Science.gov

Sample records for medical subject headings

  1. Ranking Medical Subject Headings using a factor graph model.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    Automatically assigning MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) to articles is an active research topic. Recent work demonstrated the feasibility of improving the existing automated Medical Text Indexer (MTI) system, developed at the National Library of Medicine (NLM). Encouraged by this work, we propose a novel data-driven approach that uses semantic distances in the MeSH ontology for automated MeSH assignment. Specifically, we developed a graphical model to propagate belief through a citation network to provide robust MeSH main heading (MH) recommendation. Our preliminary results indicate that this approach can reach high Mean Average Precision (MAP) in some scenarios.

  2. Two Similarity Metrics for Medical Subject Headings (MeSH):

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.; Bonifield, Gary

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we have created and characterized several similarity metrics for relating any two Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms) to each other. The article-based metric measures the tendency of two MeSH terms to appear in the MEDLINE record of the same article. The author-based metric measures the tendency of two MeSH terms to appear in the body of articles written by the same individual (using the 2009 Author-ity author name disambiguation dataset as a gold standard). The two metrics are only modestly correlated with each other (r = 0.50), indicating that they capture different aspects of term usage. The article-based metric provides a measure of semantic relatedness, and MeSH term pairs that co-occur more often than expected by chance may reflect relations between the two terms. In contrast, the author metric is indicative of how individuals practice science, and may have value for author name disambiguation and studies of scientific discovery. We have calculated article metrics for all MeSH terms appearing in at least 25 articles in MEDLINE (as of 2014) and author metrics for MeSH terms published as of 2009. The dataset is freely available for download and can be queried at http://arrowsmith.psych.uic.edu/arrowsmith_uic/mesh_pair_metrics.html. Handling editor: Elizabeth Workman, MLIS, PhD. PMID:27213780

  3. Accuracy of medical subject heading indexing of dental survival analyses.

    PubMed

    Layton, Danielle M; Clarke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To assess the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) indexing of articles that employed time-to-event analyses to report outcomes of dental treatment in patients. Articles published in 2008 in 50 dental journals with the highest impact factors were hand searched to identify articles reporting dental treatment outcomes over time in human subjects with time-to-event statistics (included, n = 95), without time-to-event statistics (active controls, n = 91), and all other articles (passive controls, n = 6,769). The search was systematic (kappa 0.92 for screening, 0.86 for eligibility). Outcome-, statistic- and time-related MeSH were identified, and differences in allocation between groups were analyzed with chi-square and Fischer exact statistics. The most frequently allocated MeSH for included and active control articles were "dental restoration failure" (77% and 52%, respectively) and "treatment outcome" (54% and 48%, respectively). Outcome MeSH was similar between these groups (86% and 77%, respectively) and significantly greater than passive controls (10%, P < .001). Significantly more statistical MeSH were allocated to the included articles than to the active or passive controls (67%, 15%, and 1%, respectively, P < .001). Sixty-nine included articles specifically used Kaplan-Meier or life table analyses, but only 42% (n = 29) were indexed as such. Significantly more time-related MeSH were allocated to the included than the active controls (92% and 79%, respectively, P = .02), or to the passive controls (22%, P < .001). MeSH allocation within MEDLINE to time-to-event dental articles was inaccurate and inconsistent. Statistical MeSH were omitted from 30% of the included articles and incorrectly allocated to 15% of active controls. Such errors adversely impact search accuracy.

  4. Characterization of the Medical Subject Headings thesaurus for pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Fernando; Van Den Boogerd, Lucienne; Salgado, Teresa M; Correr, Cassyano J; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2014-11-15

    The completeness and utility of pharmacy-oriented Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) relative to MeSH terminology pertaining to other healthcare professions (dentistry and nursing) are evaluated. The 2013 version of the MeSH thesaurus-the standard vocabulary used by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) to index articles in PubMed and MEDLINE-was searched for dentistry-, nursing-, and pharmacy-specific terms using a truncation strategy (search terms: nurs*, dent*, and pharm*); the hierarchical level of each term and the number of descendant terms (an indication of the granularity of the associated NLM-indexed content) were determined. PubMed searches were conducted to identify areas of the MeSH hierarchy containing dentistry- and nursing-specific terms but no equivalent pharmacy-specific term. The search of the MeSH thesaurus identified 145 terms representing dentistry-specific activities and 94 and 26 terms specific to nursing and pharmacy practice, respectively. Analysis of the three sets of MeSH terms indicated that dentistry-oriented MeSH terms were generally situated more prominently within the MeSH hierarchy than terms for nursing- and pharmacy-oriented research; the MeSH terminology oriented toward nursing or dentistry practice was relatively more granular, allowing for increased specificity and power of information retrieval during PubMed and MEDLINE searches. Seventeen proposed new MeSH terms describing key areas of pharmacy practice were identified; the inclusion of these terms in the MeSH hierarchy could substantially expand and improve the retrievability of NLM-indexed literature. Imbalances and gaps were found in MeSH coverage of pharmacy concepts and terminology relative to MeSH terminology specific to the nursing and dentistry professions. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mapping of medical acronyms and initialisms to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) across selected systems

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Given the common use of acronyms and initialisms in the health sciences, searchers may be entering these abbreviated terms rather than full phrases when searching online systems. The purpose of this study is to evaluate how various MEDLINE Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) interfaces map acronyms and initialisms to the MeSH vocabulary. Methods: The interfaces used in this study were: the PubMed MeSH database, the PubMed Automatic Term Mapping feature, the NLM Gateway Term Finder, and Ovid MEDLINE. Acronyms and initialisms were randomly selected from 2 print sources. The test data set included 415 randomly selected acronyms and initialisms whose related meanings were found to be MeSH terms. Each acronym and initialism was entered into each MEDLINE MeSH interface to determine if it mapped to the corresponding MeSH term. Separately, 46 commonly used acronyms and initialisms were tested. Results: While performance differed widely, the success rates were low across all interfaces for the randomly selected terms. The common acronyms and initialisms tested at higher success rates across the interfaces, but the differences between the interfaces remained. Conclusion: Online interfaces do not always map medical acronyms and initialisms to their corresponding MeSH phrases. This may lead to inaccurate results and missed information if acronyms and initialisms are used in search strategies. PMID:17082832

  6. Searching the literature using medical subject headings versus text word with PubMed.

    PubMed

    Chang, Angela A; Heskett, Karen M; Davidson, Terence M

    2006-02-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the performance of two search strategies in the retrieval of information from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) on otolaryngology-head and neck surgery related conditions and diagnoses using PubMed. Two search strategies-one based on the use of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and the second based on text word searching-were compared. The MeSH search provided a more efficient search than the text word search. Head and neck surgeons can most efficiently search the NLM using PubMed as a search engine by initiating the search with MeSH terms. Once a key article is identified, the searcher should use the "Related Articles" feature.

  7. A case study: using social tagging to engage students in learning Medical Subject Headings.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Lauren A; Bresnahan, Megan; Flynn, David B; Harzbecker, Joseph; Blanchard, Mary; Ginn, David

    2009-04-01

    In exploring new ways of teaching students how to use Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), librarians at Boston University's Alumni Medical Library (AML) integrated social tagging into their instruction. These activities were incorporated into the two-credit graduate course, "GMS MS 640: Introduction to Biomedical Information," required for all students in the graduate medical science program. Hands-on assignments and in-class exercises enabled librarians to present MeSH and the concept of a controlled vocabulary in a familiar and relevant context for the course's Generation Y student population and provided students the opportunity to actively participate in creating their education. At the conclusion of these activities, students were surveyed regarding the clarity of the presentation of the MeSH vocabulary. Analysis of survey responses indicated that 46% found the concept of MeSH to be the clearest concept presented in the in-class intervention.

  8. Transforming the Medical Subject Headings into Linked Data: Creating the Authorized Version of MeSH in RDF.

    PubMed

    Bushman, Barbara; Anderson, David; Fu, Gang

    In February 2014 the National Library of Medicine formed the Linked Data Infrastructure Working Group to investigate the potential for publishing linked data, determine best practices for publishing linked data, and prioritize linked data projects, beginning with transforming the Medical Subject Headings as a linked data pilot. This article will review the pilot project to convert the Medical Subject Headings from XML to RDF. It will discuss the collaborative process, the technical and organizational issues tackled, and the future of linked data at the library.

  9. Transforming the Medical Subject Headings into Linked Data: Creating the Authorized Version of MeSH in RDF

    PubMed Central

    Bushman, Barbara; Anderson, David; Fu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    In February 2014 the National Library of Medicine formed the Linked Data Infrastructure Working Group to investigate the potential for publishing linked data, determine best practices for publishing linked data, and prioritize linked data projects, beginning with transforming the Medical Subject Headings as a linked data pilot. This article will review the pilot project to convert the Medical Subject Headings from XML to RDF. It will discuss the collaborative process, the technical and organizational issues tackled, and the future of linked data at the library. PMID:26877832

  10. Quantitative biomedical annotation using medical subject heading over-representation profiles (MeSHOPs).

    PubMed

    Cheung, Warren A; Ouellette, B F Francis; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-09-27

    MEDLINE®/PubMed® indexes over 20 million biomedical articles, providing curated annotation of its contents using a controlled vocabulary known as Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). The MeSH vocabulary, developed over 50+ years, provides a broad coverage of topics across biomedical research. Distilling the essential biomedical themes for a topic of interest from the relevant literature is important to both understand the importance of related concepts and discover new relationships. We introduce a novel method for determining enriched curator-assigned MeSH annotations in a set of papers associated to a topic, such as a gene, an author or a disease. We generate MeSH Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs) to quantitatively summarize the annotations in a form convenient for further computational analysis and visualization. Based on a hypergeometric distribution of assigned terms, MeSHOPs statistically account for the prevalence of the associated biomedical annotation while highlighting unusually prevalent terms based on a specified background. MeSHOPs can be visualized using word clouds, providing a succinct quantitative graphical representation of the relative importance of terms. Using the publication dates of articles, MeSHOPs track changing patterns of annotation over time. Since MeSHOPs are quantitative vectors, MeSHOPs can be compared using standard techniques such as hierarchical clustering. The reliability of MeSHOP annotations is assessed based on the capacity to re-derive the subset of the Gene Ontology annotations with equivalent MeSH terms. MeSHOPs allows quantitative measurement of the degree of association between any entity and the annotated medical concepts, based directly on relevant primary literature. Comparison of MeSHOPs allows entities to be related based on shared medical themes in their literature. A web interface is provided for generating and visualizing MeSHOPs.

  11. Quantitative biomedical annotation using medical subject heading over-representation profiles (MeSHOPs)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MEDLINE®/PubMed® indexes over 20 million biomedical articles, providing curated annotation of its contents using a controlled vocabulary known as Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). The MeSH vocabulary, developed over 50+ years, provides a broad coverage of topics across biomedical research. Distilling the essential biomedical themes for a topic of interest from the relevant literature is important to both understand the importance of related concepts and discover new relationships. Results We introduce a novel method for determining enriched curator-assigned MeSH annotations in a set of papers associated to a topic, such as a gene, an author or a disease. We generate MeSH Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs) to quantitatively summarize the annotations in a form convenient for further computational analysis and visualization. Based on a hypergeometric distribution of assigned terms, MeSHOPs statistically account for the prevalence of the associated biomedical annotation while highlighting unusually prevalent terms based on a specified background. MeSHOPs can be visualized using word clouds, providing a succinct quantitative graphical representation of the relative importance of terms. Using the publication dates of articles, MeSHOPs track changing patterns of annotation over time. Since MeSHOPs are quantitative vectors, MeSHOPs can be compared using standard techniques such as hierarchical clustering. The reliability of MeSHOP annotations is assessed based on the capacity to re-derive the subset of the Gene Ontology annotations with equivalent MeSH terms. Conclusions MeSHOPs allows quantitative measurement of the degree of association between any entity and the annotated medical concepts, based directly on relevant primary literature. Comparison of MeSHOPs allows entities to be related based on shared medical themes in their literature. A web interface is provided for generating and visualizing MeSHOPs. PMID:23017167

  12. Redefining the pharmacology and pharmacy subject category in the journal citation reports using medical subject headings (MeSH).

    PubMed

    Minguet, Fernando; Salgado, Teresa M; Santopadre, Claudio; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2017-08-23

    Background The Journal Citation Reports (JCR) Pharmacology and Pharmacy subject category is heterogeneous. The inclusion of journals with basic and clinical scopes, which have different citation patterns, compromises comparability of impact factors among journals within the category. Objective To subdivide the Pharmacology and Pharmacy category into basic pharmacology, clinical pharmacology, and pharmacy based on the analyses of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as a proxy of journals' scopes. Setting JCR. Method All articles, and respective MeSH, published in 2013, 2014, and 2015 in all journals included in the 2014 JCR Pharmacology and Pharmacy category were retrieved from PubMed. Several models using a combination of the 14 MeSH categories and specific MeSH tree branches were tested using hierarchical cluster analysis. Main outcome measure Distribution of journals across the subcategories of the JCR Pharmacology and Pharmacy subject category. Results A total of 107,847 articles from 214 journals were included. Nine different models combining the MeSH categories M (Persons) and N (Health Care) with specific MeSH tree branches (selected ad-hoc) and Pharmacy-specific MeSH (identified in previous research) consistently grouped 142 journals (66.4%) in homogeneous groups reflecting their basic and clinical pharmacology, and pharmacy scopes. Ultimately, journals were clustered into: 150 in basic pharmacology, 43 in clinical pharmacology, 16 in basic pharmacology and clinical pharmacology, and 5 in pharmacy. Conclusion The reformulation of the Pharmacology and Pharmacy category into three categories was demonstrated by the consistent results obtained from testing nine different clustering models using the MeSH terms assigned to their articles.

  13. COEXPEDIA: exploring biomedical hypotheses via co-expressions associated with medical subject headings (MeSH).

    PubMed

    Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Chan Yeong; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Lee, Insuk

    2017-01-04

    The use of high-throughput array and sequencing technologies has produced unprecedented amounts of gene expression data in central public depositories, including the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). The immense amount of expression data in GEO provides both vast research opportunities and data analysis challenges. Co-expression analysis of high-dimensional expression data has proven effective for the study of gene functions, and several co-expression databases have been developed. Here, we present a new co-expression database, COEXPEDIA (www.coexpedia.org), which is distinctive from other co-expression databases in three aspects: (i) it contains only co-functional co-expressions that passed a rigorous statistical assessment for functional association, (ii) the co-expressions were inferred from individual studies, each of which was designed to investigate gene functions with respect to a particular biomedical context such as a disease and (iii) the co-expressions are associated with medical subject headings (MeSH) that provide biomedical information for anatomical, disease, and chemical relevance. COEXPEDIA currently contains approximately eight million co-expressions inferred from 384 and 248 GEO series for humans and mice, respectively. We describe how these MeSH-associated co-expressions enable the identification of diseases and drugs previously unknown to be related to a gene or a gene group of interest.

  14. Improving information retrieval using Medical Subject Headings Concepts: a test case on rare and chronic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Darmoni, Stéfan J.; Letord, Catherine; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Griffon, Nicolas; Thirion, Benoît; Névéol, Aurélie

    2012-01-01

    Background: As more scientific work is published, it is important to improve access to the biomedical literature. Since 2000, when Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Concepts were introduced, the MeSH Thesaurus has been concept based. Nevertheless, information retrieval is still performed at the MeSH Descriptor or Supplementary Concept level. Objective: The study assesses the benefit of using MeSH Concepts for indexing and information retrieval. Methods: Three sets of queries were built for thirty-two rare diseases and twenty-two chronic diseases: (1) using PubMed Automatic Term Mapping (ATM), (2) using Catalog and Index of French-language Health Internet (CISMeF) ATM, and (3) extrapolating the MEDLINE citations that should be indexed with a MeSH Concept. Results: Type 3 queries retrieve significantly fewer results than type 1 or type 2 queries (about 18,000 citations versus 200,000 for rare diseases; about 300,000 citations versus 2,000,000 for chronic diseases). CISMeF ATM also provides better precision than PubMed ATM for both disease categories. Discussion: Using MeSH Concept indexing instead of ATM is theoretically possible to improve retrieval performance with the current indexing policy. However, using MeSH Concept information retrieval and indexing rules would be a fundamentally better approach. These modifications have already been implemented in the CISMeF search engine. PMID:22879806

  15. Improving information retrieval using Medical Subject Headings Concepts: a test case on rare and chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Darmoni, Stéfan J; Soualmia, Lina F; Letord, Catherine; Jaulent, Marie-Christine; Griffon, Nicolas; Thirion, Benoît; Névéol, Aurélie

    2012-07-01

    As more scientific work is published, it is important to improve access to the biomedical literature. Since 2000, when Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Concepts were introduced, the MeSH Thesaurus has been concept based. Nevertheless, information retrieval is still performed at the MeSH Descriptor or Supplementary Concept level. The study assesses the benefit of using MeSH Concepts for indexing and information retrieval. Three sets of queries were built for thirty-two rare diseases and twenty-two chronic diseases: (1) using PubMed Automatic Term Mapping (ATM), (2) using Catalog and Index of French-language Health Internet (CISMeF) ATM, and (3) extrapolating the MEDLINE citations that should be indexed with a MeSH Concept. Type 3 queries retrieve significantly fewer results than type 1 or type 2 queries (about 18,000 citations versus 200,000 for rare diseases; about 300,000 citations versus 2,000,000 for chronic diseases). CISMeF ATM also provides better precision than PubMed ATM for both disease categories. Using MeSH Concept indexing instead of ATM is theoretically possible to improve retrieval performance with the current indexing policy. However, using MeSH Concept information retrieval and indexing rules would be a fundamentally better approach. These modifications have already been implemented in the CISMeF search engine.

  16. COEXPEDIA: exploring biomedical hypotheses via co-expressions associated with medical subject headings (MeSH)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sunmo; Kim, Chan Yeong; Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Kim, Hyojin; Shim, Hongseok; Lee, Insuk

    2017-01-01

    The use of high-throughput array and sequencing technologies has produced unprecedented amounts of gene expression data in central public depositories, including the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). The immense amount of expression data in GEO provides both vast research opportunities and data analysis challenges. Co-expression analysis of high-dimensional expression data has proven effective for the study of gene functions, and several co-expression databases have been developed. Here, we present a new co-expression database, COEXPEDIA (www.coexpedia.org), which is distinctive from other co-expression databases in three aspects: (i) it contains only co-functional co-expressions that passed a rigorous statistical assessment for functional association, (ii) the co-expressions were inferred from individual studies, each of which was designed to investigate gene functions with respect to a particular biomedical context such as a disease and (iii) the co-expressions are associated with medical subject headings (MeSH) that provide biomedical information for anatomical, disease, and chemical relevance. COEXPEDIA currently contains approximately eight million co-expressions inferred from 384 and 248 GEO series for humans and mice, respectively. We describe how these MeSH-associated co-expressions enable the identification of diseases and drugs previously unknown to be related to a gene or a gene group of interest. PMID:27679477

  17. Three-Way Catalog Division Combined with Conversion to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) in a Medium-sized Medical Library *†

    PubMed Central

    McNutt, Eleanor M.; Poland, Ursula H.

    1974-01-01

    Conversion to MeSH and other reasons are enumerated for the division of an undivided dictionary card catalog into a three-way divided catalog, consisting of Proper Names, Titles, and Topical Subjects sections. Methodology of division is described. Conversion from Library of Congress Subject Headings to Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as an authority list stimulated such concurrent changes as (1) the introduction of a guide card system that eliminates typing of subject headings on catalog cards and (2) the adoption of a filing system that employs reverse chronological order for all types of sequential material in the Proper Names and Titles sections and for all material in the Topical Subjects section. The ancillary decisions, procedures, and methods necessitated by these major conversions are also described. PMID:4462686

  18. Consistency and accuracy of the Medical Subject Headings thesaurus for electronic indexing and retrieval of chronobiologic references.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability of the National Library of Medicine (NLM)'s Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) thesaurus for electronic indexing and retrieval of published chronobiologic papers. A sample set of 228 recent chronobiologic references was downloaded from the MEDLINE's database together with all MeSH entries associated with them. The following descriptors were analyzed among the headings of obvious chronobiologic relevance: chronobiology, chronobiology disorders, biological clocks, circadian rhythm, chronotherapy, drug administration schedule, periodicity, seasons, sleep disorders/circadian rhythm, and time factors. A comparison was made between the number of references identified by each heading and the number of articles actually pertinent to the same heading (as ascertained after reading each article of the sample set). This made possible an assessment of consistency (retrieved number not less than actual number) and accuracy (retrieved number not greater than actual number) of the usage of each MeSH entry. By reading each article, it was also possible to identify common chronobiologic concepts not yet associated with specific MeSH headings. In the preselected set of chronobiologic references, seasons identified all articles pertinent to seasonal variations and rhythms. However, chronobiology disorders missed 97.6% of its pertinent articles; periodicity, 95.2%; chronobiology, 87.7%; chronotherapy, 70%; time factors, 62.3%; and sleep disorders/circadian rhythm, 47.4%. Drug administration schedule missed 40% of the chronotherapeutic articles and identified 15% of the chronopharmacologic articles; biological clocks missed 24.1% of its pertinent articles and wrongly identified 8.3% of the retrieved articles; and circadian rhythm missed 2.7% of all circadian studies and wrongly identified 8.2% of the articles it retrieved. When used to search chronobiologic articles in the entire MEDLINE database, drug administration schedule

  19. Survey of keyword adjustment of published articles medical subject headings in journal of mazandaran university of medical sciences (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Kabirzadeh, Azar; Siamian, Hasan; Abadi, Ebrahim Bagherian Farah; Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. Keywords are the most important tools for Information retrieval. They are usually used for retrieval of articles based on contents of information reserved from printed and electronic resources. Retrieval of appropriate keywords from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) can impact with exact, correctness and short time on information retrieval. Regarding the above mentioned matters, this study was done to compare the Latin keywords was in the articles published in the Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. This is a descriptive study. The data were extracted from the key words of Englsih abstracts of articles published in the years 2009-2010 in the Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences by census method. Checklist of data collection is designed, based on research objectives and literature review which has face validity. Compliance rate in this study was to determine if the keywords cited in this article as a full subject of the main subject headings in a MeSH (Bold and the selected word) is a perfect adjustment. If keywords were cited in the article but the main heading is not discussed in the following main topics to be discussed with reference to See and See related it has considered has partial adjustment. Out of 148 articles published in 12 issues in proposed time of studying, 72 research papers were analyzed. The average numbers of authors in each article were 4 ± 1. Results showed that most of specialty papers 42 (58. 4%), belonging to the (Department of Clinical Sciences) School of Medicine, 11 (15.3%) Basic Science, 6(8.4%) Pharmacy, Nursing and Midwifery 5(6.9%), 4(5.5%) Health, paramedical Sciences 3(4.2%), and non medical article 1(1.3%) school of medicine. In general, results showed that 80 (30%) of key words have been used to complete the adjustment. Also, only 1(1.4%) had complete adjustment with all the MeSH key words and in 8 articles(11.4%) key words of had no adjustment with MeSH. The results showed that only

  20. Survey of Keyword Adjustment of Published Articles Medical Subject Headings in Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences (2009-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Kabirzadeh, Azar; Abadi, Ebrahim Bagherian Farah; Saravi, Benyamin Mohseni

    2013-01-01

    CONFLICT OF INTEREST: NONE DECLARED Introduction Keywords are the most important tools for Information retrieval. They are usually used for retrieval of articles based on contents of information reserved from printed and electronic resources. Retrieval of appropriate keywords from Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) can impact with exact, correctness and short time on information retrieval. Regarding the above mentioned matters, this study was done to compare the Latin keywords was in the articles published in the Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Method This is a descriptive study. The data were extracted from the key words of Englsih abstracts of articles published in the years 2009–2010 in the Journal of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences by census method. Checklist of data collection is designed, based on research objectives and literature review which has face validity. Compliance rate in this study was to determine if the keywords cited in this article as a full subject of the main subject headings in a MeSH (Bold and the selected word) is a perfect adjustment. If keywords were cited in the article but the main heading is not discussed in the following main topics to be discussed with reference to See and See related it has considered has partial adjustment. Results Out of 148 articles published in 12 issues in proposed time of studying, 72 research papers were analyzed. The average numbers of authors in each article were 4 ± 1. Results showed that most of specialty papers 42 (58. 4%), belonging to the (Department of Clinical Sciences) School of Medicine, 11 (15.3%) Basic Science, 6(8.4%) Pharmacy, Nursing and Midwifery 5(6.9%), 4(5.5%) Health, paramedical Sciences 3(4.2%), and non medical article 1(1.3%) school of medicine. In general, results showed that 80 (30%) of key words have been used to complete the adjustment. Also, only 1(1.4%) had complete adjustment with all the MeSH key words and in 8 articles(11.4%) key words of had no

  1. Indexing Publicly Available Health Data with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): An Evaluation of Term Coverage.

    PubMed

    Marc, David T; Zhang, Rui; Beattie, James; Gatewood, Laël C; Khairat, Saif S

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Open Government Initiative, the United States federal government published datasets to increase collaboration, transparency, consumer participation, and research, and are available online at HealthData.gov. Currently, HealthData.gov does not adequately support the accessibility goal of the Open Government Initiative due to issues of retrieving relevant data because of inadequately cataloguing and lack of indexing with a standardized terminology. Given the commonalities between the HealthData.gov and MEDLINE metadata, Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) may offer an indexing solution, but there needs to be a formal evaluation of the efficacy of MeSH for covering the dataset concepts. The purpose of this study was to determine if MeSH adequately covers the HealthData.gov concepts. The noun and noun phrases from the HealthData.gov metadata were extracted and mapped to MeSH using MetaMap. The frequency of no exact, partical and no matches with MeSH terms were determined. The results of this study revealed that about 70% of the HealthData.gov concepts partially or exactly matched MeSH terms. Therefore, MeSH may be a favorable terminology for indexing the HealthData.gov datasets.

  2. Use of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) in Portuguese for categorizing web-based healthcare content.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Felipe; Sousa, Fernando Sequeira; Teixeira, Fábio Oliveira; Falcão, Alex Esteves Jacoud; Hummel, Anderson Diniz; da Costa, Thiago Martini; Calado, Pável Pereira; de Araújo, Luciano Vieira; Pisa, Ivan Torres

    2011-04-01

    Internet users are increasingly using the worldwide web to search for information relating to their health. This situation makes it necessary to create specialized tools capable of supporting users in their searches. To apply and compare strategies that were developed to investigate the use of the Portuguese version of Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) for constructing an automated classifier for Brazilian Portuguese-language web-based content within or outside of the field of healthcare, focusing on the lay public. 3658 Brazilian web pages were used to train the classifier and 606 Brazilian web pages were used to validate it. The strategies proposed were constructed using content-based vector methods for text classification, such that Naive Bayes was used for the task of classifying vector patterns with characteristics obtained through the proposed strategies. A strategy named InDeCS was developed specifically to adapt MeSH for the problem that was put forward. This approach achieved better accuracy for this pattern classification task (0.94 sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve). Because of the significant results achieved by InDeCS, this tool has been successfully applied to the Brazilian healthcare search portal known as Busca Saúde. Furthermore, it could be shown that MeSH presents important results when used for the task of classifying web-based content focusing on the lay public. It was also possible to show from this study that MeSH was able to map out mutable non-deterministic characteristics of the web. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Subject Headings for Engineering, SHE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Index, Inc., New York, NY.

    Subject Headings for Engineering (SHE) is an alphabetical list of terms currently in use by Engineering Index, Inc. (EI) technical specialists as a controlled vocabulary for indexing transdisciplinary literature of engineering and related sciences. SHE is the basic tool for indexing using the nomenclature derived from the literature of the many…

  4. Quality of pharmacy-specific Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) assignment in pharmacy journals indexed in MEDLINE.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Fernando; Salgado, Teresa M; van den Boogerd, Lucienne; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is the National Library of Medicine (NLM) controlled vocabulary for indexing articles. Inaccuracies in the MeSH thesaurus have been reported for several areas including pharmacy. To assess the quality of pharmacy-specific MeSH assignment to articles indexed in pharmacy journals. The 10 journals containing the highest number of articles published in 2012 indexed under the MeSH 'Pharmacists' were identified. All articles published over a 5-year period (2008-2012) in the 10 previously selected journals were retrieved from PubMed. MeSH terms used to index these articles were extracted and pharmacy-specific MeSH terms were identified. The frequency of use of pharmacy-specific MeSH terms was calculated across journals. A total of 6989 articles were retrieved from the 10 pharmacy journals, of which 328 (4.7%) were articles not fully indexed and therefore did not contain any MeSH terms assigned. Among the 6661 articles fully indexed, the mean number of MeSH terms was 10.1 (SD = 4.0), being 1.0 (SD = 1.3) considered as Major MeSH. Both values significantly varied across journals. The mean number of pharmacy-specific MeSH terms per article was 0.9 (SD = 1.2). A total of 3490 (52.4%) of the 6661 articles were indexed in pharmacy journals without a single pharmacy-specific MeSH. Of the total 67193 MeSH terms assigned to articles, on average 10.5% (SD = 13.9) were pharmacy-specific MeSH. A statistically significant different pattern of pharmacy-specific MeSH assignment was identified across journals (Kruskal-Wallis P < 0.001). The quality of assignment of the existing pharmacy-specific MeSH terms to articles indexed in pharmacy journals can be improved to further enhance evidence gathering in pharmacy. Over half of the articles published in the top-10 journals publishing pharmacy literature were indexed without a single pharmacy-specific MeSH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Creating Better Subject Access with Multiple Vocabularies: Upgrading the Subject Heading List for the Alzheimer's Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marilyn J.; Cochrane, Pauline Atherton

    1999-01-01

    A new subject list was generated for the Alzheimer's Association's Green-Field Library catalog, resulting in a mix of Medical Subject Headings and Library of Congress Subject Headings, augmented by local- and reviewer-supplied terms. The list gives the Library authoritative terms to use for original and copy cataloging. It can also be placed with…

  6. Compensating for literature annotation bias when predicting novel drug-disease relationships through Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profile (MeSHOP) similarity.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Warren A; Ouellette, B F Francis; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2013-01-01

    Using annotations to the articles in MEDLINE®/PubMed®, over six thousand chemical compounds with pharmacological actions have been tracked since 1996. Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs) quantitatively leverage the literature associated with biological entities such as diseases or drugs, providing the opportunity to reposition known compounds towards novel disease applications. A MeSHOP is constructed by counting the number of times each medical subject term is assigned to an entity-related research publication in the MEDLINE database and calculating the significance of the count by comparing against the count of the term in a background set of publications. Based on the expectation that drugs suitable for treatment of a disease (or disease symptom) will have similar annotation properties to the disease, we successfully predict drug-disease associations by comparing MeSHOPs of diseases and drugs. The MeSHOP comparison approach delivers an 11% improvement over bibliometric baselines. However, novel drug-disease associations are observed to be biased towards drugs and diseases with more publications. To account for the annotation biases, a correction procedure is introduced and evaluated. By explicitly accounting for the annotation bias, unexpectedly similar drug-disease pairs are highlighted as candidates for drug repositioning research. MeSHOPs are shown to provide a literature-supported perspective for discovery of new links between drugs and diseases based on pre-existing knowledge.

  7. Compensating for literature annotation bias when predicting novel drug-disease relationships through Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profile (MeSHOP) similarity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Using annotations to the articles in MEDLINE®/PubMed®, over six thousand chemical compounds with pharmacological actions have been tracked since 1996. Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs) quantitatively leverage the literature associated with biological entities such as diseases or drugs, providing the opportunity to reposition known compounds towards novel disease applications. Methods A MeSHOP is constructed by counting the number of times each medical subject term is assigned to an entity-related research publication in the MEDLINE database and calculating the significance of the count by comparing against the count of the term in a background set of publications. Based on the expectation that drugs suitable for treatment of a disease (or disease symptom) will have similar annotation properties to the disease, we successfully predict drug-disease associations by comparing MeSHOPs of diseases and drugs. Results The MeSHOP comparison approach delivers an 11% improvement over bibliometric baselines. However, novel drug-disease associations are observed to be biased towards drugs and diseases with more publications. To account for the annotation biases, a correction procedure is introduced and evaluated. Conclusions By explicitly accounting for the annotation bias, unexpectedly similar drug-disease pairs are highlighted as candidates for drug repositioning research. MeSHOPs are shown to provide a literature-supported perspective for discovery of new links between drugs and diseases based on pre-existing knowledge. PMID:23819887

  8. Cited references and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) as two different knowledge representations: clustering and mappings at the paper level.

    PubMed

    Leydesdorff, Loet; Comins, Jordan A; Sorensen, Aaron A; Bornmann, Lutz; Hellsten, Iina

    2016-01-01

    For the biomedical sciences, the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) make available a rich feature which cannot currently be merged properly with widely used citing/cited data. Here, we provide methods and routines that make MeSH terms amenable to broader usage in the study of science indicators: using Web-of-Science (WoS) data, one can generate the matrix of citing versus cited documents; using PubMed/MEDLINE data, a matrix of the citing documents versus MeSH terms can be generated analogously. The two matrices can also be reorganized into a 2-mode matrix of MeSH terms versus cited references. Using the abbreviated journal names in the references, one can, for example, address the question whether MeSH terms can be used as an alternative to WoS Subject Categories for the purpose of normalizing citation data. We explore the applicability of the routines in the case of a research program about the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer's disease. One conclusion is that referenced journals provide archival structures, whereas MeSH terms indicate mainly variation (including novelty) at the research front. Furthermore, we explore the option of using the citing/cited matrix for main-path analysis as a by-product of the software.

  9. Subject Heading Revision: A System for Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibtag, Susan

    1982-01-01

    Outlines the processes involved in improving the subject catalog at a medical library. Policy decisions concerning heading sources and revision methodology and plans for analyzing, weeding, and increasing the relevance of subject terms is discussed. The making of catalog changes and the results of catalog revision are also described. (JL)

  10. Changing from Sears to LC Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schadlich, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses factors that might induce a library to consider changing from Sears to Library of Congress subject headings and provides a quantitative evaluation of the compatibility of the two. (Author/FM)

  11. A data mining approach to selecting herbs with similar efficacy: Targeted selection methods based on medical subject headings (MeSH).

    PubMed

    Yea, Sang-Jun; Seong, BoSeok; Jang, Yunji; Kim, Chul

    2016-04-22

    Natural products have long been the most important source of ingredients in the discovery of new drugs. Moreover, since the Nagoya Protocol, finding alternative herbs with similar efficacy in traditional medicine has become a very important issue. Although random selection is a common method of finding ethno-medicinal herbs of similar efficacy, it proved to be less effective; therefore, this paper proposes a novel targeted selection method using data mining approaches in the MEDLINE database in order to identify and select herbs with a similar degree of efficacy. From among sixteen categories of medical subject headings (MeSH) descriptors, three categories containing terms related to herbal compounds, efficacy, toxicity, and the metabolic process were selected. In order to select herbs of similar efficacy in a targeted way, we adopted the similarity measurement method based on MeSH. In order to evaluate the proposed algorithm, we built up three different validation datasets which contain lists of original herbs and corresponding medicinal herbs of similar efficacy. The average area under curve (AUC) of the proposed algorithm was found to be about 500% larger than the random selection method. We found that the proposed algorithm puts more hits at the front of the top-10 list than the random selection method, and precisely discerns the efficacy of the herbs. It was also found that the AUC of the experiments either remained the same or increased slightly in all three validation datasets as the search range was increased. This study reveals and proves that the proposed algorithm is significantly more accurate and efficient in finding alternative herbs of similar efficacy than the random selection method. As such, it is hoped that this approach will be used in diverse applications in the ethno-pharmacology field. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Using MeSH (medical subject headings) to enhance PubMed search strategies for evidence-based practice in physical therapy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Randy R; Austin, Tricia M

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an important paradigm in health care. Physical therapists report lack of knowledge and time constraints as barriers to EBP. The purpose of this technical report is to illustrate how Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), a controlled vocabulary thesaurus of indexing terms, is used to efficiently search MEDLINE, the largest component of PubMed. Using clinical questions, this report illustrates how search terms common to physical therapist practice do or do not map to appropriate MeSH terms. A PubMed search strategy that takes advantage of text words and MeSH terms is provided. A search of 139 terms and 13 acronyms was conducted to determine whether they appropriately mapped to a MeSH term. The search results were categorized into 1 of 5 outcomes. Nearly half (66/139) of the search terms mapped to an appropriate MeSH term (outcome 1). When a search term did not appropriately map to a MeSH term, it was entered into the MeSH database to search for an appropriate MeSH term. Twenty-one appropriate MeSH terms were found (outcomes 2 and 4), and there were 52 search terms for which an appropriate MeSH term was not found (outcomes 3 and 5). Nearly half of the acronyms did not map to an appropriate MeSH term, and an appropriate MeSH term was not found in the database. The results are based on a limited number of search terms and acronyms. Understanding how search terms map to MeSH terms and using the PubMed search strategy can enable physical therapists to take full advantage of available MeSH terms and should result in more-efficient and better-informed searches.

  13. Punctuation in Library of Congress Subject Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Hilda

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the punctuation of the eighth edition Library of Congress Subject Headings reveals that the hyphen, coma and parentheses are most often used. Examples of these and the use of the apostrophe, dash, and period are discussed. (Author/MBR)

  14. Punctuation in Library of Congress Subject Headings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinweg, Hilda

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of the punctuation of the eighth edition Library of Congress Subject Headings reveals that the hyphen, coma and parentheses are most often used. Examples of these and the use of the apostrophe, dash, and period are discussed. (Author/MBR)

  15. Subject Heading Patterns in OCLC Monographic Records. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.; Aluri, Rao

    An analysis of a sample of 33,455 monographic records taken from the OCLC (Ohio College Library Center) database found that 94 percent of the sample's 50,213 subject headings were Library of Congress (LC) subject headings. Each record had an average of 1.4 LC subject headings; however, 18.6 percent of the records had no LC subject headings…

  16. A comparative study of the origin, structure, and indexing language of the Persian and English keywords of articles indexed in the IranMedex database and their compliance with the Persian medical thesaurus and Medical Subject Headings.

    PubMed

    Parsaei-Mohammadi, Parastoo; Ghasemi, Ali Hossein; Hassanzadeh-Beheshtabad, Raziyeh

    2017-01-01

    In the present era, thesauri as tools in indexing play an effective role in integrating retrieval preventing fragmentation as well as a multiplicity of terminologies and also in providing information content of documents. This study aimed to investigate the keywords of articles indexed in IranMedex in terms of origin, structure and indexing situation and their Compliance with the Persian Medical Thesaurus and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). This study is an applied research, and a survey has been conducted. Statistical population includes 32,850 Persian articles which are indexed in the IranMedex during the years 1385-1391. 379 cases were selected as sample of the study. Data collection was done using a checklist. In analyzing the findings, the SPSS Software were used. Although there was no significant difference in terms of indexing origin between the proportion of different types of the Persian and English keywords of articles indexed in the IranMedex, the compliance rates of the Persian and English keywords with the Persian medical thesaurus and MeSH were different in different years. In the meantime, the structure of keywords is leaning more towards phrase structure, and a single word structure and the majority of keywords are selected from the titles and abstracts. The authors' familiarity with the thesauri and controlled tools causes homogeneity in assigning keywords and also provides more precise, faster, and easier retrieval of the keywords. It's suggested that a mixture of natural and control languages to be used in this database in order to reach more comprehensive results.

  17. A comparative study of the origin, structure, and indexing language of the Persian and English keywords of articles indexed in the IranMedex database and their compliance with the Persian medical thesaurus and Medical Subject Headings

    PubMed Central

    Parsaei-Mohammadi, Parastoo; Ghasemi, Ali Hossein; Hassanzadeh-Beheshtabad, Raziyeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In the present era, thesauri as tools in indexing play an effective role in integrating retrieval preventing fragmentation as well as a multiplicity of terminologies and also in providing information content of documents. Goals: This study aimed to investigate the keywords of articles indexed in IranMedex in terms of origin, structure and indexing situation and their Compliance with the Persian Medical Thesaurus and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). Materials and Methods: This study is an applied research, and a survey has been conducted. Statistical population includes 32,850 Persian articles which are indexed in the IranMedex during the years 1385–1391. 379 cases were selected as sample of the study. Data collection was done using a checklist. In analyzing the findings, the SPSS Software were used. Findings: Although there was no significant difference in terms of indexing origin between the proportion of different types of the Persian and English keywords of articles indexed in the IranMedex, the compliance rates of the Persian and English keywords with the Persian medical thesaurus and MeSH were different in different years. In the meantime, the structure of keywords is leaning more towards phrase structure, and a single word structure and the majority of keywords are selected from the titles and abstracts. Conclusion: The authors’ familiarity with the thesauri and controlled tools causes homogeneity in assigning keywords and also provides more precise, faster, and easier retrieval of the keywords. It's suggested that a mixture of natural and control languages to be used in this database in order to reach more comprehensive results. PMID:28546967

  18. Library of Congress Subject Heading Patterns in OCLC Monographic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.; Aluri, Rao

    1981-01-01

    Examines the characteristics of subject headings found in OCLC cataloging records. The study analyzed a sample of 33,455 monographic records taken from the OCLC database, and found that 94 percent of the subject headings used were Library of Congress subject headings. Twenty-seven references are cited. (Author/FM)

  19. Bobbling head in a young subject

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.; Deb, Sumit; Ghosh, S. N.; Mondal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Bobble-head Doll Syndrome is a rare and unique movement disorder found in children. Clinically, it is characterized by a to and fro or side to side movement of the head at the frequency of 2 to 3 Hz. It is mostly associated with cystic lesions around the third ventricle, choroid plexus papilloma, aqueductal stenosis and other rare disorders. An eleven year old child presented in the outpatient department with continuous to and fro movement of the head and declining vision for the last one month. MRI Scan showed a large contrast-enhanced lesion in the region of the third ventricle along with gross hydrocephalus. Ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted and the movements of the head disappeared completely. Bobble-head doll syndrome is a rare condition and therefore this case is presented and the literature reviewed. PMID:25506155

  20. Public Library Subject Headings for 16mm Motion Pictures. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Library Association, Sacramento.

    Suggested subject headings for 16mm motion pictures are listed. The intent of the list is to provide audiovisual librarians with a tool which will aid them in making subject indexes for their printed catalogs. It is also intended as an authority for professional catalogers who may be called upon to catalog 16mm motion pictures. (Author/KKC)

  1. Arranging Roots: Classification and Subject Headings for Genealogical Collections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Linda; Stallings, Evelyn T.

    1997-01-01

    The Dewey Decimal Classification was not fulfilling genealogical researchers' needs, who search for ancestors by place (not subject). A new system that was developed at Rowan Public Library (Salisbury, North Carolina) is described. Also given are suggested additions to the Library of Congress Subject Headings to provide geographic orientation.…

  2. Medical malpractice and head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lydiatt, Daniel D

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate medical malpractice involving patients with head and neck cancer. In the United States, problems associated with the medical malpractice environment are reaching proportions that threaten the delivery of health care. Several methods to learn more about the trends and ramifications of litigation have been developed. Although patients with cancer of the head and neck bring suits rarely, when they do several themes seem prevalent. Delays in diagnosis are common allegations. Plaintiffs are frequently much younger than expected, and the oncologic outcome is frequently poor. Defendant physicians occasionally unwittingly add to the delay by not expecting the younger patient. The poor oncologic outcome may be related to the delay or to a biologically more aggressive disease. Relationships between these factors are explored. Consent issues are also relatively common. Physicians must strive to know as much as possible about tort reform, and to contribute to the process. Litigation analysis and other tools to expand our understanding can be used to educate ourselves and the legal community. Scientific standards must be developed along with clinical pathways to guide ourselves to prevent litigation. They may also guide the legal community to establish more rational standards of care based on a consensus of expert opinions.

  3. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  4. Gastrointestinal Physiology During Head Down Tilt Bedrest in Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Z.; Guthienz, J.; Putcha, L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a key role in the physiology and function of the GI tract. It directly affects absorption of medications and nutrients taken by mouth, in addition to indirectly altering GI physiology by way of changes in the microfloral composition and biochemistry of the GI tract. Astronauts have reported nausea, loss of appetite and constipation during space flight all of which indicate a reduction in GI motility and function similar to the one seen in chronic bed rest patients. The purpose of this study is to determine GI motility and bacterial proliferation during -6 degree head down tilt bed rest (HTD). Methods: Healthy male and female subjects between the ages of 25-40 participated in a 60 day HTD study protocol. GI transit time (GITT) was determined using lactulose breath hydrogen test and bacterial overgrowth was measured using glucose breath hydrogen test. H. Pylori colonization was determined using C13-urea breath test (UBIT#). All three tests were conducted on 9 days before HDT, and repeated on HDT days 2, 28, 58, and again on day 7 after HDT. Results: GITT increased during HTD compared to the respective ambulatory control values; GITT was significantly lower on day 7 after HTD. A concomitant increase in bacterial colonization was also noticed during HDT starting after approximately 28 days of HDT. However, H. Pylori proliferation was not recorded during HDT as indicated by UBIT#. Conclusion: GITT significantly decreased during HDT with a concomitant increase in the proliferation of GI bacterial flora but not H. pylori.

  5. Tangram Puzzles: Focus on Search Terms, Descriptors, and Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Describes the history of tangrams and their use as mathematical puzzles and explains how they can be adapted for library media specialists to use for developing subject headings on a particular topic. An example is given; and 28 resources on tangrams are listed, including books, nonprint materials, and addresses. (LRW)

  6. Parent-Reported Medication Use in a Head Start Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Tara M.; Carlson, John S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of medication use within a Head Start population. Parent-reported data (N = 1,397) from initial enrollment information indicated 6.8% of children were taking 34 different types of medication. More than two thirds (69%) of those on medication were prescribed more than one medication, and more than one third…

  7. Parent-Reported Medication Use in a Head Start Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Tara M.; Carlson, John S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of medication use within a Head Start population. Parent-reported data (N = 1,397) from initial enrollment information indicated 6.8% of children were taking 34 different types of medication. More than two thirds (69%) of those on medication were prescribed more than one medication, and more than one third…

  8. Subject Headings for School and Public Libraries: An LCSH/Sears Companion. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountain, Joanna F.

    This book is meant to assist library professionals who are automating their catalog or who are switching from "Sears List of Subject Headings" to the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) as subject authority. A first-check source for the most frequently used headings needed in media centers and public libraries, this third edition…

  9. Teaching medical students the subjective global assessment.

    PubMed

    Duerksen, Donald R

    2002-04-01

    Clinical nutrition assessment is a clinical skill not taught in many medical schools in North America. The purpose of this study is to determine whether second-year medical students can be taught to perform a nutritional Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). In this study, second-year medical students were given a didactic session and a bedside demonstration of the SGA. Subsequently, they performed an SGA on unknown patients and classified those patients into one of three categories: A) well nourished, B) moderately malnourished, or C) severely malnourished. This was compared with the assessments of clinical dietitians and a physician. After this instruction, medical students correctly identified malnourished individuals. They were less accurate in their subclassification between mildly and severely malnourished individuals. The degree of agreement with clinical dietitians and a physician was fair (kappa = 0.34). With a multidisciplinary team of physicians and clinical dietitians, medical students can be taught the SGA in a 3h format. This is an important clinical skill that emphasizes the importance of clinical nutrition and may help identify malnourished individuals early in the course of their hospitalization.

  10. Subject cataloging practices in North American medical school libraries.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, R B; Michael, H N

    1976-01-01

    A survey of North American medical school libraries was made to determine current trends in subject cataloging practices. First, responses from 114 of these libraries are recorded and analyzed in the following areas: subject heading authority lists employed; use of the divided versus the dictionary catalog; and the form in which local subject authority files are kept. Then, focusing on 78 libraries that use MeSH in combination with a divided catalog, a further analysis of responses is made concerning issues relating to subject cataloging practices: updating the subject catalog to conform to annual MeSH changes; use of guide cards in the catalog; use of MeSH subheadings; filing conventions; and related issues. An attempt is made to analyze the extent to which these libraries vary from NLM practices. Suggestions are offered for formulating subject cataloging practices for an individual library. Finally, while it is concluded that MeSH and the Current Catalog are useful tools, a more detailed explication of the use of MeSH and NLM cataloging practices would be beneficial. PMID:989741

  11. CINAHL list of subject headings: a nursing thesaurus revised.

    PubMed Central

    Fishel, C C; Graham, K E; Greer, D M; Gupta, A D; Lockwood, D K; Prime, E E

    1985-01-01

    The rationale and methods for revising the thesaurus of one of the major health sciences indexing tools are discussed. Computer production of the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature and the possibility of online access mandated a revision of the list of subject headings. CINAHL has maintained a policy of responding to user needs and to changes in the nursing and allied health literature, and user input was encouraged during revision of the thesaurus. The methods of structural revision are described, and major changes in the thesaurus are detailed. Modification of the thesaurus is expected to have a far-reaching impact on the retrieval of information in nursing and allied health. Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL) is now available online through DIALOG (file 218) and BRS (access code NAHL). PMID:3995203

  12. [Quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Digue, Laurence; Pedeboscq, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    In medical oncology, how can we be sure that the right drug is being administered to the right patient at the right time? The implementation of quality assurance criteria is important in medical oncology, in order to ensure that the patient receives the best treatment safely. There is very little literature about quality assurance in medical oncology, as opposed to radiotherapy or cancer surgery. Quality assurance must cover the entire patient care process, from the diagnosis, to the therapeutic decision and drug distribution, including its selection, its preparation and its delivery to the patient (administration and dosage), and finally the potential side effects and their management. The dose-intensity respect is crucial, and its reduction can negatively affect overall survival rates, as shown in breast and testis cancers for example. In head and neck medical oncology, it is essential to respect the few well-standardized recommendations and the dose-intensity, in a population with numerous comorbidities. We will first review quality assurance criteria for the general medical oncology organization and then focus on head and neck medical oncology. We will then describe administration specificities of head and neck treatments (chemoradiation, radiation plus cetuximab, postoperative chemoradiation, induction and palliative chemotherapy) as well as their follow-up. Lastly, we will offer some recommendations to improve quality assurance in head and neck medical oncology.

  13. The Hidden Classification in Library of Congress Subject Headings for Judaica.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Bella Hass

    1993-01-01

    Examines the relationship between Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) and the Library of Congress Classification for the area of Judaica. The hierarchy of LCSH is analyzed to expose the hidden classification; and tree structures are created based on Joseph Galron's compilation, "Library of Congress Subject Headings in Jewish…

  14. Medical and social problems among women headed families in Baghdad

    PubMed Central

    Lafta, Riyadh K; Hayawi, Ali H; Khudhairi, Jamal M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Women-headed families tend to be the most marginalized and poverty prone in any given community. One in 10 Iraqi households is headed by woman according to International Organization for Migration, though their assessments suggest that this ratio rises to 1 in 8 in displaced families. Objective: To draw attention to the exposure and vulnerability of women headed families to key medical and social problems. Methods: This cross – sectional study was conducted from March through February 2011. Eleven non-governmental organizations (NGOs) were chosen to be the pool of data collection, in addition to 50 primary, intermediate, and secondary schools for girls. The actual participants were 720 with a response rate of (97%). Women headed families participated in the study were distributed in different areas of Baghdad and the districts around. Results: Hypertension is the leading disease (20%) followed by arthritis (9.6%), heart disease (7.6%), and diabetes mellitus (5.2%), the least was tuberculosis (0.1%). On the other hand, the number of sons and daughters with chronic disease was 159 (6.4%). Respiratory system disease is at the top of the list at a rate of (20.6 per 1000) while the gastrointestinal disease is at the bottom at a rate of (1.6 per 1000). 7.8% of the studied household-heading women were exposed to violence that was either verbal (75%) or physical (25%), the source was the woman's parents (42.9%), husband's family (34%), neighbors (8.9%), and others (14.3%). The percentage of problematic sons (17.9%) who show different types of behavior, (30.2%) of them not obeying their mothers, (21%) hit their brothers, (9.3%) insulting the mother, (2.3%) have problems with neighbors. PMID:25003041

  15. African Studies Thesaurus. Subject Headings for Library Users. Bibliographies and Indexes in Afro-American and African Studies, Number 29.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otchere, Freda E.

    This thesaurus identifies nearly 4,000 subject heading terms that pertain specifically to the 41 countries that make up Africa south of the Sahara. The process of identifying these terms began with a search through the "Library of Congress Subject Headings," followed by searches of other subject heading materials and bibliographic…

  16. Activation of rectus capitis posterior major muscles during voluntary retraction of the head in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Richard C; Rowan, Jacob J; Bai, Peng; Pierce, Steven J; Shafer-Crane, Gail A; Prokop, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess levels of electromyographic activity measured from rectus capitis posterior major (RCPM) muscles of asymptomatic subjects as their heads moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. A 2 × 2 within-subjects factorial research design was used. Disposable, intramuscular electrodes were used to collect electromyographic data from asymptomatic subjects between the ages of 20 and 40 years old. Data analysis was performed using mixed effects β regression models. Activation of RCPM muscles was found to significantly increase (P < .0001) as the head moved from a self-defined neutral position to a retracted position. Rectus capitis posterior major muscle activation levels, measured as a function of head position, have not been previously reported. The findings from this study showed that RCPM muscle activation significantly increases during voluntary retraction of the head. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

  18. Mapping Laborline Thesaurus Terms to Library of Congress Subject Headings: Implications for Vocabulary Switching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplan, Margaret A.

    1995-01-01

    A study for assessing automatic vocabulary switching from a thesaurus to Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) revealed that a maximum 61%, but a more realistic 41.5%, of the terms could be switched automatically; as long as LCSH is used for subject descriptions in online catalogs, interfaces for vocabulary switching can only be partially…

  19. Subjective complaints versus neuropsychological test performance after moderate to severe head injury.

    PubMed

    Lannoo, E; Colardyn, F; Vandekerckhove, T; De Deyne, C; De Soete, G; Jannes, C

    1998-01-01

    Neuropsychological test performance and subjective complaints of 85 patients with moderate to severe head injury were investigated at 6 months postinjury. The neuropsychological test battery included 10 measures of attention, memory, mental flexibility, reaction time, visuoconstruction and verbal fluency. Subjective complaints were assessed using a self-report questionnaire subdivided into four subscales (somatic, cognitive, emotional and behavioural). Ratings were obtained for the pre-injury and current status. Thirty-three trauma patients with injuries to other parts of the body than the head were used as controls. For the head injured, relatives also completed the questionnaire. Head injured patients performed significantly below trauma control patients on nearly all test measures. Head injured patients and their relatives reported a significant increase in subjective complaints since the injury on all four subscales, with no differences between patients' and relatives' reports. These changes were also reported by the trauma controls, but they report fewer changes in somatic and cognitive functioning. Exploratory canonical correlation analyses revealed no correlations between any of the four scales of the questionnaire and the test measures, nor for the head injured, the trauma controls, or the relatives, indicating no relevant relationship between subjective complaints and neuropsychological test performance.

  20. Comparative Study between the "Lista de Encabezamientos de Materia" by Gloria Escamilla and the "Library of Congress Subject Heading" List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Fernando

    This study shows to what extent Gloria Escamilla's "Lista de Encabezamientos de Materia," the only published Mexican subject heading list, is equivalent to the Library of Congress subject headings (LCSH). A LCSH heading sample is obtained from OCLC's Online Union Catalog. Using the EPIC search from OCLC, 1947 bibliographic records were…

  1. Abusive head trauma in Spanish language medical literature.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M Townsend; Szyld, Edgardo; Darden, Paul M

    2016-08-01

    Anecdotal experiences raise concerns that abusive head trauma (AHT) is significantly underdiagnosed and perhaps poorly recognized in Latin American settings. With increasing interest in international collaboration in pediatrics, differences in perspectives regarding complex diagnoses should be explored to facilitate a productive exchange of knowledge and ideas. The purpose of this study was to describe the medical literature pertaining to AHT available to physicians who read only in Spanish. In this review, LILACS, SciELO (major Spanish language databases) and Pubmed were searched with appropriate terms and filters in English, Spanish, and Portuguese for Spanish language articles on AHT. Identified articles' reference lists were then examined for possible additional articles on AHT. All relevant articles were sorted by country and examined for article type and content. Thirty-four unique articles were located for review from 8 of 21 countries. Most of the articles identified were case reports, case series, or educational, and there were no studies regarding overall incidence or prevalence of AHT. Some scientific information contained in the articles varied considerably from that in the English language literature in the areas of etiology and preventive strategies. This survey highlights that the Spanish language literature regarding AHT is sparse and variable. This must be considered when working collaboratively in a global setting. Additionally, identification of this gap presents an opportunity for education and information exchange among global medical communities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Haemodynamic responses in young and elderly, healthy subjects during ambient and warm head-up tilt.

    PubMed

    Lye, M; Walley, T

    1998-05-01

    1. Postural hypotension is common in elderly people and is usually multifactorial in origin. In young subjects increased ambient temperature is associated with postural symptoms. We hypothesized that such increases in skin temperature due to the use of bed clothes might contribute to nocturnal postural hypotension in the elderly. We therefore studied haemodynamic responses to head-up tilt in healthy elderly and young subjects, with and without passive heating induced by covering with blankets. 2. Nine young (28.7 +/- 1.5 years; mean +/- S.E.M.) and nine elderly (71.9 +/- 1.8 years) subjects were studied. All had been carefully screened to exclude factors likely to affect responses to tilt. All subjects underwent a standard head-up tilt procedure at ambient room temperature while haemodynamic responses were monitored. The subjects were then covered in blankets for 55 min and the tilt repeated. Skin temperature before the second tilt had increased from approximately 32.5 degrees C to approximately 35.2 degrees C (P < 0.001). 3. The elderly subjects maintained higher blood pressures throughout both tilts (P < 0.001) and both groups showed similar qualitative responses to tilt. Supine heart rates were higher in the elderly group (P < 0.01) with a tendency to increase more in the young group in response to tilt, especially while warm (P = 0.370). Stroke volumes and cardiac indices were consistently higher in the young group who showed larger changes during both head-up tilts. In both groups the haemodynamic responses to ambient and warm tilt were essentially the same. 4. Healthy elderly subjects, who are carefully screened to exclude individuals with cardiovascular pathology, respond to head-up tilt in the same qualitative fashion as young subjects. Quantitative responses in older subjects are 'damped'. Short-term natural body warming does not impair the reflexes in young or old subjects.

  3. Physiological assessment of head-out aquatic exercises in healthy subjects: a qualitative review.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Tiago M; Marinho, Daniel A; Reis, Victor M; Silva, António J; Bragada, José A

    2009-06-01

    In the last decades head-out aquatic exercises became one of the most important physical activities within the health system. Massive research has been produced throughout these decades in order to better understand the role of head-out aquatic exercises in populations' health. Such studies aimed to obtain comprehensive knowledge about the acute and chronic response of subjects performing head-out aquatic exercises. For that, it is assumed that chronic adaptations represent the accumulation of acute responses during each aquatic session. The purpose of this study was to describe the "state of the art "about physiological assessment of head-out aquatic exercises based on acute and chronic adaptations in healthy subjects based on a qualitative review. The main findings about acute response of head-out aquatic exercise according to water temperature, water depth, type of exercise, additional equipment used, body segments exercising and music cadence will be described. In what concerns chronic adaptations, the main results related to cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations, muscular strength, flexibility and body composition improvements will be reported. Key pointsSeveral papers reported consistent and significant improvement in physical fitness (e.g., aerobic capacity, muscular strength, flexibility and body composition) after a program of head-out aquatic exercise with at least eight weeks.Chronic adaptations to head-out aquatic exercise programs are the cumulative result of appropriate acute responses during the exercise session.Appropriate acute adaptations can be obtained taking into account the water temperature, water depth, type of exercise and its variants, the equipment used and the segmental cadence according to the subjects' profile.

  4. Medical students as human subjects in educational research

    PubMed Central

    Sarpel, Umut; Hopkins, Mary Ann; More, Frederick; Yavner, Steven; Pusic, Martin; Nick, Michael W.; Song, Hyuksoon; Ellaway, Rachel; Kalet, Adina L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Special concerns often arise when medical students are themselves the subjects of education research. A recently completed large, multi-center randomized controlled trial of computer-assisted learning modules for surgical clerks provided the opportunity to explore the perceived level of risk of studies where medical students serve as human subjects by reporting on: 1) the response of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) at seven institutions to the same study protocol; and 2) the thoughts and feelings of students across study sites about being research subjects. Methods From July 2009 to August 2010, all third-year medical students at seven collaborating institutions were eligible to participate. Patterns of IRB review of the same protocol were compared. Participation burden was calculated in terms of the time spent interacting with the modules. Focus groups were conducted with medical students at each site. Transcripts were coded by three independent reviewers and analyzed using Atlas.ti. Results The IRBs at the seven participating institutions granted full (n=1), expedited (n=4), or exempt (n=2) review of the WISE Trial protocol. 995 (73% of those eligible) consented to participate, and 207 (20%) of these students completed all outcome measures. The average time to complete the computer modules and associated measures was 175 min. Common themes in focus groups with participant students included the desire to contribute to medical education research, the absence of coercion to consent, and the low-risk nature of the research. Discussion Our findings demonstrate that risk assessment and the extent of review utilized for medical education research vary among IRBs. Despite variability in the perception of risk implied by differing IRB requirements, students themselves felt education research was low risk and did not consider themselves to be vulnerable. The vast majority of eligible medical students were willing to participate as research subjects

  5. Planning times during traveling salesman's problem: differences between closed head injury and normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Basso, D; Bisiacchi, P S; Cotelli, M; Farinello, C

    2001-01-01

    We studied planning behavior in a group of normal subjects and a group of closed head injury patients (CHI). A computerized version of the traveling salesman's problem was used as a visuospatial planning ability task. The program collected measurements of partial times, number of moves, and number of skipped subgoals. These measures allow us to calculate a "planning index" of subjects' planning ability. Results show that CHI patients present limitations in the planning process due to the lack of ongoing planning.

