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Sample records for medication therapy management

  1. Medication management during electroconvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zolezzi, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has demonstrated to be highly effective and safe, even life saving for many psychiatric disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Most patients who require ECT are also on concurrent pharmacotherapy. As such, the objective of this article is to provide a review of the most recent literature focusing on the medications used during an ECT procedure and on the effects of concurrent psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications on the effectiveness and safety of ECT. The review also attempts to summarize the recommendations derived from existing documents to guide pharmacotherapy decisions for patients undergoing ECT. For this purpose, using electronic databases, an extensive search of the current literature was made using ECT and medications or drug classes as keywords. PMID:27143894

  2. 78 FR 57159 - Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Scientific Information Request on Medication... scientific information submissions from the public on medication therapy management Scientific information is being solicited to inform our review of Medication Therapy Management, which is currently...

  3. Medication therapy management services: definitions and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Annette N; Martin, Michelle T; Tilton, Jessica J; Touchette, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    In the US, the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 required that Medicare Part D insurers provide medication therapy management (MTM) services (MTMS) to selected beneficiaries, with the goals of providing education, improving adherence, or detecting adverse drug events and medication misuse. These broad goals and variety in MTM programmes available make assessment of these programmes difficult. The objectives of this article are to review the definitions of MTMS proposed by various stakeholders, and to summarize and evaluate the outcomes of MTMS consistent with those that may be offered in Medicare Part D or reimbursed by State Medicaid programmes. MTM programmes are approved by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Pharmacy, medical and insurance organizations have provided guidelines and definitions for MTM programmes, distinguishing them from other types of community pharmacy activities. MTM has been distinguished from disease state management because of the focus on medications and multiple conditions. It differs from patient counselling because it is delivered independent of dispensing and involves collaboration with patients and providers. There is no consensus on the recommended mode of delivery (i.e. face-to-face or by telephone) for MTM. A MEDLINE search was conducted to identify articles published after 2000 using the search terms 'medication therapy management' and 'medication management'. Studies with outcomes evaluating community-based programmes consistent with MTMS, regardless of MTMS reimbursement source, were included in the review. Seven publications describing four MTMS were identified. For each of the identified articles, we describe the study design, service setting, inclusion criteria and outcomes. An additional three surveys describing multiple MTMS were identified and are summarized. Finally, ongoing efforts by CMS to evaluate the success of MTMS in the US are described. To date, there are limited outcomes available for MTMS

  4. Medication therapy management programs: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Ai, Amy L; Carretta, Henry; Beitsch, Leslie M; Watson, Leah; Munn, Jean; Mehriary, Sarah

    2014-12-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) is one form of a medication benefit program offered by public and private health providers and insurers. Although the term was first coined in 2003, MTM in its earlier forms has been used since the 1990s as a mechanism to improve health metrics for medically complex patients. Its role expanded with the passage of Medicare Part D, as a mandated component to help patients with multiple chronic conditions, high drug costs, and high utilization to improve the effectiveness and safety of their medication treatments.  To review the evidence on MTM effectiveness in order to (a) provide information on its establishment and goals and (b) summarize research findings under 3 outcomes: economic, clinical, and humanistic.  PubMed, a search engine service of the National Center for Biotechnology Information was utilized by trained research assistants to search for articles with the following key words: MTM, randomized controlled trials on MTM, evaluation of MTM, comprehensive medication review, medication action plan, special needs population, special needs plans, Medicaid, disease management, adherence, non-adherence, compliance, chronic conditions, disabling chronic conditions, and disability. Additional searches were conducted for key articles in references listed in the most recent review articles. The initial search identified nearly 300 articles. When evaluated, most studies found economic benefits, but the quality of research design and end point measures varied considerably across evaluations. Clinical outcomes encompassed a wide range of potential metrics, from service utilization, to individual patient and population outcomes, and quality of care. Quality measures such as provider-prescribing habits and medication adherence were frequently found to improve. As noted with the economic outcomes studies, overall rigor of study design was suboptimal, and often underpowered.  Few studies have focused on humanistic outcomes such as

  5. Evaluation of Specialized Medication Packaging Combined With Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Zillich, Alan J.; Jaynes, Heather A. W.; Snyder, Margie E.; Harrison, Jeff; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; de Moor, Carl; French, Dustin D.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the effect of a program combing specialized medication packaging and telephonic medication therapy management on medication adherence, health care utilization, and costs among Medicaid patients. Research Design A retrospective cohort design compared Medicaid participants who voluntarily enrolled in the program (n = 1007) compared with those who did not (n = 13,614). Main outcome measures were medication adherence at 12 months, hospital admissions and emergency department visits at 6 and 12 months, and total paid claim costs at 6 and 12 months. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for the effect of age, sex, race, comorbidities, and 12-month preenrollment health care utilization. Results Measures of medication adherence were significantly improved in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort. At 6 months, adjusted all-cause hospitalization was marginally less in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort [odds ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54–1.0, P = 0.05]. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 cohorts for any of the other adjusted utilization endpoints at 6 or 12 months. Adjusted total cost at 6 and 12 months were higher in the program cohort (6-month cost ratio = 1.76, 95% CI, 1.65–1.89; 12-month cost ratio = 1.84, 95% CI, 1.72–1.97), primarily because of an increase in prescription costs. Emergency department visits and hospitalization costs did not differ between groups. Conclusions The program improved measures of medication adherence, but the effect on health care utilization and nonpharmacy costs at 6 and 12 months was not different from the usual care group. Reasons for these findings may reflect differences in the delivery of the specialized packaging and the medication therapy management program, health care behaviors in this Medicaid cohort, unadjusted confounding, or time required for the benefit of the intervention to manifest

  6. Elective Course on Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Catherine; Sterrett, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact of active-learning strategies in a medication therapy management (MTM) elective on pharmacy students' preparedness to participate in real-life MTM counseling sessions. Design The elective included active-learning assignments such as patient cases, group discussions, role playing, and use of actual patients to prepare students for MTM services. Assessment A survey was administered before (week 11) and after (week 15) completing a face-to-face comprehensive medication review (CMR) to evaluate achievement of course objectives and students' preparedness to participate in MTM. In the pre-CMR survey, 66.7% of the students strongly agreed that the course prepared them to provide MTM services. In the post-CMR survey, 88.9% of the students strongly agreed (p = 0.046). Conclusion The active-learning strategies used in the MTM elective course provided students with the skills necessary to participate in MTM counseling sessions. Face-to-face CMRs better prepared pharmacy students to provide MTM services. PMID:20498733

  7. Medication therapy disease management: Geisinger's approach to population health management.

    PubMed

    Jones, Laney K; Greskovic, Gerard; Grassi, Dante M; Graham, Jove; Sun, Haiyan; Gionfriddo, Michael R; Murray, Michael F; Manickam, Kandamurugu; Nathanson, Douglas C; Wright, Eric A; Evans, Michael A

    2017-09-15

    Pharmacists' involvement in a population health initiative focused on chronic disease management is described. Geisinger Health System has cultivated a culture of innovation in population health management, as highlighted by its ambulatory care pharmacy program, the Medication Therapy Disease Management (MTDM) program. Initiated in 1996, the MTDM program leverages pharmacists' pharmacotherapy expertise to optimize care and improve outcomes. MTDM program pharmacists are trained and credentialed to manage over 16 conditions, including atrial fibrillation (AF) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Over a 15-year period, Geisinger Health Plan (GHP)-insured patients with AF whose warfarin therapy was managed by the MTDM program had, on average, 18% fewer emergency department (ED) visits and 18% fewer hospitalizations per year than GHP enrollees with AF who did not receive MTDM services, with 23% lower annual total care costs. Over a 2-year period, GHP-insured patients with MS whose pharmacotherapy was managed by pharmacists averaged 28% fewer annual ED visits than non-pharmacist-managed patients; however, the mean annual total care cost was 21% higher among MTDM clinic patients. The Geisinger MTDM program has evolved over 20 years from a single pharmacist-run anticoagulation clinic into a large program focused on managing the health of an ever-growing population. Initial challenges in integrating pharmacists into the Geisinger patient care framework as clinical experts were overcome by demonstrating the MTDM program's positive impact on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series. PMID:26904412

  9. Medical management of neurogenic bladder with oral therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Anne P

    2016-02-01

    This is a review of the most current literature on medical management of the neurogenic bladder (NGB) to treat detrusor overactivity (DO), improve bladder compliance and treat urinary incontinence. The use of antimuscarinics, alpha blockers, tricyclic antidepressants, desmopressin and mirabegron will be discussed along with combination therapy to improve efficacy. These medical therapies will be the focus of this review with surgical therapy and botulinum toxin injections being the subject of other articles in this series.

