austere environment: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Wedmore, Ian; Johnson, Eric L; Islas, Arthur A; Anglim, Anne; Zafren, Ken; Bitter, Cindy; Mazzorana, Vicki

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to produce best-practice guidelines for wound management in the austere environment, the Wilderness Medical Society convened an expert panel charged with the development of evidence-based guidelines for the management of wounds sustained in an austere (dangerous or compromised) environment. Recommendations are made about several parameters related to wound management. These recommendations are graded based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between the benefits and risks or burdens for each parameter according to the methodology stipulated by the American College of Chest Physicians. This is an updated version of the original guidelines published in Wilderness & Environmental Medicine 2014;25(3):295-310.

  13. Integrative oncology in North America.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Stephen M

    2006-01-01

    Integrative oncology is an evolving evidence-based specialty that uses complementary therapies in concert with medical treatment to enhance its efficacy, improve symptom control, alleviate patient distress and reduce suffering. In North America the evolution of research into complementary therapies was delayed by the narrow focus of the Flexner Report. A government-funded research agenda and incorporation of complementary therapies into medical school curricula have been driven by early evidence of efficacy and patient demand. Integrative oncology focuses on the role of natural health products (botanicals, vitamins, and minerals), nutrition, acupuncture, meditation and other mind-body approaches, music therapy, touch therapies, fitness therapies, and more. Some natural health products, such as herbs and their constituent phytochemicals, may be biologic response modifiers that could increase cancer control. Current research stretches from the laboratory to health services. Institutions are exploring the effectiveness gap in their clinical services and are determining efficacy of complementary therapies through randomized controlled trials. Eventually, the goal is to establish practice guidelines through determining relative effectiveness and value through cost-utility studies. The aim of integrative oncology should be one medicine, not alternative; it should be patient-focused; it should be evidence-based; and it should provide the best care for cancer cure, prevention, symptom control, and quality of life.

  14. Implementing Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) participation in a community oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) has been developed to assist medical oncology practices in implementing continuous quality improvement. In addition, starting in 2010, ASCO started including certification measures in the QOPI program enabling practices that participate in the QOPI data collection to seek QOPI certification. In spite of a desire to wait until an electronic medical record (EMR) had been implemented, Mid-Illinois Hematology and Oncology Associates, Ltd. (MIHOA) proceeded with implementing QOPI participation in late 2011. Through internal mini QOPI audits, multiple committee meetings, ongoing quality improvement efforts, participation in the spring 2012 QOPI data collection round and continual auditing and continuous quality improvement, MIHOA staff has worked to implement QOPI documentation requirements and to improve quality of care provided in the practice. As of this writing, MIHOA is waiting to participate in the second 2012 QOPI data collection round in September with hopes of achieving QOPI certification.

  15. Translating Birdsong: Songbirds as a model for basic and applied medical research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Songbirds, long of interest to basic neuroscientists, have great potential as a model system for translational neuroscience. Songbirds learn their complex vocal behavior in a manner that exemplifies general processes of perceptual and motor skill learning, and more specifically resembles human speech learning. Song is subserved by circuitry that is specialized for vocal learning and production, but that has strong similarities to mammalian brain pathways. The combination of a highly quantifiable behavior and discrete neural substrates facilitates understanding links between brain and behavior, both normally and in disease. Here we highlight 1) behavioral and mechanistic parallels between birdsong and aspects of speech and social communication, including insights into mirror neurons, the function of auditory feedback, and genes underlying social communication disorders, and 2) contributions of songbirds to understanding cortical-basal ganglia circuit function and dysfunction, including the possibility of harnessing adult neurogenesis for brain repair. PMID:23750515

  16. Teaching the basics of redox biology to medical and graduate students: Oxidants, antioxidants and disease mechanisms☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a succinct but limited overview of the protective and deleterious effects of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in a clinical context. Reactive oxygen species include superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, single oxygen and lipid peroxides. Reactive nitrogen species include species derived from nitric oxide. This review gives a brief overview of the reaction chemistry of these species, the role of various enzymes involved in the generation and detoxification of these species in disease mechanisms and drug toxicity and the protective role of dietary antioxidants. I hope that the graphical review will be helpful for teaching both the first year medical and graduate students in the U.S. and abroad the fundamentals of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in redox biology and clinical medicine. PMID:24024158

  17. Use of the NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination as a Progress Test in the Preclerkship Curriculum of a New Medical School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Teresa R.; Khalil, Mohammed K.; Peppler, Richard D.; Davey, Diane D.; Kibble, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe the innovative use of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) as a progress test during the preclerkship medical curriculum. The main aim of this study was to provide external validation of internally developed multiple-choice assessments in a new medical…

  18. Imaging facilities for basic medical units: a case in the state of Guerrero, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Azpiroz-Leehan, Joaquín; Licona, Fabiola Martínez; Méndez, Miguel Cadena

    2011-10-01

    This work presents the methodology to design a small imaging unit in a small regional hospital that takes into account the real imaging needs in the region regardless of current administrative guidelines. The situation of the imaging facilities in Mexico's states is studied and compared with other countries, and a project plan is designed for the specific state (Guerrero) where the clinic is to be located. The proposal includes the acquisition of a basic suite of modalities that include an ultrasound system, a mammography unit, and a conventional X-ray system in addition to a CT system that is not available anywhere within the state. The system should be primarily digital and should incorporate a simple picture archiving and communications system that can be the basis of a future telemedicine unit. The conclusion of this study also proposes changes in the segmented and pyramidal structure of the Mexican health system in order to provide higher quality care at the lower level, to reduce bottlenecks, and to provide higher quality health care near the patient's home.

  19. CNS infections in patients with hematological disorders (including allogeneic stem-cell transplantation)—Guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO)

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Hieber, M.; Silling, G.; Schalk, E.; Heinz, W.; Panse, J.; Penack, O.; Christopeit, M.; Buchheidt, D.; Meyding-Lamadé, U.; Hähnel, S.; Wolf, H. H.; Ruhnke, M.; Schwartz, S.; Maschmeyer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are infrequently diagnosed in immunocompetent patients, but they do occur in a significant proportion of patients with hematological disorders. In particular, patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation carry a high risk for CNS infections of up to 15%. Fungi and Toxoplasma gondii are the predominant causative agents. The diagnosis of CNS infections is based on neuroimaging, cerebrospinal fluid examination and biopsy of suspicious lesions in selected patients. However, identification of CNS infections in immunocompromised patients could represent a major challenge since metabolic disturbances, side-effects of antineoplastic or immunosuppressive drugs and CNS involvement of the underlying hematological disorder may mimic symptoms of a CNS infection. The prognosis of CNS infections is generally poor in these patients, albeit the introduction of novel substances (e.g. voriconazole) has improved the outcome in distinct patient subgroups. This guideline has been developed by the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO) with the contribution of a panel of 14 experts certified in internal medicine, hematology/oncology, infectious diseases, intensive care, neurology and neuroradiology. Grades of recommendation and levels of evidence were categorized by using novel criteria, as recently published by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. PMID:27052648

  20. Improvement of Oncology Education at the University of Washington School of Medicine, 1984-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyer, W. Archie; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After development and implementation of a revised oncology curriculum at the University of Washington School of Medicine student performance on oncology related questions on the National Board of Medical Examiners examination indicated substantial improvement relative to student performance in non-oncology areas and to the national average. (DB)

  1. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-07-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement.

  2. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-07-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement. PMID:24353692

  3. Basic steps in establishing effective small group teaching sessions in medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Meo, Sultan Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    Small-group teaching and learning has achieved an admirable position in medical education and has become more popular as a means of encouraging the students in their studies and enhance the process of deep learning. The main characteristics of small group teaching are active involvement of the learners in entire learning cycle and well defined task orientation with achievable specific aims and objectives in a given time period. The essential components in the development of an ideal small group teaching and learning sessions are preliminary considerations at departmental and institutional level including educational strategies, group composition, physical environment, existing resources, diagnosis of the needs, formulation of the objectives and suitable teaching outline. Small group teaching increases the student interest, teamwork ability, retention of knowledge and skills, enhance transfer of concepts to innovative issues, and improve the self-directed learning. It develops self-motivation, investigating the issues, allows the student to test their thinking and higher-order activities. It also facilitates an adult style of learning, acceptance of personal responsibility for own progress. Moreover, it enhances student-faculty and peer-peer interaction, improves communication skills and provides opportunity to share the responsibility and clarify the points of bafflement. PMID:24353692

  4. Major milestones in translational oncology.

    PubMed

    Dragani, Tommaso A; Castells, Antoni; Kulasingam, Vathany; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Earl, Helena; Iams, Wade T; Lovly, Christine M; Sedelaar, J P Michiel; Schalken, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Translational oncology represents a bridge between basic research and clinical practice in cancer medicine. Today, translational research in oncology benefits from an abundance of knowledge resulting from genome-scale studies regarding the molecular pathways involved in tumorigenesis. In this Forum article, we highlight the state of the art of translational oncology in five major cancer types. We illustrate the use of molecular profiling to subtype colorectal cancer for both diagnosis and treatment, and summarize the results of a nationwide screening program for ovarian cancer based on detection of a tumor biomarker in serum. Additionally, we discuss how circulating tumor DNA can be assayed to safely monitor breast cancer over the course of treatment, and report on how therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors is proving effective in advanced lung cancer. Finally, we summarize efforts to use molecular profiling of prostate cancer biopsy specimens to support treatment decisions. Despite encouraging early successes, we cannot disregard the complex genetics of individual susceptibility to cancer nor the enormous complexity of the somatic changes observed in tumors, which urge particular attention to the development of personalized therapies. PMID:27469586

  5. Quantitative radiology: applications to oncology.

    PubMed

    Herskovits, Edward H

    2014-01-01

    Oncologists, clinician-scientists, and basic scientists collect computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography images in the process of caring for patients, managing clinical trials, and investigating cancer biology. As we have developed more sophisticated means for noninvasively delineating and characterizing neoplasms, these image data have come to play a central role in oncology. In parallel, the increasing complexity and volume of these data have necessitated the development of quantitative methods for assessing tumor burden, and by proxy, disease-free survival. PMID:25287685

  6. Cardio-Oncology: An Update on Cardiotoxicity of Cancer-Related Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lenneman, Carrie G; Sawyer, Douglas B

    2016-03-18

    Through the success of basic and disease-specific research, cancer survivors are one of the largest growing subsets of individuals accessing the healthcare system. Interestingly, cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors after recurrent malignancy. This recognition has helped stimulate a collaboration between oncology and cardiology practitioners and researchers, and the portmanteau cardio-oncology (also known as onco-cardiology) can now be found in many medical centers. This collaboration promises new insights into how cancer therapies impact cardiovascular homeostasis and long-term effects on cancer survivors. In this review, we will discuss the most recent views on the cardiotoxicity related to various classes of chemotherapy agents and radiation. We will also discuss broadly the current strategies for treating and preventing cardiovascular effects of cancer therapy.

  7. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention.

    PubMed

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F; Adamietz, Irenäus A

    2016-03-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%-90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better-with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations-when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient's medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual's background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  8. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Gröber, Uwe; Holzhauer, Peter; Kisters, Klaus; Holick, Michael F.; Adamietz, Irenäus A.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician. PMID:26985904

  9. Effect of an Electronic Health Record on the Culture of an Outpatient Medical Oncology Practice in a Four-Hospital Integrated Health Care System: 5-Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Brockstein, Bruce; Hensing, Thomas; Carro, George W.; Obel, Jennifer; Khandekar, Janardan; Kaminer, Lynne; Van De Wege, Christine; de Wilton Marsh, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The electronic health record (EHR) was adopted into the NorthShore University HealthSystem, a four-hospital integrated health system located in suburban Chicago, in 2003. By 2005, all chemotherapy and medicine order entry was conducted through the EHR, completing the incorporation of a fully paperless EHR in our hospital-based oncology practice in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The use of the EHR has dramatically changed our practice environment by improving efficiency, patient safety, research productivity, and operations, while allowing evaluation of adherence to established quality measures and incorporation of new quality improvement initiatives. The reach of the EHR has been substantial and has influenced every aspect of care at our institution over the short period since its implementation. In this article, we describe subjective and objective measures, outcomes, and achievements of our 5-year EHR experience. PMID:22043197

  10. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring. PMID:27249776

  11. Standardized Patient’s Views About their Role in the Teaching-Learning Process of Undergraduate Basic Science Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Neelam Rekha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Standardized Patients (SPs) are widely used in medical education. SPs have a number of advantages but also have certain limitations. At the institution, SPs have been used since January 2013 for both teaching-learning and assessment during the basic science years of the undergraduate medical program. Aim The present study was conducted to investigate the perception of SPs about various aspects of the program and obtain suggestions for further improvement. Materials and Methods A Focus Group Discussion (FGD) was conducted with a group of five SPs during the second week of November 2015. Respondents were explained the aims and objectives of the study and invited to participate. Written informed consent was obtained. The FGD was conducted using a discussion guide and was audio recorded. Various aspects of the SP program at the institution were discussed. Motivation/s for joining the program and suggestions for further improvement were obtained. Transcripts were created after listening to the recordings and were read through multiple times. Similar responses were coded. Items with similar codes were grouped together into themes. Results Three respondents were female while two were male. The major advantage of SPs was their flexibility and ability to present a standardized response to the student. Students become familiar and comfortable with SPs. However, as a SP is simulating an illness s/he may not always be able to do complete justice to the role. The process used by SPs to prepare themselves to portray various diseases was highlighted. The use of SPs both during teaching-learning and assessment was also discussed. Some SPs are trained to provide feedback to students. Most SPs joined the program based on invitations from their friends who were already SPs. Challenges in recruiting SPs in a small island were discussed. Suggestions for further improvement were obtained. Conclusion The present study obtained the perception of SPs regarding various aspects

  12. Identifying oncological emergencies.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kumar, Nilay; Segon, Ankur; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    Prompt identification and treatment of life-threatening oncological conditions is of utmost importance and should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Oncological emergencies can have a myriad of presentations ranging from mechanical obstruction due to tumor growth to metabolic conditions due to abnormal secretions from the tumor. Notably, hematologic and infectious conditions may complicate the presentation of oncological emergencies. Advanced testing and imaging is generally required to recognize these serious presentations of common malignancies. Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions can significantly affect the patient's clinical outcome. PMID:23873016

  13. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  14. Citation Analysis of Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences in ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and Google Scholar

    PubMed Central

    Zarifmahmoudi, Leili; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Citation tracking is an important method to analyze the scientific impact of journal articles and can be done through Scopus (SC), Google Scholar (GS), or ISI web of knowledge (WOS). In the current study, we analyzed the citations to 2011-2012 articles of Iranian Journal of Basic Medical Sciences (IJBMS) in these three resources. Material and Methods: The relevant data from SC, GS, and WOS official websites. Total number of citations, their overlap and unique citations of these three recourses were evaluated. Results: WOS and SC covered 100% and GS covered 97% of the IJBMS items. Totally, 37 articles were cited at least once in one of the studied resources. Total number of citations were 20, 30, and 59 in WOS, SC, and GS respectively. Forty citations of GS, 6 citation of SC, and 2 citations of WOS were unique. Conclusion: Every scientific resource has its own inaccuracies in providing citation analysis information. Citation analysis studies are better to be done each year to correct any inaccuracy as soon as possible. IJBMS has gained considerable scientific attention from wide range of high impact journals and through citation tracking method; this visibility can be traced more thoroughly. PMID:24379959

  15. [Treatment of lip cancer, material from the Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical College of Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun].

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Henryk; Pujanek, Zuzanna; Kaźmierczak, Wojciech; Kochan, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this study is methods and results of treatment of 21 cases of lip cancer between 2007 and 2012, which included 15 men and 6 women, aged 48-63. In 18 cases it was squamous cell carcinoma, in other 3 basocellulare carcinoma. Of the hospitalized patients the following clinical stages were found: T1 - five, T2 - five, T3 - seven, T4 - four. We operated with several techniques, we performed: V-incision and surgery according to the Webster - one patient, Rutkowski - four, Estlander - four, Karpandzic - three; in the treatment of cancer of upper lip the frontal flap was used. Fourteen patients underwent selective or modified lymph node operation. Five patients appeared local recurrence, 3 of them died due to metastases to multiply organs. Six operated patients did not continue oncological treatment, their subsequent fate is unknown. The remaining 10 patients remained under observation. The results indicate the need of extensive resection of the limph node in case of recurrence and the necessity of implementing selective or radical nodal surgery in the early stages of cancer.

  16. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  17. EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROGRAMED TEXT IN TEACHING GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, A SOURCE BOOK ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS FOR USE IN A CLINICAL DISCIPLINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WILDS, PRESTON L.; ZACHERT, VIRGINIA

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES A STUDY TO DETERMINE WHETHER PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION COULD BE USED TO IMPROVE THE TEACHING OF THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH GYNECOLOGIC NEOPLASMS TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. TWO PROGRAMED TEXTS WERE PREPARED--(1) A "CONTENT" TEXT, AN 830-FRAME LINEARLY PROGRAMED TEXT DESIGNED TO REPLACE CONVENTIONAL CLASSROOM TEACHING OF…

  18. MO-G-BRE-05: Clinical Process Improvement and Billing in Radiation Oncology: A Case Study of Applying FMEA for CPT Code 77336 (continuing Medical Physics Consultation)

    SciTech Connect

    Spirydovich, S; Huq, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The improvement of quality in healthcare can be assessed by Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA). In radiation oncology, FMEA, as applied to the billing CPT code 77336, can improve both charge capture and, most importantly, quality of the performed services. Methods: We created an FMEA table for the process performed under CPT code 77336. For a given process step, each member of the assembled team (physicist, dosimetrist, and therapist) independently assigned numerical values for: probability of occurrence (O, 1–10), severity (S, 1–10), and probability of detection (D, 1–10) for every failure mode cause and effect combination. The risk priority number, RPN, was then calculated as a product of O, S and D from which an average RPN was calculated for each combination mentioned above. A fault tree diagram, with each process sorted into 6 categories, was created with linked RPN. For processes with high RPN recommended actions were assigned. 2 separate R and V systems (Lantis and EMR-based ARIA) were considered. Results: We identified 9 potential failure modes and corresponding 19 potential causes of these failure modes all resulting in unjustified 77336 charge and compromised quality of care. In Lantis, the range of RPN was 24.5–110.8, and of S values – 2–10. The highest ranking RPN of 110.8 came from the failure mode described as “end-of-treatment check not done before the completion of treatment”, and the highest S value of 10 (RPN=105) from “overrides not checked”. For the same failure modes, within ARIA electronic environment with its additional controls, RPN values were significantly lower (44.3 for end-of-treatment missing check and 20.0 for overrides not checked). Conclusion: Our work has shown that when charge capture was missed that also resulted in some services not being performed. Absence of such necessary services may result in sub-optimal quality of care rendered to patients.

  19. The principle of respect for autonomy – Concordant with the experience of oncology physicians and molecular biologists in their daily work?

    PubMed Central

    Ebbesen, Mette; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article presents results from a qualitative empirical investigation of how Danish oncology physicians and Danish molecular biologists experience the principle of respect for autonomy in their daily work. Methods This study is based on 12 semi-structured interviews with three groups of respondents: a group of oncology physicians working in a clinic at a public hospital and two groups of molecular biologists conducting basic research, one group employed at a public university and the other in a private biopharmaceutical company. Results We found that that molecular biologists consider the principle of respect for autonomy as a negative obligation, where the informed consent of patients or research subjects should be respected. Furthermore, molecular biologists believe that very sick patients are constraint by the circumstances to a certain choice. However, in contrast to molecular biologists, oncology physicians experience the principle of respect for autonomy as a positive obligation, where the physician in dialogue with the patient performs a medical prognosis based on the patient's wishes and ideas, mutual understanding and respect. Oncology physicians believe that they have a positive obligation to adjust to the level of the patient when providing information making sure that the patient understands. Oncology physicians experience situations where the principle of respect for autonomy does not apply because the patient is in a difficult situation. Conclusion In this study we explore the moral views and attitudes of oncology physicians and molecular biologists and compare these views with bioethical theories of the American bioethicists Tom L. Beauchamp & James F. Childress and the Danish philosophers Jakob Rendtorff & Peter Kemp. This study shows that essential parts of the two bioethical theories are reflected in the daily work of Danish oncology physicians and Danish molecular biologists. However, the study also explores dimensions where the

  20. Improving patient safety in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Hendee, William R.; Herman, Michael G.

    2011-01-15

    Beginning in the 1990s, and emphasized in 2000 with the release of an Institute of Medicine report, healthcare providers and institutions have dedicated time and resources to reducing errors that impact the safety and well-being of patients. But in January 2010 the first of a series of articles appeared in the New York Times that described errors in radiation oncology that grievously impacted patients. In response, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American Society of Radiation Oncology sponsored a working meeting entitled ''Safety in Radiation Therapy: A Call to Action''. The meeting attracted 400 attendees, including medical physicists, radiation oncologists, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, hospital administrators, regulators, and representatives of equipment manufacturers. The meeting was cohosted by 14 organizations in the United States and Canada. The meeting yielded 20 recommendations that provide a pathway to reducing errors and improving patient safety in radiation therapy facilities everywhere.

  1. The Basic Social Medical Insurance Is Associated with Clinical Outcomes in the Patients with ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Retrospective Study from Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoxin; Yan, Han; Guo, Rong; Liu, Xueyuan; Li, Xiankai; Xu, Yawei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Several social economic factors play important roles in treatments of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and finally influence the clinical outcomes. The basic social medical insurance (BSMI) is an important economic factor in China's medical system. However, the impact of BSMI on clinical outcomes in STEMI patients has not been explored yet. The aim of this study is to investigate whether BSMI is a predictor of clinical outcomes in the patients with STEMI in Shanghai, China. Material and methods: In this retrospective study, 681 STEMI patients from different areas in Shanghai were classified into four groups: new rural cooperative medical scheme (NCMS) group, urban resident basic medical insurance scheme (URBMI) group, urban employee basic medical insurance scheme (UEBMI) group and UNINSURED group, major adverse events (cardiac death, nonfatal reinfarction, clinically driven target lesion revascularization/target vessel revascularization, stroke, heart failure) were regarded as study endpoints to determine whether BSMI was a prognostic factor. Results: During a mean follow-up of 36 months, the incidence of major adverse events was significantly higher in NCMS patients (64; 38.8%) compared with the other groups: URBMI (47; 24.6%); UEBMI (28; 15.6%); UNISURED (40; 27.6%). Similarly, cardiac mortality was also higher in NCMS group (19; 11.5%). A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed significantly lower event-free survival rate for major adverse events (p < 0.001) and cardiac mortality (p = 0.01) in NCMS group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that BSMI was an important prognostic factor in STEMI patients. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that BSMI is closely associated with the major adverse events-free survival rate at 36-month follow-up in the STEMI patients under the current policies in Shanghai, China. PMID:25013371

  2. [Basic problems of staff training in medical engineering management at the N.E, Bauman Moscow State Engineering University].

    PubMed

    Zharov, V P; Kalinin, S A

    2000-01-01

    The topicality of staff training in medical engineering management in the sphere of medicine and medical engineering is dictated by that the substantiated and flexible strategy in purchasing foreign medical equipment and drugs and supporting purely Russian biomedical technologies must be one of the first steps of health public reforms in Russia. As early as 1992, the N. E. Bauman Moscow State Engineering University was the first that organize to train staff in business and management in biomedical engineering and health public. The accumulated experiment was put in the development of new curricula by the supplementary education system. Interdisciplinary training in medical engineering marketing and management was organized, thus providing both additional education for specialists having complete and incomplete higher education who received diplomas of a management bachelor or master and through training of students who got diplomas of an engineer and diplomas of a management bachelor at the international level.

  3. Discordance between cancer prevalence and training: a need for an increase in oncology education.

    PubMed

    Payne, Sarah; Burke, Danny; Mansi, Janine; Jones, Alison; Norton, Alison; Joffe, Johnathan; Cunningham, David; McVie, Gordon; Agarwal, Roshan

    2013-02-01

    The impact of cancer on healthcare is increasing. Therefore, it is key that all doctors receive oncology training. This study surveyed UK undergraduate medical schools to determine the extent of oncology training provided by their curricula. Data on foundation year (FY) and core medical training (CMT) programmes were obtained and analysed for the proportion of oncology posts. Of the responding medical schools, five (36%) had a defined period dedicated to oncology (mean 2 weeks). Four foundation schools were in London, with 10,094 FY posts in 1699 programmes. Of these, 1.5% of post and 8.7% of programmes were in oncology. For CMT offered by the London deanery specialty schools, 11% of CMT post and 48% of programmes included oncology. Oncology was included in 11% posts and 48% programmes offered by the London Deanery specialty schools. Our results show that < 50% of junior doctors receive dedicated undergraduate or postgraduate oncology training. An increase in oncology training is therefore urgently required.

  4. NEURO-ONCOLOGIC PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR THE OLDER PERSON.

    PubMed

    Ching, Willie; Luhmann, Melissa

    2011-07-01

    Due to the uncertainty of the course of diagnoses, patients with neuro-oncological malignancies present challenges to the physical therapist. At times, the presentation of impairments and disabilities of these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses do not necessarily coincide with the involved area of the brain or spinal cord. It is our intention to provide guidance to the physical therapist who will be working with these patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses, in hopes that their encounters will be more productive and meaningful. This article describes a brief overview of common central nervous system malignancies, its medical treatment, as well as possible complications and side effects that would need to be considered in rehabilitating these patients. Special consideration is given to the elderly patients with neuro-oncological diagnoses. Pertinent physical therapy assessments and interventions are discussed.

  5. The modern trends of the evolution laser information technology in oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikov, A. A.; Svirin, V. N.