  6. A Method for Correcting Typographical Errors in Subject Headings in OCLC Records. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Edward T.; Aluri, Rao

    The error-correcting algorithm described was constructed to examine subject headings in online catalog records for common errors such as omission, addition, substitution, and transposition errors, and to make needed changes. Essentially, the algorithm searches the authority file for a record whose primary key exactly matches the test key. If an…

  7. Untraced References in the Machine-Readable Library of Congress Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markey, Karen; Vizine-Goetz, Diane

    1989-01-01

    Describes a study that examined the occurrence of untraced references in general explanatory see references, see also references, and scope notes in the machine readable Library of Congress Subject Headings. The discussion covers the effort required to review these fields, delete unposted references and tracings, and substitute posted ones in…

  8. Design of Pamphlet/Clipping File for UCB School of Journalism Library, Including Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedford, Mary Frances

    A solution is offered to the problem of adequately cataloging a pamphlet file without increasing staff workload. A system is described in which material is classified by broad subject headings, themselves arranged alphabetically. This had an additional advantage in that valuable material which does not in itself merit full cataloging can be…

  9. Conversion Tables. Volume 3, Subject Headings-LC and Dewey. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Mona L.

    This volume contains tables that list Library of Congress subject headings with corresponding Library of Congress and Dewey Decimal classification numbers (i.e., call numbers). Materials referenced in the conversion tables are the 21st edition of the "Dewey Decimal Classification," the most current edition of the various volumes of the…

  10. Physiological Assessment of Head-Out Aquatic Exercises in Healthy Subjects: A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Tiago M.; Marinho, Daniel A.; Reis, Victor M.; Silva, António J.; Bragada, José A.

    2009-01-01

    In the last decades head-out aquatic exercises became one of the most important physical activities within the health system. Massive research has been produced throughout these decades in order to better understand the role of head-out aquatic exercises in populations’ health. Such studies aimed to obtain comprehensive knowledge about the acute and chronic response of subjects performing head-out aquatic exercises. For that, it is assumed that chronic adaptations represent the accumulation of acute responses during each aquatic session. The purpose of this study was to describe the “state of the art ”about physiological assessment of head-out aquatic exercises based on acute and chronic adaptations in healthy subjects based on a qualitative review. The main findings about acute response of head-out aquatic exercise according to water temperature, water depth, type of exercise, additional equipment used, body segments exercising and music cadence will be described. In what concerns chronic adaptations, the main results related to cardiovascular and metabolic adaptations, muscular strength, flexibility and body composition improvements will be reported. Key points Several papers reported consistent and significant improvement in physical fitness (e.g., aerobic capacity, muscular strength, flexibility and body composition) after a program of head-out aquatic exercise with at least eight weeks. Chronic adaptations to head-out aquatic exercise programs are the cumulative result of appropriate acute responses during the exercise session. Appropriate acute adaptations can be obtained taking into account the water temperature, water depth, type of exercise and its variants, the equipment used and the segmental cadence according to the subjects’ profile. PMID:24149524

  11. Subject searching of monographs online in the medical literature.

    PubMed

    Brahmi, F A

    1988-01-01

    Searching by subject for monographic information online in the medical literature is a challenging task. The NLM database of choice is CATLINE. Other NLM databases of interest are BIOTHICSLINE, CANCERLIT, HEALTH, POPLINE, and TOXLINE. Ten BRS databases are also discussed. Of these, Books in Print, Bookinfo, and OCLC are explored further. The databases are compared as to number of total records and number and percentage of monographs. Three topics were searched on CROSS to compare hits on BBIP, BOOK, and OCLC. The same searches were run on CATLINE. The parameters of time coverage and language were equalized and the resulting citations were compared and analyzed for duplication and uniqueness. With the input of CATLINE tapes into OCLC, OCLC has become the database of choice for searching by subject for medical monographs.

  12. Preliminary rapport on head posture and muscle activity in subjects with class I and II.

    PubMed

    Gadotti, I C; Bérzin, F; Biasotto-Gonzalez, D

    2005-11-01

    Forward head posture may cause alterations in the stomatognathic system, including changes in the muscle activity of the masticatory muscles and dental occlusion alterations. Considering the need for further understanding of the relationship between the stomatognathic system and the cervical region, the purpose of this study was to analyse the head posture and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the anterior portion of temporal and masseter muscles bilaterally among bruxist's subjects with different dental occlusion classifications using the Angle method. The study consisted of 20 female volunteers, between the ages of 17 and 27 years. They were separated into two groups (class I and class II occlusions) according to a dentist-performed evaluation. An assessment of forward head posture was conducted using a photographic technique (angular calculus) combined with a clinical analysis. In the EMG analyses, active differential surface electrodes (Ag) were utilized and were placed bilaterally on the belly of masseter and temporal muscles, perpendicular to the muscles fibres. The EMG signal recorded during bilateral isotonic mastication, was presented using the Root Mean Square and was processed by Matlab software. The results indicated that the EMG responses of temporal and masseter muscles tend to be modified by occlusion alteration class II. Subjects with class II occlusion tended to present more occurrence of forward head posture with alterations in the muscle activity pattern between masseter and temporal muscles.

  13. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture.

  14. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  15. Development and validation of two subject-specific finite element models of human head against three cadaveric experiments.

    PubMed

    Tse, Kwong Ming; Tan, Long Bin; Lee, Shu Jin; Lim, Siak Piang; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2014-03-01

    Head injury, being one of the main causes of death or permanent disability, continues to remain a major health problem with significant socioeconomic costs. Numerical simulations using the FEM offer a cost-effective method and alternative to experimental methods in the biomechanical studies of head injury. The present study aimed to develop two realistic subject-specific FEMs of the human head with detailed anatomical features from medical images (Model 1: without soft tissue and Model 2: with soft tissue and differentiation of white and gray matters) and to validate them against the intracranial pressure (ICP) and relative intracranial motion data of the three cadaver experimental tests. In general, both the simulated results were in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measured ICP and relative displacements, despite slight discrepancy in a few neutral density targets markers. Sensitivity analysis showed some variations in the brain's relative motion to the material properties or marker's location. The addition of soft tissue in Model 2 helped to damp out the oscillations of the model response. It was also found that, despite the fundamental anatomical differences between the two models, there existed little evident differences in the predicted ICP and relative displacements of the two models. This indicated that the advancements on the details of the extracranial features would not improve the model's predicting capabilities of brain injury.

  16. Objective and subjective personality characteristics of medical students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meit, Heather Anderson

    The present study viewed personality characteristics of medical students using both objective (i.e., a valid and reliable psychological instrument) and subjective methods (i.e., medical students' self-ratings of how they viewed themselves and how they believed others viewed them). The 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF, 5th Edition) and a researcher developed instrument, the Subjective Rating Form (SRF), were utilized in this study. Significant differences were found in 16PF scores from entry to medical school (Time 1) to exit from medical school (Time 2). Significant differences were also observed when SRF scores were compared between Self at Time 1 (retrospectively), Self at Time 2, and self-ratings made from the perspective of Other. Most striking were differences between 16PF and SRF scores when compared with each other, at both Time 1 and Time 2. This last group of findings translated into differences between the actual and perceived self (i.e., real vs. ideal). The implications of such differences are discussed.

  17. Efficacy of the LouseBuster, a new medical device for treating head lice (Anoplura:Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Bush, Sarah E; Rock, Alex N; Jones, Sherri L; Malenke, Jael R; Clayton, Dale H

    2011-01-01

    Human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer) occur worldwide and infest millions of children and adults every year. Head lice infestations, which are known as pediculosis capitis, are psychologically stressful, physically irritating, and are one of the leading causes of K-6 school absence. The prevalence of head lice in many countries is increasing rapidly because of resistance to chemicals used in many head lice treatments. We tested the efficacy of an alternative method for controlling head lice, the LouseBuster, a custom-built medical device designed to kill head lice and their eggs using controlled, heated air. A total of 56 infested subjects was treated with the LouseBuster, and the efficacy of the treatment was evaluated by comparing the viability of lice and eggs on randomly assigned pre- and posttreatment sides of each subject's scalp. We evaluate treatment efficacy in the hands of novice versus experienced operators. We also evaluate treatment efficacy on different hair types and at different ambient humidities. Overall mortality of lice and eggs was 94.8% after treatment by experienced operators. Novice operators also achieved good results after a short training session; their results did not differ significantly from those of experienced operators. No adverse events were associated with the LouseBuster treatment. The LouseBuster is efficacious for killing head lice and their eggs. The use of heated air is appealing because it is a fast, safe, nonchemical treatment. Head lice are also unlikely to evolve resistance to desiccation, which is the apparent mode of action.

  18. Estimating formation properties from early-time recovery in wells subject to turbulent head losses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Oki, D.S.; Greene, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to interpret the early-time recovering water level following the termination of pumping in wells subject to turbulent head losses. The model assumes that turbulent head losses dissipate immediately when pumping ends. In wells subject to both borehole storage and turbulent head losses, the early-time recovery exhibits a slope equal to 1/2 on log-log plots of the recovery versus time. This half-slope response should not be confused with the half-slope response associated with a linear flow regime during aquifer tests. The presence of a borehole skin due to formation damage or stimulation around the pumped well alters the early-time recovery in wells subject to turbulent head losses and gives the appearance of borehole storage, where the recovery exhibits a unit slope on log-log plots of recovery versus time. Type curves can be used to estimate the formation storafivity from the early-time recovery data. In wells that are suspected of having formation damage or stimulation, the type curves can be used to estimate the 'effective' radius of the pumped well, if an estimate of the formation storativity is available from observation wells or other information. Type curves for a homogeneous and isotropic dual-porosity aquifer are developed and applied to estimate formation properties and the effect of formation stimulation from a single-well test conducted in the Madison limestone near Rapid City, South Dakota.A mathematical model is developed to interpret the early-time recovering water level following the termination of pumping in wells subject to turbulent head losses. The model assumes that turbulent head losses dissipate immediately when pumping ends. In wells subject to both borehole storage and turbulent head losses, the early-time recovery exhibits a slope equal to 1/2 on log-log plots of the recovery versus time. This half-slope response should not be confused with the half-slope response associated with a linear flow regime during

  19. Medical education by bedside learning - helping medical students to interact with patients who have head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Kimitaka; Asakage, Takahiro

    2007-04-01

    Our bedside interviews with patients with head neck cancer are unique and valuable educational experiences for undergraduate medical students. How can we help medical students to understand patients' thoughts and feelings? We believe that students can learn and practice empathy at the patient's bedside. Sixty medical students in their final year at the University of Tokyo and 10 patients with head and neck cancer were supervised by a professor and senior head and neck surgeons. Questionnaires were delivered to each student before and after bedside teaching, to investigate their impressions on thoughts and feelings of patients with head and neck cancer. Questions to patients were composed of: 1) backgrounds: birthplace, education, occupation and hobby; 2) cancer: the time of the first visit to clinic and the time of referral to the University of Tokyo Hospital; 3) preoperative feelings; 4) impression of surgical treatment and postoperative care; and 5) messages to medical students from the patient. Medical students also asked additional questions. Before the bedside teaching our medical students believed that it must be important to listen to patients (100%); and that it must be possible to encourage patients (50%). After the bedside teaching they noticed that a medical interview could have a positive influence on the patient (93%), probably because of general conversation (45%), the patient's personality (50%), listening to information about the patient's birthplace, education, occupation and hobby (48%), and the instructor's life experiences (25%). Most patients asked medical students to be good doctors who can understand their thoughts and feelings.

  20. Medication Nonadherence, "Professional Subjects," and Apparent Placebo Responders: Overlapping Challenges for Medications Development.

    PubMed

    McCann, David J; Petry, Nancy M; Bresell, Anders; Isacsson, Eva; Wilson, Ellis; Alexander, Robert C

    2015-10-01

    Nonadherence is a major problem in clinical trials of new medications. To evaluate the extent of nonadherence, this study evaluated pharmacokinetic sampling from 1765 subjects receiving active therapy across 8 psychiatric trials conducted between 2001 and 2011. With nonadherence defined as greater than 50% of plasma samples below the limit of quantification for study drug, the percentage of nonadherent subjects ranged from 12.8% to 39.2%. There was a trend toward increased nonadherence in studies with greater numbers of subjects, but an association with nonadherence was not apparent for other study design parameters or subject characteristics. For 2 trials with multiple recruitment sites in geographical proximity, several subjects attempted to simultaneously enroll at separate site locations. The construct of "professional subjects," those who enroll in trials only for financial gain, is gaining attention, and we therefore modeled the impact of professional subjects on medication efficacy trials. The results indicate that enrollment of professional subjects who are destined to succeed (those who will appear to achieve treatment success regardless of study drug assignment) can substantially increase both the apparent placebo response rate and the sample size requirement for statistical power, while decreasing the observed effect size. The overlapping nature of nonadherence, professional subjects, and placebo response suggests that these issues should be considered and addressed together. Following this approach, we describe a novel clinical trial design to minimize the adverse effects of professional subjects on trial outcomes and discuss methods to monitor adherence.

  1. Human sound localization: measurements in untrained, head-unrestrained subjects using gaze as a pointer.

    PubMed

    Populin, Luis C

    2008-09-01

    Studies of sound localization in humans have used various behavioral measures to quantify the observers' perceptions; a non-comprehensive list includes verbal reports, head pointing, gun pointing, stylus pointing, and laser aiming. Comparison of localization performance reveals that in humans, just as in animals, different results are obtained with different experimental tasks. Accordingly, to circumvent problems associated with task selection and training, this study used gaze, an ethologically valid behavior for spatial pointing in species with a specialized area of the fovea, to measure sound localization perception of human subjects. Orienting using gaze as a pointer does not require training, preserves the natural link between perception and action, and allows for direct behavioral comparisons across species. The results revealed, unexpectedly, a large degree of variability across subjects in both accuracy and precision. The magnitude of the average angular localization errors for the most eccentric horizontal targets, however, were very similar to those documented in studies that used head pointing, whereas the magnitude of the localization errors for the frontal targets were considerably larger. In addition, an overall improvement in sound localization in the context of the memory-saccade task, as well as a lack of effect of initial eye and head position on perceived sound location were documented.

  2. Outcome measure to assess head-down bed rest subject performance.

    PubMed

    Poritz, Julia M P; Seaton, Kimberly A; Zanello, Susana B; Cromwell, Ronita L

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an objective outcome measure to assess the performance of head-down bed rest subjects. The rationale behind the development was that the current outcome measure is subjective and dependent upon how much the clinical psychologist knows about subject behaviors during the study to rate them accurately. The behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) were developed through the use of the critical incident technique, along with traditional BARS development procedures, and the use of focus groups. Use of these methodologies yielded 86 usable critical incidents, which were used as anchors for the scales. Further research will be necessary to determine whether or not associations exist between data from the BARS and psychological screening data.

  3. Head and Trunk Acceleration During Intermediate Transport on Medical Utility Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Tucker, W Steven; Swartz, Erik E; Hornor, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    To compare head and trunk acceleration during transport on 2 medical utility vehicles. Within subject. Controlled laboratory. Nineteen male volunteers (21.8 ± 1.4 years, 176.5 ± 5.5 cm, 90.3 ± 16.1 kg). Participants were secured to a spineboard and stretcher on the Husqvarna HUV 4421DXL ambulance (HUV) and modified John Deere Gator TH (Gator) and driven over synthetic field turf transitioning to concrete slab (interval 1) and concrete slab transitioning to natural grass (interval 2). Three-dimensional (x, y, and z) accelerometers recorded head and trunk acceleration. At each data point, acceleration of the trunk was subtracted from the acceleration of the head and the peak acceleration difference was determined. Independent variables were vehicle (HUV, Gator) and interval (interval 1, interval 2). The average peak acceleration differences in 3 directions (x, y, z) were analyzed using a 2-factor within analysis of variance (P ≤ 0.05). For x, Gator in interval 2 (28.34 ± 7.45 m/s/s) was greater than HUV in interval 2 (21.87 ± 6.28 m/s/s), and HUV (11.05 ± 3.29 m/s/s) and Gator (12.56 ± 4.32 m/s/s) in interval 1. The HUV in interval 2 was greater than HUV and Gator in interval 1. For z, Gator in interval 2 (22.12 ± 4.8 m/s/s) was greater than HUV in interval 2 (15.21 ± 2.84 m/s/s), and HUV (9.51 ± 3.01 m/s/s) and Gator (12.5 ± 3.78 m/s/s) in interval 1. The HUV in interval 2 was greater than HUV and Gator in interval 1. Gator in interval 1 was greater than HUV in interval 1. Varying head and trunk accelerations exist in healthy spine-boarded participants during transport on medical utility vehicles dependent on surface and vehicle type. Intermediate transport vehicles vary in their ability to mitigate perturbations conveyed to the patient from the terrain travelled over.

  4. Trismus following different treatment modalities for head and neck cancer: a systematic review of subjective measures.

    PubMed

    Loh, Sook Y; Mcleod, Robert W J; Elhassan, Hassan A

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to compare systematically the subjective measure of trismus between different interventions to treat head and neck cancer, particularly those of the oropharynx. Using The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) Guidelines, Six databases were searched for the text using various terms which include "oropharyngeal/head and neck cancer", "trismus/mouth opening" and the various treatment modalities. Included in the review were clinical studies (> or =10 patients). Three observers independently assessed the papers identified. Among the six studies reviewed, five showed a significantly worst outcome with regard to the quality-of-life questionnaire scores for a radiotherapy or surgery and radiotherapy (RT) ± chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy when compared to surgery alone. Only one study showed no significant difference between surgery alone and other treatment modalities. Subjective quality-of-life measures are a concurrent part of modern surgical practice. Although subjective measures were utilised to measure post operative trismus successfully, there was no consensus as to which treatment modality had overall better outcomes, with conflicting studies in keeping with the current debate in this field. Larger and higher quality studies are needed to compare all three treatment modalities.

  5. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP.

  6. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  7. Non-Agricultural Databases and Thesauri: Retrieval of Subject Headings and Non-Controlled Terms in Relation to Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartol, Tomaz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to assess the utility of non-agriculture-specific information systems, databases, and respective controlled vocabularies (thesauri) in organising and retrieving agricultural information. The purpose is to identify thesaurus-linked tree structures, controlled subject headings/terms (heading words, descriptors), and principal…

  8. Non-Agricultural Databases and Thesauri: Retrieval of Subject Headings and Non-Controlled Terms in Relation to Agriculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartol, Tomaz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to assess the utility of non-agriculture-specific information systems, databases, and respective controlled vocabularies (thesauri) in organising and retrieving agricultural information. The purpose is to identify thesaurus-linked tree structures, controlled subject headings/terms (heading words, descriptors), and principal…

  9. PROJECT HEAD START MEDICAL--A GUIDE FOR DIRECTION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    HEALTH SERVICES OF PROJECT HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS PROVIDE--A MEDICAL EVALUATION OF EACH CHILD INCLUDING MEDICAL HISTORY, DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION, SCREENING TESTS FOR VISION, HEARING, SPEECH, AND TUBERCULOSIS, LABORATORY TESTS OF URINE FOR ALBUMIN AND TESTS OF SUGAR AND BLOOD FOR ANEMIA, DENTAL ASSESSMENT,…

  10. PROJECT HEAD START MEDICAL--A GUIDE FOR DIRECTION OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Economic Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    HEALTH SERVICES OF PROJECT HEAD START CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTERS PROVIDE--A MEDICAL EVALUATION OF EACH CHILD INCLUDING MEDICAL HISTORY, DEVELOPMENTAL ASSESSMENT, AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATION, SCREENING TESTS FOR VISION, HEARING, SPEECH, AND TUBERCULOSIS, LABORATORY TESTS OF URINE FOR ALBUMIN AND TESTS OF SUGAR AND BLOOD FOR ANEMIA, DENTAL ASSESSMENT,…

  11. Effects of elastic band exercise on subjects with rounded shoulder posture and forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woon; An, Da-In; Lee, Hye-Yun; Jeong, Ho-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study performed to investigate the effect of elastic band exercise program on the posture of subjects with rounded shoulder and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] The body length, forward shoulder angle, craniovertebral angle, and cranial rotation angle of participants (n=12) were measured before and after the exercise program. Furthermore, the thicknesses of the pectoralis major, rhomboid major, and upper trapezius were measured using an ultrasonographic imaging device. The exercises program was conducted with elastic bands, with 15 repetitions per set and 3 sets in total. [Results] The length of the pectoralis major, forward shoulder angle, and craniovertebral angle showed significant changes between before and after the exercise program, whereas the changes in the other measurements were not significant. The thickness of the upper trapezius showed a significant increase between before and after the elastic band exercise. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the elastic band exercise program used in the study is effective for lengthening the pectoralis major and correcting rounded shoulder and forward head posture. PMID:27390405

  12. Effects of elastic band exercise on subjects with rounded shoulder posture and forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Woon; An, Da-In; Lee, Hye-Yun; Jeong, Ho-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study performed to investigate the effect of elastic band exercise program on the posture of subjects with rounded shoulder and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] The body length, forward shoulder angle, craniovertebral angle, and cranial rotation angle of participants (n=12) were measured before and after the exercise program. Furthermore, the thicknesses of the pectoralis major, rhomboid major, and upper trapezius were measured using an ultrasonographic imaging device. The exercises program was conducted with elastic bands, with 15 repetitions per set and 3 sets in total. [Results] The length of the pectoralis major, forward shoulder angle, and craniovertebral angle showed significant changes between before and after the exercise program, whereas the changes in the other measurements were not significant. The thickness of the upper trapezius showed a significant increase between before and after the elastic band exercise. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that the elastic band exercise program used in the study is effective for lengthening the pectoralis major and correcting rounded shoulder and forward head posture.

  13. Estimation of partial optical path length in the brain in subject-specific head models for near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Kurihara, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Obata, Takayuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Okada, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Three-dimensional head models with the structures constructed from the MR head images of 40 volunteers were constructed to analyze light propagation in the subject-specific head models. The mean optical path length in the head and the partial optical path length in the brain at 13 fiducial points for each volunteer were estimated to evaluate the intersubject and spatial variability in the optical path lengths. Although the intersubject variability in the optical path lengths is very high, the spatial variability in the average of the mean optical path length and partial optical path length is similar to the previously reported data. The mean optical path length in the head increases, whereas the partial optical path length in the brain decreases with an increase in the depth of the brain surface. The partial optical path length is highly correlated with the depth of the brain surface in comparison to the mean optical path length in the head.

  14. Changes in prevalence of subjective fatigue during 14-day 6° head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayanagi, Kaname; Natsuno, Toyoki; Shiozawa, Tomoki; Yamaguchi, Nobuhisa; Watanabe, Yoriko; Suzuki, Satomi; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Yajima, Kazuyoshi

    2009-06-01

    The present study examines the prevalence of subjective fatigue in young healthy males during 14 days of 6° head-down bed rest (HDBR) by using a multidimensional questionnaire. Forty-one subjects completed the Subjective Fatigue Scale questionnaire to assess the fatigue-related complaints and symptoms. The questionnaire is composed of three sections, with 10 items each. The sections measured drowsiness and dullness (Section 1), difficulty in concentration (Section 2), and the projection of physical disintegration (Section 3). The subjects answered simple questions between 1400 and 1700 on 6 measurement days before and during the HDBR period. The prevalence rate of low back pain was markedly high (80.5%) on the second day and more than 50% in the first half of the HDBR period, and any complaints related to either a lack of sleep or a deterioration in the quality of sleep continued until the end of the HDBR period. Our findings may be useful in developing preventive strategies against physical and mental fatigue associated with prolonged HDBR, horizontal bed rest, and microgravity environments.

  15. [Medical honey in the treatment of wound-healing disorders in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Knipping, S; Grünewald, B; Hirt, R

    2012-09-01

    Already in ancient times honey was used as a drug and for the treatment of wounds. In recent years the different effects of honey on wound-healing processes have been reexamined. Based on this, the antibacterial and fungicidal qualities of honey could be confirmed. Between January 2009 and July 2011 medical honey was used on 36 patients suffering from different wound-healing disorders in the head and neck area after unsuccessful conventional treatment. The healing process was registered by microbiological investigations, measurements of the wound edges and adequate photo documentation. Medical honey can be used without problems or detectable side effects on problematic wounds of the head and neck area. Constant treatment leads to fast wound lavation, granulation, reduction of putrid smells and a decrease in inflammation. In the treatment of poorly healing and infected wounds within the head and neck area, medical honey can be used successfully without problems as an effective alternative to conventional treatment options.

  16. Critical Views of LCSH--the Library of Congress Subject Headings; A Bibliographic and Bibliometric Essay and An Analysis of Vocabulary Control in the Library of Congress List of Subject Headings (LCSH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochrane, Pauline A.; Kirtland, Monika

    A comprehensive guide to the literature published between World War II and 1979 which critically evaluates the Library of Congress list of Subject Headings (LCSH), this bibliography has been prepared for information personnel involved with subject authority files, thesauri, or vocabulary control. A brief bibliometric analysis of the literature…

  17. Characterizing Head Motion in 3 Planes during Combined Visual and Base of Support Disturbances in Healthy and Visually Sensitive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Keshner, E.A.; Dhaher, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Multiplanar environmental motion could generate head instability, particularly if the visual surround moves in planes orthogonal to a physical disturbance. We combined sagittal plane surface translations with visual field disturbances in 12 healthy (29–31 years) and 3 visually sensitive (27–57 years) adults. Center of pressure (COP), peak head angles, and RMS values of head motion were calculated and a 3-dimensional model of joint motion11 was developed to examine gross head motion in 3 planes. We found that subjects standing quietly in front of a visual scene translating in the sagittal plane produced significantly greater (p<0.003) head motion in yaw than when on a translating platform. However, when the platform was translated in the dark or with a visual scene rotating in roll, head motion orthogonal to the plane of platform motion significantly increased (p<0.02). Visually sensitive subjects having no history of vestibular disorder produced large, delayed compensatory head motion. Orthogonal head motions were significantly greater in visually sensitive than in healthy subjects in the dark (p<0.05) and with a stationary scene (p<0.01). We concluded that motion of the visual field can modify compensatory response kinematics of a freely moving head in planes orthogonal to the direction of a physical perturbation. These results suggest that the mechanisms controlling head orientation in space are distinct from those that control trunk orientation in space. These behaviors would have been missed if only COP data were considered. Data suggest that rehabilitation training can be enhanced by combining visual and mechanical perturbation paradigms. PMID:18162402

  18. Development of a high resolution voxelised head phantom for medical physics applications.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, V; Guatelli, S; Bazalova-Carter, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Schulte, R W

    2017-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have become an important investigation tool for medical imaging and dosimetry for radiotherapy and radiation protection. The development of computational phantoms with realistic anatomical features contribute significantly to the development of novel methods in medical physics. For many applications, it is desirable that such computational phantoms have a real-world physical counterpart in order to verify the obtained results. In this work, we report the development of a voxelised phantom, the HIGH_RES_HEAD, modelling a paediatric head based on the commercial phantom 715-HN (CIRS). HIGH_RES_HEAD is unique for its anatomical details and high spatial resolution (0.18×0.18mm(2) pixel size). The development of such a phantom was required to investigate the performance of a new proton computed tomography (pCT) system, in terms of detector technology and image reconstruction algorithms. The HIGH_RES_HEAD was used in an ad-hoc Geant4 simulation modelling the pCT system. The simulation application was previously validated with respect to experimental results. When compared to a standard spatial resolution voxelised phantom of the same paediatric head, it was shown that in pCT reconstruction studies, the use of the HIGH_RES_HEAD translates into a reduction from 2% to 0.7% of the average relative stopping power difference between experimental and simulated results thus improving the overall quality of the head phantom simulation. The HIGH_RES_HEAD can also be used for other medical physics applications such as treatment planning studies. A second version of the voxelised phantom was created that contains a prototypic base of skull tumour and surrounding organs at risk.

  19. Characteristics of cervical position sense in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Hae-Yong; Yong, Min-Sik

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of forward head posture (FHP) on proprioception by determining the cervical position-reposition error. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population was divided into two groups in accordance with the craniovertebral angle: the FHP group and the control group. We measured the craniovertebral angle, which is defined as the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The error value of the cervical position sense after cervical flexion, extension, and rotation was evaluated using the head repositioning accuracy test. [Results] There were significant differences in the error value of the joint position sense (cervical flexion, extension, and rotation) between the FHP and control groups. In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the craniovertebral angle and error value of the joint position sense. [Conclusion] FHP is associated with reduced proprioception. This result implies that the change in the muscle length caused by FHP decreases the joint position sense. Also, proprioception becomes worse as FHP becomes more severe.

  20. Characteristics of Cervical Position Sense in Subjects with Forward Head Posture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Hae-Yong; Yong, Min-Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of forward head posture (FHP) on proprioception by determining the cervical position-reposition error. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population was divided into two groups in accordance with the craniovertebral angle: the FHP group and the control group. We measured the craniovertebral angle, which is defined as the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The error value of the cervical position sense after cervical flexion, extension, and rotation was evaluated using the head repositioning accuracy test. [Results] There were significant differences in the error value of the joint position sense (cervical flexion, extension, and rotation) between the FHP and control groups. In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the craniovertebral angle and error value of the joint position sense. [Conclusion] FHP is associated with reduced proprioception. This result implies that the change in the muscle length caused by FHP decreases the joint position sense. Also, proprioception becomes worse as FHP becomes more severe. PMID:25435690

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Using Title Keyword Searching and Subject Headings among the 10 Divisions of Dewey Decimal Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Shu-En

    Bibliographic records taken from books listed in "OCLC Selected Titles for Research and University Libraries" are used to determine whether the use of terms in the title for subject searching is an effective alternative to the use of Library of Congress subject headings among the 10 divisions of Dewey Decimal Classification. Terms in…

  2. Comparison of smooth pursuit and combined eye-head tracking in human subjects with deficient labyrinthine function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Thurston, S. E.; Sharpe, J. A.; Ranalli, P. J.; Hamid, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of deficient labyrinthine function on smooth visual tracking with the eyes and head were investigated, using ten patients with bilateral peripheral vestibular disease and ten normal controls. Active, combined eye-head tracking (EHT) was significantly better in patients than smooth pursuit with the eyes alone, whereas normal subjects pursued equally well in both cases. Compensatory eye movements during active head rotation in darkness were always less in patients than in normal subjects. These data were used to examine current hypotheses that postulate central cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during EHT. A model that proposes summation of an integral smooth pursuit command and VOR/compensatory eye movements is consistent with the findings. Observation of passive EHT (visual fixation of a head-fixed target during en bloc rotation) appears to indicate that in this mode parametric gain changes contribute to modulation of the VOR.

  3. Comparison of smooth pursuit and combined eye-head tracking in human subjects with deficient labyrinthine function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leigh, R. J.; Thurston, S. E.; Sharpe, J. A.; Ranalli, P. J.; Hamid, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of deficient labyrinthine function on smooth visual tracking with the eyes and head were investigated, using ten patients with bilateral peripheral vestibular disease and ten normal controls. Active, combined eye-head tracking (EHT) was significantly better in patients than smooth pursuit with the eyes alone, whereas normal subjects pursued equally well in both cases. Compensatory eye movements during active head rotation in darkness were always less in patients than in normal subjects. These data were used to examine current hypotheses that postulate central cancellation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during EHT. A model that proposes summation of an integral smooth pursuit command and VOR/compensatory eye movements is consistent with the findings. Observation of passive EHT (visual fixation of a head-fixed target during en bloc rotation) appears to indicate that in this mode parametric gain changes contribute to modulation of the VOR.

  4. Educational Value of a Medical Student-Led Head and Neck Cancer Screening Event.

    PubMed

    Freiser, Monika E; Desai, Dipan D; Azcarate, Patrick M; Szczupak, Mikhaylo; Cohen, Erin R; Raffa, Francesca N; George, Joshua S; Lo, Kaming; Nayak, Chetan S; Weed, Donald T; Sargi, Zoukaa B

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate improvement of medical student knowledge of head and neck cancer (HNC) through participation in HNC screening fairs run by medical students. Prospective cohort study of surveys assessing medical students' knowledge of HNC before and after volunteering at screening fairs. Four screening fairs held at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine during Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Awareness Week. Medical student screening fair volunteers. Four HNC screening fairs were organized by medical student volunteers. All students completed a preevent survey assessing baseline knowledge and participated in an otolaryngologist-led training session about HNC and the screening examination. During the screening events, students educated guests about HNC and performed physician-guided history and physical examinations. Finally, students completed identical surveys 1 week and 3 months after the event. Thirty-four (n = 34) students completed the preevent surveys. At baseline, 59%, 44%, and 24% named tobacco, alcohol, and human papilloma virus as risk factors, compared with 84%, 81%, and 69% on 3 month follow-up, respectively. Out of 6 analyzed questions, the median total number of correctly answered questions improved from 2 on pretest to 5 at 3 months (P < .0001). Volunteer participation in a HNC screening program improves medical students' knowledge of HNC risk factors and symptoms. This innovative approach to students' education via participation and organization of screening events is a useful method of improving their HNC knowledge. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  5. Medical Anthropology in the Curriculum: A Revisit to the Subject

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Robert E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Although progress has been made in the last 15 years in the development of medical school departments with interests in the various behavioral science fields, including anthropology, based on this study only five percent of U.S. medical students had the opportunity to attend lectures in the field of medical anthropology. (Editor/JT)

  6. Uneasy subjects: medical students' conflicts over the pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    In this article I report on an investigation of the pharmaceutical industry's influence in medical education. Findings are based on fifty semi-structured interviews with medical students in the United States and Canada conducted between 2010 and 2013. Participant responses support the survey-based literature demonstrating that there is clear and pervasive influence of the pharmaceutical industry in medical education. They also challenge the theory that medical students feel entitled to industry gifts and uncritically accept industry presence. I investigate how medical students who are critical of the pharmaceutical industry negotiate its presence in the course of their medical education. Findings suggest that these participants do not simply absorb industry presence, but interpret it and respond in complex ways. Participants were uncomfortable with industry influence throughout their medical training and found multifaceted ways to resist. They struggled with power relations in medical training and the prevailing notion that industry presence is a normal part of medical education. I argue that this pervasive norm of industry presence is located in neoliberal structural transformations within and outside both education and medicine. The idea that industry presence is normal and inevitable represents a challenge for students who are critical of industry. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abusive Head Trauma in Young Children: Characteristics and Medical Charges in a Hospitalized Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettaro, L.; Berger, R. P.; Songer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presenting characteristics, hospital course, and hospital charges associated with hospital admissions for head trauma in young children at a regional pediatric trauma center, and to examine whether these factors differ among abused and non-abused subjects. Method: Comparative case series study involving a retrospective…

  8. Abusive Head Trauma in Young Children: Characteristics and Medical Charges in a Hospitalized Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettaro, L.; Berger, R. P.; Songer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To describe the presenting characteristics, hospital course, and hospital charges associated with hospital admissions for head trauma in young children at a regional pediatric trauma center, and to examine whether these factors differ among abused and non-abused subjects. Method: Comparative case series study involving a retrospective…

  9. Development of a point-of-care medical device to measure head impact in contact sports.

    PubMed

    Ambekar, Dhanashree; Al-Deneh, Zakaria; Dao, Triet; Dziech, Alexander L; Subbian, Vignesh; Beyette, Fred R

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a prototype of a wireless, point-of-care medical device to measure head impacts in contact or collision sports. The device is currently capable of measuring linear acceleration, time, and the duration of impact. The location of the impact can also be recorded by scaling the prototype design to multiple devices. An experimental apparatus was built to simulate head impacts and to verify the data from the device. Preliminary results show that the biomechanical measures from the device are sufficiently accurate.

  10. Gender and line size factors modulate the deviations of the subjective visual vertical induced by head tilt

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The subjective visual vertical (SVV, the visual estimation of gravitational direction) is commonly considered as an indicator of the sense of orientation. The present study examined the impact of two methodological factors (the angle size of the stimulus and the participant's gender) on deviations of the SVV caused by head tilt. Forty healthy participants (20 men and 20 women) were asked to make visual vertical adjustments of a light bar with their head held vertically or roll-tilted by 30° to the left or to the right. Line angle sizes of 0.95° and 18.92° were presented. Results The SVV tended to move in the direction of head tilt in women but away from the direction of head tilt in men. Moreover, the head-tilt effect was also modulated by the stimulus' angle size. The large angle size led to deviations in the direction of head-tilt, whereas the small angle size had the opposite effect. Conclusions Our results showed that gender and line angle size have an impact on the evaluation of the SVV. These findings must be taken into account in the growing body of research that uses the SVV paradigm in disease settings. Moreover, this methodological issue may explain (at least in part) the discrepancies found in the literature on the head-tilt effect. PMID:22420467

  11. The Effect of Soft and Rigid Cervical Collars on Head and Neck Immobilization in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Barati, Kourosh; Arazpour, Mokhtar; Vameghi, Roshanak; Abdoli, Ali; Farmani, Farzad

    2017-06-01

    Whiplash injury is a prevalent and often destructive injury of the cervical column, which can lead to serious neck pain. Many approaches have been suggested for the treatment of whiplash injury, including anti-inflammatory drugs, manipulation, supervised exercise, and cervical collars. Cervical collars are generally divided into two groups: soft and rigid collars. The present study aimed to compare the effect of soft and rigid cervical collars on immobilizing head and neck motion. Many studies have investigated the effect of collars on neck motion. Rigid collars have been shown to provide more immobilization in the sagittal and transverse planes compared with soft collars. However, according to some studies, soft and rigid collars provide the same range of motion in the frontal plane. Twenty-nine healthy subjects aged 18-26 participated in this study. Data were collected using a three-dimensional motion analysis system and six infrared cameras. Eight markers, weighing 4.4 g and thickened 2 cm(2) were used to record kinematic data. According to the normality of the data, a paired t-test was used for statistical analyses. The level of significance was set at α=0.01. All motion significantly decreased when subjects used soft collars (p<0.01). According to the obtained data, flexion and lateral rotation experienced the maximum (39%) and minimum (11%) immobilization in all six motions using soft collars. Rigid collars caused maximum immobilization in flexion (59%) and minimum immobilization in the lateral rotation (18%) and limited all motion much more than the soft collar. This study showed that different cervical collars have different effects on neck motion. Rigid and soft cervical collars used in the present study limited the neck motion in both directions. Rigid collars contributed to significantly more immobilization in all directions.

  12. [The head of battlefronts medical service during the Great Patriotic War].

    PubMed

    Gribovskaia, G A

    2014-05-01

    The article is dedicated to unrenowned moments of life of the outstanding organizer of the system of military healthcare general-lieutenant of medical service Arsenii Yakovlevich Barabanov (1901-1952). His outstanding organizing skills and deep knowledge in the field of military medicine revealed during the Second World War, when he was the head of medical service of 31st Army of the Western Front and 34th Army of North-Western Front and since 1942 he has helmed medical service of Donskoy, Central, 1st Belorussian Fronts. His experience in organization of collecting of PW, system medical treatment for PW acquired during the battle of Stalingrad and afterwards was used and improved during further offensive operations, especially during the final stage of the Second World War and also in organization of medical aid for prisoners of war from the Soviet Union and allied states freed from Nazi extermination camps.

  13. Resources for Educators of Adults. Annotated Bibliography for the Education of Public Offenders: by Descriptive Subject Headings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Michael J.; And Others

    This bibliography is presented to assist educators who are engaged in research activities with inmate or ex-inmate populations. The first part contains entries under descriptive subject headings (alphabetically by author); the second part contains abstracts of the material listed in part 1 (alphabetically by title). The descriptive headings…

  14. Differences in managerial behaviour between head nurses and medical directors in intensive care units in Europe.

    PubMed

    Pepermans, R; Mentens, C; Goedee, M; Jegers, M; van Roy, K

    2001-01-01

    We attempt to determine whether differences appear between the managerial behaviour of European intensive care head nurses on the one side and medical directors on the other. In order to come up with a managerial job and competency analysis of ICU managers, observations and interviews were performed. Additionally, focus groups consisting of ICU experts were organized. The results are discussed according to managerial behaviour taxonomies and existing competency models. There seems to be some differentiation between the two managerial positions studied. Head nurses are more involved in planning/coordinating and motivating/reinforcing activities, whereas medical directors are more involved in socializing/politicking, decision making/problem solving, interaction with others and disciplining.

  15. The acute morphologic changes that occur at the optic nerve head induced by medical reduction of intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Sarah P; Swift, Louise; Eke, Tom; Broadway, David C

    2007-09-01

    The mechanical theory of glaucoma postulates that raised intraocular pressure (IOP) causes laminar distortion resulting in damage to axons at the optic nerve head. There is some evidence that the change in morphology may occur over a short time course. The aim of this paper was to detail the acute morphologic changes at the optic nerve head when IOP was lowered with medical therapy in a clinical population. Subjects referred to the glaucoma clinic that had a documented IOP of over 28 mm Hg, on no treatment, in one or both eyes were included. Tonometry, pachymetry, and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy were performed before and after lowering IOP with topical apraclonidine and oral acetazolamide. The significance of change in outcome variables was assessed using a paired t test allowing for dependence within subjects and, for sensitivity, with a nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Data were obtained from 38 eyes of 19 patients with a mean age of 67 years. After lowering IOP for only 1 hour, there was a significant decrease in mean cup volume (mean change in volume below surface 26.8 microm3, P< or =0.001) and mean cup depth (13.8 microm, P<0.01), there being a corresponding increase in mean rim area (37.3 microm2, P<0.034). There was no statistically significant change in central corneal thickness after administration of the IOP lowering medications. In the present study, it was shown that acute and statistically significant alterations in optic disc morphology occur when IOP is lowered medically with a combination of topical apraclonidine and systemic acetazolamide. The technique, therefore, may be useful to further investigate subgroups of glaucomatous eyes and test etiologic hypotheses.

  16. Identical in Appearance But Not in Actuality: Headings Shared by a Subject-Access and a Form/Genre Access Authority List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, David

    1997-01-01

    Authority records were compared for established headings that are identical in "Library of Congress Subject Headings" (LCSH, 18th edition) and "Moving-Image Materials: Genre Terms" (MIM). Both quantitatively and qualitatively, pairs of identical headings differ sufficiently from each other that the creation of authority records…

  17. Psychiatry, subjectivity and emotion - deepening the medical model.

    PubMed

    Yakeley, Jessica; Hale, Rob; Johnston, James; Kirtchuk, Gabriel; Shoenberg, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Morale among psychiatrists continues to be seriously challenged in the face of recruitment difficulties, unfilled posts, diagnostic controversies, service reconfigurations and public criticism of psychiatric care, in addition to other difficulties. In this article, we argue that the positivist paradigm that continues to dominate British psychiatry has led to an undervaluing of subjectivity and of the role of emotions within psychiatric training and practice. Reintegrating the subjective perspective and promoting emotional awareness and reflection may go some way towards restoring faith in the psychiatric specialty.

  18. Psychiatry, subjectivity and emotion - deepening the medical model

    PubMed Central

    Yakeley, Jessica; Hale, Rob; Johnston, James; Kirtchuk, Gabriel; Shoenberg, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Morale among psychiatrists continues to be seriously challenged in the face of recruitment difficulties, unfilled posts, diagnostic controversies, service reconfigurations and public criticism of psychiatric care, in addition to other difficulties. In this article, we argue that the positivist paradigm that continues to dominate British psychiatry has led to an undervaluing of subjectivity and of the role of emotions within psychiatric training and practice. Reintegrating the subjective perspective and promoting emotional awareness and reflection may go some way towards restoring faith in the psychiatric specialty. PMID:25237517

  19. Adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, subjective tilt, and motion sickness to head movements during short-radius centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Young, Laurence R; Sienko, Kathleen H; Lyne, Lisette E; Hecht, Heiko; Natapoff, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Head movements made while the whole body is rotating at unusually high angular velocities (here with supine body position about an earth-vertical axis) result in inappropriate eye movements, sensory illusions, disorientation, and frequently motion sickness. We investigated the acquisition and retention of sensory adaptation to cross-coupled components of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) by asking eight subjects to make headturns while being rotated at 23 rpm on two consecutive days, and again a week later. The dependent measures were inappropriate vertical VOR, subjective tilt, and motion sickness in response to 90 degrees yaw out-of-plane head movements. Motion sickness was evaluated during and following exposure to rotation. Significant adaptation effects were found for the slow phase velocity of vertical nystagmus, the reported magnitude of the subjective tilt experienced during head turns, and motion-sickness scores. Retention of adaptation over a six-day rest period without rotation occurred, but was not complete for all measures. Adaptation of VOR was fully maintained while subjective tilt was only partially maintained and motion-sickness scores continued to decrease. Practical implications of these findings are discussed with particular emphasis on artificial gravity, which could be produced in weightlessness by means of a short-radius (2 m) rotator.

  20. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle and subjective global assessment in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Małecka-Massalska, Teresa; Mlak, Radoslaw; Smolen, Agata; Morshed, Kamal

    2016-05-01

    Malnutrition, which can be determined by subjective and objective methods, has a high prevalence in head and neck cancer patients. Subjective Global Assessment is a subjective method of nutritional status evaluation. Phase angle, determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis, is proposed as an objective nutritional marker in various disease conditions. The study was conducted to investigate the association between phase angle and Subjective Global Assessment to validate the determination of the nutrition status in adult patients with head and neck cancer. In a prospective cohort study, patients were classified as either well-nourished or malnourished using the Subjective Global Assessment. Phase angle measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis was planned in 75 naive patients with histologically confirmed head and neck cancer. Receiver operating characteristic curves were estimated using the non-parametric method to determine the optimal cut-off level of phase angle. The study was conducted on a cohort population of 75 patients. Well-nourished patients (n = 45) had a statistically significantly higher (p = 0.005) median phase angle score (5.25º) as compared to those who were malnourished (4.73º) (n = 30). A phase angle cut-off of 4.73 was 80 % sensitive and 56.7 % specific in detecting malnutrition diagnosed by SGA in these populations. Phase angle is considered to be a nutritional indicator in patients with head and neck cancer in detecting malnutrition. Further observations are needed to calculate survival, and validate the prognostic significance of phase angle. For future studies, it is important to indicate the specificity of the PA in comparison to SGA measurement.

  1. Changes in the perceived head transversal plane and the subjective visual horizontal induced by Coriolis stimulation during gondola centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Tribukait, Arne; Eiken, Ola

    2006-01-01

    For studying the influence of the vertical semicircular canals on spatial orientation in roll, the subjective visual horizontal (SVH) and the subjective transversal plane of the head (STP) were measured in a situation where the vertical canals sense a roll-velocity stimulus while the otolith organs persistently signal that the head is upright in roll. During gondola centrifugation (resultant gravitoinertial force vector 2.5 G, gondola inclination 66 degrees) subjects were exposed to controlled rotational head movements (angular speed 27 degrees/s, magnitude 40 degrees) about the yaw (body z-) axis, produced by means of a motor-driven helmet. This causes a roll-plane Coriolis stimulus to the canals, while the otoliths persistently sense upright head position in roll. The subjects reported intense sensations of rotation and tilt in the roll plane. This was reflected in tilts of both the SVH and STP. The initial tilt of the SVH was 13.0 +/- 9.7 degrees (mean +/- S.D., n=10). The STP was changed in the opposite direction. The initial tilt was 23.8 +/- 12.2 degrees (mean +/- S.D., n=5). The changes in the SVH and STP were not of equal magnitude. A few subjects who had almost no deviations in the SVH showed pronounced tilts of the STP. The time constant for exponential decay of the tilts of the SVH and STP was on average approximately 1 minute. These findings indicate that a difference in activity of the vertical canals in the right versus left ear may cause substantial tilts of the SVH even if there is no asymmetry in the activity of the otolith system. Further, the canal stimulus may induce a tilt of the fundamental egocentric frame of reference.

  2. Relationship between communication manners of head nurses with job satisfaction of nurses under their supervision in educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2006.

    PubMed

    Dehaghani, Abdollah Rezaei; Hosseini, Habibollah; Tavakol, Khosrow; Bakhtiyari, Soheila

    2010-01-01

    Interpersonal communication is considered as an important and effective factor of job satisfaction and efficiency and has special significance in nursing career because of the face to face relationship with patients. This study aimed to determine the association between head nurses' interpersonal communication and job satisfaction of nurses under their supervision. The study was conducted in educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2006. This was a descriptive and analytical study on 203 nursing personnel working in educational hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2006. Data were collected using Job Descriptive Index (JDI) developed by Smith and Kendall and interpersonal communication was measured using a researcher-made questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software and Pearson's test and presented in tables and diagrams. The majority of the participants (148 subjects, 73%) believed that head nurses' interpersonal communication was excellent and in general Pearson's test showed a significant association between head nurses' interpersonal communication and their personnel's job satisfaction (p < 0.011). Based on the results of this study on the relationship between interpersonal communication of the head nurses and job satisfaction of their personnel, we can improve the job satisfaction of nursing personnel as well as patients' satisfactory and level of services by developing educational courses and workshops on importance and effectiveness of interpersonal communication for head nurses.

  3. Linking the Heart and the Head: Humanism and Professionalism in Medical Education and Practice.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Lynda; Loue, Sana; Stange, Kurt C

    2017-05-01

    This paper articulates a practical interpretive framework for understanding humanism in medicine through the lens of how it is taught and learned. Beginning with a search for key tensions and relevant insights in the literature on humanism in health professions education, we synthesized a conceptual model designed to foster reflection and action to realize humanistic principles in medical education and practice. The resulting model centers on the interaction between the heart and the head. The heart represents the emotive domains of empathy, compassion, and connectedness. The head represents the cognitive domains of knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs. The cognitive domains often are associated with professionalism, and the emotive domains with humanism, but it is the connection between the two that is vital to humanistic education and practice. The connection between the heart and the head is nurtured by critical reflection and conscious awareness. Four provinces of experience nurture humanism: (1) personal reflection, (2) action, (3) system support, and (4) collective reflection. These domains represent potential levers for developing humanism. Critical reflection and conscious awareness between the heart and head through personal reflection, individual and collective behavior, and supportive systems has potential to foster humanistic development toward healing and health.

  4. A three-dimensional non-invasive study of head flexion and extension in young non-patient subjects.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Poggio, C E; Schmitz, J H; Tartaglia, G

    1997-05-01

    Head flexion and extension movements near the natural head position (NHP) were analysed for the location of the mean instantaneous centre of rotation (ICR). Forty-six healthy young adults (30 women and 16 men) with sound dentitions, free from cranio-cervical disorders, performed habitual movements that were automatically detected and measured by an infrared three-dimensional motion analyser. ICR and curvature radius were calculated for each movement and subject. In both extension and flexion, ICR position changed during the motion. The movement was symmetrical in all subjects. No gender or flexion/extension differences were found for both ICR position and relevant curvature radius. On average, ICR relative to NHP soft-tissue nasion was located at about 150% of the soft-tissue nasion-right tragus distance, with an angle of about 220 degrees relative to the true horizontal. Results suggest that head flexion or extension is always performed with a combination of rotation (atlanto-occipital joint) and translation (cervical spine) even in the first degrees of motion. Moreover, NHP at rest seems to be some degree more flexed and anterior than head position during movements. These relative positions and their muscular determinants could also influence mandibular posture at rest and during functional movements.

  5. Diagnostic imaging rates for head injury in the ED and states' medical malpractice tort reforms.

    PubMed

    Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; McCulloch, Charles E; Ding, Alexander; Ding, Alex; Quale, Christopher; Chu, Philip W

    2011-07-01

    Physicians' fears of being sued may lead to defensive medical practices, such as ordering nonindicated medical imaging. We investigated the association between states' medical malpractice tort reforms and neurologic imaging rates for patients seen in the emergency department with mild head trauma. We assessed neurologic imaging among a national sample of 8588 women residing in 10 US states evaluated in an emergency setting for head injury between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 2001. We assessed the odds of imaging as it varied by the enactment of medical liability reform laws. The medical liability reform laws were significantly associated with the likelihood of imaging. States with laws that limited monetary damages (odds ratio [OR], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.99), mandated periodic award payments (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.43-0.97), or specified collateral source offset rules (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.40-0.96) had an approximately 40% lower odds of imaging, whereas states that had laws that limited attorney's contingency fees had significantly higher odds of imaging (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 0.99-2.4), compared to states without these laws. When we used a summation of the number of laws in place, the greater the number of laws, the lower the odds of imaging. In the multivariate analysis, after adjusting for individual and community factors, the total number of laws remained significantly associated with the odds of imaging, and the effect of the individual laws was attenuated, but not eliminated. The tort reforms we examined were associated with the propensity to obtain neurologic imaging. If these results are confirmed in larger studies, tort reform might mitigate defensive medical practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Head-down bed rest reduces the breathing rate short-term variability in subjects with orthostatic intolerance.

    PubMed

    Balocchi, R; Menicucci, D; Varanini, M; Chillemi, S; Legramante, J M; Saltini, C; Raimondi, G

    2004-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is the most serious symptom of cardiovascular deconditioning induced by microgravity. We have showed that in symptomatic subjects the baroreflex control of sinus node is affected by short term simulated microgravity. At present the influence of the respiration on the cardiovascular system in this condition is not clear. The aim of the present study was to examine the behaviour of the Breathing Rate (BR) in 5 Non-Symptomatic (NS) and 3 Symptomatic (S) subjects before and after 4 hours of head-down bed rest (HD).

  7. Medication Nonadherence, “Professional Subjects,” and Apparent Placebo Responders: Overlapping Challenges for Medications Development

    PubMed Central

    McCann, David J.; Petry, Nancy M.; Bresell, Anders; Isacsson, Eva; Wilson, Ellis; Alexander, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Nonadherence is a major problem in clinical trials of new medications. To evaluate the extent of nonadherence, this study evaluated pharmacokinetic sampling from 1765 subjects receiving active therapy across eight psychiatric trials conducted between 2001 and 2011. With nonadherence defined as > 50% of plasma samples below the limit of quantification for study drug, the percentage of nonadherent subjects ranged from 12.8% to 39.2%. There was a trend toward increased nonadherence in studies with greater numbers of subjects but an association with nonadherence was not apparent for other study design parameters or subject characteristics. For two trials with multiple recruitment sites in geographical proximity, several subjects attempted to simultaneously enroll at separate site locations. The construct of “professional subjects,” those who enroll in trials only for financial gain, is gaining attention, and we therefore modeled the impact of professional subjects on medication efficacy trials. The results indicate that enrollment of professional subjects who are destined to succeed (those who will appear to achieve treatment success regardless of study drug assignment) can substantially increase both the apparent placebo response rate and the sample size requirement for statistical power, while decreasing the observed effect size. The overlapping nature of nonadherence, professional subjects, and placebo response suggests that these issues should be considered and addressed together. Following this approach, we describe a novel clinical trial design to minimize the adverse effects of professional subjects on trial outcomes, and discuss methods to monitor adherence. PMID:26244381

  8. [Predict factors associated with malnutrition from patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA) in head and neck cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Arribas, L; Hurtós, L; Milà, R; Fort, E; Peiró, I

    2013-01-01

    Patient Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) is a validated tool for nutrition evaluation in patients with cancer. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition in head and neck cancer patients at diagnosis and evaluate the independent prognostic factors for malnutrition from PG-SGA. All outpatients attending at the Head and Neck Cancer Multidisciplinary Meeting for primary diagnosis, staging and treatment were evaluated by an oncology dietitian using the patient generated subjective global assessment (PG-SGA). Patients with recurrences or secondary tumours will be excluded. 64 patients were evaluated (55 men and 9 women) with an average age of 63 years and body mass index (BMI) of 25.3 kg/m(2) (SD ± 5.18). After the nutritional assessment we observed that 43.8% of patients were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. The most frequent symptom at diagnosis was dysphagia (48.4%) and anorexia (26.6%). From PG-SGA, the main prognostic factors (p<0,001) were the percentage of weight loss, serum albumin levels, BMI and the presence of dysphagia or/and anorexia prior diagnosis. Parameters as BMI, weight loss and low albumin levels at the time of diagnosis in head and neck cancer patients are independent predictors for malnutrition as well as the presence of anorexia or dysphagia.reaffirms the need for sustainability of interventions over time. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  9. Simulative investigation on head injuries of electric self-balancing scooter riders subject to ground impact.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Shang, Shi; Qi, Hongsheng; Yu, Guizhen; Wang, Yunpeng; Chen, Peng

    2016-04-01

    The safety performance of an electric self-balancing scooter (ESS) has recently become a main concern in preventing its further wide application as a major candidate for green transportation. Scooter riders may suffer severe brain injuries in possible vehicle crash accidents not only from contact with a windshield or bonnet but also from secondary contact with the ground. In this paper, virtual vehicle-ESS crash scenarios combined with finite element (FE) car models and multi-body scooter/human models are set up. Post-impact kinematic gestures of scooter riders under various contact conditions, such as different vehicle impact speeds, ESS moving speeds, impact angles or positions, and different human sizes, are classified and analyzed. Furthermore, head-ground impact processes are reconstructed using validated FE head models, and important parameters of contusion and laceration (e.g., coup or contrecoup pressures and Von Mises stress and the maximum shear stress) are extracted and analyzed to assess the severity of regional contusion from head-ground contact. Results show that the brain injury risk increases with vehicle speeds and ESS moving speeds and may provide fundamental knowledge to popularize the use of a helmet and the vehicle-fitted safety systems, and lay a strong foundation for the reconstruction of ESS-involved accidents. There is scope to improve safety for the use of ESS in public roads according to the analysis and conclusions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Subjective Evaluation Experiments on an Automatic Video Editing System Using Vision-based Head Tracking for Multiparty Conversations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemae, Yoshinao; Otsuka, Kazuhiro; Yamato, Junji; Ozawa, Shinji

    This paper presents experiments conducted to evaluate an automatic video editing system, founded on vision-based head tracking, that clearly conveys face-to-face multiparty conversations, such as meetings, to viewers. Systems that archive meetings and teleconferences to effectively facilitate human communication are attracting considerable interest. Conventional systems use a fixed-viewpoint camera and simple camera selection based on participants' utterances. Unfortunately, they fail to adequately convey who is talking to whom and nonverbal information about participants etc., to viewers. To solve this problem, we previously proposed an automatic video editing system using vision-based head tracking. This paper describes subjective evaluation experiments in which videos of entire conversations with 3 participants were presented to viewers; the results confirm the effectiveness of our system.

  11. World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki: ethical principles for medical research involving human subjects.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Published research in English-language journals are increasingly required to carry a statement that the study has been approved and monitored by an Institutional Review Board in conformance with 45 CFR 46 standards if the study was conducted in the United States. Alternative language attesting conformity with the Helsinki Declaration is often included when the research was conducted in Europe or elsewhere. The Helsinki Declaration was created by the World Medical Association in 1964 (ten years before the Belmont Report) and has been amended several times. The Helsinki Declaration differs from its American version in several respects, the most significant of which is that it was developed by and for physicians. The term "patient" appears in many places where we would expect to see "subject." It is stated in several places that physicians must either conduct or have supervisory control of the research. The dual role of the physician-researcher is acknowledged, but it is made clear that the role of healer takes precedence over that of scientist. In the United States, the federal government developed and enforces regulations on researcher; in the rest of the world, the profession, or a significant part of it, took the initiative in defining and promoting good research practice, and governments in many countries have worked to harmonize their standards along these lines. The Helsinki Declaration is based less on key philosophical principles and more on prescriptive statements. Although there is significant overlap between the Belmont and the Helsinki guidelines, the latter extends much further into research design and publication. Elements in a research protocol, use of placebos, and obligation to enroll trials in public registries (to ensure that negative findings are not buried), and requirements to share findings with the research and professional communities are included in the Helsinki Declaration. As a practical matter, these are often part of the work of American

  12. The Intra- and Inter-rater Reliabilities of the Forward Head Posture Assessment of Normal Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Nam, Seok Hyun; Son, Sung Min; Kwon, Jung Won; Lee, Na Kyung

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] Assessment of posture is an important goal of physical therapy interventions for preventing the progression of forward head posture (FHP). The purpose of this study was to determine the inter- and intra-rater reliabilities of the assessment of FHP. [Subjects and Methods] We recruited 45 participants (20 male subjects, 25 female subjects) from a university student population. Two physical therapists assessed FHP using images of head extension. FHP is characterized by the measurement of angles and distances between anatomical landmarks. Forward shoulder angle of 54° or less was defined as FHP. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities were estimated using Kendall's Taub correlation coefficients. [Results] Intra-class correlation of intra-rater measurements indicated an excellent level of reliability (0.91), and intra-class correlation of inter-rater measurements showed a good level of reliability in the assessment of FHP (0.75). [Conclusion] Assessment of FHP is an important component of evaluation and affects the design of the treatment regimen. The assessment of FHP was reliably measured by two physical therapists. It could therefore become a useful method for assessing FHP in the clinical setting. Future studies will be needed to provide more detailed quantitative data for accurate assessment of posture.