  10. Collaborative drug therapy management and comprehensive medication management-2015.

    PubMed

    McBane, Sarah E; Dopp, Anna L; Abe, Andrew; Benavides, Sandra; Chester, Elizabeth A; Dixon, Dave L; Dunn, Michaelia; Johnson, Melissa D; Nigro, Sarah J; Rothrock-Christian, Tracie; Schwartz, Amy H; Thrasher, Kim; Walker, Scot

    2015-04-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) previously published position statements on collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in 1997 and 2003. Since 2003, significant federal and state legislation addressing CDTM has evolved and expanded throughout the United States. CDTM is well suited to facilitate the delivery of comprehensive medication management (CMM) by clinical pharmacists. CMM, defined by ACCP as a core component of the standards of practice for clinical pharmacists, is designed to optimize medication-related outcomes in collaborative practice environments. New models of care delivery emphasize patient-centered, team-based care and increasingly link payment to the achievement of positive economic, clinical, and humanistic outcomes. Hence clinical pharmacists practicing under CDTM agreements or through other privileging processes are well positioned to provide CMM. The economic value of clinical pharmacists in team-based settings is well documented. However, patient access to CMM remains limited due to lack of payer recognition of the value of clinical pharmacists in collaborative care settings and current health care payment policy. Therefore, the clinical pharmacy discipline must continue to establish and expand its use of CDTM agreements and other collaborative privileging mechanisms to provide CMM. Continued growth in the provision of CMM by appropriately qualified clinical pharmacists in collaborative practice settings will enhance recognition of their positive impact on medication-related outcomes.

  11. Management of cutaneous rosacea: emphasis on new medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2014-10-01

    Over the past decade, both basic science and clinical research have provided new information on pathophysiology and therapy that has led to advances in the management of rosacea. As rosacea is a very common facial skin disorder in adults of both genders and essentially all races and ethnicities, these advances can provide therapeutic benefit to many affected individuals around the world. This article provides a collective review of more recent information on the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of rosacea, and discusses individual medical therapies based on PubMed literature searches on 'rosacea', 'rosacea therapies' and each therapy that are included in this article. The perspectives of the author on management of rosacea are also included. Newer therapies and treatment concepts received greater emphasis. Management of cutaneous rosacea involves patient education, integration of proper skin care, differentiation of visible manifestations and symptoms, selecting therapies that correlate with the manifestations that are to be treated, setting realistic patient expectations on anticipated degree and time course of response and designing an overall management plan that addresses needs of the individual patient. In many cases, a combination approach is needed, and due to the chronicity of the disease long-term management is often warranted.

  12. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  13. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  14. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a... D plan, a drug utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an...

  15. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  16. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in...

  17. Creation of a Bariatric Surgery Medication Therapy Management Model.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    To describe how pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services can be applied to bariatric surgery. A pharmacy MTM consult service located in a multispecialty medical clinic with a bariatric department attached to a hospital where bariatric surgeries are performed. MTM bariatric surgery office practice where patients are seen before surgery by a pharmacist to identify medication problems and determine how best to administer alternative dosage forms post-operatively to patients. Practice innovations are a creation of a specialized service and accompanying specialized medication database within a pharmacotherapy practice. Outcome measures are number of patients referred per month and polypharmacy consults scheduled downstream from the bariatric surgery. Improved patient outcomes and prescribing efficiency from usage of the newly developed database of drugs that can be crushed. All bariatric patients are now referred to the pharmacist MTM pharmacotherapy service for medication review before bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is a source of another useful MTM practice model. Utilizing MTM pharmacists to consult with bariatric patients presurgery helps ease the physician burden of writing alternative dose prescriptions and helps identify medication problems with patients before their surgery.

  18. Maximizing medication therapy management services through a referral initiative.

    PubMed

    Imberg, Audrey J; Swanoski, Michael T; Renier, Colleen M; Sorensen, Todd D

    2012-07-15

    The implementation and effects of an initiative to refer patients to receive medication therapy management (MTM) services after hospital discharge are described. A check box to order an MTM appointment was added to the discharge medication order form printed for hospitalized patients in an integrated health system. Hospitalists were informed about MTM services and encouraged to refer hospitalized patients to the service who were at risk for adverse drug events or medication nonadherence. A retrospective case series review was conducted to evaluate documented MTM encounters, comparing the number of patients seen at the MTM practice for hospital follow-up during the four months before and after the initiative's implementation. Secondary endpoints included revenue generated by MTM encounters and the percentage of patients with documented drug therapy problems due to medication nonadherence. A total of 313 encounters were included in the analysis (142 preimplementation and 171 postimplementation). The percentage of MTM hospital follow-up encounters significantly increased from the preimplementation period to the post-implementation period, from 30.28% (n = 43) to 63.74% (n = 109) (p < 0.001). After the referral initiative was implemented, MTM hospital follow-up encounters were more likely to reveal medication nonadherence, compared with regular office visits (odds ratio, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-4.34; p = 0.039). The implementation of an initiative to refer hospitalized patients to an MTM service in an integrated health system increased the percentage of recently discharged patients seen in an MTM practice; patients seen postimplementation were more likely to be nonadherent to their medication regimen.

  19. Incorporation of pharmacogenetic testing into medication therapy management.

    PubMed

    Haga, Susanne B; Moaddeb, Jivan; Mills, Rachel; Patel, Mahesh; Kraus, William; Allen LaPointe, Nancy M

    2015-11-01

    To assess feasibility and patient satisfaction with a pharmacist-delivered medication therapy management (MTM) plus pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing service. Thirty patients from a cardiology outpatient clinic were enrolled to attend two MTM sessions, undergo PGx testing and complete pre- and post-intervention surveys. Outcome measures included duration of MTM sessions, clinical application of test results, self-reported medication adherence, patient recall of results and perceived value of testing and MTM. Overall, patients were very satisfied with the MTM plus PGx testing service. About half of participants (47%) were able to accurately recall their PGx test results. Comparable to MTM without PGx testing, the first MTM session averaged 40 min and the follow-up MTM session averaged 15 min. PGx testing incorporated into a clinical MTM service offered by pharmacists may be a feasible delivery model and is satisfactory to patients.

  20. Medication therapy management and adherence among US renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Tolley, Elizabeth A; Kaplan, Erin K

    2016-01-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) services among patient populations with a range of disease states have improved adherence rates. However, no published studies have examined the impact of Medicare Part D MTM eligibility on renal transplant recipients' (RTRs) immunosuppressant therapy (IST) adherence. This study's purpose was therefore, to determine the effects of Medicare Part D MTM on IST adherence among adult RTRs at 12 months posttransplant. Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Medicare Parts A, B, and D claims and transplant follow-up data reported in the United States Renal Data System. The sample included adult RTRs who were transplanted between 2006 and 2011, had graft survival for 12 months, were enrolled in Part D, and were prescribed tacrolimus. IST adherence was measured by medication possession ratio for tacrolimus. MTM eligibility was determined using criteria established by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Adherence was modeled using multiple logistic regression. In all, 17,181 RTRs were included. The majority of the sample were male (59.1%), and 42% were MTM-eligible. Mean medication possession ratio was 0.91±0.17 (mean ± standard deviation), with 16.83% having a medication possession ratio of <0.80. MTM eligibility, sex, age, and number of prescription drugs were significantly associated with adherence in the full model (P<0.05). MTM-eligible RTRs were more likely to be adherent than those who were not MTM-eligible (odds ratio =1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.26, P=0.02). The findings provide evidence that access to MTM services increases IST adherence among RTRs.