    2008-04-01

    Laser-optical information technologies and devices develop since the 70- years at the end of 20 century and are broadly used for diagnostics and treatment of oncological diseases to date. Although such methods as photodynamic therapy (PDT), laser-induce thermotherapy (LITT), fluorescent diagnostics and spectrophotometry already more than 30 years are used for treatment and diagnostics of oncological diseases, nevertheless, they are enough new methods and, as a rule, are used in large scientific centers and medical institutions. This is bound, first of all, with lack of information on modern method of cancer treatment, the absence of widely available laser procedures and corresponding devices in the polyclinics and even in district hospitals, as well as insufficient understanding of application areas, where laser methods has an advantage by comparison, for instance, with beam or chemotherapy. At present day laser methods are fast upcoming direction of the treatment oncological diseases. This is explained by progress in development essentially laser, particularly diode, improvement electronic and computing components and broad introduction software-algorithmic methods of control the undertaking therapeutic and diagnostic procedures. In article are considered new laser methods of the undertaking diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and is shown that introduction multiwave laser radiation for probe and influences on tissue, the different methods of the determination of the functional state of tissues, realization of the on-line diagnostics when carrying out the therapeutic procedures, automatic control systems of the power laser radiation, which depends on state patient tissue, as well as software-algorithmic methods of management session therapeutic and diagnostic procedures greatly raises efficiency of the treatment oncological diseases. On an example of the multipurpose laser therapeutic devices("MLTA") developed and introduced in clinical practice and multipurpose

  6. Learning needs of Oncology Nursing Society members.

    PubMed

    Itano, J; Miller, C A

    1990-01-01

    The ONS mission is to promote excellence in oncology nursing. In its effort to carry out this mission, ONS has a responsibility to provide high-quality continuing education (CE) for cancer nurses. An important first step in the provision of quality CE is determining learners' needs. The ONS Continuing Education Provider Committee (CEPC) conducted a comprehensive educational needs assessment of the ONS membership during 1988. Preferred content (98 topics were included), level of content needed (basic versus advanced), preferred teaching-learning methods, and items related to the logistics of CE programs (i.e., preferred length, days of week, employer reimbursement) were assessed. Half of the 1988 ONS membership (6,500) was randomly surveyed, with a 30.8% (2,002) return rate. Analysis revealed the five topics of most interest to be oncologic emergencies, pain, critical care of the patient with cancer, legal issues, and advanced nursing practice roles.

  7. Evaluation of burnout syndrome in oncology employees.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Senem; Yildirim, Yasemin Kuzeyli; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Uslu, Ruchan; Yalman, Deniz; Aras, Arif B

    2010-09-01

    Burnout is an important occupational problem for health care workers. We aimed to assess the burnout levels among oncology employees and to evaluate the sociodemographic and occupational factors contributing to burnout levels. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, which is designed to measure the three stages of burnout-emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA), was used. The study sample consisted of 90 participants with a median age of 34 (range 23-56). The mean levels of burnout in EE, DP and PA stages were 23.80 +/- 10.98, 5.21 +/- 4.99, and 36.23 +/- 8.05, respectively, for the entire sample. Among the 90 participants, 42, 20, and 35.6% of the employees had high levels of burnout in the EE, DP, and PA substage, respectively. Sociodemographic and occupational factors associated with higher levels of burnout included age of less than 35, being unmarried, being childless, >40 work hours per week, working on night shifts, and <10 years experience in the medicine/oncology field. Within all oncology clinics, medical oncology employees had the highest levels of burnout. Furthermore, employees who are not pleased with working in oncology field, who would like to change their specialty if they have an opportunity, and whose family and social lives have been negatively affected by their work experienced higher levels of burnout. Burnout syndrome may influence physical and mental health of the employee and affects the quality of health care as well. Therefore, several individual or organizational efforts should be considered for dealing with burnout.

  8. Long-Term Follow-Up of Autotransplantation Trials for Multiple Myeloma: Update of Protocols Conducted by the Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome, Southwest Oncology Group, and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Barlogie, Bart; Attal, Michel; Crowley, John; van Rhee, Frits; Szymonifka, Jackie; Moreau, Philippe; Durie, Brian G.M.; Harousseau, Jean-Luc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to update outcomes of autotransplantation trials for myeloma conducted by the Intergroupe Francophone du Myelome (IFM), the Southwest Oncology Group, and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (Total Therapy [TT]). Methods IFM90 (N = 194), IFM04 (N = 402), IFM9902 (N = 692), IFM9904 (N = 197), S9321 (N = 817), TT1 (N = 231), TT2 (N = 668), and TT3 (N = 303) were updated, and results were compared with original reports. Results Superior survival with single transplantation versus standard therapy in IFM90 was confirmed (P = .004), and a trend in favor of tandem versus single transplantation was maintained in IFM94 (P = .08). S9321 data were validated, with comparable survival in single transplantation and standard treatment arms (P = .35). A survival benefit from thalidomide maintenance in IFM9902 was not confirmed (P = .39) but emerged for the thalidomide arm of TT2 (P = .04). On multivariate analysis, survival was superior in TT2, TT3, and IFM9902 (all P < .001); tandem transplantations were superior to both single transplantations and standard therapies (P < .001), as were tandem transplantations with added thalidomide versus trials without thalidomide (P < .001). Postrelapse survival (PRS) was superior when initial event-free survival (EFS) exceeded 1280 days and when tandem transplantations had been administered, whereas PRS was shorter when EFS lasted 803 days or less and when trials had included thalidomide and bortezomib. Conclusion These long-term follow-up data of transplantation trials provide a crucial framework of reference for outcome reporting of novel agent–based trials reportedly exhibiting remarkable short-term efficacy approaching high-dose therapy results. PMID:20085933

  9. A standardised, generic, validated approach to stratify the magnitude of clinical benefit that can be anticipated from anti-cancer therapies: the European Society for Medical Oncology Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS).

    PubMed

    Cherny, N I; Sullivan, R; Dafni, U; Kerst, J M; Sobrero, A; Zielinski, C; de Vries, E G E; Piccart, M J

    2015-08-01

    The value of any new therapeutic strategy or treatment is determined by the magnitude of its clinical benefit balanced against its cost. Evidence for clinical benefit from new treatment options is derived from clinical research, in particular phase III randomised trials, which generate unbiased data regarding the efficacy, benefit and safety of new therapeutic approaches. To date, there is no standard tool for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit of cancer therapies, which may range from trivial (median progression-free survival advantage of only a few weeks) to substantial (improved long-term survival). Indeed, in the absence of a standardised approach for grading the magnitude of clinical benefit, conclusions and recommendations derived from studies are often hotly disputed and very modest incremental advances have often been presented, discussed and promoted as major advances or 'breakthroughs'. Recognising the importance of presenting clear and unbiased statements regarding the magnitude of the clinical benefit from new therapeutic approaches derived from high-quality clinical trials, the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) has developed a validated and reproducible tool to assess the magnitude of clinical benefit for cancer medicines, the ESMO Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale (ESMO-MCBS). This tool uses a rational, structured and consistent approach to derive a relative ranking of the magnitude of clinically meaningful benefit that can be expected from a new anti-cancer treatment. The ESMO-MCBS is an important first step to the critical public policy issue of value in cancer care, helping to frame the appropriate use of limited public and personal resources to deliver cost-effective and affordable cancer care. The ESMO-MCBS will be a dynamic tool and its criteria will be revised on a regular basis. PMID:26026162

  10. Nutritional Support in Cancer Patients: A Position Paper from the Italian Society of Medical Oncology (AIOM) and the Italian Society of Artificial Nutrition and Metabolism (SINPE).

    PubMed

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Cereda, Emanuele; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Pinto, Carmine; Paccagnella, Agostino; Beretta, Giordano Domenico; Nardi, Mariateresa; Laviano, Alessandro; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in cancer patients, which leads to prolonged hospitalization, a higher degree of treatment-related toxicity, reduced response to cancer treatment, impaired quality of life and a worse overall prognosis. The attitude towards this issue varies considerably and many malnourished patients receive inadequate nutritional support. We reviewed available data present in the literature, together with the guidelines issued by scientific societies and health authorities, on the nutritional management of patients with cancer, in order to make suitable and concise practical recommendations for appropriate nutritional support in this patient population. Evidence from the literature suggests that nutritional screening should be performed using validated tools (the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 [NRS 2002], the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool [MUST], the Malnutrition Screening Tool [MST] and the Mini Nutritional Assessment [MNA]), both at diagnosis and at regular time points during the course of disease according to tumor type, stage and treatment. Patients at nutritional risk should be promptly referred for comprehensive nutritional assessment and support to clinical nutrition services or medical personnel with documented skills in clinical nutrition, specifically for cancer patients. Nutritional intervention should be actively managed and targeted for each patient; it should comprise personalized dietary counseling and/or artificial nutrition according to spontaneous food intake, tolerance and effectiveness. Nutritional support may be integrated into palliative care programs. "Alternative hypocaloric anti-cancer diets" (e.g. macrobiotic or vegan diets) should not be recommended as they may worsen nutritional status. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to further our knowledge of the nutritional support required in different care settings for cancer patients.

  11. Nutritional Support in Cancer Patients: A Position Paper from the Italian Society of Medical Oncology (AIOM) and the Italian Society of Artificial Nutrition and Metabolism (SINPE)

    PubMed Central

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Cereda, Emanuele; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Pinto, Carmine; Paccagnella, Agostino; Beretta, Giordano Domenico; Nardi, Mariateresa; Laviano, Alessandro; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in cancer patients, which leads to prolonged hospitalization, a higher degree of treatment-related toxicity, reduced response to cancer treatment, impaired quality of life and a worse overall prognosis. The attitude towards this issue varies considerably and many malnourished patients receive inadequate nutritional support. We reviewed available data present in the literature, together with the guidelines issued by scientific societies and health authorities, on the nutritional management of patients with cancer, in order to make suitable and concise practical recommendations for appropriate nutritional support in this patient population. Evidence from the literature suggests that nutritional screening should be performed using validated tools (the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 [NRS 2002], the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool [MUST], the Malnutrition Screening Tool [MST] and the Mini Nutritional Assessment [MNA]), both at diagnosis and at regular time points during the course of disease according to tumor type, stage and treatment. Patients at nutritional risk should be promptly referred for comprehensive nutritional assessment and support to clinical nutrition services or medical personnel with documented skills in clinical nutrition, specifically for cancer patients. Nutritional intervention should be actively managed and targeted for each patient; it should comprise personalized dietary counseling and/or artificial nutrition according to spontaneous food intake, tolerance and effectiveness. Nutritional support may be integrated into palliative care programs. “Alternative hypocaloric anti-cancer diets” (e.g. macrobiotic or vegan diets) should not be recommended as they may worsen nutritional status. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to further our knowledge of the nutritional support required in different care settings for cancer patients. PMID:26819635

  12. Nutritional Support in Cancer Patients: A Position Paper from the Italian Society of Medical Oncology (AIOM) and the Italian Society of Artificial Nutrition and Metabolism (SINPE).

    PubMed

    Caccialanza, Riccardo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Cereda, Emanuele; Gavazzi, Cecilia; Pinto, Carmine; Paccagnella, Agostino; Beretta, Giordano Domenico; Nardi, Mariateresa; Laviano, Alessandro; Zagonel, Vittorina

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent problem in cancer patients, which leads to prolonged hospitalization, a higher degree of treatment-related toxicity, reduced response to cancer treatment, impaired quality of life and a worse overall prognosis. The attitude towards this issue varies considerably and many malnourished patients receive inadequate nutritional support. We reviewed available data present in the literature, together with the guidelines issued by scientific societies and health authorities, on the nutritional management of patients with cancer, in order to make suitable and concise practical recommendations for appropriate nutritional support in this patient population. Evidence from the literature suggests that nutritional screening should be performed using validated tools (the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 [NRS 2002], the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool [MUST], the Malnutrition Screening Tool [MST] and the Mini Nutritional Assessment [MNA]), both at diagnosis and at regular time points during the course of disease according to tumor type, stage and treatment. Patients at nutritional risk should be promptly referred for comprehensive nutritional assessment and support to clinical nutrition services or medical personnel with documented skills in clinical nutrition, specifically for cancer patients. Nutritional intervention should be actively managed and targeted for each patient; it should comprise personalized dietary counseling and/or artificial nutrition according to spontaneous food intake, tolerance and effectiveness. Nutritional support may be integrated into palliative care programs. "Alternative hypocaloric anti-cancer diets" (e.g. macrobiotic or vegan diets) should not be recommended as they may worsen nutritional status. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to further our knowledge of the nutritional support required in different care settings for cancer patients. PMID:26819635

  13. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment outcomes, and prognostic factors of primary thoracic soft tissue sarcoma: A multicenter study of the Anatolian Society of Medical Oncology (ASMO)

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Olcun Umit; Oztop, Ilhan; Yasar, Nurgul; Urakci, Zuhat; Ozatli, Tahsin; Bozkurt, Oktay; Sevinc, Alper; Gunaydin, Yusuf; Yapar Taskoylu, Burcu; Arpaci, Erkan; Ulas, Arife; Kodaz, Hilmi; Tonyali, Onder; Avci, Nilufer; Aksoy, Asude; Yilmaz, Ahmet Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Background Soft tissue sarcomas (STSs) are rare malignant tumors of embryogenic mesoderm origin. Primary thoracic STSs account for a small percentage of all STSs and limited published information is available. This study aimed to identify the prognostic factors for thoracic STSs and evaluate the disease's clinical outcomes. Methods The medical records of 109 patients with thoracic STSs who were treated between 2003 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' survival rates were analyzed and potential prognostic factors evaluated. Results The median follow-up period was 29 months (range: 1–121 months). STSs were most frequently localized on the chest wall (n = 42; 38.5%) and lungs (n = 42; 38.5%). The most common histological types were malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n = 23; 21.1%), liposarcoma (n = 17; 15.6%), and leiomyosarcoma (n = 16; 14.7%). The median survival time of all patients was 40.3 months (95% confidence interval, 14.22–66.37 months), with one and five-year survival rates of 93.4% and 63.5%, respectively. Univariate analysis of all groups revealed that metastatic stage, unresectability, tumor diameter of >10 cm, tumor location other than the chest wall, and grade 3 diseases were predictable of poor survival. However, only grade 3 diseases and tumor location other than the chest wall were confirmed by multivariate analysis as poor prognostic factors. Conclusions Primary thoracic STSs are rarely seen malignant tumors. Our results indicated that patients with low-grade tumors and those localized on the chest wall often experienced better survival outcomes. PMID:26273340

  14. Quality in radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-05-15

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years.

  15. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

  16. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  17. Student failures on first-year medical basic science courses and the USMLE step 1: a retrospective study over a 20-year period.

    PubMed

    Burns, E Robert; Garrett, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Correlates of achievement in the basic science years in medical school and on the Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE®), (Step 1) in relation to preadmission variables have been the subject of considerable study. Preadmissions variables such as the undergraduate grade point average (uGPA) and Medical College Admission Test® (MCAT®) scores, solely or in combination, have previously been found to be predictors of achievement in the basic science years and/or on the Step 1. The purposes of this retrospective study were to: (1) determine if our statistical analysis confirmed previously published relationships between preadmission variables (MCAT, uGPA, and applicant pool size), and (2) study correlates of the number of failures in five M1 courses with those preadmission variables and failures on Step 1. Statistical analysis confirmed previously published relationships between all preadmission variables. Only one course, Microscopic Anatomy, demonstrated significant correlations with all variables studied including the Step 1 failures. Physiology correlated with three of the four variables studied, but not with the Step 1 failures. Analyses such as these provide a tool by which administrators will be able to identify what courses are or are not responding in appropriate ways to changes in the preadmissions variables that signal student performance on the Step 1.

  18. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual. Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Basic section. (FY-89)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to the Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  19. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E. . E-mail: eklein@radonc.wustl.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Price, Robert A.; Balter, James M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  20. ASTRO's 2007 core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eric E; Gerbi, Bruce J; Price, Robert A; Balter, James M; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, the American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. The American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated

  1. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  2. Quality Indicators in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, Jeffrey M.; Das, Prajnan

    2013-03-15

    Oncologic specialty societies and multidisciplinary collaborative groups have dedicated considerable effort to developing evidence-based quality indicators (QIs) to facilitate quality improvement, accreditation, benchmarking, reimbursement, maintenance of certification, and regulatory reporting. In particular, the field of radiation oncology has a long history of organized quality assessment efforts and continues to work toward developing consensus quality standards in the face of continually evolving technologies and standards of care. This report provides a comprehensive review of the current state of quality assessment in radiation oncology. Specifically, this report highlights implications of the healthcare quality movement for radiation oncology and reviews existing efforts to define and measure quality in the field, with focus on dimensions of quality specific to radiation oncology within the “big picture” of oncologic quality assessment efforts.

  3. Requirements for radiation oncology physics in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Oliver, L; Fitchew, R; Drew, J

    2001-03-01

    This Position Paper reviews the role, standards of practice, education, training and staffing requirements for radiation oncology physics. The role and standard of practice for an expert in radiation oncology physics, as defined by the ACPSEM, are consistent with the IAEA recommendations. International standards of safe practice recommend that this physics expert be authorised by a Regulatory Authority (in consultation with the professional organization). In order to accommodate the international and AHTAC recommendations or any requirements that may be set by a Regulatory Authority, the ACPSEM has defined the criteria for a physicist-in-training, a base level physicist, an advanced level physicist and an expert radiation oncology physicist. The ACPSEM shall compile separate registers for these different radiation oncology physicist categories. What constitutes a satisfactory means of establishing the number of physicists and support physics staff that is required in radiation oncology continues to be debated. The new ACPSEM workforce formula (Formula 2000) yields similar numbers to other international professional body recommendations. The ACPSEM recommends that Australian and New Zealand radiation oncology centres should aim to employ 223 and 46 radiation oncology physics staff respectively. At least 75% of this workforce should be physicists (168 in Australia and 35 in New Zealand). An additional 41 registrar physicist positions (34 in Australia and 7 in New Zealand) should be specifically created for training purposes. These registrar positions cater for the present physicist shortfall, the future expansion of radiation oncology and the expected attrition of radiation oncology physicists in the workforce. Registrar physicists shall undertake suitable tertiary education in medical physics with an organised in-house training program. The rapid advances in the theory and methodology of the new technologies for radiation oncology also require a stringent approach

  4. Basic concepts and issues: a primer on distribution and sales representative agreements in the medical device and durable medical equipment industries.

    PubMed

    Burow, Heiko E; Kolls, Raymond C

    2006-01-01

    Counsel for a manufacturer of medical devices or durable medical equipment must have working knowledge of various legal disciplines to draft contracts with intermediaries (sales representatives and distributors) for the marketing and sale of the manufacturer's products. If the manufacturer wishes to sell its products abroad, counsel must become familiar with the laws and business practices of the target country, and methods of gaining access to the foreign market. This Article gives readers an overview of the applicable legal principles, under U.S. and foreign laws, in the areas of agency, contracts, healthcare regulation, consumer protection, intellectual property protection, and dealer protection. To aid counsel in drafting intermediary agreements, specific contractual terms and issues are explored in depth, including: appointment clauses, performance provisions, provisions concerning pricing and payment, protective clauses (shielding the manufacturer from liability), term and termination provisions, independent contractor clauses, export control clauses, recordkeeping and audit provisions, choice of law clauses, and dispute resolution clauses.

  5. Basic concepts and issues: a primer on distribution and sales representative agreements in the medical device and durable medical equipment industries.

    PubMed

    Burow, Heiko E; Kolls, Raymond C

    2006-01-01

    Counsel for a manufacturer of medical devices or durable medical equipment must have working knowledge of various legal disciplines to draft contracts with intermediaries (sales representatives and distributors) for the marketing and sale of the manufacturer's products. If the manufacturer wishes to sell its products abroad, counsel must become familiar with the laws and business practices of the target country, and methods of gaining access to the foreign market. This Article gives readers an overview of the applicable legal principles, under U.S. and foreign laws, in the areas of agency, contracts, healthcare regulation, consumer protection, intellectual property protection, and dealer protection. To aid counsel in drafting intermediary agreements, specific contractual terms and issues are explored in depth, including: appointment clauses, performance provisions, provisions concerning pricing and payment, protective clauses (shielding the manufacturer from liability), term and termination provisions, independent contractor clauses, export control clauses, recordkeeping and audit provisions, choice of law clauses, and dispute resolution clauses. PMID:17002232

  6. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  7. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  8. Use of the NBME Comprehensive Basic Science Examination as a progress test in the preclerkship curriculum of a new medical school.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Teresa R; Khalil, Mohammed K; Peppler, Richard D; Davey, Diane D; Kibble, Jonathan D

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, we describe the innovative use of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Comprehensive Basic Science Examination (CBSE) as a progress test during the preclerkship medical curriculum. The main aim of this study was to provide external validation of internally developed multiple-choice assessments in a new medical school. The CBSE is a practice exam for the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and is purchased directly from the NBME. We administered the CBSE five times during the first 2 yr of medical school. Student scores were compared with scores on newly created internal summative exams and to the USMLE Step 1. Significant correlations were observed between almost all our internal exams and CBSE scores over time as well as with USMLE Step 1 scores. The strength of correlations of internal exams to the CBSE and USMLE Step 1 broadly increased over time during the curriculum. Student scores on courses that have strong emphasis on physiology and pathophysiology correlated particularly well with USMLE Step 1 scores. Student progress, as measured by the CBSE, was found to be linear across time, and test performance fell behind the anticipated level by the end of the formal curriculum. These findings are discussed with respect to student learning behaviors. In conclusion, the CBSE was found to have good utility as a progress test and provided external validation of our new internally developed multiple-choice assessments. The data also provide performance benchmarks both for our future students to formatively assess their own progress and for other medical schools to compare learning progression patterns in different curricular models.

  9. Attitudes among students and teachers on vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Brynhildsen, J; Dahle, L O; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Important elements in the curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science sections of the curriculum, and horizontal integration between different subject areas. Integration throughout the whole curriculum is time-consuming for both teachers and students and hard work is required for planning, organization and execution. The aim was to assess the importance of vertical and horizontal integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to opinions among students and teachers. In a questionnaire 102 faculty teachers and 106 students were asked about the importance of 14 different components of the undergraduate medical curriculum including vertical and horizontal integration. They were asked to assign between one and six points to each component (6 points = extremely important for the quality of the curriculum; 1 point = unimportant). Students as well as teachers appreciated highly both forms of integration. Students scored horizontal integration slightly but significantly higher than the teachers (median 6 vs 5 points; p=0.009, Mann-Whitney U-test), whereas teachers scored vertical integration higher than students (6 vs 5; p=0.019, Mann-Whitney U-test). Both students and teachers considered horizontal and vertical integration to be highly important components of the undergraduate medical programme. We believe both kinds of integration support problem-based learning and stimulate deep and lifelong learning and suggest that integration should always be considered deeply when a new curriculum is planned for undergraduate medical education.

  10. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  11. National Institutes of Health Funding in Radiation Oncology: A Snapshot

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Currently, pay lines for National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition, knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like radiation oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, these data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH's database because it does not discriminate between radiology and radiation oncology departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013 we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from radiation oncology departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in radiation oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to principal investigators at the full professor level, and 122 principal investigators held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants, the research topic fell into the field of biology, 13% in the field of medical physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggest that the field of radiation oncology is underfunded by the NIH and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of radiation oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force.

  12. NIH funding in Radiation Oncology – A snapshot

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael; McBride, William H.; Vlashi, Erina; Pajonk, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Currently, pay lines for NIH grants are at a historical low. In this climate of fierce competition knowledge about the funding situation in a small field like Radiation Oncology becomes very important for career planning and recruitment of faculty. Unfortunately, this data cannot be easily extracted from the NIH s database because it does not discriminate between Radiology and Radiation Oncology Departments. At the start of fiscal year 2013, we extracted records for 952 individual grants, which were active at the time of analysis from the NIH database. Proposals originating from Radiation Oncology Departments were identified manually. Descriptive statistics were generated using the JMP statistical software package. Our analysis identified 197 grants in Radiation Oncology. These proposals came from 134 individual investigators in 43 academic institutions. The majority of the grants (118) were awarded to PIs at the Full Professor level and 122 PIs held a PhD degree. In 79% of the grants the research topic fell into the field of Biology, in 13 % into the field of Medical Physics. Only 7.6% of the proposals were clinical investigations. Our data suggests that the field of Radiation Oncology is underfunded by the NIH, and that the current level of support does not match the relevance of Radiation Oncology for cancer patients or the potential of its academic work force. PMID:23523324

  13. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Eleanor Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  14. Privacy and Security in an Oncology Information System

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Bruce I.; Lenhard, Raymond E.

    1978-01-01

    The growing number of automated medical data bases has focused attention upon the problems associated with privacy and security of patient data. This paper briefly reviews some of the approaches to data base protection and then describes the solution to these problems which have been implemented in the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Clinical Information System.

  15. Maintenance of Certification for Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Kun, Larry E.; Ang, Kian; Erickson, Beth; Harris, Jay; Hoppe, Richard; Leibel, Steve; Davis, Larry; Hattery, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Maintenance of Certification (MOC) recognizes that in addition to medical knowledge, several essential elements involved in delivering quality care must be developed and maintained throughout one's career. The MOC process is designed to facilitate and document professional development of American Board of Radiology (ABR) diplomates in the essential elements of quality care in Radiation Oncology and Radiologic Physics. ABR MOC has been developed in accord with guidelines of the American Board of Medical Specialties. All Radiation Oncology certificates issued since 1995 are 10-year, time-limited certificates; diplomates with time-limited certificates who wish to maintain specialty certification must complete specific requirements of the American Board of Radiology MOC program. Diplomates with lifelong certificates are not required to participate but are strongly encouraged to do so. Maintenance of Certification is based on documentation of participation in the four components of MOC: (1) professional standing, (2) lifelong learning and self-assessment, (3) cognitive expertise, and (4) performance in practice. Through these components, MOC addresses six competencies-medical knowledge, patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Details of requirements for components 1, 2, and 3 of MOC are outlined along with aspects of the fourth component currently under development.

  16. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements.

  17. [Bioinformatics: a key role in oncology].

    PubMed

    Olivier, Timothée; Chappuis, Pierre; Tsantoulis, Petros

    2016-05-18

    Bioinformatics is essential in clinical oncology and research. Combining biology, computer science and mathematics, bioinformatics aims to derive useful information from clinical and biological data, often poorly structured, at a large scale. Bioinformatics approaches have reclassified certain cancers based on their molecular and biological presentation, improving treatment selection. Many molecular signatures have been developed and, after validation, some are now usable in clinical practice. Other applications could facilitate daily practice, reduce the risk of error and increase the precision of medical decision-making. Bioinformatics must evolve in accordance with ethical considerations and requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Its application depends on a sound technical foundation that meets strict quality requirements. PMID:27424424

  18. Integrative Physical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Chauviere, Arnaud; Bauer, Amy L.; Leier, André; Lewis, Michael T.; Macklin, Paul; Marquez-Lago, Tatiana T.; Bearer, Elaine L.; Cristini, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is arguably the ultimate complex biological system. Solid tumors are micro-structured soft matter that evolves as a consequence of spatio-temporal events at the intracellular (e.g., signaling pathways, macromolecular trafficking), intercellular (e.g., cell-cell adhesion/communication), and tissue (e.g., cell-extracellular matrix interactions, mechanical forces) scales. To gain insight, tumor and developmental biologists have gathered a wealth of molecular, cellular and genetic data, including immunohistochemical measurements of cell type-specific division and death rates, lineage tracing, and gain-of-function/loss-of-function mutational analyses. These data are empirically extrapolated to a diagnosis/prognosis of tissue-scale behavior, e.g., for clinical decision. Integrative Physical Oncology (IPO) is the science that develops physically consistent mathematical approaches to address the significant challenge of bridging the nano (nm)-micro (μm) to macro (mm, cm) scales with respect to tumor development and progression. In the current literature, such approaches are referred to as multiscale modeling. In the present review, we attempt to assess recent modeling approaches on each separate scale and critically evaluate the current “hybrid-multiscale” models used to investigate tumor growth in the context of brain and breast cancers. Finally, we provide our perspective on the further development and the impact of Integrative Physical Oncology. PMID:21853537

  19. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it. PMID:27093325

  20. [Dignity therapy in oncology].