  13. The medical cost of abusive head trauma in the United States.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Cora; Xu, Likang; Florence, Curtis; Parks, Sharyn E; Miller, Ted R; Barr, Ronald G; Barr, Marilyn; Steinbeigle, Ryan

    2014-07-01

    Health consequences of shaken baby syndrome, or pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT), can be severe and long-lasting. We aimed to estimate the multiyear medical cost attributable to AHT. Using Truven Health MarketScan data, 2003-2011, we identified children 0 to 4 years old with commercial or Medicaid insurance and AHT diagnoses. We used exact case-control matching based on demographic and insurance characteristics such as age and health plan type to compare medical care between patients with and without AHT diagnoses. Using regression models, we assessed service use (ie, average annual number of inpatient visits per patient) and inpatient, outpatient (including emergency department), drug, and total medical costs attributable to an AHT diagnosis during the 4-year period after AHT diagnosis. We assessed 1209 patients with AHT and 5895 matched controls. Approximately 48% of patients with AHT received inpatient care within 2 days of initial diagnosis, and 25% were treated in emergency departments. AHT diagnosis was associated with significantly greater medical service use and higher inpatient, outpatient, drug, and total costs for multiple years after the diagnosis. The estimated total medical cost attributable to AHT in the 4 years after diagnosis was $47,952 (95% confidence interval [CI], $40,219-$55,685) per patient with AHT (2012 US dollars) and differed for commercially insured ($38,231 [95% CI, $29,898-$46,564]) and Medicaid ($56,691 [95% CI, $4290-$69,092]) patients. Children continue to have substantial excess medical costs for years after AHT. These estimates exclude related nonmedical costs such as special education and disability that also are attributable to AHT. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy as Primary Treatment for Elderly Patients with Medically Inoperable Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Clump, David A.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: With a growing elderly population, elderly patients with head and neck cancers represent an increasing challenge with limited prospective data to guide management. The complex interplay between advanced age, associated co-morbidities, and conventional local therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy ± chemotherapy, can significantly impact elderly patients’ quality of life (QoL). Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a well-established curative strategy for medical-inoperable early-stage lung cancers even in elderly populations; however, there is limited data examining SBRT as primary therapy in head and neck cancer. Material/methods: Twelve patients with medically inoperable head and neck cancer treated with SBRT ± cetuximab from 2002 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. SBRT consisted of primarily 44 Gy in five fractions delivered on alternating days over 1–2 weeks. Concurrent cetuximab was administered at a dose of 400 mg/m2 on day −7 followed by 250 mg/m2 on day 0 and +7 in n = 3 (25%). Patient-reported quality of life (PRQoL) was prospectively recorded using the previously validated University of Washington quality of life revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Median clinical follow-up was 6 months (range: 0.5–29 months). The 1-year actuarial local progression-free survival, distant progression-free survival, progression-free survival, and overall survival for definitively treated patients were 69, 100, 69, and 64%, respectively. One patient (8%) experienced acute grade 3 dysphagia and one patient (8%) experienced late grade 3 mucositis; there were no grade 4–5 toxicities. Prospective collection of PRQoL as assessed by UW-QoL-R was preserved across domains. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy shows encouraging survival and relatively low toxicity in elderly patients with unresectable head and neck cancer, which may provide an aggressive potentially curative local therapy while maintaining QoL. PMID

  15. Modeling time series of ground water head fluctuations subjected to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    von Asmuth, Jos R; Maas, Kees; Bakker, Mark; Petersen, Jörg

    2008-01-01

    The methods behind the predefined impulse response function in continuous time (PIRFICT) time series model are extended to cover more complex situations where multiple stresses influence ground water head fluctuations simultaneously. In comparison to autoregressive moving average (ARMA) time series models, the PIRFICT model is optimized for use on hydrologic problems. The objective of the paper is twofold. First, an approach is presented for handling multiple stresses in the model. Each stress has a specific parametric impulse response function. Appropriate impulse response functions for other stresses than precipitation are derived from analytical solutions of elementary hydrogeological problems. Furthermore, different stresses do not need to be connected in parallel in the model, as is the standard procedure in ARMA models. Second, general procedures are presented for modeling and interpretation of the results. The multiple-input PIRFICT model is applied to two real cases. In the first one, it is shown that this model can effectively decompose series of ground water head fluctuations into partial series, each representing the influence of an individual stress. The second application handles multiple observation wells. It is shown that elementary physical knowledge and the spatial coherence in the results of multiple wells in an area may be used to interpret and check the plausibility of the results. The methods presented can be used regardless of the hydrogeological setting. They are implemented in a computer package named Menyanthes (www.menyanthes.nl).

  16. Reconstruction of the biomechanical transfer path of femoral head necrosis: a subject-specific finite element investigation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guang-Quan; Pang, Zhi-Hui; Chen, Qin-Qun; He, Wei; Chen, Zhen-Qiu; Chen, Lei-Lei; Li, Zi-Qi

    2014-09-01

    According to Wolff׳s law, the structure and function of bone are interdependent. The disruption of trabeculae in the necrotic femoral head destroys the biomechanical transfer path, increasing the risk of a collapse in the cortical bone. Hence, biomaterials are needed to promote osteogenesis to aid in the reconstruction of a similar biomechanical transfer path that can provide structural and biomechanical support to prevent and delay bone deterioration. Fibular allograft combined with impaction bone grafting (FAIBG) is a hip preservation method that provides both biological repair materials and biomechanical support. This method has been used successfully in the clinical setting, but it still lacks biomechanical insight. In this paper, we aim to provide a biomechanical basis for treatment using FAIBG, we used subject-specific finite element (FE) methods to analyse the biomechanical transfer characteristics of hip models: physiological, pathological and postoperative. The physiological model provided insight into the biomechanical transfer characteristics of the proximal femur. The pathological model showed an abnormal stress distribution that destroyed stress transfer capability. The postoperative model showed that FAIBG can reconstruct the biomechanical transfer path of the femoral head and reduce the risk of a collapse in the cortical bone. In conclusion, FAIBG seems to treat necrosis of the femoral head.

  17. First year medical students' learning style preferences and their correlation with performance in different subjects within the medical course.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Torrano, Daniel; Ali, Syed; Chan, Chee-Kai

    2017-08-08

    Students commencing their medical training arrive with different educational backgrounds and a diverse range of learning experiences. Consequently, students would have developed preferred approaches to acquiring and processing information or learning style preferences. Understanding first-year students' learning style preferences is important to success in learning. However, little is understood about how learning styles impact learning and performance across different subjects within the medical curriculum. Greater understanding of the relationship between students' learning style preferences and academic performance in specific medical subjects would be valuable. This cross-sectional study examined the learning style preferences of first-year medical students and how they differ across gender. This research also analyzed the effect of learning styles on academic performance across different subjects within a medical education program in a Central Asian university. A total of 52 students (57.7% females) from two batches of first-year medical school completed the Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire, which measures four dimensions of learning styles: sensing-intuitive; visual-verbal; active-reflective; sequential-global. First-year medical students reported preferences for visual (80.8%) and sequential (60.5%) learning styles, suggesting that these students preferred to learn through demonstrations and diagrams and in a linear and sequential way. Our results indicate that male medical students have higher preference for visual learning style over verbal, while females seemed to have a higher preference for sequential learning style over global. Significant associations were found between sensing-intuitive learning styles and performance in Genetics [β = -0.46, B = -0.44, p < 0.01] and Anatomy [β = -0.41, B = -0.61, p < 0.05] and between sequential-global styles and performance in Genetics [β = 0.36, B = 0.43, p < 0.05]. More specifically

  18. Relationship between subjective assessment of oral health and medical expenses in community-dwelling elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Eriko; Moriya, Shingo; Murata, Ayumi; Muramatsu, Masumi; Kashiwazaki, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Notani, Kenji; Inoue, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The increasing medical expenses of elderly persons in Japan’s rapidly ageing society have become a major concern. It is therefore important to elucidate the factors associated with such escalation. Here, we focused on the relationship between subjective self-assessment of oral health, as an index of general health, and medical expenses (excluding dental repair) under the hypothesis that oral health contributes to general medical expenses. Several studies have shown that oral health status is correlated with general health status among elderly persons. We speculated that oral health status might show a relation with medical costs among elderly persons. However, few studies have investigated this relationship to date. Materials and Methods Participants were 259 elderly subjects (range: 65–84 years; 120 men, 139 women) residing independently. Subjective assessment of oral health was evaluated by their responses (‘Good’, ‘Not good’ and ‘Not at all good’) on a survey questionnaire. The correlation between subjective assessment of oral health and medical expenditure was analysed using Spearman’s rank method, the Mann–Whitney U-test and the Kruskal–Wallis test. Medical expenses were used as the dependent variable in multinomial logistic regression analysis with background and intraoral factors as independent variables. Results A slight yet statistically significant correlation was observed between subjective assessment of oral health and outpatient treatment fees. Conclusion The findings revealed that subjective assessment of oral health is significantly and independently related to the medical expenses of community-dwelling elderly persons after adjusting for social background, living environment and physical factors. PMID:21306431

  19. Added value of integrated circuit detector in head CT: objective and subjective image quality in comparison to conventional detector design.

    PubMed

    Korn, Andreas; Bender, Benjamin; Spira, Daniel; Schabel, Christoph; Bhadelia, Rafeeque; Claussen, Claus; Ernemann, Ulrike; Brodoefel, Harald

    2014-12-01

    A new computed tomography (CT) detector with integrated electric components and shorter conducting pathways has recently been introduced to decrease system inherent electronic noise. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential benefit of such integrated circuit detector (ICD) in head CT by comparing objective and subjective image quality in low-dose examinations with a conventional detector design. Using a conventional detector, reduced-dose noncontrast head CT (255 mAs; effective dose, 1.7 mSv) was performed in 25 consecutive patients. Following transition to ICD, 25 consecutive patients were scanned using identical imaging parameters. Images in both groups were reconstructed with iterative reconstruction (IR) and filtered back projection (FBP) and assessed in terms of quantitative and qualitative image quality. Acquisition of head CT using ICD increased signal-to-noise ratio of gray and white matter by 14% (10.0 ± 1.6 vs. 11.4 ± 2.5; P = .02) and 17% (8.2 ± 0.8 vs. 9.6 ± 1.5; P = .000). The associated improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio was 12% (2.0 ± 0.5 vs. 2.2 ± 0.6; P = .121). In addition, there was a 51% increase in objective image sharpness (582 ± 85 vs. 884.5 ± 191; change in HU/Pixel; P < .000). Compared to standard acquisitions, subjective grading of noise and overall image quality scores were significantly improved with ICD (2.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3; P < .000; 2.0 ± 0.5 vs. 1.6 ± 0.3; P = .001). Moreover, streak artifacts in the posterior fossa were substantially reduced (2.3 ± 0.7 vs. 1.7 ± 0.5; P = .004). At the same radiation level, acquisition of head CT with ICD achieves superior objective and subjective image quality and provides potential for significant dose reduction. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of head models in N170 component source imaging: results in control subjects and ADHD patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrachini, L.; Blenkmann, A.; von Ellenrieder, N.; Petroni, A.; Urquina, H.; Manes, F.; Ibáñez, A.; Muravchik, C. H.

    2011-12-01

    The major goal of evoked related potential studies arise in source localization techniques to identify the loci of neural activity that give rise to a particular voltage distribution measured on the surface of the scalp. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the head model adopted in order to estimate the N170 component source in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) patients and control subjects, considering faces and words stimuli. The standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography algorithm (sLORETA) is used to compare between the three shell spherical head model and a fully realistic model based on the ICBM-152 atlas. We compare their variance on source estimation and analyze the impact on the N170 source localization. Results show that the often used three shell spherical model may lead to erroneous solutions, specially on ADHD patients, so its use is not recommended. Our results also suggest that N170 sources are mainly located in the right occipital fusiform gyrus for faces stimuli and in the left occipital fusiform gyrus for words stimuli, for both control subjects and ADHD patients. We also found a notable decrease on the N170 estimated source amplitude on ADHD patients, resulting in a plausible marker of the disease.

  1. Medical marijuana use in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David A; Nabavizadeh, Nima; Romer, Jeanna L; Chen, Yiyi; Holland, John M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to better understand why patients with history of head and neck cancer (HNC) treated with radiotherapy are using medical marijuana (MM). Established HNC quality of life questionnaires and our own MM quality of life questionnaire were sent to 15 HNC patients treated at our institution who reported using MM. Patients are clinically disease free and currently using MM to manage long-term side effects after curative HNC treatment. There was a 100 % response rate. Median time from treatment was 45 months (21-136 months). Most patients smoked marijuana (12 patients), while others reported ingestion (4 patients), vaporizing (3 patients), and use of homemade concentrated oil (1 patient). Six patients reported prior recreational marijuana use before diagnosis. MM provided benefit in altered sense, weight maintenance, depression, pain, appetite, dysphagia, xerostomia, muscle spasm, and sticky saliva. HNC patients report MM use to help with long-term side effects of radiotherapy.

  2. Sir William Burnett (1779-1861), professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department and entrepreneur.

    PubMed

    Penn, Christopher

    2004-08-01

    Sir William Burnett (1779-1861) had an active career as a Royal Navy surgeon in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, including service at the battles of St Vincent, the Nile and Trafalgar. From 1822 to 1855 he was professional head of the Royal Naval Medical Department, when he provided effective leadership in a time of great change. Although his official work earned him the reputation of a "hard-working, unimaginative, somewhat harsh man", his correspondence shows a very humane centre under the official carapace. His official performance and reputation were both eroded towards the end of his career by his determined promotion of zinc chloride, for which he held lucrative patents.

  3. Medication Adherence Interventions That Target Subjects with Adherence Problems: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Vicki S.; Ruppar, Todd M.; Enriquez, Maithe; Cooper, Pam

    2015-01-01

    Background Inadequate medication adherence is a pervasive, under-recognized cause of poor health outcomes. Many intervention trials designed to improve medication adherence have targeted adults with adherence problems. No previous reviews have synthesized the effectiveness of medication adherence interventions focused on subjects with medication adherence difficulties. Objective This systematic review and meta-analysis synthesized findings from medication adherence intervention studies conducted among adults with medication adherence difficulties. Methods Primary research studies were eligible for inclusion if they tested an intervention designed to increase medication adherence among adults with documented adherence difficulties and reported medication adherence behavior outcomes. Comprehensive search strategies of 13 computerized databases, author and ancestry searches, and hand searches of 57 journals were used to locate eligible primary research. Participant demographics, intervention characteristics, and methodological features were reliably coded from reports along with medication adherence outcomes. Effect sizes for outcomes were calculated as standardized mean differences, and random effects models were used to estimate overall mean effects. Exploratory dichotomous and continuous variable moderator analyses were employed to examine potential associations between medication adherence effect size and sample, intervention, and methodological characteristics. Results Data were extracted from 53 reports of studies involving 8,243 individual primary study participants. The overall standardized mean difference effect size for treatment vs. control subjects was 0.301. For treatment pre- vs. post-intervention comparisons, the overall effect size was 0.533. Significantly larger effect sizes were associated with interventions incorporating prompts to take medications than interventions lacking medication prompts (0.497 vs. 0.234). Larger effect sizes were also found

  4. Head roll dependent variability of subjective visual vertical and ocular counterroll.

    PubMed

    Tarnutzer, Alexander A; Bockisch, Christopher J; Straumann, Dominik

    2009-06-01

    We compared the variability of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) and static ocular counterroll (OCR), and hypothesized a correlation between the measurements because of their shared macular input. SVV and OCR were measured simultaneously in various whole-body roll positions [upright, 45 degrees right-ear down (RED), and 75 degrees RED] in six subjects. Gains of OCR were -0.18 (45 degrees RED) and -0.12 (75 degrees RED), whereas gains of compensation for body roll in the SVV task were -1.11 (45 degrees RED) and -0.96 (75 degrees RED). Normalized SVV and OCR variabilities were not significantly different (P > 0.05), i.e., both increased with increasing roll. Moreover, a significant correlation (R(2) = 0.80, slope = 0.29) between SVV and OCR variabilities was found. Whereas the gain of OCR is different from the gain of SVV, trial-to-trial variability of OCR follows the same roll-dependent modulation observed in SVV variability. We propose that the similarities in variability reflect a common otolith input, which, however, is subject to distinct central processing for determining the gain of SVV and OCR.

  5. Applying double magnetic induction to measure two-dimensional head-unrestrained gaze shifts in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Bremen, Peter; Van der Willigen, Robert F; Van Opstal, A John

    2007-12-01

    This study compares the performance of a newly developed gaze (eye-in-space) measurement technique based on double magnetic induction (DMI) by a custom-made gold-plated copper ring on the eye with the classical scleral search coil (SSC) technique to record two-dimensional (2D) head-unrestrained gaze shifts. We tested both systems simultaneously during head-free saccades toward light-emitting diodes (LEDs) within the entire oculomotor range (+/-35 deg). The absence of irritating lead wires in the case of the DMI method leads to a higher guarantee of success (no coil breakage) and to less irritation on the subject's eye, which results in a longer and more comfortable measurement time. Correlations between DMI and SSC signals for horizontal and vertical eye position, velocity, and acceleration were close to 1.0. The difference between the SSC signal and the DMI signal remains within a few degrees. In our current setup the resolution was about 0.3 deg for the DMI method versus 0.2 deg for the SSC technique. The DMI method is an especially good alternative in the case of patient and laboratory animal gaze control studies where breakage of the SSC lead wires is particularly cumbersome.

  6. Subjective Evaluation of a Semi-Automatic Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Display Calibration Technique.

    PubMed

    Moser, Kenneth; Itoh, Yuta; Oshima, Kohei; Swan, J Edward; Klinker, Gudrun; Sandor, Christian

    2015-04-01

    With the growing availability of optical see-through (OST) head-mounted displays (HMDs) there is a present need for robust, uncomplicated, and automatic calibration methods suited for non-expert users. This work presents the results of a user study which both objectively and subjectively examines registration accuracy produced by three OST HMD calibration methods: (1) SPAAM, (2) Degraded SPAAM, and (3) Recycled INDICA, a recently developed semi-automatic calibration method. Accuracy metrics used for evaluation include subject provided quality values and error between perceived and absolute registration coordinates. Our results show all three calibration methods produce very accurate registration in the horizontal direction but caused subjects to perceive the distance of virtual objects to be closer than intended. Surprisingly, the semi-automatic calibration method produced more accurate registration vertically and in perceived object distance overall. User assessed quality values were also the highest for Recycled INDICA, particularly when objects were shown at distance. The results of this study confirm that Recycled INDICA is capable of producing equal or superior on-screen registration compared to common OST HMD calibration methods. We also identify a potential hazard in using reprojection error as a quantitative analysis technique to predict registration accuracy. We conclude with discussing the further need for examining INDICA calibration in binocular HMD systems, and the present possibility for creation of a closed-loop continuous calibration method for OST Augmented Reality.

  7. Timing Bias in the Psychiatry Subject Examination of the National Board of Medical Examiners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manley, Myrl; Heiss, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigate whether the timing of the psychiatry clerkship influences scores on the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) subject exam as has been reported for other clerkships. The authors attempt to identify which clerkships, if any, offer an advantage when taken before psychiatry. Methods: Mean aggregate exam scores…

  8. Medical subject heading (MeSH) annotations illuminate maize genetics and evolution

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the modern era, high-density marker panels and/or whole-genome sequencing,coupled with advanced phenotyping pipelines and sophisticated statistical methods, have dramatically increased our ability to generate lists of candidate genes or regions that are putatively associated with phenotypes or pr...

  9. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) for indexing and retrieving open-source healthcare data.

    PubMed

    Marc, David T; Khairat, Saif S

    2014-01-01

    The US federal government initiated the Open Government Directive where federal agencies are required to publish high value datasets so that they are available to the public. Data.gov and the community site Healthdata.gov were initiated to disperse such datasets. However, data searches and retrieval for these sites are keyword driven and severely limited in performance. The purpose of this paper is to address the issue of extracting relevant open-source data by proposing a method of adopting the MeSH framework for indexing and data retrieval. A pilot study was conducted to compare the performance of traditional keywords to MeSH terms for retrieving relevant open-source datasets related to "mortality". The MeSH framework resulted in greater sensitivity with comparable specificity to the keyword search. MeSH showed promise as a method for indexing and retrieving data, yet future research should conduct a larger scale evaluation of the performance of the MeSH framework for retrieving relevant open-source healthcare datasets.

  10. Analysis of Retinal Vascular Branching in Human Subjects Undergoing 70-Day Head-Down Tilt by NASAs VESGEN Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Vyas, Ruchi J.; Raghunandan, Sneha; Vu, Amanda C.; Zanello, Susana B.; Ploutz-Snyder, Rob; Taibbi, Giovanni; Vizzeri, Gianmarco

    2016-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment were discovered recently in astronauts following spaceflight, especially after long-duration missions. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within the retinal vasculature that precede visual and other ocular impairments. We therefore are analyzing retinal vessels in healthy subjects before and after head-down tilt (HDT), a ground-based microgravity analog with NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software. Methods. Spectralis® infrared (IR) fundus images were collected from both eyes of 6 subjects before and after 70 days of bed rest at 6 degree HDT (NASA Campaign 11). For our retrospective study, branching patterns in arterial and venous trees are mapped by VESGEN into vessel branching generations (Gx) that are quantified by parameters such as densities of vessel length (Lv), area (Av), number (Nv) and fractal dimension (Df) as described previously for diabetic retinopathy (IOVS 51(1):498). Results are further assigned by VESGEN into groups of large (G1-3), medium (G4-6) and small (G=7) vessels. Results. All subjects remained asymptomatic throughout duration of HDT. To date, we have analyzed one IR image from each of the 12 eyes. Interestingly, two groups of the masked study population identified by VESGEN are distinguished by the presence or absence of small veins (G=7). For example, L=7 and Av=7 are 2.7+/-1.3 E-4 px/px2 and 7.2+/-3.6 E-4 px2/px2 in 6 retinas, but 0 in the other 6 retinas. Nonetheless, the space-filling properties of the entire venous trees were remarkably uniform by all parameters, such as Df = 1.56+/-0.02 for 6 retinas with G=7 and 1.55+/-0.02 for retinas without G=7. No small arteries (G=7) were detected. Conclusions. For our preliminary masked analysis, two groups of venous trees with and without small veins (G=7) were clearly revealed by VESGEN. Upon completing all images and unmasking the subject status of before and after HDT, we will determine

  11. Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery in undergraduate medical education: advances and innovations.

    PubMed

    Fung, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    Medical students graduate with the knowledge and skills to be undifferentiated general physicians. Otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OtoHNS) is an essential component of primary healthcare, but is disproportionately under-represented in undergraduate medical education (UME). Advances and innovations in educational technology may represent an exciting and creative solution to this important problem. Failure to meet this educational need will result in substantial downstream effects in primary healthcare delivery. The objectives of this study were to 1) demonstrate current deficits in OtoHNS teaching at the UME level; 2) develop, validate, and critically appraise educational innovations that may enrich OtoHNS teaching in medical school curricula; and 3) propose a process for standardization of learning objectives for OtoHNS in UME as it relates to development and deployment of such educational tools. A white paper, prepared as a Triological Society thesis, which consolidates a prospective 10-year investigation of the problem of and potential solutions for under-representation of OtoHNS in UME. Cited datasets include multicenter surveys, cohort studies, and prospective, randomized controlled trials. A series of published and unpublished data were synthesized that addresses the following: 1) the current state of OtoHNS teaching at the UME level with respect to content, volume, structure, and methods; and 2) educational innovations including e-learning and simulation with emphasis on validity and learning effectiveness. Educational innovations specific to postgraduate (residency) training were excluded. Data support the observation that there is uniformly disproportionate under-representation of OtoHNS within UME curricula. Medical school graduates, especially those pursuing primary care specialties, report poor overall comfort levels in managing OtoHNS problems. A series of novel teaching methods were developed and validated using e-learning and simulation

  12. Medical Subspecialty Textbooks in the 21st Century. Essential or Headed for Extinction?

    PubMed

    Broaddus, V Courtney; Grippi, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the role of medical subspecialty textbooks as sources of information for students, trainees, and practicing clinicians has been challenged. Although the structure of textbooks continues to evolve from standard, printed versions to digital formats, including e-books and online texts, we maintain that the authoritative compilation of clinical and scientific material by experts in the field (i.e., a modern-day textbook) remains central to the education, training, and practice of subspecialists. Regardless of format, an effective medical subspecialty textbook is authoritative, comprehensive, and integrated in its coverage of the subject. Textbook content represents a unique synthesis of clinical and scientific material of real educational and clinical value. Incorporation of illustrations, including figures, tables, videos, and audios, bolsters the presentation and further solidifies the reader's understanding of the subject. The textbook, both printed and digital, reinforces the many widely available online resources and serves as a platform from which to evaluate other sources of information and to launch additional scientific and clinical inquiry.

  13. Out of the classroom and into the community: medical students consolidate learning about health literacy through collaboration with Head Start.

    PubMed

    Milford, Emily; Morrison, Kristin; Teutsch, Carol; Nelson, Bergen B; Herman, Ariella; King, Mernell; Beucke, Nathan

    2016-04-23

    Medical schools need to teach future physicians about health literacy and patient-doctor communication, especially when working with vulnerable communities, but many fall short. In this article, we present a community-based, service learning experience over one academic year during the pre-clerkship portion of medical school as an innovative and successful model for medical students to learn about health literacy and practice effective communication strategies. "Eat Healthy, Stay Active!" (EHSA) is a 5-month pediatric obesity intervention designed for Head Start children, their parent (s), and staff. We hypothesized students' attitudes, knowledge, and skills confidence regarding healthy literacy and patient communication would improve from baseline after receiving training and serving as family mentors in the EHSA intervention. First- and second-year medical students were trained through a series of didactics and then partnered with Head Start children, parents, and staff to help educate and set goals with families during the EHSA intervention. Medical students were given a pre- and post-intervention survey designed to measure their attitudes, knowledge, and skills confidence regarding health literacy. The pre-survey was administered before the first didactic session and the post-survey was administered after the conclusion of the EHSA intervention. We compared students' pre- and post-intervention responses using paired t-tests. Throughout the project, the medical students were asked to complete a set of open-ended journal questions about their experiences. These responses were examined using qualitative, thematic analyses. Additionally, the Head Start parents and staff were asked to complete a survey about their experience working with the medical students. Participant (n=12) pre- and post-surveys revealed that medical students' attitudes about the importance of health literacy were ranked highly both pre- and post- intervention. However, knowledge and skills

  14. Higher heart rate increments on head-up tilt in control subjects are not associated with autonomic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ives, Colleen T; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2014-10-01

    To determine whether there is altered autonomic function associated with elevated heart rate increments on head-up tilt (HUT) in younger individuals. A total of 149 subjects were enrolled in this study. Subjects underwent the autonomic reflex screen including HUT and completed the Autonomic Symptom Profile. Heart rate increment on HUT did not show a correlation with Composite Autonomic Severity Score (CASS) and the individual CASS scores were low (score 0/10, n=103; score 1/10, n=27; score 2/10, n=1; score 3/10, n=2). There was no correlation with multiple autonomic domains assessed by the Autonomic Symptom Profile. However, there were significant inverse correlations between heart rate increment and total COMPASS score including male sexual dysfunction (r=-0.318; p=0.011; n=64), bladder (r=-0.209; p=0.014; n=138), pupillomotor (r=-0.235; p=0.006; n=138) and male sexual dysfunction (r=-0.554; p<0.0001; n=64). These domains showed a positive correlation with age and a significant effect of age but not heart rate increment with regression analysis (except pupillomotor domain). These results argue against a reduction in autonomic function underlying the higher heart rate increments seen on HUT in younger individuals. These findings argue that the development of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome involves mechanisms that potentially occur independently of heart rate increment. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optic Nerve Head (ONH) Topographic Analysis by Stratus OCT in Normal Subjects: Correlation to Disc Size, Age, and Ethnicity

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Barbara C.; Cantor, Louis B.; WuDunn, Darrell; Hoop, Joni; Lipyanik, Jennifer; Patella, Vincent Michael; Budenz, Donald L.; Greenfield, David S.; Savell, Jonathan; Schuman, Joel S.; Varma, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study optic nerve head (ONH) topography parameters measured by Stratus optical coherence tomography (OCT) in normal subjects and to analyze ONH data for differences in relation to disc size, ethnicity, and age. Methods Three hundred sixty-seven normal subjects underwent Stratus optical coherence tomography ONH measurement using the fast optic disc scan protocol software package 3.0. Only ONH scans meeting specific qualification criteria were included for data analysis ensuring appropriate scan quality and reliability. ONH topographic parameters of qualified scans were analyzed for differences in regards to optic disc size, age, and ethnicity. Results Two hundred and twelve qualified ONH scans were included for data analysis. Mean disc area was 2.27±0.41 mm2 and optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width increased with disc size, whereas vertical integrated rim area did not. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, and rim area decreased and cup area increased with age. Mean optic disc area was larger in African-Americans as compared with Hispanics or Whites and this difference was statistically significant. Conclusions Optic cup area, rim area, and horizontal integrated rim width correlated to disc size. Vertical integrated rim area, horizontal integrated rim width, rim area, and cup area, changed with age. African-American optic discs had larger disc area measurements as compared with Whites optic discs and this difference was statistically significant. PMID:19855299

  16. Physician empathy and subjective evaluation of medical treatment outcome in trauma surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Steinhausen, Simone; Ommen, Oliver; Thüm, Sonja; Lefering, Rolf; Koehler, Thorsten; Neugebauer, Edmund; Pfaff, Holger

    2014-04-01

    To analyze whether patients' perception of their medical treatment outcome is higher among patients who experienced a higher empathy by trauma surgeons during their stay in hospital. 127 patients were surveyed six weeks after discharge from the trauma surgical general ward. Subjective evaluation of medical treatment outcome was measured with the corresponding scale from the Cologne Patient Questionnaire. Clinical empathy was assessed by using the CARE measure. The influence of physician empathy and control variables on a dichotomized index of subjective evaluation of medical treatment outcome was identified with a logistic regression. 120 patients were included in the logistic regression analysis. Compared to patients with physician empathy ratings of less than 30 points, patients with ratings of 41 points or higher have a 20-fold higher probability to be in the group with a better medical treatment outcome on the CPQ-scale (α-level<.001, R(2) 46.9). Findings emphasize the importance of a well-functioning relationship between physician and patient even in a surgical setting where the focus is mostly on the bare medical treatment. Communication trainings i.e. in surgical education can be an effective way to improve the ability to show empathy with patients' concerns. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Amide proton transfer-weighted imaging of the head and neck at 3 T: a feasibility study on healthy human subjects and patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Chen, Shuzhong; King, Ann D; Zhou, Jinyuan; Bhatia, Kunwar S; Zhang, Qinwei; Yeung, David Ka Wei; Wei, Juan; Mok, Greta Seng Peng; Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility and repeatability of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) MRI for the head and neck on clinical MRI scanners. Six healthy volunteers and four patients with head and neck tumors underwent APTw MRI scanning at 3 T. The APTw signal was quantified by the asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) at 3.5 ppm. Z spectra of normal tissues in the head and neck (masseter muscle, parotid glands, submandibular glands and thyroid glands) were analyzed in healthy volunteers. Inter-scan repeatability of APTw MRI was evaluated in six healthy volunteers. Z spectra of patients with head and neck tumors were produced and APTw signals in these tumors were analyzed. APTw MRI scanning was successful for all 10 subjects. The parotid glands showed the highest APTw signal (~7.6% average), whereas the APTw signals in other tissues were relatively moderate. The repeatability of APTw signals from the masseter muscle, parotid gland, submandibular gland and thyroid gland of healthy volunteers was established. Four head and neck tumors showed positive mean APTw ranging from 1.2% to 3.2%, distinguishable from surrounding normal tissues. APTw MRI was feasible for use in the head and neck regions at 3 T. The preliminary results on patients with head and neck tumors indicated the potential of APTw MRI for clinical applications.

  18. Relationship between symptoms, subjective well-being and medication use in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R; Liker, H R; Ducrotté, P

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To report data from a multinational survey investigating the relationship between gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, treatment and subjective well-being. Methods: Patients formally diagnosed with GERD (n = 929) and undiagnosed subjects with symptoms suggestive of GERD (n = 924) were included. Results: Sixty per cent of diagnosed (mean age: 51.7 years) and 54% of undiagnosed (mean age: 44.3 years) participants were female. Over 50% of participants were overweight or obese. Most respondents consumed alcohol, and one-third were smokers. In total, 78% of diagnosed subjects were currently receiving medication prescribed by their doctor, and 65% were taking over-the-counter (OTC) treatments. The majority (97%) of undiagnosed subjects were taking OTC medication, the most common of which were antacids (78%). Despite medication, 58% of diagnosed and 73% of undiagnosed subjects still experienced GERD symptoms some of the time. Approximately one-third of subjects in each group reported that they ate less than usual, felt generally unwell, were tired/worn out or worried/fearful for the majority of the time because of their GERD symptoms, and around half reported decreased well-being, including reduced work or leisure time productivity. Conclusions: These findings attest to the severity and impact of GERD symptoms, highlighting the need to improve the management of GERD in routine practice. Many symptomatic and long-term sufferers, for example, may benefit from taking steps towards a healthier lifestyle (e.g. weight reduction) in addition to optimisation of acid-suppressive therapy. PMID:17590216

  19. Correlations between corneal and optic nerve head variables in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Saenz-Frances, Federico; Jañez, Luis; Borrego-Sanz, Lara; Berrozpe-Villabona, Clara; Martinez-de-la-Casa, Jose Maria; Morales-Fernandez, Laura; Garcia-Sanchez, Julian; Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To correlate corneal variables (determined using the Pentacam) with optic nerve head (ONH) variables determined using the Heidelberg retina tomograph (HRT) in healthy subjects and patients diagnosed with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Measurements were made in 75 healthy eyes and 73 eyes with POAG and correlations examined through Pearson correlation coefficients between the two sets of variables in the two subject groups. The corneal variables determined were corneal volume (CVol), central corneal thickness (CCT), overall corneal thickness (OvCT), the mean thickness of a circular zone centered at the corneal apex of 1 mm radius (zone I) and the mean thickness of several concentric rings, also centered at the apex until the limbus, each of 1 mm width (zones II to VI respectively). The ONH variables were determined using the HRT. RESULTS The following pairs of variables were correlated in the control group: CCT-disc area (DAr) (-0.48; P<0.0001), Zone I-DAr (-0.503; P<0.0001) and Zone II-DAr (-0.443; P<0.0001); and in the POAG group: CCT-cup-to-disc area ratio (CDRa) (-0.402; P<0.0001), Zone I-CDRa (-0.418; P<0.0001), Zone II-CDRa (-0.405; P=0.006), Zone I-cup shape measure (CSM) (-0.415; P=0.002), Zone II-CSM (-0.405; P=0.001), Zone IV-height variation contour (HVC) (0.378; P=0.002); Zone V-HVC (0.388, P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS In the healthy subjects, significant negative correlation was detected between central and paracentral corneal thickness and optic disc area. In contrast, the POAG patients showed significant negative correlation between central and paracentral corneal thickness and the cup-disc ratio and CSM, and positive correlation between peripheral corneal thickness and HVC. PMID:26682165

  20. Dynamic Parameter Identification of Subject-Specific Body Segment Parameters Using Robotics Formalism: Case Study Head Complex.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rodríguez, Miguel; Valera, Angel; Page, Alvaro; Besa, Antonio; Mata, Vicente

    2016-05-01

    Accurate knowledge of body segment inertia parameters (BSIP) improves the assessment of dynamic analysis based on biomechanical models, which is of paramount importance in fields such as sport activities or impact crash test. Early approaches for BSIP identification rely on the experiments conducted on cadavers or through imaging techniques conducted on living subjects. Recent approaches for BSIP identification rely on inverse dynamic modeling. However, most of the approaches are focused on the entire body, and verification of BSIP for dynamic analysis for distal segment or chain of segments, which has proven to be of significant importance in impact test studies, is rarely established. Previous studies have suggested that BSIP should be obtained by using subject-specific identification techniques. To this end, our paper develops a novel approach for estimating subject-specific BSIP based on static and dynamics identification models (SIM, DIM). We test the validity of SIM and DIM by comparing the results using parameters obtained from a regression model proposed by De Leva (1996, "Adjustments to Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's Segment Inertia Parameters," J. Biomech., 29(9), pp. 1223-1230). Both SIM and DIM are developed considering robotics formalism. First, the static model allows the mass and center of gravity (COG) to be estimated. Second, the results from the static model are included in the dynamics equation allowing us to estimate the moment of inertia (MOI). As a case study, we applied the approach to evaluate the dynamics modeling of the head complex. Findings provide some insight into the validity not only of the proposed method but also of the application proposed by De Leva (1996, "Adjustments to Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's Segment Inertia Parameters," J. Biomech., 29(9), pp. 1223-1230) for dynamic modeling of body segments.

  1. Heading in football. Part 2: Biomechanics of ball heading and head response

    PubMed Central

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy surrounding the long term effects of repeated impacts from heading has raised awareness among the public and the medical community. However, there is little information about the human response to the impacts and what measures can be taken to alter their effect. The objective of the current study was to gain a better understanding of heading biomechanics through the implementation of a numerical model and subsequent investigation of parameters related to heading technique and ball characteristics. Methods: A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20–23 years who underwent medical screening and were instrumented with accelerometers mounted in bite plates and electromyographic electrodes on the major neck muscle groups. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects demonstrated several specific heading manoeuvres. Photographic targets were tracked via high speed video to measure heading kinematics. One subject demonstrating reasonably averaged flexion–extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human numerical model with detailed representation of the head and neck. Results: Heading kinematics and subject responses were used with a detailed numerical model to simulate impact biomechanics for a baseline heading scenario. Changes to heading techniques and ball characteristics which mitigated head impact response were identified. Conclusion: A numerical model combined with biomechanical measurement techniques is an important tool for parametric investigation of strategies to reduce head impact severity via changes in heading technique or the physical properties of the ball. PMID:16046352

  2. Heading in football. Part 2: biomechanics of ball heading and head response.

    PubMed

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-08-01

    Controversy surrounding the long term effects of repeated impacts from heading has raised awareness among the public and the medical community. However, there is little information about the human response to the impacts and what measures can be taken to alter their effect. The objective of the current study was to gain a better understanding of heading biomechanics through the implementation of a numerical model and subsequent investigation of parameters related to heading technique and ball characteristics. A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20-23 years who underwent medical screening and were instrumented with accelerometers mounted in bite plates and electromyographic electrodes on the major neck muscle groups. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects demonstrated several specific heading manoeuvres. Photographic targets were tracked via high speed video to measure heading kinematics. One subject demonstrating reasonably averaged flexion-extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human numerical model with detailed representation of the head and neck. Heading kinematics and subject responses were used with a detailed numerical model to simulate impact biomechanics for a baseline heading scenario. Changes to heading techniques and ball characteristics which mitigated head impact response were identified. A numerical model combined with biomechanical measurement techniques is an important tool for parametric investigation of strategies to reduce head impact severity via changes in heading technique or the physical properties of the ball.

  3. Twelve tips to avoid ethical pitfalls when recruiting students as subjects in medical education research.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Elisabeth; Patenaude, Johane; St-Onge, Christina

    2017-07-30

    Medical education research has unique characteristics that raise their own set of ethical issues, which differ significantly from those commonly found in clinical research. In contexts where researchers have a dual role as teachers, free consent to participate in research may be undermined and students' data must be kept confidential from faculty who play any role in their academic or professional path. Faculty members who recruit students as research subjects within their institution for education research should pay particular attention to ensure students' consent to participate is indeed free and continuous and that their privacy is adequately protected. A good understanding of ethical standards and of the appropriate strategies to fulfill them is essential to conduct ethical medical education research and to ensure ethics approval is obtained. These twelve tips draw from the Declaration of Helsinki, from the ICMJE recommendations and from the example of their application to medical education research in a Canadian and North American context. They aim to act as a reminder and as a guide to address the main ethical issues which should be given proper consideration when designing a study involving students as subjects for medical education research.

  4. Head repositioning accuracy in patients with neck pain and asymptomatic subjects: concurrent validity, influence of motion speed, motion direction and target distance.

    PubMed

    Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; De Santis, Roberta; Tits, Mathieu; Sobczak, Stéphane; Vigne, Anna; Feipel, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Cervicocephalic kinesthetic deficiencies have been demonstrated in patients with chronic neck pain (NP). On the other hand, authors emphasized the use of different motion speeds for assessing functional impairment of the cervical spine. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the head repositioning accuracy in NP patients and control subjects and (2) to assess the influence of target distance, motion speed, motion direction and pain. Seventy-one subjects (36 healthy subjects and 35 NP patients; age 30-55 years) performed the head repositioning test (HRT) at two different speeds for horizontal and vertical movements and at two different distances. For each condition, six consecutive trials were sampled. The study showed the validity and reproducibility of the HRT, confirming a dysfunctional threshold of 4.5°. Normative values of head repositioning error up to 3.6° and 7.1° were identified for healthy and NP subjects, respectively. A distance of 180 cm from the target and a natural motion speed increased HRT accuracy. Repositioning after extension movement showed a significantly larger error in both groups. Intensity, duration of pain as well as pain level did not significantly alter head repositioning error. The assessment of proprioceptive performance in healthy and NP subjects allowed the validation of the HRT. The HRT is a simple, not expensive and fast test, easily implementable in daily practice to assess and monitor treatment and evolution of proprioceptive cervical deficits.

  5. Twenty-first Century ethics of medical research involving human subjects: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tzamaloukas, Antonios H; Konstantinov, Konstantin N; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Raj, Dominic S C; Murata, Glen H; Glew, Robert H

    2008-01-01

    The field of ethics in medical research has seen important developments in the last three decades, but it also faces great challenges in the new century. The purposes of this report are to examine the current status of ethics of medical research involving human subjects and the nature of the ethical challenges facing this research, to identify the weakness of the current system of safeguards for ethical research, and to stress the importance of the ethical character of the researcher, which is the safeguard that has the greatest potential for protecting the research subjects. Researchers appreciate the risks of human medical research that create ethical dilemmas and the need for an ethical compromise in order to proceed with the research. The main elements of the compromise, formulated primarily from experiences in the Second World War, include: (1) the dominant position of the ethical principle of autonomy; (2) the demand for a signed informed consent; (3) the likelihood of improving health with the research protocol, which must be approved by a duly appointed supervising committee; and (4) an acceptable risk/benefit ratio. The main weakness of this set of safeguards is the difficulty with obtaining a truly informed consent. The new challenges to ethical medical research stem from certain types of research, such as genetic and stem cell research, and from the increasing involvement of the industry in planning and funding the research studies. Developing medical researchers with an ethical character and knowledge about ethics in medicine may be the most effective safeguard in protecting participants of medical research experiments.

  6. Effects of suboccipital release with craniocervical flexion exercise on craniocervical alignment and extrinsic cervical muscle activity in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Been; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Hyo-Jung; Cynn, Heon-Seock

    2016-10-01

    Forward head posture is a head-on-trunk malalignment, which results in musculoskeletal dysfunction and neck pain. To improve forward head posture, both the craniocervical flexion exercise and the suboccipital release technique have been used. The purpose of this study was to compare the immediate effects of craniocervical flexion exercise and suboccipital release combined with craniocervical flexion exercise on craniovertebral angle, cervical flexion and extension range of motion, and the muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and splenius capitis during craniocervical flexion exercise in subjects with forward head posture. In total, 19 subjects (7 males, 12 females) with forward head posture were recruited using G-power software. Each subject performed craniocervical flexion exercise and suboccipital release combined with craniocervical flexion exercise in random order. After one intervention was performed, the subject took a 20min wash out period to minimize any carry-over effect between interventions. Craniovertebral angle, cervical flexion and extension range of motion, and the muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and splenius capitis were measured. A one-way, repeated-measures ANOVA was used to assess differences between the effects of the craniocervical flexion exercise and suboccipital release combined with craniocervical flexion exercise interventions in the same group. Craniovertebral angle (p<0.05), cervical flexion range of motion (p<0.05), and cervical extension range of motion (p<0.001) were significantly greater after suboccipital release combined with craniocervical flexion exercise compared to craniocervical flexion exercise alone. The muscle activities of the sternocleidomastoid, anterior scalene, and splenius capitis were significantly lower during suboccipital release combined with craniocervical flexion exercise than during craniocervical flexion exercise alone across all craniocervical flexion

  7. Subject Control of the Literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierbaum, Esther Green; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study that analyzed the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms used to index the literature of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Subject access to the AIDSLINE database developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is examined, and changes in subject headings that reflect the growth of the field are analyzed. (12…

  8. PubMed vs. HighWire Press: a head-to-head comparison of two medical literature search engines.

    PubMed

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Barnes, Michael A; Zimmerman, Janet; Shoichet, Sandor

    2007-09-01

    PubMed and HighWire Press are both useful medical literature search engines available for free to anyone on the internet. We measured retrieval accuracy, number of results generated, retrieval speed, features and search tools on HighWire Press and PubMed using the quick search features of each. We found that using HighWire Press resulted in a higher likelihood of retrieving the desired article and higher number of search results than the same search on PubMed. PubMed was faster than HighWire Press in delivering search results regardless of search settings. There are considerable differences in search features between these two search engines.

  9. Transcending Library Catalogs: A Comparative Study of Controlled Terms in Library of Congress Subject Headings and User-Generated Tags in LibraryThing for Transgender Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest power of folksonomies, especially when set against controlled vocabularies like the Library of Congress Subject Headings, lies in their capacity to empower user communities to name their own resources in their own terms. This article analyzes the potential and limitations of both folksonomies and controlled vocabularies for…

  10. Transcending Library Catalogs: A Comparative Study of Controlled Terms in Library of Congress Subject Headings and User-Generated Tags in LibraryThing for Transgender Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest power of folksonomies, especially when set against controlled vocabularies like the Library of Congress Subject Headings, lies in their capacity to empower user communities to name their own resources in their own terms. This article analyzes the potential and limitations of both folksonomies and controlled vocabularies for…

  11. Effects of head-up tilting on baroreceptor control in subjects with different tolerances to orthostatic stress.

    PubMed

    Cooper, V L; Hainsworth, R

    2002-09-01

    During orthostatic stress, an increase in peripheral vascular resistance normally results in arterial blood pressure being well maintained, despite a decrease in cardiac output. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the sensitivity of the carotid baroreceptor reflex was increased during orthostatic stress and whether failure to develop this increase was associated with poor orthostatic tolerance. Three groups of subjects were studied: asymptomatic controls; patients investigated for suspected posturally related syncope but who had normal responses to an orthostatic stress test (normal patients); and patients who were shown to have low orthostatic tolerance (early fainters). We determined responses of R-R interval and forearm vascular resistance (mean arterial pressure/brachial artery velocity by Doppler ultrasonography) to the loading and unloading of carotid baroreceptors by application of pressures of -30 and +30 mmHg to a chamber fitted over the neck. Responses were determined after 20 min of supine rest and after 10 min of head-up tilt at 60 degrees. Responses of cardiac interval were not significantly different between the three groups, and they were not altered by the postural change. Vascular responses also did not differ between the groups during supine rest. However, in healthy volunteers and in normal patients, responses to both neck suction and pressure were significantly enhanced during head-up tilt. In controls, responses to suction were increased by tilt from 0.04+/-0.1 to -1.01+/-0.2%.mmHg(-1) (means+/-S.E.M.; P<0.001) and those to neck pressure from -0.6+/-0.3 to -3.1+/-1.1%.mmHg(-1) (P<0.05). In the normal patients, the corresponding changes were: during suction, from -0.2+/-0.1 to -0.7+/-0.1%.mmHg(-1) (P<0.05); during pressure, from -0.7+/-0.1 to -1.5+/-0.3%.mmHg(-1) (P<0.05). In contrast, in patients with low orthostatic tolerance, posture had no effect on the reflex (neck suction, from -0.3+/-0.1 to -0.3+/-0.1%.mmHg(-1); neck

  12. Comparison of optic area measurement using fundus photography and optical coherence tomography between optic nerve head drusen and control subjects.

    PubMed

    Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gili, Pablo; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores; Grifol-Clar, Eulalia

    2013-03-01

    To compare optic disc area measurement between optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and control subjects using fundus photography, time-domain optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). We also made a comparison between each of the three techniques. We performed our study on 66 eyes (66 patients) with ONHD and 70 healthy control subjects (70 controls) with colour ocular fundus photography at 20º (Zeiss FF 450 IR plus), TD-OCT (Stratus OCT) with the Fast Optic Disc protocol and SD-OCT (Cirrus OCT) with the Optic Disc Cube 200 × 200 protocol for measurement of the optic disc area. The measurements were made by two observers and in each measurement a correction of the image magnification factor was performed. Measurement comparison using the Student's t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, the intraclass correlation coefficient, Pearson/Spearman rank correlation coefficient and the Bland-Altman plot was performed in the statistical analysis. Mean and standard deviation (SD) of the optic disc area in ONHD and in controls was 2.38 (0.54) mm(2) and 2.54 (0.42) mm(2), respectively with fundus photography; 2.01 (0.56) mm(2) and 1.66 (0.37) mm(2), respectively with TD-OCT, and 2.03 (0.49) mm(2) and 1.75 (0.38) mm(2), respectively with SD-OCT. In ONHD and controls, repeatability of optic disc area measurement was excellent with fundus photography and optical coherence tomography (TD-OCT and SD-OCT), but with a low degree of agreement between both techniques. Optic disc area measurement is smaller in ONHD compared to healthy subjects with fundus photography, unlike time-domain and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in which the reverse is true. Both techniques offer good repeatability, but a low degree of correlation and agreement, which means that optic disc area measurement is not interchangeable or comparable between techniques. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  13. Neutron activation processes simulation in an Elekta medical linear accelerator head.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo estimation of the giant-dipole-resonance (GRN) photoneutrons inside the Elekta Precise LINAC head (emitting a 15 MV photon beam) were performed using the MCNP6 (general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code, version 6). Each component of LINAC head geometry and materials were modelled in detail using the given manufacturer information. Primary photons generate photoneutrons and its transport across the treatment head was simulated, including the (n, γ) reactions which undergo activation products. The MCNP6 was used to develop a method for quantifying the activation of accelerator components. The approach described in this paper is useful in quantifying the origin and the amount of nuclear activation.

  14. Assessment of nasal obstruction with rhinomanometry and subjective scales and outcomes of surgical and medical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lara-Sánchez, Hugo; Álvarez Nuño, Candelas; Gil-Carcedo Sañudo, Elisa; Mayo Iscar, Agustín; Vallejo Valdezate, Luis Ángel

    Prospective study of patients with nasal obstruction (NO) in order to measure therapeutic success by anterior active rhinomanometry (AAR), Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and to establish the correlation between these tests. Patients with NO, on whom we performed an AAR, NOSE and VAS scales at baseline and after medical treatment (topical nasal steroid) or surgery (septoplasty, turbinoplasty or septoplasty and turbinoplasty). The nasal flow obtained by the AAR and the score of both subjective scales (NOSE and VAS) were compared and analyzed. A total of 102 patients were included in the study. Surgical treatment resulted in statistically significant differences with the AAR and the subjective scales. While in patients with medical treatment there was an increase in the AAR nasal flow but without statistical significance (P=.1363). The correlation between the AAR, the NOSE and VAS scales was measured finding a strong correlation between the NOSE and VAS scales only (r=.83327). The patients with NO treated surgically have better results when these are evaluated by AAR or with subjective scales. There is no significant correlation between AAR, NOSE and VAS scales, this is considered to be because the AAR and subjective scales are complementary and measure different aspects of NO. The AAR and subjective scales are useful tools to be used together for the follow up of patients with NO. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  15. [Implementation of the new Federal Medical Licensing Regulations for doctors in the interdisciplinary subject "Rehabilitation, physical medicine, naturopathic treatment" by the German medical faculties].

    PubMed

    Mau, W; Kusak, G

    2005-06-01

    The introduction of the new interdisciplinary subject "Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Treatment" based on the 9th revision of the Federal Medical Licensing Regulations (Approbationsordnung fur Arzte) implies new opportunities and challenges for teaching. In order to investigate the transfer of the new subject to teaching practise, a written questionnaire was sent to all German medical faculties. With regard to the implementation of new teaching structures and procedures in the subject, a range of different indicators was examined. 50 % of the medical faculties have been planning for comprehensive teaching sessions as compared to distribution over the whole semester. Lectures predominate with an average of more than half of the teaching time available for the subject. For examination purposes written tests are used in 83 %, compared to only 17 % Objective Structured Clinical Examinations. Considering the diversity among the medical faculties, there is room for improvement in many universities concerning more patient- and practice-oriented medical training as intended by the Federal Medical Licensing Regulations. However, in spite of increased demands, supplementary funds for additional equipment or manpower are rarely provided for. In the future, enhanced allocation of resources based on performance-related evaluation within the medical faculties and teaching competition between universities may provide significant stimuli for advances in medical training also in the new interdisciplinary subject. Further improvement of general teaching conditions is necessary in order to utilize all the opportunities offered by the new Federal Medical Regulations.

  16. Bronchodilator action of inhaled fenoterol and ipratropium in normal subjects: a teaching exercise for medical students.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, R G; Maclagan, J; Cook, D G

    1989-01-01

    1. A pharmacology practical class for preclinical medical students was designed as a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of two bronchodilator drugs. 2. Fenoterol hydrobromide (800 micrograms), ipratropium bromide (80 micrograms) and placebo (propellant only) were given by metered dose inhaler to 79 non-asthmatic volunteers. Their effects on FEV1, heart rate and tremor (assessed by the time taken to thread five sewing needles) were compared. 3. Both drugs caused a significant increase in FEV1: the largest group mean increase was 77 ml, recorded 15 min after fenoterol, and 103 ml, recorded 60 min after ipratropium. 4. Fenoterol also caused a mean increase of 8.7 beats min-1 in heart rate, 5 min after inhalation. This effect was still apparent after 60 min. 5. Fenoterol appeared to prolong needle threading time in some individuals. 6. In subjects who inhaled fenoterol, there were no correlations between the increase in FEV1, the increase in heart rate, or the development of tremor. 7. It is concluded that inhaled fenoterol and ipratropium both cause bronchodilation in normal subjects. Systemic absorption of fenoterol is indicated by the rapid increase in heart rate. The bronchodilator effect of ipratropium suggests that resting airway calibre is governed partly by parasympathetic tone in normal subjects. 8. The bronchodilator and systemic effects of these drugs can be used to demonstrate pharmacological, therapeutic and statistical principles to medical students. PMID:2532922

  17. 45 CFR 1307.3 - Basis for determining whether a Head Start agency will be subject to an open competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Align with the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework, State early learning... Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES...

  18. 45 CFR 1307.3 - Basis for determining whether a Head Start agency will be subject to an open competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Align with the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework, State early learning... Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES...

  19. 45 CFR 1307.3 - Basis for determining whether a Head Start agency will be subject to an open competition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Align with the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework, State early learning... Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, HEAD START PROGRAM POLICIES AND PROCEDURES...

  20. Three-dimensional vector analysis of the human vestibuloocular reflex in response to high-acceleration head rotations. I. Responses in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Aw, S T; Haslwanter, T; Halmagyi, G M; Curthoys, I S; Yavor, R A; Todd, M J

    1996-12-01

    1. The kinematics of the human angular vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) in three dimensions was investigated in 12 normal subjects during high-acceleration head rotations (head "impulses"). A head impulse is a passive, unpredictable, high-acceleration (3,000-4,000 degrees/s2) head rotation of approximately 10-20 degrees in roll, pitch, or yaw, delivered with the subject in the upright position and focusing on a fixation target. Head and eye rotations were measured with dual search coils and expressed as rotation vectors. The first of these two papers describes a vector analysis of the three-dimensional input-output kinematics of the VOR as two indexes in the time domain: magnitude and direction. 2. Magnitude is expressed as speed gain (G) and direction as misalignment angle (delta). G is defined as the ratio of eye velocity magnitude (eye speed) to head velocity magnitude (head speed). delta is defined as the instantaneous angle by which the eye rotation axis deviates from perfect alignment with the head rotation axis in three dimensions. When the eye rotation axis aligns perfectly with the head rotation axis and when eye velocity is in a direction opposite to head velocity, delta = 0. The orientation of misalignment between the head and the eye rotation axes is characterized by two spatial misalignment angles, which are the projections of delta onto two orthogonal coordinate planes that intersect at the head rotation axis. 3. Time series of G were calculated for head impulses in roll, pitch, and yaw. At 80 ms after the onset of an impulse (i.e., near peak head velocity), values of G were 0.72 +/- 0.07 (counterclockwise) and 0.75 +/- 0.07 (clockwise) for roll impulses, 0.97 +/- 0.05 (up) and 1.10 +/- 0.09 (down) for pitch impulses, and 0.95 +/- 0.06 (right) and 1.01 +/- 0.07 (left) for yaw impulses (mean +/- 95% confidence intervals). 4. The eye rotation axis was well aligned with head rotation axis during roll, pitch, and yaw impulses: delta remained almost constant

  1. The head trauma amnesia cure: The making of a medical myth.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Mary V

    2016-06-14

    The myth that a second head trauma can restore memory to someone with a previous head injury is evident in popular fiction and believed by a significant number of people. The double trauma amnesia plot device appeared in 19th century fiction and was fully formed by the 1880s. This article explores the contributions of scientific and popular ideas related to brain symmetry and memory permanence that fueled inaccurate ideas about memory recovery following brain injury. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. Effect of space flight and head-down bedrest on neuroendocrine response to metabolic stress in physically trained subjects.

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Ksinantová, L; Koska, J; Noskov, V B; Vigas, M; Grigoriev, A I; Macho, L

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) responses to insulin induced hypoglycemia (ITT) 3 weeks before the space flight (SF), on the 5th day of SF, on the 2nd and 16th days after the landing in the first Slovak astronaut, and before and on the 5th day of prolonged subsequent head-down (-6 degrees) bed rest (BR) in 15 military aircraft pilots. Blood samples during the test were collected via cannula inserted into cubital vein, centrifuged in the special appliance Plasma-03, frozen in Kryogem-03, and at the end of the 8-day space flight transferred to Earth in special container for hormonal analysis. Insulin hypoglycemia was induced by i.v. administration of 0.1 IU/kg BW insulin (Actrapid HM) in bolus. Insulin administration led to a comparable hypoglycemia in pre-flight, in-flight conditions and before and after bed rest. ITT led to a pronounced increase in EPI levels and moderate increase in NE in pre-flight studies. However, an evidently reduced EPI response was found after insulin administration during SF and during BR. Thus, during the real microgravity in SF and simulated microgravity in BR, insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the adrenomedullary system to less extent than at conditions of the Earth gravitation. Post-flight changes in EPI and NE levels did not significantly differ from those of pre-flight since SF was relatively short (8 days) and the readaptation to Earth gravitation was fast. It seems, that an increased blood flow in brain might be responsible for the reduced EPI response to insulin. Responses to ITT in physically fit subjects indicate the stimulus specificity of deconditioning effect of 5 days bed rest on stress response. Thus, the data indicate that catecholamine responses to ITT are reduced after exposure to real as well as simulated microgravity.

  3. Changes in neck and upper trunk muscle activities according to the angle of movement of the neck in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, SongHee; Park, SoHyun

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated changes in neck and upper trunk muscle activities according to the angle of movement of the neck in subjects with Forward Head Posture. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects with forward head postures were recruited. The activities of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, splenius capitis and splenius cervicis muscles, upper trapezius muscle, and middle trapezius muscle during flexion and extension were assessed. [Results] The activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscle showed significant differences between the 30° flexed position and the full range of motion position, and between the neutral position and the full ROM position. The activity of the middle trapezius muscle showed a significant reduction in the 30° extended position and the full ROM position as compared to the neutral position. [Conclusion] In the full flexed position, sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased significantly, and during extension position, the middle trapezius muscle reduced its activities. PMID:28265137

  4. Changes in neck and upper trunk muscle activities according to the angle of movement of the neck in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Cheon, SongHee; Park, SoHyun

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated changes in neck and upper trunk muscle activities according to the angle of movement of the neck in subjects with Forward Head Posture. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty subjects with forward head postures were recruited. The activities of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, splenius capitis and splenius cervicis muscles, upper trapezius muscle, and middle trapezius muscle during flexion and extension were assessed. [Results] The activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscle showed significant differences between the 30° flexed position and the full range of motion position, and between the neutral position and the full ROM position. The activity of the middle trapezius muscle showed a significant reduction in the 30° extended position and the full ROM position as compared to the neutral position. [Conclusion] In the full flexed position, sternocleidomastoid muscle activity increased significantly, and during extension position, the middle trapezius muscle reduced its activities.