  1. Migraine responds better to a combination of medical therapy and trigger point management than routine medical therapy alone.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Ali; Askarzadeh, Saghar; Petramfar, Peyman; Mohamadi, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most frequent headaches. Cervical myofascial and trigger point disorders are effective factors on accession of this type of headache. PRT is an indirect technique that treats trigger points. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of trigger points' management by positional release therapy (PRT) combined with routine medical therapy and routine medical therapy alone in treatment of migraine headache. Forty-four patients with active trigger points in cervical muscles entered to the study. They were randomly assigned to PRT-medical therapy or medical therapy group. Headache frequency, intensity, duration and tablet count were recorded by use of a daily headache diary. The sensitivity of trigger points was assessed by the use of a digital force gauge (Wagner-FDIX). Cervical range of motion was measured by a goniometer. Both groups showed significant reduction in headache intensity, frequency, duration and tablet count after 4 months follow up. The sensitivity of trigger points and all cervical range of motions significantly increased in PRT-medical group after 4 months follow up; however in medication group except cervical right lateral flexion, right and left rotation the other factors showed no change after 4 months follow up. In comparison of the two study groups, there was no significant difference in headache-related variables. Apart from the headache intensity and tablet count, the trends of other factors were significantly different between the two groups (p <  0.05). The combined PRT-medical therapy is more effective than the medical therapy alone. Thus, the combination of PRT and medical therapy is suggested as a treatment choice for patients with migraine headache.

  2. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Poole, Traci M; Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists' perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services.

  3. Integrating Medication Therapy Management Education into a Core Pharmacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Leela; Pace, Adam C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe the design of a core course directed at improving confidence and competence of students to perform medication therapy management (MTM) services. Design. Using the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) certificate training program framework, a core course was developed to teach MTM concepts to third-year student pharmacists. Using deep learning and authentic assignments, course instructors attempted to improve student confidence and readiness to provide MTM services. Assessment. Student ability to meet course objectives was evaluated by examinations and the APhA MTM program self-assessment. Students had an overall success rate of 93% on all three assessments. Student perceptions of confidence, competence, and importance of performing MTM services were measured using a survey instrument with 56 Likert-type items. Students completing both surveys reported significantly increased confidence and competence. Conclusion. Integrating MTM-specific education into the core curriculum increased student pharmacists’ perceived competence and confidence to perform MTM services. PMID:27293237

  4. Analyzing the costs to deliver medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    To provide pharmacy managers and consultant pharmacists with a step-by-step approach for analyzing of the costs of delivering medication therapy management (MTM) services and to describe use of a free online software application for determining costs of delivering MTM. The process described is applicable to community pharmacies and consultant pharmacists who provide MTM services from nonpharmacy settings. The PharmAccount Service Cost Calculator is an Internet- based software application that uses a guided online interview to collect information needed to conduct a comprehensive cost analysis of any specialized pharmacy service. In addition to direct variable and fixed costs, the software automatically allocates indirect and overhead costs to the service and generates an itemized report that details the components of service delivery costs. The service cost calculator is sufficiently flexible to support the analysis of virtually any specialized pharmacy service, irrespective of whether the service is being delivered from a physical pharmacy. The software application allows users to perform sensitivity analysis to quickly determine the potential impact that alternate scenarios would have on service delivery cost. It is therefore particularly well suited to assist in the design and planning of a new pharmacy service. Good management requires that the cost implications of service delivery decisions are known and considered. Analyzing the cost of an MTM service is an important step in developing a sustainable business model.

  5. Challenges to Integrating Pharmacogenetic Testing into Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Moaddeb, Jivan

    2015-01-01

    Background Some have proposed the integration of pharmacogenetic (PGx) testing into medication therapy management (MTM) to enable further refinement of treatment(s) to reduce risk of adverse responses and improve efficacy. PGx testing involves the analysis of genetic variants associated with therapeutic or adverse response and may be useful in enhancing the ability to identify ineffective and/or harmful drugs or drug combinations. This “enhanced” MTM might also reduce patient concerns about side effects and increase confidence that the medication is effective, addressing two key factors that impact patient adherence - concern and necessity. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of the integration of PGx testing into MTM in clinical practice has not yet been determined. Objectives In this paper, we consider some of the challenges to the integration and delivery of PGx testing in MTM services. What is already known about this subject While the addition of pharmacogenetic testing has been suggested, little literature exists exploring the challenges or feasibility of doing so. PMID:25803768

  6. Role of medication therapy management in preexposure prophylaxis therapy for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Kelli W; Woodard, Laresa M; Woodard, Todd J

    2015-02-01

    Patient medication adherence is a long-standing problem and is one that raises serious issues for patient health, public health, and health care quality. Medication nonadherence costs the US economy an estimated US$290 billion in avoidable medical spending every year. One of the most costly health conditions is HIV disease, which continues to be a serious health issue for parts of the world. About 34 million people are living with HIV around the world. With the emerging preventative treatment against HIV, known as preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), come concerns surrounding the potential impact of nonadherence to this newly approved medication therapy. Nonadherence to antiretroviral treatments are commonly the root cause for patients not reaching their treatment goals, putting them at risk of progression and worsening of their disease and complications, such as increased risk of opportunistic infections. Therefore, it is essential to improve antiretroviral medication adherence. By identifying members who are nonadherent to their prescribed antiretroviral medications and working collaboratively with patients, physicians, and pharmacists, Medication Therapy Management (MTM) can potentially increase medication adherence by helping patients identify, resolve, and prevent issues that may affect their decision not to take a medication as intended.

  7. Medication therapy management (MTM): an innovative approach to improve medication adherence in diabetics.

    PubMed

    Bindu Murali, Athira; Boban, Belsy; Karoor Shanmughan, Aswathy; Marimuthu, Karthikeyan; Ramakrishnan Sreelatha, Aravind; Xavier, Augustine

    2016-09-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) is a pharmacist-led professional service, one of the main aims of which is to improve patient medication adherence. Ensuring adequate adherence to the prescribed therapeutic regimen is one of the major challenges in attaining the desired therapeutic goals in diabetics. The objective of this study was to implement MTM in diabetic patients and to identify its effectiveness in improving patient medication adherence. A prospective interventional study was carried out within a 1-year period in KIMS-Al-Shifa Hospital, which is a tertiary care referral hospital in Malabar region of Kerala, including inpatients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the general medicine department of the hospital. The MTM programme was applied in selected patients, including personal medication record, medication-related action plan and detailed counselling. Adherence was measured using the Modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 both before and after the programme. A total of 104 patients were included in the study. The adherence of patients to anti-diabetic therapy was very low, which showed significant improvement after applying intervention (p-value<0.05 in a paired t-test). Initially, only 37.5% had high adherence which was increased to 59.5% after intervention. Age and educational status were identified to have a significant impact on patient medication adherence (p-value<0.05 in a χ2-test). Medication adherence is a key component of self-management for patients with diabetes. A pharmacist-led MTM programme if appropriately designed and implemented will have a potential positive impact on medication adherence in diabetic patients.