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Carla Ida

    2016-04-01

    In oncology, little is known about dignity, dignity-related distress and the issues that influence the sense of dignity for patients. Dignity is personal, subject to changes depending on the experience and the path of life. In oncology some patients feel that their dignity is directly related to the disease, to physical and emotional symptoms, to the highest level of physical and cognitive autonomy and to the continuity of the self. Patient dignity inventory (PDI) is a validate tool designed to measure various sources of dignity-related distress among patients nearing the end of life and serve as a screening tool to assess a broad range of issues that influence the sense of dignity. Dignity therapy is a novel focused psychotherapy consisting in a brief semi-structured interview, audio-recorded and transcribed in order to obtain the "generativity document". The patients are invited to tell about their life history, and to leave words of guidance and offer instructions to pass along to their son, daughters, husband, wife, parents, others. The generativity document is the result of process of emotional and existential care for the patients and a gift for everybody will receive it.

  1. Thinking about thinking and emotion: the metacognitive approach to the medical humanities that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition--“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”--offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  2. Thinking about thinking and emotion: the metacognitive approach to the medical humanities that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition--“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”--offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  3. Thinking about Thinking and Emotion: The Metacognitive Approach to the Medical Humanities that Integrates the Humanities with the Basic and Clinical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Eichbaum, Quentin G

    2014-01-01

    Medical knowledge in recent decades has grown prodigiously and has outstripped the capacity of the human brain to absorb and understand it all. This burgeoning of knowledge has created a dilemma for medical educators. We can no longer expect students to continue memorizing this large body of increasingly complex knowledge. Instead, our efforts should be redirected at developing in students a competency as flexible thinkers and agile learners so they can adeptly deal with new knowledge, complexity, and uncertainty in a rapidly changing world. Such a competency would entail not only cognitive but also emotional skills essential for the holistic development of their professional identity. This article will argue that metacognition—“thinking about thinking (and emotion)”—offers the most viable path toward developing this competency. The overwhelming volume of medical knowledge has driven some medical schools to reduce the time allocated in their curricula to the “soft-option” humanities as they tend to consider them an expendable “luxury.” Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, has moved away from the traditional conception of the medical humanities as “the arts,” composed of art, music, and literature, toward an approach that integrates the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences, based on metacognition. This metacognitive approach to the humanities, described in this article, has three goals: 1) to develop students as flexible thinkers and agile learners and to provide them with essential cognitive and emotional skills for navigating medical complexity and uncertainty; 2) to elicit in students empathy and tolerance by making them aware of the immense diversity in human cognition (and emotion); and 3) to integrate the humanities with the basic and clinical sciences. Through this metacognitive approach, students come to understand their patterns of cognition and emotions, and in the group setting, they learn to mindfully

  4. ImaSim, a software tool for basic education of medical x-ray imaging in radiotherapy and radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Guillaume; deBlois, François; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: X-ray imaging is an important part of medicine and plays a crucial role in radiotherapy. Education in this field is mostly limited to textbook teaching due to equipment restrictions. A novel simulation tool, ImaSim, for teaching the fundamentals of the x-ray imaging process based on ray-tracing is presented in this work. ImaSim is used interactively via a graphical user interface (GUI). Materials and methods: The software package covers the main x-ray based medical modalities: planar kilo voltage (kV), planar (portal) mega voltage (MV), fan beam computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging. The user can modify the photon source, object to be imaged and imaging setup with three-dimensional editors. Objects are currently obtained by combining blocks with variable shapes. The imaging of three-dimensional voxelized geometries is currently not implemented, but can be added in a later release. The program follows a ray-tracing approach, ignoring photon scatter in its current implementation. Simulations of a phantom CT scan were generated in ImaSim and were compared to measured data in terms of CT number accuracy. Spatial variations in the photon fluence and mean energy from an x-ray tube caused by the heel effect were estimated from ImaSim and Monte Carlo simulations and compared. Results: In this paper we describe ImaSim and provide two examples of its capabilities. CT numbers were found to agree within 36 Hounsfield Units (HU) for bone, which corresponds to a 2% attenuation coefficient difference. ImaSim reproduced the heel effect reasonably well when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. Discussion: An x-ray imaging simulation tool is made available for teaching and research purposes. ImaSim provides a means to facilitate the teaching of medical x-ray imaging.

  5. Medical students’ satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The integration of simulation-based learning (SBL) methods holds promise for improving the medical education system in Greece. The Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students (ABCS3) is a novel two-day SBL course that was designed by the Scientific Society of Hellenic Medical Students. The ABCS3 targeted undergraduate medical students and consisted of three core components: the case-based lectures, the ABCDE hands-on station, and the simulation-based clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general educational environment of the course, as well as the skills and knowledge acquired by the participants. Methods: Two sets of questions were distributed to the participants: the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire and an internally designed feedback questionnaire (InEv). A multiple-choice examination was also distributed prior to the course and following its completion. A total of 176 participants answered the DREEM questionnaire, 56 the InEv, and 60 the MCQs. Results: The overall DREEM score was 144.61 (±28.05) out of 200. Delegates who participated in both the case-based lectures and the interactive scenarios core components scored higher than those who only completed the case-based lecture session (P=0.038). The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5. Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001). Conclusion: The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills. PMID:27012313

  6. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.

  7. Periodontium destruction associated with oncology therapy. Five case reports

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radiation treatment to the head and neck and cytotoxic chemotherapy can produce deleterious side effects to the periodontium that are generally transient in nature, reversible, and do not result in permanently visible defects. However, combinations of the malignant disease itself, the direct and indirect effects of medical therapy and associated oral infections, along with local trauma can lead to periodontal tissue destruction with resulting permanent architectural defects. Five case reports illustrate destructive alterations of the periodontium that were associated with oncology therapy. Proposed guidelines for periodontal treatment of compromised individuals undergoing oncology therapies are suggested.

  8. The Growth of Academic Radiation Oncology: A Survey of Endowed Professorships in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, Todd H.; Smith, Steven M.; Powell, Simon N.

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: The academic health of a medical specialty can be gauged by the level of university support through endowed professorships. Methods and Materials: We conducted a survey of the 86 academic programs in radiation oncology to determine the current status of endowed chairs in this discipline. Results: Over the past decade, the number of endowed chairs has more than doubled, and it has almost tripled over the past 13 years. The number of programs with at least one chair has increased from 31% to 65%. Conclusions: Coupled with other indicators of academic growth, such as the proportion of graduating residents seeking academic positions, there has been clear and sustained growth in academic radiation oncology.

  9. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    PubMed

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance. PMID:26897865

  10. Multicriteria decision analysis in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Adunlin, Georges; Diaby, Vakaramoko; Montero, Alberto J.; Xiao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background There has been a growing interest in the development and application of alternative decision-making frameworks within health care, including multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). Even though the literature includes several reviews on MCDA methods, applications of MCDA in oncology are lacking. Aim The aim of this paper is to discuss a rationale for the use of MCDA in oncology. In this context, the following research question emerged: How can MCDA be used to develop a clinical decision support tool in oncology? Methods In this paper, a brief background on decision making is presented, followed by an overview of MCDA methods and process. The paper discusses some applications of MCDA, proposes research opportunities in the context of oncology and presents an illustrative example of how MCDA can be applied to oncology. Findings Decisions in oncology involve trade-offs between possible benefits and harms. MCDA can help analyse trade-off preferences. A wide range of MCDA methods exist. Each method has its strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the appropriate method varies depending on the source and nature of information used to inform decision making. The literature review identified eight studies. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was the most often used method in the identified studies. Conclusion Overall, MCDA appears to be a promising tool that can be used to assist clinical decision making in oncology. Nonetheless, field testing is desirable before MCDA becomes an established decision-making tool in this field. PMID:24635949

  11. Compare the educational achievement of medical students with different circadian rhythms in difficult courses of basic sciences

    PubMed Central

    Liaghatdar, Mohammad Javad; Ashoorion, Vahid; Avizhgan, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advantageous times for different people are different to some extent, considering the effective physiological changes during the circadian rhythm, in terms of the peak time of physiological activities. The goal of this study is to compare the educational achievement of students, with different morning–evening habits, in completing difficult and easy courses. Materials and Methods: This research is a retrospective descriptive–analytical study, which has been conducted on students of the fifth semester of General Medicine in the Faculty of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The morning–evening habits of the students were determined by the Horne-Strauss 19-item questionnaire. The students were asked to determine the courses that were ’difficult’ and ’easy,’ using a researcher-made questionnaire. The students’ scores in the considered courses during the five semesters were obtained from the Education Department of the Faculty and analyzed using the descriptive t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the multivariate regression test in the SPSS software. Results: Sixty-three students (67% girls and 33% boys) participated in this study, of whom 11, 60, and 29% were morning, morning–evening, and evening students, respectively. The mean scores of the difficult courses in all five semesters were reduced in the evening pattern compared to the morning and morning–evening patterns. Reduction of the mean score in the difficult courses, in the evening group, compared with the morning–evening and morning groups was observed in all five semesters among girls, but in three semesters among boys. Conclusion: This study showed that evening students experienced academic failure in difficult courses, which required a more cognitive performance. It is recommended that difficult specialized courses be presented at hours when all student groups have a better cognitive performance PMID:27110555

  12. [Donatori di Musica: when oncology meets music].

    PubMed

    Graiff, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Donatori di Musica is a network of musicians - both physicians and volunteers - that was initially founded in 2009 with the aim to set up and coordinate classical music concerts in hospitals. This activity was initially started and led by the Oncology Departments at Carrara and Bolzano Hospitals, where high profile professional musicians make themselves available for concerts in support of Oncological in/out-patients of that specific Hospital. A live classical music performance is a deeply touching experience - particularly for those who live a critical condition like cancer. Main characteristics of Donatori di Musica concerts are: continuity (concerts are part of a regular and non-stopping music season); quality (concerts are held by well-established professional musicians); philanthropic attitude (musicians do not wear a suit and usually chat with patients; they also select an easy-to-listen program; a convivial event is usually organized after the performance with the aim of overcoming distinctions and barriers between physician and patient); no profit: musicians perform for free - travel expenses and/or overnight staying only can be claimed; concerts have free access for patients, their families and hospital staff.Patients and musicians therefore do get in close contact and music is able to merge each other experiences - with patients being treated by the beauty of music and musicians being treated theirselves by patients daily-life feedback. The Donatori di Musica experience is therefore able to help Medicine to retrieve its very first significance - the medical act regain that human and cultural dimension that seems to be abandoned in the last decades in favour of a mere technicism. This is the spirit and the deep significance of Donatori di Musica - «[…] the hope that Music can become a key support to medical treatments in every Oncology department» (by Gian Andrea Lodovici).

  13. [Donatori di Musica: when oncology meets music].

    PubMed

    Graiff, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Donatori di Musica is a network of musicians - both physicians and volunteers - that was initially founded in 2009 with the aim to set up and coordinate classical music concerts in hospitals. This activity was initially started and led by the Oncology Departments at Carrara and Bolzano Hospitals, where high profile professional musicians make themselves available for concerts in support of Oncological in/out-patients of that specific Hospital. A live classical music performance is a deeply touching experience - particularly for those who live a critical condition like cancer. Main characteristics of Donatori di Musica concerts are: continuity (concerts are part of a regular and non-stopping music season); quality (concerts are held by well-established professional musicians); philanthropic attitude (musicians do not wear a suit and usually chat with patients; they also select an easy-to-listen program; a convivial event is usually organized after the performance with the aim of overcoming distinctions and barriers between physician and patient); no profit: musicians perform for free - travel expenses and/or overnight staying only can be claimed; concerts have free access for patients, their families and hospital staff.Patients and musicians therefore do get in close contact and music is able to merge each other experiences - with patients being treated by the beauty of music and musicians being treated theirselves by patients daily-life feedback. The Donatori di Musica experience is therefore able to help Medicine to retrieve its very first significance - the medical act regain that human and cultural dimension that seems to be abandoned in the last decades in favour of a mere technicism. This is the spirit and the deep significance of Donatori di Musica - «[…] the hope that Music can become a key support to medical treatments in every Oncology department» (by Gian Andrea Lodovici). PMID:25282347

  14. Radiation oncology (Vol. 2)

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, T.L.; Wara, W.

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the Radiation Oncology series features update reports on the current status of primary therapy for lung cancer and the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of hepatomas. Other articles describe the use of stereotaxic interstitial implantation in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and discuss the indications for and results of radiation as the primary or adjuvant treatment of large bowel cancer. Reports on new technological developments examine the biological basis and clinical potential of local-regional hyperthermia and photodynamic therapy. Included are reviews of the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic evaluation of cancer and of three-dimensional treatment planning for high energy external beam radiotherapy.

  15. [Genomics medicine and oncology].

    PubMed

    Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2014-05-01

    Progress in genomics with, in particular, high throughput next generation sequencing is revolutionizing oncology. The impact of these techniques is seen on the one hand the identification of germline mutations that predispose to a given type of cancer, allowing for a personalized care of patients or healthy carriers and, on the other hand, the characterization of all acquired somatic mutation of the tumor cell, opening the door to personalized treatment targeting the driver oncogenes. In both cases, next generation sequencing techniques allow a global approach whereby the integrality of the genome mutations is analyzed and correlated with the clinical data. The benefits on the quality of care delivered to our patients are extremely impressive. PMID:24800772

  16. Evaluation of pediatric oncology objectives developed by the American Association for Cancer Education.

    PubMed

    Bertolone, S; Teller, D N; Bell, R A

    1986-01-01

    Educational objectives in pediatric oncology for medical students developed at the Fall, 1981 meeting of the American Association for Cancer Education (AACE) were reviewed. These six terminal (general) and 40 enabling (specific) objectives were converted into 130 statements which were ranked from essential (rank 5) to not required (rank 0). The 58 pediatric oncology respondents gave broad support to the AACE pediatric oncology objectives. Primary importance was given to medical students knowing to refer pediatric malignancies. Principles of therapy, psychosocial management, management of infection, and complications during long term surveillance ranked high. Objectives were not ranked differently when related to number of new pediatric patients seen, type of hospital, or whether the institution had a core undergraduate pediatric training site. The list of terminal, enabling and supplemental pediatric oncology objectives developed by AACE appears valid for inclusion in the core curriculum of medical students.

  17. Moral distress in nurses in oncology and haematology units.

    PubMed

    Lazzarin, Michela; Biondi, Andrea; Di Mauro, Stefania

    2012-03-01

    One of the difficulties nurses experience in clinical practice in relation to ethical issues in connection with young oncology patients is moral distress. In this descriptive correlational study, the Moral Distress Scale-Paediatric Version (MDS-PV) was translated from the original language and tested on a conventional sample of nurses working in paediatric oncology and haematology wards, in six north paediatric hospitals of Italy. 13.7% of the total respondents claimed that they had changed unit or hospital due to moral distress. The items with the highest mean intensity in the sample were almost all connected with medical and nursing competence and have considerably higher values than frequency. The instrument was found to be reliable. The results confirmed the validity of the MDS-PV (Cronbach's alpha = 0.959). This study represents the first small-scale attempt to validate MDS-PV for use in paediatric oncology-haematology nurses in Italy.

  18. Exploratory survey of patients' needs and perceptions of psychosocial oncology.

    PubMed

    Preyde, Michele; Macdonald, Janice; Seegmiller, Merle

    2014-03-01

    Cancer is a major disease that affects a significant proportion of the population worldwide. With a decrease in mortality due to advancements in oncology treatment, there is an expanding role for psychosocial oncology. A satellite clinic for medical treatment (only chemotherapy) of cancer is available at the Guelph General Hospital (GGH). Patients accessing the chemotherapy clinic at GGH have minimal access to psychosocial or supportive care and it is not known if the existing services are addressing the psychosocial symptoms of cancer patients. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous survey which included self-report measures of depression, symptom severity, quality of life, and social support while receiving treatment at this facility. There was a great deal of variability in the patients' emotional symptoms at this satellite clinic, though many patients reported emotional difficulties. Greater social work presence may lead to better identification of patients who would benefit from psychosocial oncology services. PMID:24193219

  19. 2016 AAHA Oncology Guidelines for Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Biller, Barb; Berg, John; Garrett, Laura; Ruslander, David; Wearing, Richard; Abbott, Bonnie; Patel, Mithun; Smith, Diana; Bryan, Christine

    2016-01-01

    All companion animal practices will be presented with oncology cases on a regular basis, making diagnosis and treatment of cancer an essential part of comprehensive primary care. Because each oncology case is medically unique, these guidelines recommend a patient-specific approach consisting of the following components: diagnosis, staging, therapeutic intervention, provisions for patient and personnel safety in handling chemotherapy agents, referral to an oncology specialty practice when appropriate, and a strong emphasis on client support. Determination of tumor type by histologic examination of a biopsy sample should be the basis for all subsequent steps in oncology case management. Diagnostic staging determines the extent of local disease and presence or absence of regional or distant metastasis. The choice of therapeutic modalities is based on tumor type, histologic grade, and stage, and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and adjunctive therapies, such as nutritional support and pain management. These guidelines discuss the strict safety precautions that should be observed in handling chemotherapy agents, which are now commonly used in veterinary oncology. Because cancer is often a disease of older pets, the time of life when the pet-owner relationship is usually strongest, a satisfying outcome for all parties involved is highly dependent on good communication between the entire healthcare team and the client, particularly when death or euthanasia of the patient is being considered. These guidelines include comprehensive tables of common canine and feline cancers as a resource for case management and a sample case history. PMID:27259020

  20. 1986 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey.

    PubMed

    Meredith, R F; Eisert, D R

    1987-12-01

    Two simultaneous surveys were conducted by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). A survey of all residents in Radiation Oncology was conducted to obtain information on trends in residency training. A simultaneous survey of Chief Residents was obtained to determine more specific information on current training programs. Over one-half of residents responded. Eighty-eight percent of respondents were graduates of a North American medical school. Most did at least an internship prior to entering Radiation Oncology and 3/4 of those who did not do a separate internship rotated through other areas at a later time to broaden their knowledge. One-half are Board certified or Board eligible in another specialty or hold a Masters or Ph.D. degree. Three-quarters of all residents had authorship of at least one paper during training and one-half were primary authors. Eighty percent felt adequately prepared for practice after residency. One-half plan at least an initial post-residency affiliation with an academic center. Many were concerned that Radiation Oncologists are not afforded respect equivalent to that of other specialties. Ninety-eight percent favored departmental status for Radiation Oncology. Resident recommendations for improving the image of Radiation Oncology are presented.

  1. Community oncology in an era of payment reform.

    PubMed

    Cox, John V; Ward, Jeffery C; Hornberger, John C; Temel, Jennifer S; McAneny, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Patients and payers (government and private) are frustrated with the fee-for-service system (FFS) of payment for outpatient health services. FFS rewards volume and highly valued services, including expensive diagnostics and therapeutics, over lesser valued cognitive services. Proposed payment schemes would incent collaboration and coordination of care among providers and reward quality. In oncology, new payment schemes must address the high costs of all services, particularly drugs, while preserving the robust distribution of sites of service available to patients in the United States. Information technology and personalized cancer care are changing the practice of oncology. Twenty-first century oncology will require increasing cognitive work and shared decision making, both of which are not well regarded in the FFS model. A high proportion of health care dollars are consumed in the final months of life. Effective delivery of palliative and end-of-life care must be addressed by practice and by new models of payment. Value-based reimbursement schemes will require oncology practices to change how they are structured. Lessons drawn from the principles of primary care's Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) will help oncology practice to prepare for new schemes. PCMH principles place a premium on proactively addressing toxicities of therapies, coordinating care with other providers, and engaging patients in shared decision making, supporting the ideal of value defined in the triple aim-to measurably improve patient experience and quality of care at less cost. Payment reform will be disruptive to all. Oncology must be engaged in policy discussions and guide rational shifts in priorities defined by new payment models.

  2. Antisense therapeutics in oncology: current status

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rehman, Zia ur; Muntane, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing progress in translational oncology and tremendous breakthroughs have been made as evidenced by preclinical and clinical trials. Data obtained from high-throughput technologies are deepening our understanding about the molecular and gene network in cancer cells and rapidly emerging in vitro and in vivo evidence is highlighting the role of antisense agents as specific inhibitors of the expression of target genes, thus modulating the response of cancer cells to different therapeutic strategies. Much information is continuously being added into various facets of molecular oncology and it is now understood that overexpression of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenes, oncogenic microRNAs (miRNA), and fusion proteins make cancer cells difficult to target. Delivery of antisense oligonucleotides has remained a challenge and technological developments have helped in overcoming hurdles by improving the ability to penetrate cells, effective and targeted binding to gene sequences, and downregulation of target gene function. Different delivery systems, including stable nucleic acid lipid particles, have shown potential in enhancing the delivery of cargo to the target site. In this review, we attempt to summarize the current progress in the development of antisense therapeutics and their potential in medical research. We partition this multicomponent review into introductory aspects about recent breakthroughs in antisense therapeutics. We also discuss how antisense therapeutics have shown potential in resensitizing resistant cancer cells to apoptosis by targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins, oncogenic miRNAs, and BCR-ABL. PMID:25395862

  3. The oncological patient in the palliative situation.

    PubMed

    Eychmueller, Steffen; Zwahlen, Diana; Fliedner, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Palliative care approaches the patient and his or her suffering with a biopsychosocial-spiritual model. Thus, it is the strength of palliative care to complement the diagnosis driven approach of medical cancer care by a problem and resources-based assessment, participatory care plan, and patient-directed interventions. Interventions need to reflect timely prognosis, target population (the patient, the family carer, the professional), and level of trust and remaining energy. In palliative care the relevance of psycho-oncological aspects in the care of the terminally ill is considerable in the understanding of the overall suffering of patients approaching death and their loved ones and in their care and support. There is little evidence to date in terms of clinical benefit of specific psycho-oncological interventions in the last months or weeks of life, but there is evidence on effects of stress reduction and reduced anxiety if locus of control can stay within the patient as long as possible. One major difficulty in psychosocial research at the end-of-life, however, is defining patient relevant outcomes. PMID:24305769

  4. SU-A-210-00: AAPM Medical Physics Student Meeting: Medical Billing and Regulations: Everything You Always Wanted To Know, But Were Too Afraid To Ask

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the

  5. Microfluidics for research and applications in oncology.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Parthiv Kant; Ebrahimi Warkiani, Majid; Jing, Tengyang; Kenry; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-01-21

    Cancer is currently one of the top non-communicable human diseases, and continual research and developmental efforts are being made to better understand and manage this disease. More recently, with the improved understanding in cancer biology as well as the advancements made in microtechnology and rapid prototyping, microfluidics is increasingly being explored and even validated for use in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. With inherent advantages such as small sample volume, high sensitivity and fast processing time, microfluidics is well-positioned to serve as a promising platform for applications in oncology. In this review, we look at the recent advances in the use of microfluidics, from basic research such as understanding cancer cell phenotypes as well as metastatic behaviors to applications such as the detection, diagnosis, prognosis and drug screening. We then conclude with a future outlook on this promising technology. PMID:26010996

  6. Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN)

    Cancer.gov

    The Comprehensive Oncologic Emergencies Research Network (CONCERN) was established in March 2015 with the goal to accelerate knowledge generation, synthesis and translation of oncologic emergency medicine research through multi-center collaborations.

  7. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology...

  8. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... relevance and potential use of such measures in the pediatric development plans of oncology products....

  9. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee...

  10. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development...

  11. 78 FR 63224 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... late stage development for various adult oncology indications. The subcommittee will consider...

  12. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  13. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  14. The importance of pharmacist providing patient education in oncology.

    PubMed

    Avery, Mia; Williams, Felecia

    2015-02-01

    The world's increasing diversity requires health care professionals to adjust delivery methods of teaching to accommodate different cultural values and beliefs. The ability to communicate effectively across languages and various cultural practices directly affects patient education outcomes. Pharmacist should be aware of varying modalities and considerations when counseling a patient diagnosed with cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. In more recent years, the medical profession has seen an increase in patient outcomes due to using the multidisciplinary team approach and has benefited by implementing Medication Therapy Management (MTM) programs at various institutions. For the clinical pharmacist, this would mean documentation for these services should be precise and accurate based on the specific patients needs. There are several factors involved in the care and therapy of the patient with cancer. Clinical oncology pharmacist should be aware of the ever-changing role in oncology and be able to implement new practices at their facility for better patient outcomes.

  15. Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guidelines 2010 for antiemesis in oncology: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hideki; Saeki, Toshiaki; Aiba, Keisuke; Tamura, Kazuo; Aogi, Kenjiro; Eguchi, Kenji; Okita, Kenji; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Boku, Narikazu; Wada, Makoto; Akechi, Tatsuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Okawa, Yutaka; Onozawa, Yusuke; Sasaki, Hidenori; Shima, Yasuo; Shimoyama, Naohito; Takeda, Masayuki; Nishidate, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Akifumi; Ikeda, Tadashi; Hirata, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to disseminate the standard of antiemetic therapy for Japanese clinical oncologists. On the basis of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument, which reflects evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, a working group of the Japanese Society of Clinical Oncology (JSCO) reviewed clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis and performed a systematic review of evidence-based domestic practice guidelines for antiemetic therapy in Japan. In addition, because health-insurance systems in Japan are different from those in other countries, a consensus was reached regarding standard treatments for chemotherapy that induce nausea and vomiting. Current evidence was collected by use of MEDLINE, from materials from meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology National Comprehensive Cancer Network, and from European Society of Medical Oncology/Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer guidelines for antiemesis. Initially, 21 clinical questions (CQ) were selected on the basis of CQs from other guidelines. Patients treated with highly emetic agents should receive a serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT3) receptor antagonist, dexamethasone, and a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist. For patients with moderate emetic risk, 5HT3 receptor antagonists and dexamethasone were recommended, whereas for those receiving chemotherapy with low emetic risk dexamethasone only is recommended. Patients receiving high-emetic-risk radiation therapy should also receive a 5HT3 receptor antagonist. In this paper the 2010 JSCO clinical practice guidelines for antiemesis are presented in English; they reveal high concordance of Japanese medical circumstances with other antiemetic guidelines that are similarly based on evidence.