  5. The effect of head position on the distribution of topical nasal medication using the Mucosal Atomization Device: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Habib, Al-Rahim R; Thamboo, Andrew; Manji, Jamil; Dar Santos, Rachelle C; Gan, Eng Cern; Anstead, Amy; Javer, Amin R

    2013-12-01

    The Mucosal Atomization Device (MAD) distributes medication throughout the paranasal sinuses for patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Determining the optimal head position is important to ensure maximal delivery of medication to the sinus cavities. The objective of this work was to determine the effect of the lying-head-back (LHB) and head-down and forward (HDF) position, on the distribution of topical nasal medication via MAD in cadaver specimens. Twenty specimens having received complete functional endoscopic sinus dissection were chosen. The MAD was used to administer 2 mL of fluorescein-impregnated saline solution through the nose in both the LHB and HDF positions. Fluorescein was identified on 11 predetermined anatomical areas using a blue light filter. Three blinded investigators assessed endoscopic images to determine the presence of fluorescein. A total of 440 anatomical locations (n = 20 cadavers) received administration of the fluorescein nasal spray in the LHB or HDF position. LHB position had significantly greater total distribution to all pertinent anatomical sites than the HDF position (76% vs 41%; p < 0.001; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.26-0.44). The proportion of staining was significantly greater for the ethmoid (p = 0.11; 95% CI, 0.05-0.66), frontal (p < 0.01; 95% CI, 0.20-0.80), and sphenoid sinuses (p = 0.03; 95% CI, 0.07-0.73) when compared to the HDF position. A greater distribution of medication to the sinonasal cavities was observed in the LHB position compared to the HDF position. These areas are of particular clinical relevance in postsurgical patients with refractory CRS. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  6. Physical activity, symptoms, medication and subjective health among veteran endurance athletes with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Myrstad, Marius; Aarønæs, Marit; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Ariansen, Inger; Nystad, Wenche; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen

    2016-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is highly prevalent, but has not previously been characterized in detail in veteran athletes. We aimed to describe physical activity (PA), symptoms, medication and subjective health in relation to AF subtype and co-morbidity among veteran cross-country skiers with AF. In total, 4952 Norwegian men and women aged 53-85 years took part in this cohort study, 2626 veteran cross-country skiers and 2326 from the general population. PA, endurance exercise, functional capacity, co-morbidity, drug use and subjective health were self-reported by questionnaires. AF was self-reported and confirmed by electrocardiograms in a medical record review. The prevalence of self-reported AF among veteran skiers was 12.3%. AF was confirmed in 140 skiers and 118 individuals from the general population. Among skiers with AF (mean age 69 years), 52% had paroxysmal, 23% persistent and 24% permanent AF. AF was associated with poor subjective health, but 89% of the veteran skiers were physically active and 64% engaged in regular endurance exercise after the onset of AF. While 59% had experienced palpitations during the past year, 32% reported reduced functional capacity. Two out of three with AF and a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥ 2 used oral anticoagulants (OACs). AF was associated with poor subjective health, but the vast majority of veteran athletes engaged in regular PA and endurance exercise also after the onset of AF. This is important, as PA and exercise might reduce AF symptoms, mortality and morbidity. Many veteran skiers with AF were not optimally treated with OACs.

  7. Aetiological spectrum, injury characteristics and treatment outcome of head injury patients at Bugando Medical Centre in north-western Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Kanumba, Emmanuel S; Mabula, Joseph B; Giiti, Godfrey; Gilyoma, Japhet M

    2011-01-01

    Head injury is considered as a major health problem that is a frequent cause of death and disability and makes considerable demands on health services. A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the etiological spectrum, injury characteristics and treatment outcome of head injury patients at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC) in North-western Tanzania. Data were collected using a pre-tested, coded questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS programme. A total of 260 head injury patients (mean age=26.84 years) were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 1.5:1. Road traffic accidents (RTAs) were the most common cause of injury accounting for 49.2% of patients. Scalp injuries, cerebral concussion and skull fractures were the most common type of head injuries. Fifty-six (21.5%) patients had associated injuries of which musculoskeletal region (36.1%) was commonly affected. Most of patients (66.1%) sustained mild head injury. The majority of patients (75.8%) were treated conservatively and only 24.2% of patients needed surgical interventions. Most of patients (85.4%) had good recovery. The mean hospital stay (LOS) was 24.56 days and the mortality rate was 11.2%. Patients who had RTAs, penetrating head injuries, associated long bone fractures and those who were treated surgically were found to have significantly longer LOS (P< 0.001). Mortality was found to be significantly associated with extreme of age, presence of pre-morbid illness and associated injuries, admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90mmHg, injury severity core > or =16, longer duration of loss of consciousness, the need for intensive care unit admission and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan (P < 0.001). Head injuries resulting from RTAs remain a major public health problem in this part of Tanzania. Urgent preventive measures targeting at reducing the occurrence of RTAs is necessary to reduce the incidence of head injuries in this region.

  8. Medical Monitoring during Short Radius Centrifugation in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinertson, Randal; Nelson, Victor; Aunon, Serena; Schlegel, Todd; Paloski, William

    2007-01-01

    The artificial gravity pilot project was designed to investigate the efficacy of daily exposure to a Gz acceleration gradient for counteracting the physiologic decrements induced by prolonged bed rest. A short radius centrifuge was used to produce a Gz gradient such that 1 g was applied at the level of the subject s heart and 2.5 g at the feet. For inclusion in the study, subjects were required to complete a 75-minute screening spin on the centrifuge. During the study, each active treatment subject was scheduled for a 60-minute spin each day for 20 consecutive days. During centrifugation, subjects were continuously monitored by a physician for signs and symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, arrhythmias, joint/muscle pain and any other unanticipated problems. The physician was also present to provide emergency care in the case of a medical emergency. Cameras mounted on the centrifuge were used to provide a means of observing the subject s face and torso. Audio communication was continuously maintained. Other monitoring tools included two-lead EKG tracings, pulse oximetry, intermittent sphygmomanometer readings, lights in the peripheral visual field, and continuous blood pressure readout from a tonometry device. Thirty screening runs were attempted using twenty-seven subjects. Seven of these runs were terminated early for symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, or GI distress. A total of eight subjects completed the active treatment arm of the study. Of the 160 centrifuge runs that were scheduled for these eight treatment subjects, 152 were completed, seven were terminated early, and one was not attempted. Of the seven early terminations, four were related to symptoms of pre-syncope, one to leg pain, one to GI discomfort, and one to equipment failure. Three terminations for adverse symptoms occurred on the first treatment day. Three terminations occurred on day nineteen of treatment and within 24 hours after scheduled soleus and quadriceps muscle biopsies. We

  9. Medical Monitoring during Short Radius Centrifugation in Bed-rested Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinertson, Randal; Nelson, Victor; Aunon, Serena; Schlegel, Todd; Paloski, William

    2007-01-01

    The artificial gravity pilot project was designed to investigate the efficacy of daily exposure to a Gz acceleration gradient for counteracting the physiologic decrements induced by prolonged bed rest. A short radius centrifuge was used to produce a Gz gradient such that 1 g was applied at the level of the subject s heart and 2.5 g at the feet. For inclusion in the study, subjects were required to complete a 75-minute screening spin on the centrifuge. During the study, each active treatment subject was scheduled for a 60-minute spin each day for 20 consecutive days. During centrifugation, subjects were continuously monitored by a physician for signs and symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, arrhythmias, joint/muscle pain and any other unanticipated problems. The physician was also present to provide emergency care in the case of a medical emergency. Cameras mounted on the centrifuge were used to provide a means of observing the subject s face and torso. Audio communication was continuously maintained. Other monitoring tools included two-lead EKG tracings, pulse oximetry, intermittent sphygmomanometer readings, lights in the peripheral visual field, and continuous blood pressure readout from a tonometry device. Thirty screening runs were attempted using twenty-seven subjects. Seven of these runs were terminated early for symptoms of pre-syncope, motion sickness, or GI distress. A total of eight subjects completed the active treatment arm of the study. Of the 160 centrifuge runs that were scheduled for these eight treatment subjects, 152 were completed, seven were terminated early, and one was not attempted. Of the seven early terminations, four were related to symptoms of pre-syncope, one to leg pain, one to GI discomfort, and one to equipment failure. Three terminations for adverse symptoms occurred on the first treatment day. Three terminations occurred on day nineteen of treatment and within 24 hours after scheduled soleus and quadriceps muscle biopsies. We

  10. Injury prevention strategies, coach compliance and player adherence of 33 of the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study teams: a survey of teams' head medical officers.

    PubMed

    McCall, Alan; Dupont, Gregory; Ekstrand, Jan

    2016-06-01

    (1) To quantify current practice at the most elite level of professional club football in Europe with regard to injury prevention strategy; (2) to describe player adherence and coach compliance to the overall injury prevention programme. A structured online survey was administered to the Head medical officers of 34 elite European teams currently participating in the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study. The survey had 4 sections; (1) risk factors for injury, (2) assessment and monitoring of injury risk, (3) prevention strategies and (4) coach compliance and player adherence to the injury prevention process. 33 (97%) Medical officers of the teams responded. The most important perceived injury risk factor was previous injury. Four of the top 6 risk factors-physical fitness, accumulated fatigue, reduced recovery time between matches and training load-were related to player workload. The top 3 preventative exercises were eccentric, balance/proprioception and core training. Regarding monitoring, the top 3 tools implemented were measurement of workload, subjective wellness and a general medical screen. The subjectively rated level of coach compliance in UEFA teams was perceived as 'high', while the player adherence varied from none at all to perfect. Medical officers place importance on workload-related variables as risk factors for injury in elite European football players. A lack of consistently high player adherence may limit the effects of contemporary injury prevention programmes in elite European footballers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Non-prescription Drugs and Self-medication: Features and Subjects in Pharmaceutical Education.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kinzo

    2016-01-01

    At the time of consultation with a patient regarding OTC drugs, a pharmacist goes through the following five steps. In Step 1 information is collected, including the patient's gender, age, health condition, living situation, etc. In Step 2, upon analyzing and evaluating this collected information, the pharmacist decides whether to recommend that the patient see a medical doctor or whether an OTC drug is sufficient. In Step 3, when an OTC drug is required, the pharmacist suggests the most suitable OTC drug. In Step 4, the pharmacist provides the patient recommendations and information about the selected OTC. In Step 5, sales record entry and aftercare are performed. In these five steps, the pharmacist is making a decision on whether the consultation recommendation is required or optional; the step of making an optimal selection of an OTC drug is distinct from prescription dispensing. In many cases, at the time of OTC drug consultation, since the patient is not consulting a medical doctor, a pharmacist becomes a "first access" health professional. In this instance, the advice of a pharmacist may have a great influence on a patient's prognosis regarding the particular health challenge. Therefore, pharmacists who perform patient consultations regarding OTC drugs are required to have broad medical knowledge and communication skills. The features of consultation and information dissemination about OTC drugs by a pharmacist, and the practice and study of this subject in present-day pharmaceutical education, are described herein.

  12. Subjective quality and depth assessment in stereoscopic viewing of volume-rendered medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousson, Johanna; Couturou, Jeanne; Vetsuypens, Arnout; Platisa, Ljiljana; Kumcu, Asli; Kimpe, Tom; Philips, Wilfried

    2014-03-01

    No study to-date explored the relationship between perceived image quality (IQ) and perceived depth (DP) in stereoscopic medical images. However, this is crucial to design objective quality metrics suitable for stereoscopic medical images. This study examined this relationship using volume-rendered stereoscopic medical images for both dual- and single-view distortions. The reference image was modified to simulate common alterations occurring during the image acquisition stage or at the display side: added white Gaussian noise, Gaussian filtering, changes in luminance, brightness and contrast. We followed a double stimulus five-point quality scale methodology to conduct subjective tests with eight non-expert human observers. The results suggested that DP was very robust to luminance, contrast and brightness alterations and insensitive to noise distortions until standard deviation σ=20 and crosstalk rates of 7%. In contrast, IQ seemed sensitive to all distortions. Finally, for both DP and IQ, the Friedman test indicated that the quality scores for dual-view distortions were significantly worse than scores for single-view distortions for multiple blur levels and crosstalk impairments. No differences were found for most levels of brightness, contrast and noise distortions. So, DP and IQ didn't react equivalently to identical impairments, and both depended whether dual- or single-view distortions were applied.

  13. Management of acute sports injuries and medical conditions by South Dakota high school head coaches: assessment via case scenarios.

    PubMed

    Cross, Patrick S; Karges, Joy R; Horkey, Melissa Ann; Kolb, Ginger A; Alexander, Krystle L; Knippling, Amy L; Jacobsen, Jordan Anthony

    2012-03-01

    When medical coverage does not exist at games and practices, coaches are often responsible for the management of acute conditions. The question that arises is whether they make proper medical decisions concerning the health and safety of their athletes. The purpose of this study was to assess high school head coaches' decision-making skills related to acute medical condition management through the use of case scenarios. A cover letter/web link to the web-based survey was e-mailed to all 2008-2009 school year South Dakota high school head athletic coaches. Head coaches were found to be responsible for the immediate care of injured athletes at practice (87.2 percent) and home competitions (72.3 percent). Less than 75.0 percent of coaches reported feeling "prepared" or "somewhat prepared" to handle 11 of the 16 types of acute athletic injuries and medical conditions presented, with less than 75.0 percent of coaches giving "appropriate" or "overly cautious" responses to eight of the 17 cases. Little to no relationship was found between perceived level of preparedness for treating various conditions and appropriateness of responses. A significant difference was found in appropriateness of decisions based on level of athlete (68.9 percent starters, 79.3 percent non-starters) and event situation (66.5 percent important events, 76.6 percent non-important events). In South Dakota, high school coaches are most often responsible for the initial management of acute injuries; yet, a large percentage of coaches did not feel "prepared" to manage various conditions and/or gave "inappropriate" responses to multiple cases. Furthermore, the level of athlete and the event situation may influence coaches' decisions. Further education may include the proper management of head and neck injuries, multiple concussions, dislocations, heat emergencies, eye injuries and internal organ injuries. Health care workers can be an integral part of training coaches in the care of acute conditions, as

  14. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  15. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gai-yun; Al-wesabi, Samer abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study. Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis’ RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters. No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = −0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively). MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH

  16. Retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation of the optic nerve head in open-angle glaucoma subjects by multispectral imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Gai-Yun; Al-Wesabi, Samer Abdo; Zhang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether differences exist in oxygen supply to the optic nerve head (ONH) from the retinal and choroidal vascular layers in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) using multispectral imaging (MSI).This ia an observational, cross-sectional study.Multispectral images were acquired from 38 eyes of 19 patients with POAG, and 42 healthy eyes from 21 matched volunteers with Annidis' RHA multispectral digital ophthalmoscopy. Superficial and deeper oxygen saturation of the optic disc was represented by the mean gray scale values on the retinal and choroidal oxy-deoxy maps, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed to detect differences in ONH oxygen saturation between the 2 groups. Oxygen saturation levels in the eyes of POAG patients with severe glaucoma were compared to those of fellow eyes from the same subjects. Linear correlation analysis was performed to assess the association between ONH oxygen saturation and systemic and ocular parameters.No statistical difference was found in retinal and choroidal oxygen saturation between the POAG and control groups. In the glaucoma patients, retinal oxygen saturation was lower for eyes with worse visual fields than in those with good visual fields (t = 4.009, P = 0.001). In POAG patients, retinal oxygen saturation was dependent on mean defect of visual field and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) (r = 0.511, 0.504, P = 0.001, 0.001, respectively), whereas the choroid vasculature oxygen saturation was inversely related to RNFLT (r = -0.391, P = 0.015). An age-dependent increase in retinal oxygen saturation was found for both the POAG and control groups (r = 0.473, 0.410, P = 0.007, 0.003, respectively).MSI revealed a significant correlation between functional and structural impairments in glaucoma and retinal oxygen saturation. MSI could provide objective assessments of perfusion impairments of the glaucomatous ONH. This is a

  17. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  18. Grading Medical Students in a Psychiatry Clerkship: Correlation with the NBME Subject Examination Scores and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramchandani, Dilip

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: The author analyzed and compared various assessment methods for assessment of medical students; these methods included clinical assessment and the standardized National Board of Medical Education (NBME) subject examination. Method: Students were evaluated on their 6-week clerkship in psychiatry by both their clinical…

  19. The role of epidemiology in determining if a simple short fall can cause fatal head injury in an infant: a subject review and reflection.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Johnathon P; Ibrahim, Joseph E; Bugeja, Lyndal; Cordner, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    This article is a subject review summarizing and interpreting the existing knowledge on the question "Can a simple short fall cause fatal head injury in an infant?" It also reflects on the challenges of undertaking a review in the contentious area of pediatric forensic pathology. The authors identified and considered 1055 publications for inclusion. Using explicit selection criteria 27 publications were included in the subject review. The literature suggests that it is rare, but possible, for fatal head injury to occur from a simple short fall. Large population studies of childhood injuries indicate that severe head injury from a short fall is extremely rare. This is counter pointed by a single documented case report that demonstrates it can happen. The question of whether it is a credible claim in a particular case is inextricable from the circumstances of that case.To strengthen the evidence based on fatal potential of simple short falls in infants, future studies addressing this question would ideally be prospective in design and include the key elements of: (1) a large sample size, (2) clearly defined comparison groups, (3) clear and verifiable criteria for causation, (4) specified fall height, (5) specified fall type: vertical free fall or the presence of additional forces, (6) composition of contact surface, and (7) nature of contact point: concentrated to one point or onto a flat surface.We believe subject reviews for forensic pathology require a specific approach because the application of information differs between clinical and courtroom settings.

  20. Subject, function, and trend in medical ethics research: a comparative study of Chinese and non-Chinese literature using bibliometrics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lanhui; Shen, Jiantong; Li, Youping; Deng, Shaolin; Wu, Taixiang; Chen, Baoqing; Xie, Zhiyi; Qin, Chaoyi; Yu, Zhiyuan; Qin, Chuan; Huang, Jin; Liu, Xuemei; Li, Yan; Jiang, Jie

    2012-05-01

    To perform a comparative quantitative and qualitative analysis of Chinese and non-Chinese medical ethics literature using systematic research and literature analysis in order to discern research trends in the area and provide baseline data as a reference for relevant decision making and further study. We retrieved articles using MeSH terms and keywords related to medical ethics in PubMed and CNKI, and then constructed a set of charts by applying word co-occurrence, The Pathfinder Networks algorithms, an included subject chart, a research field relationship chart, and strategy coordination charts. The total of number of papers retrieved from PubMed was six times that retrieved from CNKI. Outside China, medical ethics has been studied in eight fully shaped subject fields, including morals, ethical review, physician-patient relationships, clinical trials, euthanasia, ethics education, clinical ethics, and health policy. In contrast, medical ethics research in China is still confined to five subject fields: morals, physician-patient relations, medical ethics education, ethical review, and medical research. Medical ethics research outside China emphasizes the application of medical ethics to solve emerging problems in clinical and medical research. It is mainly centered on morals, ethical review, and physician-patient relations. By comparison, medical ethics research in China places greater emphasis on morals and medical education. In order to narrow this gap between China and other countries, we should broaden the research scope of medical ethics and add more applied research, such as ethical review and medical education. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  1. It's All in Your Head: Feminist and Medical Models of Menopause (Strange Bedfellows).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Judith

    1979-01-01

    This article describes the medical model of menopause as it exists in contemporary gynecological textbooks and some popular books written by gynecologists for the general public. The feminist position on menopause is then compared and contrasted with the medical model. (Author/EB)

  2. It's All in Your Head: Feminist and Medical Models of Menopause (Strange Bedfellows).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Judith

    1979-01-01

    This article describes the medical model of menopause as it exists in contemporary gynecological textbooks and some popular books written by gynecologists for the general public. The feminist position on menopause is then compared and contrasted with the medical model. (Author/EB)

  3. The development of a core syllabus for the teaching of head and neck anatomy to medical students.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Sorenson, Edward P; Sharma, Amit; Benninger, Brion; Norton, Neil; Loukas, Marios; Moxham, Bernard J

    2014-04-01

    The study of human anatomy has traditionally served as a fundamental component in the basic science education of medical students, yet there exists a remarkable lack of firm guidance on essential features that must be included in a gross anatomy course, which would constitute a "Core Syllabus" of absolutely mandatory structures and related clinical pathologies. While universal agreement on the details of a core syllabus is elusive, there is a general consensus that a core syllabus aims to identify the minimum level of knowledge expected of recently qualified medical graduates in order to carry out clinical procedures safely and effectively, while avoiding overloading students with unnecessary facts that have less immediate application to their future careers as clinicians. This paper aims to identify consensus standards of essential features of Head and Neck anatomy via a Delphi Panel consisting of anatomists and clinicians who evaluated syllabus content structures (greater than 1,000) as "essential", "important", "acceptable", or "not required." The goal is to provide guidance for program/course directors who intend to provide the optimal balance between establishing a comprehensive list of clinically relevant essential structures and an overwhelming litany, which would otherwise overburden trainees in their initial years of medical school with superficial rote learning, which potentially dilutes the key and enduring fundamental lessons that prepare students for training in any medical field. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of repeated snowboard exercise in virtual reality with time lags of visual scene behind body rotation on head stability and subjective slalom run performance in healthy young subjects.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshiro; Nishiike, Suetaka; Kitahara, Tadashi; Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Imai, Takao; Ito, Taeko; Sato, Go; Matsuda, Kazunori; Kitamura, Yoshiaki; Takeda, Noriaki

    2016-11-01

    After repeated snowboard exercises in the virtual reality (VR) world with increasing time lags in trials 3-8, it is suggested that the adaptation to repeated visual-vestibulosomatosensory conflict in the VR world improved dynamic posture control and motor performance in the real world without the development of motion sickness. The VR technology was used and the effects of repeated snowboard exercise examined in the VR world with time lags between visual scene and body rotation on the head stability and slalom run performance during exercise in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy young subjects participated in the study. After trials 1 and 2 of snowboard exercise in the VR world without time lag, trials 3-8 were conducted with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6 s time lags of the visual scene that the computer creates behind board rotation, respectively. Finally, trial 9 was conducted without time lag. Head linear accelerations and subjective slalom run performance were evaluated. The standard deviations of head linear accelerations in inter-aural direction were significantly increased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly decreased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. The subjective scores of slalom run performance were significantly decreased in trial 8, with a time lag of 0.6 s, but significantly increased in trial 9 without a time lag, compared with those in trial 2 without a time lag. Motion sickness was not induced in any subjects.

  5. [HIGH VELOCITY PENETRATING HEAD AND NECK INJURIES OF SYRIAN CIVIL WAR CASUALTIES TREATED IN THE GALILEE MEDICAL CENTER].

    PubMed

    Ronen, Ohad; Assadi, Nidal; Sela, Eyal

    2017-05-01

    For two years the State of Israel has been treating casualties from the Syrian civil war. The Galilee Medical Center in Nahariya is the main hospital for this humanitarian mission. Objectives: To evaluate the demographic and clinical characteristics of the casualties that were treated in our department. Information from medical records of all Syrian casualties evacuated to the Galilee Medical Center were evaluated. Between March 2013 and December 2014, 450 casualties were evacuated to the Galilee Medical Center. Of those, 45 were treated in the Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. Of the 45 cases, 43 were male (95.5%) and the mean age was 30.4 years (range 1-79 years). There was a significant difference in terms of gender (p <0.0001). The majority of cases (42.1%) were aged 21-27 years. The most common cause of injury was a gunshot wound. Thirty five patients (77.7%) suffered from multiple trauma, and complex injuries of the maxillofacial bones and upper respiratory tract. Eight (18%) of the cases arrived at the medical center with a tracheotomy. The average length of hospital stay was 15 days (range: 1-141). Of the 450 cases, 97.3% were discharged back to Syria, and 12 died. Of all Syrian injured treated in the ENT department, the vast majority were young men. The main cause of injury was gunshot wounds. It is likely that the lack of protective gear that exist in western armies is a factor in the complex injuries treated at the Galilee Medical Center.

  6. Correlations between posturographic findings and symptoms in subjects with fractures of the condylar head of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Faralli, Mario M; Calenti, Claudio C; Ibba, Maria Cristina M; Ricci, Gianpietro G; Frenguelli, Antonio A

    2009-04-01

    Our study examined the posture of 15 patients who had sustained a simple unilateral or bilateral fracture of the condylar head of the mandible as a result of sports or traffic accidents. Following preliminary testing of vestibular function, the patients underwent balance testing: Romberg test with eyes closed (EC), Romberg EC and bite test (ECBT), EC and head retroflexed (ECR). The study parameters were: surface (S) of the statokinesigram, stomatognathic influence index related to S (SSI), and postural oscillations on the frontal plane (X). In keeping with the literature, we felt that the following pattern in static balance suggested a posture destabilised by the stomatognathic system: SSI values of less than 60, reduction of S in the transition from EC to ECR, pathological increase of postural oscillations on the X plane. The study was completed by obtaining a list of new symptoms reported by the patients (altered bite, fullness, tinnitus, pain, loss of balance). The most significant patterns were observed in patients with vestibular dysfunctions and neck pain. It seems that a fracture of the condylar head can affect postural behaviour, although proprioceptive changes alone are not enough to cause true loss of balance and there must be concomitant vestibular dysfunction. The stabilometric pattern is not conditioned by the extent of the trauma or the related treatment. In terms of proprioceptive elements, the presence of muscle pain seems to point to cervical muscle tension as the main culprit in the onset of posttraumatic instability.

  7. [Medicalization of life at the GP level: Where are we headed to?].

    PubMed

    Cerecedo Pérez, M Jesús; Tovar Bobo, Margarita; Rozadilla Arias, Aurora

    2013-12-01

    The power of medicine has lately enhanced the idea of medicalizing any aspects of life that can be perceived as medical problems. Medicine sometimes creates false needs and there is nowadays an increasing number of situations are medicalized with the pretext of treating fake diseases such as spring fatigue, shyness o natural biological processes like menopause. Despite the better life conditions, we now attend more people that complain about discomfort that may have more to do with «feeling sick» than with authentic disease. There is an endless list: sadness, hyperactive children, anorexia, bulimia, vigorexia or problematic teenagers, amongst others. In this article we revise some interventions that, contribute to promote these situations also from the own doctor's office. Everyday adversity acquires today the status of disease, hence the remarkable increase in these consultations in the diverse sanitary services.

  8. Compensation for subjects of medical research: the moral rights of patients and the power of research ethics committees.

    PubMed Central

    Guest, S

    1997-01-01

    Awareness of the morally significant distinction between research and innovative therapy reveals serious gaps in the legal provision for compensation in the UK for injured subjects of medical research. Major problems are limitations inherent in negligence actions and a culture that emphasises indemnifying researchers before compensating victims. Medical research morally requires compensation on a no-fault basis even where there is proper consent on the part of the research subject. In particular, for drug research, there is insufficient provision in the current patient guidelines of the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry, since they make "no legal commitment" to paying compensation for injury to patient subjects. There is a need for the provision of both adequate insurance and contractual arrangements for making payments. The solution is for Local Research Ethics Committees (LRECs) to make use of their power to withhold approval of medical research where compensation is not legally enforceable. PMID:9220333

  9. Effect of the craniocervical brace on craniocervical angle, thoracic kyphosis angle, and trunk extensor muscle activity during typing in subjects with forward head posture.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tae-Lim; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Choi, Sil-Ah; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Chio, Bong-Sam

    2016-09-27

    The relationship between forward head posture (FHP) and thoracic kyphosis has been a subject of interest in the rehabilitation field for visual display terminal workers. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of the craniocervical brace use on craniocervical angle (CCA), thoracic kyphosis angle (TKA), and trunk extensor muscle activity. Twelve young male subjects with forward head posture (21.6±1.9 years) participated in this study. We compared CCA & TKA and trunk extensor muscle activity between with and without application of the craniocervical brace during visual display terminal work. When wearing the craniocervical brace, the subjects demonstrated significantly greater CCA at the start and the end of the task and less change in CCA during the task (p < 0.05). While non-significantly less TKA was seen at the start of the task, significantly less TKA was observed at the end of the task when using the craniocervical brace (p < 0.05). The craniocervical brace use also led to significantly less change in TKA (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in the trunk extensor muscle activity. Use of the craniocervical brace decreased FHP immediately, lessened thoracic kyphosis over time, and prevented the worsening of FHP and thoracic kyphosis during visual display terminal work.

  10. Evaluating direct medical expenditures estimation methods of adults using the medical expenditure panel survey: an example focusing on head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Diarmuid; Yeh, Susan T; O'Neill, Ciaran; Frick, Kevin D

    2014-01-01

    To inform policymakers of the importance of evaluating various methods for estimating the direct medical expenditures for a low-incidence condition, head and neck cancer (HNC). Four methods of estimation have been identified: 1) summing all health care expenditures, 2) estimating disease-specific expenditures consistent with an attribution approach, 3) estimating disease-specific expenditures by matching, and 4) estimating disease-specific expenditures by using a regression-based approach. A literature review of studies (2005-2012) that used the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) was undertaken to establish the most popular expenditure estimation methods. These methods were then applied to a sample of 120 respondents with HNC, derived from pooled data (2003-2008). The literature review shows that varying expenditure estimation methods have been used with MEPS but no study compared and contrasted all four methods. Our estimates are reflective of the national treated prevalence of HNC. The upper-bound estimate of annual direct medical expenditures of adult respondents with HNC between 2003 and 2008 was $3.18 billion (in 2008 dollars). Comparable estimates arising from methods focusing on disease-specific and incremental expenditures were all lower in magnitude. Attribution yielded annual expenditures of $1.41 billion, matching method of $1.56 billion, and regression method of $1.09 billion. This research demonstrates that variation exists across and within expenditure estimation methods applied to MEPS data. Despite concerns regarding aspects of reliability and consistency, reporting a combination of the four methods offers a degree of transparency and validity to estimating the likely range of annual direct medical expenditures of a condition. © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Published by International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) All rights reserved.

  11. Parametric analysis of the biomechanical response of head subjected to the primary blast loading--a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feng; Kalra, Anil; Saif, Tal; Yang, Zaihan; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury due to primary blast loading has become a signature injury in recent military conflicts and terrorist activities. Extensive experimental and computational investigations have been conducted to study the interrelationships between intracranial pressure response and intrinsic or 'input' parameters such as the head geometry and loading conditions. However, these relationships are very complicated and are usually implicit and 'hidden' in a large amount of simulation/test data. In this study, a data mining method is proposed to explore such underlying information from the numerical simulation results. The heads of different species are described as a highly simplified two-part (skull and brain) finite element model with varying geometric parameters. The parameters considered include peak incident pressure, skull thickness, brain radius and snout length. Their interrelationship and coupling effect are discovered by developing a decision tree based on the large simulation data-set. The results show that the proposed data-driven method is superior to the conventional linear regression method and is comparable to the nonlinear regression method. Considering its capability of exploring implicit information and the relatively simple relationships between response and input variables, the data mining method is considered to be a good tool for an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of blast-induced brain injury. As a general method, this approach can also be applied to other nonlinear complex biomechanical systems.

  12. File Maintenance of MeSH Headings in MEDLINE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphrey, Susanne M.

    1984-01-01

    Emphasizes class maintenance of National Library of Medicine's bibliographic retrieval file in which maintenance actions (replacement, deletion, addition) reflect yearly changes in Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). File maintenance of other authoritative information attached to headings, class maintenance failures, checking class maintenance,…

  13. The attitudes and perceptions of medical students towards basic science subjects during their clinical years: A cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shalini; Gupta, Ashwani K; Verma, Minni; Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Amandeep; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-01-01

    In the conventional system of medical education, basic subjects are taught in the 1(st) year with least interdisciplinary interaction. The objective of this study was to explore the students' perception about content, need and application of basic science subjects during the clinical years of their medical education. A total of 300 questionnaires were distributed among students randomly after taking their written consent for participation in the study. About 265 completely filled questionnaires were received back and the response was analyzed. Students identified anatomy as the subject with overloaded syllabus (75.4%) and also with maximum clinical application with 50.1% of them considering it the most important basic subject. Students were satisfied with the practical integration of subjects to impart clinical skills, but considered problem based learning a better method of teaching. According to 37%, 43.8% and 33.2% of respondents respectively; anatomy, biochemistry and physiology curriculum should only cover the general concepts to give the working knowledge of the subject. Approximately, 65% of the respondents were able to recall the knowledge of anatomy and physiology while biochemistry was retained by 40%. Overall, the attitudes of students toward basic science subjects were positive. The learning experience for them can be improved significantly by better clinical integration of the subjects.

  14. The attitudes and perceptions of medical students towards basic science subjects during their clinical years: A cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shalini; Gupta, Ashwani K; Verma, Minni; Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Amandeep; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the conventional system of medical education, basic subjects are taught in the 1st year with least interdisciplinary interaction. The objective of this study was to explore the students’ perception about content, need and application of basic science subjects during the clinical years of their medical education. Materials and Methods: A total of 300 questionnaires were distributed among students randomly after taking their written consent for participation in the study. About 265 completely filled questionnaires were received back and the response was analyzed. Results: Students identified anatomy as the subject with overloaded syllabus (75.4%) and also with maximum clinical application with 50.1% of them considering it the most important basic subject. Students were satisfied with the practical integration of subjects to impart clinical skills, but considered problem based learning a better method of teaching. According to 37%, 43.8% and 33.2% of respondents respectively; anatomy, biochemistry and physiology curriculum should only cover the general concepts to give the working knowledge of the subject. Approximately, 65% of the respondents were able to recall the knowledge of anatomy and physiology while biochemistry was retained by 40%. Conclusions: Overall, the attitudes of students toward basic science subjects were positive. The learning experience for them can be improved significantly by better clinical integration of the subjects. PMID:24600572

  15. The Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMPs) Recorded Along the Sternocleidomastoid Muscles During Head Rotation and Flexion in Normal Human Subjects.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Alexander; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Chunming; Wei, Wei; Mustain, William; Eby, Thomas; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Wu

    2016-08-01

    Tone burst-evoked myogenic potentials recorded from tonically contracted sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) (cervical VEMP or cVEMP) are widely used to assess the vestibular function. Since the cVEMP response is mediated by the vestibulo-collic reflex (VCR) pathways, it is important to understand how the cVEMPs are determined by factors related to either the sensory components (vestibular end organs) or the motor components (SCM) of the VCR pathways. Compared to the numerous studies that have investigated effects of sound parameters on the cVEMPs, there are few studies that have examined effects of SCM-related factors on the cVEMPs. The goal of the present study is to fill this knowledge gap by testing three SCM-related hypotheses. The first hypothesis is that contrary to the current view, the cVEMP response is only present in the SCM ipsilateral to the stimulated ear. The second hypothesis is that the cVEMP response is not only dependent on tonic level of the SCM, but also on how the tonic level is achieved, i.e., by head rotation or head flexion. The third hypothesis is that the SCM is compartmented and the polarity of the cVEMP response is dependent on the recording site. Seven surface electrodes were positioned along the left SCMs in 12 healthy adult subjects, and tone bursts were delivered to the ipsilateral or contralateral ear (8 ms plateau, 1 ms rise/fall, 130 dB SPL, 50-4000 Hz) while subjects activated their SCMs by head rotation (HR condition) or chin downward head flexion (CD condition). The first hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the contralateral cVEMPs were minimal at all recording sites for all the tested tones during both HR and CD conditions. The second hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the ipsilateral cVEMPs were larger in HR condition than in CD condition at recording sites above and below the SCM midpoint. Finally, the third hypothesis was confirmed by the finding that the cVEMPs exhibit reversed polarities at the sites

  16. Derangements in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density in south Indian subjects on antiepileptic medications

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, George; Varghese, Ron Thomas; Naik, Dukhabandhu; Asha, Hesargatta Shyamsunder; Thomas, Nihal; Seshadri, Mandalam Subramaniam; Alexander, Mathew; Thomas, Maya; Aaron, Sanjith; Paul, Thomas Vizhalil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there are reports describing the association of alternations of bone and mineral metabolism in epileptic patients with long-term anticonvulsant therapy, there are only limited Indian studies which have looked at this aspect. Objectives: This study was done to compare the prevalence of changes in bone mineral parameters and bone mineral density (BMD) in ambulant individuals on long-term anticonvulsant therapy with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Materials and Methods: There were 55 men (on medications for more than 6 months) and age- and BMI-matched 53 controls. Drug history, dietary calcium intake (DCI), and duration of sunlight exposure were recorded. Bone mineral parameters and BMD were measured. Results: The control group had a significantly higher daily DCI with mean ± SD of 396 ± 91 mg versus 326 ± 101 mg (P = 0.007) and more sunlight exposure of 234 ± 81 vs 167 ± 69 min (P = 0.05). BMD at the femoral neck was significantly lower in cases (0.783 ± 0.105 g/cm2) when compared to controls (0.819 ± 0.114 g/cm2). Majority of the patients (61%) had low femoral neck BMD (P = 0.04). There was no significant difference in the proportion of subjects with vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) between cases (n = 32) and controls (n = 37) (P = 0.234). Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency was seen in both the groups in equal proportions, highlighting the existence of a high prevalence of this problem in India. Low femoral neck BMD found in cases may stress the need for supplementing calcium and treating vitamin D deficiency in this specific group. However, the benefit of such intervention has to be studied in a larger proportion of epileptic patients. PMID:25221394

  17. Legal and ethical issues in neuroimaging research: human subjects protection, medical privacy, and the public communication of research results.

    PubMed

    Kulynych, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Humans subjects research entails significant legal and ethical obligations. Neuroimaging researchers must be familiar with the requirements of human subjects protection, including evolving standards for the protection of privacy and the disclosure of risk in "non-therapeutic" research. Techniques for creating veridical surface renderings from volumetric anatomical imaging data raise new privacy concerns, particularly under the federal medical privacy regulation. Additionally, neuroimaging researchers must consider their obligation to communicate research results responsibly. The emerging field of neuroethics should strive to raise awareness of these issues and to involve neuroimaging researchers in the legal, ethical, and policy debates that currently surround human subjects research.

  18. [Misuse of psychotropic medications in a population of subjects held for custody in the city of Paris].

    PubMed

    Sec, Isabelle; Questel, Frank; Rey, Caroline; Pourriat, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Identify which psychotropic medications are misused and peddled in a population of subjects held for custody in the city of Paris. Subjects held for custody in the Medico-Legal Emergency Unit of the Paris Hôtel-Dieu hospital were examined and interrogated between March 2006 and March 2007 in order to assess their consumption of psychotropic medications. Sixty one of the 659 subjects (9.2%) interrogated were included in the study. Their main source of psychotropic medications was street dealers. The most frequently misused psychotropic agent was clonazepam (42.6%), followed by buprenorphine (30.65%) and methadone (21.3%). Clonazepam appears to have replaced flunitrazepam which now only comes in fifth position (11.4%). The finding that methadone is the third most misused drug should lead us to query this medication's dispensing method. Practitioners should remain vigilant regarding the potential misuse of psychotropic medications, particularly since they may induce severe undesirable events (addiction, neurological disorders, possibly lethal overdosage).

  19. Usage of the National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Test in Psychiatry by U.S. and Canadian Clerkships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Ruth E.; Carlson, David L.; Rosenthal, Renathe H.; Clegg, Kathleen A.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors explored psychiatry clerkship usage of the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Subject Test. METHODS: U.S. and Canadian psychiatry clerkship directors (N=150) were sent an 18-item questionnaire surveying evaluation and remediation practices. RESULTS: Of 111 questionnaires (74%) returned, 76 (69%) reported using the…

  20. [Broadening of opportunities for research with older persons: adaptation of the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act].

    PubMed

    Pijnenborg, Maaike A A; van der Marck, Marjolein A; Olde Rikkert, Marcel G M

    2015-01-01

    Older persons represent a growing proportion of the population. However, few of them participate in medical research. Moreover, amendments have been proposed to the Medical Research Involving Human Subjects Act (WMO) concerning the participation of vulnerable subjects such as older persons. In light of these changes, the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport sought to develop a guideline to improve the quality of research involving older persons. This guideline will also be a tool for researchers to enhance the inclusion of older persons in their medical research. It focuses on six aspects to consider when setting up a research project: recruitment, informed consent, attrition, reluctance to participate, proportionality between the burden for participants and the benefits for the investigator, and societal relevance.

  1. 78 FR 12664 - Human Subject Protection; Acceptance of Data From Clinical Studies for Medical Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 807, 812, and 814 RIN 0910-AG48 Human Subject... ensure the protection of human subjects and the quality and integrity of data obtained from these studies... the protection of human subjects and the quality and integrity of data obtained from these...

  2. Analysis of recorded biomedical book and journal use in the Yale Medical Library. I. Date and subject relations.

    PubMed

    Stangl, P; Kilgour, F G

    1967-07-01

    Analysis of book and journal circulation is based on cancelled charge slips collected over a one-year period in the Yale Medical Library. About two-fifths of material circulated were monographs. Books and journals in seven subject fields provided over half of the circulation. Approximately two-thirds of both books and journals used had been published during the most recent nine years. A subject-by-subject examination of the ratio of books to journals circulating revealed that, in subjects where proportionally more journals than books were taken out of the Library, books were of more recent imprint dates than were journals, contrary to the overall pattern. Date distribution of books and journals by subject was also studied. Results are illustrated with graphs and tables.

  3. Creating a mobile subject guide to improve access to point-of-care resources for medical students: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Boruff, Jill T; Bilodeau, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Question: Can a mobile optimized subject guide facilitate medical student access to mobile point-of-care tools? Setting: The guide was created at a library at a research-intensive university with six teaching hospital sites. Objectives: The team created a guide facilitating medical student access to point-of-care tools directly on mobile devices to provide information allowing them to access and set up resources with little assistance. Methods: Two librarians designed a mobile optimized subject guide for medicine and conducted a survey to test its usefulness. Results: Web analytics and survey results demonstrate that the guide is used and the students are satisfied. Conclusion: The library will continue to use the subject guide as its primary means of supporting mobile devices. It remains to be seen if the mobile guide facilitates access for those who do not need assistance and want direct access to the resources. Internet access in the hospitals remains an issue. PMID:22272160

  4. Medical, social and societal issues in infants with abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Koe, S; Price, B; May, S; Kyne, L; Keenan, P; McKay, M; Nicholson, A J

    2010-04-01

    Abusive head trauma (AHT) is the leading cause of death from traumatic brain injury in under 2 year olds. AHT presents with acute encephalopathy, subdural hemorrhages and retinal hemorrhages occurring in the context of an inappropriate or inconsistent history. We retrospectively analyzed, over a 10 year period, admissions and transfers to our hospital with suspected AHT to assess patterns of presentation, presenting symptoms, investigations, subsequent confirmation, social work input and both neurological and social outcomes. We analyzed all suspected AHT infants and children looking for the time of presentation, presenting symptoms, caregivers concerns prior to presentation, a family profile including stressors, investigations (in particular neuroradiology and ophthalmology assessments), treatment in hospital, length of stay in hospital, social work involvement, subsequent discharge, neurological outcome and subsequent social work follow up. Data was collected from the hospital HIPE system, RIS (radiology reports system) and records from the social work department from a period October 1998 to January 2009 inclusive. Of 22 patients with confirmed AHT, ages seizures and irritability followed by vomiting, poor feeding, a bulging fontanelle and lethargy. The father was the sole minder in 5 cases. There was a delayed history in 4 cases. One had multiple visits to his GP. All cases had subdural hemorrhages proven by either CT or MRI scans and retinal hemorrhages diagnosed by ophthalmology. One infant presented with a torn frenulum. Four had suspicious bruising. All had normal coagulation profiles, skeletal surveys and extensive metabolic tests. Hospital stays ranged from 1 to 124 days (the median was 28 days and mean 33 days). Ten (45%) infants required ventilatory support. Sixteen infants had social work involvement within 4 days of admission (7 of these were interviewed immediately). Outcomes after case conferences were that 6 returned home with parents, 9 were

  5. Evaluation of the accuracy of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT): medical imaging technology in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the introduction, development and commercialization of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) technologies in the field of head and neck reconstruction, clinicians now have increased access to the technology. Given the growth of this new user group, there is an increasing concern regarding proper use, understanding, quality and patient safety. Methods The present study was carried out to evaluate data acquisition of CBCT medical imaging technology and the accuracy of the scanning at three different machine warming times. The study also compared the accuracy of CBCT at 0.2 mm slice thickness and Computerized Tomography (CT) at 1 mm slice thickness. A control model was CT scanned at five random intervals, at 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanned at specialized intervals, at 0.2 mm slice thickness. The data was then converted and imported into a software program where a digital registration procedure was used to compare the average deviations of the scanned models to the control. Results The study found that there was no statistically significant difference amongst the three CBCT machine warming times. There was a statistically significant difference between CT scanning with 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanning with 0.2 mm slice thickness. Conclusions The accuracy of the i-CAT CBCT scans used in the present study with a parameter at voxel size 0.2, will remain consistent and reliable at any warming stage. Also the difference between the CBCT i-CAT scans and the CT scans was not clinically significant based on suggested requirements of clinicians in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:23672880

  6. Saving lives, not sacrificing them: the inevitable clash between medical research and the protection of medical subjects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Throughout history, medical practitioners have been admonished to do nothing in treating their patients that might result in harming them. It was not until the 20th century that such teaching was codified in specific legislation. Spurred on by the perversity of Nazi doctors during the Holocaust, world leaders produced the Nuremberg Code in 1947 and the Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. Revelations about other egregious acts in the guise of legitimate medical research led to other measures to prevent such mistreatment. Regulations to ensure physician competency and responsibility have mushroomed in the succeeding years. While such measures were coming into being, some of the greatest advances in medicine were being achieved, not least among them those in cardiovascular surgery. Ironically, much of this valuable research would likely not have been approved under regulatory measures now firmly in place. Given the nature of medical research, more often than not a certain degree of risk in all patients entering such trials may be unavoidable. There is always a balance to be maintained between risk and potential benefit. PMID:23814400

  7. Saving lives, not sacrificing them: the inevitable clash between medical research and the protection of medical subjects.

    PubMed

    Weisse, Allen B

    2013-07-01

    Throughout history, medical practitioners have been admonished to do nothing in treating their patients that might result in harming them. It was not until the 20th century that such teaching was codified in specific legislation. Spurred on by the perversity of Nazi doctors during the Holocaust, world leaders produced the Nuremberg Code in 1947 and the Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. Revelations about other egregious acts in the guise of legitimate medical research led to other measures to prevent such mistreatment. Regulations to ensure physician competency and responsibility have mushroomed in the succeeding years. While such measures were coming into being, some of the greatest advances in medicine were being achieved, not least among them those in cardiovascular surgery. Ironically, much of this valuable research would likely not have been approved under regulatory measures now firmly in place. Given the nature of medical research, more often than not a certain degree of risk in all patients entering such trials may be unavoidable. There is always a balance to be maintained between risk and potential benefit.

  8. Naval Air Development Center Medical Standards for Research Subjects Exposed to Hazardous Aerospace Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    Postero-anterior and lateral chest radiographs and a complete anteroposterior and lateral spine (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar) radiographic series...certain congenital or acquired vertebral abnormalities, transitional vertebrae, and spina bifida occulta greater than one millimeter. In general, the...evaluation of the spine as described under Part II Centrifuge Acceleration Stress Medical Standards apply to ejection stress medical standards. NADC-91035

  9. Improving the National Board of Medical Examiners internal Medicine Subject Exam for use in clerkship evaluation.

    PubMed

    Elnicki, D Michael; Lescisin, Dianne A; Case, Susan

    2002-06-01

    To provide a consensus opinion on modifying the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) Medicine Subject Exam (Shelf) to: 1) reflect the internal medicine clerkship curriculum, developed by the Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) and the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine (CDIM); 2) emphasize knowledge important for a clerkship student; and 3) obtain feedback about students' performances on the Shelf. Two-round Delphi technique. The CDIM Research and Evaluation Committee and CDIM members on NBME Step 2 Committees. Using 1-5 Likert scales (5 = highest ratings), the group rated test question content for relevance to the SGIM-CDIM Curriculum Guide and importance for clerkship students' knowledge. The Shelf content is organized into 4 physician tasks and into 11 sections that are generally organ system based. Each iteration of the Shelf has 100 questions. Participants indicated a desired distribution of questions by physician task and section, topics critical for inclusion on each exam, and new topics to include. They specified the types of feedback clerkship directors desired on students' performances. Following the first round, participants viewed pooled results prior to submitting their second-round responses. Of 15 individuals contacted, 12 (80%) participated in each round. The desired distribution by physician task was: diagnosis (43), treatment (23), mechanism of disease (20), and health maintenance (15). The sections with the most questions requested were the cardiovascular (17), respiratory (15), and gastroenterology (12) sections. The fewest were requested in aging/ethics (4) and neurology, dermatology, and immunology (5 each). Examples of low-rated content were Wilson's Disease, chancroid and tracheal rupture (all <2.0). Health maintenance in type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease all received 5.0 ratings. Participants desired feedback by: section (4.6) and physician task (3.9), on performances of the entire class (4

  10. Family-centered rounds and medical student performance on the NBME pediatrics subject (shelf) examination: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kimbrough, Tiffany N.; Heh, Victor; Wijesooriya, N. Romesh; Ryan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between family-centered rounds (FCR) and medical student knowledge acquisition as assessed by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) pediatric subject (shelf) exam. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted of third-year medical students who graduated from Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine between 2009 and 2014. This timeframe represented the transition from ‘traditional’ rounds to FCR on the pediatric inpatient unit. Data collected included demographics, United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 and 2 scores, and NBME subject examinations in pediatrics (PSE), medicine (MSE), and surgery (SSE). Results Eight hundred and sixteen participants were included in the analysis. Student performance on the PSE could not be statistically differentiated from performance on the MSE for any year except 2011 (z-score=−0.17, p=0.02). Average scores on PSE for years 2009, 2010, 2013, and 2014 were significantly higher than for SSE, but not significantly different for all other years. The PSE was highly correlated with USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 examinations (correlation range 0.56–0.77) for all years. Conclusions Our results showed no difference in PSE performance during a time in which our institution transitioned to FCR. These findings should be reassuring for students, attending physicians, and medical educators. PMID:27087016

  11. Development and Use of Mark Sense Record Cards for Recording Medical Data on Pilots Subjected to Acceleration Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smedal, Harald A.; Havill, C. Dewey

    1962-01-01

    A TIME-HONORED system of recording medical histories and the data obtained on physical and laboratory examination has been that of writing the information on record sheets that go into a folder for each patient. In order to have information which would be more readily retrieved, 'a program was initiated in 1952 by the U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in connection with their "Care of the Flyer" study to place this information on machine record cards. In 1958, a machine record card method was developed for recording medical data in connection with the astronaut selection program. Machine record cards were also developed by the Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio, and the Aviation Medical Acceleration Laboratory, Naval Air Development Center, Johnsville, Pennsylvania, for use in connection with a variety of tests including acceleration stress.1 Therefore, a variety of systems resulted in which data of a medical nature could easily be recalled. During the NASA, Ames Research Center centrifuge studies/'S the pilot subjects were interviewed after each centrifuge run, or series of runs, and subjective information was recorded in a log book by the usual history taking methods referred to above. After the methods Were reviewed, it' was recognized that a card system would be very useful in recording data from our pilots after they had been exposed to acceleration stress. Since the acceleration stress cards already developed did not meet our requirements, it was decided a different card was needed.

  12. [Pain medicine as a cross-sectional subject in German medical schools. An opportunity for general pain management].

    PubMed

    Kopf, A; Dusch, M; Alt-Epping, B; Petzke, F; Treede, R-D

    2014-08-01

    Unrelieved pain is a substantial public health concern owing in part to deficits in clinical expertise among physicians. In most medical faculties worldwide, teaching on pain and pain management is either nonexistent or limited to a small number of students attending voluntary courses. In light of the fact that pain is the most frequent reason to seek medical advice, the lack of formal training of pain medicine is considered the leading reason for inadequate pain management. Therefore, the patients' unmet needs for adequate diagnosis and therapy call for action. Pain assessment and effective pain management should be a priority in the health care system. The limited number of pain specialists available in hospitals and primary care and CME (continuous medical education) activities focusing on pain are not sufficient to solve the problem. Every practicing physician should, therefore, have basic knowledge of the most prominent painful conditions and management strategies. To achieve this goal, pain medicine should become an integral part of the undergraduate curriculum for medical students. In Germany, pain medicine became a mandatory subject in undergraduate medical studies in 2012. The introduction of pain medicine into the undergraduate curriculum in Germany is a major challenge regarding the development and implementation processes. This article describes current instruments and implementation strategies for pain medicine as a new cross-sectional subject in Germany.

  13. DLP technology application: 3D head tracking and motion correction in medical brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olesen, Oline V.; Wilm, Jakob; Paulsen, Rasmus R.; Højgaard, Liselotte; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel sensing system, robust Near-infrared Structured Light Scanning (NIRSL) for three-dimensional human model scanning application. Human model scanning due to its nature of various hair and dress appearance and body motion has long been a challenging task. Previous structured light scanning methods typically emitted visible coded light patterns onto static and opaque objects to establish correspondence between a projector and a camera for triangulation. In the success of these methods rely on scanning objects with proper reflective surface for visible light, such as plaster, light colored cloth. Whereas for human model scanning application, conventional methods suffer from low signal to noise ratio caused by low contrast of visible light over the human body. The proposed robust NIRSL, as implemented with the near infrared light, is capable of recovering those dark surfaces, such as hair, dark jeans and black shoes under visible illumination. Moreover, successful structured light scan relies on the assumption that the subject is static during scanning. Due to the nature of body motion, it is very time sensitive to keep this assumption in the case of human model scan. The proposed sensing system, by utilizing the new near-infrared capable high speed LightCrafter DLP projector, is robust to motion, provides accurate and high resolution three-dimensional point cloud, making our system more efficient and robust for human model reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrate that our system is effective and efficient to scan real human models with various dark hair, jeans and shoes, robust to human body motion and produces accurate and high resolution 3D point cloud.

  14. Medical Communication-related Informational Need and Resource Preferences Among Family Caregivers for Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Longacre, Margaret L; Galloway, Thomas J; Parvanta, Claudia F; Fang, Carolyn Y

    2015-12-01

    Despite advances in treatment, head and neck cancer (HNC) patients often experience considerable functional impairment during and following treatment. As a result, family caregivers are essential in a patient's recovery; however, few caregivers are well-prepared to handle the extensive caregiving needs of this patient population. To date, little is known about HNC caregivers' informational needs in this role. Thus, we surveyed a sample of HNC caregivers about their informational needs including those related to interacting in the medical context as a caregiver and meeting patient needs. We also asked these caregivers their preferences for obtaining caregiving information. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 59 family caregivers for HNC patients who had completed radiation therapy at a comprehensive cancer center. The majority of caregivers (74.6%) reported having high informational need at diagnosis related to interacting as a caregiver. Although the need for such information decreased over time, over half still had a high need for information at treatment end. Importantly, caregivers who desired information about reducing patient pain and distress also reported having greater informational needs on issues related to interacting in the medical context. Further, the caregivers most often preferred to receive information from health-care professionals as a first source. However, preferring an informal (e.g., Internet) resource at first was significantly associated with needing information on how to talk to a doctor or nurse. The development of evidence-based resources and tools for HNC caregivers as well as clinicians may help caregivers more effectively manage patient symptoms and warrants further attention. Further, Internet resources may represent an effective resource for providing caregivers with strategies toward enhancing communication with healthcare professionals.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation as a Possible Damage Mechanism in Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Post-Mortem Human Subject Heads.

    PubMed

    Salzar, Robert S; Treichler, Derrick; Wardlaw, Andrew; Weiss, Greg; Goeller, Jacques

    2017-01-13

    The potential of blast-induced traumatic brain injury from the mechanism of localized cavitation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is investigated. While the mechanism and criteria for non-impact blast-induced traumatic brain injury is still unknown, this study demonstrates that local cavitation in the CSF layer of the cranial volume could contribute to these injuries. The cranial contents of three post-mortem human subject (PMHS) heads were replaced with both a normal saline solution and a ballistic gel mixture with a simulated CSF layer. Each were instrumented with multiple pressure transducers and placed inside identical shock tubes at two different research facilities. Sensor data indicates that cavitation may have occurred in the PMHS models at pressure levels below those for a 50% risk of blast lung injury. This study points to skull flexion, the result of the shock wave on the front of the skull leading to a negative pressure in the contrecoup, as a possible mechanism that contributes to the onset of cavitation. Based on observation of intracranial pressure transducer data from the PMHS model, cavitation onset is thought to occur from approximately a 140 kPa head-on incident blast.

  16. Studies of the Ability to Hold the Eye in Eccentric Gaze: Measurements in Normal Subjects with the Head Erect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Leigh, R. John; Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, William H.; Kornilova, Ludmila

    2006-01-01

    We studied the ability to hold the eyes in eccentric horizontal or vertical gaze angles in 68 normal humans, age range 19-56. Subjects attempted to sustain visual fixation of a briefly flashed target located 30 in the horizontal plane and 15 in the vertical plane in a dark environment. Conventionally, the ability to hold eccentric gaze is estimated by fitting centripetal eye drifts by exponential curves and calculating the time constant (t(sub c)) of these slow phases of gazeevoked nystagmus. Although the distribution of time-constant measurements (t(sub c)) in our normal subjects was extremely skewed due to occasional test runs that exhibited near-perfect stability (large t(sub c) values), we found that log10(tc) was approximately normally distributed within classes of target direction. Therefore, statistical estimation and inference on the effect of target direction was performed on values of z identical with log10t(sub c). Subjects showed considerable variation in their eyedrift performance over repeated trials; nonetheless, statistically significant differences emerged: values of tc were significantly higher for gaze elicited to targets in the horizontal plane than for the vertical plane (P less than 10(exp -5), suggesting eccentric gazeholding is more stable in the horizontal than in the vertical plane. Furthermore, centrifugal eye drifts were observed in 13.3, 16.0 and 55.6% of cases for horizontal, upgaze and downgaze tests, respectively. Fifth percentile values of the time constant were estimated to be 10.2 sec, 3.3 sec and 3.8 sec for horizontal, upward and downward gaze, respectively. The difference between horizontal and vertical gazeholding may be ascribed to separate components of the velocity position neural integrator for eye movements, and to differences in orbital mechanics. Our statistical method for representing the range of normal eccentric gaze stability can be readily applied in a clinical setting to patients who were exposed to environments

  17. Analysis by NASA's VESGEN Software of Retinal Blood Vessels in Human Subjects Undergoing Head-Down Tilt During 70-Day Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyas, Ruchi J.; Murray, Matthew C.; Predovic, Marina; Lim, Shiyin; Askin, Kayleigh N.; Vizzeri, Gianmarco; Taibbi, Giovanni; Mason, Sara Stroble; Zanello, Susana B.; Young, Millenia; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Significant risks for visual impairment associated with increased intracranial pressure (VIIP) are incurred by microgravity spaceflight, especially long-duration missions [1]. We hypothesize that microgravity-induced fluid shifts result in pathological changes within blood vessels of the retina that precede development of visual and other ocular impairments. Potential contributions of retinal vascular remodeling to VIIP etiology are therefore being investigated for two studies in 30deg infrared (IR) Heidelberg Spectralis(Registered Trademark) images with NASA's innovative VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software [2,3]. The retrospective studies include: (1) before, during and after (pre, mid and post) 6º head-down tilt (HDT) in human subjects during 70 days of bed rest, and (2) before and after missions to the International Space Station (ISS) by U.S. crew members. Results for both studies are almost complete. A preliminary example for HDT is described below.

  18. Does the Integration of Haptic and Visual Cues Reduce the Effect of a Biased Visual Reference Frame on the Subjective Head Orientation?

    PubMed Central

    Gueguen, Marc; Vuillerme, Nicolas; Isableu, Brice

    2012-01-01

    Background The selection of appropriate frames of reference (FOR) is a key factor in the elaboration of spatial perception and the production of robust interaction with our environment. The extent to which we perceive the head axis orientation (subjective head orientation, SHO) with both accuracy and precision likely contributes to the efficiency of these spatial interactions. A first goal of this study was to investigate the relative contribution of both the visual and egocentric FOR (centre-of-mass) in the SHO processing. A second goal was to investigate humans' ability to process SHO in various sensory response modalities (visual, haptic and visuo-haptic), and the way they modify the reliance to either the visual or egocentric FORs. A third goal was to question whether subjects combined visual and haptic cues optimally to increase SHO certainty and to decrease the FORs disruption effect. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirteen subjects were asked to indicate their SHO while the visual and/or egocentric FORs were deviated. Four results emerged from our study. First, visual rod settings to SHO were altered by the tilted visual frame but not by the egocentric FOR alteration, whereas no haptic settings alteration was observed whether due to the egocentric FOR alteration or the tilted visual frame. These results are modulated by individual analysis. Second, visual and egocentric FOR dependency appear to be negatively correlated. Third, the response modality enrichment appears to improve SHO. Fourth, several combination rules of the visuo-haptic cues such as the Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE), Winner-Take-All (WTA) or Unweighted Mean (UWM) rule seem to account for SHO improvements. However, the UWM rule seems to best account for the improvement of visuo-haptic estimates, especially in situations with high FOR incongruence. Finally, the data also indicated that FOR reliance resulted from the application of UWM rule. This was observed more particularly, in the

  19. Use of NLM medical subject headings with the MeSH2010 thesaurus in the PORTAL-DOORS system.

    PubMed

    Taswell, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The NLM MeSH Thesaurus has been incorporated for use in the PORTAL-DOORS System (PDS) for resource metadata management on the semantic web. All 25588 descriptor records from the NLM 2010 MeSH Thesaurus have been exposed as web accessible resources by the PDS MeSH2010 Thesaurus implemented as a PDS PORTAL Registry operating as a RESTful web service. Examples of records from the PDS MeSH2010 PORTAL are demonstrated along with their use by records in other PDS PORTAL Registries that reference the concepts from the MeSH2010 Thesaurus. Use of this important biomedical terminology will greatly enhance the quality of metadata content of other PDS records thus improving cross-domain searches between different problem oriented domains and amongst different clinical specialty fields.