  8. Impact of a comprehensive pharmacist medication-therapy management service.

    PubMed

    Shaya, Fadia T; Chirikov, Viktor V; Rochester, Charmaine; Zaghab, Roxanne W; Kucharski, Kathrin C

    2015-01-01

    This proof of concept study aimed to determine whether a pharmacist-managed medication therapy management (MTM) program in a private endocrinologist physician's practice reduced healthcare services utilization and related costs 6 months after patients' discharge from an institution with a transition of care service. Patients were included in the study if they were English-speaking, ages >18 years, had type 1 or 2 diabetes, and had a recent transition of care experience (inpatient hospital stay or emergency department/urgent care/paramedic or other acute care visit). The study had a non-randomized design where intervention patients, enrolled July 1, 2012-September 30, 2013, were administered MTM at four visits over 6 months and were compared to historical control patients with available electronic medical records from August 8, 2008 to March 15, 2012. The primary study end-point was the rate of 30-day hospital readmissions, as related to the reason for the index admission. Secondary end-points included the cumulative rate of all-cause hospitalizations, emergency department, paramedic and urgent care visits at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days post-discharge as well as imputed total costs, including prescription medication costs, at 180 days. Propensity score weights were constructed to balance covariate characteristics between the intervention and control groups. Weighted multivariate negative binomial and generalized linear regressions were used to model cumulative utilization rates and log-transformed costs, respectively. The intervention (n = 28) and control (n = 73) groups had 0% hospital readmissions at 30 days post-discharge. In propensity score weighted multivariate analyses, cumulative utilization rate was not different between the two groups (IRR = 1.61, p = 0.72 at 180 days) while costs in the intervention group were lower but not statistically different (cost ratio = 0.65, p = 0.13 at 180 days). Further studies should investigate whether

  9. Medication reconciliation and therapy management in dialysis-dependent patients: need for a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Amy Barton; Cardone, Katie E; Manley, Harold J; St Peter, Wendy L; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-11-01

    Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model.

  10. Medication Reconciliation and Therapy Management in Dialysis-Dependent Patients: Need for a Systematic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Katie E.; Manley, Harold J.; St. Peter, Wendy L.; Shaffer, Rachel; Somers, Michael; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with ESRD undergoing dialysis have highly complex medication regimens and disproportionately higher total cost of care compared with the general Medicare population. As shown by several studies, dialysis-dependent patients are at especially high risk for medication-related problems. Providing medication reconciliation and therapy management services is critically important to avoid costs associated with medication-related problems, such as adverse drug events and hospitalizations in the ESRD population. The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 included an unfunded mandate stipulating that medication therapy management be offered to high-risk patients enrolled in Medicare Part D. Medication management services are distinct from the dispensing of medications and involve a complete medication review for all disease states. The dialysis facility is a logical coordination center for medication management services, like medication therapy management, and it is likely the first health care facility that a patient will present to after a care transition. A dedicated and adequately trained clinician, such as a pharmacist, is needed to provide consistent, high-quality medication management services. Medication reconciliation and medication management services that could consistently and systematically identify and resolve medication-related problems would be likely to improve ESRD patient outcomes and reduce total cost of care. Herein, this work provides a review of available evidence and recommendations for optimal delivery of medication management services to ESRD patients in a dialysis facility-centered model. PMID:23990162

  11. Simulated Medication Therapy Management Activities in a Pharmacotherapy Laboratory Course

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Trapskin, Kari

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To measure the impact of medication therapy management (MTM) learning activities on students’ confidence and intention to provide MTM using the Theory of Planned Behavior. Design. An MTM curriculum combining lecture instruction and active-learning strategies was incorporated into a required pharmacotherapy laboratory course. Assessment. A validated survey instrument was developed to evaluate student confidence and intent to engage in MTM services using the domains comprising the Theory of Planned Behavior. Confidence scores improved significantly from baseline for all items (p < 0.00), including identification of billable services, documentation, and electronic billing. Mean scores improved significantly for all Theory of Planned Behavior items within the constructs of perceived behavioral control and subjective norms (p < 0.05). At baseline, 42% of students agreed or strongly agreed that they had knowledge and skills to provide MTM. This percentage increased to 82% following completion of the laboratory activities. Conclusion. Implementation of simulated MTM activities in a pharmacotherapy laboratory significantly increased knowledge scores, confidence measures, and scores on Theory of Planned Behavior constructs related to perceived behavioral control and subjective norms. Despite these improvements, intention to engage in future MTM services remained unchanged. PMID:21829269

  12. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi; Markel Vaysman, Anna; Wilken, Lori

    2013-07-01

    To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM) clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting. This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32%) completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as 'excellent', 44% as 'good', 5% as 'fair', and 0% stated 'poor'. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise. In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  13. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A.; Solomon, David K.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. Objectives To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. Methods This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008–2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. Results For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. Conclusion The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans. PMID:26380030

  14. Definition of medication therapy management: development of professionwide consensus.

    PubMed

    Bluml, Benjamin M

    2005-01-01

    To describe events leading to development of a professionwide consensus definition of medication therapy management (MTM) and attendant programs and services and present the document (definition, services, and program requirements) resulting from the process. Author's own knowledge and records of events. Following the late 2003 passage of the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act, the pharmacy profession had a need to act quickly to define MTM so that a consensus definition would be available as regulations implementing the Medicare Part D benefit were being written. The American Pharmacists Association facilitated this process by convening a broad working group of members and other involved parties to draft a preliminary definition. The Pharmacy Practice Activity Classification was used to check elements of the definition for consistency with services being offered in a wide variety of settings. A professionwide stakeholders conference was then convened with representatives from each of 11 national pharmacy organizations. This group, following a daylong meeting in late May 2004 and several weeks of e-mail messages and conference calls, finalized the MTM definition, which was then approved by the chief executive officers of all 11 groups. Through the extraordinary efforts of the numerous organizations and participants, the MTM Services Definition is one that is applicable within diverse pharmacy practice segments, whose services are feasible for a majority of practitioners to implement, and whose elements are supported by a profession-wide consortium of 11 national professional pharmacy organizations. This historic achievement is the first step on a journey to find the best ways to effectively deliver MTM services to patients.

  15. Trends in Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Qin, Yolanda; Young, Theo; Thomas, Zachary; Spivey, Christina A; Solomon, David K; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-01-01

    To increase the enrollment rate of medication therapy management (MTM) programs in Medicare Part D plans, the US Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) lowered the allowable eligibility thresholds based on the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs for Medicare Part D plans for 2010 and after. However, an increase in MTM enrollment rates has not been realized. To describe trends in MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans and to identify patterns that may hinder enrollment in MTM programs. This study analyzed data extracted from the Medicare Part D MTM Programs Fact Sheets (2008-2014). The annual percentages of utilizing each threshold value of the number of chronic diseases and Part D drugs, as well as other aspects of MTM enrollment practices, were analyzed among Medicare MTM programs that were established by Medicare Part D plans. For 2010 and after, increased proportions of Medicare Part D plans set their eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. For example, in 2008, 48.7% of Medicare Part D plans (N = 347:712) opened MTM enrollment to Medicare beneficiaries with only 2 chronic disease states (specific diseases varied between plans), whereas the other half restricted enrollment to patients with a minimum of 3 to 5 chronic disease states. After 2010, only approximately 20% of plans opened their MTM enrollment to patients with 2 chronic disease states, with the remaining 80% restricting enrollment to patients with 3 or more chronic diseases. The policy change by CMS for 2010 and after is associated with increased proportions of plans setting their MTM eligibility thresholds at the maximum numbers allowable. Changes to the eligibility thresholds by Medicare Part D plans might have acted as a barrier for increased MTM enrollment. Thus, CMS may need to identify alternative strategies to increase MTM enrollment in Medicare plans.

  16. Integrating pharmacogenomics into pharmacy practice via medication therapy management.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    To explore the application and integration of pharmacogenomics in pharmacy clinical practice via medication therapy management (MTM) to improve patient care. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) Personalized Health Care Initiative, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pharmacogenomics activity, and findings from the Utilizing E-Prescribing Technologies to Integrate Pharmacogenomics into Prescribing and Dispensing Practices Stakeholder Workshop, convened by the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) on March 5, 2009. Participants at the Stakeholder Workshop included diverse representatives from pharmacy, medicine, pathology, health information technology (HIT), standards, science, academia, government, and others with a key interest in the clinical application of pharmacogenomics. In 2006, HHS initiated the Personalized Health Care Initiative with the goal of building the foundation for the delivery of gene-based care, which may prove to be more effective for large patient subpopulations. In the years since the initiative was launched, drug manufacturers and FDA have begun to incorporate pharmacogenomic data and applications of this information into the drug development, labeling, and approval processes. New applications and processes for using this emerging pharmacogenomics data are needed to effectively integrate this information into clinical practice. Building from the findings of a stakeholder workshop convened by APhA and the advancement of the pharmacist's collaborative role in patient care through MTM, emerging roles for pharmacists using pharmacogenomic information to improve patient care are taking hold. Realizing the potential role of the pharmacist in pharmacogenomics through MTM will require connectivity of pharmacists into the electronic health record infrastructure to permit the exchange of pertinent health information among all members of a patient's health care team. Addressing current barriers, concerns, and system limitations and developing