  16. Identification of the Key Fields and Their Key Technical Points of Oncology by Patent Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Juan; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background This paper aims to identify the key fields and their key technical points of oncology by patent analysis. Methodology/Principal Findings Patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were searched in the Thomson Innovation database. The key fields and their key technical points were determined by analyzing the Derwent Classification (DC) and the International Patent Classification (IPC), respectively. Patent applications in the top ten DC occupied 80% of all the patent applications of oncology, which were the ten fields of oncology to be analyzed. The number of patent applications in these ten fields of oncology was standardized based on patent applications of oncology from 2006 to 2012. For each field, standardization was conducted separately for each of the seven years (2006–2012) and the mean of the seven standardized values was calculated to reflect the relative amount of patent applications in that field; meanwhile, regression analysis using time (year) and the standardized values of patent applications in seven years (2006–2012) was conducted so as to evaluate the trend of patent applications in each field. Two-dimensional quadrant analysis, together with the professional knowledge of oncology, was taken into consideration in determining the key fields of oncology. The fields located in the quadrant with high relative amount or increasing trend of patent applications are identified as key ones. By using the same method, the key technical points in each key field were identified. Altogether 116,820 patents of oncology applied from 2006 to 2012 were retrieved, and four key fields with twenty-nine key technical points were identified, including “natural products and polymers” with nine key technical points, “fermentation industry” with twelve ones, “electrical medical equipment” with four ones, and “diagnosis, surgery” with four ones. Conclusions/Significance The results of this study could provide guidance on the development

  17. Big Data and Pharmacovigilance: The Role of Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David G

    2016-10-01

    When new anticancer medications are approved, their safety profiles are often not fully understood. Oncology nurses have a responsibility to file reports of adverse drug events with safety registries such as MedWatch. If these registries receive prompt, complete, and accurate data from clinicians, agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will have a stronger ability to detect hazards and to issue safety recommendations.
.

  18. Big Data and Pharmacovigilance: The Role of Oncology Nurses.

    PubMed

    Glenn, David G

    2016-10-01

    When new anticancer medications are approved, their safety profiles are often not fully understood. Oncology nurses have a responsibility to file reports of adverse drug events with safety registries such as MedWatch. If these registries receive prompt, complete, and accurate data from clinicians, agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will have a stronger ability to detect hazards and to issue safety recommendations.
. PMID:27668367

  19. Positron emission tomography and radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, PhD, Gary D.; Fox, MD, Peter; Phillips, MD, William T.

    2001-10-01

    Medical physics research is providing new avenues for addressing the fundamental problem of radiation therapy-how to provide a tumor-killing dose while reducing the dose to a non-lethal level for critical organs in adjacent portions of the patient anatomy. This talk reviews the revolutionary impact of Positron Emission Tomography on the practice of radiation oncology. The concepts of PET imaging and the development of "tumor" imaging methods using 18F-DG flouro-deoxyglucose are presented to provide the foundation for contemporary research and application to therapy. PET imaging influences radiation therapy decisions in multiple ways. Imaging of occult but viable tumor metastases eliminates misguided therapy attempts. The ability to distinguish viable tumor from scar tissue and necroses allows reduction of treatment portals and more selective treatments. Much research remains before the clinical benefits of these advances are fully realized.

  20. SU-A-210-02: Medical Physics Opportunities at the NRC

    SciTech Connect

    Abogunde, M.

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this student annual meeting is to address topics that are becoming more relevant to medical physicists, but are not frequently addressed, especially for students and trainees just entering the field. The talk is divided into two parts: medical billing and regulations. Hsinshun Wu – Why should we learn radiation oncology billing? Many medical physicists do not like to be involved with medical billing or coding during their career. They believe billing is not their responsibility and sometimes they even refuse to participate in the billing process if given the chance. This presentation will talk about a physicist’s long career and share his own experience that knowing medical billing is not only important and necessary for every young medical physicist, but that good billing knowledge could provide a valuable contribution to his/her medical physics development. Learning Objectives: The audience will learn the basic definition of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes performed in a Radiation Oncology Department. Understand the differences between hospital coding and physician-based or freestanding coding. Apply proper CPT coding for each Radiation Oncology procedure. Each procedure with its specific CPT code will be discussed in detail. The talk will focus on the process of care and use of actual workflow to understand each CPT code. Example coding of a typical Radiation Oncology procedure. Special procedure coding such as brachytherapy, proton therapy, radiosurgery, and SBRT. Maryann Abogunde – Medical physics opportunities at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) The NRC’s responsibilities include the regulation of medical uses of byproduct (radioactive) materials and oversight of medical use end-users (licensees) through a combination of regulatory requirements, licensing, safety oversight including inspection and enforcement, operational experience evaluation, and regulatory support activities. This presentation will explore the

  1. Spirituality as experienced by Muslim oncology nurses in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khorami Markani, Abdolah; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Khodayari Fard, Mohammad

    Spirituality, as an essential part of holistic care, is concerned with faith and meaning, and is usually conceptualised as a 'higher' experience or a transcendence of oneself. A resurgence of interest in this area is evident in post modern culture because of the effects that spirituality and religious beliefS may have on health. Up until the last two decades, spirituality and spiritual care, although vital, were invisible aspects of nursing. However, now that these concepts have made their way into the mainstream, literature in this area has burgeoned. In addition, modern nursing grew out of spiritual roots, and spiritual care is a component of holistic care. In the Islamic Republic of Iran,little information exists documenting the expressed spirituality of nurses in general and of oncology nurses in particular. This article presents spirituality as it is experienced by Muslim oncology nurses.The investigation involved a qualitative analysis of the spirituality of 24 participants, using semi-structured interviews. Participants were oncology nurses at 12 hospitals in two educational universities of medical sciences in Tehran. The main categories of spirituality as experienced by oncology nurses included religious and existential dimensions in an Iranian Muslim context. Findings are consistent with the holistic view of Islam, that considers all dimensions of personhood simultaneously. This study is important to transcultural nursing because of the benefits of increasing nursing knowledge through research that examines nurses' spirituality in diverse cultures.

  2. Dynamic optical projection of acquired luminescence for aiding oncologic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarder, Pinaki; Gullicksrud, Kyle; Mondal, Suman; Sudlow, Gail P.; Achilefu, Samuel; Akers, Walter J.

    2013-12-01

    Optical imaging enables real-time visualization of intrinsic and exogenous contrast within biological tissues. Applications in human medicine have demonstrated the power of fluorescence imaging to enhance visualization in dermatology, endoscopic procedures, and open surgery. Although few optical contrast agents are available for human medicine at this time, fluorescence imaging is proving to be a powerful tool in guiding medical procedures. Recently, intraoperative detection of fluorescent molecular probes that target cell-surface receptors has been reported for improvement in oncologic surgery in humans. We have developed a novel system, optical projection of acquired luminescence (OPAL), to further enhance real-time guidance of open oncologic surgery. In this method, collected fluorescence intensity maps are projected onto the imaged surface rather than via wall-mounted display monitor. To demonstrate proof-of-principle for OPAL applications in oncologic surgery, lymphatic transport of indocyanine green was visualized in live mice for intraoperative identification of sentinel lymph nodes. Subsequently, peritoneal tumors in a murine model of breast cancer metastasis were identified using OPAL after systemic administration of a tumor-selective fluorescent molecular probe. These initial results clearly show that OPAL can enhance adoption and ease-of-use of fluorescence imaging in oncologic procedures relative to existing state-of-the-art intraoperative imaging systems.

  3. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia. PMID:27296401

  4. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    PubMed

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia.

  5. Rehabilitation of Oncology Patients with Hard Palate Defects Part 2: Principles of Obturator Design.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rahat; Altaie, Asmaa; Nattress, Brian

    2015-06-01

    The first part of this series on the conventional rehabilitation of oncology patients with hard palate defects discussed the dental challenges posed by oncology patients and the surgical/restorative planning interface for conventional dental rehabilitation. This article will describe Aramany's classification of hard palate defects, Brown's classification of palatal defects and focus on the basic principles of obturator design which need to be appreciated when prosthetically rehabilitating a patient with a hard palate defect. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: A good understanding of basic removable prosthodontic theory relating to denture design, dental materials science and head and neck anatomy is a prerequisite when designing an obturator for a patient. PMID:26964444

  6. [Psychological stress in oncology: the role of glucocorticoids].

    PubMed

    Ronson, Alain

    2006-07-01

    During the last years, the correlations between biological processes, psychological adjustment and stress disorders have received increasing attention and a growing body of research results has been published in the general literature. In the realm of psycho-oncology, however, conceptual models on this topic and studies aimed at their validation have remained relatively scanty. On the basis of our observations and available literature in the field of post-traumatic and depressive stress disorders in oncology, we have proposed to apply the concept of allostatic load to the study and understanding of the psychological experience of cancer. This strategy has led us to the formulation of a novel classification of adjustment disorders in oncology and the creation of the clinical entity named "cancer-specific stress syndrome". Depending on clinical presentation of the syndrome, one distinguishes three subtypes, namely the depressive, post-traumatic and "dysallostatic" (mixed) forms. In the present paper, we examine the role of glucocorticoids and their relationships with one of the basic components of allostatic load--a failure to counter-regulate the immune system by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis--in the physiopathology of stress disorders in oncology. Conflicting theories are presented--glucocorticoid cascade versus insufficient glucocorticoid signal transmission--and studies measuring potential correlations between stress and cortisol in oncology are critically reviewed. The results of this process provide substantial support for the application of the allostatic load model and post-traumatic phenomenology, but important advances have yet to be achieved before definitive conclusions can be established in this field. Such advances could lead to profound changes in the way we understand and treat psychological distress in patients with cancer, both pharmacologically and psychotherapeutically.

  7. Gender Trends in Radiation Oncology in the United States: A 30-Year Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Awad A.; Egleston, Brian; Holliday, Emma; Eastwick, Gary; Takita, Cristiane; Jagsi, Reshma

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women's participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials: We examined the gender of first and senior US physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010, and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared with female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the past 3 decades, using Association of American Medical Colleges data. Results: The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusions: Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women's participation among full-time faculty, but women remain underrepresented among radiation oncology residents compared with their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology.

  8. The ethics of space, design and color in an oncology ward.

    PubMed

    Andritsch, Elisabeth; Stöger, Herbert; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Andritsch, Hans; Kasparek, Anne-Katrin; Schaberl-Moser, Renate; Ploner, Ferdinand; Samonigg, Hellmut

    2013-06-01

    Change affects all areas of healthcare organizations and none more so than each aspect of the oncology ward, beginning with the patient's room. It is there that the issues faced by the major players in healing environments - administrator, caregiver, family member, and, most importantly, the patient - come sharply into focus. Hospitals are building new facilities or renovating old ones in order to adapt to new environmental demands of patient care and security. Driven by ethical and professional responsibility, the oncological team headed by Professor Hellmut Samonigg of Graz Medical University Graz pursued a vision of designing a model oncology ward unique in Europe. Friedensreich Hundertwasser, the world-famous artist, was the creative force behind the design. The oncology ward became a place of healing, permeated with a colorful sense of life and harmonious holistic care. The successful outcome was confirmed by the extraordinarily positive feedback by patients, families, and healthcare staff.

  9. [Importance of the National Childhood Cancer Registry in the field of paediatric oncology care in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Garami, Miklós; Schuler, Dezső; Jakab, Zsuzsanna

    2014-05-11

    National Childhood Cancer Registry has been operated since 1971 by the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network. This Registry collects data on epidemiology, treatment modalities and effectiveness, as well as late follow-up of childhood cancers. An internet-based paediatric cancer registration and communication system for the Hungarian Paediatric Oncology Network has been introduced in April, 2010. The National Childhood Cancer Registry contains data of all paediatric cancer patients (0-18 yrs) who have insurance covered by the Hungarian Social Security Card. Creation (1971) and operation of the National Childhood Cancer Registry have been very important steps in the field of childhood oncology to evaluate the efficiency of paediatric oncology treatments as well as maximize return on medical investment.

  10. Analyzing the Affordable Care Act: Essential Health Benefits and Implications for Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Valerie A.; Samuels, Marc B.; Lively, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) will have lasting effects on oncology coverage and, perhaps, on oncology practice as well. The ACA ushers in a new class of insured individuals; approximately 25 million will purchase insurance through the exchanges, and Medicaid will expand by 12 million beneficiaries over the next 10 years. Essential health benefits (EHBs), which are required in all qualified health plans (QHPs) sold in the exchanges, will define the coverage available to the newly insured population and could lead to the development of new definitions and standards for medical necessity. This article will discuss effects of the ACA EHB requirements on oncology coverage, as well as the state and federal options and responsibilities as they relate to coverage of and access to oncology services within the QHPs in the exchanges. PMID:23814512

  11. Basic sciences: an alternative career?

    PubMed

    Khatri, R

    2013-01-01

    Career selection is a crucial and a complex process which is also true for the medical profession. In the context of our country, due to the limited opportunity and proper guidance, migration of medical graduates to foreign countries is increasing. Though, clinical subjects have a huge attraction, basic science field has failed to impress our medical graduates. In current scenario, basic science field seems to be a dumping site for the incompetent as the candidates who have failed trying their luck elsewhere stumble upon basic science careers though it is not true for all. Moreover, a very few medical graduates are interested in developing their career as a basic scientist. Therefore, to motivate today's young medical graduates, there is a need of a good mentor along with a proper career guidance which can help them to understand the basic science field as an alternative career. PMID:23774420

  12. Biomarker analysis for oncology.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yinfa; Gamagedara, Sanjeewa

    2015-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers are biological, chemical or biophysical entities that are present in tumor tissues or body fluids which give valuable information about current and future behavior of cancer. This review discusses the applicability of biomarkers in different stages of cancer from cancer risk assessment to recurrence. In medical practice, biomarkers can be helpful in finding out one's potential cancer risk, confirming whether or not one is already affected with a particular type of cancer, to which drug will the cancer respond best and in what doses should it be administered, the effectiveness of the treatment and whether the cancer will recur. Although biomarker discovery and validation is a very challenging process, when considering its applications and advantages, it is well worth the effort.

  13. A Primer on Health Economic Evaluations in Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Bocsi, Gregary T; Camidge, D Ross

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest for economic evaluation in oncology to illustrate the value of multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. As these analyses have started to move from specialist publications into mainstream medical literature, the wider medical audience consuming this information may need additional education to evaluate it appropriately. Here we review standard practices in economic evaluation, illustrating the different methods with thoracic oncology examples where possible. When interpreting and conducting health economic studies, it is important to appraise the method, perspective, time horizon, modeling technique, discount rate, and sensitivity analysis. Guidance on how to do this is provided. To provide a method to evaluate this literature, a literature search was conducted in spring 2015 to identify economic evaluations published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. Articles were reviewed for their study design, and areas for improvement were noted. Suggested improvements include using more rigorous sensitivity analyses, adopting a standard approach to reporting results, and conducting complete economic evaluations. Researchers should design high-quality studies to ensure the validity of the results, and consumers of this research should interpret these studies critically on the basis of a full understanding of the methodologies used before considering any of the conclusions. As advancements occur on both the research and consumer sides, this literature can be further developed to promote the best use of resources for this field.

  14. A Primer on Health Economic Evaluations in Thoracic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Whittington, Melanie D; Atherly, Adam J; Bocsi, Gregary T; Camidge, D Ross

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest for economic evaluation in oncology to illustrate the value of multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. As these analyses have started to move from specialist publications into mainstream medical literature, the wider medical audience consuming this information may need additional education to evaluate it appropriately. Here we review standard practices in economic evaluation, illustrating the different methods with thoracic oncology examples where possible. When interpreting and conducting health economic studies, it is important to appraise the method, perspective, time horizon, modeling technique, discount rate, and sensitivity analysis. Guidance on how to do this is provided. To provide a method to evaluate this literature, a literature search was conducted in spring 2015 to identify economic evaluations published in the Journal of Thoracic Oncology. Articles were reviewed for their study design, and areas for improvement were noted. Suggested improvements include using more rigorous sensitivity analyses, adopting a standard approach to reporting results, and conducting complete economic evaluations. Researchers should design high-quality studies to ensure the validity of the results, and consumers of this research should interpret these studies critically on the basis of a full understanding of the methodologies used before considering any of the conclusions. As advancements occur on both the research and consumer sides, this literature can be further developed to promote the best use of resources for this field. PMID:27079184

  15. Recommendations of the Spanish Societies of Radiation Oncology (SEOR), Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging (SEMNiM), and Medical Physics (SEFM) on 18F-FDG PET-CT for radiotherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    Caballero Perea, Begoña; Villegas, Antonio Cabrera; Rodríguez, José Miguel Delgado; Velloso, María José García; Vicente, Ana María García; Cabrerizo, Carlos Huerga; López, Rosa Morera; Romasanta, Luis Alberto Pérez; Beltrán, Moisés Sáez

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is a valuable tool for diagnosing and staging malignant lesions. The fusion of PET and computed tomography (CT) yields images that contain both metabolic and morphological information, which, taken together, have improved the diagnostic precision of PET in oncology. The main imaging modality for planning radiotherapy treatment is CT. However, PET-CT is an emerging modality for use in planning treatments because it allows for more accurate treatment volume definition. The use of PET-CT for treatment planning is highly complex, and protocols and standards for its use are still being developed. It seems probable that PET-CT will eventually replace current CT-based planning methods, but this will require a full understanding of the relevant technical aspects of PET-CT planning. The aim of the present document is to review these technical aspects and to provide recommendations for clinical use of this imaging modality in the radiotherapy planning process. PMID:24377032

  16. The Oncology Care Model: A Critique.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christian A; Ward, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly increasing national health care expenditures are a major area of concern as threats to the integrity of the health care system. Significant increases in the cost of care for patients with cancer are driven by numerous factors, most importantly the cost of hospital care and escalating pharmaceutical costs. The current fee-for-service system (FFS) has been identified as a potential driver of the increasing cost of care, and multiple stakeholders are interested in replacing FFS with a system that improves the quality of care while at the same time reducing cost. Several models have been piloted, including a Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI)-sponsored medical home model (COME HOME) for patients with solid tumors that was able to generate savings by integrating a phone triage system, pathways, and seamless patient care 7 days a week to reduce overall cost of care, mostly by decreasing patient admissions to hospitals and referrals to emergency departments. CMMI is now launching a new pilot model, the Oncology Care Model (OCM), which differs from COME HOME in several important ways. It does not abolish FFS but provides an additional payment in 6-month increments for each patient on active cancer treatment. It also allows practices to participate in savings if they can decrease the overall cost of care, to include all chemotherapy and supportive care drugs, and fulfill certain quality metrics. A critical discussion of the proposed model, which is scheduled to start in 2016, will be provided at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting with practicing oncologists and a Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) representative. PMID:27249711

  17. [Oncological data elements in histopathology].

    PubMed

    Haroske, G; Kramm, T; Mörz, M; Oberholzer, M

    2010-09-01

    In order to cope with increasing demands to supply information to a variety of documentation systems outside pathology, pathologists need to set standards both for the content and the use of the information they generate. Oncological datasets based on a set vocabulary are urgently required for use both in pathology and in further processing. Data elements were defined according to German pathology report guidelines for colorectal cancers in line with ISO 11179 requirements for the relations between data element concepts and value domains, as well as for further formal conditions, which can be exported in XML together with metadata information. Tests on 100 conventionally written diagnoses showed their principal usability and an increasing degree of guideline conformity in diagnoses commensurate with training time. This set of oncological data elements is a valuable checklist tool for pathologists, enabling formatted information export for further use and saving documentation effort. PMID:20544201

  18. A Model for Rural Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Heifetz, Laurence J.; Christensen, Scott D.; deVere-White, Ralph W.; Meyers, Fredrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Small rural hospitals in the United States have had challenging issues developing sustainable oncology programs. This is a report on the development of a successful rural oncology program. In 2006, the Tahoe Forest Health System in Truckee, CA, a remote mountain resort town, started a cancer program that was focused on addressing patient and family fears that are common to all cancer patients but more frightening in the rural setting. Four years later, it is a thriving program with significant community support, a creative academic affiliation, and a central focus of the future of the hospital. The Tahoe Forest Cancer Center developed a sustainable model for high quality cancer care that overcomes geographic, cultural and financial barriers. This structure may serve as a model for national rural health care. PMID:21886498

  19. Statistical Methods for Establishing Personalized Treatment Rules in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junsheng; Hobbs, Brian P.; Stingo, Francesco C.

    2015-01-01

    The process for using statistical inference to establish personalized treatment strategies requires specific techniques for data-analysis that optimize the combination of competing therapies with candidate genetic features and characteristics of the patient and disease. A wide variety of methods have been developed. However, heretofore the usefulness of these recent advances has not been fully recognized by the oncology community, and the scope of their applications has not been summarized. In this paper, we provide an overview of statistical methods for establishing optimal treatment rules for personalized medicine and discuss specific examples in various medical contexts with oncology as an emphasis. We also point the reader to statistical software for implementation of the methods when available. PMID:26446492

  20. A CD-ROM database product for oncology.

    PubMed

    Schipma, P B

    1988-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a vertically oriented CD-ROM database product in the medical subdiscipline of oncology. Called OncoDisc, the CD-ROM is mastered by ISG. It contains three major information collections: (1) PDQ (a system of a series of files and a set of relationships; the user accesses the data through those relationships); (2) Cancerlit (the research literature that underlies the treatment information contained in PDQ), and (3) full-text articles. SearchLITE, the retrieval system, is written in C language and has been implemented on the the DEC VAX family and the IBM PC/XT and PC/AT. The disc provides a personal library of oncology information for immediate local use by the health professional; it requires no subscription to an online service, no telecommunications, and no online search charges. PMID:10302065

  1. GENDER TRENDS IN RADIATION ONCOLOGY IN THE UNITED STATES: A 30 YEAR ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Awad A; Egleston, Brian; Holliday, Emma; Eastwick, Gary; Takita, Cristiane; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Although considerable research exists regarding the role of women in the medical profession in the United States, little work has described the participation of women in academic radiation oncology. We examined women’s participation in authorship of radiation oncology literature, a visible and influential activity that merits specific attention. Methods and Materials We examined the gender of first and senior U.S. physician-authors of articles published in the Red Journal in 1980, 1990, 2000, 2004, 2010 and 2012. The significance of trends over time was evaluated using logistic regression. Results were compared to female representation in journals of general medicine and other major medical specialties. Findings were also placed in the context of trends in the representation of women among radiation oncology faculty and residents over the last three decades, using AAMC data. Results The proportion of women among Red Journal first authors increased from 13.4% in 1980 to 29.7% in 2012, and the proportion among senior authors increased from 3.2% to 22.6%. The proportion of women among radiation oncology full-time faculty increased from 11% to 26.7% from 1980 to 2012. The proportion of women among radiation oncology residents increased from 27.1% to 33.3% from 1980 to 2010. Conclusion Female first and senior authorship in the Red Journal has increased significantly, as has women’s participation among full-time faculty, but women remain under-represented among radiation oncology residents as compared to their representation in the medical student body. Understanding such trends is necessary to develop appropriately targeted interventions to improve gender equity in radiation oncology. PMID:24189127

  2. Between parasitic theory and experimental oncology: a proposal for systematizing oncological science in Portugal, 1889-1945.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui Manuel Pinto

    2012-06-01

    This article deals with the bio-medical investigation of cancer studies in Portugal between 1889 and 1945. By examining the main works produced between the end of the nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth century, it has been possible to illuminate and define a field of scientific endeavour which has been the scope of little study to date. Starting from the introduction and consolidation of the defining principles of experimental oncology, distinct phases can be discerned in the production of scientific material, alternating between support for the dominant theories and the application of methods for artificially creating the disease. In accordance with the principal phases of investigation, a brief systematic overview of the scope of these oncological studies is presented.

  3. Between parasitic theory and experimental oncology: a proposal for systematizing oncological science in Portugal, 1889-1945.

    PubMed

    Costa, Rui Manuel Pinto

    2012-06-01

    This article deals with the bio-medical investigation of cancer studies in Portugal between 1889 and 1945. By examining the main works produced between the end of the nineteenth century and the middle of the twentieth century, it has been possible to illuminate and define a field of scientific endeavour which has been the scope of little study to date. Starting from the introduction and consolidation of the defining principles of experimental oncology, distinct phases can be discerned in the production of scientific material, alternating between support for the dominant theories and the application of methods for artificially creating the disease. In accordance with the principal phases of investigation, a brief systematic overview of the scope of these oncological studies is presented. PMID:22872387

  4. Supportive care in oncology.

    PubMed

    Levy, M H; Rosen, S M; Ottery, F D; Hermann, J

    1992-01-01

    Pain management, nutritional support, and psychosocial support are fundamental services that enhance patients' ability to cope with their cancer and its therapy. The common goal of symptom prevention mandates that each of these supportive services be provided to all patients throughout their cancer experience. Comprehensive cancer pain management begins with identifying the origin of all of the patient's pains and treating each one specifically. Pain prevention can be achieved through around-the-clock opioid administration with as-needed supplements for breakthrough pain and dose titration. Common narcotic side effects such as constipation and nausea also must be prevented. Successful opioid analgesia requires that patient and family concerns regarding addiction and tolerance be dispelled at the outset. Cancer pain prevention can be further optimized with the use of appropriate coanalgesics in response to the pathophysiology of the patient's pains. Cognitive and behavioral therapies may also be useful adjuncts to reduce both pain and suffering. Procedure-oriented pain control should be considered when systemic pharmacologic therapy does not provide adequate pain relief or is associated with intolerable side effects. The only absolute contraindications for pain-relieving procedures are untreatable coagulopathy and a decrease in mental status not related to medical pain management. Useful neurodestructive techniques include radiofrequency lesioning, cryoanalgesia, and chemical neurolysis with agents such as phenol, alcohol, and hypertonic saline. The most beneficial pain-relieving procedures and percutaneous cordotomy, spinal narcotics, celiac and hypogastric plexus ablation, spinal neurolysis, and epidural injection of steroids and hypertonic saline. Procedure selection depends on the cause of the pain and the patient's prognosis. Common indications for pain-relieving procedures include unilateral pain below the shoulder, upper abdominal visceral pains, pelvic

  5. Organisational design for an integrated oncological department

    PubMed Central

    Meiss-de Haas, Ch.L.; Falkmann, H.; Douma, J.; van Gassel, J.G.; Peters, W.G.; van Mierlo, R.; van Turnhout, J.M.; Verhagen, C.A.H.H.V.M.; Schrijvers, A.J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Objective The outcomes of a Strength, Weakness, Opportunities and Threat (SWOT) analysis of three Integrated Oncological Departments were compared with their present situation three years later to define factors that can influence a successful implementation and development of an Integrated Oncological Department in- and outside (i.e. home care) the hospital. Research design Comparative Qualitative Case Study. Methods Auditing based on care-as-usual norms by an external, experienced auditing committee. Research setting Integrated Oncological Departments of three hospitals. Results Successful multidisciplinary care in an integrated, oncological department needs broad support inside the hospital and a well-defined organisational plan. PMID:16896411

  6. 76 FR 58520 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee...