  20. Subjective well-being and its association with peer caring and resilience among nursing vs medical students: A questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, FangFang; Guo, Yujie; Suhonen, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2016-02-01

    The subjective well-being (SWB) of nursing and medical students is a very important component in the training of future nurses and doctors, as well-being enables them to be more productive. The study examined the effects of peer caring and resilience on SWB as well as the mediating and moderating effects of resilience in the relationship between peer caring and SWB. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A university and an affiliated hospital in China. The convenience sample consisted of 426 nursing students and 336 medical students. Questionnaires comprising peer caring measurement, a resilience scale and a well-being scale were used in the spring of 2014. Students participate in the study showed low SWB. There was a significant difference between nursing students and medical students in peer caring, but not in SWB and resilience. The mediating effects of resilience on the relationship between peer caring and SWB were examined. As hypothesized, resilience mediated the relationship between peer caring and SWB partly for nursing students (SE=0.022, 95% CI=0.041-0.128) and fully for medical students (SE=0.023, 95% CI=0.067-0.161). Resilience did not statistically significantly moderate the peer caring-SWB relationship for nursing students (β=0.092, p=0.057) but did so for medical students (β=0.108, p<0.05). Peer caring and resilience improved the SWB of both nursing students and medical students. In addition, resilience improved SWB through peer caring for both nursing students and medical students, and higher resilience in medical students enhanced the positive effects of peer caring on SWB. Therefore, educators should promote peer caring and resilience in order to improve students' SWB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An experiment using hypothetical patient scenarios in healthy subjects to evaluate the treatment satisfaction and medication adherence intention relationship.

    PubMed

    Kucukarslan, Suzan N; Lee, Kristin S; Patel, Tejal D; Ruparelia, Beejal

    2015-10-01

    Treatment beliefs and illness consequence have been shown to impact medication adherence in patients with years of asthma experience. These relationships are unknown in patients with early experience. The purpose was to test the relationship between illness consequence, treatment beliefs, treatment satisfaction and medication adherence intentions in healthy subjects exposed to an asthma scenario. A 2×2×2 factorial design experiment was conducted in 91 healthy University student subjects. Each student was randomized to receive one scenario with varying levels of illness consequence (high/low), treatment concerns (high/low) and treatment necessity (high/low). After reading the scenarios the students responded to questions about treatment satisfaction and likelihood of using the medication as directed by the physician. A multiple regression model was used to test the impact of factors on treatment satisfaction and medication adherence at the 0.05 level of significance. Treatment satisfaction was significantly predicted by treatment necessity with a moderating effect by illness consequence. Medication adherence intentions were significantly predicted by treatment satisfaction. Patients with early diagnosis of asthma are likely to form treatment satisfaction as a result of illness consequence and treatment necessity. Patients' perceptions of illness consequence are likely to influence (moderate) the impact of treatment necessity on treatment satisfaction; and their intentions to take medication as directed are likely to be influenced by treatment satisfaction rather than treatment beliefs or illness consequence early in the patient illness experience. These results are from an experiment that should be tested in a patient population. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Using PBL and Interactive Methods in Teaching Subjects in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demikhova, Nadiia; Prykhodko, Olga; Loboda, Andrii; Bumeister, Valentina; Smiianov, Vladyslav; Smiianov, Yevgen; Lukianykhin, Vadym; Demikhov, Oleksii

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays information and telecommunication technologies are becoming more and more developed. It especially attracts and captures the young--young scientists, teachers and students. The purpose of the article is to highlight the experience of implementing problem-based learning technology in the traditional system of teaching medical disciplines.…

  3. Head Start.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Geri

    2000-01-01

    Discusses an art project in which students created drawings of mop heads. Explains that the approach of drawing was more important than the subject. States that the students used the chiaroscuro technique, used by Rembrandt and Caravaggio, in which light appears out of the darkness. (CMK)

  4. Out of Our Heads! Four perspectives on the curation of an on-line exhibition of medically themed artwork by UK medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Trevor; van de Klee, Danny; Lamont-Robinson, Catherine; Duffin, Will

    2010-11-26

    The Medical School at Bristol University is noted for offering, and in some instances requiring, its students to work creatively with medical themes. Students, artists, educationalists and a web designer have worked to create an on-line exhibition of the resulting creative output. This can be viewed at www.outofourheads.net. This site is a themed repository of poetry, prose, drawings, paintings, cartoons, films, music, dance and rap. Most works come with commentaries that can be as illuminating as the works they describe. The site invites comment and welcomes new postings from anyone connected to medicine. As an alternative to the conventional pedagogical report, and in keeping with the subject matter, in this paper we tell the story of this unique educational enterprise through the narratives of four of its principle architects. The 'Teacher's Tale', the 'Designer's Tale', the 'Curator's Tale' and the 'Artist's Tale' offer different, personal, tellings of how the site came to be. Each tale contains hypertext links to notable works on the site some of which have become teaching resources within the institution. This paper is of relevance to anyone who seeks to explore and champion the human insights of this privileged community.

  5. Out of Our Heads! Four perspectives on the curation of an on-line exhibition of medically themed artwork by UK medical undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Trevor; van de Klee, Danny; Lamont-Robinson, Catherine; Duffin, Will

    2010-01-01

    The Medical School at Bristol University is noted for offering, and in some instances requiring, its students to work creatively with medical themes. Students, artists, educationalists and a web designer have worked to create an on-line exhibition of the resulting creative output. This can be viewed at www.outofourheads.net. This site is a themed repository of poetry, prose, drawings, paintings, cartoons, films, music, dance and rap. Most works come with commentaries that can be as illuminating as the works they describe. The site invites comment and welcomes new postings from anyone connected to medicine. As an alternative to the conventional pedagogical report, and in keeping with the subject matter, in this paper we tell the story of this unique educational enterprise through the narratives of four of its principle architects. The ‘Teacher's Tale’, the ‘Designer's Tale’, the ‘Curator's Tale’ and the ‘Artist's Tale’ offer different, personal, tellings of how the site came to be. Each tale contains hypertext links to notable works on the site some of which have become teaching resources within the institution. This paper is of relevance to anyone who seeks to explore and champion the human insights of this privileged community. PMID:21321667

  6. Mortality of harmful drinkers increased after reduction of alcohol prices in northern Finland: a 10-year follow-up of head trauma subjects.

    PubMed

    Vaaramo, Kalle; Puljula, Jussi; Tetri, Sami; Juvela, Seppo; Hillbom, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol-related mortality may be influenced by the level of alcohol consumption. We investigated the effect of alcohol price reduction on mortality in a cohort of 827 subjects with head injury. We used the Finnish National Hospital Discharge Register to identify all diagnoses recorded during hospital and health center visits for survivors of the index injury during a follow-up of 10 years. Mortality data were gathered from death records obtained from the Official Cause-of-Death Statistics. Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify independent predictors for death. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to characterize the effect of alcohol price reduction on mortality of harmful and non-harmful drinkers. Alcohol-related deaths increased after the reduction of alcohol prices on March 1, 2004. Subjects recorded as harmful drinkers during the follow-up period were significantly (p < 0.001) more likely than others to die after the price reduction. Older age (HR 1.06, 95% CI 1.05-1.07), moderate-to-severe brain injury (HR 2.39, 95% CI 1.59-3.60) and harmful drinking recorded after the index trauma (HR 2.59, 95% CI 1.62-4.62) were significant (p < 0.001) predictors for death. We conclude that a political decision to lower the price of alcohol may cause a significant increase in the death rate of harmful drinkers. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The implementation of game in a 20-day head-down tilting bed rest experiment upon mood status and neurotic levels of rest subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, Yuko; Fukuoka, Hideoki; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Hidetaka; Ishitobi, Hiromi

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the implementation of game on mental health among participants in a bed rest (BR) experiment. Subjects were 12 healthy males aged 20-26, who participated in a 20-day 6-degrees head-down tilting BR experiment. The participants were asked to complete psychometrical questionnaires before, during, and after the experiment. We entrusted the participants to manage their leisure time and they intended a game in which all of them could take part over the experiment period. The general conversation and light-hearted mood among the subjects continued during the experimental period. Longitudinal data analysis showed that levels of neurosis and mood status did not deteriorate during the experiment, while our previous experiments, which were performed under the same protocol as this study except for the implementation of the game showed a distinct deterioration in psychosocial status. We consider that the implementation of game autonomously contributes to the positive effects on the mental health among the participants.

  8. [Gender perspective relevant in many medical school subjects. Essential to perceive men and women holistically].

    PubMed

    Hamberg, Katarina

    2003-12-04

    Gender perspective in medicine implies that people are seen as biological as well as social and cultural creatures and the concept of wholeness is important. Still, it is common that biological explanations dominate when gender differences in various symptoms and disorders are discussed in medicine and medical training. Applying a gender perspective implies a change in that attention is then also paid to social conditions for men and women in various contexts, for example in education, on the labour market, and in different ethnic groups, parallel and simultaneously to biological causes. In this article it is shown that a gender perspective is relevant in many fields of medical training. A gender perspective can bring new insights in education about the healthy and diseased body, investigation and treatment of disease, communication and the patient-doctor-relationship, as well as career and speciality choices. The need for education of teachers on gender issues is a crucial issue for those responsible for the academic syllabus.

  9. Evaluating Medication Response in ADHD: Cognitive, Behavioral, and Single-Subject Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, James B.; Hoeppner, Jo-Ann B.; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Coury, Daniel L.; Ritacco, David G.; Trommer, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    A technique is presented for evaluating methylphenidate (MPH) effects on core behavioral symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at the single-subject level of analysis. Case-study results and multivariate analyses suggests systematic evaluation of behavior and cognitive MPH dose-response relationships could lead to more accurate MPH…

  10. Evaluating Medication Response in ADHD: Cognitive, Behavioral, and Single-Subject Methodology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, James B.; Hoeppner, Jo-Ann B.; DeWitt, Mary Beth; Coury, Daniel L.; Ritacco, David G.; Trommer, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    A technique is presented for evaluating methylphenidate (MPH) effects on core behavioral symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at the single-subject level of analysis. Case-study results and multivariate analyses suggests systematic evaluation of behavior and cognitive MPH dose-response relationships could lead to more accurate MPH…

  11. Medical students' subjective ratings of stress levels and awareness of student support services about mental health.

    PubMed

    Walter, Garry; Soh, Nerissa Li-Wey; Norgren Jaconelli, Sanna; Lampe, Lisa; Malhi, Gin S; Hunt, Glenn

    2013-06-01

    To descriptively assess medical students' concerns for their mental and emotional state, perceived need to conceal mental problems, perceived level of support at university, knowledge and use of student support services, and experience of stresses of daily life. From March to September 2011, medical students at an Australian university were invited to complete an anonymous online survey. 475 responses were received. Students rated study and examinations (48.9%), financial concerns (38.1%), isolation (19.4%) and relationship concerns (19.2%) as very or extremely stressful issues. Knowledge of available support services was high, with 90.8% indicating they were aware of the university's medical centre. Treatment rates were modest (31.7%). Students' concerns about their mental state were generally low, but one in five strongly felt they needed to conceal their emotional problems. Despite widespread awareness of appropriate support services, a large proportion of students felt they needed to conceal mental and emotional problems. Overall treatment rates for students who were greatly concerned about their mental and emotional state appeared modest, and, although comparable with those of similarly aged community populations, may reflect undertreatment. It would be appropriate for universities to address stressors identified by students. Strategies for encouraging distressed students to obtain appropriate assessment and treatment should also be explored. Those students who do seek healthcare are most likely to see a primary care physician, suggesting an important screening role for these health professionals.

  12. Peer-Assisted History-Taking Groups: A Subjective Assessment of their Impact Upon Medical Students' Interview Skills.

    PubMed

    Keifenheim, Katharina Eva; Petzold, Ernst Richard; Junne, Florian; Erschens, Rebecca Sarah; Speiser, Natalie; Herrmann-Werner, Anne; Zipfel, Stephan; Teufel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Among the clinical skills needed by all physicians, history taking is one of the most important. The teaching model for peer-assisted history-taking groups investigated in the present study consists of small-group courses in which students practice conducting medical interviews with real patients. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the expectations, experiences, and subjective learning progress of participants in peer-assisted history-taking groups. Methods: The 42 medical student participants completed a 4-month, peer-assisted, elective history-taking course, which both began and ended with a subjective assessment of their interview skills by way of a pseudonymized questionnaire. Measures comprised the students' self-assessment of their interview skills, their expectations of, and their experiences with the course and especially with the peer tutors. Results: Medical students' most important motivations in attending peer-assisted history-taking groups were becoming able to complete a structured medical interview, to mitigate difficult interviewing situations, and to address patients' emotional demands appropriately. By the end of the course, students' self-assessment of both their interview skills and management of emotional issues improved significantly. Students especially benefitted from individual feedback regarding interview style and relationship formation, as well as generally accepted and had their expectations met by peer tutors. Conclusions: To meet the important learning objectives of history-taking and management of emotional issues, as well as self-reflection and reflection of student-patient interactions, students in the field greatly appreciate practicing medical interviewing in small, peer-assisted groups with real patients. At the same time, peer tutors are experienced to be helpful and supportive and can help students to overcome inhibitions in making contact with patients.

  13. [Who limit vaginal birth for breech presentation: medical practice or Law? Discussion between a medical doctor, a lawyer and the head chief of an university hospital].

    PubMed

    Delotte, J; Oliver, A; Boukaidi, S; Mialon, O; Breaud, J; Benchimol, D; Bongain, A

    2011-10-01

    The mode of delivery of breech presentation still remains a debate in France. Despite the medical arguments, themselves in debate, exists a legal pressure felt by medical practitioners. Our study highlights the different opinions of medical practitioners, lawyers and medical teachers faced with breech presentation.

  14. Analysis of the impact of medical technology assessment subjects on BME curricula.

    PubMed

    Martínez Licona, Fabiola; Azpiroz Leehan, Joaquín; Méndez, Miguel Cadena; Sacristán Rock, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and analyzes the factors that have arisen on the implementation of the medical technology assessment and management courses, and the academic methodologies used to deal with them. Five courses that cover topics as Technology Management, Health Economics, Quality Assessment, Innovation and Entrepreneurship were designed as electives for BME curriculum and have been taught for the last two years. The activities carried out within the courses are described and their impact on the comprehension of the course contents are presented. Also, several elements and factors pertaining to the teaching-learning process are discussed. Future perspectives for the students that follow this sub-specialty branch of the BME curriculum are presented.

  15. A Remote-Controlled Airbag Device Can Improve Upper Airway Collapsibility by Producing Head Elevation With Jaw Closure in Normal Subjects Under Propofol Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaka, Satoru; Kobayashi, Masato; Kajihara, Hiroki; Koga, Kazuya; Sugahara, Hirofumi; Ishimatsu, Takakazu; Kurata, Shinji; Kirkness, Jason P.; Oi, Kumiko; Ayuse, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Continuous maintenance of an appropriate position of the mandible and head purely by manual manipulation is difficult, although the maneuver can restore airway patency during sleep and anesthesia. The aim of this paper was to examine the effect of head elevation with jaw closure using a remote-controlled airbag device, such as the airbag system, on passive upper airway collapsibility during propofol anesthesia. Seven male subjects were studied. Propofol infusion was used for anesthesia induction and maintenance, with a target blood propofol concentration of 1.5–2 \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}\\(\\mu \\) \\end{document}g/ml. Nasal mask pressure (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}\\({P}_{\\text {N}}\\) \\end{document}) was intermittently reduced to evaluate upper airway collapsibility (passive \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}\\({P}_{_{\\text {CRIT}}}\\) \\end{document}) and upstream resistance (\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}\\({R}_{_{\\text {US}}}\\) \\end{document}) at three different head and jaw positions, jaw opening position in the supine position, jaw opening position in the sniffing position with 6-cm head elevation, and jaw

  16. An Unwilling Partnership With the Great Society Part I: Head Start and the Beginning of Change in the White Medical Community.

    PubMed

    deShazo, Richard D; Minor, Wilson F Bill; Smith, Robert; Skipworth, Leigh Baldwin

    2016-07-01

    By 1965, the policies and programs of Lyndon B. Johnson's Great Society brought optimism to black physicians and a new wave of resistance against black civil rights advocates in the American South. The largest of the first Head Start programs, Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), had its roots in Freedom Summer 1964 and the Medical Committee for Human Rights. Like other proposed programs with strong medical components, CDGM was caught in a legislative Bermuda triangle created by the powerful Mississippi congressional delegation to maintain white supremacy and plantation economics. Physician-led investigations exposed the extraordinary level of poor health among Mississippi's black children, supported Head Start as a remedy, and awakened the white medical establishment to health disparities of the Jim Crow period. It was also the beginning of positive change in the previously silent white medical community in the South and their support of civil justice in health. Copyright © 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dosage of conventional neuroleptic medication and subjective cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Krausz, M; Moritz, S; Lambert, M; Naber, D

    2000-03-01

    Subjective cognitive and perceptual disturbances as assessed with the Frankfurt Complaint Questionnaire (FCQ) were correlated with chlorpromazine equivalents in 40 schizophrenic inpatients, who were treated with conventional neuroleptics. In line with previous research using 'objective' neuropsychological tests, both correlations and partial correlations (controlling for the effects of psychopathology, extrapyramidal symptoms and length of illness) confirmed that higher neuroleptic doses significantly worsen several cognitive and perceptual domains (r = 0.44 -0.54; P < or = 0.005 -0.05) with the possible exception of mnestic functions (r = 0.21 -0.24, n.s.) and language (r = 0.37 -0.38, P < 0.1). The clinical importance of self-report scales for evaluating both the risks and benefits of neuroleptic treatment is discussed.

  18. Relevance of early head CT scans following neurosurgical procedures: an analysis of 892 intracranial procedures at Rush University Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Ricardo B V; Smith, Adam P; Muñoz, Lorenzo F; Byrne, Richard W; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2014-08-01

    Early postoperative head CT scanning is routinely performed following intracranial procedures for detection of complications, but its real value remains uncertain: so-called abnormal results are frequently found, but active, emergency intervention based on these findings may be rare. The authors' objective was to analyze whether early postoperative CT scans led to emergency surgical interventions and if the results of neurological examination predicted this occurrence. The authors retrospectively analyzed 892 intracranial procedures followed by an early postoperative CT scan performed over a 1-year period at Rush University Medical Center and classified these cases according to postoperative neurological status: baseline, predicted neurological change, unexpected neurological change, and sedated or comatose. The interpretation of CT results was reviewed and unexpected CT findings were classified based on immediate action taken: Type I, additional observation and CT; Type II, active nonsurgical intervention; and Type III, surgical intervention. Results were compared between neurological examination groups with the Fisher exact test. Patients with unexpected neurological changes or in the sedated or comatose group had significantly more unexpected findings on the postoperative CT (p < 0.001; OR 19.2 and 2.3, respectively) and Type II/III interventions (p < 0.001) than patients at baseline. Patients at baseline or with expected neurological changes still had a rate of Type II/III changes in the 2.2%-2.4% range; however, no patient required an immediate return to the operating room. Over a 1-year period in an academic neurosurgery service, no patient who was neurologically intact or who had a predicted neurological change required an immediate return to the operating room based on early postoperative CT findings. Obtaining early CT scans should not be a priority in these patients and may even be cancelled in favor of MRI studies, if the latter have already been planned

  19. Delayed hypothermia as selective head cooling or whole body cooling does not protect brain or body in newborn pig subjected to hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mathias; Tooley, James R; Satas, Saulius; Hobbs, Catherine E; Chakkarapani, Ela; Stone, Janet; Porter, Helen; Thoresen, Marianne

    2008-07-01

    The neuroprotective efficacy of hypothermia (HT) after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) falls dramatically the longer the delay in initiating HT. Knowledge is scarce regarding protective or adverse effects of HT in organs beyond the brain. In addition, the relative effectiveness of selective head cooling (SHC) and whole body cooling (WBC) has not been studied. We aimed to examine whether 24 h HT, initiated 3 h after global HI is brain- and/or organ-protective using pathology, neurology, and biochemical markers. Fifty, subjected to global HI causing permanent brain injury. Animals were randomized to normothermia (NT), (Trectal) 39.0 degrees C, SHCTrectal 34.5 degrees C, or WBCTrectal 34.5 degrees C for 24 h, all followed by 48 h NT. There was no difference in injury to the brain or organs between groups. There was no gender difference in brain injury but females had significantly more organs injured [2.3 (+/- 1.3) [mean +/- SD] vs. 1.4 +/- (1.0)]. The postinsult decline in lactate was temperature independent. However, HT animals normalized their plasma-calcium, magnesium, and potassium significantly faster than NT. Delayed SHC or WBC, initiated 3 h after HI, does not reduce pathology in the brain nor in organs. Delayed HT improves postinsult recovery of plasma-calcium, magnesium, and potassium. There were no differences in adverse effects across groups.

  20. Signs, symptoms and the prevalence of fungi detected from the oral cavity and pharynx of radiotherapy subjects with head and neck tumors, and their susceptibility to chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kurnatowski, Piotr; Moqbil, Salah; Kaczmarczyk, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Radio- and chemotherapy for malignant neoplasms, especially in head and neck region, is associated with a greater risk of fungal infections due to secondary alterations in the mucous membranes. The study had three aims: 1.to determine the signs and symptoms which occur among patients undergoing radiotherapy; 2. to determine the fungi prevalence in the mouth and throat of patients before, during and after radiotherapy; 3. to examine the sensitivity of strains to antimycotic drugs. The study comprised 44 patients (11 female, 33 male) with head and neck cancers,examined at the following stages: before radiotherapy (44 patients – batch 1), 3rd week of therapy (30 of the 44 patients– batch 2), last day of therapy (28 of batch 2 – batch 3) and the 6th week after completion of radiotherapy (10 of batch 3 – batch 4). Clinical examination was performed and mycological status was estimated from an oral rinse on a selected medium. The fungal strains were isolated and sensitivity to antifungal drugs was determined. The most common symptoms were pain, dysphagia, and dysgeusia. Physical examination revealed signs of mucositis mainly among patients from batches 2 and 3. The presence of fungi in the mouth and throat was noted in over 2/3 (66.2%) of the patients from batch 1, and in 4/5 (80%) of batch 2. The fungi were detected in over half (57.1%) of patients from batch 3 and also in patients from batch 4. In all cases, fungi of various Candida species were identified: 6 species in batch 1,8 in batch 2, 6 in batch 3 and 5 in batch 4. The most frequently detected species was C. albicans, constituting 40–60%;the other species detected are known to be resistant to antimycotic drugs. The isolated strains were the most sensitive to nystatin and miconazole, and the least to ketoconazole and fluconazole. Conclusions: 1. Patients undergoing radiotherapy complain of pain, dysphagia, and dysgeusia; in most cases mucositis is diagnosed. 2. The high prevalence of fungi in the mouth

  1. A Prediction of Response of the Head and Neck of the U.S. Adult Military Population to Dynamic Impact Acceleration from Selected Dynamic Test Subjects.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-05-01

    degree of head- neck hyperextension. This disagreement among researchers as to the mecha- nisms of injury in hdad impact and whiplash is also seen in...concern in this study was to measure those physical characteristics which relate to head and neck movement in the sagittal plane (since NAMRL sled testing...for those properties judged to have the most significant effects on head and neck dyrwmic response in sagittal flexion was made and resulted in a

  2. Objective and subjective assessment of reciprocal peer teaching in medical gross anatomy laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Brian S; Hill, Robert V

    2009-01-01

    Reciprocal peer teaching (RPT), wherein students alternate roles as teacher and learner, has been applied in several educational arenas with varying success. Here, we describe the implementation of a reciprocal peer teaching protocol in a human gross anatomy laboratory curriculum. We compared the outcomes of the RPT class with those of previous classes in which RPT was not employed. Objective data (i.e., course grades) show no significant differences in gross anatomy laboratory grades between students in the RPT and non-RPT classes. To subjectively evaluate the relative success of RPT in the laboratory, we analyzed student opinions obtained through anonymous surveys. These data show that a powerful majority of student respondents felt that RPT was beneficial and should be used in future classes. The greatest disadvantage was unreliable quality of teaching from peers; however, most students still felt that RPT should be continued. Students who felt that they had insufficient hands-on experience (by virtue of dissecting only half the time) were significantly more likely to recommend abandoning RPT. These results underscore the importance of active student dissection, and suggest that a modified version of the described RPT protocol may satisfy more of the needs of large, diverse student populations. Several hidden benefits of RPT exist for faculty, administration, and students, including reduced need for large numbers of cadavers, attendant reduction in operating costs, and smaller student-to-teacher ratios.

  3. Neurocognition in depression: patients on and off medication versus healthy comparison subjects.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas; Johnson, Lynda G; Benedict, Kenneth B

    2006-01-01

    Patients with depression have neuropsychological deficits in attention, memory, psychomotor speed, processing speed, and executive function. It is not clear, however, whether neurocognition in depression is impaired in a global or nonspecific way or if specific cognitive domains are selectively impaired. This naturalistic cross-sectional study employed a computerized neurocognitive screening battery to evaluate 38 depressed, drug-free patients, compared to 31 patients who responded to antidepressant monotherapy and to 69 healthy comparison subjects. There was evidence for global neuropsychological impairment in untreated depressed patients. In patients who had been successfully treated, performance was improved but not normalized. There was also evidence for specific depression-related deficits in executive function and processing speed but not in memory, psychomotor speed, or reaction time. Although depressed patients have global neurocognitive impairments, deficits in certain cognitive domains are more important than in others. In particular, impairments are noted in tests of executive control and in tests that demand effortful attention. Information processing speed is also impaired but not reaction time. Computerized testing in the clinic setting demonstrates a range of neurocognitive problems in patients with depression. These problems may have a bearing on treatment and outcome.

  4. Outcome-based self-assessment on a team-teaching subject in the medical school

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sa Sun

    2014-01-01

    We attempted to investigate the reason why the students got a worse grade in gross anatomy and the way how we can improve upon the teaching method since there were gaps between teaching and learning under recently changed integration curriculum. General characteristics of students and exploratory factors to testify the validity were compared between year 2011 and 2012. Students were asked to complete a short survey with a Likert scale. The results were as follows: although the percentage of acceptable items was similar between professors, professor C preferred questions with adequate item discrimination and inappropriate item difficulty whereas professor Y preferred adequate item discrimination and appropriate item difficulty with statistical significance (P<0.01). The survey revealed that 26.5% of total students gave up the exam on gross anatomy of professor Y irrespective of years. These results suggested that students were affected by the corrected item difficulty rather than item discrimination in order to obtain academic achievement. Therefore, professors in a team-teaching subject should reach a consensus on an item difficulty with proper teaching methods. PMID:25548724

  5. Memory for Medication Side Effects in Younger and Older Adults: The Role of Subjective and Objective Importance

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Michael C.; McGillivray, Shannon; Murayama, Kou; Castel, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults often experience memory impairments, but can sometimes use selective processing and schematic support to remember important information. The current experiments investigate to what degree younger and healthy older adults remember medication side effects that were subjectively or objectively important to remember. Participants studied a list of common side effects, and rated how negative these effects were if they were to experience them, and were then given a free recall test. In Experiment 1, the severity of the side effects ranged from mild (e.g., itching) to severe (e.g., stroke), and in Experiment 2, certain side effects were indicated as critical to remember (i.e., “contact your doctor if you experience this”). There were no age differences in terms of free recall of the side effects, and older adults remembered more severe side effects relative to mild effects. However, older adults were less likely to recognize critical side effects on a later recognition test, relative to younger adults. The findings suggest that older adults can selectively remember medication side effects, but have difficulty identifying familiar but potentially critical side effects, and this has implications for monitoring medication use in older age. PMID:25331278

  6. ADHD subjects fail to suppress eye blinks and microsaccades while anticipating visual stimuli but recover with medication.

    PubMed

    Fried, Moshe; Tsitsiashvili, Eteri; Bonneh, Yoram S; Sterkin, Anna; Wygnanski-Jaffe, Tamara; Epstein, Tamir; Polat, Uri

    2014-08-01

    Oculomotor behavior and parameters are known to be affected by the allocation of attention and could potentially be used to investigate attention disorders. We explored the oculomotor markers of Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that are involuntary and quantitative and that could be used to reveal the core-affected mechanisms, as well as be used for differential diagnosis. We recorded eye movements in a group of 22 ADHD-diagnosed patients with and without medication (methylphenidate) and in 22 control observers while performing the test of variables of attention (t.o.v.a.). We found that the average microsaccade and blink rates were higher in the ADHD group, especially in the time interval around stimulus onset. These rates increased monotonically over session time for both groups, but with significantly faster increments in the unmedicated ADHD group. With medication, the level and time course of the microsaccade rate were fully normalized to the control level, regardless of the time interval within trials. In contrast, the pupil diameter decreased over time within sessions and significantly increased above the control level with medication. We interpreted the suppression of microsaccades and eye blinks around the stimulus onset as reflecting a temporal anticipation mechanism for the transient allocation of attention, and their overall rates as inversely reflecting the level of arousal. We suggest that ADHD subjects fail to maintain sufficient levels of arousal during a simple and prolonged task, which limits their ability to dynamically allocate attention while anticipating visual stimuli. This impairment normalizes with medication and its oculomotor quantification could potentially be used for differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Status of subjective well-being for medical staff in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunlong; Liu, Yan; Xu, Shaorong; Zhao, Min; Li, Junping; Xiong, Yan

    2016-06-28

    目的:了解三级甲等综合医务人员直接面对病人对其主观幸福感的影响。方法:采用中国城市居民幸福感量表简本(subjective well-being scale for Chinese citizen,SWBS-cc20),于2012,2013及2014年5月对湖南省某三级甲等综合性医院医务人员进行调查。结果:医务人员的主观幸福感评分较高(81.67±12.33);在10个分维度中,家庭氛围、成长进步及人际适应得分最高;知足充裕、心理健康及身体健康得分最低。职称、工作性质、受教育程度及职业影响医务人员的主观幸福感。直接面对病人的医务人员主观幸福感低于非直接面对病人者(t=–4.80,P<0.001);直接面对病人的医务人员在知足充裕维度(OR=0.079,95% CI:1.278~2.214,P<0.001)高于非直接面对病人者,在心理健康 (OR=1.315,95% CI:1.023~1.690,P<0.05)及身体健康(OR=1.313,95% CI:1.029~1.677,P<0.05)维度低于非直接面对病人者。结论:医务人员的主观幸福感较高。直接面对病人的医务人员主观幸福感总体低于非直接面对病人者;且在知足充裕维度高于非直接面对病人者,在心理健康及身体健康维度低于非直接面对病人者。.

  8. Is trauma transfer influenced by factors other than medical need? An examination of insurance status and transfer in patients with mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Babu, Maya A; Nahed, Brian V; Demoya, Marc A; Curry, William T

    2011-09-01

    The Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act was meant to provide access to emergency medical care irrespective of financial resources. Yet, many Level I trauma Centers have raised concerns about the financial drivers influencing transfer. : To study the relationship between insurance status and transfer, we focused on patients with mild head injury to tease apart the medical necessity for transfer from other potential drivers, such as financial factors. Using the 2002 to 2006 American College of Surgeons National Trauma Databank and Massachusetts General Hospital's Trauma Databank from 1993 to 2009, we conducted a retrospective study and limited our population to patients with mild head injuries and mild to moderate systemic injuries as determined by the Glasgow Coma Scale, Abbreviated Injury Scale, or Injury Severity Score. Statistical analyses were conducted with STATA software. In a nationalized database, (1) uninsured patients with mild head injury are more likely to be transferred out of a Level II or III facility (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 2.07; P = .000) compared with privately insured patients and (2) uninsured patients are less likely to be accepted by a Level II or III facility for transfer compared with privately insured patients (adjusted OR: = .143; P = .000l). For transfers received by 1 Level I trauma center (Massachusetts General Hospital), uninsured patients are more likely to be transferred to (1) Massachusetts General Hospital between midnight and 6 am (adjusted OR: 5.201; P = .000) compared with other time periods throughout the day and (2) Massachusetts General Hospital on Sunday (adjusted OR: 1.09; P = .000) compared with other days of the week. Insurance status appears to influence transfer patterns.

  9. The effect of the muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist biperiden on cognition in medication free subjects with psychosis.

    PubMed

    Vingerhoets, Claudia; Bakker, Geor; van Dijk, Jelske; Bloemen, Oswald J N; Wang, Ya; Chan, Raymond C K; Booij, Jan; van Amelsvoort, Therese A M J

    2017-09-01

    The acetylcholine muscarinic M1 receptor has been implicated in both psychosis and cognition. Post-mortem research has shown reduced muscarinic M1 receptor density in 25% of chronic patients with schizophrenia. It is unknown whether reduced M1 receptor density is related to cognitive symptoms of psychosis. We investigated the role of the M1 receptor in separate cognitive domains in subjects with a psychotic disorder using a muscarinic M1 antagonist as an acute pharmacological challenge. 33 young subjects with a psychotic disorder and 30 gender, age and IQ matched healthy controls were enrolled. All participants completed a comprehensive cognitive test battery twice: once after placebo and once after oral administration of 4mg. biperiden (M1 antagonist). The order of drug administration was counterbalanced. Biperiden significantly negatively influenced both verbal (p< 0.001 and p=0.032) and visual learning and memory (p=0.028) in both groups. A medication x group interaction effect was found for reasoning and problem solving (p=0.005). No main or interaction effects were found for other cognitive domains. These results provide further in-vivo evidence that the M1 receptor is involved in cognitive functioning, particularly verbal and visual memory processes. Lack of differential effects of biperiden between psychotic subjects and healthy controls may suggest that decreased M1 receptor density is only present in chronic, older schizophrenia patients. However, it remains possible that differential effects of biperiden would be present in more severe cognitive impaired subjects with psychosis after several doses of biperiden instead of a single administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effects of postponing nitrogen application on photosynthetic characteristics and grain yield of winter wheat subjected to water stress after heading stage].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-da; Ma, Shou-chen; Yang, Shen-jiao; Zhang, Su-yu; Guan, Xiao-kang; Li, Xue-mei; Wang, Tong-chao; Li, Chun-xi

    2015-11-01

    A pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of postponing nitrogen (N) application on photosynthetic characteristics and grain yield of winter wheat subjected to water stress after heading stage. Equal in the total N rate in winter wheat growth season, N application was split before sowing, and/or at jointing and /or at anthesis at the ratio of 10:0:0 (N1), 6:4:0 (N2) and 4:3:3 (N3), combined with unfavorable water condition (either waterlogged or drought) with the sufficient water condition as control. The results showed that, under each of the water condition, both N2 and N3 treatments significantly improved the leaf photosynthetic rate and the SPAD value of flag leaf compared with N1 treatment during grain filling stage, and also the crop ear number, grain number per spike and above-ground biomass were increased. Although postponing nitrogen application increased water consumption, both grain yield and water use efficiency were increased. Compared with sufficient water supply, drought stress and waterlogging stress significantly reduced the photosynthetic rate of flag leaves at anthesis and grain filling stages, ear number, 1000-grain mass and yield under all of the N application patterns. The decline of photosynthetic rate under either drought stress or waterlogging stress was much less in N2 and N3 than in N1 treatments, just the same as the grain yield. The results indicated that postponing nitrogen application could regulate winter wheat yield as well as its components to alleviate the damages, caused by unfavorable water stress by increasing flag leaf SPAD and maintaining flag leaf photosynthetic rate after anthesis, and promoting above-ground dry matter accumulation.

  11. Relationships between the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Achievement Test (COMAT) subject examinations and the COMLEX-USA Level 2-Cognitive Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiming; Kalinowski, Kevin E; Song, Hao; Bates, Bruce P

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Achievement Test (COMAT) series of subject examinations and the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA Level 2-Cognitive Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE) has not been thoroughly examined. To investigate the factors associated with performance on COMAT subject examinations and how COMAT scores correlate with COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores. We examined scores of participants from 2 COMAT examination cycles in 2011 and 2012. According to surveys, most schools used COMAT scores in clerkship and clinical rotation evaluation, which were classified as being used for "high-stakes" purposes. We matched first-attempt COMAT scores with first-attempt COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores, and we conducted correlation analyses between the scores from the 7 COMAT subject examinations, as well as between COMAT and COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed to investigate how much variance in COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores was explained by COMAT scores. In 2011 and 2012, respectively, 3751 and 3786 COMAT candidates had COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores (53.0% and 93.9%, respectively, had ⩾1 high-stakes COMAT score). Intercorrelations between COMAT scores were low to moderate (r=0.27-0.53), as hypothesized. Correlations between COMAT and Level 2-CE scores were moderate to high, with the highest correlations for internal medicine COMAT scores (r=0.63-0.65). All regressions showed internal medicine scores as the strongest predictor of Level 2-CE performance. Groups with high-stakes scores had larger adjusted coefficients of determination than those with low-stakes scores (eg, R(2)=0.63 vs 0.52, respectively, in 2011). For 2012 candidates with high-stakes scores, all predictors were statistically significant. The COMAT subject examination scores were moderately intercorrelated, as hypothesized, with higher correlations between COMAT and COMLEX-USA Level 2-CE scores. The COMAT

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage alters scalp potential distribution in bioimpedance cerebral monitoring: Preliminary results from FEM simulation on a realistic head model and human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Atefi, Seyed Reza; Seoane, Fernando; Kamalian, Shervin; Rosenthal, Eric S.; Lev, Michael H.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Current diagnostic neuroimaging for detection of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is limited to fixed scanners requiring patient transport and extensive infrastructure support. ICH diagnosis would therefore benefit from a portable diagnostic technology, such as electrical bioimpedance (EBI). Through simulations and patient observation, the authors assessed the influence of unilateral ICH hematomas on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions in order to establish the feasibility of EBI technology as a potential tool for early diagnosis. Methods: Finite element method (FEM) simulations and experimental left–right hemispheric scalp potential differences of healthy and damaged brains were compared with respect to the asymmetry caused by ICH lesions on quasisymmetric scalp potential distributions. In numerical simulations, this asymmetry was measured at 25 kHz and visualized on the scalp as the normalized potential difference between the healthy and ICH damaged models. Proof-of-concept simulations were extended in a pilot study of experimental scalp potential measurements recorded between 0 and 50 kHz with the authors’ custom-made bioimpedance spectrometer. Mean left–right scalp potential differences recorded from the frontal, central, and parietal brain regions of ten healthy control and six patients suffering from acute/subacute ICH were compared. The observed differences were measured at the 5% level of significance using the two-sample Welch t-test. Results: The 3D-anatomically accurate FEM simulations showed that the normalized scalp potential difference between the damaged and healthy brain models is zero everywhere on the head surface, except in the vicinity of the lesion, where it can vary up to 5%. The authors’ preliminary experimental results also confirmed that the left–right scalp potential difference in patients with ICH (e.g., 64 mV) is significantly larger than in healthy subjects (e.g., 20.8 mV; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Realistic

  13. The "Human Subject," "Vulnerable Populations," and Medical History: The Problem of Presentism and the Discourse of Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2017-02-15

    This discussion considers recent historical works of eugenics and sterilization in Canada, but it is not an historiographic review essay or critique per se of this literature. Rather, by focussing on the topic of historic diagnostic categories such as "feeble-minded," "idiot," and "moron," methodological issues such as historical presentism and its possible interactions with the discourse of modern bioethics are examined. The conclusions derived are meant only to be cautionary, and are neither prescriptive nor proscriptive. Medical historians undertaking analyses of currently contentious topics that may directly involve or indirectly allude to "human subjects" or "vulnerable populations" perhaps ought to reflect on the degree, if any, they may be anachronistically writing contemporary bioethical categories into bygone eras.

  14. The "Human Subject," "Vulnerable Populations," and Medical History: The Problem of Presentism and the Discourse of Bioethics.

    PubMed

    Connor, J T H

    2017-01-01

    This discussion considers recent historical works of eugenics and sterilization in Canada, but it is not an historiographic review essay or critique per se of this literature. Rather, by focussing on the topic of historic diagnostic categories such as "feeble-minded," "idiot," and "moron," methodological issues such as historical presentism and its possible interactions with the discourse of modern bioethics are examined. The conclusions derived are meant only to be cautionary, and are neither prescriptive nor proscriptive. Medical historians undertaking analyses of currently contentious topics that may directly involve or indirectly allude to "human subjects" or "vulnerable populations" perhaps ought to reflect on the degree, if any, they may be anachronistically writing contemporary bioethical categories into bygone eras.

  15. [Defining trials of medicinal products according to the revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO)].

    PubMed

    Vos, E J; Huitema, A D R

    2006-09-23

    The revised Dutch Medical Research in Human Subjects Act (WMO), which implements the European directive regarding 'good clinical practice in the conduct of clinical trials on medicinal products for human use' (2001/20/EC), became effective on March 1, 2006. The revision places additional requirements on trials of medicinal products. Whether a trial should be regarded as a trial of a medicinal product is therefore an important question. The law does not provide adequate guidance for the classification of trials in which biological samples are collected, e.g. for genomic, proteomic or pharmacokinetic studies, while a medicinal product is given for a registered indication. Classifying these types of trials as trials of medicinal products does not enhance the safety of the participants. Therefore, these studies should not be considered as trials of medicinal products to avoid the increased administrative burden required by the revised WMO.

  16. Chemical Compatibility of Depacon® with Medications Frequently Administered by Intravenous Y-Site Delivery in Patients with Epilepsy or Head Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Rashed, Sahar M.; Sweatman, Trevor W.; Thoma, Laura; Hovinga, Collin A.; Phelps, Stephanie J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Intravenous Y-site administration of more than one medication through the same in-line catheter is a common practice used in the management of acute seizures. The objective of this study was to determine the compatibility of valproate sodium (Depacon®; 2 or 20 mg/mL) with 13 medications that are frequently administered to manage seizures or are given to patients with an acute head injury who are at risk for developing post-traumatic epilepsy. METHODS The study medications included atracurium, dexamethasone, diazepam, fosphenytoin, lorazepam, magnesium sulfate, mannitol, methyl-prednisolone, midazolam, pentobarbital, phenytoin, ranitidine, and thiopental. Equal volumes of valproate and each of the study drugs were admixed and immediately examined using several physiochemical criteria: Tyndall effect, color and pH change, gas evolution, and particle formation (HIAC/Royco liquid particle counter). Samples were also evaluated using HPLC analysis (C18 column; methanol/tetrahydrofuran/ phosphate buffer; 44/1/55% v/v, at 1.5 mL/min; 50°C) with UV (190-400 nm) photodiode detection. The valproate peak (220 nm) was quantified by both peak area and height. Samples were analyzed within 5 minutes of admixture and were reassessed at 15 and 30 minutes. RESULTS With the exception of diazepam, midazolam, and phenytoin, all of the remaining drugs were chemically compatible with valproate, both in 5% Dextrose Injection, USP(D5W) and in 0.9% Sodium Chloride Injection, USP (Normal Saline -NS). None of the compatible medications produced a significant pH change, discernible gas, particle formation, reduced valproate titer by HPLC analysis (coefficient of variability < 1.5%), or the temporal formation of unidentified UV absorbing (190–400 nm) peaks. CONCLUSIONS Intravenous valproate is compatible with most agents employed in seizure management or used in patients at risk for seizures following head injury and is safe for concurrent Y-site drug administration. PMID:23118699

  17. [Prophylactic medical examination of patients with head and neck tumours in Moscow--continuity of patients' care provided by oncologists and general practitioners].

    PubMed

    Sdvizhkov, A M; Shatskaia, N Kh; Kuznetsov, I L

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of prophylactic medical examination of oncological patients is reduction of mortality and improvement of the quality of life. Activities of the Department of Head and Neck Tumours of No 1 Oncological Clinical Dispensary are focused on dynamic follow-up of treated patients for early identification of continued tumour growth, diagnosis of relapses and metastases. Compliance with the schedule of control examination in the post-treatment period facilitates early identification of continued tumour growth, diagnosis of relapses and metastases. It is maintained that irregular examination is a cause of progression of latent relapses and metastasis in oncological patients. Actions and duties of district otorhinolaryngologists and ENT specialists of the Department of Head and Neck Tumours, No 1 Oncological Clinical Dispensary are outlined for the periods of prophylactic medical examination and follow up studies at the pre-hospital stage and in the course of dynamic post-treatment observations. Continuity of patients' care provided by oncologists and otorhinolaryngologists is supposed to contribute to the reduction of time spent during pre-treatment studies, early diagnosis of relapses and metastases, and improvement of the quality of life in the patients with incurable and recurring tumours.

  18. [Influence of "optical illusion" on detectability in diagnosis for head CT images: participation of optical illusion of light perception in medical image reading and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2006-07-20

    Even if the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain in head CT images is shown as physically the same, it is known that optical illusions of lightness perception (assimilation, contrast, picture frame effect, etc.) occur and that practical density can be observed psychologically differently, according to differences in the color of the skull and background, and differences in cases (differences in picture pattern). Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the influence of optical illusion on detectability in diagnosis, the author attempted to compare detectability in four sample cases, consisting of acute cerebral infarction (1), acute epidural hematoma (1), and chronic subdural hematoma (2), using visual subjective evaluation. In the case of acute cerebral infarction, there was no significant difference in detectability between the original image and the virtual images. Further, it clarified that the original head CT image (acute epidural hematoma) with the high-density hematoma recognized at the marginal limited part of the brain was inferior to virtual images in detectability, while it clarified that the original head CT image (chronic subdural hematoma) with the low-density hematoma was superior to virtual images in detectability, because of visual psychological emphasis on the difference of the film contrast between the hematoma and white skull.

  19. Treatment of head lice.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Stephanie A; Morrell, Dean S; Burkhart, Craig N

    2009-01-01

    Pediculosis capitis, or head lice, is a common infestation among children worldwide. Multiple therapies exist for the treatment of this condition, including topical pediculicides and oral medications. When used in combination with environmental decontamination, these drugs can be very effective in eradicating head lice infestation without significant adverse events. The present study discusses the use of available over-the-counter and prescription treatments, including pyrethroids and permethrin, lindane, malathion, ivermectin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, in the treatment of head lice.

  20. Subjects with osteoarthritis can easily use a handheld touch screen electronic device to report medication use: qualitative results from a usability study

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Laura; Durand, Ellen M; Gary, Sarah T; Otero, Antonio V; Gerzon, Millie C; Beck, Jamie; Hall, Chris; Dallabrida, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Electronic data capture is increasingly used to improve collection of patient-reported outcome measures in clinical trials and care. The validation of electronic patient-reported outcome devices requires information on patient preference and ease of use. This study conducted usability testing for a General Symptom Questionnaire and Medication Module™ on a handheld device for subjects with osteoarthritis (OA) to determine whether subjects can report on their symptoms and medication use using an electronic diary. Methods Nine subjects with OA participating in a large US mode equivalency study were surveyed independently in this study. Subjects completed a General Symptom Questionnaire and Medication Module™ using the LogPad® LW handheld device. Demographic and technology use information was collected, and the subjects were queried on device usability. Results Subjects reported that the handheld device was easy to use and that they were able to complete a General Symptom Questionnaire and Medication Module™ with little or no assistance. They did not report any issues with the screen or size of the device. Subjects were willing to travel with the device to complete electronic diaries at home or in public. Participants indicated that they would be able to use the handheld device to answer questions during a clinical trial. Subjects with OA experienced no physical discomfort during completion of either questionnaire. Conclusion The General Symptom Questionnaire and Medication Module™ were usable and acceptable to subjects with OA on a handheld device. This was consistent regardless of previous experience and confidence with technology, despite the potential physical restrictions for an OA cohort. PMID:27822018

  1. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  2. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... vary widely and often include medication, nutritional changes, relaxation techniques, emotional support, and other therapies. You may ... help treat head and neck cancer. Immunotherapy. An active area of immunotherapy research centers around drugs that ...

  3. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Karl B.

    1989-01-01

    This article reviews the medical literature on head injuries in soccer and concludes that protective headgear to reduce these injuries may not be as effective as rule changes and other measures, such as padding goal posts. (IAH)

  4. Strategies for searching medical natural language text. Distribution of words in the anatomic diagnoses of 7000 autopsy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G. W.; Hutchins, G. M.; Miller, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Computerized indexing and retrieval of medical records is increasingly important; but the use of natural language versus coded languages (SNOP, SNOMED) for this purpose remains controversial. In an effort to develop search strategies for natural language text, the authors examined the anatomic diagnosis reports by computer for 7000 consecutive autopsy subjects spanning a 13-year period at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were 923,657 words, 11,642 of them distinct. The authors observed an average of 1052 keystrokes, 28 lines, and 131 words per autopsy report, with an average 4.6 words per line and 7.0 letters per word. The entire text file represented 921 hours of secretarial effort. Words ranged in frequency from 33,959 occurrences of "and" to one occurrence for each of 3398 different words. Searches for rare diseases with unique names or for representative examples of common diseases were most readily performed with the use of computer-printed key word in context (KWIC) books. For uncommon diseases designated by commonly used terms (such as "cystic fibrosis"), needs were best served by a computerized search for logical combinations of key words. In an unbalanced word distribution, each conjunction (logical and) search should be performed in ascending order of word frequency; but each alternation (logical inclusive or) search should be performed in descending order of word frequency. Natural language text searches will assume a larger role in medical records analysis as the labor-intensive procedure of translation into a coded language becomes more costly, compared with the computer-intensive procedure of text searching. PMID:6546837

  5. Prospective, randomized study of one, two, or three trabecular bypass stents in open-angle glaucoma subjects on topical hypotensive medication

    PubMed Central

    Katz, L Jay; Erb, Carl; Carceller, Guillamet Amadeu; Fea, Antonio M; Voskanyan, Lilit; Wells, Jeffrey M; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the safety and efficacy of one, two, or three trabecular microbypass stents in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (OAG) not controlled on ocular hypotensive medication. A total of 119 subjects were followed for 18 months postoperatively. Materials and methods Subjects with medicated intraocular pressure (IOP) 18–30 mmHg and postmedication-washout baseline IOP 22–38 mmHg were randomized to implantation of one, two, or three stents. Ocular hypotensive medication was to be used if postoperative IOP exceeded 18 mmHg. Results A total of 38 subjects were implanted with one stent, 41 subjects with two stents, and 40 subjects with three stents. Both month 12 IOP reduction ≥20% without ocular hypotensive medication vs baseline unmedicated IOP and month 12 unmedicated IOP ≤18 mmHg were achieved by 89.2%, 90.2%, and 92.1% of one-, two-, and three-stent eyes, respectively. Furthermore, 64.9%, 85.4%, and 92.1% of the three respective groups achieved unmedicated IOP ≤15 mmHg. Over the 18-month follow-up period, medication was required in seven one-stent subjects, four two-stent subjects, and three three-stent subjects. At 18 months, mean unmedicated IOP was 15.9±0.9 mmHg in one-stent subjects, 14.1±1.0 mmHg in two-stent subjects, and 12.2±1.1 mmHg in three-stent subjects. Month 18 IOP reduction was significantly greater (P<0.001) with implantation of each additional stent, with mean differences in reduction of 1.84 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.96–2.73) for three-stent vs two-stent groups and 1.73 mmHg (95% confidence interval 0.83–2.64) for two-stent vs one-stent groups. Adverse events through 18 months were limited to cataract progression with best-corrected visual acuity loss and subsequent cataract surgery. Conclusion In this series, implantation of each additional stent resulted in significantly greater IOP reduction with reduced medication use. Titratability of stents as a sole procedure was shown to be effective and safe, with

  6. Effects of Mild Hypercapnia During Head-Down Bed Rest on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, aud Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Taibbi, G.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Zanello, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Hu, X.; Stenger, M. B.; Vizzeri, G.

    2014-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to cause an elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, as experienced by some astronauts during long-duration space flight. Elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on ISS may also raise ICP and contribute to VIIP development. We seek to determine if the combination of mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the International Space Station, with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt, will induce ophthalmic and cerebral blood flow changes similar to those described in the VIIP syndrome. We hypothesize that mild hypercapnia in the head-down tilt position will increase choroidal blood volume and cerebral blood flow, raise intraocular pressure (IOP), and transiently reduce visual acuity as compared to the seated or the head-down tilt position without elevated CO2, respectively.

  7. Performance of able-bodied subjects on a text-typing task using a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys.

    PubMed

    Capilouto, Gilson J; McClenaghan, Bruce; Williams, Harriet G; Dickerson, John; Hussey, James R

    2004-02-01

    Children and adults with disabilities frequently rely on computers to complete written tasks. Those with significant motor limitations typically use alternative computer-input devices since the traditional keyboard and mouse are insufficient to accommodate their abilities. For persons unable to isolate their fingers, input devices controlled by movements of the head or whole hand or arm movements may be among the options considered. This study investigated the performance of a head-operated device and expanded membrane cursor keys for text entry. Data from 24 young adults indicated the head-operated device performed significantly faster given reduced cognitive demands for device operation, increased stimulus-response compatibility, and simplicity of movement. Use of the expanded membrane cursor keys resulted in significantly lower error rates. No significant differences in comfort or ease of use were reported for the two devices. The relative performance of device options for users sharing similar motor challenges provides rehabilitation specialists with important clinical information.

  8. Resting-state networks in healthy adult subjects: a comparison between a 32-element and an 8-element phased array head coil at 3.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Marco; Keeser, Daniel; Ingrisch, Michael; Werner, Natalie; Kindermann, Nicole; Reiser, Maximilian; Blautzik, Janusch

    2015-05-01

    Little research exists on the influence of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) head coil's channel count on measured resting-state functional connectivity. To compare a 32-element (32ch) and an 8-element (8ch) phased array head coil with respect to their potential to detect functional connectivity within resting-state networks. Twenty-six healthy adults (mean age, 21.7 years; SD, 2.1 years) underwent resting-state functional MRI at 3.0 Tesla with both coils using equal standard imaging parameters and a counterbalanced design. Independent component analysis (ICA) at different model orders and a dual regression approach were performed. Voxel-wise non-parametric statistical between-group contrasts were determined using permutation-based non-parametric inference. Phantom measurements demonstrated a generally higher image signal-to-noise ratio using the 32ch head coil. However, the results showed no significant differences between corresponding resting-state networks derived from both coils (p < 0.05, FWE-corrected). Using the identical standard acquisition parameters, the 32ch head coil does not offer any significant advantages in detecting ICA-based functional connectivity within RSNs. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  9. Pattern of Head Injuries (Cranio-cerebral) due to Homicide in Association with Other Injuries: A Retrospective Post-mortem Study Autopsied at Dhaka Medical College Morgue House.

    PubMed

    Akber, E B; Alam, M T; Rahman, K M; Jahan, I; Musa, S A

    2016-04-01

    Annually, homicide contributes to a greater number of the total head injury cases. This retrospective study was conducted from 1(st) January 2009 to 31(st)December 2011 at Dhaka Medical College Mortuary. During this study period of three years a total of 15300 autopsies were done of which 5649 cases (36.84%) were of head injuries. Of them 747(13.22%) were of homicidal, 4080(72.22%) road-traffic accidents, 502(8.88%) accidental and 320(5.66%) cases of fall from heights. Three hundred ninety eight (398) urban cases (53.27%) out numbered 307 rural cases (41.09%) followed by 42 unknown cases (5.62%). Most cases belong to the younger age group i.e. 21-40 years (43.34%) with male preponderance 470(63.10%). Defense wounds were present in 281 cases (37.82%) out of the total 747 homicidal head injuries. There were 206(27.57%) upper limb, 176(23.56%) spinal, 139(18.60%) abdominal, 135(18.07%) thoracic, 58(7.76%) lower limb and 33(4.41%) pelvic injuries found as associated injury. There were 258(34.53%) fractures of occipital followed by 209(28.29%) parietal, 113(15.01%) frontal, 104(13.75%) temporal, 24(3.21%) ant. Cranial fossa, 23(3.07%) post. Cranial fossa and 16(2.08%) of middle cranial fossa fractures. Extradural haemorrhage was more i.e. 434 cases (58.43%) followed by subdural, combination of all, subarachnoid and intra-cerebral haemorrhages. Cases of concussion were more common i.e. 445(59.75%) than lacerated and combination of them. Blunt weapon tops the list of causative weapons i.e. 669(89.22%) than firearms 59(8.07%) and sharp pointed weapons 19(2.68%).

  10. Medical Students Who Pursue a Joint MD/MBA Degree: Who Are They and Where Are They Heading?

    PubMed

    Krupat, Edward; Dienstag, Jules L; Kester, W Carl; Finkelstein, Stan N

    2016-01-21

    Increasingly, health care is being delivered in large, complex organizations, and physicians must learn to function effectively in them. As a result, several medical and business schools have developed joint programs to train physician leaders who receive both medical degree (MD) and master of business administration (MBA) degrees. We examined several themes in relation to these programs, revolving around concerns about who is attracted to them and whether exposure to the differing cultures of medicine and business have an impact on the professional identities of their graduates as manifested in their motivations, aspirations, and careers. We addressed these issues by studying students in the joint MD/MBA program at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Harvard Business School (HBS). Our data came from several internal sources and a survey of all students enrolled in the joint program in spring 2013. We found relatively few differences between joint program students and equivalent cohorts of HMS students in terms of personal characteristics, preadmission performance, and performance at HMS and HBS. Contrary to the concerns that such programs may draw students away from medicine, the vast majority embraced careers involving extensive postgraduate medical training, with long-term plans that leveraged their new perspectives and skills to improve health care delivery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Dissonant Role Perception and Paradoxical Adjustments: An Exploratory Study on Medical Residents' Collaboration with Senior Doctors and Head Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiordelli, Maddalena; Schulz, Peter J.; Caiata Zufferey, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A good collaboration between health professionals is considered to have benefits for patients, healthcare staff, and organizations. Nevertheless, effective interprofessional collaboration is difficult to achieve. This is particularly true for collaboration between Medical Residents (MRs) and the immediate colleagues they interact with, as Senior…

  12. Dissonant Role Perception and Paradoxical Adjustments: An Exploratory Study on Medical Residents' Collaboration with Senior Doctors and Head Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiordelli, Maddalena; Schulz, Peter J.; Caiata Zufferey, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A good collaboration between health professionals is considered to have benefits for patients, healthcare staff, and organizations. Nevertheless, effective interprofessional collaboration is difficult to achieve. This is particularly true for collaboration between Medical Residents (MRs) and the immediate colleagues they interact with, as Senior…

  13. Understanding the Subjective Experience of Medication Adherence for Older Urban African Americans With Type 2 Diabetes and a History of Illicit Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Brandy Harris; Reese, Ashante M; Chard, Sarah; Roth, Erin G; Quinn, Charlene; Eckert, J Kevin

    2017-04-01

    African Americans experience high rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Self-management strategies, such as medication adherence, are key to mitigating negative T2D outcomes. This article addresses a gap in the literature by examining the intersections of drug abuse histories and medication adherence among urban, older African Americans with T2D. In-depth interview data were collected as part of a larger ethnographic study examining the subjective experience of T2D among urban older adults. Two representative focal cases were selected and thematic analysis performed to illustrate how former illicit drug addicts perceive prescription medication usage. Narratives reveal that participants are displeased about having to take prescription drugs and are making lifestyle changes to reduce medication usage and maintain sobriety. Previous drug abuse not only complicates medication adherence but is also a significant part of how older African Americans who are former drug users frame their understanding of T2D more broadly.

  14. Stress Level of Dental and Medical Students: Comparison of Effects of a Subject-Based Curriculum versus a Case-Based Integrated Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Fatemah A; Karimi, Anfal A; Alboloushi, Naela A; Al-Omari, Qasem D; AlSairafi, Fatimah J; Qudeimat, Muawia A

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the stress level of medical and dental students at Kuwait University after a case-based integrated curriculum replaced the former subject-based curriculum. A modified version of the Dental Environment Stress questionnaire was used to measure possible stressors for both medical and dental students. The investigators administered the questionnaire for the first time in 2008, when Kuwait University medical and dental schools followed a subject-based curriculum (group A). The same questionnaire was administered for a second time in 2014, when both medical and dental schools had adopted a case-based integrated curriculum (group B). A total of 345 fifth- and sixth-year medical and dental students responded to the questionnaire (group A=187, group B=158), with an overall 83% response rate. The results showed that, for both the dental and medical students, changing to a case-based integrated curriculum raised the stress level for most of the stressors evaluated. "Inconsistency of feedback on work between different instructors," "difficulties in communicating with teaching staff," "amount of assigned class work," and "examinations and grades" were some of the statistically significant stressors for group B students. Female students reported higher levels of stress than male students in both groups. These results suggest that introducing stress management education into the case-based integrated dental and medical curricula could enhance students' psychological well-being.

  15. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    Head lice are parasitic wingless insects. They live on people's heads and feed on their blood. An adult louse ... Children ages 3-11 and their families get head lice most often. Personal hygiene has nothing to ...

  16. Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... Schedules Nutrient Shortfall Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Head Lice Head Lice Condition Family HealthKids and Teens Share Head Lice Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Causes4. Prevention5. ...

  17. Head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... a child's head circumference. Normal ranges for a child's sex and age (weeks, months), based on values that experts have obtained for normal growth rates of infants' and children's heads. Measurement of the head circumference is an ...

  18. A stepped wedge, cluster controlled trial of an intervention to improve safety and quality on medical wards: the HEADS-UP study protocol.