  17. Increasing Medicare part D enrollment in medication therapy management could improve health and lower costs.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Loh, F Ellen; Roberto, Pamela; Miller, Laura M

    2013-07-01

    Targeting efforts to improve medication adherence, especially among people with high health needs, can improve health and lower health care spending. To this end, Medicare requires that insurance plans that provide prescription drug (Part D) coverage offer specialized medication therapy management services to optimize medication use for enrollees with high drug costs, multiple chronic diseases, and multiple covered drugs. We analyzed a large random sample of Part D enrollees with diabetes, heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, to see whether poor adherence to recommended drugs was associated with higher Medicare costs. We found that beneficiaries with poor adherence had higher costs, ranging from $49 to $840 per month for patients with diabetes, for example. However, such beneficiaries were not uniformly more likely than others to be eligible for medication therapy management services. Aligning medication therapy management eligibility with a metric such as potentially preventable future costs holds promise for both improving the quality of care and reducing spending.

  18. Medication therapy management: why it no longer should be considered optional.

    PubMed

    Molokwu, Ogochukwu Chidozie; Nkansah, Nancy Twum

    2009-08-01

    Medications are the primary therapeutic intervention in many health care settings. As prescription drug use continues to grow, and medication therapies become more complex, our health care systems have become more prone to medication errors and adverse drug events. Medication Therapy Management services provided by pharmacists have been shown to help reduce medication errors, adverse drug events, and costs. Such services need to be integrated into the health care system and not be regarded as optional. This article is intended to provide pharmacists, pharmacy leaders, and health care policymakers the information needed to broach this topic at the health care policy level.

  19. Eligibility For And Enrollment In Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Programs Varies By Plan Sponsor.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Hendrick, Franklin B; Shen, Xian; Dai, Mingliang; Tom, Sarah E; Dougherty, J Samantha; Miller, Laura M

    2016-09-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management to beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions and high drug expenditures. However, plan sponsors have considerable latitude in setting eligibility criteria. Newly available data indicate that enrollment rates in medication therapy management among stand-alone prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage drug plans averaged only 10 percent in 2012. The enrollment variation across plan sponsors-from less than 0.2 percent to more than 57.0 percent-was associated with the restrictiveness of their eligibility criteria. For example, enrollment was 16.4 percent in plans requiring two chronic conditions versus 9.2 percent in plans requiring three, and 12.7 percent in plans requiring the use of any Part D drug versus 4.4 percent in plans requiring the use of drugs in specific classes. This variation represents inequities in access to medication therapy management across plans and results in missed opportunities for interventions that might improve therapeutic outcomes and reduce spending. The new Part D Enhanced Medication Therapy Management model of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has the potential to significantly increase the impact of medication therapy management by aligning financial incentives with improvements in medication use and encouraging innovation. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  20. Medication therapy management: its relationship to patient counseling, disease management, and pharmaceutical care.

    PubMed

    McGivney, Melissa Somma; Meyer, Susan M; Duncan-Hewitt, Wendy; Hall, Deanne L; Goode, Jean-Venable R; Smith, Randall B

    2007-01-01

    To delineate the relationship, including similarities and differences, between medication therapy management (MTM) and contemporary pharmacist-provided services, including patient counseling, disease management, and pharmaceutical care, to facilitate the continued evolution of commonly used language and a standard of practice across geographic areas and practice environments. Incorporation of MTM services into the array of Medicare-funded services affords an opportunity for pharmacists to develop direct patient care services in the community. Defining the role of MTM within the scope of pharmacist-provided patient care activities, including patient counseling, disease management, and all currently provided pharmacy services is essential to the delineation of a viable and sustainable practice model for pharmacists. The definitions of each of these services are offered, as well as comparisons and contrasts of the individual services. In addition to Medicare-eligible patients, MTM services are appropriate for anyone with medication-related needs. MTM is offered as an all-encompassing model that incorporates the philosophy of pharmaceutical care, techniques of patient counseling, and disease management in an environment that facilitates the direct collaboration of patients, pharmacists, and other health professionals. Defining the role of MTM within the current patient care models, including patient counseling, disease management, and all who provide pharmacy services, is essential in delineating a viable and sustainable practice model for pharmacists.

  1. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Present and future perspectives for medical therapy of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Greenman, Yona

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to the clear indication for surgical treatment in symptomatic patients with clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA), there are no randomized controlled studies comparing therapeutic strategies such as watchful waiting, irradiation or medical therapy for the management of NFPA after surgery. Further, no medical therapy is currently approved for the treatment of NFPA. In this review, we summarize accumulating data on medications currently approved for secreting pituitary adenomas, used off-label in patients with NFPA. Perspectives on overall treatment optimization and potential future therapies are also detailed. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. “Keeping the Boogie Man Away”: Medication Self-Management among Women Receiving Anastrozole Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wickersham, Karen; Happ, Mary Beth; Bender, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The oral hormonal agent anastrozole improves clinical outcomes for women with breast cancer, but women have difficulty taking it for the five-year course. The unique medication-taking experiences related to self-management of anastrozole therapy for women with early stage breast cancer are not known. Our purpose was to describe the medication-taking experiences for postmenopausal women with early stage breast cancer who were prescribed a course of anastrozole therapy. Twelve women aged 58 to 67 years, midway through therapy, participated in audio-recorded interviews. Women's medication-taking experiences involved a belief in their importance and an imperative to take anastrozole. We found that women's side effect experiences, particularly menopausal symptoms, were significant, but only one woman stopped anastrozole due to side effects. Medication-taking included routinization interconnected with remembering/forgetting and a storage strategy. Some women noted a mutual medication-taking experience with their spouse, but most felt taking anastrozole was something they had to do alone. Our results provide insight into the way some women with early stage breast cancer manage their hormonal therapy at approximately the midpoint of treatment. Next steps should include examinations of patient-provider communication, potential medication-taking differences between pre- and postmenopausal women, and the effects of medication-taking on clinical outcomes. PMID:23326655

  3. 78 FR 61363 - Correction-Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Correction--Scientific Information Request on Medication Therapy Management The original date of publication for this Federal Register notice was September...

  4. Incorporation of Herbal Supplements into a Pharmacogenomic Medication Therapy Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Wieruszewski, Patrick M; Schuh, Michael J

    2017-02-01

    Personalized medicine, including direct-to-consumer (DTC) testing, is becoming a more common patient-centered approach to pharmacotherapy. However, DTC testing companies may not provide adequate information and follow-up to patients after genetic testing is done. This article is the first report describing a medication therapy management pharmacotherapy service that specializes in pharmacogenomic counseling, specifically geared toward identifying implications of dietary and herbal supplements. A pharmacist provides a comprehensive review of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of a patient's herbal substances, and counseling is provided on subsequent drug therapy effects. If properly implemented, offering a pharmacogenomic medication therapy management service that specializes in the use of herbal supplements provides patients with education on the safe use of these substances based on their genetic factors.