  7. Computerized prescriber order entry in the outpatient oncology setting: from evidence to meaningful use

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, V.; Cosby, R.; Cheung, A.; Lankshear, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy is an effective treatment in the fight against many cancers. Medication errors in oncology can be particularly serious given the narrow therapeutic window of antineoplastic drugs and their high toxicities. Computerized prescriber order entry (cpoe) has consistently been shown to reduce medication errors and adverse drug events in various settings, but its use in the oncology setting has not been well established. To gain a better understanding of the meaningful use of cpoe systems in the outpatient chemotherapy setting, we undertook a systematic review of systemic therapy cpoe. Methods A province-wide expert panel consisting of clinical experts, health information professionals, and specialists in human factors design provided guidance in the development of the research questions, search terms, databases, and inclusion criteria. The systematic review was undertaken by a core team consisting of a medical oncologist, nurse, pharmacist, and methodologist. The medline, embase, cinahl, and compendex databases were searched for relevant evidence. Results The database searches resulted in 5642 hits, of which 9 met the inclusion criteria and were retained. In the oncology setting, cpoe systems generally reduce chemotherapy medication errors; however, specific types of errors increase with the use of cpoe. These systems affect practice both positively and negatively with respect to time, workload, and productivity. Conclusions Despite the paucity of oncology-specific research, cpoe should be used in outpatient chemotherapy delivery to reduce chemotherapy-related medication errors. Adoption by clinicians will be enhanced by cpoe processes that complement current practice and workflow processes. PMID:25089110

  8. Future trends in the supply and demand for radiation oncology physicists.

    PubMed

    Mills, Michael D; Thornewill, Judah; Esterhay, Robert J

    2010-04-12

    Significant controversy surrounds the 2012 / 2014 decision announced by the Trustees of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) in October of 2007. According to the ABR, only medical physicists who are graduates of a Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs, Inc. (CAMPEP) accredited academic or residency program will be admitted for examination in the years 2012 and 2013. Only graduates of a CAMPEP accredited residency program will be admitted for examination beginning in the year 2014. An essential question facing the radiation oncology physics community is an estimation of supply and demand for medical physicists through the year 2020. To that end, a Demand & Supply dynamic model was created using STELLA software. Inputs into the model include: a) projected new cancer incidence and prevalence 1990-2020; b) AAPM member ages and retirement projections 1990-2020; c) number of ABR physics diplomates 1990-2009; d) number of patients per Qualified Medical Physicist from Abt Reports I (1995), II (2002) and III (2008); e) non-CAMPEP physicists trained 1990-2009 and projected through 2014; f) CAMPEP physicists trained 1993-2008 and projected through 2014; and g) working Qualified Medical Physicists in radiation oncology in the United States (1990-2007). The model indicates that the number of qualified medical physicists working in radiation oncology required to meet demand in 2020 will be 150-175 per year. Because there is some elasticity in the workforce, a portion of the work effort might be assumed by practicing medical physicists. However, the minimum number of new radiation oncology physicists (ROPs) required for the health of the profession is estimated to be 125 per year in 2020. The radiation oncology physics community should plan to build residency programs to support these numbers for the future of the profession.

  9. On the Way to New Horizons: Telemedicine in Oncology.

    PubMed

    Schlag

    1997-01-01

    Breathtaking insights into carcinogenesis and tumor biology have been gained mainly by recent technical advances in molecular-biological and genetic techniques. Thus, dimensions of earlier diagnosis and the development of new concepts in therapy arise, which were previously unavailable. There is no doubt that through these techniques the future role and tasks of surgical oncology will change. New indications will result, for example, in the context of prophylactic therapy of hereditary malignant disease or the removal of tissue predisposed to tumors. However, modes of therapy orientated toward molecular biology will still be dependent on specialist surgical interventions in the future. Examples are such innovative concepts of therapy as transport of a therapeutic device to or into tumor cells (e.g., gene gun), or even simply obtaining the necessary tumor tissue for therapy (vaccination with transfected autologous tumor cells). Therefore, the future of surgical oncology will be influenced quantitatively as well as conceptually by new qualitative requirements. Improving precision of the surgical intervention will have to go hand-in-hand with a further reduction in surgical trauma. The consistent use of laser, video, computer and communication technology can be seen as an important predeterminant here for optimizing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. If correctly guided, the professional experience of the individual surgeon and his personal efficiency can also be positively influenced by the swift conversion of society to multimedia and information technology. Major advances in interdisciplinary communication, as one important factor in the choice and the course of suitable complex therapies in oncology, will have to target and help to overcome former weak spots. Communication in and outside one department or hospital, as well as external communication between different medical disciplines and specialists, is being developed further and increasingly refined. The

  10. Oncology nurses' knowledge, practice, and educational needs regarding cancer genetics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S K; Rieger, P T; Marani, S K; deMoor, C; Gritz, E R

    2001-01-01

    This study evaluated oncology nurses' knowledge of cancer genetics and related topics, and identified current practice patterns and perceived educational needs in this area. A 54-item study questionnaire was mailed to a random sample of 1,200 Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) members and 75 members of the ONS-Cancer Genetics Special Interest Group; 656 (51%) of those eligible responded. After exclusions, we analyzed 573 responses. Most respondents were Caucasian, female, and worked in hospital or outpatient settings. Half were staff nurses and 8% specialized in cancer genetics. Respondents with higher levels of nursing education or with continuing education in cancer genetics, who worked in positions other than staff nurses, and whose primary practice area was cancer genetics had significantly higher mean scores overall on questions measuring knowledge of cancer genetics and related areas. Higher perceived educational needs to improve knowledge or practice related to cancer genetics at basic, intermediate or advanced levels were associated with all or some of the following variables: lower education; hospital/ outpatient or managed care/private practice settings; lack of continuing education in cancer genetics, and positions other than advanced practice nurses. Although nearly half of the respondents had received patient inquiries regarding cancer genetics, only 35% were aware of referral resources and 26% had made such referrals. These findings may be used to develop targeted educational approaches that prepare oncology nurses to incorporate cancer genetics into any level of practice. PMID:11426452

  11. Industry progress report on neuro-oncology: a biotech update.

    PubMed

    Haber, Jessica S; Banu, Matei A; Ray, Ashley; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John A

    2013-04-01

    With steadily rising revenue and large numbers of clinical trials utilizing novel treatment strategies, the field of neuro-oncology is at the core of the growing cancer therapy industry. In June 2012, the Weill Cornell Brain and Tumor Center hosted the first Brain Tumor Biotech Summit as a forum for fostering and encouraging collaboration between researches and investors to accelerate novel treatments for brain cancer. This event brought together neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, academicians, entrepreneurs, non-profits, CEOs and investors in an attempt to bring innovative treatments and concepts to the fore. Specific subjects presented at the meeting included new surgical devices and delivery techniques, targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy, and stem cell biology. The mission of the summit was to provide opportunities for researchers in neuro-oncology to directly interact with leaders from the investment community with insight into the commercial aspects of our work. Our shared goal is to shorten the time for basic science ideas to be translated into the clinical setting. The following serves as a progress report on the biotech industry in neuro-oncology, as presented at the Brain Tumor Biotech Summit. PMID:23423513

  12. Industry progress report on neuro-oncology: a biotech update.

    PubMed

    Haber, Jessica S; Banu, Matei A; Ray, Ashley; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John A

    2013-04-01

    With steadily rising revenue and large numbers of clinical trials utilizing novel treatment strategies, the field of neuro-oncology is at the core of the growing cancer therapy industry. In June 2012, the Weill Cornell Brain and Tumor Center hosted the first Brain Tumor Biotech Summit as a forum for fostering and encouraging collaboration between researches and investors to accelerate novel treatments for brain cancer. This event brought together neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, academicians, entrepreneurs, non-profits, CEOs and investors in an attempt to bring innovative treatments and concepts to the fore. Specific subjects presented at the meeting included new surgical devices and delivery techniques, targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy, and stem cell biology. The mission of the summit was to provide opportunities for researchers in neuro-oncology to directly interact with leaders from the investment community with insight into the commercial aspects of our work. Our shared goal is to shorten the time for basic science ideas to be translated into the clinical setting. The following serves as a progress report on the biotech industry in neuro-oncology, as presented at the Brain Tumor Biotech Summit.

  13. BASIC Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Carol Ann

    Designed for use by both secondary- and postsecondary-level business teachers, this curriculum guide consists of 10 units of instructional materials dealing with Beginners All-Purpose Symbol Instruction Code (BASIC) programing. Topics of the individual lessons are numbering BASIC programs and using the PRINT, END, and REM statements; system…

  14. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. Immunotherapy for neuro-oncology: the critical rationale for combinatorial therapy.

    PubMed

    Reardon, David A; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Liau, Linda

    2015-11-01

    A successful therapeutic paradigm established historically in oncology involves combining agents with potentially complementary mechanisms of antitumor activity into rationally designed regimens. For example, cocktails of cytotoxic agents, which were carefully designed based on mechanisms of action, dose, and scheduling considerations, have led to dramatic improvements in survival including cures for childhood leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, and several other complex cancers. Outcome for glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant CNS cancer, has been more modest, but nonetheless our current standard of care derives from confirmation that combination therapy surpasses single modality therapy. Immunotherapy has recently come of age for medical oncology with exciting therapeutic benefits achieved by several types of agents including vaccines, adoptive T cells, and immune checkpoint inhibitors against several types of cancers. Nonetheless, most benefits are relatively short, while others are durable but are limited to a minority of treated patients. Critical factors limiting efficacy of immunotherapeutics include insufficient immunogenicity and/or inadequate ability to overcome immunosuppressive factors exploited by tumors. The paradigm of rationally designed combinatorial regimens, originally established by cytotoxic therapy for oncology, may also prove relevant for immunotherapy. Realization of the true therapeutic potential of immunotherapy for medical oncology and neuro-oncology patients may require development of combinatorial regimens that optimize immunogenicity and target tumor adaptive immunosuppressive factors.

  16. [ASTRO 2006 : significant advances in urological oncology].

    PubMed

    Coquard, Régis

    2007-02-01

    The state of the art in radiation oncology has been recently updated at the ASTRO 2006 meeting. Innovating results have been reported in the field of urological oncology. This paper aims to summarize and to comment the studies presenting an important impact on the urologists' daily practice. Technological advances are also described.

  17. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  18. Art Therapy with an Oncology Care Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nainis, Nancy A.

    2005-01-01

    Oncology nurses are particularly vulnerable to "burnout" syndrome due to the intensity of their work and the ongoing losses they experience while providing oncology care to their patients. High levels of stress in the workplace left untended lead to high job turnover, poor productivity, and diminished quality of care for patients. Attention to…

  19. Report from the OECI Oncology Days 2014

    PubMed Central

    van Harten, WH; Stanta, G; Bussolati, G; Riegman, P; Hoefler, G; Becker, KF; Folprecht, G; Truini, M; Haybaeck, J; Buiga, R; Dono, M; Bagg, A; López Guerrero, JA; Zupo, S; Lemare, F; de Lorenzo, F; Goedbloed, N; Razavi, D; Lövey, J; Cadariu, PA; Rollandi, GA; Paparo, F; Pierotti, M; Ciuleanu, T; De Paoli, P; Weiner, G; Saghatchian, M; Lombardo, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 OECI Oncology Days was held at the ‘Prof. Dr. Ion Chiricuta’ Oncology Institute in Cluj, Romania, from 12 to 13 June. The focus of this year’s gathering was on developments in personalised medicine and other treatment advances which have made the cost of cancer care too high for many regions throughout Europe. PMID:25624877

  20. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs. PMID:27264203

  1. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs.

  2. Development and Validation of the Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, David A. J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Development of a parent report measure for assessing the quality of life of children with cancer is described. The Pediatric Oncology Quality of Life Scale assesses physical function and role restriction, emotional distress, and reaction to current medical treatment. Reliability and validity assessments provide preliminary support for the…

  3. A Comparison of Computer-Assisted Instruction and Tutorials in Hematology and Oncology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study comparing the effectiveness of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and small group instruction found no significant difference in medical student achievement in oncology but higher achievement through small-group instruction in hematology. Students did not view CAI as more effective, but saw it as a supplement to traditional methods. (MSE)

  4. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  5. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, A

    2008-01-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe. PMID:21611002

  6. Expanding the role of the oncology nurse.

    PubMed

    Quinn, A

    2008-07-01

    Oncology nursing continues to evolve in response to advances in cancer treatment, information and biotechnology. As new scientific and technological discoveries are integrated into cancer care, oncology nurses need to play a key role in the management of this patient population. The role of the oncology nurse has expanded significantly and can differ greatly across cultures. Sophisticated treatments and the growth of targeted therapies will create the challenge of ensuring that all nurses working in this arena are well-educated, independent thinkers. Thus the future success of oncology nurses will focus on enhancement of nursing practice through advanced education. The increased globalisation of healthcare offers exciting opportunities to accomplish this goal by allowing for collaborative relationships among oncology nurses across the globe.

  7. Caregivers' perception of drug administration safety for pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Harris, Nariman; Badr, Lina Kurdahi; Saab, Raya; Khalidi, Aziza

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors (MEs) are reported to be between 1.5% and 90% depending on many factors, such as type of the institution where data were collected and the method to identify the errors. More significantly, the risk for errors with potential for harm is 3 times higher for children, especially those receiving chemotherapy. Few studies have been published on averting such errors with children and none on how caregivers perceive their role in preventing such errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric oncology patient's caregivers' perception of drug administration safety and their willingness to be involved in averting such errors. A cross-sectional design was used to study a nonrandomized sample of 100 caregivers of pediatric oncology patients. Ninety-six of the caregivers surveyed were well informed about the medications their children receive and were ready to participate in error prevention strategies. However, an underestimation of potential errors uncovered a high level of "trust" for the staff. Caregivers echoed their apprehension for being responsible for potential errors. Caregivers are a valuable resource to intercept medication errors. However, caregivers may be hesitant to actively communicate their fears with health professionals. Interventions that aim at encouraging caregivers to engage in the safety of their children are recommended.

  8. Crowdfunding drug development: the state of play in oncology and rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic, Nick; Lynd, Larry D

    2014-11-01

    In this article, we present descriptive data on 125 crowdfunding campaigns aimed at financing research in oncology (including basic research, drug discovery, and clinical trials). We also describe five campaigns that have succeeded in raising substantial funds to support the development of treatments for ultrarare diseases. The data suggest that crowdfunding is a viable approach to supporting early proof-of-concept research that could allow researchers in oncology and rare diseases to succeed in traditional grant competitions or to attract private investment. The data also suggest that such an approach could become a valuable additional source of funding for early-stage innovators in the drug development arena.

  9. High-intensity focused ultrasound plus concomitant radiotherapy: a new weapon in oncology?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The potential impact of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to general medicine and oncology seems very high. However, while in the research area, the development of this technique is very rapid and unchallenged. The direct application of HIFU to human tumour therapy is hampered by various technical difficulties, which may confine its role to a marginal device in the surgery armamentarium. To deploy the full potential of focused ultrasound in oncology, it seems necessary to review the basic relationship between HIFU and external beam radiotherapy. This is the aim of the present work. PMID:24761227

  10. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients.

  11. Decision making in surgical oncology.

    PubMed

    Lamb, B; Green, J S A; Vincent, C; Sevdalis, N

    2011-09-01

    Decisions in surgical oncology are increasingly being made by multi-disciplinary teams (MDTs). Although MDTs have been widely accepted as the preferred model for cancer service delivery, the process of decision making has not been well described and there is little evidence pointing to the ideal structure of an MDT. Performance in surgery has been shown to depend on non-technical skills, such as decision making, as well as patient factors and the technical skills of the healthcare team. Application of this systems approach to MDT working allows the identification of factors that affect the quality of decision making for cancer patients. In this article we review the literature on decision making in surgical oncology and by drawing from the systems approach to surgical performance we provide a framework for understanding the process of decision making in MDTs. Technical factors that affect decision making include the information about patients, robust ICT and video-conferencing equipment, a minimum dataset with expert review of radiological and pathological information, implementation and recording of the MDTs decision. Non-technical factors with an impact on decision making include attendance of team members at meetings, leadership, teamwork, open discussion, consensus on decisions and communication with patients and primary care. Optimising these factors will strengthen the decision making process and raise the quality of care for cancer patients. PMID:20719499

  12. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable. PMID:1727112

  13. Radiation oncology residents' computer workstation.

    PubMed

    Zusag, T W; McDonald, S; Miller, A; Purdy, J A; Rubin, P

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of using the Macintosh computer as a workstation platform for radiation oncology residents because of its ease of use, graphics capability, and low cost. Hypercard was chosen as the programming environment because it easily mixes graphics, text, and control functions in an integrated screen display. Furthermore, it results in a system that can be relatively easily extended and customized by individual users with varying degrees of computer skills. We have developed several software modules in order to test the ability of this environment to support the demands of such a workstation. Modules created thus far include various clinical physics aids and tutorials, treatment planning guides, oncology databases, and others. The software runs on all Macintosh configurations, but calculation speeds are improved when a 68020 or greater processor is used. In general, we have been pleased with the implementation thus far. Graphics display capability is good, but design and entry of graphics have proved labor-intensive. Searching is fast and text is easily entered and manipulated. Finished modules can be customized with minimal computer training, but implementing complex new functions requires familiarity with Hypercard's programming language. New modules, once developed, are easily integrated into the workstation universe, suggesting that cooperative development of the workstation by multiple contributors is realistically achievable.

  14. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient’s ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient’s presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  15. Thyroid Disorders in the Oncology Patient.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Kari

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid disease and cancer diagnoses are common conditions likely to coexist. Optimal management requires appropriate diagnostic testing and consideration of a number of factors, including overall health status and prognosis. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can lead to a number of symptoms that may affect not only quality of life but can interfere with the patient's ability to tolerate cancer treatment. Imaging studies performed for cancer staging can identify incidental structural abnormalities in the thyroid, which should be assessed with dedicated neck ultrasonography and possibly fine-needle aspiration. Incidental thyroid cancer is most often less urgent than the patient's presenting malignancy and can be addressed surgically when appropriate in the context of other treatments (i.e., chemotherapy). Providers working in an oncology setting, as well as primary care providers, should be aware of medications that are associated with hormonal abnormalities. Any patient with a history of neck or brain radiation therapy is at risk of developing hypothyroidism and possibly other endocrinopathies. Complex or very ill patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that utilizes the experience of a knowledgeable endocrinologist. PMID:26649243

  16. Treatment of Cachexia in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, EM; Errihani, H

    2010-01-01

    Cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with many chronic or end-stage diseases, especially cancer, and is characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The management of cachexia is a complex challenge that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event with an integrated or multimodal treatment approach targeting the different factors involved in its pathophysiology. The purpose of this article was to review the current medical treatment of cancer-related cachexia, in particular focusing on combination therapy and ongoing research. Among the treatments proposed in the literature for cancer-related cachexia, some proved to be ineffective, namely, cyproheptadine, hydrazine, metoclopramide, and pentoxifylline. Among effective treatments, progestagens are currently considered the best available treatment option for cancer-related cachexia, and they are the only drugs approved in Europe. Drugs with a strong rationale that have failed or have not shown univocal results in clinical trials so far include eicosapentaenoic acid, cannabinoids, bortezomib, and anti-TNF-alpha MoAb. Several emerging drugs have shown promising results but are still under clinical investigation (thalidomide, selective cox-2 inhibitors, ghrelin mimetics, insulin, oxandrolone, and olanzapine). To date, despite several years of coordinated efforts in basic and clinical research, practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of cancer-related muscle wasting are lacking, mainly because of the multifactorial pathogenesis of the syndrome. From all the data presented, one can speculate that one single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful. PMID:21218002

  17. Treatment of cachexia in oncology.

    PubMed

    Tazi, Em; Errihani, H

    2010-09-01

    Cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with many chronic or end-stage diseases, especially cancer, and is characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The management of cachexia is a complex challenge that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event with an integrated or multimodal treatment approach targeting the different factors involved in its pathophysiology. The purpose of this article was to review the current medical treatment of cancer-related cachexia, in particular focusing on combination therapy and ongoing research. Among the treatments proposed in the literature for cancer-related cachexia, some proved to be ineffective, namely, cyproheptadine, hydrazine, metoclopramide, and pentoxifylline. Among effective treatments, progestagens are currently considered the best available treatment option for cancer-related cachexia, and they are the only drugs approved in Europe. Drugs with a strong rationale that have failed or have not shown univocal results in clinical trials so far include eicosapentaenoic acid, cannabinoids, bortezomib, and anti-TNF-alpha MoAb. Several emerging drugs have shown promising results but are still under clinical investigation (thalidomide, selective cox-2 inhibitors, ghrelin mimetics, insulin, oxandrolone, and olanzapine). To date, despite several years of coordinated efforts in basic and clinical research, practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of cancer-related muscle wasting are lacking, mainly because of the multifactorial pathogenesis of the syndrome. From all the data presented, one can speculate that one single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful.

  18. Schizophrenia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... I know with schizophrenia? For More Information Share Schizophrenia Basics Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy What is schizophrenia? Schizophrenia is a serious mental disorder that affects ...

  19. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indrisano, Roselmina; And Others

    1976-01-01

    These articles are presented as an aide in teaching basic subjects. This issue examines reading diagnosis, food preservation, prime numbers, electromagnets, acting out in language arts, self-directed spelling activities, and resources for environmental education. (Editor/RK)

  20. Fluoridation Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Water Fluoridation Basics Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... because of tooth decay. History of Fluoride in Water In the 1930s, scientists examined the relationship between ...

  1. Basic Finance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A discussion of the basic measures of corporate financial strength, and the sources of the information is reported. Considered are: balance sheet, income statement, funds and cash flow, and financial ratios.

  2. Diagnostic Online Assessment of Basic IT Skills in 1st-Year Undergraduates in the Medical Sciences Division, University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sieber, Vivien

    2009-01-01

    Attitude, experience and competence (broadly covered by the European Computer Driving Licence syllabus) in information technology (IT) were assessed in 846 1st-year Medical Sciences Division undergraduates (2003-06) at the start of their first term. Online assessments delivered during induction workshops were presented as an opportunity for…

  3. Pros and cons of vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum: examples and experiences from Linköping, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dahle, L O; Brynhildsen, J; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL), combined with early patient contact, multiprofessional education and emphasis on development of communications skills, has become the basis for the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping (FHS), Sweden, which was started in 1986. Important elements in the curriculum are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science parts of the curriculum and horizontal integration between different subject areas. This article discusses the importance of vertical integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to experiences from the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping, and also give examples on how it has been implemented during the latest 15 years. Results and views put forward in published articles concerning vertical integration within undergraduate medical education are discussed in relation to the experiences in Linköping. Vertical integration between basic sciences and clinical medicine in a PBL setting has been found to stimulate profound rather than superficial learning, and thereby stimulates better understanding of important biomedical principles. Integration probably leads to better retention of knowledge and the ability to apply basic science principles in the appropriate clinical context. Integration throughout the whole curriculum entails a lot of time and work in respect of planning, organization and execution. The teachers have to be deeply involved and enthusiastic and have to cooperate over departmental borders, which may produce positive spin-off effects in teaching and research but also conflicts that have to be resolved. The authors believe vertical integration supports PBL and stimulates deep and lifelong learning.

  4. Oncologic Outcomes After Transoral Robotic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Magnuson, J. Scott; Smith, Richard V.; Moore, Eric; Lawson, Georges; Remacle, Marc; Ganly, Ian; Kraus, Dennis H.; Teng, Marita S.; Miles, Brett A.; White, Hilliary; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Ferris, Robert L.; Mehta, Vikas; Kiyosaki, Krista; Damrose, Edward J.; Wang, Steven J.; Kupferman, Michael E.; Koh, Yoon Woo; Genden, Eric M.; Holsinger, F. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Large patient cohorts are necessary to validate the efficacy of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the management of head and neck cancer. OBJECTIVES To review oncologic outcomes of TORS from a large multi-institutional collaboration and to identify predictors of disease recurrence and disease-specific mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective review of records from 410 patients undergoing TORS for laryngeal and pharyngeal cancers from January 1, 2007, through December 31, 2012, was performed. Pertinent data were obtained from 11 participating medical institutions. INTERVENTIONS Select patients received radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy before or after TORS. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Locoregional control, disease-specific survival, and overall survival were calculated. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with log-rank testing to evaluate individual variable association with these outcomes, followed by multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression modeling to identify independent predictors. RESULTS Of the 410 patients treated with TORS in this study, 364 (88.8%) had oropharyngeal cancer. Of these 364 patients, information about post-operative adjuvant therapy was known about 338: 106 (31.3) received radiation therapy alone, and 72 (21.3%) received radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Neck dissection was performed in 323 patients (78.8%). Mean follow-up time was 20 months. Local, regional, and distant recurrence occurred in 18 (4.4%), 15 (3.7%), and 10 (2.4%) of 410 patients, respectively. Seventeen (4.1%) died of disease, and 13 (3.2%) died of other causes. The 2-year locoregional control rate was 91.8% (95% CI, 87.6%-94.7%), disease-specific survival 94.5% (95% CI, 90.6%-96.8%), and overall survival 91% (95% CI, 86.5%-94.0%). Multivariate analysis identified improved survival among women (P = .05) and for patients with tumors arising in tonsil (P = .01). Smoking was associated with worse overall

  5. Improving Diversity, Inclusion, and Representation in Radiology and Radiation Oncology Part 1: Why These Matter

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoote, Johnson B.; Fielding, Julia R.; Deville, Curtiland; Gunderman, Richard B.; Morgan, Gail N.; Pandharipande, Pari V.; Duerinckx, Andre J.; Wynn, Raymond B.; Macura, Katarzyna J.