    PubMed

    Pannick, Samuel; Beveridge, Iain; Ashrafian, Hutan; Long, Susannah J; Athanasiou, Thanos; Sevdalis, Nick

    2015-06-22

    The majority of preventable deaths in healthcare are due to errors on general wards. Staff perceptions of safety correlate with patient survival, but effectively translating ward teams' concerns into tangibly improved care remains problematic. The Hospital Event Analysis Describing Significant Unanticipated Problems (HEADS-UP) trial evaluates a structured, multidisciplinary team briefing, capturing safety threats and adverse events, with rapid feedback to clinicians and service managers. This is the first study to rigorously assess a simpler intervention for general medical units, alongside an implementation model applicable to routine clinical practice. 7 wards from 2 hospitals will progressively incorporate the intervention into daily practice over 14 months. Wards will adopt HEADS-UP in a pragmatic sequence, guided by local clinical enthusiasm. Initial implementation will be facilitated by a research lead, but rapidly delegated to clinical teams. The primary outcome is excess length of stay (a surplus stay of 24 h or more, compared to peer institutions' Healthcare Resource Groups-predicted length of stay). Secondary outcomes are 30-day readmission or excess length of stay; in-hospital death or death/readmission within 30 days; healthcare-acquired infections; processes of escalation of care; use of traditional incident-reporting systems; and patient safety and teamwork climates. HEADS-UP will be analysed as a stepped wedge cluster controlled trial. With 7840 patients, using best and worst case predictions, the study would achieve between 75% and 100% power to detect a 2-14% absolute risk reduction in excess length of stay (two-sided p<0.05). Regression analysis will use generalised linear mixed models or generalised estimating equations, and a time-to-event regression model. A qualitative analysis will evaluate facilitators and barriers to HEADS-UP implementation and impact. Participating institutions' Research and Governance departments approved the study

  19. Muscle activity and head kinematics in unconstrained movements in subjects with chronic neck pain; cervical motor dysfunction or low exertion motor output?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic neck pain after whiplash associated disorders (WAD) may lead to reduced displacement and peak velocity of neck movements. Dynamic neck movements in people with chronic WAD are also reported to display altered movement patterns such as increased irregularity, which is suggested to signify impaired motor control. As movement irregularity is strongly related to the velocity and displacement of movement, we wanted to examine whether the increased irregularity in chronic WAD could be accounted for by these factors. Methods Head movements were completed in four directions in the sagittal plane at three speeds; slow (S), preferred (P) and maximum (M) in 15 men and women with chronic WAD and 15 healthy, sex and age-matched control participants. Head kinematics and measures of movement smoothness and symmetry were calculated from position data. Surface electromyography (EMG) was recorded bilaterally from the sternocleidomastoid and splenius muscles and the root mean square (rms) EMG amplitude for the accelerative and decelerative phases of movement were analyzed. Results The groups differed significantly with regard to movement velocity, acceleration, displacement, smoothness and rmsEMG amplitude in agonist and antagonist muscles for a series of comparisons across the test conditions (range 17 – 121%, all p-values < 0.05). The group differences in peak movement velocity and acceleration persisted after controlling for movement displacement. Controlling for differences between the groups in displacement and velocity abolished the difference in measures of movement smoothness and rmsEMG amplitude. Conclusions Simple, unconstrained head movements in participants with chronic WAD are accomplished with reduced velocity and displacement, but with normal muscle activation levels and movement patterns for a given velocity and displacement. We suggest that while reductions in movement velocity and displacement are robust changes and may be of clinical

  20. Writing otorhinolaryngology head & neck surgery operative reports.

    PubMed

    Laccourreye, O; Rubin, F; Villeneuve, A; Bonfils, P

    2017-04-04

    Only about ten articles devoted to operative reports have been published in the medical literature, but this document is essential, both medically and legally, to ensure optimal management of operated patients. In this technical note, based on published studies on this subject, the authors describe the key features of operating reports after otorhinolaryngology head & neck surgery and emphasize the need to write this document during the minutes after the end of the operation, the importance of standardization and its teaching role during surgical training.

  1. A Guide to Medications Inducing Salivary Gland Dysfunction, Xerostomia, and Subjective Sialorrhea: A Systematic Review Sponsored by the World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Andy; Joshi, Revan Kumar; Ekström, Jörgen; Aframian, Doron; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Proctor, Gordon; Narayana, Nagamani; Villa, Alessandro; Sia, Ying Wai; Aliko, Ardita; McGowan, Richard; Kerr, Alexander Ross; Jensen, Siri Beier; Vissink, Arjan; Dawes, Colin

    2017-03-01

    Medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction (MISGD), xerostomia (sensation of oral dryness), and subjective sialorrhea cause significant morbidity and impair quality of life. However, no evidence-based lists of the medications that cause these disorders exist. Our objective was to compile a list of medications affecting salivary gland function and inducing xerostomia or subjective sialorrhea. Electronic databases were searched for relevant articles published until June 2013. Of 3867 screened records, 269 had an acceptable degree of relevance, quality of methodology, and strength of evidence. We found 56 chemical substances with a higher level of evidence and 50 with a moderate level of evidence of causing the above-mentioned disorders. At the first level of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system, 9 of 14 anatomical groups were represented, mainly the alimentary, cardiovascular, genitourinary, nervous, and respiratory systems. Management strategies include substitution or discontinuation of medications whenever possible, oral or systemic therapy with sialogogues, administration of saliva substitutes, and use of electro-stimulating devices. While xerostomia was a commonly reported outcome, objectively measured salivary flow rate was rarely reported. Moreover, xerostomia was mostly assessed as an adverse effect rather than the primary outcome of medication use. This study may not include some medications that could cause xerostomia when administered in conjunction with others or for which xerostomia as an adverse reaction has not been reported in the literature or was not detected in our search. We compiled a comprehensive list of medications with documented effects on salivary gland function or symptoms that may assist practitioners in assessing patients who complain of dry mouth while taking medications. The list may also prove useful in helping practitioners anticipate adverse effects and consider alternative medications.

  2. Acute reduction of anandamide-hydrolase (FAAH) activity is coupled with a reduction of nociceptive pathways facilitation in medication-overuse headache subjects after withdrawal treatment.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Armando; Arce-Leal, Natalia; Tassorelli, Cristina; Gasperi, Valeria; Sances, Grazia; Blandini, Fabio; Serrao, Mariano; Bolla, Monica; Pierelli, Francesco; Nappi, Giuseppe; Maccarrone, Mauro; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2012-10-01

    We investigated (1) a possible relationship between the functional activity of the endocannabinoid system and the facilitation of pain processing in migraineurs with medication-overuse headache, and (2) the effect of withdrawal treatment on both. The endocannabinoid system antinociception effect includes prevention of nociceptive pathways sensitization. The sensitization of the pain pathways has been demonstrated to be pivotal in the development and maintenance of chronic form of migraine, including medication-overuse headache. We used the temporal summation threshold of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex to explore the spinal cord pain processing, and the platelet activity of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase to detect the functional state of the endocannabinoid system in 27 medication-overuse headache subjects before and 10 and 60 days after a standard withdrawal treatment and compared results with those of 14 controls. A significantly reduced temporal summation threshold and increased related pain sensation was found in subjects before withdrawal treatment when compared with controls. A significant fatty acid amide hydrolase activity reduction coupled with a significant improvement (reduction) in facilitation of spinal cord pain processing (increase in temporal summation threshold and reduction in related pain sensation) was found in medication-overuse headache subjects at both 10 and 60 days after withdrawal treatment when compared with medication-overuse headache subjects before withdrawal treatment. We demonstrated a marked facilitation in spinal cord pain processing in medication-overuse headache before withdrawal treatment when compared with controls. Furthermore, the acute reduction of the fatty acid amide hydrolase activity coupled with a reduction of the facilitation in pain processing immediately (10 days) after withdrawal treatment and its persistence 60 days after withdrawal treatment could represent the consequence of a mechanism devoted to

  3. Effect of 1% Inspired CO2 During Head-Down Tilt on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, and Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, S. S.; Hu, X.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Phillips, T. R.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Taibbi, G.; Zwart, S. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome experienced by many astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. In addition, elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has also been hypothesized to contribute to the development of VIIP. We seek to determine if an acute, mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the ISS, combined with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt will induce ophthalmic and ICP changes consistent with the VIIP syndrome.

  4. Head-to-head comparison of 11C-PiB and 18F-FC119S for Aβ imaging in healthy subjects, mild cognitive impairment patients, and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Kim, Byung Il; Park, Su Yeon; Ko, In Ok; Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jun-Young; Bu, Seon Hee; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chi, Dae Yoon; Ha, Jeong Ho; Lim, Sang Moo

    2017-03-01

    As a new beta amyloid (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, F-FC119S has shown higher cortical uptake in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) than that in healthy control subjects without adverse effects in a previous preliminary study. The aim of this study was to compare F-FC119S PET and C-PiB PET in healthy control (HC) subjects, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and AD patients.A total of 48 subjects, including 28 HC subjects, 10 MCI patients, and 10 AD patients, underwent static F-FC119S PET (30 minutes after intravenous [i.v.] injection) and C-PiB PET (40 minutes after i.v. injection) on the same day. Both PET images were visually and quantitatively assessed. Standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were calculated for each brain region using the cerebellar cortex as a reference region.None (0%) of the 28 HC subjects and 4 (40%) of 10 MCI patients had positive scans on both PET images. Of the 10 AD patients, 7 (70%) had positive scans on C-PiB PET while 6 (60%) had positive scans on F-FC119S PET. Overall, 47 (98%) of 48 participants showed identical results based on visual analysis. Cortical SUVR of F-FC119S was higher in AD patients (1.38 ± 0.16), followed by that in MCI patients (1.24 ± 0.10) and in HC subjects (1.14 ± 0.05). Compared with C-PiB PET, F-FC119S PET yielded a higher effect size (d = 2.02 vs. 1.67) in AD patients and a slightly lower effect size (d = 1.26 vs. 1.38) in MCI patients. In HC subjects, the nonspecific binding of F-FC119S to white matter (with the frontal cortex-to-white matter SUV ratio of 0.76) was slightly lower than that of C-PiB (ratio of 0.73). There was a significant linear correlation (slope = 0.41, r = 0.78, P < 0.001) between C-PiB and F-FC119S cortical SUVR.We could safely obtain images similar to C-PiB PET imaging Aβ in the brain using F-FC119S PET. Therefore, F-FC119S might be suitable for imaging Aβ deposition.

  5. Head-trunk kinematics during high-velocity-low-amplitude manipulation of the cervical spine in asymptomatic subjects: helical axis computation and anatomic motion modeling.

    PubMed

    Dugailly, Pierre-Michel; Sobczak, Stéphane; Van Geyt, Bernard; Bonnechère, Bruno; Maroye, Laura; Moiseev, Fedor; Rooze, Marcel; Salvia, Patrick; Feipel, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the in vivo 3-dimensional kinematics of the head during cervical manipulation including helical axis (HA) computation and anatomic motion representation. Twelve asymptomatic volunteers were included in this study. An osteopathic practitioner performed 1 to 3 manipulations (high-velocity and low-amplitude [HVLA] multiple component technique) of the cervical spine (between C2 and C5) with the patient in the sitting position. During manipulation, head motion was collected using an optoelectronic system and expressed relative to the thorax. Motion data were processed to analyze primary and coupled motions and HA parameters. Anatomic motion representation including HA was obtained. During manipulation, average maximal range of motion was 39° (SD, 6°), 21° (SD, 7°), and 8° (SD, 5°) for lateral bending (LB), axial rotation (AR), and flexion extension, respectively. For the impulse period, magnitude averaged of 8° (SD, 2°), 5° (SD, 2°), and 3° (SD, 2°), for LB, AR, and flexion extension, respectively. Mean impulse velocity was 139°/s (SD, 39°/s). Concerning AR/LB ratios, an average of 0.6 (SD, 0.3) was observed for global motion, premanipulation positioning, and impulse. Mean HA was mostly located ipsilateral to the impulse side and displayed an oblique orientation. This study demonstrated limited range of AR during cervical spine manipulation and provided new perspectives for the development of visualization tools, which might be helpful for practitioners and for the analysis of cervical manipulation using HA computation and anatomic representation of motion. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Shifting subjects of health-care: placing "medical tourism" in the context of Malaysian domestic health-care reform.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Meghann

    2011-01-01

    "Medical tourism" has frequently been held to unsettle naturalised relationships between the state and its citizenry. Yet in casting "medical tourism" as either an outside "innovation" or "invasion," scholars have often ignored the role that the neoliberal retrenchment of social welfare structures has played in shaping the domestic health-care systems of the "developing" countries recognised as international medical travel destinations. While there is little doubt that "medical tourism" impacts destinations' health-care systems, it remains essential to contextualise them. This paper offers a reading of the emergence of "medical tourism" from within the context of ongoing health-care privatisation reform in one of today's most prominent destinations: Malaysia. It argues that "medical tourism" to Malaysia has been mobilised politically both to advance domestic health-care reform and to cast off the country's "underdeveloped" image not only among foreign patient-consumers but also among its own nationals, who are themselves increasingly envisioned by the Malaysian state as prospective health-care consumers.

  7. Noncompliance with Human Subjects' Protection Requirements as a Reason for Retracting Papers: Survey of Retraction Notices on Medical Papers Published from 1981 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yusuke; Muto, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Though protection of human research subjects is universally recognized as a critical requirement for the ethical conduct of research, few studies have examined retractions of medical articles through apparent noncompliance with that requirement. From our survey of 99 retracted papers published from 1981 to 2011, we found that the basis for those decisions was poorly explained in retraction notices and that most of the articles continued to be cited. In retraction notices, the current manner of explaining failure to protect human subjects is misleading and confusing.

  8. Head-to-head comparison of 11C-PiB and 18F-FC119S for Aβ imaging in healthy subjects, mild cognitive impairment patients, and Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Kim, Byung Il; Park, Su Yeon; Ko, In Ok; Lee, Kyo Chul; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Jun-Young; Bu, Seon Hee; Kim, Jung Hwa; Chi, Dae Yoon; Ha, Jeong Ho; Lim, Sang Moo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As a new beta amyloid (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, 18F-FC119S has shown higher cortical uptake in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) than that in healthy control subjects without adverse effects in a previous preliminary study. The aim of this study was to compare 18F-FC119S PET and 11C-PiB PET in healthy control (HC) subjects, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and AD patients. A total of 48 subjects, including 28 HC subjects, 10 MCI patients, and 10 AD patients, underwent static 18F-FC119S PET (30 minutes after intravenous [i.v.] injection) and 11C-PiB PET (40 minutes after i.v. injection) on the same day. Both PET images were visually and quantitatively assessed. Standardized uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were calculated for each brain region using the cerebellar cortex as a reference region. None (0%) of the 28 HC subjects and 4 (40%) of 10 MCI patients had positive scans on both PET images. Of the 10 AD patients, 7 (70%) had positive scans on 11C-PiB PET while 6 (60%) had positive scans on 18F-FC119S PET. Overall, 47 (98%) of 48 participants showed identical results based on visual analysis. Cortical SUVR of 18F-FC119S was higher in AD patients (1.38 ± 0.16), followed by that in MCI patients (1.24 ± 0.10) and in HC subjects (1.14 ± 0.05). Compared with 11C-PiB PET, 18F-FC119S PET yielded a higher effect size (d = 2.02 vs. 1.67) in AD patients and a slightly lower effect size (d = 1.26 vs. 1.38) in MCI patients. In HC subjects, the nonspecific binding of 18F-FC119S to white matter (with the frontal cortex-to-white matter SUV ratio of 0.76) was slightly lower than that of 11C-PiB (ratio of 0.73). There was a significant linear correlation (slope = 0.41, r = 0.78, P < 0.001) between 11C-PiB and 18F-FC119S cortical SUVR. We could safely obtain images similar to 11C-PiB PET imaging Aβ in the brain using 18F-FC119S PET. Therefore, 18F-FC119S might be suitable for imaging Aβ deposition

  9. A Conflict in Your Head: An Exploration of Trainee Science Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge Development and Its Impact on Teacher Self-Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Teachers' subject matter knowledge (SMK) is one factor contributing to teaching 'successfully', as this provides a basis from which pedagogical content knowledge develops. UK-based trainee science teachers teach all sciences to age 14 and often up to age 16. Trainees have specialist science knowledge in chemistry, physics, or biology from their…

  10. Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... from becoming larger and causing more serious problems. Antiplatelets are medications that stop blood particles called platelets ... an angioplasty procedure. Aspirin is one type of antiplatelet medicine. (See "Aspirin: Take With Caution" ) Beta blockers ...

  11. [Experiments on living subjects: the vivisection debate in German and British medical weekly journals 1919-1939].

    PubMed

    Lisner, Wiebke

    2009-01-01

    By the end of the 1920s, animal experiments were considered a standardized procedure for testing medical substances and therapies. In the context of the so-called "crisis of medicine", however, some physicians and the wider lay public in Germany and Great Britain criticized animal based research. While British antivivisectionists had little relevance in the 1930s, their German counterparts allied with the National Socialist Party and gained social and political force. The debates within the German and British medical profession about doctors' interventions in that debate, as well as the public perception of doctors will be analysed on the basis of the most important medical weekly journals of the time, that were involved in these debates.

  12. [Medical professionals on the subject of their core values: the importance of practice-based stories and intrinsic motivation].

    PubMed

    Witman, Yolande; van den Kerkhof, Peter C M; Braat, Didi D M

    2013-01-01

    In the current system for guaranteeing quality of care, emphasis is placed firmly on external control of professionals. We looked for a way to appeal to the intrinsic motivation of medical professionals and to discover what they mean by 'good work'. This was achieved with the aid of reflective sessions using the toolkit 'Good Work': in four sessions three different groups of medical professionals (medical department chairs, residents and interns) from a Dutch university hospital reflected on the topics 'excellence', 'moral responsibility' and 'personal engagement'. The participants exchanged practice-based stories during the sessions. The most important theme was moral responsibility, with its accompanying dilemmas. The sessions gave rise to feelings of mutual acknowledgement, recognition, inspiration and motivation. Sharing meaningful practice-based stories can be considered as a 'moment of learning', strengthening professional identity and stimulating intrinsic motivation. More space for this form of reflection might restore the balance with external control systems.

  13. Influence of a vertical subject on research in biomedicine and activities of The Cochrane Collaboration branch on medical students' knowledge and attitudes toward evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Balajić, Karolina; Barac-Latas, Vesna; Drenjančević, Ines; Ostojić, Marko; Fabijanić, Damir; Puljak, Livia

    2012-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether the introduction of a vertical subject on research in biomedicine and founding of The Cochrane Collaboration branch at the University of Split School of Medicine influenced students’ knowledge and attitudes toward evidence-based medicine (EBM), including the use of research literature. Methods We used a 26-item questionnaire on EBM knowledge and attitudes to survey 1232 medical students of all study years in 3 medical schools in Croatia (Split, Rijeka, Osijek) and the Croatian-speaking medical school in Mostar (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Results Students from the University of Split School of Medicine who had been exposed to the vertical subject on research in biomedicine and activities of The Cochrane Collaboration at the school had better knowledge and more positive attitudes toward EBM. In general, students rarely searched for evidence; 28% of students searched for evidence more than once a month and 96% of students used only textbooks in Croatian and teachers’ handouts, even though 74% of students agreed that articles from scholarly journals were an important supplement for textbooks. Conclusion Building up an environment that fosters EBM may be beneficial for students’ knowledge and attitudes toward EBM. Teachers should encourage and require using evidence during all the courses in medical school. PMID:22911530

  14. Heads Up

    MedlinePlus

    ... Us HEADS UP Apps Reshaping the Culture Around Concussion in Sports Get HEADS UP on Your Web Site Concussion ... fit, and maintain the right helmet for specific sports. Concussion Laws Learn about Return to Play and other ...

  15. Head MRI

    MedlinePlus

    ... the head; MRI - cranial; NMR - cranial; Cranial MRI; Brain MRI; MRI - brain; MRI - head ... the test, tell your provider if you have: Brain aneurysm clips An artificial heart valves Heart defibrillator ...

  16. Management of Jehovah's Witnesses in otolaryngology, head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Adelola, Olubukola A; Ahmed, Ishtiaque; Fenton, John E

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative that surgeons should have some knowledge and understanding of the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses to respect the patient's wishes and effectively minimize and manage blood loss. The objective of this review was to provide a management strategy for Jehovah's Witness patients undergoing otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, because there is paucity of information regarding this within our literature. A systematic review of medical literature was conducted. Articles were identified using MEDLINE (1966-2007). The search strategy used Medical Subject Heading terms Jehovah's Witnesses, Beliefs, Ethical and Legal issues, Blood transfusion alternatives, ENT, Head and Neck surgery in Jehovah' witnesses. There is a broad range of nonblood surgical management strategies available in other specialities, making major surgery possible within this population. This review suggests recommendations in elective surgery, trauma, and emergencies.

  17. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Barbara L; Weiner, Leonard B

    2002-09-01

    Head lice infestation is associated with little morbidity but causes a high level of anxiety among parents of school-aged children. This statement attempts to clarify issues of diagnosis and treatment of head lice and makes recommendations for dealing with head lice in the school setting.

  18. The relation of intrinsic religiousness to the subjective health of Greek medical inpatients: the mediating role of illness-related coping.

    PubMed

    Karademas, Evangelos C; Petrakis, Charoula

    2009-08-01

    A large number of studies suggest a significant beneficial relationship between religiousness and many health indicators. The aim of this study was to (1) examine the association between intrinsic religiousness and subjective health in a sample of medical inpatients; (2) examine the mediating role of illness-related coping. A cross-sectional design was employed. Participants were 128 inpatients suffering from a coronary artery disease, cancer, or a renal disease. Intrinsic religiousness was found to be uncorrelated to psychological symptoms or self-rated health. Weak to modest positive correlations were noticed with wishful thinking, emotional reactions, and palliative coping. These coping strategies were also found to mediate the relationship to subjective health measures. Results suggest a weak, indirect, and negative relation of intrinsic religiousness to participants' subjective health. Situational, assessment, and conceptual factors may underlie the discrepancy between these findings and research supporting the health benefits of religiousness.

  19. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V; Rego, Paulo; Dantas, Pedro; Gaspar, Augusto; Soldado, Francisco; Consciência, José G

    2017-05-01

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω°) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α°) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω°. We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω° and circumferential α°). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α° at 3/1 o´clock were 46.9°/60.8° overall, 51.8°/65.4° for men and 45.7°/55.3° for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α° correlated with higher Ω°, meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α° was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α° measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω°, may enable a more accurate diagnosis. • 95% reference interval limits of cam morphotype were beyond currently defined thresholds. • Current morphometric definitions for cam-type morphotype should be applied with care. • Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter are significantly gender different. • Cam and alpha angle thresholds should be defined according to sex/location. • Quantitative 3D morphometric assessment allows thorough and reproducible FAI diagnosis and monitoring.

  20. Characterizing the Vertical Distribution of Hydraulic Conductivity Using the Multilevel Slug Test Subject to Skin Effects: Comparison of the Uniform-head and Uniform-flux Wellbore Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    wei-Chiang, C.; Chen, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    The multilevel slug test (MLST) is an in-well technique in characterizing the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity K(z) in granular or fractured formations. In modeling MLST, the well screen is either simulated as a uniform-flux (UF) or a uniform head (UH) condition. This study investigates the impact of the skin effect, positive or negative, on the UH and UF models. The positive skin effect, as associated with a reduced hydraulic conductivity surrounding the well due to drilling mud invasion, is taken into account by making use of a skin factor, Sk.The negative skin effect, as associated with an increased hydraulic conductivity due to overdeveloping of the well, is modeled by using an effective well radius, re, which is greater than or equal to the well radius, rw. The UF and UH models are compared using different values of Sk and re for a variety of the partial penetration ratio of screen length to aquifer thickness, φ, the vertical anisotropy ratio of hydraulic conductivity, κ, and the aspect ratio of rw to the screen length, α. It is found that (1) the two models yield results of negligible difference when the well fully penetrates the aquifer (i.e., φ=1) regardless of the values of α,κ, Sk or re, (2) the two models yield essentially the same results for negative skin for all α and κ, (3) the difference between the two models decreases as Sk gets larger, regardless of the values of α, φ, or κ, yet it becomes negligible for Sk is greater than unity, and (4) when the skin effect is absent, the maximum difference between the two models is within 3-5%. As a result, it is suggested the UF model be used since it is mathematically easier to solve than the UH model, with or without skin effects.

  1. Topographic quantitative EEG sequelae of chronic marihuana use: a replication using medically and psychiatrically screened normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Struve, F A; Straumanis, J J; Patrick, G; Leavitt, J; Manno, J E; Manno, B R

    1999-10-01

    In two previous studies it was reported that chronic marihuana (THC) use was associated with unique quantitative EEG features which were present in the non-intoxicated state. THC users, as contrasted with controls, had significant elevations of Absolute Power, Relative Power, and Coherence of alpha activity over the bilateral frontal cortex. Furthermore, a quantitative EEG discriminant function analyses permitted a 95% correct user versus non-user classification. However, because all of the THC users and 58% of the non-user controls were psychiatric inpatients, diagnostic and medication effects, if any, were uncontrolled. In the present study the same quantitative EEG methods were used to study daily THC users and non-user controls who underwent a rigorous screening process to insure that they were medically and psychiatrically healthy. The results of previous studies were replicated and an additional EEG correlate of chronic THC exposure (reduced alpha frequency) was identified.

  2. Toward a better understanding of gender-based performance in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship: women outscore men on the NBME subject examination at one medical school.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Carolina; Bustamante, Alejandrina; Wang, Lili; Friedman, Frederick; Chen, Katherine T

    2015-03-01

    To better understand why women outperform men in the obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn) clerkship. The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study of students who rotated in the Ob/Gyn clerkship from 2008 to 2011 and graduated by May 2012 from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. They compared female and male students' performance on preclerkship standardized tests (the Medical College Admission Test [MCAT] and United States Medical Licensing Examination [USMLE] Step 1) and on Ob/Gyn clerkship components (clinical skills achievement, oral and written case presentations, clinical evaluations, and National Board of Medical Examiners [NBME] subject examination). The study included 163 (53.4%) women and 142 (46.6%) men. Among students who took the MCAT, women scored lower than men with a mean (standard deviation) of 33.2 (3.2) versus 34.6 (3.3) (P=.001). Similarly, among all students, women scored lower than men on the USMLE Step 1: 227 (19.1) versus 232.5 (18.8) (P=.012). There were no significant gender differences on most clerkship components. However, women scored higher than men on the Ob/Gyn NBME subject examination: 78.0 (7.5) versus 74.8 (8.4) (P=.001). Consequently, female students achieved higher overall clerkship scores than men: 88.5 (5.6) versus 87.1 (5.1) (P=.024). Analysis of covariance confirmed that gender is associated with NBME subject examination score (P<.001). Women outscored men on the NBME subject examination in Ob/Gyn and thereby outperformed men in the Ob/Gyn clerkship.

  3. A study of the association between patterns of eye drop prescription and medication usage in glaucoma subjects.

    PubMed

    Kawai-Tsuboi, Naoko; Kawai, Motofumi; Minami, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Akitoshi

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between patterns of eye drop prescription and medication usage in patients with glaucoma. Sixty-seven Japanese patients with glaucoma who were prescribed topical antiglaucoma medications including a prostaglandin analogue bilaterally for >6 months at Nayoro City General Hospital, Nayoro, Japan, were included in the study. A self-administered, 5-item patient questionnaire was administered to determine how patients routinely use medications, including the method of eye drop administration, number of eye drops per instillation, accuracy of eye drop placement, weekly frequency of eye drop application, and their awareness of local side effects. The number of prostaglandin analogue bottles prescribed monthly was compared in each factor. The mean patient age was 74.4±10.0 years (range, 52 to 95 y; 39 women, 28 men). The mean duration of glaucoma treatment was 4.2±3.2 years (range, 0.7 to 10.6 y). Patients who placed the eye drops outside the eye were prescribed significantly more bottles monthly (P=0.008). The other factors had no significant effect on the number of bottles prescribed monthly. Patients with glaucoma who used eye drops incorrectly were routinely prescribed additional bottles of eye drops. Ophthalmologists should determine whether patients who request an unusual number of eye drops are using the eye drops correctly.

  4. Does dimeticone clear head lice?

    PubMed

    2007-07-01

    Head lice infestation is common and mainly affects children of primary school age. Treatments include licensed topical preparations containing conventional chemical insecticides and medical devices. Each of these fail to eradicate head lice in some patients and resistance is a problem with chemical insecticides. Dimeticone 4% lotion (Hedrin - Thornton & Ross) is a new treatment licensed "for the eradication of head lice infestations". Here we consider its place in the context of other options.

  5. Medical, statistical, ethical and human rights considerations in the assessment of age in children and young people subject to immigration control.

    PubMed

    Aynsley-Green, A; Cole, T J; Crawley, H; Lessof, N; Boag, L R; Wallace, R M M

    2012-06-01

    Unprecedented changes in both the scale and the complexity of international migration have led to international concern and controversy over the assessment of age in children and young people subject to immigration control or seeking asylum who say they are children yet have no documents to prove their stated age. The article reviews the existing evidence on the reliability of medical and non-medical techniques for the assessment of chronological age. There is evidence that radiography (X-rays) of bones and teeth, which is increasingly relied upon by immigration authorities, is imprecise, unethical and potentially unlawful, and should not be used for age assessment. Medical techniques including X-rays continue to be relied upon in the absence of an alternative approach resulting in legal challenges and uncertainty for children and young people. Further work is needed to establish a process for age assessment based on a 'holistic' multi-disciplinary approach which focuses not on chronological age exclusively but rather on the needs of children and young people subject to immigration control.

  6. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  7. Posaconazole tablet pharmacokinetics: lack of effect of concomitant medications altering gastric pH and gastric motility in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Walter K; Chang, Peter S; van Iersel, Marlou L P S; Waskin, Hetty; Krishna, Gopal; Kersemaekers, Wendy M

    2014-07-01

    Posaconazole oral suspension is an extended-spectrum triazole that should be taken with food to maximize absorption. A new posaconazole tablet formulation has demonstrated improved bioavailability over the oral suspension in healthy adults in a fasting state. This study evaluated the effects of concomitant medications altering gastric pH (antacid, ranitidine, and esomeprazole) and gastric motility (metoclopramide) on the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole tablets. This was a prospective open-label 5-way crossover study in 20 healthy volunteers. In each treatment period, a single 400-mg dose (4 100-mg tablets) of posaconazole was administered alone or with 20 ml antacid (2 g of aluminum hydroxide and 2 g of magnesium hydroxide), ranitidine (150 mg), esomeprazole (40 mg), or metoclopramide (15 mg). There was a ≥ 10-day washout between treatment periods. Posaconazole exposure, time to maximum concentration of drug in serum (Tmax), and apparent terminal half-life (t1/2) were similar when posaconazole was administered alone or with medications affecting gastric pH and gastric motility. Geometric mean ratios (90% confidence intervals [CIs]) of the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0-inf) (posaconazole with medications affecting gastric pH and gastric motility versus posaconazole alone) were 1.03 (0.88-1.20) with antacid, 0.97 (0.84-1.12) with ranitidine, 1.01 (0.87-1.17) with esomeprazole, and 0.93 (0.79-1.09) with metoclopramide. Geometric mean ratios (90% CIs) of the maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) were 1.06 (0.90-1.26) with antacid, 1.04 (0.88-1.23) with ranitidine, 1.05 (0.89-1.24) with esomeprazole, and 0.86 (0.73-1.02) with metoclopramide. In summary, in healthy volunteers, the pharmacokinetics of a single 400-mg dose of posaconazole tablets was not altered to a clinically meaningful extent when posaconazole was administered alone or with medications affecting gastric pH or gastric motility.

  8. [Subjectivity, decision and neurodegenerative diseases: reflexions on the role of the clinical psychologist in medical decision making].

    PubMed

    Brocq, H; Liarte, A; Soriani, M-H; Desnuelle, C

    2013-01-01

    Should a patient be forced to accept a treatment, especially when suffering from a neurodegenerative disease? We argue that physicians, nurses and care givers should instead accept his or her choice in accordance with the principle that every patient is an autonomous person able to make a choice, even in case of declined cognition. Beside the legal obligation, we suggest a theoretical approach and focus on the practical impacts of the patient's decision. Our objective is to promote the value of ethical doubt and attentive listening to individual opinions, so as to improve the quality of the medical staff's work and reduce patients' distress when affected by fatal diseases.

  9. Head Start: A Promise for Alaska's Children and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara J.

    In fiscal year 1983 nearly 1,500 Alaskan children under the age of 6 received Head Start services from a total of 262 staff members--149 of whom were classroom personnel--and 1,473 volunteers. Over 700 Head Start children received medical screening, and more than 100 needed and received medical treatment through Head Start. Over 800 Head Start…

  10. [Changes of teaching in the interdisciplinary subject "rehabilitation, physical medicine, naturopathic treatment" in the German medical faculties 2004 to 2006/07].

    PubMed

    Kusak, G; Gülich, M; Lay, W; Morfeld, M; Schwarzkopf, S R; Mau, W

    2008-02-01

    Rehabilitation, Physical Medicine, Naturopathic Treatment (Querschnittsbereich Q-12) was introduced as a compulsory interdisciplinary subject in the revised Federal Medical Licensing Regulations (Approbationsordnung für Arzte) in October 2003. This offered the opportunity to increase the students' interest in rehabilitation-related issues and to integrate current evidence of rehabilitation research. The implementation of the Q-12 in the German medical faculties was investigated by yearly questionnaires during a three-year-period. In 2004, 2005, and 2006/07 anonymous postal questionnaires concerning the teaching in Q-12 were sent to the 36 medical faculties in Germany. Non-responders were reminded at least once by a repeat postal questionnaire. The response rates were 67% in 2004, 72% in 2005, 50% in 2006/07, respectively. Of the 36 faculties 34 responded at least once. Ten faculties responded to all questionnaires. In a considerable number of faculties, Q-12 is being coordinated by university institutions which are not denominated as one of the subjects designated in the Q-12 title. Major differences regarding the implementation of Q-12 were found between the faculties. Further development of Q-12 faces several limitations of resources. Almost all faculties provide curricula for teaching Q 12, some of which are still incomplete. During all three examinations lecturer-centered teaching methods (lectures, seminars, other presentations) were used most frequently. POL-cases and other structured patient oriented teaching were also reported less frequently. E-learning was very rarely offered to the students. Musculoskeletal and neurological disorders were the most frequent specific indications for practice-related integration of Q-12 issues. Compulsory election subjects (Wahlpflichtfächer) related to Q-12 issues before and during the final year of the medical students, are not being offered by all faculties. The vast majority of the faculties advocate an exchange of

  11. Absorption and metabolism of bioactive molecules after oral consumption of cooked edible heads of Cynara scolymus L. (cultivar Violetto di Provenza) in human subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Azzini, E; Bugianesi, R; Romano, F; Di Venere, D; Miccadei, S; Durazzo, A; Foddai, M S; Catasta, G; Linsalata, V; Maiani, G

    2007-05-01

    The current growing interest for natural antioxidants has led to a renewed scientific attention for artichoke, due not only to its nutritional value, but, overall, to its polyphenolic content, showing strong antioxidant properties. The major constituents of artichoke extracts are hydroxycinnamic acids such as chlorogenic acid, dicaffeoylquinic acids caffeic acid and ferulic acid, and flavonoids such as luteolin and apigenin glycosides. In vitro studies, using cultured rat hepatocytes, have shown its hepatoprotective functions and in vivo studies have shown the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis in human subjects. Several studies have shown the effect on animal models of artichoke extracts, while information on human bioavailability and metabolism of hydroxycinnamates derivatives is still lacking. Results showed a plasma maximum concentration of 6.4 (SD 1.8) ng/ml for chlorogenic acid after 1 h and its disappearance within 2 h (P< 0.05). Peak plasma concentrations of 19.5 (SD 6.9) ng/ml for total caffeic acid were reached within 1 h, while ferulic acid plasma concentrations showed a biphasic profile with 6.4 (SD1.5) ng/ml and 8.4 (SD4.6) ng/ml within 1 h and after 8 h respectively. We observed a significant increase of dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid total levels after 8 h (P<0.05). No circulating plasma levels of luteolin and apigenin were present. Our study confirms the bioavailability of metabolites of hydroxycinnamic acids after ingestion of cooked edible Cynara scolymus L. (cultivar Violetto di Provenza).

  12. Full-texts Representations with Medical Subject Headings, and Co-citations Network Reranking Strategies for TREC 2014 Clinical Decision Support Track

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    evaluation campaigns [7]. MeSH concepts were recog- nised in documents using a classical strict mapping (Rabin- Karp algorithm). See [8] for further...details and evaluation of MeSH recognition by Rabin- Karp algo- rithm. MeSH concepts manually assigned by human in- dexers also could be collected when

  13. [Is it possible to predict approval of medical rehabilitation by the extent of fatigue and subjective need for rehabilitation? Development, results and acceptance of a short screening].

    PubMed

    Kobelt, A; Grosch, E; Wasmus, A; Ehlebracht-König, I; Schwarze, M; Krähling, M; Gutenbrunner, C

    2007-02-01

    In earlier studies the lack of correlation between subjective need for rehabilitation of the applicant and the medically determined objective need for rehabilitation was reported again and again. The correlation between fatigue and subjective need for rehabilitation was not yet examined so far. Nevertheless fatigue is not defined sufficiently in the ICD, so interactions between chronic fatigue and somatic diseases are not taken into account appropriately. The following questions are considered: How high is the degree of chronic fatigue in insurees applying for rehabilitation? Is there a correlation between degree of fatigue and need for rehabilitation? Is it possible to predict approval of medical rehabilitation by fatigue and need for rehabilitation? How will insurees accept a screening accompanying their application for rehabilitation? The study is based on data of 500 (response rate 85.6%) insurees of the pension insurance Braunschweig-Hannover, who had applied for medical rehabilitation between 1/2004 and 3/2004. The screening instrument included: scales on functional activity, mobility, social support, coping (IRES), the Chalder Fatigue Scale, SCL 14, Items concerning need for rehabilitation. As statistical methods t-, chi (2)-test, correlations, covariance-analysis and regression analysis are used. 70.2% of the patients claiming rehabilitation reported relevant clinical symptoms of chronic fatigue. There were no differences in age, work status, motivation, or expectations of returning to work, but differences in sex. Patients with chronic fatigue met more citeria of need for rehabilitation. But the approval of medical rehabilitation could not be predicted by fatigue and need for rehabilitation. Nevertheless the acceptance of the screening was high in the insurees. Patients with chronic fatigue met more criteria of need for rehabilitation. But the approval of medical rehabilitation could not be predicted by fatigue and need for rehabilitation. We assume that

  14. Computer-assisted adult medical diagnosis: subject review and evaluation of a new microcomputer-based system.

    PubMed

    Waxman, H S; Worley, W E

    1990-05-01

    Three decades after the conceptual foundation was laid for computer-aided diagnosis, some of its potential has been realized. Systems based on probabilistic reasoning have been developed and applied within limited domains (e.g., acute abdominal pain) and for the general diagnosis of systemic disorders. Less progress has been made in the development and application of diagnostic systems based on "artificial intelligence", reflecting theoretical limits to this application of computers to medicine and the enormity of the task. The presently available probabilistic systems have recently been joined by a new microcomputer-based system, MEDITEL Computer-Assisted Diagnosis, Adult System. The performance of this system was evaluated with both clinical-pathologic conference cases and consecutive admissions with undiagnosed illnesses. The correct diagnosis appeared on the list generated by the system in 80 to 90% of the cases. Experience with this and other systems illustrates current issues in the evaluation of computer systems for aid in diagnosis and of computer-based medical "expert" systems in general. These issues include physician acceptance of these systems and the ethical, legal, and regulatory aspects of computer system application. We conclude that, in appropriately selected cases, the accuracy and efficiency of physician diagnosis can be enhanced with computer assistance, and the risk of overlooking the correct diagnosis can be reduced.

  15. Head & Face Medicine - a new journal for 'intra-interdisciplinary' science. Why? When? Where?

    PubMed

    Stamm, Thomas

    2005-08-24

    The human head and face is the target structure of a large number of medical disciplines which are subject to a continuing trend in medical science - 'ongoing fragmentation' or, to use a better established term, 'opening up new fields'. An adverse side effect of this trend is the separation of scientists, which contributes to a breakdown in communication. Specialization is necessary, but who is able to recombine the pieces of knowledge gained in different branches of science? Who is able to trace back an effect to its cause through the whole system? What is the instrument that enables scientists to think 'laterally', or across disciplines?To be one of these instruments is the vision of Head & Face Medicine. To induce 'intra-interdisciplinary' thinking of scientists by bringing together the findings achieved by different researchers from various specialties, all exploring the same target structure - the human head and face. Head & Face Medicine's objective is to support scientists in gaining new insights from different views, to recognize patterns, to extract new thoughts, to recombine them and bring new visions to life. Evolving tools like the internet, e-publishing, Open Access and open peer review make Head & Face Medicine a cross between a traditional journal and a data stream which can be queried, analyzed and processed with the aim of increasing medical knowledge in the area of head and face medicine. These tools represent several advantages: fast publication, increase of a paper's scientific impact and ethical superiority. Head & Face Medicine looks forward to receiving your contributions.

  16. Extracting Characteristics of the Study Subjects from Full-Text Articles.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Mork, James G

    Characteristics of the subjects of biomedical research are important in determining if a publication describing the research is relevant to a search. To facilitate finding relevant publications, MEDLINE citations provide Medical Subject Headings that describe the subjects' characteristics, such as their species, gender, and age. We seek to improve the recommendation of these headings by the Medical Text Indexer (MTI) that supports manual indexing of MEDLINE. To that end, we explore the potential of the full text of the publications. Using simple recall-oriented rule-based methods we determined that adding sentences extracted from the methods sections and captions to the abstracts prior to MTI processing significantly improved recall and F1 score with only a slight drop in precision. Improvements were also achieved in directly assigning several headings extracted from the full text. These results indicate the need for further development of automated methods capable of leveraging the full text for indexing.

  17. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy and medical treatment for obesity on glucagon-like peptide 1 levels and glucose homeostasis in non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Valderas, Juan Patricio; Irribarra, Veronica; Rubio, Lorena; Boza, Camilo; Escalona, Manuel; Liberona, Yessica; Matamala, Andrea; Maiz, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    The effects of medical and surgical treatments for obesity on glucose metabolism and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) levels independent of weight loss remain unclear. This study aims to assess plasma glucose levels, insulin sensitivity and secretion, and GLP-1 levels before and after sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or medical treatment (MED) for obesity. This study is a prospective, controlled, non-randomised study. Two groups of non-diabetic obese patients with similar BMIs, including a SG group (BMI, 35.5 ± 0.9 kg/m(2); n = 6) and a MED group (BMI, 37.7 ± 1.9 kg/m(2); n = 6) and a group of lean subjects (BMI, 21.7 ± 0.7 kg/m(2); n = 8). Plasma glucose, insulin, and total GLP-1 levels at fasting and after the intake of a standard liquid meal at baseline and at 2 months post-intervention. At baseline, total GLP-1 levels were similar, but obese patients had lower insulin sensitivity and higher insulin secretion than lean subjects. At 2 months post-intervention, SG and MED patients achieved similar weight loss (14.4 ± 0.8%, 15.3 ± 0.9%, respectively). Insulin sensitivity increased in SG and MED patients; however, postprandial insulin secretion decreased after MED, but not after SG. The incremental area under the curve of GLP-1 increased after SG (P = 0.04), but not after MED. Weight loss by medical or surgical treatment improved insulin sensitivity. However, only MED corrected the hyperinsulinemic postprandial state associated to obesity. Postprandial GLP-1 levels increased significantly after SG without duodenal exclusion, which may explain why insulin secretion did not decrease following this surgery.

  18. Implementation of palliative care as a mandatory cross-disciplinary subject (QB13) at the Medical Faculty of the Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Christian; Wenzel-Meyburg, Ursula; Karger, André; Scherg, Alexandra; in der Schmitten, Jürgen; Trapp, Thorsten; Paling, Andreas; Bakus, Simone; Schatte, Gesa; Rudolf, Eva; Decking, Ulrich; Ritz-Timme, Stephanie; Grünewald, Matthias; Schmitz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background: By means of the revision of the Medical Licensure Act for Physicians (ÄAppO) in 2009, undergraduate palliative care education (UPCE) was incorporated as a mandatory cross sectional examination subject (QB13) in medical education in Germany. Its implementation still constitutes a major challenge for German medical faculties. There is a discrepancy between limited university resources and limited patient availabilities and high numbers of medical students. Apart from teaching theoretical knowledge and skills, palliative care education is faced with the particular challenge of imparting a professional and adequate attitude towards incurably ill and dying patients and their relatives. Project description: Against this background, an evidence-based longitudinal UPCE curriculum was systematically developed following Kern’s Cycle [1] and partly implemented and evaluated by the students participating in the pilot project. Innovative teaching methods (virtual standardised/simulated patient contacts, e-learning courses, interdisciplinary and interprofessional collaborative teaching, and group sessions for reflective self-development) aim at teaching palliative care-related core competencies within the clinical context and on an interdisciplinary and interprofessional basis. Results: After almost five years of development and evaluation, the UPCE curriculum comprises 60 teaching units and is being fully implemented and taught for the first time in the winter semester 2014/15. The previous pilot phases were successfully concluded. To date, the pilot phases (n=26), the subproject “E-learning in palliative care” (n=518) and the blended-learning elective course “Communication with dying patients” (n=12) have been successfully evaluated. Conclusion: All conducted development steps and all developed programmes are available for other palliative care educators (Open Access). The integrated teaching formats and methods (video, e-learning module

  19. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... won't stop crying complains of head and neck pain (younger or nonverbal children may be more fussy) ... vision pupils of unequal size weakness or paralysis neck pain or stiffness seizure If your child is unconscious: ...

  20. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  1. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... before. Often, the injury is minor because your skull is hard and it protects your brain. But ... injuries can be more severe, such as a skull fracture, concussion, or traumatic brain injury. Head injuries ...

  2. Head Noises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Explains how a toy called "Sound Bites" can be modified to demonstrate the transmission of sound waves. Students can hear music from the toy when they press it against any bone in their heads or shoulders. (WRM)

  3. Head Tilt

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & Nervous System Heart Infections Learning Disabilities Obesity Orthopedic Prevention Sexually Transmitted Skin Tobacco ...

  4. Head Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... object that's stuck in the wound. previous continue Concussions Concussions — the temporary loss of normal brain function due ... also a type of internal head injury. Repeated concussions can permanently damage the brain. In many cases, ...

  5. Head Pose Estimation Without Manual Initialization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    consisting of video of head move- ments with ground truth measured by a Flock of Birds sensor on the subjectsheads. These sequences are 200 frames in...Ophthalmology and Visual Science, 35:1735-1740, May 1994. [20] J. Smith- Mickelson . Design and application of a head detection and tracking system. Master’s

  6. Head perturbations during walking while viewing a head-fixed target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Vallabh E.; Zivotofsky, Ari Z.; Discenna, Alfred O.; Leigh, R. John

    1995-01-01

    Inexpensive, head-fixed computer displays are now available that subjects can wear during locomotion. Our hypothesis is that viewing a head-fixed visual display will change the character- istics of rotational head perturbations during natural walking. Using a 3-axis angular rate sensor, we measured head rotations during natural or treadmill walking, in 10 normal subjects and 2 patients with deficient vestibular function, as they attempted to view (1) a stationary target at optical infinity; and (2) a target at a distance of 20 cm rigidly attached to the head. Normal subjects and patients showed no significant change in the predominant frequency of head rotations in any plane (ranging 0.7-5.7 Hz) during the two different viewing tasks. Mean peak head velocities also showed no difference during the two viewing conditions except in the yaw plane, in which values were greater while viewing the near target. Predominant frequencies of head rotations were similar in the pitch plane during natural or treadmill walking; however, peak velocities of pitch head rotations were substantially greater during natural walking. One vestibular patient showed modest increases of head velocity during natural walking compared with normal subjects. Rotational head perturbations that occur during natural walking are largely unaffected when subjects view a head-fixed target. There is need to study how such perturbations, which induce vestibular eye movements, affect vision of head-fixed displays.

  7. Visualizing the Structure of Medical Informatics Using Term Co-Occurrence Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore Allan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the structure of medical informatics and the relationship between biomedicine and information science and information technology. Uses co-occurrence analysis of subject headings assigned to items indexed for MEDLINE as well as multidimensional scaling to show seven to eight broad multidisciplinary subject clusters. (Contains 28…

  8. Visualizing the Structure of Medical Informatics Using Term Co-Occurrence Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Theodore Allan

    2000-01-01

    Examines the structure of medical informatics and the relationship between biomedicine and information science and information technology. Uses co-occurrence analysis of subject headings assigned to items indexed for MEDLINE as well as multidimensional scaling to show seven to eight broad multidisciplinary subject clusters. (Contains 28…

  9. [Pilot scheme to gain young professionals in orthopedics and trauma surgery. A new optional subject for students at the medical school in Göttingen (Germany)].

    PubMed

    Schüttrumpf, Jan Philipp; Münzberg, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    The Young Forum of the German Society of Orthopedics and Traumatology is an interest group of young orthopedics and trauma surgeons in Germany. Besides dealing with topics of political interest, the group tries to arouse enthusiasm and interest for musculoskeletal surgery by means of new lectures and teaching methods.An example is the newly invented optional subject for students at the Medical School in Göttingen (Germany). The idea for such a new teaching offer was built by the Young Forum itself. The optional subject was on the syllabus for the first time this year and the organization was done by the university Department of Trauma Surgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. The course is divided in two main parts: a theoretical (16 hours) and a practical (10 hours) one. A good ratio of lectures, skills stations and workshops was on choice. This article explains the course in detail and shows a first evaluation result. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Common and differential pathophysiological features accompany comparable cognitive impairments in medication-free patients with schizophrenia and in healthy aging subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dreher, Jean-Claude; Koch, Paul; Kohn, Philip; Apud, Jose; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Berman, Karen Faith

    2016-01-01

    Background Dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and parahippocampal region along with poor working memory are common neurophysiological and behavioral features associated with schizophrenia and normal aging. It is, however, unknown whether the associated patterns of neural activation differ between these two groups when their cognitive performance is closely matched in a pairwise manner. The authors sought to pinpoint common and differential pathophysiological features that accompany comparable working memory impairments in schizophrenia and healthy aging. Methods Fifty-three subjects were scanned using H215O PET regional cerebral blood flow measurements during working memory. Seventeen medication-free patients with schizophrenia were individually matched for working memory performance with seventeen healthy aging subjects. Brain activation of the two index groups were compared to each other and to nineteen young healthy individuals. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed right DLPFC hypoactivation, both when compared to age-matched controls, and after direct comparison with working memory performance-matched elderly subjects. Moreover, both groups with working memory deficits shared an inability to suppress parahippocampal and anterior medial prefrontal cortex activation. Conclusions These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which impaired working memory performance can arise by showing that both common (parahippocampal/anterior medial PFC) and differential (DLPFC) pathophysiological features accompany similar cognitive impairments. The aging data also demonstrate that poor performance is not necessarily accompanied by the DLPFC hypofunction that was seen in schizophrenia. Finally, these results more closely link the DLPFC functional abnormalities in schizophrenia to the pathophysiology of the disorder, rather than to poor performance per se. PMID:22341369

  11. Minor head injury: pathophysiological or iatrogenic sequelae?

    PubMed

    Newcombe, F; Rabbitt, P; Briggs, M

    1994-06-01

    This study addresses the possibility that cognitive sequelae--albeit of a transient or minor character--can be associated with mild head injury. Twenty men (aged 16-30 years of age), whose post-traumatic amnesia did not exceed eight hours, were examined within 48 hours of their accident and again one month later. This unselected sample had no previous history of head injury. A control group of 20 men of similar socioeconomic background, was selected from medical wards (where they had been admitted for orthopaedic treatment or a minor operation). They were also retested one month after the first examination. Neuropsychological tests were selected to measure abilities often compromised after significant head injury, namely memory and attention. The experimental component consisted of the fractionation of a complex skill (paced addition) to probe for deficits at different stages of information processing: perception and input into storage; search for and retrieval of information from working memory; and paced and unpaced addition. In general, no significant difference was found between the experimental and control groups, with the possible exception of an initial decrement on two working memory tasks: probe digits and a keeping track task (where the subject has to keep in mind and update a number of variables at the same time). The keeping track paradigm, ostensibly of ecological relevance, may well be worth further exploration in memory research, and in studies of more severely head-injured patients. It is further suggested that the appropriate management and counselling of mildly head-injured patients may help to avert symptoms that are of psychological rather than pathophysiological origin.

  12. An evaluation of flight path formats head-up and head-down

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, George A.; Moody, Laura E.; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Kenneth E.

    1988-01-01

    Flight path primary flight display formats were incorporated on head-up and head-down electronic displays and integrated into an Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. Objective and subjective data were collected while ten airline pilots evaluated the formats by flying an approach and landing task under various ceiling, visibility and wind conditions. Deviations from referenced/commanded airspeed, horizontal track, vertical track and touchdown point were smaller using the head-up display (HUD) format than the head-down display (HDD) format, but not significantly smaller. Subjectively, the pilots overwhelmingly preferred (1) flight path formats over attitude formats used in current aircraft, and (2) the head-up presentation over the head-down, primarily because it eliminated the head-down to head-up transition during low visibility landing approaches. This report describes the simulator, the flight displays, the format evaluation, and the results of the objective and subjective data.

  13. Topiramate responsive exploding head syndrome.

    PubMed

    Palikh, Gaurang M; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2010-08-15

    Exploding head syndrome is a rare phenomenon but can be a significant disruption to quality of life. We describe a 39-year-old female with symptoms of a loud bang and buzz at sleep onset for 3 years. EEG monitoring confirmed these events occurred in transition from stage 1 sleep. This patient reported improvement in intensity of events with topiramate medication. Based on these results, topiramate may be an alternative method to reduce the intensity of events in exploding head syndrome.

  14. Heading in football. Part 1: development of biomechanical methods to investigate head response.

    PubMed

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-08-01

    There has been growing controversy regarding long term effects of repeated low severity head impacts such as when heading a football. However, there are few scientific data substantiating these concerns in terms of the biomechanical head response to impact. The present study aimed to develop a research methodology to investigate the biomechanical response of human subjects during intentional heading and identify strategies for reducing head impact severity. A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20-23 and of average stature and weight. The subjects were fitted with photographic targets for kinematic analysis and instrumented to measure head linear/angular accelerations and neck muscle activity. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects executed several specific forward heading manoeuvres in the standing position. Heading speeds up to 11 m/s were seen when the head closing speed was considered. One subject demonstrating averaged flexion-extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human model with a detailed head and neck. The model was exercised under ball incoming speeds of 6-7 m/s with parameter variations including torso/head alignment, neck muscle tensing, and follow through. The model output was subsequently compared with additional laboratory tests with football players (n = 3). Additional heading scenarios were investigated including follow through, non-active ball impact, and non-contact events. Subject and model head responses were evaluated with peak linear and rotational accelerations and maximum incremental head impact power. Modelling of neck muscle tensing predicted lower head accelerations and higher neck loads whereas volunteer head acceleration reductions were not consistent. Modelling of head-torso alignment predicted a modest reduction in volunteer head accelerations. Exaggerated

  15. Response inhibition and reward anticipation in medication-naïve adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a within-subject case-control neuroimaging study.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Susana; Hoekzema, Elseline; Ramos-Quiroga, J Antoni; Richarte, Vanesa; Canals, Clara; Bosch, Rosa; Rovira, Mariana; Soliva, Juan Carlos; Bulbena, Antonio; Tobeña, Adolf; Casas, Miguel; Vilarroya, Oscar

    2012-10-01

    Previous research suggests that ADHD patients are characterized by both reduced activity in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) during response inhibition tasks (such as the Go-NoGo task), and reduced activity in the ventral striatum during reward anticipation tasks (such as the Monetary-Incentive-Delay [MID] task). However, no prior research has applied either of these paradigms in medication-naïve adults with ADHD, nor have these been implemented in an intrasubject manner. The sample consisted of 19 medication-naïve adults with ADHD and 19 control subjects. Main group analyses were based on individually defined regions of interest: the IFG and the VStr for the Go-NoGo and the MID task respectively. In addition, we analyzed the correlation between the two measures, as well as between these measures and the clinical symptoms of ADHD. We observed reduced bilateral VStr activity in adults with ADHD during reward anticipation. No differences were detected in IFG activation on the Go-NoGo paradigm. Correlation analyses suggest that the two tasks are independent at a neural level, but are related behaviorally in terms of the variability of the performance reaction time. Activity in the bilateral VStr but not in the IFG was associated negatively with symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity. Results underline the implication of the reward system in ADHD adult pathophysiology and suggest that frontal abnormalities during response inhibition performance may not be such a pivotal aspect of the phenotype in adulthood. In addition, our findings point toward response variability as a core feature of the disorder. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  17. Magnetic Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoshima, Tokihiko

    Figure 6.1 shows how rapidly the areal density of hard disk drives (HDD) has been increasing over the past 20 years [1]. Several critical innovations were necessary to bring about such rapid progress in the field of magnetic recording [2]. One of the most significant innovations from the viewpoint of material improvement was the electrodeposition of permalloy (Ni80Fe20), which was introduced by IBM in 1979 as the core material of a thin-film inductive head to increase the magnetic recording density [3]. After the introduction of the magneto-resistive (MR) element as the read head and the electrodeposited permalloy as the write head by IBM in 1991 [4], the rate of increase in the recording density of HDDs jumped from 30% per year to 60% per year. Recently, a giant magneto-resistive (GMR) element has been used for the read element instead of the MR element. The rate of increase in the recording density jumped to over 100% per year in 1999, which is an incredible rate of increase. Since 2002, however, the rate of increase has decreased to 30%; thus, new innovations are required to maintain the rate of increase. In 2004, the practical use of perpendicular magnetic recording instead of longitudinal magnetic recording was announced [5]. This system is a critical innovation for developing high-performance HDD systems with high-recording density. The design of the magnetic recording head was changed because of the change of the recording system.

  18. Exercise capacity and physical activity in patients with COPD and healthy subjects classified as Medical Research Council dyspnea scale grade 2.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Warrington, Vicki; Harrison, Samantha; Mitchell, Katy; Steiner, Mick; Morgan, Mike; Singh, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often classified by Medical Research Council (MRC) dyspnea grade and comparisons thus made to healthy individuals. The MRC grade of a healthy population is assumed to be grade 1, although this may be inaccurate. Physical activity and exercise capacity are not well-defined for those with MRC grade 2. This study was undertaken to establish whether there are differences in physical activity and exercise capacity between individuals with COPD and healthy controls, who have all assessed themselves as MRC grade 2. Patients with COPD (n = 83) and 19 healthy controls, with a self-selected MRC grade of 2, completed the Incremental Shuttle Walk Test (ISWT) and wore a SenseWear (BodyMedia, Pittsburgh, PA) activity monitor for 12 hours for 2 weekdays. Adjusting for age, step count and ISWT were significantly reduced for those with COPD, compared with healthy controls (P < .05). Patients with COPD achieved mean (SD) 425.5 (131.3) m on ISWT and took 6022 (3276) steps per day compared with 647.8 (146.3) m and 9462 (4141) steps per day for healthy controls. For subjects achieving 10 000 steps per day, 8 (42.11%) healthy controls achieved this level compared with 7 (8.43%) patients with COPD (P < .01). Healthy individuals may report functional limitations and categorize themselves as MRC grade 2. However, despite both groups subjectively considering themselves similarly functionally limited, exercise capacity and physical activity were significantly reduced in patients with COPD compared with healthy participants. This highlights the importance of early interventions to increase physical performance and prevent functional decline for patients with COPD.

  19. Heading in football. Part 1: Development of biomechanical methods to investigate head response

    PubMed Central

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: There has been growing controversy regarding long term effects of repeated low severity head impacts such as when heading a football. However, there are few scientific data substantiating these concerns in terms of the biomechanical head response to impact. The present study aimed to develop a research methodology to investigate the biomechanical response of human subjects during intentional heading and identify strategies for reducing head impact severity. Methods: A controlled laboratory study was carried out with seven active football players, aged 20–23 and of average stature and weight. The subjects were fitted with photographic targets for kinematic analysis and instrumented to measure head linear/angular accelerations and neck muscle activity. Balls were delivered at two speeds (6 m/s and 8 m/s) as the subjects executed several specific forward heading manoeuvres in the standing position. Heading speeds up to 11 m/s were seen when the head closing speed was considered. One subject demonstrating averaged flexion–extension muscle activity phased with head acceleration data and upper torso kinematics was used to validate a biofidelic 50th percentile human model with a detailed head and neck. The model was exercised under ball incoming speeds of 6–7 m/s with parameter variations including torso/head alignment, neck muscle tensing, and follow through. The model output was subsequently compared with additional laboratory tests with football players (n = 3). Additional heading scenarios were investigated including follow through, non-active ball impact, and non-contact events. Subject and model head responses were evaluated with peak linear and rotational accelerations and maximum incremental head impact power. Results: Modelling of neck muscle tensing predicted lower head accelerations and higher neck loads whereas volunteer head acceleration reductions were not consistent. Modelling of head–torso alignment predicted a modest reduction in

  20. Results of a prospective, randomized, multicenter study evaluating sacral neuromodulation with InterStim therapy compared to standard medical therapy at 6-months in subjects with mild symptoms of overactive bladder.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Steven; Noblett, Karen; Mangel, Jeffrey; Griebling, Tomas L; Sutherland, Suzette E; Bird, Erin T; Comiter, Craig; Culkin, Daniel; Bennett, Jason; Zylstra, Samuel; Berg, Kellie Chase; Kan, Fangyu; Irwin, Christopher P

    2015-03-01

    This prospective, randomized, multicenter trial evaluated the 6-month success rate of sacral neuromodulation (SNM) with InterStim® Therapy versus standard medical therapy (SMT) for overactive bladder (OAB). Enrolled subjects discontinued OAB medications prior to and during baseline data collection and were randomized 1:1 to SNM or SMT. Subjects had bothersome symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) including urinary urge incontinence (≥2 leaks/72 hr) and/or urgency-frequency (≥8 voids/day). Subjects failed at least one anticholinergic medication, and had at least one medication not yet attempted. The primary objective was to compare OAB therapeutic success rate at 6 months between SNM and SMT. Overall, 147 subjects were randomized (70 to SNM and 77 to SMT); 93% were female and mean age was 58. The primary intent to treat analysis showed OAB therapeutic success was significantly greater in the SNM group (61%) than the SMT group (42%; P = 0.02). In the as treated analysis, OAB therapeutic success was 76% for SNM and 49% for SMT (P = 0.002). The SNM group showed significant improvements in quality of life versus the SMT group (all P < 0.001) and 86% of SNM subjects reported improved or greatly improved urinary symptom interference score at 6 months, compared to 44% for SMT subjects. The device-related adverse event rate was 30.5% and the medication-related adverse event rate was 27.3%. This study demonstrates superior objective and subjective success of SNM compared to SMT. SNM is shown to be a safe and effective treatment for OAB patients with mild to moderate symptoms. Neurourol. Urodynam. 34:224-230, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Towards the estimation of the scattered energy spectra reaching the head of the medical staff during interventional radiology: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorska, A.; Bliznakova, K.; Buchakliev, Z.