  5. Considerations for Medication Management and Anticoagulation During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ashley; Li, Fanny; Gross, A Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Providing safe and high-quality care to critically ill patients receiving continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) includes adequate drug dosing and evaluation of patients' response to medications during therapy. Pharmacokinetic drug studies in acute kidney injury and CRRT are limited, considering the number of medications used in critical care. Therefore, it is important to understand the basic principles of drug clearance during CRRT by evaluating drug properties, CRRT modalities, and how they affect medication clearance. Few published studies have addressed drug disposition and clinical response during CRRT. Additionally, clotting in the CRRT circuit is a concern, so a few options for anticoagulation strategies are presented. This article reviews (1) the CRRT system and drug property factors that affect medication management, (2) the evidence available to guide drug dosing, and (3) anticoagulation strategies for critically ill patients receiving CRRT. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. Older Adults' Self-Management of Daily Symptoms: Complementary Therapies, Self-Care, and Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Lang, Wei; Nguyen, Ha; Altizer, Kathryn; Stoller, Eleanor P.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe older adults' use of complementary therapies, self-care practices, and medical care to treat daily symptoms and to delineate gender, ethnic, age, and education differences. Method A total of 200 African American and White participants (age 65+) selected using a site-based procedure complete a baseline interview and up to six sets of three daily follow-up interviews at monthly intervals. The percent of older adults using a therapy and the frequency with which therapies are used are considered. Results The use of complementary therapies to treat daily symptoms, though important, is substantially less than the use of self-care practices and medical care. Participants differed by age, ethnicity, and education in the use of therapies. Discussion In considering the percentage of individuals who use a therapy and the frequency with which therapies are used, this analysis adds a new dimension to understanding how older adults manage daily symptoms. Older adults are selective in their use of health self-management. PMID:22187091

  7. Evaluation of a pilot medication therapy management project within the North Carolina State Health Plan.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Dale B; Roth, Mary; Trygstad, Troy; Byrd, John

    2007-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of a pharmacist-based medication therapy management (MTM) service for North Carolina State Health Plan enrollees. Before/after design with two control groups. Community pharmacies and an ambulatory care clinic in North Carolina serving patients from October 2004 to March 2005. 67 patients who used a large number of prescription drugs, 10 community/ambulatory care pharmacists, and more than 600 participants from two control groups. Pharmacist-conducted MTM reviews for volunteering patients. Process measures (type and frequency of drug therapy problems detected and services performed), economic measures (number and cost of medications dispensed), and humanistic measures (patient satisfaction with services). Pharmacists identified an average of 3.6 potential drug therapy problems (PDTPs) per patient at the first visit. The most common PDTP categories were "potential underuse" and "more cost-effective drug available." Pharmacist actions were divided nearly equally between activities that would result in increased and decreased drug use. Pharmacists recommended a drug therapy change in about 50% of patients and contacted the prescriber more than 85% of the time. About 50% of patients with PDTPs had a change in drug therapy. Prescription use during the postintervention period decreased in both the study and control groups but was statistically significant only among the control groups. No significant differences were observed in patient co-payment or insurer prescription costs. Pharmacists provided the following educational services: medication use (90%), disease management (88%), adherence, and self-care (60%). Survey results indicated that patients highly valued the service. A voluntary MTM program targeted at ambulatory patients using a large number of medications reduced the number of PDTPs but did not necessarily result in reductions in prescription drug use or cost. Nearly all patients received some form of medication adherence or disease

  8. Role of the Pharmacist in Medication Therapy Management Services in Patients With Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy-Menezes, Megan

    2015-07-01

    , some pharmacist-managed medication therapy management programs are devoted entirely to treatment adherence. However, osteoporosis is a chronic disease state for which indefinite therapy may no longer be recommended due to potential long-term tolerability issues. It is crucial that the pharmacist understand the data and new guidelines addressing the optimal duration of therapy in osteoporotic patients so that they recognize which patients qualify for a drug holiday, do not mistakenly categorize a patient as nonadherent when therapy is stopped, and recommend when therapy should be restarted. This understanding will result in better patient management and health system cost-savings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of specialized medication packaging combined with medication therapy management: adherence, outcomes, and costs among Medicaid patients.

    PubMed

    Zillich, Alan J; Jaynes, Heather A W; Snyder, Margie E; Harrison, Jeff; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; de Moor, Carl; French, Dustin D

    2012-06-01

    This study evaluates the effect of a program combing specialized medication packaging and telephonic medication therapy management on medication adherence, health care utilization, and costs among Medicaid patients. A retrospective cohort design compared Medicaid participants who voluntarily enrolled in the program (n = 1007) compared with those who did not (n = 13,614). Main outcome measures were medication adherence at 12 months, hospital admissions and emergency department visits at 6 and 12 months, and total paid claim costs at 6 and 12 months. Multivariate regression models were used to adjust for the effect of age, sex, race, comorbidities, and 12-month preenrollment health care utilization. Measures of medication adherence were significantly improved in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort. At 6 months, adjusted all-cause hospitalization was marginally less in the program cohort compared with the usual care cohort [odds ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-1.0, P = 0.05]. No statistically significant differences were observed between the 2 cohorts for any of the other adjusted utilization endpoints at 6 or 12 months. Adjusted total cost at 6 and 12 months were higher in the program cohort (6-month cost ratio = 1.76, 95% CI,1.65-1.89; 12-month cost ratio = 1.84, 95% CI,1.72-1.97), primarily because of an increase in prescription costs. Emergency department visits and hospitalization costs did not differ between groups. : The program improved measures of medication adherence, but the effect on health care utilization and nonpharmacy costs at 6 and 12 months was not different from the usual care group. Reasons for these findings may reflect differences in the delivery of the specialized packaging and the medication therapy management program, health care behaviors in this Medicaid cohort, unadjusted confounding, or time required for the benefit of the intervention to manifest.

  10. Attitudes toward and factors affecting implementation of medication therapy management services by community pharmacists.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Christina; Weiser, Courtney; Wassimi, Atal; Reddick, Jason; Scovis, Nicole; Guy, Mignonne; Boesen, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    To compare the attitudes of community pharmacy managers who did and did not contract with Mirixa to provide Medicare Part D medication therapy management (MTM) services in 2006. Cross-sectional descriptive study. United States in 2006. 100 pharmacy managers contracted to provide MTM services in 2006 and 100 pharmacy managers not contracted to provide MTM services in 2006. Telephone-administered survey of independent community pharmacy managers. Pharmacist knowledge of and attitudes toward Medicare Part D MTM services. 200 pharmacy managers completed the study (n = 100 for each group). Pharmacists who contracted with Mirixa to provide MTM services in 2006 were more familiar with Medicare Part D MTM (80% vs. 59%, P = 0.001). Significantly more pharmacists contracted with Mirixa to provide MTM services agreed that they were qualified to provide MTM services (96% vs. 88%, P = 0.01) and strongly agreed that an annual personal medication review would benefit patient outcomes (59% vs. 45%, P = 0.04). No significant difference was found between groups with regard to other variables addressed in the survey. Results of this study suggest that familiarity with Medicare Part D MTM services was a key factor in whether pharmacists chose to contract to provide MTM in 2006. Additionally, significantly more pharmacists who contracted felt strongly that personal medication reviews would improve patient outcomes.

  11. Evaluation of a Hybrid Training Module for Community Pharmacy Staff Providing Hypertension Medication Therapy Management.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wendy I; Cernusca, Dan; Roehrich, Leneika

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the impact of web-based training on the knowledge and perceived practice of community pharmacy staff engaged in a hypertension medication therapy management program. Following the recommendations from adult learning end experiential learning theoretical frameworks, the proposed training engaged learners in a series of short online educational videos with preknowledge and postknowledge assessment and patient interactions in a clinical setting to reenforce newly learned skills. The participants in this study were from Community pharmacies who actively participate in medication therapy management and disease management services in the 2 largest towns in North Dakota. The preknowledge and postknowledge tests indicated a statistically significant improvement in hypertension management knowledge for the participating pharmacy staff. The qualitative input from the participants fully complemented these findings by showing a strong positive perception on the implemented instructional process. Training proved to be both effective and essential for pharmacy staff when initiating clinical services to ensure they have the necessary skills to be able to do their job well, and online training is an easy and efficient way to provide this training.