    2015-01-01

    The ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity is committed to identifying barriers to a diverse physician workforce in radiology and radiation oncology (RRO), and to offering policy recommendations to overcome these barriers. In Part 1 of a 2-part position article from the commission, diversity as a concept and its dimensions of personality, character, ethnicity, biology, biography, and organization are introduced. Terms commonly used to describe diverse individuals and groups are reviewed. The history of diversity and inclusion in US society and health care are addressed. The post–Civil Rights Era evolution of diversity in medicine is delineated: Diversity 1.0, with basic awareness, nondiscrimination, and recruitment; Diversity 2.0, with appreciation of the value of diversity but inclusion as peripheral or in opposition to other goals; and Diversity 3.0, which integrates diversity and inclusion into core missions of organizations and their leadership, and leverages its potential for innovation and contribution. The current states of diversity and inclusion in RRO are reviewed in regard to gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender identity. The lack of representation and unchanged demographics in these fields relative to other medical specialties are explored. The business case for diversity is discussed, with examples of successful models and potential application to the health care industry in general and to RRO. The moral, ethical, and public health imperative for diversity is also highlighted. PMID:24993534

  6. Improving diversity, inclusion, and representation in radiology and radiation oncology part 1: why these matter.

    PubMed

    Lightfoote, Johnson B; Fielding, Julia R; Deville, Curtiland; Gunderman, Richard B; Morgan, Gail N; Pandharipande, Pari V; Duerinckx, Andre J; Wynn, Raymond B; Macura, Katarzyna J

    2014-07-01

    The ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity is committed to identifying barriers to a diverse physician workforce in radiology and radiation oncology (RRO), and to offering policy recommendations to overcome these barriers. In Part 1 of a 2-part position article from the commission, diversity as a concept and its dimensions of personality, character, ethnicity, biology, biography, and organization are introduced. Terms commonly used to describe diverse individuals and groups are reviewed. The history of diversity and inclusion in US society and health care are addressed. The post-Civil Rights Era evolution of diversity in medicine is delineated: Diversity 1.0, with basic awareness, nondiscrimination, and recruitment; Diversity 2.0, with appreciation of the value of diversity but inclusion as peripheral or in opposition to other goals; and Diversity 3.0, which integrates diversity and inclusion into core missions of organizations and their leadership, and leverages its potential for innovation and contribution. The current states of diversity and inclusion in RRO are reviewed in regard to gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, and gender identity. The lack of representation and unchanged demographics in these fields relative to other medical specialties are explored. The business case for diversity is discussed, with examples of successful models and potential application to the health care industry in general and to RRO. The moral, ethical, and public health imperative for diversity is also highlighted.

  7. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... waiting room or office. Top of Page CDC’s response to SARS during the 2003 outbreak CDC worked ... Center to provide round-the-clock coordination and response. Committed more than 800 medical experts and support ...

  8. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... of asthma. The doctor may take a spirometer reading, give the child an inhaled medication that opens ...

  9. ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eric E; Balter, James M; Chaney, Edward L; Gerbi, Bruce J; Hughes, Lesley

    2004-11-01

    In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of

  10. ASTRO's core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E. . E-mail: klein@radonc.wustl.edu; Balter, James M.; Chaney, Edward L.; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Hughes, Lesley

    2004-11-01

    In 2002, the Radiation Physics Committee of the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) appointed an Ad-hoc Committee on Physics Teaching to Medical Residents. The main initiative of the committee was to develop a core curriculum for physics education. Prior publications that have analyzed physics teaching have pointed to wide discrepancies among teaching programs. The committee was composed of physicists or physicians from various residency program based institutions. Simultaneously, members had associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO), American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology (ACR). The latter two organizations' representatives were on the physics examination committees, as one of the main agendas was to provide a feedback loop between the examining organizations and ASTRO. The document resulted in a recommended 54-h course. Some of the subjects were based on American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements (particles, hyperthermia), whereas the majority of the subjects along with the appropriated hours per subject were devised and agreed upon by the committee. For each subject there are learning objectives and for each hour there is a detailed outline of material to be covered. Some of the required subjects/h are being taught in most institutions (i.e., Radiation Measurement and Calibration for 4 h), whereas some may be new subjects (4 h of Imaging for Radiation Oncology). The curriculum was completed and approved by the ASTRO Board in late 2003 and is slated for dissemination to the community in 2004. It is our hope that teaching physicists will adopt the recommended curriculum for their classes, and simultaneously that the ABR for its written physics examination and the ACR for its training examination will use the recommended curriculum as the basis for subject matter and depth of

  11. Oncology Nursing as Ethical Practice.

    PubMed

    Barton-Burke, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Many of us have patients we remember who left us with lasting memories. One such patient I cared for was a young man from Ghana. This young man had a wife, two children, and terminal cancer. He would not discuss the seriousness of his illness with his doctors, his nurses, his wife, or his community. However, from his hospital bed, he decided to go to Ghana to visit his mother. I was the clinical nurse specialist on the oncology unit at the time, and the nurses on the unit became upset with this man's plan because they knew that he would probably never return from Ghana. He would not die with his wife or his children surrounding his bedside, as in a U.S. healthcare setting. He would die with his mother in his country--in his own way.

  12. Total centralisation and optimisation of an oncology management suite via Citrix®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, C.; Frantzis, J.; Ripps, L.; Fenton, P.

    2014-03-01

    The management of patient information and treatment planning is traditionally an intra-departmental requirement of a radiation oncology service. Epworth Radiation Oncology systems must support the transient nature of Visiting Medical Officers (VMOs). This unique work practice created challenges when implementing the vision of a completely paperless solution that allows for a responsive and efficient service delivery. ARIA® and EclipseTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) have been deployed across four dedicated Citrix® (Citrix Systems, Santa Clara, CA, USA) servers allowing VMOs to access these applications remotely. A range of paperless solutions were developed within ARIA® to facilitate clinical and organisational management whilst optimising efficient work practices. The IT infrastructure and paperless workflow has enabled VMOs to securely access the VarianTM (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) oncology software and experience full functionality from any location on multiple devices. This has enhanced access to patient information and improved the responsiveness of the service. Epworth HealthCare has developed a unique solution to enable remote access to a centralised oncology management suite, while maintaining a secure and paperless working environment.

  13. PET-Based Thoracic Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Houshmand, Sina; Kalbasi, Anusha; Salavati, Ali; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET is increasingly being integrated into multiple aspects of oncology. PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) has become especially important in radiation oncology. With the increasing use of advanced techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy, PET/CT scans have played critical roles in the target delineation of tumors for radiation oncologists delivering conformal treatment techniques. Use of PET/CT is well established in lung cancer and several other thoracic malignancies. This article details the current uses of PET/CT in thoracic radiation oncology with a focus on lung cancer and describes expected future roles of PET/CT for thoracic tumors.

  14. Mission-Focused, Productivity-Based Model for Sustainable Support of Academic Hematology/Oncology Faculty and Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Randall F.; Hollinger, Krista J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adoption of a mission-focused, productivity-based funds-flow model recognizes faculty activities regardless of their primary mission and incentivizes and financially rewards both academic and clinical productivity. We describe here how such a model could be utilized for an academic division of hematology and medical oncology. Methods: On the basis of our own experience in managing the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of California at Irvine, and results of a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs, a new model was developed with clear definitions of missions (ascertaining faculty effort toward each mission and definition of productivity benchmarks for each), careful identification of revenue streams, and establishment of base and incentive salary support that rewards productivity. Ongoing performance improvement and monitoring was incorporated into the model. Results: A model for sustainable support of hematology/oncology faculty and divisions was developed that was transparent, flexible, and had buy-in from both the faculty and departmental/school administration. Development of the model was supported by a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs. Conclusion: It is possible to reorganize a faculty practice and salary structure to achieve a mission-focused, productivity-based paradigm. Although the model described is specifically targeted at academic hematology and medical oncology divisions, with modification, it could serve as a framework for other departments or throughout schools of medicine. PMID:20592779

  15. DOS basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    DOS is an acronym for Disk Operating System. It is actually a set of programs that allows you to control your personal computer. DOS offers the capabilities to create and manage files; organize and maintain information placed on disks; use application programs such as WordPerfect, Lotus 123, Excel, Windows, etc. In addition, DOS provides the basic utilities needed to copy files from one area to another, delete files and list files. The latest version of DOS also offers more advanced features that include hard disk compression and memory management. Basic DOS commands are discussed.

  16. A survey of emotional difficulties of nurses who care for oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Oflaz, Fahriye; Arslan, Filiz; Uzun, Senay; Ustunsoz, Ayfer; Yilmazkol, Elif; Unlü, Emine

    2010-02-01

    Nurses who care for dying patients are under pressure emotionally because of their beliefs and values about death as well as the emotions and reactions of the patients and their families. This study examines the emotional difficulties of nurses caring for oncology patients in Turkey. The study used a descriptive survey design. The participants were 157 nurses from three medical oncology units in Ankara. Results showed that nurses had difficulty in talking to oncology patients about end-of-life issues and found that caring for dying patients affected their personal lives. This study also showed that the length of nurses' work experience had no effect on their feelings and perceptions toward terminally ill patients. However, the nurses who had more work experience were more likely to report difficulty in talking to patients. Most of the nurses expressed feelings of inadequacy and hopelessness about pain management and treatments.

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance.

  18. New targets and targeted drugs for the treatment of cancer: an outlook to pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Rossig, Claudia; Juergens, Heribert; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2011-10-01

    Novel drugs and treatment modalities are urgently needed to further improve survival of children with cancer. In medical oncology, an increased understanding of the molecular basis of cancer is driving the development of new drugs that target relevant signaling pathways in cancer cells and tumor microenvironment. Small-molecule modulators of signal transduction and monoclonal antibodies against various cellular targets have been approved in adult cancers in recent years. These drugs are now starting to be considered for the use in children. Despite the biological differences between adult and pediatric cancers, common cellular pathways have emerged from experimental research. Thus, insights into clinical experience with molecular targeted drugs in adults may help to accelerate progress in pediatric oncology. Here, the authors review molecules and pathways for which drugs are approved for adult cancer treatment and provide links to existing and potential applications in pediatric oncology.

  19. Recent advances in immuno-oncology and its application to urological cancers.

    PubMed

    Mataraza, Jennifer M; Gotwals, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in immuno-oncology have the potential to transform the practice of medical oncology. Antibodies directed against negative regulators of T-cell function (checkpoint inhibitors), engineered cell therapies and innate immune stimulators, such as oncolytic viruses, are effective in a wide range of cancers. Immune'based therapies have had a clinically meaningful impact on the treatment of advanced melanoma, and the lessons regarding use of single agents and combinations in melanoma may be applicable to the treatment of urological cancers. Checkpoint inhibitors, cytokine therapy and therapeutic vaccines are already showing promise in urothelial bladder cancer, renal cell carcinoma and prostate cancer. Critical areas of future immuno-oncology research include the prospective identification of patients who will respond to current immune-based cancer therapies and the identification of new therapeutic agents that promote immune priming in tumours, and increase the rate of durable clinical responses.

  20. A contemporary case study illustrating the integration of health information technologies into the organisation and clinical practice of radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alexis Andrew; Phillips, Aaron K

    2006-01-01

    The development of software in radiation oncology departments has seen the increase in capability from the Record and Verify software focused on patient safety to a fully-fledged Oncology Information System (OIS). This paper reports on the medical aspects of the implementation of a modern Oncology Information System (IMPAC MultiAccess, also known as the Siemens LANTIS) in a New Zealand hospital oncology department. The department was successful in translating paper procedures into electronic procedures, and the report focuses on the changes in approach to organisation and data use that occurred. The difficulties that were faced, which included procedural re-design, management of change, removal of paper, implementation cost, integration with the HIS, quality assurance and datasets, are highlighted along with the local solutions developed to overcome these problems.

  1. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  2. TH-A-16A-01: Image Quality for the Radiation Oncology Physicist: Review of the Fundamentals and Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, J; Imbergamo, P

    2014-06-15

    The expansion and integration of diagnostic imaging technologies such as On Board Imaging (OBI) and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) into radiation oncology has required radiation oncology physicists to be responsible for and become familiar with assessing image quality. Unfortunately many radiation oncology physicists have had little or no training or experience in measuring and assessing image quality. Many physicists have turned to automated QA analysis software without having a fundamental understanding of image quality measures. This session will review the basic image quality measures of imaging technologies used in the radiation oncology clinic, such as low contrast resolution, high contrast resolution, uniformity, noise, and contrast scale, and how to measure and assess them in a meaningful way. Additionally a discussion of the implementation of an image quality assurance program in compliance with Task Group recommendations will be presented along with the advantages and disadvantages of automated analysis methods. Learning Objectives: Review and understanding of the fundamentals of image quality. Review and understanding of the basic image quality measures of imaging modalities used in the radiation oncology clinic. Understand how to implement an image quality assurance program and to assess basic image quality measures in a meaningful way.

  3. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  4. Body Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more about how the body works, what basic human anatomy is, and what happens when parts of the body don't function properly. Blood Bones, Muscles, and Joints Brain and Nervous System Digestive System Endocrine System Eyes Female Reproductive System ...

  5. Basic brownfields

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, B.L.

    1997-12-31

    This article is a basic guide to the brownfields problem. It will define the problem and will attempt to identify the various causes thereof. It also will review federal brownfields initiatives and state brownfields reforms in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia.

  6. Armchair BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Annie; Fox, David

    1983-01-01

    A first lesson in learning the computer programing language BASIC, this article explains how to give instructions to the computer; the commands PRINT, NEW, LIST, and RUN; and how to do simple line editing. There is a short quiz at the end. (EAO)

  7. Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Virginia, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    This issue of "Basic Education" is devoted to the arts in education as a concern that should be addressed in a time of new priorities for the curriculum. Five articles and a book review are included. The opening article, "The State of the Arts in Education: Envisioning Active Participation By All" (Virginia Robinson), emphasizes that the study of…

  8. Basic Backwardness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weingartner, Charles

    This paper argues that the "back to basics" movement is regressive and that regression is the characteristic mode of fear-ridden personalities. It is argued that many people in American society today have lost their ability to laugh and do not have the sense of humor which is crucial to a healthy mental state. Such topics as necrophilia, mental…

  9. Basic Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Barbra Farabough

    This learning packet contains teaching suggestions and student learning materials for a course in basic horticulture aimed at preparing students for employment in a number of horticulture areas. The packet includes nine sections and twenty instructional units. Following the standard format established for Oklahoma vocational education materials in…

  10. Basic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    Instructional materials are provided for a course that covers basic concepts of physics and chemistry. Designed for use in a workplace literacy project developed by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners, the course describes applications of these concepts to real-life situations, with an emphasis on applications of…

  11. Risk Factors in the Pediatric Ward Recognized by Students Before Pediatric Nursing Practice -Basic Data for Medical Safety Education Based on Student's Learning Readiness-.

    PubMed

    Hirowatari, Kanako; Nakamura, Emi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to extract the risk factors recognized by students before pediatric nursing practice in order to conduct medical safety education based on student's learning readiness. Third-year nursing students of A nursing college used the P-mSHELL model to find the risk factors in a simulated pediatric hospital room, and the researchers analyzed the contents. The students recognized four categories of risk factors: "burden on the family", "characteristics of the infant", "characteristics of children with disease", and "the family's cognition and understanding". There were three categories of risk factors related to "the environment": "environment that can cause a dangerous action", "unsafe environment", and "sickroom as a living space". There were four categories of risk factors related to "the student": "students' own physical/mental condition", "anxiety caused by pediatric nursing practice", "learning process in nursing practice" and "students' understanding of pediatric nursing". The students recognized that there were various risk factors in the child, the family, and the environment, and, by the P-mSHELL model, they recognized that they themselves could become a risk factor. Based on the risk factors that students extracted, teachers should think about what kind of preparation is necessary for students in pediatric nursing practice, and it is important to conduct medical safety education.

  12. Risk Factors in the Pediatric Ward Recognized by Students Before Pediatric Nursing Practice -Basic Data for Medical Safety Education Based on Student's Learning Readiness-.

    PubMed

    Hirowatari, Kanako; Nakamura, Emi

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to extract the risk factors recognized by students before pediatric nursing practice in order to conduct medical safety education based on student's learning readiness. Third-year nursing students of A nursing college used the P-mSHELL model to find the risk factors in a simulated pediatric hospital room, and the researchers analyzed the contents. The students recognized four categories of risk factors: "burden on the family", "characteristics of the infant", "characteristics of children with disease", and "the family's cognition and understanding". There were three categories of risk factors related to "the environment": "environment that can cause a dangerous action", "unsafe environment", and "sickroom as a living space". There were four categories of risk factors related to "the student": "students' own physical/mental condition", "anxiety caused by pediatric nursing practice", "learning process in nursing practice" and "students' understanding of pediatric nursing". The students recognized that there were various risk factors in the child, the family, and the environment, and, by the P-mSHELL model, they recognized that they themselves could become a risk factor. Based on the risk factors that students extracted, teachers should think about what kind of preparation is necessary for students in pediatric nursing practice, and it is important to conduct medical safety education. PMID:27627974

  13. Ethical issues in oncology biostatistics.

    PubMed

    Thall, Peter F

    2002-10-01

    A medical statistician's routine professional activities are likely to have important ethical consequences. This is due in part to the fact that good medical practice and scientifically valid medical research both require as precursors high quality statistical design and data analysis. In this paper I discuss various ethical issues that I have encountered while working as a biostatistician at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. I describe particular experiences and the ethical issues involved. Topics include medical decision making, benefit-harm trade-offs, safety monitoring, adaptive randomization, informed consent, and publication bias. PMID:12357588

  14. Cooperation between medicine and sociology in head and neck oncology.

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Grandazzi, Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-first-century medicine is facing many challenges--knowledge and command of technical advances, research development, team management, knowledge transmission, and adaptation to economic constraints--without neglecting "human" aspects, via transformed carer-patient relationships, social change, and so on. The "modern" physicians know that simply treating disease is no longer enough. One of their essential missions lies in offering the individual patient overall care, which implies acknowledging the latter as an individual within a family, social, and professional environment. Indeed, medical practice requires pluridimensional knowledge of the patients' experience of their disease. Yet the contribution sociology can offer to health care remains largely unknown to many physicians, and medical training includes only limited instruction in the human sciences. On the basis of a few observations taken from sociological research, we would like to demonstrate how, in head and neck oncology, interdisciplinary collaboration between medicine and sociology can prove propitious to improving patient care and attention to their close relations.

  15. Demystified … Molecular pathology in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J

    2002-01-01

    In the past 10 years, molecular biology has found major applications in pathology, particularly in oncology. This has been a field of enormous expansion, where pure science has found a place in clinical practice and is now of everyday use in any academic unit. This demystified review will discuss the techniques used in molecular pathology and then provide examples of how these can be used in oncology. PMID:12456768

  16. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    PubMed

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers. PMID:25146345

  17. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report

    PubMed Central

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A.; Ferrell, Betty

    2014-01-01

    ExCEL in Social Work : Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program’s curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers - the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers. PMID:25146345

  18. ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership: An Oncology Social Work Response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report.

    PubMed

    Otis-Green, Shirley; Jones, Barbara; Zebrack, Brad; Kilburn, Lisa; Altilio, Terry A; Ferrell, Betty

    2015-09-01

    ExCEL in Social Work: Excellence in Cancer Education & Leadership was a multi-year National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded grant for the development and implementation of an innovative educational program for oncology social workers. The program's curriculum focused upon six core competencies of psychosocial-spiritual support necessary to meet the standard of care recommended by the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report: Cancer Care for the Whole Patient: Meeting Psychosocial Health Needs. The curriculum was delivered through a collaborative partnership between the City of Hope National Medical Center and the two leading professional organizations devoted exclusively to representing oncology social workers--the Association of Oncology Social Work and the Association of Pediatric Oncology Social Workers. Initial findings support the feasibility and acceptability of this tailored leadership skills-building program for participating oncology social workers.

  19. Education: The Basics. The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Kay

    2011-01-01

    Everyone knows that education is important, we are confronted daily by discussion of it in the media and by politicians, but how much do we really know about education? "Education: The Basics" is a lively and engaging introduction to education as an academic subject, taking into account both theory and practice. Covering the schooling system, the…

  20. [The first 25 years of oncopsychology at the National Institute of Oncology: antecedents and events (1988-2013)].

    PubMed

    Riskó, Ágnes

    2015-09-01

    The first oncopsychological department was established in National Institute of Oncology by Sándor Eckhardt in 1988. At an early stage the specialists who were interested in mental hygiene made a united effort with Katalin Muszbek's oncopsychologic group. Ágnes Riskó was the first specialist who seceded from this group, and she became a permanent member of the onco-hematology group in 1992. Due to the universalized approach, the psyhcologist would become a permanent member of onco-team. The overhand and increasing multidisciplinary cooperation enable to use this accepted method in the daily medical treatment. When necessary, patients' relatives may come in for treatment and this method can help for medical stuff to avoid burnout. As a result of oncopsychology techniques and cooperation of oncologic teamwork the integration of psychosocial intervention into a complex oncologic treatment has already begun. The attendance of supervised onco-psychological specialists is being increased. Our activity contributes to improve our patients' psychosocial standard of living, their cooperation with the medical staff and the atmosphere of oncologic departments. The integration of the approach and methods of psychosocial rehabilitation into the new oncologic professional guideline has also begun. PMID:26339913

  1. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jagsi, Reshma; Bekelman, Justin E.; Brawley, Otis W.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Thomas, Charles R.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  2. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  3. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  4. Comparative Effectiveness Research in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although randomized controlled trials represent the gold standard for comparative effective research (CER), a number of additional methods are available when randomized controlled trials are lacking or inconclusive because of the limitations of such trials. In addition to more relevant, efficient, and generalizable trials, there is a need for additional approaches utilizing rigorous methodology while fully recognizing their inherent limitations. CER is an important construct for defining and summarizing evidence on effectiveness and safety and comparing the value of competing strategies so that patients, providers, and policymakers can be offered appropriate recommendations for optimal patient care. Nevertheless, methodological as well as political and social challenges for CER remain. CER requires constant and sophisticated methodological oversight of study design and analysis similar to that required for randomized trials to reduce the potential for bias. At the same time, if appropriately conducted, CER offers an opportunity to identify the most effective and safe approach to patient care. Despite rising and unsustainable increases in health care costs, an even greater challenge to the implementation of CER arises from the social and political environment questioning the very motives and goals of CER. Oncologists and oncology professional societies are uniquely positioned to provide informed clinical and methodological expertise to steer the appropriate application of CER toward critical discussions related to health care costs, cost-effectiveness, and the comparative value of the available options for appropriate care of patients with cancer. PMID:23697601

  5. Targeted molecular imaging in oncology.

    PubMed

    Yang, David J; Kim, E Edmund; Inoue, Tomio

    2006-01-01

    Improvement of scintigraphic tumor imaging is extensively determined by the development of more tumor specific radiopharmaceuticals. Thus, to improve the differential diagnosis, prognosis, planning and monitoring of cancer treatment, several functional pharmaceuticals have been developed. Application of molecular targets for cancer imaging, therapy and prevention using generator-produced isotopes is the major focus of ongoing research projects. Radionuclide imaging modalities (positron emission tomography, PET; single photon emission computed tomography, SPECT) are diagnostic cross-sectional imaging techniques that map the location and concentration of radionuclide-labeled radiotracers. 99mTc- and 68Ga-labeled agents using ethylenedicysteine (EC) as a chelator were synthesized and their potential uses to assess tumor targets were evaluated. 99mTc (t1/2 = 6 hr, 140 keV) is used for SPECT and 68Ga (t1/2 = 68 min, 511 keV) for PET. Molecular targets labeled with Tc-99m and Ga-68 can be utilized for prediction of therapeutic response, monitoring tumor response to treatment and differential diagnosis. Molecular targets for oncological research in (1) cell apoptosis, (2) gene and nucleic acid-based approach, (3) angiogenesis (4) tumor hypoxia, and (5) metabolic imaging are discussed. Numerous imaging ligands in these categories have been developed and evaluated in animals and humans. Molecular targets were imaged and their potential to redirect optimal cancer diagnosis and therapeutics were demonstrated. PMID:16485568

  6. Risk factors for opioid misuse in adolescents and young adults with focus on oncology setting.

    PubMed

    Peck, Kelly R; Ehrentraut, Jennifer Harman; Anghelescu, Doralina L

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid use has increased in recent decades. Although opioids provide effective pain control, their use may be associated with the risk of misuse. Opioid misuse (OM) is prevalent among adolescents and young adults (AYAs). Opioids are necessary to treat cancer-related pain; however, oncology patients are not immune to medication misuse. Research examining OM among AYAs with cancer is scarce. This article examines the risk factors described in the general adult and adolescent medication abuse literature and aims to provide recommendations for practice in the AYA oncology population. The following risk factors should be examined in AYA oncology patients to determine their relevance: age, sex, behavioral and academic problems, psychological conditions, and a history of illicit drug use/abuse. To maintain the delicate balance of providing adequate pain relief while protecting patients from the risk of OM, clinicians must consider potential risk factors, motivating factors, and individual behaviors. Placing these challenges in perspective, this review provides clinical considerations, recommendations, and intervention strategies for OM prevention in AYA oncology patients. PMID:27435441

  7. ACPSEM ROSG Oncology-PACS and OIS working group recommendations for quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, John; Perez, Mario; Tremethick, Lindsay; Ceylan, Abdurrahman; Bailey, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) Radiation Oncology Specialty Group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop position papers for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These position papers are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these position papers. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, have been subject to independent expert reviews. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the Tripartite Radiation Oncology Practice Standards [1, 2]. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM OPACS and OIS Working Group (OISWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM position papers. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM position papers will contribute to the development of future versions through the Radiation Oncology Specialty Group of the ACPSEM.