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the International Commission on Radiological Protection has recommended a reduction of the dose limits to the eye lens for occupational exposure. Recent studies showed that in interventional rooms is possible to reach these limits especially without using protective equipment. The aim of this study was to calculate the scattered energy spectra distribution at the level of the operator's head. For this purpose, an in-house developed Monte Carlo-based computer application was used to design computational phantoms (patient and operator), the acquisition geometry as well as to simulate the photon transport through the designed system. The initial spectra from 70 kV tube voltage and 8 different filtrations were calculated according to the IPEM Report 78. An experimental study was carried out to verify the results from the simulations. The calculated scattered radiation distributions were compared to the initial incident on the patient spectra. Results showed that there is no large difference between the effective energies of the scattered spectra registered in front of the operator's head obtained from simulations of all 8 incident spectra. The results from the experimental study agreed well to simulations as well.

  2. Database Subject Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Donald T.; Teitelbaum, Henry H.

    1978-01-01

    Broad subject headings which have been assigned to each of the 86 data bases available or announced on the five major on-line search systems--Lockheed, SDC, BRS, NIM, and New York Times Information Bank--are arranged alphabetically followed by the name(s) of the appropriate data base(s). (JPF)

  3. Accuracy of emergency medical dispatchers' subjective ability to identify when higher dispatch levels are warranted over a Medical Priority Dispatch System automated protocol's recommended coding based on paramedic outcome data

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, Jeff; Olola, Christopher H O; Heward, Andy; Scott, Greg; Patterson, Brett

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To establish the accuracy of the emergency medical dispatcher's (EMD's) decisions to override the automated Medical Priority Dispatch System (MPDS) logic‐based response code recommendations based on at‐scene paramedic‐applied transport acuity determinations (blue‐in) and cardiac arrest (CA) findings. Methods A retrospective study of a 1 year dataset from the London Ambulance Service (LAS) National Health Service (NHS) Trust was undertaken. We compared all LAS “bluing in” frequency (BIQ) and cardiac arrest quotient (CAQ) outcomes of the incidents automatically recommended and accepted as CHARLIE‐level codes, to those receiving EMD DELTA‐overrides from the auto‐recommended CHARLIE‐level. We also compared the recommended DELTA‐level outcomes to those in the higher ECHO‐override cases. Results There was no significant association between outcome (CA/Blue‐in) and the determinant codes (DELTA‐override and CHARLIE‐level) for both CA (odds ratio (OR) 0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0 to 41.14; p = 1.000) and Blue‐in categories (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.34 to 2.33; p = 1.000). Similar patterns were observed between outcome and all DELTA‐level and ECHO‐override codes for both CA (OR 0, 95% CI 0 to 70.05; p = 1.000) and Blue‐in categories (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0 to 7.12; p = 0.597). Conclusion This study contradicts the belief that EMDs can accurately perceive when a patient or situation requires more resources than the MPDS's structured interrogation process logically indicates. This further strengthens the concept that automated, protocol‐based call taking is more accurate and consistent than the subjective, anecdotal or experience‐based determinations made by individual EMDs. PMID:17652678

  4. Effects of vestibular loss on head stabilization in response to head and body perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Control of head position during postural responses is important to facilitate both the interpretation of vestibular signals and the stabilization of gaze. In these experiments, we compared head stabilization for two different postural tasks: 1) in response to perturbations at the head, and 2) in response to perturbations induced at the support surface, which perturb both body and head position. To determine whether normal vestibular function is necessary for head stabilization in these two tasks, responses to forward and backward mechanical perturbations of the head and body were compared for 13 normal subjects and 4 patients with profound bilateral vestibular loss (two with vestibular loss in adulthood and two in infancy). Normal subjects showed little neck muscle activity for body perturbations, but large, early activations in both neck extensors and flexors for head perturbations. In contrast, vestibular patients showed excessive neck muscle activation for body perturbations and reduced or absent neck muscle activity for head perturbations. Patients with vestibular loss in adulthood also showed increased head acceleration in response to both head and body perturbations, but patients with vestibular loss in infancy showed more normal head accelerations. For body perturbations, the differences in head acceleration between patients and normals were greater for later head acceleration peaks, indicating poor head control during the execution of the postural response. Trunk angle changes were also higher in the patients for forward body perturbations, indicating that poorer control of trunk position could have contributed to their poorer head stabilization. These results indicate that the vestibular system plays an important role in head and trunk stabilization for both head and body perturbations. However, the more normal head accelerations of the patients with infant vestibular loss also indicate that other mechanisms, possibly involving neck reflexes, can at least

  5. Turning the history of medical ethics from its head onto its feet: a critical commentary on Baker and McCullough.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ulf

    2007-03-01

    The paper provides a critical commentary on the article by Baker and McCullough on Medical Ethic's Appropriation of Moral Philosophy. The author argues that Baker and McCullough offer a more "pragmatic" approach to the history of medical ethics that has the potential to enrich the bioethics field with a greater historical grounding and sound methodology. Their approach can help us to come to a more nuanced understanding about the way in which medical ethics has connected, disconnected, and reconnected with philosophical ideas throughout the centuries. The author points out that Baker and McCullough's model can run the danger of overemphasizing the role of medical ethicists whilst marginalizing the influence of philosophers and of other historical actors and forces. He critically reviews the two case studies on which Baker and McCullough focus and concludes that scholars need to bear in mind the levels of uncertainty and ambivalence that accompany the process of transformation and dissemination of moral values in medicine and medical practice.

  6. The subjectively perceived quality of postgraduate medical training in integrative medicine within the public healthcare systems of Germany and Switzerland: the example of anthroposophic hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine (IM) integrates evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) with conventional medicine (CON). Medical schools offer basic CAM electives but in postgraduate medical training (PGMT) little has been done for the integration of CAM. An exception to this is anthroposophic medicine (AM), a western form of CAM based on CON, offering an individualized holistic IM approach. AM hospitals are part of the public healthcare systems in Germany and Switzerland and train AM in PGMT. We performed the first quality evaluation of the subjectively perceived quality of this PGMT. Methods An anonymous full survey of all 214 trainers (TR) and 240 trainees (TE) in all 15 AM hospitals in Germany and Switzerland, using the ETHZ questionnaire for annual national PGMT assessments in Switzerland (CH) and Germany (D), complemented by a module for AM. Data analysis included Cronbach’s alpha to assess internal consistency questionnaire scales, 2-tailed Pearson correlation of specific quality dimensions of PGMT and department size, 2-tailed Wilcoxon Matched-Pair test for dependent variables and 2-tailed Mann–Whitney U-test for independent variables to calculate group differences. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results Return rates were: D: TE 89/215 (41.39%), TR 78/184 (42.39%); CH: TE 19/25 (76%), TR 22/30 (73.33%). Cronbach’s alpha values for TE scales were >0.8 or >0.9, and >0.7 to >0.5 for TR scales. Swiss hospitals surpassed German ones significantly in Global Satisfaction with AM (TR and TE); Clinical Competency training in CON (TE) and AM (TE, TR), Error Management, Culture of Decision Making, Evidence-based Medicine, and Clinical Competency in internal medicine CON and AM (TE). When the comparison was restricted to departments of comparable size, differences remained significant for Clinical Competencies in AM (TE, TR), and Culture of Decision Making (TE). CON received better grades than AM in Global Satisfaction

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection status had no influence on upper gastrointestinal symptoms: a cross-sectional analysis of 3,005 Japanese subjects without upper gastrointestinal lesions undergoing medical health checkups.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Tomomi; Takeshita, Eri; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Hara, Megumi; Akutagawa, Kayo; Sakata, Natsuko; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Ohyama, Takashi; Matsunaga, Keiji; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Shirai, Shinpei; Ito, Yoichiro; Tsuruoka, Nanae; Iwakiri, Ryuichi; Kusano, Motoyasu; Fujimoto, Kazuma

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on the upper gastrointestinal symptoms of relatively healthy Japanese subjects. A total of 3,005 subjects (male/female: 1,549/1,456) undergoing medical health checkups were enrolled in the present study, at five hospitals in Saga, Japan, from January to December 2013. They had no significant findings following upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All subjects completed a questionnaire that addressed a frequency scale for symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The questionnaire comprised seven questions regarding reflux symptoms and seven regarding acid-related dyspepsia, which were answered with a score based on the frequency of symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection was identified by a rapid urease test and/or H. pylori antibody titer, and an eradication history was confirmed by the subjects' medical records. Helicobacter pylori infection was positive in 894 subjects out of 3,005 (29.8%). Eradication of Helicobacter pylori was successfully achieved in 440 subjects of 458 treated. Helicobacter pylori infection had no influence on the acid-related dyspepsia evaluated by the questionnaire, whereas the mean reflux score was relatively high in the Helicobacter pylori native negative subjects compared to Helicobacter pylori native positive. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori and time span after the eradication had no effect on the upper gastrointestinal symptoms evaluated by the questionnaire. Helicobacter pylori infection and history of eradication did not affect acid-related dyspepsia symptoms in Japanese healthy subjects.

  8. Catastrophic Head Injuries in High School and Collegiate Sports

    PubMed Central

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To describe the incidence of catastrophic head injuries in a variety of high school and college sports. Design and Setting: Data on catastrophic head injuries were compiled in a national surveillance system maintained by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research. The data were compiled with the assistance of coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, executive officers of state and national athletic organizations, a national newspaper clipping service, professional associates of the researchers, and national sport organizations. Subjects: Data included all high school and college athletic programs in the United States. Measurements: Background information on the athlete (age, height, weight, experience, previous injury, etc), accident information, immediate and postaccident medical care, type of injury, and equipment involved. Autopsy reports were used when available. Results: A football-related fatality has occurred every year from 1945 through 1999, except for 1990. Head-related deaths accounted for 69% of football fatalities, cervical spinal injuries for 16.3%, and other injuries for 14.7%. High school football produced the greatest number of football head-related deaths. From 1984 through 1999, 69 football head-related injuries resulted in permanent disability. Sixty-three of the injuries were associated with high school football and 6 with college football. Although football has received the most attention, other sports have also been associated with head-related deaths and permanent disability injuries. From 1982 through 1999, 20 deaths and 19 permanent disability injuries occurred in a variety of sports. Track and field, baseball, and cheerleading had the highest incidence of these catastrophic injuries. Three deaths and 3 injuries resulting in permanent disability have occurred in female participants. Conclusions/Recommendations: Reliable data collection systems and continual analysis of the data can help us to reduce the

  9. Catastrophic Head Injuries in High School and Collegiate Sports.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Frederick O.

    2001-09-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence of catastrophic head injuries in a variety of high school and college sports. DESIGN AND SETTING: Data on catastrophic head injuries were compiled in a national surveillance system maintained by the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research. The data were compiled with the assistance of coaches, athletic trainers, athletic directors, executive officers of state and national athletic organizations, a national newspaper clipping service, professional associates of the researchers, and national sport organizations. SUBJECTS: Data included all high school and college athletic programs in the United States. MEASUREMENTS: Background information on the athlete (age, height, weight, experience, previous injury, etc), accident information, immediate and postaccident medical care, type of injury, and equipment involved. Autopsy reports were used when available. RESULTS: A football-related fatality has occurred every year from 1945 through 1999, except for 1990. Head-related deaths accounted for 69% of football fatalities, cervical spinal injuries for 16.3%, and other injuries for 14.7%. High school football produced the greatest number of football head-related deaths. From 1984 through 1999, 69 football head-related injuries resulted in permanent disability. Sixty-three of the injuries were associated with high school football and 6 with college football. Although football has received the most attention, other sports have also been associated with head-related deaths and permanent disability injuries. From 1982 through 1999, 20 deaths and 19 permanent disability injuries occurred in a variety of sports. Track and field, baseball, and cheerleading had the highest incidence of these catastrophic injuries. Three deaths and 3 injuries resulting in permanent disability have occurred in female participants. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Reliable data collection systems and continual analysis of the data can help us to reduce the

  10. Modeling heading in adult soccer players.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Ernesto; Ponce, Daniel; Andresen, Max

    2014-01-01

    Heading soccer balls can generate mild brain injuries and in the long run can lead to difficulty in solving problems, memory deficits, and language difficulties. Researchers evaluated the effects on the head for both correct and incorrect heading techniques. They based the head's geometry on medical images. They determined the injury's magnitude by comparing the neurological tissue's resistance with predictions of the generated stresses. The evaluation examined fast playing conditions in adult soccer, taking into account the ball's speed and the type of impact. Mathematical simulations using the finite element method indicated that correctly heading balls arriving at moderate speed presents a low risk of brain injury. However, damage can happen around the third cervical vertebra. These results coincide with medical studies. Incorrect heading greatly increases the brain injury risk and can alter the parietal area.

  11. Hyperoxia Improves Hemodynamic Status During Head-up Tilt Testing in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fromonot, Julien; Chaumet, Guillaume; Gavarry, Olivier; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lucciano, Michel; Joulia, Fabrice; Brignole, Michele; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Guieu, Regis; Boussuges, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Head-up tilt test is useful for exploring neurally mediated syncope. Adenosine is an ATP derivative implicated in cardiovascular disturbances that occur during head-up tilt test. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperoxia on adenosine plasma level and on hemodynamic changes induced by head-up tilt testing. Seventeen healthy male volunteers (mean age 35 ± 11 years) were included in the study. The experiment consisted of 2 head-up tilt tests, 1 session with subjects breathing, through a mask, medical air (FiO2 = 21%) and 1 session with administration of pure oxygen (FiO2 = 100%) in double-blind manner. Investigations included continuous monitoring of hemodynamic data and measurement of plasma adenosine levels. No presyncope or syncope was found in 15 of the 17 volunteers. In these subjects, a slight decrease in systolic blood pressure was recorded during orthostatic stress performed under medical air exposure. In contrast, hyperoxia led to increased systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress when compared with medical air. Furthermore, mean adenosine plasma levels decreased during hyperoxic exposure before (0.31 ± 0.08 μM) and during head-up tilt test (0.33 ± 0.09 μM) when compared with baseline (0.6 ± 0.1 μM). Adenosine plasma level was unchanged during medical air exposure at rest (0.6 ± 0.1 μM), and slightly decreased during orthostatic stress. In 2 volunteers, the head-up tilt test induced a loss of consciousness when breathing air. In these subjects, adenosine plasma level increased during orthostatic stress. In contrast, during hyperoxic exposure, the head-up tilt test did not induce presyncope or syncope. In these 2 volunteers, biological study demonstrated a decrease in adenosine plasma level at both baseline and during orthostatic stress for hyperoxic exposure compared with medical air. These results suggest that hyperoxia was able to increase blood pressure during head

  12. Hyperoxia Improves Hemodynamic Status During Head-up Tilt Testing in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Fromonot, Julien; Chaumet, Guillaume; Gavarry, Olivier; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Lucciano, Michel; Joulia, Fabrice; Brignole, Michele; Deharo, Jean-Claude; Guieu, Regis; Boussuges, Alain

    2016-02-01

    Head-up tilt test is useful for exploring neurally mediated syncope. Adenosine is an ATP derivative implicated in cardiovascular disturbances that occur during head-up tilt test. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperoxia on adenosine plasma level and on hemodynamic changes induced by head-up tilt testing.Seventeen healthy male volunteers (mean age 35 ± 11 years) were included in the study. The experiment consisted of 2 head-up tilt tests, 1 session with subjects breathing, through a mask, medical air (FiO2 = 21%) and 1 session with administration of pure oxygen (FiO2 = 100%) in double-blind manner. Investigations included continuous monitoring of hemodynamic data and measurement of plasma adenosine levels.No presyncope or syncope was found in 15 of the 17 volunteers. In these subjects, a slight decrease in systolic blood pressure was recorded during orthostatic stress performed under medical air exposure. In contrast, hyperoxia led to increased systolic blood pressure during orthostatic stress when compared with medical air. Furthermore, mean adenosine plasma levels decreased during hyperoxic exposure before (0.31 ± 0.08 μM) and during head-up tilt test (0.33 ± 0.09 μM) when compared with baseline (0.6 ± 0.1 μM). Adenosine plasma level was unchanged during medical air exposure at rest (0.6 ± 0.1 μM), and slightly decreased during orthostatic stress. In 2 volunteers, the head-up tilt test induced a loss of consciousness when breathing air. In these subjects, adenosine plasma level increased during orthostatic stress. In contrast, during hyperoxic exposure, the head-up tilt test did not induce presyncope or syncope. In these 2 volunteers, biological study demonstrated a decrease in adenosine plasma level at both baseline and during orthostatic stress for hyperoxic exposure compared with medical air.These results suggest that hyperoxia was able to increase blood pressure during head-up tilt

  13. Subjective memory complaints in elderly: relationship with health status, multimorbidity, medications, and use of services in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Montejo C; Mercedes, Montenegro-Peña; Ramón, López-Higes; Borja, Montejo R

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the associations between subjective memory complaints (SMC) and health variables: multimorbidity, presence of certain diseases, health perceived state, difficulties seeing and hearing, pain, and use of medications and health services. Furthermore, we aim to identify risk groups based on multimorbidity and calculate the effect size for each of these relationships. Cross-sectional epidemiological study using a face-to-face interview with a structured questionnaire. 1,342 people aged 65 years and older taken from a random sample of the census tracts. SMC were studied using questions regarding memory complaints. Multimorbidity and polypharmacy are associated with SMC, so are impaired vision and hearing. SMC are more frequently present in people who use health services more intensively and exhibit reduced functional activity as a result of diseases. With respect to specific diseases, only cerebrovascular accidents and chronic constipation were associated with SMC. In regression analysis, predictors of SMC were vision and hearing impairment, poor self-perceived health, pain, and general practitioner visits. However, the effect size of these factors is low. The variables that indicate risk groups are number of diseases, reduced functional activity, hearing impairment, and poor self-perceived health. Memory complaints are a heterogeneous phenomenon. Our results confirm that multimorbidity, polypharmacy, greater use of health services, pain, and poor self-perceived health are associated with SMC. We identified two risk groups with a high percentage of complaints and a healthy group with a low percentage. Detecting these factors and these risk and healthy groups is useful in achieving proper patients management.

  14. The Current Practices in Injury Prevention and Safety Helmet Use in an Air Force Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    skateboarding . Findings from the DoD survey (1995) suggest that additional effort is necessary to meet Healthy People 2000 objectives in the area of...rollerblading or skateboarding . Primary care provider A family or individual goes to a primary care provider initially for medical care and the management...related head injury was considered a head injury that occurred while the subject was riding either a bicycle, motorcycle, rollerblading or skateboarding

  15. Dropped head syndrome in mitochondriopathy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, J

    2004-11-01

    In a 63-year-old, 165-cm-tall woman with a history of repeated tick bites, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, progressive head ptosis with neck stiffness and cervical pain developed. The family history was positive for thyroid dysfunction and neuromuscular disorders. Neurological examination revealed prominent forward head drop, weak anteflexion and retroflexion, nuchal rigidity, weakness of the shoulder girdle, cogwheel rigidity, and tetraspasticity. The lactate stress test was abnormal. Electromyograms of various muscles were myogenic. Muscle biopsy showed non-specific myogenic abnormalities and generally weak staining for cytochrome oxydase. Mitochondriopathy with multi-organ involvement was suspected. The response to anti-Parkinson medication was poor. In conclusion, dropped head syndrome (DHS) may be due to multi-organ mitochondriopathy, manifesting as Parkinsonism, tetraspasticity, dilative cardiomyopathy, osteoporosis, short stature, and myopathy. Anti-Parkinson medication is of limited effect.

  16. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... stethoscope head is a weighted chest piece used during anesthesia to listen to a patient's heart, breath,...

  17. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... stethoscope head is a weighted chest piece used during anesthesia to listen to a patient's heart, breath,...

  18. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... stethoscope head is a weighted chest piece used during anesthesia to listen to a patient's heart, breath,...

  19. 21 CFR 868.1930 - Stethoscope head.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stethoscope head. 868.1930 Section 868.1930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... stethoscope head is a weighted chest piece used during anesthesia to listen to a patient's heart, breath,...

  20. Neurobehavioral outcome following minor head injury: a three-center study.

    PubMed

    Levin, H S; Mattis, S; Ruff, R M; Eisenberg, H M; Marshall, L F; Tabaddor, K; High, W M; Frankowski, R F

    1987-02-01

    The majority of hospital admissions for head trauma are due to minor injuries; that is, no or only transient loss of consciousness without major complications and not requiring intracranial surgery. Despite the low mortality rate following minor head injury, there is controversy surrounding the extent of morbidity and the long-term sequelae. The authors postulated that consecutively admitted patients who fulfilled research diagnostic criteria for minor head injury and who were carefully screened for antecedent neuropsychiatric disorder and prior head injury would exhibit subacute cognitive and memory deficits that would resolve over a period of 1 to 3 months postinjury. To evaluate this hypothesis, the neurobehavioral functioning of 57 patients was compared within 1 week after minor head injury (baseline) and at 1 month postinjury with that of 56 selected control subjects at three medical centers. Quantified tests of memory, attention, and information-processing speed revealed that neurobehavioral impairment demonstrated at baseline by all means of measurement generally resolved during the first 3 months after minor head injury. Although nearly all patients initially reported cognitive problems, somatic complaints, and emotional malaise, these postconcussion symptoms had substantially resolved by the 3-month follow-up examination. The data suggest that a single uncomplicated minor head injury produces no permanent disabling neurobehavioral impairment in the great majority of patients who are free of preexisting neuropsychiatric disorder and substance abuse.

  1. A model for enhancing Internet medical document retrieval with "medical core metadata".

    PubMed

    Malet, G; Munoz, F; Appleyard, R; Hersh, W

    1999-01-01

    Finding documents on the World Wide Web relevant to a specific medical information need can be difficult. The goal of this work is to define a set of document content description tags, or metadata encodings, that can be used to promote disciplined search access to Internet medical documents. The authors based their approach on a proposed metadata standard, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which has recently been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force. Their model also incorporates the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary and MEDLINE-type content descriptions. The model defines a medical core metadata set that can be used to describe the metadata for a wide variety of Internet documents. The authors propose that their medical core metadata set be used to assign metadata to medical documents to facilitate document retrieval by Internet search engines.

  2. A Model for Enhancing Internet Medical Document Retrieval with “Medical Core Metadata”

    PubMed Central

    Malet, Gary; Munoz, Felix; Appleyard, Richard; Hersh, William

    1999-01-01

    Objective: Finding documents on the World Wide Web relevant to a specific medical information need can be difficult. The goal of this work is to define a set of document content description tags, or metadata encodings, that can be used to promote disciplined search access to Internet medical documents. Design: The authors based their approach on a proposed metadata standard, the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set, which has recently been submitted to the Internet Engineering Task Force. Their model also incorporates the National Library of Medicine's Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) vocabulary and Medline-type content descriptions. Results: The model defines a medical core metadata set that can be used to describe the metadata for a wide variety of Internet documents. Conclusions: The authors propose that their medical core metadata set be used to assign metadata to medical documents to facilitate document retrieval by Internet search engines. PMID:10094069

  3. Head lice.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Ian F

    2011-05-16

    Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: benzyl alcohol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, insecticide combinations, isopropyl myristate, ivermectin, lindane, malathion, mechanical removal by combing ("bug busting"), oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole, TMP-SMX), permethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrum, and spinosad.

  4. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Head lice can only be diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings, longer hair, and of lower socioeconomic group. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 26 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: benzyl alcohol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, insecticide combinations, isopropyl myristate, ivermectin, lindane, malathion, mechanical removal by combing ("bug busting"), oral trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole, TMP-SMX), permethrin, phenothrin, pyrethrum, and spinosad. PMID:21575285

  5. Head lice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Head louse infection is diagnosed by finding live lice, as eggs take 7 days to hatch (but a few may take longer, up to 13 days) and may appear viable for weeks after death of the egg. Infestation may be more likely in school children, with risks increased in children with more siblings or of lower socioeconomic group. Factors such as longer hair make diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of physically acting treatments for head lice? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2014 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found six studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 1,2-octanediol, dimeticone, herbal and essential oils, and isopropyl myristate. PMID:25587918

  6. Does soccer ball heading cause retinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    Reed, William F; Feldman, Kenneth W; Weiss, Avery H; Tencer, Alan F

    2002-04-01

    To define forces of youth soccer ball heading (headers) and determine whether heading causes retinal hemorrhage. Regional Children's Hospital, youth soccer camp. Male and female soccer players, 13 to 16 years old, who regularly head soccer balls. Dilated retinal examination, after 2-week header diary, and accelerometer measurement of heading a lofted soccer ball. Twenty-one youth soccer players, averaging 79 headers in the prior 2 weeks, and 3 players who did not submit header diaries lacked retinal hemorrhage. Thirty control subjects also lacked retinal hemorrhage. Seven subjects heading the ball experienced linear cranial accelerations of 3.7 +/- 1.3g. Rotational accelerations were negligible. Headers, not associated with globe impact, are unlikely to cause retinal hemorrhage. Correctly executed headers did not cause significant rotational acceleration of the head, but incorrectly executed headers might.

  7. Natural convection around the human head.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R P; Toy, N

    1975-01-01

    1. Factors determining the convective flow patterns around the human head in 'still' conditions are discussed in relation to body posture. 2. The flow patterns have been visualized using a schlieren optical system which reveals that the head has a thicker 'insulating' layer of convecting air in the erect posture than in the supine position. 3. Local convective and radiative heat transfer measurements from the head have been using surface calorimeters. These results are seen to be closely related to the thickness of the convective boundary layer flows. 4. The total convective and radiative heat loss from the head of a subject in the erect and supine position has been evaluated from the local measurements. For the head of the supine subject the heat loss was found to be 30% more than when the subject was standing. Images Plate 1 PMID:1142118

  8. Multilaser print head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Douglas S.; Roblee, Jeffrey W.; Plummer, William T.; Clark, Peter P.

    1998-12-01

    This paper discusses the optical and opto-mechanical design of a new laser head developed at Polaroid for printing Helios binary film for printing high quality medical hard copy images. The head is part of an external drum printer for 14' X 17' film. The pixel size is 84 X 84 micrometer, produced by four lasers, with the smallest printable spot 3 X 6 micrometer, to produce 4096 gray levels. Two pixels side-by-side are simultaneously printed. The head has eight independent 840 nm diode lasers manufactured by Polaroid. Each laser emits up to 1.1 W over an emission length of about 100 micrometer, with a particularly uniform nearfield irradiance. The lasers are microlensed to equalize the divergences in the two principal meridians. Each packaged laser is aligned in a field-replaceable illuminator whose output beam, focused at infinity, is bore-sighted in a mechanical cylinder. The illuminators are arranged roughly radially. Eight lenses image the laser nearfields on a multi-facet mirror produced by diamond machining. The mirror facets truncate the beams to give the desired pixel shapes and separations. A reducing afocal relay images the mirror onto the film. The final element is a molded aspheric lens, mounted in an actuator to maintain focus on the film. The focusing unit also comprises a triangulation-based focus sensor. The alignment procedures and fixtures were devised concurrently with the head for manufacturing simplicity. The main physical structure is a casting, into which reference surfaces are machined. All optical subassemblies are attached to this casting, with a mixture of optical alignment and self-location. Semi-kinematic cylinder-in-V methodology is utilized. The active alignment steps are done in a sequence that tends to reduce errors from previous steps.

  9. Syncope as a health risk for soldiers - influence of medical history and clinical findings on the sensitivity of head-up tilt table testing.

    PubMed

    Gilfrich, Hans-Joachim; Heidelmann, Lena Marie; Grube, Franziska; Frickmann, Hagen; Jungblut, Sven Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is a relevant health problem in military environments. Reliable diagnosis is challenging. Tilt table testing is an important tool for syncope diagnosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs such as prodromal symptoms, co-morbidity, frequency of syncopal events, body length, body mass index, and electrocardiography abnormalities can be used to predict the success of tilt table testing at diagnosing syncope. Data from 100 patients with histories of syncope or pre-syncope, who were diagnosed using head-up tilt table testing, were retrospectively analyzed in a cross-sectional analysis. The diagnostic procedure was based upon a modified version of the Westminster protocol without any pharmacological provocation. Patients showing pathological reaction patterns during tilt table testing suffered from prodromal symptoms, such as dizziness and sweating, significantly more often. The patients reported more injuries resulting from syncopal events and more previous syncopal events, and the prevalence of co-morbidity was greater among patients presenting negative findings during tilt testing. An asthenic-leptosomal physique was not confirmed as a risk factor for syncopal events as is the case for idiopathic arterial hypotension. However, patients with pathological reaction patterns during tilt table testing were significantly taller. This finding was detected for both females and males. No significant predictors were found in the electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns of patients showing syncope during tilt table testing. Frequency of prior syncope and prodromal symptoms, and increased body length with an otherwise good state of health influence the predictive value of tilt table testing for syncope diagnosis. In particular, if these factors are present, tilt table testing should be considered part of the diagnostic algorithm for soldiers with recurrent syncope.

  10. Head Start Graduates: One Year Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nummedal, Susan G.; Stern, Carolyn

    To determine the continuing impact of Head Start experience, this follow-up study compared (1) the behavior of children who had Full Year Head Start (FYHS) experience under three different types of agencies, and (2) within each agency, where possible, the behavior of children who did not have FYHS experience. Subjects were 102 FYHS children and 39…

  11. That Elusive Concept of "Aboutness": The Year's Work in Subject Analysis, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Alva T.

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the 1992 literature on subject analysis. Highlights include theoretical foundations; subject cataloging; machine-assisted subject cataloging; machine-executed subject cataloging; classification systems; subject headings and indexing; online subject access; and special materials. (Contains 133 references.) (LRW)

  12. Concurrent Radiotherapy with Carboplatin and Cetuximab for the Treatment of Medically Compromised Patients with Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Kunal; Santos, Edgardo S.; Tolba, Khaled; Kwon, Deukwoo; Elsayyad, Nagy; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Mandalia, Amar; Samuels, Michael Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cetuximab (Cx) + radiation therapy (RT) is well-tolerated and has improved survival in patients (pts) with locoregionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (LA-HNSCC). However, its efficacy when compared to HD-DDP + RT has been questioned. At our institution, low-dose weekly carboplatin is added to Cx + RT for patients unsuitable for HD-DDP. Methods: We reviewed records of 16 patients with LA-HNSCC treated with definitive Cx + carboplatin + RT at the University of Miami from 2007 to 2011. Median follow-up was 24 months (range: 1–69 months). Results: Median age: 71.5 years (range: 57–90 years); 15 male, 1 female. ECOG PS 0 = 15, 1 = 1. TNM staging was: T1 = 1, T2 = 5, T3 = 8, T4 = 2; N stage: N0 = 8, N1 = 5, N2a = 2, N2b = 1. All patients received weekly carboplatin (AUC 1.5–2), Cx given conventionally and daily conventionally fractionated RT. Median total weeks of concurrent systemic therapy = 7 (range: 3–8 weeks). RT was delivered to a median total dose of 70 Gy (range 30–74 Gy). Of the 15 evaluable patients, there were: 12 CR, 2 PR, and 1 PD. There were three local in-field failures, two regional failures, and three distant failures. At last follow-up, 8/15 patients remained with NED. Three-year locoregional recurrence was 28.3% (95% CI: 7.7–53.9%). Mean percentage of weight loss was 14% (range: 6–26%). Two patients required systemic therapy dose reduction. Three patients experienced a treatment delay and three did not finish RT as planned including a patient who received only 30 Gy due to death secondary to MI during treatment. Conclusion: In this small retrospective series, carboplatin/Cx/RT was well-tolerated and efficacious in patients unsuitable for HD-DDP having LA-HNSCC. Acute toxicities were similar to Cx + RT, likely due to the non-overlapping toxicity profiles of the two systemic agents. We hypothesize that the addition of a well

  13. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a patient's...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a patient's...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a patient's...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5560 - Gas mask head strap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas mask head strap. 868.5560 Section 868.5560...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5560 Gas mask head strap. (a) Identification. A gas mask head strap is a device used to hold an anesthetic gas mask in position on a...

  18. Head-to-head randomized trials are mostly industry sponsored and almost always favor the industry sponsor.

    PubMed

    Flacco, Maria Elena; Manzoli, Lamberto; Boccia, Stefania; Capasso, Lorenzo; Aleksovska, Katina; Rosso, Annalisa; Scaioli, Giacomo; De Vito, Corrado; Siliquini, Roberta; Villari, Paolo; Ioannidis, John P A

    2015-07-01

    To map the current status of head-to-head comparative randomized evidence and to assess whether funding may impact on trial design and results. From a 50% random sample of the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in journals indexed in PubMed during 2011, we selected the trials with ≥ 100 participants, evaluating the efficacy and safety of drugs, biologics, and medical devices through a head-to-head comparison. We analyzed 319 trials. Overall, 238,386 of the 289,718 randomized subjects (82.3%) were included in the 182 trials funded by companies. Of the 182 industry-sponsored trials, only 23 had two industry sponsors and only three involved truly antagonistic comparisons. Industry-sponsored trials were larger, more commonly registered, used more frequently noninferiority/equivalence designs, had higher citation impact, and were more likely to have "favorable" results (superiority or noninferiority/equivalence for the experimental treatment) than nonindustry-sponsored trials. Industry funding [odds ratio (OR) 2.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6, 4.7] and noninferiority/equivalence designs (OR 3.2; 95% CI: 1.5, 6.6), but not sample size, were strongly associated with "favorable" findings. Fifty-five of the 57 (96.5%) industry-funded noninferiority/equivalence trials got desirable "favorable" results. The literature of head-to-head RCTs is dominated by the industry. Industry-sponsored comparative assessments systematically yield favorable results for the sponsors, even more so when noninferiority designs are involved. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Head circumference (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Head circumference is a measurement of the circumference of the child's head at its largest area (above the eyebrows and ears and around the back of the head). During routine check-ups, the distance is measured ...

  20. The influence of post-traumatic syndrome in determining capacity to return to work after closed head injury.

    PubMed

    Politynska, B; Mariak, Z; Lewko, J

    1999-01-01

    Neuropsychological deficits following closed head injury are responsible for a significant part of the post-traumatic syndrome. Nonetheless such deficits frequently elude standard neurological examination and head injured subjects are not recognised as suffering from any impairments, despite these having a significant effect on their ability to return to work. As a result, subjects are refused disability status, resulting in a large number of litigation appeals. The criteria for determining disability status after head injury are often inadequate, as they do not take into account the post-traumatic syndrome, and medical experts, if they are sensitive to these issues are left in a quandary as to how to justify their decisions before the courts. Equally, psychological assessment, where it is included, is frequently limited to the examination of intellectual functions and memory, which are not always grossly disturbed in these cases. It is recommended that neuropsychological assessments should form part of routine practice in the evaluation of outcome in closed head injury and the test instruments be of adequate sensitivity to measure the deficits occurring after head injury. However, it is necessary to bear in mind that these subjective symptoms, which in reality hamper subjects' ability to return to work, may be the result of disruption of fine cognitive functions, which are inaccessible to currently available test methods.

  1. Can imaginary head tilt shorten postrotatory nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianna-Poulin, C. C.; Voelker, C. C.; Erickson, B.; Black, F. O.

    2001-01-01

    In healthy subjects, head tilt upon cessation of a constant-velocity yaw head rotation shortens the duration of postrotatory nystagmus. The presumed mechanism for this effect is that the velocity storage of horizontal semicircular canal inputs is being discharged by otolith organ inputs which signal a constant yaw head position when the head longitudinal axis is no longer earth-vertical. In the present study, normal subjects were rotated head upright in the dark on a vertical-axis rotational chair at 60 degrees/s for 75 s and were required to perform a specific task as soon as the chair stopped. Horizontal position of the right eye was recorded with an infra-red video camera. The average eye velocity (AEV) was measured over a 30-s interval following chair acceleration/deceleration. The ratios (postrotatory AEV/perrotatory AEV) were 1.1 (SD 0.112) when subjects (N=10) kept their head erect, 0.414 (SD 0.083) when subjects tilted their head forward, 1.003 (SD 0.108) when subjects imagined watching a TV show, 1.012 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined looking at a painting on a wall, and 0.995 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined floating in a prone position on a lake. Thus, while actual head tilt reduced postrotatory nystagmus, the imagination tasks did not have a statistically significant effect on postrotatory nystagmus. Therefore, velocity storage does not appear to be under the influence of cortical neural signals when subjects imagine that they are floating in a prone orientation.

  2. Can imaginary head tilt shorten postrotatory nystagmus?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianna-Poulin, C. C.; Voelker, C. C.; Erickson, B.; Black, F. O.

    2001-01-01

    In healthy subjects, head tilt upon cessation of a constant-velocity yaw head rotation shortens the duration of postrotatory nystagmus. The presumed mechanism for this effect is that the velocity storage of horizontal semicircular canal inputs is being discharged by otolith organ inputs which signal a constant yaw head position when the head longitudinal axis is no longer earth-vertical. In the present study, normal subjects were rotated head upright in the dark on a vertical-axis rotational chair at 60 degrees/s for 75 s and were required to perform a specific task as soon as the chair stopped. Horizontal position of the right eye was recorded with an infra-red video camera. The average eye velocity (AEV) was measured over a 30-s interval following chair acceleration/deceleration. The ratios (postrotatory AEV/perrotatory AEV) were 1.1 (SD 0.112) when subjects (N=10) kept their head erect, 0.414 (SD 0.083) when subjects tilted their head forward, 1.003 (SD 0.108) when subjects imagined watching a TV show, 1.012 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined looking at a painting on a wall, and 0.995 (SD 0.074) when subjects imagined floating in a prone position on a lake. Thus, while actual head tilt reduced postrotatory nystagmus, the imagination tasks did not have a statistically significant effect on postrotatory nystagmus. Therefore, velocity storage does not appear to be under the influence of cortical neural signals when subjects imagine that they are floating in a prone orientation.

  3. Evaluation of a teaching strategy based on integration of clinical subjects, virtual autopsy, pathology museum, and digital microscopy for medical students.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Perez, Julio A; Raju, Sharat; Echeverri, Jorge H

    2014-01-01

    Learning pathology is fundamental for a successful medical practice. In recent years, medical education has undergone a profound transformation toward the development of an integrated curriculum incorporating both basic science and clinical material. Simultaneously, there has been a shift from a magisterial teaching approach to one centered around problem-based learning. Now-a-days, informatics tools are expected to help better implement these strategies. We applied and evaluated a new teaching method based on an active combination of clinical problems, gross pathology, histopathology, and autopsy pathology, all given through informatics tools, to teach a group of medical students at the Universidad de Santander, Colombia. Ninety-four medical students were followed in two consecutive semesters. Students were randomized to receive teaching either through traditional methodology or through the new integrated approach. There was no significant difference between the intervention group and the control group at baseline. At the end of the study, the scores in the intervention group were significantly higher compared to the control group (3.91/5.0 vs. 3.33/5.0, P = 0.0008). Students and tutors endorsed the benefits of the integrated approach. Participants were very satisfied with this training approach and rated the program an 8.7 out of 10, on average. This study confirms that an integrated curriculum utilizing informatics systems provides an excellent opportunity to associate pathology with clinical medicine early in training of medical students. This can be possible with the use of virtual microscopy and digital imaging.

  4. Motorcycle helmet fixation status is more crucial than helmet type in providing protection to the head.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Roszalina; Oxley, Jennie

    2016-11-01

    In Malaysia, motorcyclists continue to outnumber other road users in injuries and deaths. The objective of this study was to determine the association between helmet fixation and helmet type with head injury and severity of head injury among Malaysian motorcyclists. The study design was a prospective cross-sectional study. The participants involved injured motorcyclists who were admitted in five selected hospitals in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Participants who sustained head injury were selected as the cases while those with injury below the neck (IBN) were selected as the controls. Questionnaire comprising motorcyclist, vehicle, helmet and crash factors was examined. Diagnoses of injuries were obtained from the participants' medical records. The total subjects with head injuries were 404 while those with IBN were 235. Majority of the cases (76.2%) and controls (80.4%) wore the half-head and open-face helmets, followed by the tropical helmets (5.4% and 6.0% of the cases and controls, respectively). Full-face helmets were used by 1.2% of the cases and 4.7% of the controls. 5.7% of the cases and 6.0% of the controls did not wear a helmet. 32.7% of the cases and 77.4% of the controls had their helmets fixed. Motorcyclists with ejected helmets were five times as likely to sustain head injury [adjusted odds ratio, AOR 5.73 (95% CI 3.38-9.73)] and four times as likely to sustain severe head injury [AOR of 4.83 (95% CI 2.76-8.45)]. The half head and open face helmets had AOR of 0.24 (95% CI 0.10-0.56) for severe head injury when compared to motorcyclists who did not wear a helmet. Helmet fixation is more effective than helmet type in providing protection to the motorcyclists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bioterrorism and disaster preparedness among medical specialties.

    PubMed

    Lane, Joshua E; Dimick, Jacob; Syrax, Michael; Bhandary, Madhusudan; Rudy, Bruce S

    2012-01-01

    A core priority of all medical specialties includes information for members regarding inherent priorities and principles. The authors sought to investigate the priority and contribution of various medical specialties to the fields of bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness. A mixed study design (quantitative and qualitative) was used to identify pertinent characteristics of various medical specialties. A scored survey analysis of resources available from the representative organizations and/or societies of the primary medical specialties and select subspecialties was examined and scored based on availability, ease of accessibility, updated status, and content. A MEDLINE search completed through PubMed using the medical subject headings bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness coupled with specific medical specialties was conducted to assess the involvement and contribution of each to the medical literature. The primary study outcome was to evaluate the priority of and existing resources available to members for bioterrorism/terrorism and disaster/emergency preparedness among various medical specialties as reflected by their representative organizations and scientific publication. The search of individual medical specialties and of the medical literature (2000-2010) revealed that these topics (via keywords bioterrorism, terrorism, disaster preparedness, and emergency preparedness) are indeed a priority topic for the majority of medical specialties. A number of specialties with expectant priority in these topics were confirmed. All seven primary care specialties demonstrated a core priority of these topics and offered resources. The MEDLINE (PubMed) search yielded 7,228 articles published from 2000 to 2010. Bioterrorism/terrorism and disaster/ emergency preparedness are priority topics of most medical specialties. This core priority is demonstrated by both the medical specialty resources in addition

  6. [Forensic medical assessment of the cases of HIV infection and hemocontact viral hepatitis B and C during the period from 2011 till 2015 in different subjects of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Kadochnikov, D S; Minaeva, P V

    2016-01-01

    The annually increasing number of the patients presenting with HIV infection and hemocontact viral hepatitis is naturally accompanied by the growing number of deaths from these infectious pathologies. The objective of the present study was to analyze the results of forensic medical expertises of the cases of HIV infection and hemocontact viral hepatitis B and C during the period from 2011 till 2015 in different subjects of the Russian Federation. The data obtained confirm the tendency toward the further rise in the frequency of such cases in the practical work of forensic medical experts. Moreover, they indicate the necessity of registration of such cases in state forensic medical expertise organizations and open up the prospects for the development of the common approaches to the solution of the existing problems including the evaluation of the degree of the harm to human health.

  7. Optimizing the sensitivity of the head thrust test for identifying vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Michael C; Tusa, Ronald J; Grine, Lawrence E; Herdman, Susan J

    2004-02-01

    The head thrust test (HTT) is used to assess the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) in patients following vestibular ablation is excellent (100%), although sensitivity is lower (35%-39%) for patients with nonsurgically induced UVH. The variability of the test results may be from moving the subject's head outside the plane of the lateral semicircular canals as well as using a head thrust of predictable timing and direction. The purpose of this study was to examine sensitivity and specificity of the horizontal HTT in identifying patients with UVH and bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) when the head was flexed 30 degrees in attempt to induce acceleration primarily in the lateral semicircular canal and the head was moved unpredictably. The medical records of 176 people with and without vestibular dysfunction (n=79 with UVH, n=32 with BVH, and n=65 with nonvestibular dizziness) were studied. Data were retrospectively tabulated from a de-identified database (ie, with health information stripped of all identifiers). Sensitivity of the HTT for identifying vestibular hypofunction was 71% for UVH and 84% for BVH. Specificity was 82%. Ensuring the head is pitched 30 degrees down and thrust with an unpredictable timing and direction appears to improve sensitivity of the HTT.

  8. Heading and head injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Kirkendall, D T; Jordan, S E; Garrett, W E

    2001-01-01

    In the world of sports, soccer is unique because of the purposeful use of the unprotected head for controlling and advancing the ball. This skill obviously places the player at risk of head injury and the game does carry some risk. Head injury can be a result of contact of the head with another head (or other body parts), ground, goal post, other unknown objects or even the ball. Such impacts can lead to contusions, fractures, eye injuries, concussions or even, in rare cases, death. Coaches, players, parents and physicians are rightly concerned about the risk of head injury in soccer. Current research shows that selected soccer players have some degree of cognitive dysfunction. It is important to determine the reasons behind such deficits. Purposeful heading has been blamed, but a closer look at the studies that focus on heading has revealed methodological concerns that question the validity of blaming purposeful heading of the ball. The player's history and age (did they play when the ball was leather and could absorb significant amounts of water), alcohol intake, drug intake, learning disabilities, concussion definition and control group use/composition are all factors that cloud the ability to blame purposeful heading. What does seem clear is that a player's history of concussive episodes is a more likely explanation for cognitive deficits. While it is likely that the subconcussive impact of purposeful heading is a doubtful factor in the noted deficits, it is unknown whether multiple subconcussive impacts might have some lingering effects. In addition, it is unknown whether the noted deficits have any affect on daily life. Proper instruction in the technique is critical because if the ball contacts an unprepared head (as in accidental head-ball contacts), the potential for serious injury is possible. To further our understanding of the relationship of heading, head injury and cognitive deficits, we need to: learn more about the actual impact of a ball on the

  9. Development of a Medical Specialty Recurring Bibliography—Index of Rheumatology*†

    PubMed Central

    Ruhl, Mary Jane

    1967-01-01

    The Index of Rheumatology is a newly-developed, recurring bibliography produced by the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System (MEDLARS) of the National Library of Medicine. It is published semimonthly by the American Rheumatism Association. This report describes preliminary testing of MEDLARS output, modification of MEDLARS Medical Subject Headings (MeSH), and the computer formulation for retrieval of the bibliographic citations comprising the Index. PMID:5334177

  10. Memory and head injury severity.

    PubMed

    Dikmen, S; Temkin, N; McLean, A; Wyler, A; Machamer, J

    1987-12-01

    One hundred and two consecutive head injured patients were studied at 1 and 12 months after injury. Their performances were compared with a group of uninjured friends. The results indicate that impairment in memory depends on the type of task used, time from injury to testing, and on the severity of head injury (that is, degree of impaired consciousness). Head injury severity indices are more closely related to behavioural outcome early as compared with later after injury. At 1 year, only those with deep or prolonged impaired consciousness (as represented by greater than 1 day of coma, Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 or less, and post traumatic amnesia of 2 weeks or greater) are performing significantly worse than comparison subjects.

  11. Risk factors for COPD exacerbations in inhaled medication users: the COPDGene study biannual longitudinal follow-up prospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Busch, Robert; Han, MeiLan K; Bowler, Russell P; Dransfield, Mark T; Wells, J Michael; Regan, Elizabeth A; Hersh, Craig P

    2016-02-10

    Despite inhaled medications that decrease exacerbation risk, some COPD patients experience frequent exacerbations. We determined prospective risk factors for exacerbations among subjects in the COPDGene Study taking inhaled medications. 2113 COPD subjects were categorized into four medication use patterns: triple therapy with tiotropium (TIO) plus long-acting beta-agonist/inhaled-corticosteroid (ICS ± LABA), tiotropium alone, ICS ± LABA, and short-acting bronchodilators. Self-reported exacerbations were recorded in telephone and web-based longitudinal follow-up surveys. Associations with exacerbations were determined within each medication group using four separate logistic regression models. A head-to-head analysis compared exacerbation risk among subjects using tiotropium vs. ICS ± LABA. In separate logistic regression models, the presence of gastroesophageal reflux, female gender, and higher scores on the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire were significant predictors of exacerbator status within multiple medication groups (reflux: OR 1.62-2.75; female gender: OR 1.53 - OR 1.90; SGRQ: OR 1.02-1.03). Subjects taking either ICS ± LABA or tiotropium had similar baseline characteristics, allowing comparison between these two groups. In the head-to-head comparison, tiotropium users showed a trend towards lower rates of exacerbations (OR = 0.69 [95 % CI 0.45, 1.06], p = 0.09) compared with ICS ± LABA users, especially in subjects without comorbid asthma (OR = 0.56 [95% CI 0.31, 1.00], p = 0.05). Each common COPD medication usage group showed unique risk factor patterns associated with increased risk of exacerbations, which may help clinicians identify subjects at risk. Compared to similar subjects using ICS ± LABA, those taking tiotropium showed a trend towards reduced exacerbation risk, especially in subjects without asthma. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00608764, first received 1/28/2008.

  12. The postconcussion syndrome and the sequelae of mild head injury.

    PubMed

    Evans, R W

    1992-11-01

    The postconcussion syndrome refers to a large number of symptoms and signs that may occur alone or in combination following usually mild head injury. The most common complaints are headaches, dizziness, fatigue, irritability, anxiety, insomnia, loss of consciousness and memory, and noise sensitivity. Mild head injury is a major public health concern because the annual incidence is about 150 per 100,000 population, accounting for 75% or more of all head injuries. The postconcussion syndrome has been recognized for at least the last few hundred years and has been the subject of intense controversy for more than 100 years. The Hollywood head injury myth has been an important contributor to persisting skepticism and might be countered by educational efforts and counter-examples from boxing. The organicity of the postconcussion syndrome has now become well documented. Abnormalities following mild head injury have been reported in neuropathologic, neurophysiologic, neuroimaging, and neuropsychologic studies. There are multiple sequelae of mild head injury, including headaches of multiple types, cranial nerve symptoms and signs, psychologic and somatic complaints, and cognitive impairment. Rare sequelae include hematomas, seizures, transient global amnesia, tremor, and dystonia. Neuroimaging and physiologic and psychologic testing should be used judiciously based on the problems of the particular patient rather than in a cookbook fashion. Prognostic studies clearly substantiate the existence of a postconcussion syndrome. Manifestations of the postconcussion syndrome are common, with resolution in most patients by 3 to 6 months after the injury. Persistent symptoms and cognitive deficits are present in a distinct minority of patients for additional months or years. Risk factors for persisting sequelae include age over 40 years; lower educational, intellectual, and socioeconomic level; female gender; alcohol abuse; prior head injury; and multiple trauma. Although a small

  13. Subjects such as strategic planning, extra-disciplinary communication, and management have become crucial to medical physics clinical practice and should become an integral part of the medical physics curriculum.

    PubMed

    Caruana, Carmel J; Cunha, J Adam M; Orton, Colin G

    2017-03-15

    In addition to their clinical duties, many medical physicists find themselves in a situation where they have to do managerial work such as strategic planning and communication within a hospital or with outside agencies. Typically, these skills are obtained on-the-job or by taking extra-curricular courses. However, some believe that such strategic planning and communication and management skills are so important that courses on these topics should become an integral part of the medical physics curriculum. This is the claim debated in this month's Point/Counterpoint. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment outcomes of chronic post-traumatic headaches after mild head trauma in US soldiers: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Jay C

    2011-06-01

    he effectiveness of medical therapies for chronic post-traumatic headaches (PTHs) attributable to mild head trauma in military troops has not been established. To determine the treatment outcomes of acute and prophylactic medical therapies prescribed for chronic PTHs after mild head trauma in US Army soldiers. A retrospective cohort study was conducted with 100 soldiers undergoing treatment for chronic PTH at a single US Army neurology clinic. Headache frequency and Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) scores were determined at the initial clinic visit and then again by phone 3 months after starting headache prophylactic medication. Response rates of headache abortive medications were also determined. Treatment outcomes were compared between subjects with blast-related PTH and non-blast PTH. Ninety-nine of 100 subjects were male. Seventy-seven of 100 subjects had blast PTH and 23/100 subjects had non-blast PTH. Headache characteristics were similar for blast PTH and non-blast PTH with 96% and 95%, respectively, resembling migraine. Headache frequency among all PTH subjects decreased from 17.1 days/month at baseline to 14.5 days/month at follow-up (P = .009). Headache frequency decreased by 41% among non-blast PTH compared to 9% among blast PTH. Fifty-seven percent of non-blast PTH subjects had a 50% or greater decline in headache frequency compared to 29% of blast PTH subjects (P =.023). A significant decline in headache frequency occurred in subjects treated with topiramate (n = 29, -23%, P = .02) but not among those treated with a low-dose tricyclic antidepressant (n = 48, -12%, P = .23). Seventy percent of PTH subjects who used a triptan class medication experienced reliable headache relief within 2 hours compared to 42% of subjects using other headache abortive medications (P = .01). Triptan medications were effective for both blast PTH and non-blast PTH (66% response rate vs 86% response rate, respectively; P = .20). Headache-related disability, as measured

  15. Influence of forward head posture on condylar position.

    PubMed

    Ohmure, H; Miyawaki, S; Nagata, J; Ikeda, K; Yamasaki, K; Al-Kalaly, A

    2008-11-01

    There are several reports suggesting that forward head posture is associated with temporomandibular disorders and restraint of mandibular growth, possibly due to mandibular displacement posteriorly. However, there have been few reports in which the condylar position was examined in forward head posture. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the condyle moves posteriorly in the forward head posture. The condylar position and electromyography from the masseter, temporal and digastric muscles were recorded on 15 healthy male adults at mandibular rest position in the natural head posture and deliberate forward head posture. The condylar position in the deliberate forward head posture was significantly more posterior than that in the natural head posture. The activity of the masseter and digastric muscles in the deliberate forward head posture was slightly increased. These results suggest that the condyle moves posteriorly in subjects with forward head posture.

  16. Cognitive outcomes of multiple mild head injuries in children.

    PubMed

    Bijur, P E; Haslum, M; Golding, J

    1996-06-01

    This study assessed cumulative effects of multiple mild head injuries on cognitive functioning in children. Subjects included 1586 children with one mild head injury, 278 with two, and 51 with three or more head injuries between birth and age 10 years and controls without head injuries matched on gender and total number of injuries. The number of head injuries and injuries not to the head was associated with decreasing performance on measures of intelligence (p < .01), reading (p < .01), and math (p = .02). There was no interaction between case-control status and number of injuries, indicating a similar relationship between cognitive outcomes and number of injuries in head-injured cases and controls. After adjustment for covariates, the relationship between number of injuries and cognitive outcomes became nonsignificant. This study suggests that cognitive deficits associated with multiple mild head injury are due to social and personal factors related to multiple injuries and not to specific damage to the head.

  17. CUSUM analysis of learning curves for the head-mounted microscope in phonomicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting; Vamos, Andrew C; Dailey, Seth H; Jiang, Jack J

    2016-10-01

    To observe the learning curve of the head-mounted microscope in a phonomicrosurgery simulator using cumulative summation (CUSUM) analysis, which incorporates a magnetic phonomicrosurgery instrument tracking system (MPTS). Retrospective case series. Eight subjects (6 medical students and 2 surgeons inexperienced in phonomicrosurgery) operated on phonomicrosurgical simulation cutting tasks while using the head-mounted microscope for 400 minutes total. Two 20-minute sessions occurred each day for 10 total days, with operation quality (Qs ) and completion time (T) being recorded after each session. Cumulative summation analysis of Qs and T was performed by using subjects' performance data from trials completed using a traditional standing microscope as success criteria. The motion parameters from the head-mounted microscope were significantly better than the standing microscope (P < 0.01), but T was longer than that from the standing microscope (P < 0.01). No subject successfully adapted to the head-mounted microscope, as assessed by CUSUM analysis. Cumulative summation analysis can objectively monitor the learning process associated with a phonomicrosurgical simulator system, ultimately providing a tool to assess learning status. Also, motion parameters determined by our MPTS showed that, although the head-mounted microscope provides better motion control, worse Qs and longer T resulted. This decrease in Qs is likely a result of the relatively unstable visual environment that it provides. Overall, the inexperienced surgeons participating in this study failed to adapt to the head-mounted microscope in our simulated phonomicrosurgery environment. 4 Laryngoscope, 126:2295-2300, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. [Forensic medical expertise of sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy in the subjects having a low ethanol concentration in the blood and urine].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O V; Petrova, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the cases of sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy of the subjects having a low ethanol concentration in the blood and urine; the second objective was the statistical analysis of the data thus obtained. It was shown that sudden cardiac death from alcoholic cardiomyopathy occurs in the men more frequently than in the women despite rather low ethanol levels in the blood and urine of both genders or even in the cases of complete absence of ethanol in these fluids. It is concluded that ethanol concentration in the blood and urine of the subjects who died from the alcohol-induced heart injury depends on their age and sex.

  19. Multiple-dose escalation, safety, and tolerability study of wood creosote, the principal active ingredient of seirogan, an herbal antidiarrheal medication, in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kuge, Tomoo; Shibata, Takashi; Willett, Michael S

    2003-03-01

    Seirogan, an herbal medicine containing wood creosote (CAS 8021-39-4), a mixture of simple phenolic compounds, has been marketed for the past century in Asia for the treatment of acute diarrhea and associated symptoms, such as abdominal discomfort and cramping. The present study was designed to assess the safety and tolerability of an anticipated acute antidiarrheal dosing regimen. Sixty healthy males were randomized into five groups of 12 subjects each (9 wood creosote; 3 placebo) to receive 45-, 90-, 135-, 180-, and 225-mg tablets every 2 hours for five doses. Serial sitting and standing vital signs, ECG rhythm strips, and continuous telemetry monitoring were obtained predose and for 24 hours after the first dose. Clinical laboratory tests and 12-lead resting ECGs were obtained predose and 24 hours postdose. Of the subjects, 27% (12/45) receiving wood creosote and 27% (4/15) receiving placebo reported adverse events. The most common adverse events were altered taste and somnolence, reported more often with 180- and 225-mg doses. Wood creosote had no clinically significant effects on vital signs, ECG intervals or interpretations, or clinical laboratory tests. No clinically significant or serious dysrhythmias were reported on continuous telemetry monitoring. It was concluded that oral doses of wood creosote 45 to 225 mg every 2 hours for up to five doses were safe and well tolerated in 45 healthy subjects. Wood creosote doses ranging from 45 to 135 mg per dose, which are commonly administered antidiarrheal doses in Asia, were associated with minimal side effects.

  20. Human visual and vestibular heading perception in the vertical planes.

    PubMed

    Crane, Benjamin T

    2014-02-01

    Heading estimation has not previously been reported in the vertical planes. This is a potentially interesting issue because although distribution of neuronal direction sensitivities is near uniform for vertical headings, there is an overrepresentation of otolith organs sensitive to motion in the horizontal relative to the vertical plane. Furthermore, thresholds of horizontal motion perception are considerably lower than those of vertical motion which has the potential to bias heading perception. The current data from 14 human subjects (age 19 to 67) measured heading estimation in response to vestibular motion of 14 cm (28 cm/s) over a 360° of headings at 5° intervals. An analogous visual motion was tested in separate trials. In this study, earth and head vertical/horizontal were always aligned. Results demonstrated that the horizontal component of heading was overestimated relative to the vertical component for vestibular heading stimuli in the coronal (skew) and sagittal (elevation) planes. For visual headings, the bias was much smaller and in the opposite direction such that the vertical component of heading was overestimated. Subjects older than 50 had significantly worse precision and larger biases relative to that of younger subjects for the vestibular conditions, although visual heading estimates were similar. A vector addition model was fit to the data which explains the observed heading biases by the known distribution of otolith organs in humans. The greatly decreased precision with age is explained by the model with decreases in end organ numbers, and relatively greater loss of otoliths that are sensitive to vertical motion.