  12. An Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience in a Student-Staffed Medication Therapy Management Call Center

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Anna M.; Roane, Teresa E.; Mistry, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To describe the implementation of an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) designed to contribute to student pharmacists’ confidence and abilities in providing MTM. Design. Sixty-four student pharmacists provided MTM services during an APPE in a communication and care center. Assessment. Students conducted 1,495 comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) identifying 6,056 medication-related problems. Ninety-eight percent of the students who completed a survey instrument (52 of 53) following the APPE expressed that they had the necessary knowledge and skills to provide MTM services. Most respondents felt that pharmacist participation in providing Medicare MTM could move the profession of pharmacy forward and that pharmacists will have some role in deciding the specific provisions of the Medicare MTM program (92% and 91%, respectively). Conclusion. Students completing the MTM APPE received patient-centered experiences that supplemented their confidence, knowledge, and skill in providing MTM services in the future. PMID:22919086

  13. Impact of a medication therapy management intervention targeting medications associated with falling: Results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mott, David A.; Martin, Beth; Breslow, Robert; Michaels, Barb; Kirchner, Jeff; Mahoney, Jane; Margolis, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of fall risk–increasing drugs (FRIDs) by older adults is one factor associated with falling, and FRID use is common among older adults. A targeted medication therapy management intervention focused on FRID use that included prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) medications, along with follow-up telephone calls was designed. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this pilot study was to examine preliminary effects of a medication therapy management (MTM) intervention focused on FRIDs provided by a community pharmacist to older adults. DESIGN Randomized, controlled trial. SETTING One community pharmacy. PARTICIPANTS Eighty older adults who completed a fall prevention workshop. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The main outcome measures were the rate of discontinuing FRIDs, the proportion of older adults falling, and the number of falls. A secondary outcome was the acceptance rate of medication recommendations by patients and prescribers. RESULTS Thirty-eight older adults received the targeted MTM intervention. Of the 31 older adults using a FRID, a larger proportion in the intervention group had FRID use modified relative to controls (77% and 28%, respectively; P < 0.05). There were no significant changes between the study groups in the risk and rate of falling. Medication recommendations in the intervention group had a 75% acceptance rate by patients and prescribers. CONCLUSION A targeted MTM intervention provided by a community pharmacist and focused on FRID use among older adults was effective in modifying FRID use. This result supports the preliminary conclusion that community pharmacists can play an important role in modifying FRID use among older adults. PMID:26802916

  14. Medication therapy management and condition care services in a community-based employer setting.

    PubMed

    Johannigman, Mark J; Leifheit, Michael; Bellman, Nick; Pierce, Tracey; Marriott, Angela; Bishop, Cheryl

    2010-08-15

    A program in which health-system pharmacists and pharmacy technicians provide medication therapy management (MTM), wellness, and condition care (disease management) services under contract with local businesses is described. The health-system pharmacy department's Center for Medication Management contracts directly with company benefits departments for defined services to participating employees. The services include an initial wellness and MTM session and, for certain patients identified during the initial session, ongoing condition care. The initial appointment includes a medication history, point-of-care testing for serum lipids and glucose, body composition analysis, and completion of a health risk assessment. The pharmacist conducts a structured MTM session, reviews the patient's test results and risk factors, provides health education, discusses opportunities for cost savings, and documents all activities on the patient's medication action plan. Eligibility for the condition care program is based on a diagnosis of diabetes, hypertension, asthma, heart failure, or hyperlipidemia or elevation of lipid or glucose levels. Findings are summarized for employers after the initial wellness screening and at six-month intervals. Patients receiving condition care sign a customized contract, establish goals, attend up to four MTM sessions per year, and track their information on a website; employers may offer incentives for participation. When pharmacists recommend adjustments to therapy or cost-saving changes, it is up to patients to discuss these with their physician. A survey completed by each patient after the initial wellness session has indicated high satisfaction. Direct cost savings related to medication changes have averaged $253 per patient per year. Total cost savings to companies in the first year of the program averaged $1011 per patient. For the health system, the program has been financially sustainable. Key laboratory values indicate positive clinical

  15. Generating demand for pharmacist-provided medication therapy management: identifying patient-preferred marketing strategies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gladys M; Snyder, Margie E; McGrath, Stephanie Harriman; Smith, Randall B; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2009-01-01

    To identify effective strategies for marketing pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services to patients in a self-insured employer setting. Qualitative study. University of Pittsburgh during March through May 2008. 26 university employees taking at least one chronic medication. Three focus group sessions were conducted using a semistructured topic guide to facilitate the discussion. Employees' perceived medication-related needs, perceived benefits of pharmacist-provided MTM, potential barriers for employee participation in MTM, and effective strategies for marketing MTM. Participants reported concerns with timing of doses, medication costs, access, and ensuring adherence. Participants generally felt positively toward pharmacists; however, the level of reported patient contact with pharmacists varied among participants. Some participants questioned pharmacists' education and qualifications for this enhanced role in patient care. Perceived benefits of MTM noted by participants included the opportunity to obtain personalized information about their medications and the potential for improved communication among their health providers. Barriers to patient participation were out-of-pocket costs and lack of time for MTM visits. Participants suggested use of alternative words to describe MTM and marketing approaches that involve personal contact. Pharmacists should emphasize parts of MTM that patients feel are most beneficial (i.e., provision of a personal medication record) and use patient-friendly language to describe MTM when marketing their practice. Patients will need greater exposure to the concept of MTM and the pharmacists' role in order to correctly describe and assign value to this type of pharmacist patient care practice.

  16. Design of a medication therapy management program for Medicare beneficiaries: qualitative findings from patients and physicians.

    PubMed

    Lauffenburger, Julie C; Vu, Maihan B; Burkhart, Jena Ivey; Weinberger, Morris; Roth, Mary T

    2012-04-01

    The quality of pharmacologic care provided to older adults is less than optimal. Medication therapy management (MTM) programs delivered to older adults in the ambulatory care setting may improve the quality of medication use for these individuals. We conducted focus groups with older adults and primary care physicians to explore (1) older adults' experiences working with a clinical pharmacist in managing medications, (2) physician perspectives on the role of clinical pharmacists in facilitating medication management, and (3) key attributes of an effective MTM program and potential barriers from patient and provider perspectives. Five focus groups (4 with older adults, 1 with physicians) were conducted by a trained moderator using a semistructured interview guide. Each participant completed a demographic questionnaire. Sessions were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative analysis software for theme identification. Twenty-eight older adults and 8 physicians participated. Older adults valued the professional, trusting nature of their interactions with the pharmacist. They found the clinical pharmacist to be a useful resource, thorough, personable, and a valuable team member. Physicians believe that the clinical pharmacist fills a unique role as a specialized practitioner, contributing meaningfully to patient care. Physicians emphasized the importance of effective communication, pharmacist access to the medical record, and a mutually trusting relationship as key attributes of a program. Potential barriers to an effective program include poor communication and lack of familiarity with the patient's history. The lack of a sustainable reimbursement model was cited as a barrier to widespread implementation of MTM. This study provides information to assist pharmacists in designing MTM programs in the ambulatory setting. Key attributes of an effective program include being comprehensive and addressing all medication-related needs over time. The

  17. Analysis of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services in community pharmacies over 7 years.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Mitchell J; Frank, Jessica; Wehring, Heidi; Newland, Brand; VonMuenster, Shannon; Kumbera, Patty; Halterman, Tom; Perry, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Although community pharmacists have historically been paid primarily for drug distribution and dispensing services, medication therapy management (MTM) services evolved in the 1990s as a means for pharmacists and other providers to assist physicians and patients in managing clinical, service, and cost outcomes of drug therapy. The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA 2003) and the subsequent implementation of Medicare Part D in January 2006 for the more than 20 million Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in the Part D benefit formalized MTM services for a subset of high-cost patients. Although Medicare Part D has provided a new opportunity for defining the value of pharmacist-provided MTM services in the health care system, few publications exist which quantify changes in the provision of pharmacist-provided MTM services over time. To (a) describe the changes over a 7-year period in the primary types of MTM services provided by community pharmacies that have contracted with drug plan sponsors through an MTM administrative services company, and (b) quantify potential MTM-related cost savings based on pharmacists' self-assessments of the likely effects of their interventions on health care utilization. Medication therapy management claims from a multistate MTM administrative services company were analyzed over the 7-year period from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2006. Data extracted from each MTM claim included patient demographics (e.g., age and gender), the drug and type that triggered the intervention (e.g., drug therapeutic class and therapy type as either acute, intermittent, or chronic), and specific information about the service provided (e.g., Reason, Action, Result, and Estimated Cost Avoidance [ECA]). ECA values are derived from average national health care utilization costs, which are applied to pharmacist self-assessment of the "reasonable and foreseeable" outcome of the intervention. ECA values are updated