  8. Implementing a regional oncology information system: approach and lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W.K.; Ashbury, F.D.; Hogue, G.L.; Smith, A.; Pun, J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Paper-based medical record systems are known to have major problems of inaccuracy, incomplete data, poor accessibility, and challenges to patient confidentiality. They are also an inefficient mechanism of record-sharing for interdisciplinary patient assessment and management, and represent a major problem for keeping current and monitoring quality control to facilitate improvement. To address those concerns, national, regional, and local health care authorities have increased the pressure on oncology practices to upgrade from paper-based systems to electronic health records. Objectives Here, we describe and discuss the challenges to implementing a region-wide oncology information system across four independent health care organizations, and we describe the lessons learned from the initial phases that are now being applied in subsequent activities of this complex project. Results The need for change must be shared across centres to increase buy-in, adoption, and implementation. It is essential to establish physician leadership, commitment, and engagement in the process. Work processes had to be revised to optimize use of the new system. Culture change must be included in the change management strategy. Furthermore, training and resource requirements must be thoroughly planned, implemented, monitored, and modified as required for effective adoption of new work processes and technology. Interfaces must be established with multiple existing electronic systems across the region to ensure appropriate patient flow. Periodic assessment of the existing project structure is necessary, and adjustments are often required to ensure that the project meets its objectives. Conclusions The implementation of region-wide oncology information systems across different health practice locations has many challenges. Leadership is essential. A strong, collaborative information-sharing strategy across the region and with the supplier is essential to identify, discuss, and resolve

  9. Future Supply and Demand for Oncologists : Challenges to Assuring Access to Oncology Services

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Clese; Salsberg, Edward; Forte, Gaetano; Bruinooge, Suanna; Goldstein, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a comprehensive analysis of supply of and demand for oncology services through 2020. This study was commissioned by the Board of Directors of ASCO. Methods New data on physician supply gathered from surveys of practicing oncologists, oncology fellows, and fellowship program directors were analyzed, along with 2005 American Medical Association Masterfile data on practicing medical oncologists, hematologists/oncologists, and gynecologic oncologists, to determine the baseline capacity and to forecast visit capacity through 2020. Demand for visits was calculated by applying age-, sex-, and time-from-diagnosis-visit rate data from the National Cancer Institute's analysis of the 1998 to 2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database to the National Cancer Institute's cancer incidence and prevalence projections. The cancer incidence and prevalence projections were calculated by applying a 3-year average (2000–2002) of age- and sex-specific cancer rates from SEER to the US Census Bureau population projections released on March 2004. The baseline supply and demand forecasts assume no change in cancer care delivery and physician practice patterns. Alternate scenarios were constructed by changing assumptions in the baseline models. Results Demand for oncology services is expected to rise rapidly, driven by the aging and growth of the population and improvements in cancer survival rates, at the same time the oncology workforce is aging and retiring in increasing numbers. Demand is expected to rise 48% between 2005 and 2020. The supply of services provided by oncologists during this time is expected to grow more slowly, approximately 14%, based on the current age distribution and practice patterns of oncologists and the number of oncology fellowship positions. This translates into a shortage of 9.4 to 15.0 million visits, or 2,550 to 4,080 oncologists—roughly one-quarter to one-third of the 2005 supply. The baseline projections do not

  10. The National Oncology Working Group (NOW) initiative: payer and provider collaborations in oncology benefits management.

    PubMed

    Soper, Aileen M; Reeder, C E; Brown, Loreen M; Stojanovska, Ana; Lennert, Barbara J

    2010-04-01

    Payers recognize the need to expand benefits management for oncology but struggle to find effective solutions amid the complexity of available therapies and skepticism from oncologists, who are facing their own set of economic pressures. An effort called the National Oncology Working Group (NOW) Initiative is trying to change the sometimes adversarial relationship between payers and oncologists through a collaborative model. The group, which is supported by pharmaceutical manufacturer sanofi-aventis, is developing patient-centered strategies for successful and sustainable oncology benefits management. The focus includes finding consensus between payers and providers and devising solutions for oncology management such as decreasing variability of cancer care and improving end-of-life care for patients with terminal illness. NOW is designing tools that will be tested in small-scale regional demonstration projects, which NOW participants anticipate will set an example for successful oncology benefits management that can be replicated and expanded.

  11. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    MedlinePlus

    ... I AM A: Please Select a User Type Radiation Oncologist Medical Physicist Member of Treatment Team Resident - ... award/grant Please Select an Action Find a radiation oncologist Learn more about breast cancer Learn about ...

  12. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... to get records for non-emergency situations (like switching to a new doctor), it's best to give ... Your Medical Care Health Insurance Basics Finding Low-Cost Medical Care Health Insurance: Cracking the Code Questions ...

  13. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics. PMID:16822631

  14. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics.

  15. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Philip L.; James, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This paper reports the key findings of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census and compares the results with earlier surveys. Methods The census was conducted in mid‐2014 with distribution to all radiation oncologists, educational affiliates and trainees listed on the college database. There were six email reminders and responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 76.1%. Results The age range of fellows was 32–96 (mean = 49 years, median = 47 years). The majority of the radiation oncologists were male (n = 263, 63%). The minority of radiation oncologists were of Asian descent (n = 43, 13.4%). Radiation oncologists graduated from medical school on average 23 years ago (median = 22 years). A minority of fellows (n = 66, 20%) held another postgraduate qualification. Most radiation oncologists worked, on average, at two practices (median = 2, range 1–7). Practising radiation oncologists worked predominantly in the public sector (n = 131, 49%), but many worked in both the public and private sectors (n = 94, 37%), and a minority worked in the private sector only (n = 38, 14%). The largest proportion of the workforce was from New South Wales accounting for 29% of radiation oncologists. Radiation oncologists worked an average of 43 h/week (median = 43 h, range 6–80). Radiation oncologists who worked in the private sector worked less hours than their public sector or public/private sector colleagues. (38.3 vs. 42.9 vs. 44.3 h, P = 0.042). Victorians worked the fewest average hours per week at 38 h and West Australians the most at 46 h/week. Radiation oncologists averaged 48 min for each new case, 17 min per follow up and 11 min for a treatment review. Radiation oncologists averaged 246 new patients per year (median = 250, range = 20–600) with men (average = 268), Western Australians (average = 354) and those in private practice seeing

  16. Precision oncology: origins, optimism, and potential.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay; Fojo, Tito; Brada, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Imatinib, the first and arguably the best targeted therapy, became the springboard for developing drugs aimed at molecular targets deemed crucial to tumours. As this development unfolded, a revolution in the speed and cost of genetic sequencing occurred. The result--an armamentarium of drugs and an array of molecular targets--set the stage for precision oncology, a hypothesis that cancer treatment could be markedly improved if therapies were guided by a tumour's genomic alterations. Drawing lessons from the biological basis of cancer and recent empirical investigations, we take a more measured view of precision oncology's promise. Ultimately, the promise is not our concern, but the threshold at which we declare success. We review reports of precision oncology alongside those of precision diagnostics and novel radiotherapy approaches. Although confirmatory evidence is scarce, these interventions have been widely endorsed. We conclude that the current path will probably not be successful or, at a minimum, will have to undergo substantive adjustments before it can be successful. For the sake of patients with cancer, we hope one form of precision oncology will deliver on its promise. However, until confirmatory studies are completed, precision oncology remains unproven, and as such, a hypothesis in need of rigorous testing.

  17. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  18. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    PubMed

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field. PMID:26399749

  19. Organization and implementation of a cardio-oncology program.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Manuela; Ribeiro, Leonor; Magalhães, Andreia; Sousa, Ana Rita; Nobre Menezes, Miguel; Jorge, Marília; Costa, Luís; Pinto, Fausto José

    2016-09-01

    Considerable advances in cancer therapies in recent decades have reshaped the prognosis of cancer patients. There are now estimated to be over 20 million cancer survivors in the USA and Europe, numbers unimaginable a few years ago. However, this increase in survival, along with the aging of the patient population, has been accompanied by a rise in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when there is a previous history of heart disease. The incidence of cardiotoxicity continues to grow, which can compromise the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Cardiotoxicity associated with conventional therapies, especially anthracyclines and radiation, is well known, and usually leads to left ventricular dysfunction. However, heart failure represents only a fraction of the cardiotoxicity associated with newer therapies, which have diverse cardiovascular effects. There are few guidelines for early detection, prevention and treatment of cardiotoxicity of cancer treatments, and no well-established tools for screening these patients. Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessment of patients before, during and after cancer treatment. It therefore makes sense to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to these patients, involving cardiologists, oncologists and radiotherapists, collaborating in the development of new training modules, and performing clinical and translational research in a cardio-oncology program. Cardio-oncology is a new frontier in medicine and has emerged as a new medical subspecialty that concentrates knowledge, understanding, training and treatment of cardiovascular comorbidities, risks and complications in patients with cancer in a comprehensive approach to the patient rather than to the disease. PMID:27503589

  20. Electronic patient-reported outcome systems in oncology clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Antonia V; Jensen, Roxanne E; Basch, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires assess topics a patient can report about his or her own health. This includes symptoms (eg, nausea, fatigue, diarrhea, pain, or frequent urination), physical functioning (eg, difficulty climbing stairs or difficulty fastening buttons), and mental health (eg, anxiety, fear, or worry). Electronic PRO (ePRO) systems are used in oncology clinical care because of 1) their ability to enhance clinical care by flagging important symptoms and saving clinicians time; 2) the availability of standardized methods for creating and implementing PROs in clinics; and 3) the existence of user-friendly platforms for patient self-reporting like tablet computers and automated telephone surveys. Many ePRO systems can provide actionable links to clinical care such as summary reports in a patient's electronic medical record and real-time e-mail alerts to providers when patients report acute needs. This review presents 5 examples of ePRO systems currently in use in oncology practice. These systems support multiple clinical activities, including assessment of symptoms and toxicities related to chemotherapy and radiation, postoperative surveillance, and symptom management during palliative care and hospice. Patient self-reporting is possible both at clinical visits and between visits over the Internet or by telephone. The implementation of an ePRO system requires significant resources and expertise, as well as user training. ePRO systems enable regular monitoring of patient symptoms, function, and needs, and can enhance the efficiency and quality of care as well as communication with patients.

  1. Children's Oncology Group's 2013 blueprint for research: behavioral science.

    PubMed

    Noll, Robert B; Patel, Sunita K; Embry, Leanne; Hardy, Kristina K; Pelletier, Wendy; Annett, Robert D; Patenaude, Andrea; Lown, E Anne; Sands, Stephen A; Barakat, Lamia P

    2013-06-01

    Behavioral science has long played a central role in pediatric oncology clinical service and research. Early work focused on symptom relief related to side effects of chemotherapy and pain management related to invasive medical procedures. As survival rates improved, the focused has shifted to examination of the psychosocial impact, during and after treatment, of pediatric cancer and its treatment on children and their families. The success of the clinical trials networks related to survivorship highlights an even more critical role in numerous domains of psychosocial research and care. Within the cooperative group setting, the field of behavioral science includes psychologists, social workers, physicians, nurses, and parent advisors. The research agenda of this group of experts needs to focus on utilization of psychometrically robust measures to evaluate the impact of treatment on children with cancer and their families during and after treatment ends. Over the next 5 years, the field of behavioral science will need to develop and implement initiatives to expand use of standardized neurocognitive and behavior batteries; increase assessment of neurocognition using technology; early identification of at-risk children/families; establish standards for evidence-based psychosocial care; and leverage linkages with the broader behavioral health pediatric oncology community to translate empirically supported research clinical trials care to practice.

  2. The road not taken and choices in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Glatstein, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Accomplishments and contributions in a career in radiation oncology, and in medicine in general, involve individual choices that impact the direction of a specialty, decisions in patient care, consequences of treatment outcome, and personal satisfaction. Issues in radiation oncology include: the development and implementation of new radiation treatment technology; the use of multimodality and biologically based therapies; the role of nonradiation "energy" technologies, often by other medical specialties, including the need for quality assurance in treatment and data reporting; and the type of evidence, including appropriate study design, analysis, and rigorous long-term follow-up, that is sought before widespread implementation of a new treatment. Personal choices must weigh: the pressure from institutions-practices, departments, universities, and hospitals; the need to serve society and the underserved; the balance between individual reward and a greater mission; and the critical role of personal values and integrity, often requiring difficult and "life-defining" decisions. The impact that each of us makes in a career is perhaps more a result of character than of the specific details enumerated on one's curriculum vitae. The individual tapestry weaved by choosing the more or less traveled paths during a career results in many pathways that would be called success; however, the one path for which there is no good alternative is that of living and acting with integrity.

  3. The road not taken and choices in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman; Glatstein, Eli

    2010-01-01

    Accomplishments and contributions in a career in radiation oncology, and in medicine in general, involve individual choices that impact the direction of a specialty, decisions in patient care, consequences of treatment outcome, and personal satisfaction. Issues in radiation oncology include: the development and implementation of new radiation treatment technology; the use of multimodality and biologically based therapies; the role of nonradiation "energy" technologies, often by other medical specialties, including the need for quality assurance in treatment and data reporting; and the type of evidence, including appropriate study design, analysis, and rigorous long-term follow-up, that is sought before widespread implementation of a new treatment. Personal choices must weigh: the pressure from institutions-practices, departments, universities, and hospitals; the need to serve society and the underserved; the balance between individual reward and a greater mission; and the critical role of personal values and integrity, often requiring difficult and "life-defining" decisions. The impact that each of us makes in a career is perhaps more a result of character than of the specific details enumerated on one's curriculum vitae. The individual tapestry weaved by choosing the more or less traveled paths during a career results in many pathways that would be called success; however, the one path for which there is no good alternative is that of living and acting with integrity. PMID:20413638

  4. The meaning of body experience evaluation in oncology.

    PubMed

    Slatman, Jenny

    2011-12-01

    Evaluation of quality of life, psychic and bodily well-being is becoming increasingly important in oncology aftercare. This type of assessment is mainly carried out by medical psychologists. In this paper I will seek to show that body experience valuation has, besides its psychological usefulness, a normative and practical dimension. Body experience evaluation aims at establishing the way a person experiences and appreciates his or her physical appearance, intactness and competence. This valuation constitutes one's 'body image'. While, first, interpreting the meaning of body image and, second, indicating the limitations of current psychological body image assessment, I argue that the normative aspect of body image is related to the experience of bodily wholeness or bodily integrity. Since this experience is contextualized by a person's life story, evaluation should also focus on narrative aspects. I finally suggest that the interpretation of body experience is not only valuable to assess a person's quality of life after treatment, but that it can also be useful in counseling prior to interventions, since it can support patients in making decisions about interventions that will change their bodies. To apply this type of evaluation to oncology practice, a rich and tailored vocabulary of body experiences has to be developed.

  5. Organization and implementation of a cardio-oncology program.

    PubMed

    Fiuza, Manuela; Ribeiro, Leonor; Magalhães, Andreia; Sousa, Ana Rita; Nobre Menezes, Miguel; Jorge, Marília; Costa, Luís; Pinto, Fausto José

    2016-09-01

    Considerable advances in cancer therapies in recent decades have reshaped the prognosis of cancer patients. There are now estimated to be over 20 million cancer survivors in the USA and Europe, numbers unimaginable a few years ago. However, this increase in survival, along with the aging of the patient population, has been accompanied by a rise in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when there is a previous history of heart disease. The incidence of cardiotoxicity continues to grow, which can compromise the effectiveness of cancer therapy. Cardiotoxicity associated with conventional therapies, especially anthracyclines and radiation, is well known, and usually leads to left ventricular dysfunction. However, heart failure represents only a fraction of the cardiotoxicity associated with newer therapies, which have diverse cardiovascular effects. There are few guidelines for early detection, prevention and treatment of cardiotoxicity of cancer treatments, and no well-established tools for screening these patients. Echocardiography is the method of choice for assessment of patients before, during and after cancer treatment. It therefore makes sense to adopt a multidisciplinary approach to these patients, involving cardiologists, oncologists and radiotherapists, collaborating in the development of new training modules, and performing clinical and translational research in a cardio-oncology program. Cardio-oncology is a new frontier in medicine and has emerged as a new medical subspecialty that concentrates knowledge, understanding, training and treatment of cardiovascular comorbidities, risks and complications in patients with cancer in a comprehensive approach to the patient rather than to the disease.

  6. Acupuncture: could it become everyday practice in oncology?

    PubMed Central

    Kilian-Kita, Aneta; Konopka, Kamil; Krzemieniecki, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture is a complementary and alternative medical treatment (CAM) which is increasingly used in the care of cancer patients. Traditionally derived from Chinese medicine, nowadays it is becoming a part of evidence-based oncology. The use of acupuncture in these patients has been recommended by the American Cancer Society (ACS) for the treatment of side effects associated with conventional cancer therapy and cancer-related ailments. A growing body of evidence supports the use of acupuncture in the treatment of cancer-induced pain and chemotherapy-related nausea and vomiting. Also other indications, such as xerostomia, fatigue, hot flashes, anxiety and peripheral neuropathy, are being constantly evaluated. This article summarizes the most important discoveries related to the possible usefulness of this method in contemporary oncology. Emphasis is placed on the results of randomized controlled trials with an adequate level of evidence. However, explanation of the mechanisms responsible for these effects requires confirmation in further studies with an adequate level of evidence. In future, acupuncture may become an interesting and valuable addition to conventional medicine. PMID:27358589

  7. Sunspace basics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Anyone who lives in a home with a sunspace will tell you that the sunspace is the most enjoyable room in the house. Many times the homeowner`s only regret is that the sunspace is not larger. Although aesthetics often drive the decision to add a sunspace or include one in a new home design, sunspaces can also provide supplemental space heating and a healthy environment for plants and people. In fact, a well-designed sunspace can provide up to 60% of a home`s winter heating requirements. This publication addresses basic elements of sunspace design; design considerations for supplemental space heating, growing plants, and use as a living space; design guidelines including siting, heat distribution, and glazing angles; and major sunspace components including glazing options, thermal mass, insulation, and climate controls. A list of sources for more information is also provided.

  8. [The Oncologic and Palliative Network Landshut: a problem-solving approach to oncological and palliative care in structurally weak rural areas, with special emphasis on outpatient and inpatient networking].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, F; Vehling-Kaiser, U; Flieser-Hartl, M; Weiglein, T

    2014-10-01

    The Oncologic and Palliative Network Landshut is a problem-solving approach to structurally weak rural areas to improve an a dequate care of critically ill patients, especially by a close involvement of outpatient and inpatient care providers. These networks not only improve the medical and nursing care of patients, but can also be cost-effective.

  9. [The Oncologic and Palliative Network Landshut: a problem-solving approach to oncological and palliative care in structurally weak rural areas, with special emphasis on outpatient and inpatient networking].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, F; Vehling-Kaiser, U; Flieser-Hartl, M; Weiglein, T

    2014-10-01

    The Oncologic and Palliative Network Landshut is a problem-solving approach to structurally weak rural areas to improve an adequate care of critically ill patients, especially by a close involvement of outpatient and inpatient care providers. These networks not only improve the medical and nursing care of patients, but can also be cost-effective.

  10. Inflation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Dan

    2014-03-01

    inflation since metrical fluctuations, both scalar and tensor, are also produced in inflationary models. Thus, the time appears to be appropriate for a very basic and simple exposition of the inflationary model written from a particle physics perspective. Only the simplest scalar model will be explored because it is easy to understand and contains all the basic elements of the inflationary model.

  11. Potential role for metformin in urologic oncology

    PubMed Central

    Sayyid, Rashid Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Metformin is one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide. It is currently considered first-line pharmacological agent for management of diabetes mellitus type 2. Recent studies have suggested that metformin may have further benefits, especially in the field of urologic oncology. Use of metformin has been shown to be associated with decreased incidence and improved outcomes of prostate, bladder, and kidney cancer. These studies suggest that metformin does have a future role in the prevention and management of urologic malignancies. In this review, we will discuss the latest findings in this field and its implications on the management of urologic oncology patients. PMID:27195314

  12. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  13. Surgical education and training program development for gynecologic oncology: American perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Mitchel S; Bodurka, Diane C

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide information about gynecologic oncology fellowship training and guidance in program development. The characteristics necessary for a physician to develop into a successful gynecologic oncologist include an extensive fund of knowledge related to the subspecialty, strong interpersonal skills, the ability to practice within the complex systems required for management of gynecologic cancer patients, surgical expertise, and the clinical ability to provide comprehensive oncologic care for these women. In order for a trainee to acquire these skills, a gynecologic oncology training program must accept only highly qualified individuals as fellows, have a dedicated core faculty, practice in a supportive environment that has appropriate facilities, and provide adequate clinical material. The gynecologic oncology training program must be organized with an emphasis on education of the fellows. Part of the educational program is formal (lectures, assigned reading, basic skill sets, etc.). Training in clinical and surgical skills is a day-to-day process that occurs during the course of patient care. One requirement of The American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ABOG) is that the fellow spends 12 months of protected time doing research. Fellows are also required to take 2 courses, one in biostatistics and one in cancer biology. A thesis of publishable quality is also required. All programs must perform ongoing quality assurance and reassessment of potential areas for improvement. ABOG is responsible for the accreditation and ongoing monitoring of the fellowship programs.

  14. Cardio-Oncology: How New Targeted Cancer Therapies and Precision Medicine Can Inform Cardiovascular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Arteaga, Carlos L; Force, Thomas; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Demetri, George D; Druker, Brian J; Moslehi, Javid J

    2015-12-01

    Cardio-oncology (the cardiovascular care of cancer patients) has developed as a new translational and clinical field based on the expanding repertoire of mechanism-based cancer therapies. Although these therapies have changed the natural course of many cancers, several may also lead to cardiovascular complications. Many new anticancer drugs approved over the past decade are "targeted" kinase inhibitors that interfere with intracellular signaling contributing to tumor progression. Unexpected cardiovascular and cardiometabolic effects of patient treatment with these inhibitors have provided unique insights into the role of kinases in human cardiovascular biology. Today, an ever-expanding number of cancer therapies targeting novel kinases and other specific cellular and metabolic pathways are being developed and tested in oncology clinical trials. Some of these drugs may affect the cardiovascular system in detrimental ways and others perhaps in beneficial ways. We propose that the numerous ongoing oncology clinical trials are an opportunity for closer collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists to study the cardiovascular and cardiometabolic changes caused by the modulation of these pathways in patients. In this regard, cardio-oncology represents an opportunity and a novel platform for basic and translational investigation and can serve as a potential avenue for optimization of anticancer therapies and for cardiovascular research and drug discovery.

  15. Physical oncology: a bench-to-bedside quantitative and predictive approach.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; Thompson, Alastair M; Bearer, Elaine L; Lowengrub, John S; Cristini, Vittorio

    2011-01-15

    Cancer models relating basic science to clinical care in oncology may fail to address the nuances of tumor behavior and therapy, as in the case, discussed herein, of the complex multiscale dynamics leading to the often-observed enhanced invasiveness, paradoxically induced by the very antiangiogenic therapy designed to destroy the tumor. Studies would benefit from approaches that quantitatively link the multiple physical and temporal scales from molecule to tissue in order to offer outcome predictions for individual patients. Physical oncology is an approach that applies fundamental principles from the physical and biological sciences to explain certain cancer behaviors as observable characteristics arising from the underlying physical and biochemical events. For example, the transport of oxygen molecules through tissue affects phenotypic characteristics such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, and adhesion, which in turn underlie the patient-scale tumor growth and invasiveness. Our review of physical oncology illustrates how tumor behavior and treatment response may be a quantifiable function of marginally stable molecular and/or cellular conditions modulated by inhomogeneity. By incorporating patient-specific genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and cellular data into multiscale physical models, physical oncology could complement current clinical practice through enhanced understanding of cancer behavior, thus potentially improving patient survival.

  16. Basic genetics for dermatologists.

    PubMed

    Kumaran, Muthu Sendhil; De, Dipankar

    2013-01-01

    During the past few decades, advances in the field of molecular genetics have enriched us in understanding the pathogenesis of diseases, their identification, and appropriate therapeutic interventions. In the last 20 years, genetic basis of more than 350 monogenic skin diseases have been elucidated and is counting. The widespread use of molecular genetics as a tool in diagnosis is not practiced routinely due to genetic heterogenicity, limited access and low sensitivity. In this review, we have presented the very basics of genetics so as to enable dermatologists to have working understanding of medical genetics.

  17. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    endoscopic diagnosis is likely to be impacted by a combination of biomarkers and technology, and 'endoscopic molecular imaging' should be defined as "visualization of molecular characteristics with endoscopy". These innovations will allow us not only to locate a tumor or dysplastic lesion but also to visualize its molecular characteristics (e.g., DNA mutations and polymorphisms, gene and/or protein expression), and the activity of specific molecules and biological processes that affect tumor behavior and/or its response to therapy. In the near future, these methods should be promising technologies that will play a central role in gastrointestinal oncology.

  18. Medical malpractice: a review of issues for providers.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Marsha

    2002-12-01

    The worlds of law and medicine meet in some very interesting and very important ways. Together, lawyers and physicians tackle such subjects as cloning, right to die, surrogate parenthood, and embryo preservation and implantation, to name a few. The most personal and painful nexus for physicians comes when a physician is sued and must then deal with the legal system as a defendant. The world of plaintiffs, experts, legal doctrines, state and federal law, and judicial application of law to the facts of the case can be intimidating. It is hoped that this overview has allowed the hematology-oncology practitioner to become more familiar with the theories and procedures involved in medical negligence actions. The physician, when comfortable with the basics, may better tolerate the apparent idiosyncrasies of the system and even may be able to protect him or herself from becoming involved in a lawsuit ab initio.

  19. Medical malpractice: a review of issues for providers.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Marsha

    2002-12-01

    The worlds of law and medicine meet in some very interesting and very important ways. Together, lawyers and physicians tackle such subjects as cloning, right to die, surrogate parenthood, and embryo preservation and implantation, to name a few. The most personal and painful nexus for physicians comes when a physician is sued and must then deal with the legal system as a defendant. The world of plaintiffs, experts, legal doctrines, state and federal law, and judicial application of law to the facts of the case can be intimidating. It is hoped that this overview has allowed the hematology-oncology practitioner to become more familiar with the theories and procedures involved in medical negligence actions. The physician, when comfortable with the basics, may better tolerate the apparent idiosyncrasies of the system and even may be able to protect him or herself from becoming involved in a lawsuit ab initio. PMID:12512170

  20. 75 FR 81283 - Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... of December 6, 2010 (75 FR 75680). On February 9, 2011, the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee was... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Cancellation AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Oncologic Drugs...

  1. [Using Twitter in oncology. Research, continuing education, and advocacy].

    PubMed

    De Fiore, Luciano; Ascierto, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Traditional mass media coverage has been enhanced by Twitter, an interactive, real-time media, useful in health care, and particularly in oncology. Social media such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as tools for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO and ESMO are using microblogging to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. To widen the message and maximize the potential for word-of-mouth marketing using Twitter, organizations (such as AIOM, ASCO or ESMO) and industries need a strategic communications plan to ensure on-going social media conversations. Twitter is a very powerful tool indeed that amplifies the results of scientific meetings, and conference organisers should put in place strategies to capitalise on this. This review demonstrates that cancer patients also share information more and more via Twitter about their disease, including diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments. This information could prove useful to health care providers. PMID:25621780

  2. [Organization of cooperative oncologic immunological research in the RSFSR].

    PubMed

    Gorodilova, V V; Starinskiĭ, V V; Kovalev, B N; Popova, A A; Nevskaia, E A

    1982-01-01

    A number of medical establishments are conducting a joint study on Immunology of Tumors sponsored by CMEA. The study is carried out under the auspices of the P. A. Herzen Research Institute in the following directions: (1) Investigations in the diagnostic and prognostic value of immunologic tests in oncological clinic; (2) Establishment of basal immunological status of patients and its changes in relation to stages of cancer development; (3) Identification of immunological markers for tumors of different sites. This research is channeled into several programs. The success of the whole venture depends on active participation of all concerned. The results of the study will contribute to the clinical experience of application of immunological tests in examination of considerable groups of patients with tumors at different sites.