  1. Heading in football. Part 3: Effect of ball properties on head response

    PubMed Central

    Shewchenko, N; Withnall, C; Keown, M; Gittens, R; Dvorak, J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Head impacts from footballs are an essential part of the game but have been implicated in mild and acute neuropsychological impairment. Ball characteristics have been noted in literature to affect the impact response of the head; however, the biomechanics are not well understood. The present study determined whether ball mass, pressure, and construction characteristics help reduce head and neck can impact response. Methods: Head responses under ball impact (6–7 m/s) were measured with a biofidelic numerical human model and controlled human subject trials (n = 3). Three ball masses and four ball pressures were investigated for frontal heading. Further, the effect of ball construction in wet/dry conditions was studied with the numerical model. The dynamic ball characteristics were determined experimentally. Head linear and angular accelerations were measured and compared with injury assessment functions comprising peak values and head impact power. Neck responses were assessed with the numerical model. Results: Ball mass reductions up to 35% resulted in decreased head responses up to 23–35% for the numerical and subject trials. Similar decreases in neck axial and shear responses were observed. Ball pressure reductions of 50% resulted in head and neck response reductions up to 10–31% for the subject trials and numerical model. Head response reductions up to 15% were observed between different ball constructions. The wet condition generally resulted in greater head and neck responses of up to 20%. Conclusion: Ball mass, pressure, and construction can reduce the impact severity to the head and neck. It is foreseeable that the benefits can be extended to players of all ages and skill levels. PMID:16046354

  2. [Anaesthesiology as a compulsory subject in the new German medical school curriculum. Evaluation of a curricular model at the University Hospital Aachen].

    PubMed

    Beckers, S K; Sopka, S; Fries, M; Skorning, M H; Kuhlen, R; Rossaint, R

    2007-06-01

    Since October 2003 new regulations for qualifications to practice medicine in Germany now require compulsory courses in anaesthesiology. Therefore, existing curricular activities had to be changed from facultative courses for a small number of interested students to compulsory activities for all students. Previous data of the department of anaesthesiology at the University Hospital Aachen (Germany) were collected and taken into consideration for the development of a new curriculum: The result was a course consisting of a tutorial with integrated "basic skill training", practical training in the operating theatre and a simulation-based session, in addition to two series of lectures. An evaluation by the students was carried out using EvaLuna as a tool for web-based on-line evaluation and faculty members had to fill out a standardized questionnaire. The different parts of the curriculum received the highest scores of all courses in the undergraduate medical school curriculum. Best results were achieved by the anaesthesia-simulation session followed by the tutorial and the practical training. The feedback of faculty members as well as the results of students' evaluation approved the developed concept of integrating anaesthesia-relevant issues into the formal medical school curriculum. Nevertheless, the on-line evaluation system EvaLuna provided additional suggestions for future improvements in the newly created curriculum.

  3. Direction specific biases in human visual and vestibular heading perception.

    PubMed

    Crane, Benjamin T

    2012-01-01

    Heading direction is determined from visual and vestibular cues. Both sensory modalities have been shown to have better direction discrimination for headings near straight ahead. Previous studies of visual heading estimation have not used the full range of stimuli, and vestibular heading estimation has not previously been reported. The current experiments measure human heading estimation in the horizontal plane to vestibular, visual, and spoken stimuli. The vestibular and visual tasks involved 16 cm of platform or visual motion. The spoken stimulus was a voice command speaking a heading angle. All conditions demonstrated direction dependent biases in perceived headings such that biases increased with headings further from the fore-aft axis. The bias was larger with the visual stimulus when compared with the vestibular stimulus in all 10 subjects. For the visual and vestibular tasks precision was best for headings near fore-aft. The spoken headings had the least bias, and the variation in precision was less dependent on direction. In a separate experiment when headings were limited to ± 45°, the biases were much less, demonstrating the range of headings influences perception. There was a strong and highly significant correlation between the bias curves for visual and spoken stimuli in every subject. The correlation between visual-vestibular and vestibular-spoken biases were weaker but remained significant. The observed biases in both visual and vestibular heading perception qualitatively resembled predictions of a recent population vector decoder model (Gu et al., 2010) based on the known distribution of neuronal sensitivities.

  4. Superior antidepressant effect occurring 1 month after rTMS: add-on rTMS for subjects with medication-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Chang, Chung-Hung; Tsai, Hsin-Chi; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lin, Chaucer CH

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder. The standard treatment for depression is antidepressant medication, but the responses to antidepressant treatment are only partial, even poor, among 30%–45% of patients. Refractory depression is defined as depression that does not respond to antidepressant therapy after 4 weeks of use. There is evidence that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may exert effects in treating psychiatric disorder through moderating focal neuronal functions. High-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal area and low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal area were shown to be effective in alleviating depressive symptoms. Given the statistically significant antidepressant effectiveness noted, the clinical application of rTMS as a depression treatment warrants further studies. Application of rTMS as an add-on therapy would be a practical research model. High-frequency (5–20 Hz) rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was found to have a significant effect on medication-resistant depression. In the present study, we not only measured the acute antidepressant effect of rTMS during treatment and immediately after its completion but also evaluated participants 1 month after completion of the treatment protocol. Study participants were divided into two groups: an active rTMS group (n = 10) and a sham group (n = 10). The active rTMS group was defined as participants who received the rTMS protocol, and the sham group was defined as participants who received a sham rTMS procedure. A significant Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score reduction was observed in both groups after the fifth and tenth treatments. However, those in the active rTMS group maintained their improvement as measured one month after completion of the rTMS protocol. Participants who received active rTMS were more likely to have persistent improvement in depression scores than participants who received sham rTMS. PMID:23576870

  5. Urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate excretion in intellectually disabled subjects with sleep disorders and multiple medications: validation of measurements in urine extracted from diapers.

    PubMed

    Laakso, M-L; Lindblom, N; Kaipainen, P; Kaski, M

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate (MT6s) measurements in the evaluation of melatonin secretion in intellectually disabled patients with sleep disorders. All 17 patients received drugs with potential interactions with melatonin metabolism. Serum melatonin 24-h profiles were determined at hourly intervals. The area under the curve (AUC) value, peak amplitude, half-rise time, and half-decline time were calculated individually. Urinary MT6s excretion was determined from samples collected from disposable diapers during three consecutive days at varying intervals. The average excretion rate for each hour of the day was calculated. The excretion profiles were characterized by total amount of MT6s excretion/24 h/kg body mass, amount of excreted MT6s during 6 h of maximum excretion (MAX 6h), and start time of the maximum excretion (start MAX 6h). There were significant positive correlations between serum melatonin AUC value and total excretion of MT6s/body mass, between serum melatonin amplitude and urinary MAX 6h, and between melatonin half-rise time and start MAX 6h; one patient on phenobarbital medication was out of line. The serum melatonin profiles of the patients were classified by comparing them with those of matched healthy volunteers (low-, normal-, or high secretors, normal or delayed rhythm). Similarly, the parameters of MT6s profiles were compared with those obtained from healthy controls, and the patients were reclassified as normal or aberrant. The classifications based on serum melatonin and urinary MT6s measurements were mostly concordant. The daily pattern of urinary MT6s excretion reliably reflected the phase of the serum melatonin rhythm irrespective of the medications, but in some cases, the total amount of excreted MT6s was lower than expected based on serum melatonin measurements.

  6. Head Lag in Infancy: What Is It Telling Us?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lauren C.; Seefeldt, Kristin; Hilton, Claudia L.; Rogers, Cynthia L.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate changes in head lag across postmenstrual age and define associations between head lag and (1) perinatal exposures and (2) neurodevelopment. METHOD. Sixty-four infants born ≤30 wk gestation had head lag assessed before and at term-equivalent age. Neurobehavior was assessed at term age. At 2 yr, neurodevelopmental testing was conducted. RESULTS. Head lag decreased with advancing postmenstrual age, but 58% (n = 37) of infants continued to demonstrate head lag at term. Head lag was associated with longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (p = .009), inotrope use (p = .04), sepsis (p = .02), longer endotracheal intubation (p = .01), and cerebral injury (p = .006). Head lag was related to alterations in early neurobehavior (p < .03), but no associations with neurodevelopment were found at 2 yr. CONCLUSION. Head lag was related to medical factors and early neurobehavior, but it may not be a good predictor of outcome when used in isolation. PMID:26709421

  7. [Subjective sensitivity to noise].

    PubMed

    Belojević, G

    1991-01-01

    It is likely that individual variations in subjectively estimated noise sensitivity influence different social and psychophysiological reactions of people exposed to noise. Subjective noise sensitivity might be a relatively stable personal characteristic. A correlation have been found between high sensitiveness to noise and some medical symptoms (sleep disturbance, nervousness, depression), and worse work performance in noisy environments. An introvert person with neurotic symptoms is more frequently found in people highly sensitive to noise. Testing for subjective sensitivity to noise might be helpful in professional selection and orientation for noisy work-places as well as in housing advising.

  8. Dropped head syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kashihara, Kenichi; Ohno, Manabu; Tomita, Susumu

    2006-08-01

    We determined the frequency of dropped head syndrome in Parkinson's disease (PD) in Japan and evaluated its clinical correlates. A total of 252 consecutive patients with PD who visited our hospital were studied. Dropped head syndrome was found in 15 patients (6.0%) (3 men, 12 women; mean age at onset of PD, 62.8 +/- 11.5 years). The interval before emergence of dropped head after disease onset was 5.4 +/- 4.3 years (-0.5 to 15 years). The Hoehn-Yahr score at the on stage was 3.2 +/- 0.7; at the off stage 3.5 +/- 0.8. Of those 15 patients, 8 had major symptoms of rigidity and akinesia. In 2 patients, administration of a dopamine agonist appeared to evoke dropped head syndrome. An increase in and/or the addition of antiparkinsonian drugs alleviated head drop in 4 patients and reduced head drop in 7 patients. Any medication was not effective for 4 patients. Dropped head syndrome in PD is not rare in Japan. It is more often observed in women and is associated with patients who primarily suffer rigidity and akinesia. Dropped head syndrome in these patients appears to be produced by disproportionate tonus of the neck muscles. It is modulated by antiparkinsonian drugs and is considered to be a type of dystonia.

  9. Age-related changes in head and eye coordination.

    PubMed

    Proudlock, Frank A; Shekhar, Himanshu; Gottlob, Irene

    2004-01-01

    The effect of ageing upon head movements during gaze shifts is unknown. We have investigated age-related changes in head and eye coordination in a group of healthy volunteers. Horizontal head and eye movements were recorded in 53 subjects, aged between 20 and 83 years, during the performance of saccades, antisaccades, smooth pursuit and a reading task. The subjects were divided into three groups, young subjects (20-40 years), middle-aged subjects (41-60 years) and older subjects (over 60 years). Logarithmic transformations of the head gain were significantly greater in the older subjects compared to the young subjects during the saccadic task (P=0.001), antisaccadic task (P=0.004), smooth pursuit at 20 degrees/s (P=0.001) and 40 degrees/s (P=0.005), but not reading. For saccadic and antisaccadic tasks, the increase in transformed head gain was non-linear with significant differences between older and middle-aged subjects but not middle-aged and young subjects. Head movement tendencies were highly consistent for related tasks. Head movement gain during gaze shifts significantly increases with age, which may contribute to dizziness and balance problems experienced by the elderly.

  10. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  11. Head CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... conditions: Birth (congenital) defect of the head or brain Brain infection Brain tumor Buildup of fluid inside ...

  12. Increased head circumference

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003305.htm Increased head circumference To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Increased head circumference is when the measured distance around the ...

  13. Compact Multifunction Inspection Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volpe, Richard A.; Ivlev, Robert; Ohm, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-sensor inspection head designed to be mounted at tip of robot arm for performing multiple automated and/or remotely controlled inspection functions. Inspection head houses optoelectronic sensors, electrochemical sensor, sources of illumination, and parallel-jaw gripper.

  14. Head injury - first aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... a gunshot to the head. Head injuries include: Concussion , in which the brain is shaken, is the ... function. This is called a traumatic brain injury. Concussion is a mild traumatic brain injury. Symptoms of ...

  15. Head injury. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 22 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Radiographic Evaluation; Epidemiology of Head Injury; Emergency Care and Initial Evaluation; Skull Fracture and Traumatic Cerebrospinal Fluid Fistulas; Mild Head Injury; and Injuries of the Cranial Nerves.

  16. Factors affecting the aluminium content of human femoral head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Dąbrowski, Mikołaj; Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Rogala, Piotr; Frankowski, Marcin

    2015-11-01

    Tissues for the study were obtained intraoperatively during hip replacement procedures from 96 patients. In all the cases, the indication for this treatment was primary or secondary degenerative changes in the hip joint. The subject of the study was the head and neck of the femur, resected in situ. Aluminium concentrations measured in femoral head and neck samples from patients aged between 25 and 91 were varied. Statistical methods were applied to determine the variations in relation to the parameters from the background survey. Significant differences in the aluminium content of femoral head samples were observed between patients under and over 60 years of age. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the aluminium accumulates in bones over a lifetime. The study showed that the content of aluminium in the head and neck of the femur depends on the factors such as: type of medicines taken, contact with chemicals at work, differences in body anatomy and sex. The study on the levels of aluminium in bones and the factors affecting its concentration is a valuable source of information for further research on the role of aluminium in bone diseases. Based on the investigations, it was found that the GF-AAS technique is the best analytical tool for routine analysis of aluminium in complex matrix samples. The use of femoral heads in the investigations was approved by the Bioethics Committee of the University of Medical Sciences in Poznań (Poland). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of heat donation through the head or torso on mild hypothermia rewarming.

    PubMed

    Sran, Bhupinder Jit K; McDonald, Gerren K; Steinman, Alan M; Gardiner, Phillip F; Giesbrecht, Gordon G

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the effectiveness of head vs torso warming in rewarming mildly hypothermic, vigorously shivering subjects using a similar source of heat donation. Six subjects (1 female) were cooled on 3 occasions in 8 ºC water for 60 minutes or to a core temperature of 35 ºC. They were then dried, insulated, and rewarmed by 1) shivering only; 2) charcoal heater applied to the head; or 3) charcoal heater applied to the torso. The order of rewarming methods followed a balanced design. Esophageal temperature, skin temperature, heart rate, oxygen consumption, and heat flux were measured. There were no significant differences in rewarming rate among the 3 conditions. Torso warming increased skin temperature and inhibited shivering heat production, thus providing similar net heat gain (268 ± 66 W) as did shivering only (355 ± 105 W). Head warming did not inhibit average shivering heat production (290 ± 72 W); it thus provided a greater net heat gain during 35 to 60 minutes of rewarming than did shivering only. Head warming is as effective as torso warming for rewarming mildly hypothermic victims. Head warming may be the preferred method of rewarming in the field management of hypothermic patients if: 1) extreme conditions in which removal of the insulation and exposure of the torso to the cold is contraindicated; 2) excessive movement is contraindicated (eg, potential spinal injury or severe hypothermia that has a risk of ventricular fibrillation); or 3) if emergency personnel are working on the torso. © 2013 Wilderness Medical Society Published by Wilderness Medical Society All rights reserved.

  18. Linear and angular head accelerations during heading of a soccer ball.

    PubMed

    Naunheim, Rosanne S; Bayly, Philip V; Standeven, John; Neubauer, Jeremy S; Lewis, Larry M; Genin, Guy M

    2003-08-01

    Cognitive deficits observed in professional soccer players may be related to heading of a soccer ball. To assess the severity of a single instance of heading a soccer ball, this study experimentally and theoretically evaluated the linear and angular accelerations experienced by the human head during a frontal heading maneuver. Accelerations were measured using a set of three triaxial accelerometers mounted to the head of each of four adult male subjects. These measurements (nine signals) were used to estimate the linear acceleration of the mass center and the angular acceleration of the head. Results were obtained for ball speeds of 9 and 12 m.s(-1) (approximately 20 and 26 mph). A simple mathematical model was derived for comparison. At 9 m.s(-1), peak linear acceleration of the head was 158 +/- 19 m.s(-2) (mean +/- standard deviation) and peak angular acceleration was 1302 +/- 324 rad.s(-2); at 12 m.s(-1), the values were 199 +/- 27 m.s-2 and 1457 +/- 297 rad.s-2, respectively. The initial acceleration pulses lasted approximately 25 ms. Measured head accelerations confirmed laboratory headform measurements reported in the literature and fell within the ranges predicted by the theoretical model. Linear and angular acceleration levels for a single heading maneuver were well below those thought to be associated with traumatic brain injury, as were computed values of the Gadd Severity Index and the Head Injury Criterion. However, the effect of repeated acceleration at this relatively low level is unknown.

  19. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics.

  20. The Video Head Impulse Test

    PubMed Central

    Halmagyi, G. M.; Chen, Luke; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Weber, Konrad P.; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Curthoys, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    In 1988, we introduced impulsive testing of semicircular canal (SCC) function measured with scleral search coils and showed that it could accurately and reliably detect impaired function even of a single lateral canal. Later we showed that it was also possible to test individual vertical canal function in peripheral and also in central vestibular disorders and proposed a physiological mechanism for why this might be so. For the next 20 years, between 1988 and 2008, impulsive testing of individual SCC function could only be accurately done by a few aficionados with the time and money to support scleral search-coil systems—an expensive, complicated and cumbersome, semi-invasive technique that never made the transition from the research lab to the dizzy clinic. Then, in 2009 and 2013, we introduced a video method of testing function of each of the six canals individually. Since 2009, the method has been taken up by most dizzy clinics around the world, with now close to 100 refereed articles in PubMed. In many dizzy clinics around the world, video Head Impulse Testing has supplanted caloric testing as the initial and in some cases the final test of choice in patients with suspected vestibular disorders. Here, we consider seven current, interesting, and controversial aspects of video Head Impulse Testing: (1) introduction to the test; (2) the progress from the head impulse protocol (HIMPs) to the new variant—suppression head impulse protocol (SHIMPs); (3) the physiological basis for head impulse testing; (4) practical aspects and potential pitfalls of video head impulse testing; (5) problems of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain calculations; (6) head impulse testing in central vestibular disorders; and (7) to stay right up-to-date—new clinical disease patterns emerging from video head impulse testing. With thanks and appreciation we dedicate this article to our friend, colleague, and mentor, Dr Bernard Cohen of Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, who since his

  1. Is having a job a protective factor? Employment status and state of medical care as subjectively perceived by adults with CHD in Germany.

    PubMed

    Helm, Paul C; Sticker, Elisabeth J; Keuchen, Roland; Koerten, Marc-André; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Tutarel, Oktay; Bauer, Ulrike M M

    2017-08-01

    Most patients born with CHD nowadays reach adulthood, and thus quality of life, life situation, and state of medical care aspects are gaining importance in the current era. The present study aimed to investigate whether patients' assessment depends on their means of occupation. The findings are expected to be helpful in optimising care and for developing individual treatment plans. The present study was based on an online survey conducted in cooperation with patient organisations. Participants were recruited from the database of the German National Register for Congenital Heart Defects. In total, 1828 individuals (777 males, 1051 females) took part. Participants were asked to rate aspects such their state of health on a six-tier scale (1=worst specification). Response behaviour was measured against the background of occupational details. Training for or pursuing a profession was found to be significantly associated with participants' rating of five of the six examined aspects (p<0.05). Sex seemed to play an important part in four of the six aspects. An optimal treatment plan for adults with CHD should always consider aspects such as sex and employment status. To work out such an optimal and individual treatment plan for each adult CHD patient, an objective tool to measure patients' actual CHD-specific knowledge precluding socially accepted response bias would be very useful.

  2. Sex differences in subjective and objective responses to a stimulant medication (methylphenidate): Comparisons between overweight/obese adults with and without binge-eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Davis, Caroline; Levitan, Robert D; Kaplan, Allan S; Carter-Major, Jacqueline C; Kennedy, James L

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in response to a single dose of a psychomotor-stimulant medication (methylphenidate: MP) and to assess whether expected differences were moderated by binge-eating disorder (BED) status. It is anticipated that findings will shed light on factors that contribute to response variation in the use of stimulant pharmacotherapy to treat BED. The study employed a double-blind, drug-placebo, cross-over design in overweight/obese adults with BED (n = 90) and without BED (n = 108). Emotional/mood ratings were assessed every 15 minutes after oral administration of the drug/placebo, and appetite, cravings, and consumption were assessed during a laboratory-based snack-food challenge. Women reported earlier and more sustained "overall" effects of the drug-including "feeling high"-than the men. There was also a significantly greater suppression in appetite ratings, food cravings, and food consumption from the placebo to the drug condition among the women. Indeed, among men there were no significant differences between the two conditions on any of the food-related variables. BED status also did not moderate any of the drug-placebo differences. These findings are relevant to the use of stimulant pharmacotherapy for BED, and raise the possibility that overweight/obese men may be relatively less responsive to this form of treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:473-481). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Efficacy, Safety, and Subject Satisfaction of a Specified Skin Care Regimen to Cleanse, Medicate, Moisturize, and Protect the Skin of Patients Under Treatment for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror “real world” management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  4. Patient-reported-outcomes in subjects with painful lumbar or cervical radiculopathy treated with pregabalin: evidence from medical practice in primary care settings.

    PubMed

    Saldaña, María Teresa; Navarro, Ana; Pérez, Concepción; Masramón, Xavier; Rejas, Javier

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pregabalin in painful cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy treated in Primary Care settings under routine clinical practice. An observational, prospective 12-week secondary analysis was carried-out. Male and female above 18 years, naïve to PGB, with refractory chronic pain secondary to cervical/lumbosacral radiculopathy were enrolled. SF-MPQ, Sheehan Disability Inventory, MOS Sleep Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the EQ-5D were administered. A total of 490 (34%) patients were prescribed PGB-monotherapy, 702 (48%) received PGB add-on, and 159 (11%) were administered non-PGB drugs. After 12 weeks, significant improvements in pain, associated symptoms of anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances, general health; and level of disability were observed in the three groups, being significantly greater in PGB groups. In routine medical practice, monotherapy or add-on pregabalin is associated with substantial pain alleviation and associated symptoms improvements in painful cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  5. Patient-reported-outcomes in subjects with painful lumbar or cervical radiculopathy treated with pregabalin: evidence from medical practice in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Ana; Pérez, Concepción; Masramón, Xavier; Rejas, Javier

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pregabalin in painful cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy treated in Primary Care settings under routine clinical practice. An observational, prospective 12-week secondary analysis was carried-out. Male and female above 18 years, naïve to PGB, with refractory chronic pain secondary to cervical/lumbosacral radiculopathy were enrolled. SF-MPQ, Sheehan Disability Inventory, MOS Sleep Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the EQ-5D were administered. A total of 490 (34%) patients were prescribed PGB-monotherapy, 702 (48%) received PGB add-on, and 159 (11%) were administered non-PGB drugs. After 12 weeks, significant improvements in pain, associated symptoms of anxiety, depression and sleep disturbances, general health; and level of disability were observed in the three groups, being significantly greater in PGB groups. In routine medical practice, monotherapy or add-on pregabalin is associated with substantial pain alleviation and associated symptoms improvements in painful cervical or lumbosacral radiculopathy. PMID:19798503

  6. Vestibulopathy and age effects on head stability during chair rise.

    PubMed

    McGibbon, C A; Krebs, D E; Scarborough, D M

    2001-01-01

    It is unknown how vestibular dysfunction and age differentially affect balance control during functional activities. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the effects of age and vestibulopathy on head control when rising from a chair. Head relative to trunk (head-on-trunk) sagittal plane angular and linear control strategies were studied in patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) and in healthy subjects aged 30-80 years. A two-way analysis of variance was used to compare head-on-trunk kinematics by age (young vs elderly) and diagnosis (healthy vs BVH) at the time of liftoff from the seat. Angular control strategies differed with age but not diagnosis: young (healthy and BVH) subjects stabilized head rotations in space while elderly (healthy and BVH) subjects stabilized head rotations on the trunk. In contrast, linear control strategies differed by diagnosis but not age: BVH subjects (young and old) allowed a greater rate of head-on-trunk translation while healthy subjects (young and old) inhibited such translations. Young BVH subjects stabilized head-in-space rotations (as did young healthy subjects) without a functioning vestibular system, suggesting cervicocollic reflex and/or other sensory compensation for vestibular loss. Elderly BVH subjects stabilized head rotation with respect to the trunk, as did healthy elders, but did not stabilize head-on-trunk translations, suggesting a reliance on passive mechanical responses of the neck to sense head movements. We conclude that compensation strategies used by patients with vestibulopathy are age-dependent and appear to be more tractable in the younger BVH patient.

  7. Head Lice - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Head Lice - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (bosanski) Expand Section Head Lice - bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) (简体中文) Expand Section Head ...

  8. Head Start Automation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Univ. Coll.

    The task for the National Data Management Project is to share technological capabilities with the Head Start Community in order to implement improved services for children and families involved in Head Start. Many Head Start programs have incorporated technology into their programs, including word processing, database management systems,…

  9. Treating Head Lice

    MedlinePlus

    ... 180 K) En Español On this page: Blood-Sucking Bugs Steps for Safe Use Heading Off Head Lice Head lice. Every parent’s nightmare. A year-round problem, the number of cases seems to peak when ...

  10. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  11. Head Injury Prevention Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fax: 847-378-0600 www.NeurosurgeryToday.org A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain. TBI can result when the head suddenly and ...

  12. Mania following head injury.

    PubMed

    Yatham, L N; Benbow, J C; Jeffers, A M

    1988-03-01

    A case of mania following head injury in an individual with a genetic predisposition to schizophrenia is reported. It is argued that the head injury is probably causative in his case and suggested that head injury should be considered as one of the aetiological factors in secondary mania.

  13. The Head Start Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigler, Edward, Ed.; Styfco, Sally J., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The future of Head Start depends on how well people learn from and apply the lessons from its past. That's why everyone involved in early education needs this timely, forward-thinking book from the leader of Head Start. The first book to capture the Head Start debates in all their complexity and diversity, this landmark volume brings together the…

  14. Subject and Citation Indexing. Part I: The Clustering Structure of Composite Representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection. Part II: The Optimal, Cluster-Based Retrieval Performance of Composite Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, W. M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the clustering of composite representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection from the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE file. Clustering is evaluated as a function of the exhaustivity of composite representations based on Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and citation indexes, and evaluation of retrieval…

  15. Subject and Citation Indexing. Part I: The Clustering Structure of Composite Representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection. Part II: The Optimal, Cluster-Based Retrieval Performance of Composite Representations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, W. M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the clustering of composite representations in the Cystic Fibrosis Document Collection from the National Library of Medicine's MEDLINE file. Clustering is evaluated as a function of the exhaustivity of composite representations based on Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and citation indexes, and evaluation of retrieval…

  16. Repurposing the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v2 for external head motion tracking for brain PET.

    PubMed

    Noonan, P J; Howard, J; Hallett, W A; Gunn, R N

    2015-11-21

    Medical imaging systems such as those used in positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of spatial resolutions that enable the imaging of small, functionally important brain structures. However, the quality of data from PET brain studies is often limited by subject motion during acquisition. This is particularly challenging for patients with neurological disorders or with dynamic research studies that can last 90 min or more. Restraining head movement during the scan does not eliminate motion entirely and can be unpleasant for the subject. Head motion can be detected and measured using a variety of techniques that either use the PET data itself or an external tracking system. Advances in computer vision arising from the video gaming industry could offer significant benefits when re-purposed for medical applications. A method for measuring rigid body type head motion using the Microsoft Kinect v2 is described with results presenting  ⩽0.5 mm spatial accuracy. Motion data is measured in real-time at 30 Hz using the KinectFusion algorithm. Non-rigid motion is detected using the residual alignment energy data of the KinectFusion algorithm allowing for unreliable motion to be discarded. Motion data is aligned to PET listmode data using injected pulse sequences into the PET/CT gantry allowing for correction of rigid body motion. Pilot data from a clinical dynamic PET/CT examination is shown.

  17. Repurposing the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v2 for external head motion tracking for brain PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noonan, P. J.; Howard, J.; Hallett, W. A.; Gunn, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    Medical imaging systems such as those used in positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of spatial resolutions that enable the imaging of small, functionally important brain structures. However, the quality of data from PET brain studies is often limited by subject motion during acquisition. This is particularly challenging for patients with neurological disorders or with dynamic research studies that can last 90 min or more. Restraining head movement during the scan does not eliminate motion entirely and can be unpleasant for the subject. Head motion can be detected and measured using a variety of techniques that either use the PET data itself or an external tracking system. Advances in computer vision arising from the video gaming industry could offer significant benefits when re-purposed for medical applications. A method for measuring rigid body type head motion using the Microsoft Kinect v2 is described with results presenting  ⩽0.5 mm spatial accuracy. Motion data is measured in real-time at 30 Hz using the KinectFusion algorithm. Non-rigid motion is detected using the residual alignment energy data of the KinectFusion algorithm allowing for unreliable motion to be discarded. Motion data is aligned to PET listmode data using injected pulse sequences into the PET/CT gantry allowing for correction of rigid body motion. Pilot data from a clinical dynamic PET/CT examination is shown.

  18. Head movements and simulator sickness generated by a virtual environment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Alexander D; Muth, Eric R; Switzer, Fred S; Hoover, Adam

    2010-10-01

    For virtual environments (VEs) to be useful in training it is important to understand the negative effects of VE exposure. The purpose of this study was to observe head movements in virtual and real environments and the relation between those movements and simulator sickness. There were 48 men who were trained in 4-person teams in either a head-mounted display (HMD)-based VE or in a real world environment. Head position data were collected in both systems and simulator sickness scores were collected in the VE. The relationship of head movements and sickness scores in theVE was examined and the degree of head movements in the real world and VE compared. Differences were found in the length of time subjects spent moving their heads; subjects with the highest sickness scores moved their heads less often than other subjects in the VE. Also, subjects moved their heads significantly less and less often in the VE (means: 3 degrees x 50 ms(-1), 71% of trial time not moving head), compared to the real world (means: 10 degrees 50 ms(-1), 59% of trial time not moving head). This study observed that when head movements are quantified, past assumptions of the link between increased sickness scores and decreased head movements may not hold. Though not linked to simulator sickness, head movements were reduced in the VE compared to the real world. Though observational in nature, this study is one of the first to quantify head movements and how they may relate to simulator sickness.

  19. Neuroelectromagnetic forward head modeling toolbox.

    PubMed

    Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Makeig, Scott

    2010-07-15

    This paper introduces a Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox (NFT) running under MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.) for generating realistic head models from available data (MRI and/or electrode locations) and for computing numerical solutions for the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging. The NFT includes tools for segmenting scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues from T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is used for the numerical solution of the forward problem. After extracting segmented tissue volumes, surface BEM meshes can be generated. When a subject MR image is not available, a template head model can be warped to measured electrode locations to obtain an individualized head model. Toolbox functions may be called either from a graphic user interface compatible with EEGLAB (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab), or from the MATLAB command line. Function help messages and a user tutorial are included. The toolbox is freely available under the GNU Public License for noncommercial use and open source development. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Zeynep Akalin; Makeig, Scott

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a Neuroelectromagnetic Forward Head Modeling Toolbox (NFT) running under MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.) for generating realistic head models from available data (MRI and/or electrode locations) and for computing numerical solutions for the forward problem of electromagnetic source imaging. The NFT includes tools for segmenting scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues from T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is used for the numerical solution of the forward problem. After extracting segmented tissue volumes, surface BEM meshes can be generated. When a subject MR image is not available, a template head model can be warped to measured electrode locations to obtain an individualized head model. Toolbox functions may be called either from a graphic user interface compatible with EEGLAB (http://sccn.ucsd.edu/eeglab), or from the MATLAB command line. Function help messages and a user tutorial are included. The toolbox is freely available under the GNU Public License for noncommercial use and open source development. PMID:20457183

  1. Decisive evidence on a smaller-than-you-think phenomenon: revisiting the "1-in-X" effect on subjective medical probabilities.

    PubMed

    Sirota, Miroslav; Juanchich, Marie; Kostopoulou, Olga; Hanak, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Accurate perception of medical probabilities communicated to patients is a cornerstone of informed decision making. People, however, are prone to biases in probability perception. Recently, Pighin and others extended the list of such biases with evidence that "1-in-X" ratios (e.g., "1 in 12") led to greater perceived probability and worry about health outcomes than "N-in-X*N" ratios (e.g., "10 in 120"). Subsequently, the recommendation was to avoid using "1-in-X" ratios when communicating probabilistic information to patients. To warrant such a recommendation, we conducted 5 well-powered replications and synthesized the available data. We found that 3 out of the 5 replications yielded statistically nonsignificant findings. In addition, our results showed that the "1-in-X" effect was not moderated by numeracy, cognitive reflection, age, or gender. To quantify the evidence for the effect, we conducted a Bayes factor meta-analysis and a traditional meta-analysis of our 5 studies and those of Pighin and others (11 comparisons, N = 1131). The meta-analytical Bayes factor, which allowed assessment of the evidence for the null hypothesis, was very low, providing decisive evidence to support the existence of the "1-in-X" effect. The traditional meta-analysis showed that the overall effect was significant (Hedges' g = 0.42, 95% CI 0.29-0.54). Overall, we provide decisive evidence for the existence of the "1-in-X" effect but suggest that it is smaller than previously estimated. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  2. Cortical cholinergic dysfunction after human head injury.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, I; Perry, E K; Court, J A; Graham, D I; Dewar, D

    1998-05-01

    Loss of cholinergic neurotransmission is implicated in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction after head injury. The aim of the present study was to investigate presynaptic markers, particularly in relation to cholinergic neurotransmission in human postmortem brain from patients who died following a head injury and age-matched controls. Choline acetyltransferase activity and high-affinity nicotinic receptor binding sites were assayed in the inferior temporal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, and superior parietal cortex of 16 head-injured patients and 8 controls. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity was determined in the left cingulate gyrus from the same patient groups. In the head-injured group, choline acetyltransferase activity was consistently reduced in each cortical region compared to control subjects. The presence of a subdural haematoma and a prolonged survival period after head injury tended to be associated with lower choline acetyltransferase activity. In contrast to the marked reduction in choline acetyltransferase activity, nicotine receptor binding was unchanged in head-injured compared to control patients. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the cingulate gyrus was reduced by approximately 30% (p < 0.05) in the head-injured group compared to controls. Correlation of choline acetyltransferase activity with synaptophysin immunoreactivity indicated there is a deficit of cholinergic presynaptic terminals in postmortem human brain following head injury.

  3. Eye-Head Coordination for Visual Cognitive Processing

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Nakashima, Ryoichi; Matsumiya, Kazumichi; Kuriki, Ichiro; Shioiri, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated coordinated movements between the eyes and head (“eye-head coordination”) in relation to vision for action. Several studies have measured eye and head movements during a single gaze shift, focusing on the mechanisms of motor control during eye-head coordination. However, in everyday life, gaze shifts occur sequentially and are accompanied by movements of the head and body. Under such conditions, visual cognitive processing influences eye movements and might also influence eye-head coordination because sequential gaze shifts include cycles of visual processing (fixation) and data acquisition (gaze shifts). In the present study, we examined how the eyes and head move in coordination during visual search in a large visual field. Subjects moved their eyes, head, and body without restriction inside a 360° visual display system. We found patterns of eye-head coordination that differed those observed in single gaze-shift studies. First, we frequently observed multiple saccades during one continuous head movement, and the contribution of head movement to gaze shifts increased as the number of saccades increased. This relationship between head movements and sequential gaze shifts suggests eye-head coordination over several saccade-fixation sequences; this could be related to cognitive processing because saccade-fixation cycles are the result of visual cognitive processing. Second, distribution bias of eye position during gaze fixation was highly correlated with head orientation. The distribution peak of eye position was biased in the same direction as head orientation. This influence of head orientation suggests that eye-head coordination is involved in gaze fixation, when the visual system processes retinal information. This further supports the role of eye-head coordination in visual cognitive processing. PMID:25799510

  4. Interaction profile of armodafinil with medications metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2, 3A4 and 2C19 in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; Robertson, Philmore; Hellriegel, Edward T

    2008-01-01

    Armodafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent, is the pure R-enantiomer of racemic modafinil. The objective of this article is to summarize the results of three clinical drug-interaction studies assessing the potential for drug interactions of armodafinil with agents metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes 1A2, 3A4 and 2C19. Study 1 evaluated the potential for armodafinil to induce the activity of CYP1A2 using oral caffeine as the probe substrate. Study 2 evaluated the potential for armodafinil to induce gastrointestinal and hepatic CYP3A4 activity using intravenous and oral midazolam as the probe substrate. Study 3 evaluated the potential for armodafinil to inhibit the activity of CYP2C19 using oral omeprazole as the probe substrate. Healthy men and nonpregnant women aged 18-45 years with a body mass index of subjects participated in the three studies (study 1, n = 29; study 2, n = 24; study 3, n = 24). Prolonged armodafinil administration had no effect on the C(max) or the AUC of oral caffeine compared with administration of caffeine

  5. Head and Neck Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Head and neck cancer overview What ... there any new developments in treating my disease? Head and neck cancer overview The way a particular head and ...

  6. Head Impact Measurement Devices.

    PubMed

    Williams, Richelle M; Dowling, Margaret; O'Connor, Kathryn L

    Concussive injuries are at the forefront of sports medicine research. Recently, researchers have used a variety of head- and helmet-based impact-monitoring devices to quantify impacts sustained during contact sport participation. This review provides an up-to-date collection of head accelerometer use at the youth, high school, and collegiate levels. PubMed was searched for articles published between 1980 and 2015 using the terms accelerometer and concussion, impact sensor and concussion, head impact telemetry system, head impact telemetry, and linear acceleration and concussion. An additional Google search was performed to capture devices without publications. Clinical review. Level 4. Twenty-four products track and/or record head impact for clinical or research use. Ten of these head impact devices have publications supporting their utility. Head impact measuring devices can describe athlete exposure in terms of magnitude and/or frequency, highlighting their utility within a multimodal approach for concussion assessment and diagnosis.

  7. Vacuum compatible miniature CCD camera head

    DOEpatents

    Conder, Alan D.

    2000-01-01

    A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera head which can replace film for digital imaging of visible light, ultraviolet radiation, and soft to penetrating x-rays, such as within a target chamber where laser produced plasmas are studied. The camera head is small, capable of operating both in and out of a vacuum environment, and is versatile. The CCD camera head uses PC boards with an internal heat sink connected to the chassis for heat dissipation, which allows for close(0.04" for example) stacking of the PC boards. Integration of this CCD camera head into existing instrumentation provides a substantial enhancement of diagnostic capabilities for studying high energy density plasmas, for a variety of military industrial, and medical imaging applications.

  8. Analysis of head gesture and prosody patterns for prosody-driven head-gesture animation.

    PubMed

    Sargin, Mehmet E; Yemez, Yucel; Erzin, Engin; Tekalp, Ahmet M

    2008-08-01

    We propose a new two-stage framework for joint analysis of head gesture and speech prosody patterns of a speaker towards automatic realistic synthesis of head gestures from speech prosody. In the first stage analysis, we perform Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based unsupervised temporal segmentation of head gesture and speech prosody features separately to determine elementary head gesture and speech prosody patterns, respectively, for a particular speaker. In the second stage, joint analysis of correlations between these elementary head gesture and prosody patterns is performed using Multi-Stream HMMs to determine an audio-visual mapping model. The resulting audio-visual mapping model is then employed to synthesize natural head gestures from arbitrary input test speech given a head model for the speaker. In the synthesis stage, the audio-visual mapping model is used to predict a sequence of gesture patterns from the prosody pattern sequence computed for the input test speech. The Euler angles associated with each gesture pattern are then applied to animate the speaker head model. Objective and subjective evaluations indicate that the proposed synthesis by analysis scheme provides natural looking head gestures for the speaker with any input test speech, as well as in "prosody transplant" and gesture transplant" scenarios.

  9. Prevalence of seizures in cats after head trauma.

    PubMed

    Grohmann, Kristina S; Schmidt, Martin J; Moritz, Andreas; Kramer, Martin

    2012-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of seizures in cats after head trauma. Retrospective cross-sectional study. 52 cats with head trauma. Information was obtained from medical records of cats with head trauma and via telephone interviews of owners at least 2 years after cats had head trauma. Severity of head trauma in cats was classified with the modified Glasgow coma scale (mGCS), and the association between scores and development of seizures was determined. 9 cats had moderate head trauma (mGCS score, 9 to 14), and 43 cats had mild head trauma (mGCS score, 15 to 18). None of the cats developed seizures during the follow-up period (≥ 2 years after head injury). The calculated 95% confidence interval for prevalence of seizures in cats after head injury was 0% to 5.6%. There was no significant relationship between severity of head trauma and the risk of seizures in cats. Results indicated the probability that cats with mild to moderate head trauma would develop posttraumatic seizures was low. However, clinicians should monitor cats with a history of head trauma for development of secondary epilepsy.

  10. Head Circumference and Height in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Lainhart, Janet E.; Bigler, Erin D.; Bocian, Maureen; Coon, Hilary; Dinh, Elena; Dawson, Geraldine; Deutsch, Curtis K.; Dunn, Michelle; Estes, Annette; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Folstein, Susan; Hepburn, Susan; Hyman, Susan; McMahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Osann, Kathy; Ozonoff, Sally; Rodier, Patricia; Rogers, Sally; Sigman, Marian; Spence, M. Anne; Stodgell, Christopher J.; Volkmar, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Data from 10 sites of the NICHD/NIDCD Collaborative Programs of Excellence in Autism were combined to study the distribution of head circumference and relationship to demographic and clinical variables. Three hundred thirty-eight probands with autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) including 208 probands with autism were studied along with 147 parents, 149 siblings, and typically developing controls. ASDs were diagnosed, and head circumference and clinical variables measured in a standardized manner across all sites. All subjects with autism met ADI-R, ADOS-G, DSM-IV, and ICD-10 criteria. The results show the distribution of standardized head circumference in autism is normal in shape, and the mean, variance, and rate of macrocephaly but not microcephaly are increased. Head circumference tends to be large relative to height in autism. No site, gender, age, SES, verbal, or non-verbal IQ effects were present in the autism sample. In addition to autism itself, standardized height and average parental head circumference were the most important factors predicting head circumference in individuals with autism. Mean standardized head circumference and rates of macrocephaly were similar in probands with autism and their parents. Increased head circumference was associated with a higher (more severe) ADI-R social algorithm score. Macrocephaly is associated with delayed onset of language. Although mean head circumference and rates of macrocephaly are increased in autism, a high degree of variability is present, underscoring the complex clinical heterogeneity of the disorder. The wide distribution of head circumference in autism has major implications for genetic, neuroimaging, and other neurobiological research. PMID:17022081

  11. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder....

  12. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder....

  13. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder....

  14. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder....

  15. 21 CFR 892.1920 - Radiographic head holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiographic head holder. 892.1920 Section 892.1920 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1920 Radiographic head holder....

  16. [The video Head Impulse Test in the vertiginous patient].

    PubMed

    Duchoud, Lorry; Maire, Raphaël

    2017-10-04

    The video Head Impulse Test (vHIT) is a new diagnostic device which, in clinical practice, can be used to evaluate the vestibular canal function in a fast and objective way by recording the movements of the eyes and the head. The medical literature makes it possible today to define the place of this device in the care of patients with vertigo.

  17. Visual perception of axes of head rotation

    PubMed Central

    Arnoldussen, D. M.; Goossens, J.; van den Berg, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    Registration of ego-motion is important to accurately navigate through space. Movements of the head and eye relative to space are registered through the vestibular system and optical flow, respectively. Here, we address three questions concerning the visual registration of self-rotation. (1) Eye-in-head movements provide a link between the motion signals received by sensors in the moving eye and sensors in the moving head. How are these signals combined into an ego-rotation percept? We combined optic flow of simulated forward and rotational motion of the eye with different levels of eye-in-head rotation for a stationary head. We dissociated simulated gaze rotation and head rotation by different levels of eye-in-head pursuit. We found that perceived rotation matches simulated head- not gaze-rotation. This rejects a model for perceived self-rotation that relies on the rotation of the gaze line. Rather, eye-in-head signals serve to transform the optic flow's rotation information, that specifies rotation of the scene relative to the eye, into a rotation relative to the head. This suggests that transformed visual self-rotation signals may combine with vestibular signals. (2) Do transformed visual self-rotation signals reflect the arrangement of the semi-circular canals (SCC)? Previously, we found sub-regions within MST and V6+ that respond to the speed of the simulated head rotation. Here, we re-analyzed those Blood oxygenated level-dependent (BOLD) signals for the presence of a spatial dissociation related to the axes of visually simulated head rotation, such as have been found in sub-cortical regions of various animals. Contrary, we found a rather uniform BOLD response to simulated rotation along the three SCC axes. (3) We investigated if subject's sensitivity to the direction of the head rotation axis shows SCC axes specifcity. We found that sensitivity to head rotation is rather uniformly distributed, suggesting that in human cortex, visuo-vestibular integration is

  18. Probing the mechanism of saccade-associated head movements through observations of head movement propensity and cognition in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Thumser, Zachary C; Adams, Nancy L; Lerner, Alan J; Stahl, John S

    2010-05-01

    Humans may accomplish gaze shifts by eye-only saccades or combined eye-head saccades. The mechanisms that determine whether the head moves remain poorly understood. Many observations can be explained if phylogenetically ancient circuits generate eye-head saccades by default and frontal cerebral structures interrupt this synergy when eye-only saccades are preferable. Saccade-associated head movements have been reported to increase in the elderly. To test the hypothesis of frontal inhibition of head movements, we investigated whether the increase is associated with a decline in frontal cognitive function. We measured head movement tendencies and cognition in volunteers aged 61-80. Measures of head movement tendency included the customary range of eye eccentricity, customary range of head eccentricity, range of target eccentricities evoking predominantly eye-only saccades, and two measures of head amplitude variation as a function of target eccentricity. Cognitive measures encompassed verbal fluency, verbal memory, non-verbal memory, and executive function. There was no correlation between cognition and any measure of head movement tendency. We combined these elderly data with measurements of head movements in a group aged 21-67 and found mildly reduced, not increased, head movement tendencies with age. However, when confronted with a task that could be accomplished without moving the head, young subjects were more likely to cease all head movements. While inconclusive regarding the hypothesis of inhibition of saccade-associated head movements by cerebral structures, the results indicate the need to distinguish between mechanisms that define head movement tendencies and mechanisms that adapt head motion to the geometry of a specific task.

  19. Head-to-toe whole-body MRI in psoriatic arthritis, axial spondyloarthritis and healthy subjects: first steps towards global inflammation and damage scores of peripheral and axial joints.

    PubMed

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Eshed, Iris; Sørensen, Inge Juul; Møller, Jakob M; Madsen, Ole Rintek; Thomsen, Henrik S; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2015-06-01

    By whole-body MRI (WBMRI), we aimed to examine the frequency and distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions in PsA patients, SpA patients and healthy subjects (HSs), to introduce global WBMRI inflammation/damage scores, and to assess WBMRI's reproducibility and correlation with conventional MRI (convMRI). WBMRI (3.0-T) of patients with peripheral PsA (n = 18) or axial SpA (n = 18) and of HS (n = 12) was examined for proportion of evaluable features (readability) and the presence and pattern of lesions in axial and peripheral joints. Furthermore, global WBMRI scores of inflammation and structural damage were constructed, and WBMRI findings were compared with clinical measures and convMRI (SpA/HS: spine and SI joints; PsA/HS: hand). The readability (92-100%) and reproducibility (intrareader intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.62-1.0) were high in spine/SI joint, but lower in the distal peripheral joints. Wrists, shoulders, knees, ankles and MTP joints were most commonly involved, with frequency of synovitis > bone marrow oedema (BMO) > erosion. WBMRI global BMO scores of peripheral and axial joints were higher in PsA {median 7 [interquartile range (IQR) 3-15]} and SpA [8 (IQR 2-14)] than in HSs [2.5 (IQR 1-4.5)], both P < 0.05. WBMRI global structural damage scores (erosion, fat infiltration and ankylosis) were higher in SpA [7 (IQR 3-12)] than HSs [1.5 (IQR 0-4.5)], P = 0.012. Correlations between WBMRI and convMRI spine and SI joint scores were ρ = 0.20-0.78. WBMRI allows simultaneous assessment of peripheral and axial joints in PsA and SpA, and the distribution of inflammatory and structural lesions and global scores can be determined. The study strongly encourages further development and longitudinal testing of WBMRI techniques and assessment methods in PsA and SpA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Head Injuries in Soccer.

    PubMed

    Myrick, Karen M

    2016-07-01

    Soccer is currently the most popular and fastest growing sport worldwide, with approximately 265 million registered soccer players existing around the world. The popularity of the sport, coupled with the high incidence of 18.8-21.5 head injuries per 1,000 player hours reported, make it essential that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes, have a solid understanding of head injuries. The successful rehabilitation of athletes with head injuries relies upon early and accurate identification strategies and implementation of appropriate return to play measures across all areas in the continuum of care. Soccer is a frequently played sport, and head injuries are common. Therefore, it is imperative that clinicians, coaches, and the athletes themselves have a solid understanding of head injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options. The purpose of this article was to provide rehabilitation nurses with current information regarding frequently occurring head injuries in the widespread sport of soccer. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  1. Preventing head and neck injury.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, A S; McCrory, P

    2005-06-01

    A wide range of head and neck injury risks are present in sport, including catastrophic injury. The literature since 1980 on prevention of head and neck injury in sport was reviewed, focusing on catastrophic and brain injury and identifying the range of injury prevention methods in use. There have been few formal evaluations of injury prevention methods. Approaches that are considered, or have been proven, to be successful in preventing injury include: modification of the baseball; implementation of helmet standards in ice hockey and American football and increased wearing rates; use of full faceguards in ice hockey; changes in rules associated with body contact; implementation of rules to reduce the impact forces in rugby scrums. Helmets and other devices have been shown to reduce the risk of severe head and facial injury, but current designs appear to make little difference to rates of concussion. Research methods involving epidemiological, medical, and human factors are required in combination with biomechanical and technological approaches to reduce further injury risks in sport.

  2. Hippocampal head atrophy after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Mar; Serra-Grabulosa, Josep M; Junqué, Carme; Ramírez, Blanca; Mataró, Maria; Poca, Antonia; Bargalló, Nuria; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2006-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes hippocampal damage. The hippocampus can be macroscopically divided into the head, body and tail, which differ in terms of their sensitivity to excitability and also in terms of their cortical connections. We investigated whether damage also varies according to the hippocampal area involved, and studied the relationship of hippocampal reductions with memory performance. Twenty TBI patients and matched controls were examined. MRI measurements were performed separately for the hippocampal head, body and tail. Memory outcome was measured by Rey's auditory verbal learning test, Rey's complex figure test and a modified version of Warrington's facial recognition memory test. Group comparison showed that patients had bilateral hippocampal atrophy, mainly involving the hippocampal head. Moreover, TBI subjects showed verbal memory deficits which presented slight correlations with left hippocampal head atrophy.

  3. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  4. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, A.B.

    1998-09-01

    A bottom head dome assembly is described which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending there through. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending there through, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending there through, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore there through, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. 2 figs.

  5. Bottom head assembly

    DOEpatents

    Fife, Alex Blair

    1998-01-01

    A bottom head dome assembly which includes, in one embodiment, a bottom head dome and a liner configured to be positioned proximate the bottom head dome is described. The bottom head dome has a plurality of openings extending therethrough. The liner also has a plurality of openings extending therethrough, and each liner opening aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening. A seal is formed, such as by welding, between the liner and the bottom head dome to resist entry of water between the liner and the bottom head dome at the edge of the liner. In the one embodiment, a plurality of stub tubes are secured to the liner. Each stub tube has a bore extending therethrough, and each stub tube bore is coaxially aligned with a respective liner opening. A seat portion is formed by each liner opening for receiving a portion of the respective stub tube. The assembly also includes a plurality of support shims positioned between the bottom head dome and the liner for supporting the liner. In one embodiment, each support shim includes a support stub having a bore therethrough, and each support stub bore aligns with a respective bottom head dome opening.

  6. Effect of clenching with a mouthguard on head acceleration during heading of a soccer ball.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Keishiro; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Konno, Michiyo; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are acceleration-deceleration injuries that occur when biomechanical forces are transmitted to the cerebral tissues. By limiting acceleration of the head, enhanced cervical muscle activity derived from clenching with a mouthguard (MG) may reduce the incidence or severity of concussions following impact. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of voluntary clenching with a proper MG on acceleration of the head during "heading" of a soccer ball. Eleven male high school soccer players (mean age, 16.8 years) participated in the study. Each player was given a customized MG. An automated soccer machine was used to project the ball at the participants at a constant speed. The participants headed the ball under 3 different oral conditions: drill 1, heading freely performed without instruction and without the MG; drill 2, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench the masseter muscles tightly while not wearing the MG; drill 3, heading performed as the subject was instructed to clench tightly while wearing the MG. Each participant repeated each drill 5 times. Linear acceleration of the head was measured with a 3-axis accelerometer. Activity of the masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles was measured by wireless electromyography. Weak masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity was observed during drill 1. After the soccer players had been instructed to clench their masseter muscles (drills 2 and 3), statistically significant decreases in head acceleration and increases in masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscle activity were observed (P < 0.05; paired t test). The effect was stronger when the players wore the MG. Dentists should encourage soccer players to habitually clench while wearing a proper mouthguard to strengthen cervical muscle resistance as a way to mitigate the damage caused by heading.

  7. Rotation axes of the head during positioning, head shaking, and locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kunin, Mikhail; Osaki, Yasuhiro; Cohen, Bernard; Raphan, Theodore

    2007-11-01

    Static head orientations obey Donders' law and are postulated to be rotations constrained by a Fick gimbal. Head oscillations can be voluntary or generated during natural locomotion. Whether the rotation axes of the voluntary oscillations or during locomotion are constrained by the same gimbal is unknown and is the subject of this study. Head orientation was monitored with an Optotrak (Northern Digital). Human subjects viewed visual targets wearing pin-hole goggles to achieve static head positions with the eyes centered in the orbit. Incremental rotation axes were determined for pitch and yaw by computing the velocity vectors during head oscillation and during locomotion at 1.5 m/s on a treadmill. Static head orientation could be described by a generalization of the Fick gimbal by having the axis of the second rotation rotate by a fraction, k, of the angle of the first rotation without a third rotation. We have designated this as a k-gimbal system. Incremental rotation axes for both pitch and yaw oscillations were functions of the pitch but not the yaw head positions. The pivot point for head oscillations was close to the midpoint of the interaural line. During locomotion, however, the pivot point was considerably lower. These findings are well explained by an implementation of the k-gimbal model, which has a rotation axis superimposed on a Fick-gimbal system. This could be realized physiologically by the head interface with the dens and occipital condyles during head oscillation with a contribution of the lower spine to pitch during locomotion.

  8. Premorbid prevalence of poor academic performance in severe head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Haas, J F; Cope, D N; Hall, K

    1987-01-01

    A study of 80 head injured patients revealed poor premorbid academic performance in up to 50% of the sample. Poor academic performance, as defined by diagnosis of learning disability, multiple failed academic subjects, or school dropout during secondary education, is not a previously cited risk factor for head injury. These findings have important implications in the identification of a high risk population and in the subsequent ability to reduce the incidence of head injury. PMID:3819755

  9. Infant Abusive Head Trauma in a Military Cohort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    higher AHT risk infants may not receive preventive education targeted at the newborn nursery. Parental risk factors related to AHT included lower pay...Naval Health Research Center Infant Abusive Head Trauma in A Military Cohort Gia Gumbs David W. Lloyd Heather T. Keenan Desmond K...3521 Infant Abusive Head Trauma in a Military Cohort WHAT’S KNOWN ON THIS SUBJECT: Abusive head trauma (AHT) is a type of physical child abuse, with

  10. Year's Work in Subject Analysis: 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellisch, Hans H.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews contributions by scholars and institutions in the fields of classification, subject headings, thesauri, indexing, abstracting, and automatic classification and indexing. Also included are works exploring the theoretical foundations of subject analysis and the history of indexing and abstracting. There are 111 references. (RAA)

  11. Year's Work in Subject Analysis: 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younger, Jennifer A.

    1982-01-01

    Presents a selective review of works in 1981 concerned with subject access to information sources, with specific discussions devoted to general and theoretical works, vocabulary management, classification schemes, subject headings, indexing, and automatic indexing and classification. A 110-item bibliography is included. (JL)

  12. Subject Access for Hispanic Library Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabello-Argandona, Roberto; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Outlines progress of California Spanish Language Data Base (CSLDB) project in its effort to provide subject access to Spanish language collections in public libraries. Generating Spanish counterparts for English subject headings, going online, and the current effort of seeking a host bibliographic utility are examined. References are provided.…

  13. Subjective Evaluation of Life Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontana, Alan F.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Surveyed medical/surgical patients concerning life events during the preceding year. Subjective evaluations of events were obtained for dimensions of desirability, adjustment, anticipation, and control. Psychological impairment was associated with subjective evaluations, specifically desirability and adjustment. Inclusion of anticipation and…

  14. Emergency management of head injuries.

    PubMed

    Rimel, R W; Jane, J A; Tyson, G W

    1981-03-01

    Sophisticated care of the head injury patient in the emergency department does not demand sophisticated knowledge of neurosurgery. Instead it depends upon: (1) Meticulous attention to the fundamental principles of resuscitation; (B) Prevention of secondary cardiopulmonary abnormalities which can further injure the traumatized brain; (C) Performance of serial neurologic examinations. (In the case of acute head injury, a simple neurologic examination performed repeatedly usually provides the physician with more useful information than a more elaborate examination performed only once). (D) Consultation with the neurosurgeon. If there is any possibility that neurosurgical consultation might enhance the emergency department management of the patient, one should not hesitate to contact him. There is no question that protocols for any phase of emergency management of central nervous system (CNA) trauma are of no values unless there is a high degree of compliance. This can only be achieved through persons dedicated to training emergency medical technicians, nurses and physicians in the optimal care that can be afforded these patients. If advances are to be made in decreasing the morbidity and mortality of the CNS trauma patient, those actively involved in emergency medicine are going to have to take an active role in training programs, seminars and clinical practice for physicians, emergency department nurses, and emergency medical technicians.

  15. Efficacy of a Film-Forming Medical Device Containing Piroxicam and Sun Filters in the Treatment of Multiple Actinic Keratosis Lesions in a Subject with a History of Kaposi Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Elisabetta; Deledda, Salvatore; Milani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is considered a premalignant form of skin cancer due to chronic sun exposure. In addition, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been advocated a role in the pathogenesis of this clinical condition. HPV proteins (mainly E6 and E7) seem to act synergistically with ultraviolet (UV) radiation in reducing the defensive mechanisms of keratinocyte apoptosis after UV damage. Data regarding the involvement of other viruses, i.e. human herpes viruses (HHV), in the pathogenesis of AK are so far controversial. HHV8 is considered the infective agent involved in the development of Kaposi sarcoma. Some experimental data have shown that AK lesions carry HHV8 in more than 30% of the bioptic samples. Topical piroxicam was shown to be effective in the treatment of AK. In addition, the molecule shows antiviral action against HPV and HHV8. Here, we report the efficacy of a medical device containing a film-forming substance (polyvinyl alcohol), chemical and physical sun filters (SPF 50+), and 0.8% piroxicam (Actixicam™, Difa Cooper; ACTX) in the treatment of multiple scalp AK lesions, unresponsive to other treatments, in a subject with Kaposi sarcoma and a history of severe contact dermatitis. The subject presented with severe involvement of the scalp, with multiple hypertrophic AK lesions. Previous lesion-directed and field-targeted treatments have not been effective. The subject was treated with ACTX applied twice daily on the affected scalp. Relevant clinical improvement was observed as soon as 1 month of therapy. Complete clinical resolution of all scalp lesions was observed after 3 months of treatment. The product was well tolerated.

  16. Efficacy of a Film-Forming Medical Device Containing Piroxicam and Sun Filters in the Treatment of Multiple Actinic Keratosis Lesions in a Subject with a History of Kaposi Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Elisabetta; Deledda, Salvatore; Milani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is considered a premalignant form of skin cancer due to chronic sun exposure. In addition, human papilloma virus (HPV) has been advocated a role in the pathogenesis of this clinical condition. HPV proteins (mainly E6 and E7) seem to act synergistically with ultraviolet (UV) radiation in reducing the defensive mechanisms of keratinocyte apoptosis after UV damage. Data regarding the involvement of other viruses, i.e. human herpes viruses (HHV), in the pathogenesis of AK are so far controversial. HHV8 is considered the infective agent involved in the development of Kaposi sarcoma. Some experimental data have shown that AK lesions carry HHV8 in more than 30% of the bioptic samples. Topical piroxicam was shown to be effective in the treatment of AK. In addition, the molecule shows antiviral action against HPV and HHV8. Here, we report the efficacy of a medical device containing a film-forming substance (polyvinyl alcohol), chemical and physical sun filters (SPF 50+), and 0.8% piroxicam (Actixicam™, Difa Cooper; ACTX) in the treatment of multiple scalp AK lesions, unresponsive to other treatments, in a subject with Kaposi sarcoma and a history of severe contact dermatitis. The subject presented with severe involvement of the scalp, with multiple hypertrophic AK lesions. Previous lesion-directed and field-targeted treatments have not been effective. The subject was treated with ACTX applied twice daily on the affected scalp. Relevant clinical improvement was observed as soon as 1 month of therapy. Complete clinical resolution of all scalp lesions was observed after 3 months of treatment. The product was well tolerated. PMID:28101017

  17. Postirradiation sarcoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Bailet, J W; Poen, J; Tran, L M; Calcaterra, T C; Abemayor, E; Fu, Y S; Parker, R G

    1993-08-01

    With improvement in survival after cancer treatment, it is becoming increasingly important to study treatment-related morbidity and mortality. Sarcoma can develop in the irradiated field after radiation therapy. The authors performed a study to estimate the risk, and compared the risk of sarcoma after radiation therapy with that of other treatment modalities used against cancer. Between 1955 and 1988, 229 patients with sarcoma of the head and neck were seen at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Medical Center. Of these, 13 (6%) had a previous history of radiation therapy to th