  3. Theory and practice of clinical pharmacodynamics in oncology drug development.

    PubMed

    Parchment, Ralph E; Doroshow, James H

    2016-08-01

    The clinical development of molecularly targeted cancer therapies is enhanced by proof of mechanism of action as well as proof of concept, which relate molecular pharmacodynamics to efficacy via changes in cancer cell biology and physiology resulting from drug action on its intended target. Here, we present an introduction to the field of clinical pharmacodynamics, its medical and laboratory aspects, and its practical incorporation into clinical trials. We also describe key success factors that are useful for judging the quality of clinical pharmacodynamic studies, including biopsy quality and suitability, specimen handling, assay fitness-for-purpose, and reagent quality control. This introduction provides not only context for the following articles in this issue, but also an appreciation of the role of well-conducted clinical pharmacodynamic studies in oncology drug development. PMID:27663474

  4. LAS: a software platform to support oncological data management.

    PubMed

    Baralis, Elena; Bertotti, Andrea; Fiori, Alessandro; Grand, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    The rapid technological evolution in the biomedical and molecular oncology fields is providing research laboratories with huge amounts of complex and heterogeneous data. Automated systems are needed to manage and analyze this knowledge, allowing the discovery of new information related to tumors and the improvement of medical treatments. This paper presents the Laboratory Assistant Suite (LAS), a software platform with a modular architecture designed to assist researchers throughout diverse laboratory activities. The LAS supports the management and the integration of heterogeneous biomedical data, and provides graphical tools to build complex analyses on integrated data. Furthermore, the LAS interfaces are designed to ease data collection and management even in hostile environments (e.g., in sterile conditions), so as to improve data quality.

  5. [Health economics of oncology care: financial effect of performance volume limit (PVL)].

    PubMed

    Boncz, Imre; Donkáné Verebes, Eva; Oberfrank, Ferenc; Kásler, Miklós

    2010-03-01

    The aim of our study is to analyze the effect of performance volume limit (PVL) on the performance indicators of acute oncology care, with special respect to the health insurance reimbursement not paid to health care providers. Data were derived from the nationwide administrative dataset of the National Health Insurance Fund Administration (OEP) covering the period of 2006-2008. We analyzed the effect of PVL according to medical specialities. We calculated the average annual reimbursement rate of DRG cost-weight with and without the application of PVL. The loss due to PVL was calculated both by monetary terms and as the % of annual revenue. The loss of medical specialities measured by monetary units (Hungarian forint, HUF) and as a percent of their revenues was the following in 2008: oncology 1327 million HUF (4.7%), cardiology 791 million HUF (3.0%), gynecology and obstetrics 772 million HUF (3.0%), internal medicine 708 million HUF (3.3%), intensive care 661 million HUF (2.5%), surgery 637 million HUF (3.2%), pediatrics 614 million HUF (3.9%), traumatology 545 million HUF (2.5%), radiotherapy 438 million HUF (3.1%). The application of performance volume limit had significantly different effect on the different medical specialities. Oncology care can be considered as one of the largest losers of the application of performance volume limit. PMID:20350866

  6. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    PubMed Central

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Tates, Kiek; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Kamps, Willem A; Bensing, Jozien M

    2007-01-01

    Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17), 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis) participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents. PMID:17996108

  7. From one side to the other: what is essential? Perception of oncology patients and their caregivers in the beginning of oncology treatment and in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Munhoz, Bruna Antenussi; Paiva, Henrique Soares; Abdalla, Beatrice Martinez Zugaib; Zaremba, Guilherme; Rodrigues, Andressa Macedo Paiva; Carretti, Mayra Ribeiro; Monteiro, Camila Ribeiro de Arruda; Zara, Aline; Silva, Jussara Oliveira; Assis, Widner Baptista; Auresco, Luciana Campi; Pereira, Leonardo Lopes; del Giglio, Adriana Braz; Lepori, Ana Claudia de Oliveira; Trufelli, Damila Cristina; del Giglio, Auro

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the perception of oncology patients and their caregivers upon diagnosis and beginning of the therapy and during palliative care. Methods A cross-sectional study at the oncology and palliative care outpatients clinics of the Faculdade de Medicina do ABC . Clinical and demographic data from patients and their caregivers were collected and questionnaires regarding the elements considered important in relation to the treatment were applied. Results We enrolled 32 patients and 23 caregivers that were initiating treatment at the oncology outpatient clinic, as well as 20 patients and 20 caregivers at the palliative care clinic. Regarding the patients treated at the oncology clinic, the issues considered most important were a physician available to discuss the disease and answer questions (84%), trust in the physician (81%), and a physician with accessible language (81%). For their caregivers, the following issues were considered extremely important: trust in the medical team that treats the patients (96%), and the same medical team taking care of their relatives (87%). As to patients treated at the palliative care clinic, trust in the physician (83%), to be with people considered important to them (78%), and to be treated preserving their dignity (72%) were considered extremely important. For their caregivers, to receive adequate information about the disease and the treatment’s risks and benefits (84%), and sincere communication of information about the disease (79%) were considered extremely relevant. Conclusion Confidence through good communication and consistency in care were fundamental values to achieve satisfaction among caregivers and patients with cancer during all the course of disease development. PMID:25628202

  8. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna; Olsen, Christine; Fung, Claire Y.; Hopkins, Shane; Pohar, Surjeet

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  9. Development of the family symptom inventory: a psychosocial screener for children with hematology/oncology conditions.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Cynthia W; Haynes, Stacey; Faith, Melissa A; Elkin, Thomas D; Smith, Maria L; Megason, Gail

    2015-03-01

    A growing body of literature has begun to underscore the importance of integrating family-based comprehensive psychological screening into standard medical care for children with oncology and hematology conditions. There are no known family-based measures designed to screen for clinically significant emotional and behavioral concerns in pediatric oncology and hematology patients. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the Family Symptom Inventory (FSI), a brief screener of patient and family member psychological symptoms. The FSI also screens for common comorbid physical symptoms (pain and sleep disturbance) and is designed for use at any point during treatment and follow-up. A total of 488 caregivers completed the FSI during regular hematology/oncology visits for 193 cancer, 219 sickle cell disease, and 76 hematology pediatric patients. Exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and tests of reliability and preliminary validity were conducted. Exploratory factor analysis suggested a 34-item, 4-factor solution, which was confirmed in an independent sample using confirmatory factor analysis (factor loadings=0.49 to 0.88). The FSI demonstrated good internal reliability (α's=0.86 to 0.92) and good preliminary validity. Regular psychosocial screening throughout the course of treatment and follow-up may lead to improved quality of care for children with oncology and hematology conditions.

  10. [Introduction of a clinical protocol for extravasation at the National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary].

    PubMed

    Bartal, Alexandra; Mátrai, Zoltán; Rosta, András; Szûcs, Attila

    2011-03-01

    Extravasation of cytostatics occurs when an infusion containing a cytotoxic drug leaks into the surrounding perivascular and subcutaneous tissues. Incidence of cytostatic extravasation is found to be 0.1-6% according to the literature. Depending on the severity of complications, pain, loss of function in the extremities, or in extreme cases tissue necrosis necessitating an amputation may develop, drawing consequences like delay or interruption of the chemotherapy. Extent of complications is greatly influenced by the type of medication administered, general condition of the patient, and professional preparedness of staff providing the oncological health service. The protocol recently implemented in the National Institute of Oncology is a short, compact guidance for physicians and nurses providing oncological care, so by quick and adequate management of extravasation cases, severe complications could be prevented. More complex practical guidelines including algorithms could be created as a result of a wider collaboration, with the help of which oncological health professionals could easily cope with this rare problem. The authors describe in their review the implementation of the use of dry warm and cold packs, dymethylsulfoxide and hyaluronidase and their function within the algorithm of extravasation treatment.

  11. Evaluating stress, burnout and job satisfaction in New Zealand radiation oncology departments.

    PubMed

    Jasperse, M; Herst, P; Dungey, G

    2014-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the levels of occupational stress, burnout and job satisfaction among radiation oncology workers across New Zealand. All oncology staff practising in all eight radiation oncology departments in New Zealand were invited to participate anonymously in a questionnaire, which consisted of the Maslach Burnout Inventory and measures of stress intensity associated with specific occupational stressors, stress reduction strategies and job satisfaction. A total of 171 (out of 349) complete responses were analysed using spss 19; there were 23 oncologists, 111 radiation therapists, 22 radiation nurses and 15 radiation physicists. All participants, regardless of profession, reported high stress levels associated with both patient-centred and organisational stressors. Participants scored high in all three domains of burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Interestingly, although organisational stressors predicted higher emotional exhaustion and emotional exhaustion predicted lower job satisfaction, patient stressors were associated with higher job satisfaction. Job satisfaction initiatives such as ongoing education, mentoring and role extension were supported by many participants as was addressing organisational stressors, such as lack of recognition and support from management and unrealistic expectations and demands. New Zealand staff exhibit higher levels of burnout than Maslach Burnout Inventory medical norms and oncology workers in previous international studies.

  12. Computers in Radiation Oncology: The Third Decade

    PubMed Central

    Sternick, Edward S.

    1978-01-01

    Computers have been used for the past 25 years in radiation oncology for such diverse activities as treatment planning, treatment machine verification, image processing, and tumor registry analysis. This paper reviews each of these areas, with examples of working systems, and outlines a computer hardware configuration most suitable for their implementation. ImagesFig. 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5

  13. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  14. Medications for Angina (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or condition in this Agreement. 6. RESTRICTION AGAINST TRANSFER: You may not sublicense, assign, share, sell, rent, lease, or otherwise transfer your right to use the Licensed Materials (including ...

  15. Guidelines for treatment naming in radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Denton, Travis R; Shields, Lisa B E; Hahl, Michael; Maudlin, Casey; Bassett, Mark; Spalding, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Safety concerns may arise from a lack of standardization and ambiguity during the treatment planning and delivery process in radiation therapy. A standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention in radiation therapy was developed by a task force comprised of several Radiation Oncology Societies. We present a nested-survey approach in a community setting to determine the methodology for radiation oncology departments to standardize their practice. Our Institution's continuous quality improvement (CQI) committee recognized that, due to growth from one to three centers, significant variability existed within plan parameters specific to patients' treatment. A multidiscipline, multiclinical site consortium was established to create a guideline for standard naming. Input was gathered using anonymous, electronic surveys from physicians, physicists, dosimetrists, chief therapists, and nurse managers. Surveys consisted of several primary areas of interest: anatomical sites, course naming, treatment plan naming, and treatment field naming. Additional concepts included capitalization, specification of laterality, course naming in the event of multiple sites being treated within the same course of treatment, primary versus boost planning, the use of bolus, revisions for plans, image-guidance field naming, forbidden characters, and standard units for commonly used physical quantities in radiation oncology practice. Guidelines for standard treatment naming were developed that could be readily adopted. This multidisciplinary study provides a clear, straightforward, and easily implemented protocol for the radiotherapy treatment process. Standard nomenclature facilitates the safe means of communication between team members in radiation oncology. The guidelines presented in this work serve as a model for radiation oncology clinics to standardize their practices. PMID:27074449

  16. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic. PMID:26460989

  17. Personalized oncology: recent advances and future challenges.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Madhu

    2013-01-01

    Personalized oncology is evidence-based, individualized medicine that delivers the right care to the right cancer patient at the right time and results in measurable improvements in outcomes and a reduction on health care costs. Evolving topics in personalized oncology such as genomic analysis, targeted drugs, cancer therapeutics and molecular diagnostics will be discussed in this review. Biomarkers and molecular individualized medicine are replacing the traditional "one size fits all" medicine. In the next decade the treatment of cancer will move from a reactive to a proactive discipline. The essence of personalized oncology lies in the use of biomarkers. These biomarkers can be from tissue, serum, urine or imaging and must be validated. Personalized oncology based on biomarkers is already having a remarkable impact. Three different types of biomarkers are of particular importance: predictive, prognostic and early response biomarkers. Tools for implementing preemptive medicine based on genetic and molecular diagnostic and interventions will improve cancer prevention. Imaging technologies such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Positron Emitted Tomography (PET) are already influencing the early detection and management of the cancer patient. Future advances in imaging are expected to be in the field of molecular imaging, integrated diagnostics, biology driven interventional radiology and theranostics. Molecular diagnostics identify individual cancer patients who are more likely to respond positively to targeted chemotherapies. Molecular diagnostics include testing for genes, gene expression, proteins and metabolites. The use of companion molecular diagnostics is expected to grow significantly in the future and will be integrated into new cancer therapies a single (bundled) package which will provide greater efficiency, value and cost savings. This approach represents a unique opportunity for integration, increased value in personalized oncology.

  18. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic.

  19. Radiation oncology--linking technology and biology in the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Coleman, C Norman

    2002-01-01

    Technical advances in radiation oncology including CT-simulation, 3D- conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery techniques, and brachytherapy have allowed greater treatment precision and dose escalation. The ability to intensify treatment requires the identification of the critical targets within the treatment field, recognizing the unique biology of tumor, stroma and normal tissue. Precision is technology based while accuracy is biologically based. Therefore, the intensity of IMRT will undoubtedly mean an increase in both irradiation dose and the use of biological agents, the latter considered in the broadest sense. Radiation oncology has the potential and the opportunity to provide major contributions to the linkage between molecular and functional imaging, molecular profiling and novel therapeutics for the emerging molecular targets for cancer treatment. This process of 'credentialing' of molecular targets will require multi disciplinary imaging teams, clinicians and basic scientists. Future advances will depend on the appropriate integration of biology into the training of residents, continuing post graduate education, participation in innovative clinical research and commitment to the support of basic research as an essential component of the practice of radiation oncology.

  20. Emergency medicine: beyond the basics.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1997-07-01

    Medical emergencies can arise in the dental office. Preparedness for these emergencies is predicated on an ability to rapidly recognize a problem and to effectively institute prompt and proper management. In all emergency situations, management is based on implementation of basic life support, as needed. The author describes the appropriate management of two common emergency situations: allergy and chest pain.

  1. Pediatric oncology at Hospital Infantil de Mexico: fifty-five years of accomplishment.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sanson, A; Martínez-Avalos, A; Gallegos-Castorena, S; Juárez-Villegas, L E; González-Montalvo, P; Perales-Arroyo, A; Gallegos-González, E; Ayometzi-Ouchi, M T

    2002-09-01

    The Department of Oncology at Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG) was the first unit in our country, and one of the first in Latin America, to specialize in the management of children with cancer. The HIMFG is part of the National Institutes of Health of Mexico, and is a reference hospital with research, educative, and tertiary care medical function. To date, the HIMFG and the Instituto Nacional de Pediatria are the principal medical centers in which children with cancer receive comprehensive care.

  2. Recent advances in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Mauer, A M

    1977-09-01

    There have been remarkable improvements in our knowledge of how to treat children with cancer and also in the results of treatment. Much of this improvement has come from careful and systematic clinical therapeutic studies. We have learned much about the natural history and some about the biology of childhood cancer. For the future it would seem that major advances are going to come not from clinical therapeutic trials but from combined laboratory and clinical research approaches. Chemotherapy will be the main stay of treatment for the foreseeable future. Immunotherapy may play some role as our knowledge of that modality improves. Basically, however, we need much more understanding of the biology of childhood tumors to effect significant answers in this disease area.

  3. Undergraduate cancer education in Spain: The debate, the opportunities and the initiatives of the University Forum of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR).

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro; Calvo, Felipe A; Guedea, Ferran; Bilbao, Pedro; Biete, Alberto

    2013-11-09

    Most medical schools in Spain (80%) offer undergraduate training in oncology. This education is highly variable in terms of content (theory and practical training), number of credits, and the medical specialty and departmental affiliation of the professors. Much of this variability is due to university traditions in the configuration of credits and programmes, and also to the structure of the hospital-based practical training. Undergraduate medical students deserve a more coherent and modern approach to education with a strong emphasis on clinical practice. Oncology is an interdisciplinary science that requires the input of professors from multiple specialties to provide the primary body of knowledge and skills needed to obtain both a theoretical and clinical understanding of cancer. Clinical skills should be a key focus due to their importance in the current model of integrated medical management and care. Clinical radiation oncology is a traditional and comprehensive hospital-based platform for undergraduate education in oncology. In Spain, a significant number (n = 80) of radiation oncology specialists have a contractual relationship to teach university courses. Most Spanish universities (80%) have a radiation oncologist on staff, some of whom are department chairs and many others are full professors who have been hired and promoted under competitive conditions of evaluation as established by the National Agency for Quality Evaluation. The Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) has identified new opportunities to improve undergraduate education in oncology. In this article, we discuss proposals related to theoretical (20 items) and practical clinical training (9 items). We also describe the SEOR University Forum, which is an initiative to develop a strategic plan to implement and organize cancer education at the undergraduate level in an interdisciplinary teaching spirit and with a strong contribution from radiation oncologists.

  4. Undergraduate cancer education in Spain: The debate, the opportunities and the initiatives of the University Forum of the Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR)

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro; Calvo, Felipe A.; Guedea, Ferran; Bilbao, Pedro; Biete, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Most medical schools in Spain (80%) offer undergraduate training in oncology. This education is highly variable in terms of content (theory and practical training), number of credits, and the medical specialty and departmental affiliation of the professors. Much of this variability is due to university traditions in the configuration of credits and programmes, and also to the structure of the hospital-based practical training. Undergraduate medical students deserve a more coherent and modern approach to education with a strong emphasis on clinical practice. Oncology is an interdisciplinary science that requires the input of professors from multiple specialties to provide the primary body of knowledge and skills needed to obtain both a theoretical and clinical understanding of cancer. Clinical skills should be a key focus due to their importance in the current model of integrated medical management and care. Clinical radiation oncology is a traditional and comprehensive hospital-based platform for undergraduate education in oncology. In Spain, a significant number (n = 80) of radiation oncology specialists have a contractual relationship to teach university courses. Most Spanish universities (80%) have a radiation oncologist on staff, some of whom are department chairs and many others are full professors who have been hired and promoted under competitive conditions of evaluation as established by the National Agency for Quality Evaluation. The Spanish Society of Radiation Oncology (SEOR) has identified new opportunities to improve undergraduate education in oncology. In this article, we discuss proposals related to theoretical (20 items) and practical clinical training (9 items). We also describe the SEOR University Forum, which is an initiative to develop a strategic plan to implement and organize cancer education at the undergraduate level in an interdisciplinary teaching spirit and with a strong contribution from radiation oncologists. PMID:24416587

  5. Medical Physicists and AAPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amols, Howard

    2006-03-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), a member society of the AIP is the largest professional society of medical physicists in the world with nearly 5700 members. Members operate in medical centers, university and community hospitals, research laboratories, industry, and private practice. Medical physics specialties include radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. The majority of AAPM members are based in hospital departments of radiation oncology or radiology and provide technical support for patient diagnosis and treatment in a clinical environment. Job functions include support of clinical care, calibration and quality assurance of medical devices such as linear accelerators for cancer therapy, CT, PET, MRI, and other diagnostic imaging devices, research, and teaching. Pathways into a career in medical physics require an advanced degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, or closely related field, plus clinical training in one or more medical physics specialties (radiation therapy physics, imaging physics, or radiation safety). Most clinically based medical physicists also obtain certification from the American Board of Radiology, and some states require licensure as well.

  6. Medical use of marijuana in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Johannigman, Suzanne; Eschiti, Valerie

    2013-08-01

    Marijuana has been documented to provide relief to patients in palliative care. However, healthcare providers should use caution when discussing medical marijuana use with patients. This article features a case study that reveals the complexity of medical marijuana use. For oncology nurses to offer high-quality care, examining the pros and cons of medical marijuana use in the palliative care setting is important. PMID:23899972

  7. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene-Drug Associations for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee's work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested.

  8. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene-Drug Associations for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee's work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested. PMID:27618021

  9. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene—Drug Associations for Clinical Use †

    PubMed Central

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee’s work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested. PMID:27618021

  10. Ontario Radiation Oncology Residents' Needs in the First Postgraduate Year-Residents' Perspective Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Szumacher, Ewa Warner, Eiran; Zhang Liying; Kane, Gabrielle; Ackerman, Ida; Nyhof-Young, Joyce; Agboola, Olusegun; Metz, Catherine de; Rodrigues, George; Rappolt, Susan

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To assess radiation oncology residents' needs and satisfaction in their first postgraduate year (PGY-1) in the province of Ontario. Methods and Materials: Of 62 radiation oncology residents, 58 who had completed their PGY-1 and were either enrolled or had graduated in 2006 were invited to participate in a 31-item survey. The questionnaire explored PGY-1 residents' needs and satisfaction in four domains: clinical workload, faculty/learning environment, stress level, and discrimination/harassment. The Fisher's exact and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to determine relationships between covariate items and summary scores. Results: Of 58 eligible residents, 44 (75%) responded. Eighty-four percent of residents felt that their ward and call duties were appropriate. More than 50% of respondents indicated that they often felt isolated from their radiation oncology program. Only 77% agreed that they received adequate feedback, and 40% received sufficient counseling regarding career planning. More than 93% of respondents thought that faculty members had contributed significantly to their learning experience. Approximately 50% of residents experienced excessive stress and inadequate time for leisure or for reading the medical literature. Less than 10% of residents indicated that they had been harassed or experienced discrimination. Eighty-three percent agreed or strongly agreed that their PGY-1 experience had been outstanding. Conclusions: Most Ontario residents were satisfied with their PGY-1 training program. More counseling by radiation oncology faculty members should be offered to help residents with career planning. The residents might also benefit from more exposure to 'radiation oncology' and an introduction to stress management strategies.

  11. Bibliometric analysis of nanotechnology applied in oncology from 2002 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xifeng; Qiu, Xiao-chun; Liu, Qian; Jia, Jack

    2013-12-01

    Innovation in the last decade has endowed nanotechnology with an assortment of tools for drug delivery system, imaging, and sensing in cancer research. These rapidly emerging tools are indicative of a burgeoning field ready to expand into medical applications. The aim of this study is to analyze the applications of nanotechnology in oncology with bibliometric methods and evaluate development in this field. Literature search was performed using PubMed search engines with MeSH terms (all)--nanotechnology, nanomedicine, nanoparticle, nanocapsules, micellar systems, and oncology or cancer or neoplasms. Within 2,543 articles from 2002 to 2011 in over 50 medical magazines from over 30 countries, we did a series analysis on these articles' countries, keywords, and authors. Our results show that articles in nanotechnology in oncology are increasing year by year, especially in recent years. Quantity and quality of the articles are becoming more and influential. In the global research, the USA is leading in this field, accounting for half above of the whole articles, followed by countries like Japan, Germany, and France and also some emerging nations like China, in the second place, and India. Subjects like nanoparticles, tumor marker, and drug delivery are the common research focus. So, with more and more scientists' interests and attention drawn to this field, it is likely to make major breakthroughs in the coming years.

  12. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  13. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  14. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  15. Puget sound oncology nursing education cooperative.

    PubMed

    Whipple, V T; Hogeland-Drummond, S; Purrier, M; Tofthagen, C

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the Leadership & Professional Development feature is to provide readers with information, ideas, and exemplars of leadership competencies and professional roles in oncology nursing. Manuscripts submitted to the Leadership & Professional Development feature should be prepared according to the Information for Authors published in the Oncology Nursing Forum (ONF) but limited to six to eight double-spaced typed pages. Submit two copies of the manuscript using IBM-compatible software along with a computer disk copy, or submit a copy of the manuscript as an e-mail attachment to Joan Such Lockhart, PhD, RN, CORLN, ONF Associate Editor, 1365 Simona Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15201; lockhart /duq.edu (e-mail). Manuscripts should be referenced and include tables, figures, or illustrations as appropriate. Ideas for possible manuscripts are welcome.

  16. Value: a framework for radiation oncology.

    PubMed

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A; Steinberg, Michael L

    2014-09-10

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment.

  17. Value: A Framework for Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Teckie, Sewit; McCloskey, Susan A.; Steinberg, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    In the current health care system, high costs without proportional improvements in quality or outcome have prompted widespread calls for change in how we deliver and pay for care. Value-based health care delivery models have been proposed. Multiple impediments exist to achieving value, including misaligned patient and provider incentives, information asymmetries, convoluted and opaque cost structures, and cultural attitudes toward cancer treatment. Radiation oncology as a specialty has recently become a focus of the value discussion. Escalating costs secondary to rapidly evolving technologies, safety breaches, and variable, nonstandardized structures and processes of delivering care have garnered attention. In response, we present a framework for the value discussion in radiation oncology and identify approaches for attaining value, including economic and structural models, process improvements, outcome measurement, and cost assessment. PMID:25113759

  18. Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care.

  19. Plastic Surgery for the Oncological Patient

    PubMed Central

    Daigeler, Adrien; Harati, Kamran; Kapalschinski, Nicolai; Goertz, Ole; Hirsch, Tobias; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Kolbenschlag, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    The therapy of oncological patients has seen tremendous progress in the last decades. For most entities, it has been possible to improve the survival as well as the quality of life of the affected patients. To supply optimal cancer care, a multidisciplinary approach is vital. Together with oncologists, radiotherapists and other physicians, plastic surgeons can contribute to providing such care in all stages of treatment. From biopsies to the resection of advanced tumors, the coverage of the resulting defects and even palliative care, plastic surgery techniques can help to improve survival and quality of life as well as mitigate negative effects of radiation or the problems arising from exulcerating tumors in a palliative setting. This article aims to present the mentioned possibilities by illustrating selected cases and reviewing the literature. Especially in oncological patients, restoring their quality of life with the highest patient safety possible is of utmost importance. PMID:25593966

  20. Mind-body therapies in integrative oncology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Fisher, William; Johnson, Aimee

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in mind-body therapies as adjuncts to mainstream cancer treatment, and an increasing number of patients turn to these interventions for the control of emotional stress associated with cancer. Increased research funding has enabled many such interventions to be evaluated for their efficacy, including studies of mind-body interventions to reduce pain, anxiety, insomnia, anticipatory, and treatment-related nauseas, hot flashes, and improved mood. Mind-body treatments evaluated for their utility in oncology include relaxation therapies, biofeedback, meditation and hypnosis, yoga, art and music therapy, tai chi, and qigong. Although studies are not always methodologically sound and results mixed, a growing number of well-designed studies provide convincing evidence that mind-body techniques are beneficial adjuncts to cancer treatment. The evidence is sufficient to recommend further investigation and adoption of these techniques in mainstream oncology care. PMID:21116746