  18. The certainty in consumers' willingness to accept pharmacist-provided medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence M; Rashrash, Mohamed E; Schommer, Jon C

    To describe consumers' willingness to accept medication therapy management (MTM) services provided by a pharmacist. Cross-sectional Internet survey included questions about willingness to use 11 components of MTM services. The data of 8352 United States' adults who were on 3 or more medications were obtained from the 2015 National Consumer Survey on the Medication Experience and Pharmacists' Roles, which included 26,173 respondents. Respondents used a scale that ranged from "definitely would not accept" to "definitely would accept" to specify their willingness to use each of the MTM components. The mean age was 53.1 years, with an average of 1.9 health problems and 5.4 prescription medications. About 50% of respondents definitely would accept 6 or more MTM components. The services with the highest rates of "definitely would accept" were "Recommend the use of a generic drug to help save money" and "Provide advice in administering medications as prescribed" (65.4% and 64.2%, respectively). The next highest were "Performing a review of all medications to make sure they are effective, safe, and affordable" and "Recommendation of nonprescription medications to take care of mild ailments or discomforts" (57.0% and 56.4%, respectively). Those who definitely would accept MTM services, compared with those who would not, differed in terms of gender, education level, income, medication insurance coverage, ever having been a pharmacist, and number of health problems. The majority of United States' adults expressed a certain willingness to accept most of the components of MTM services. More research needs to be done to understand why certain groups were less willing to accept MTM services. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Assessing Medicare beneficiaries' willingness-to-pay for medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Woelfel, Joseph A; Carr-Lopez, Sian M; Delos Santos, Melanie; Bui, Ann; Patel, Rajul A; Walberg, Mark P; Galal, Suzanne M

    2014-02-01

    To assess Medicare beneficiaries' willingness-to-pay (WTP) for medication therapy management (MTM) services and determine sociodemographic and clinical characteristics influencing this payment amount. A cross-sectional, descriptive study design was adopted to elicit Medicare beneficiaries' WTP for MTM. Nine outreach events in cities across Central/Northern California during Medicare's 2011 open-enrollment period. A total of 277 Medicare beneficiaries participated in the study. Comprehensive MTM was offered to each beneficiary. Pharmacy students conducted the MTM session under the supervision of licensed pharmacists. At the end of each MTM session, beneficiaries were asked to indicate their WTP for the service. Medication, self-reported chronic conditions, and beneficiary demographic data were collected and recorded via a survey during the session. The mean WTP for MTM was $33.15 for the 277 beneficiaries receiving the service and answering the WTP question. WTP by low-income subsidy recipients (mean ± standard deviation; $12.80 ± $24.10) was significantly lower than for nonsubsidy recipients ($41.13 ± $88.79). WTP was significantly (positively) correlated with number of medications regularly taken and annual out-of-pocket drug costs. The mean WTP for MTM was $33.15. WTP for MTM significantly varied by race, subsidy status, and number of prescription medications taken. WTP was significantly higher for nonsubsidy recipients than subsidy recipients, and significantly positively correlated with the number of medications regularly taken and the beneficiary rating of the delivered services.

  20. Disparity implications of the Medicare medication therapy management eligibility criteria: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Kiraat D; Shih, Ya-Chen T; Brown, Lawrence M; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Wan, Jim Y; Wang, Junling

    2013-04-01

    The emphasis on eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare has received national attention, with various policy initiatives addressing this problem and proposing solutions. However, in the current economic era requiring tight monetary constraints, emphasis is increasingly being placed on economic efficiency, which often conflicts with the equality doctrine upon which many policies have been framed. The authors' review aims to highlight the disparity implications of one such policy provision - the predominantly utilization-based eligibility criteria for medication therapy management services under Medicare Part D - by identifying studies that have documented racial and ethnic disparities in health status and the use of and spending on prescription medications. Future design and evaluation of various regulations and legislations employing utilization-based eligibility criteria must use caution in order to strike an equity-efficiency balance.

  1. Oral targeted therapies: managing drug interactions, enhancing adherence and optimizing medication safety in lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liewer, Susanne; Huddleston, Ashley N

    2015-04-01

    The advent of newer, targeted oral chemotherapy medications such as small molecule kinase inhibitors, ibrutinib and idelalisib, has created additional options for the treatment of lymphoma. The targeted nature of these agents offers many patient-identified advantages over older, intravenously administered chemotherapy regimens such as ease of self-administration and an increased sense of independence. However, newer oral agents also present unique challenges not previously experienced with older therapies that may affect safety, efficacy and patient adherence. In this article, we review oral agents for the treatment of lymphoma, how to evaluate and manage drug-drug and drug-food interactions with concomitant oral medications, and issues with patient adherence as well as methods to determine adherence for oral chemotherapy.

  2. A Scale to Measure Pharmacy Students’ Self-Efficacy in Performing Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jaela R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a college of pharmacy curriculum creates a sense of self-efficacy among students with respect to providing medication therapy management (MTM) services. Methods. An electronic survey instrument was sent to all pharmacy students to elicit information on their perceived confidence in providing MTM services, and the results were reviewed. Results. Of the 1,160 students targeted, 464 (40%) completed the survey instrument. Responses indicated that overall self-efficacy increased with each successive year of the curriculum that students completed. Fourth-year students completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in medication therapy management (MTM) had significantly higher self-efficacy than did other fourth-year students, whose self-efficacy was similar to that of third-year students. Conclusion. In this study population, students’ self-efficacy increased with each successive year in pharmacy school, with those who completed an APPE in MTM exhibiting the highest level of self-efficacy. These students may be more likely to pursue MTM opportunities in future careers. PMID:24249853

  3. Consensus Statement National Consensus Workshop on Management of SAM Children through Medical Nutrition Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sachdev, H P S; Kapil, Umesh; Vir, Sheila

    2010-08-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is an important preventable and treatable cause of morbidity and mortality in children below five years of age in India. The concerned stakeholders are not in agreement about the role of product based medical nutrition therapy in the management of this condition. In November 2009, a National Consensus Workshop was organized by the Department of Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in collaboration with the Department of Pediatrics and Clinical Epidemiology, Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research, New Delhi, and the Sub-specialty Chapter on Nutrition, Indian Academy of Pediatrics. Presentations by eminent national and international scientists, the ensuing discussions, and opinions expressed by the participants provided the basic framework for drafting the consensus statement. The draft of the consensus statement was circulated to all the participants; it underwent two revisions after consideration of their comments. (i) Critically appraise the current global evidence on the utility of Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) for the management of SAM in under five children; (ii) Formulate a consensus amongst stakeholders regarding the need to introduce product based MNT for the management of SAM in under five children in India; (iii) Identify research priorities for MNT for the management of SAM in under five children in India; and (iv)Ascertain potential challenges for introducing product based MNT in India, if consensus opinion identifies such a need. Guidelines related to the role of MNT in management of children suffering from SAM are presented. Global and regional data document the effectiveness of MNT using ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) and locally formulated products. Adequate caution should be exercised to ensure that MNT for SAM does not interfere with measures for the holistic prevention of childhood undernutrition. Indian manufacture of RUTF is feasible, and can be scaled up. Product

  4. Medical Expulsive Therapy is Underused for the Management of Renal Colic in the Emergency Setting.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Christopher; Nyame, Yaw; Hinck, Bryan; Greene, Daniel; Chaparala, Hemant; Alazem, Kareem; Monga, Manoj

    2016-04-01

    Although the 2007 AUA (American Urological Association) guidelines established it as first line therapy for ureteral stones less than 10 mm, widespread adoption of medical expulsive therapy has been low. We determined the current penetrance of medical expulsive therapy guideline recommendations and the efficacy of medical expulsive therapy in reducing the requirement for urological procedures after emergency department visits for ureteral stones. In a retrospective analysis of patients seen in the emergency department we included 2,105 emergency department visits associated with an ICD-9 diagnosis of urolithiasis in which computerized tomography abdomen/pelvis scan was performed. Outcomes were reviewed for spontaneous passage or required urological procedure. Ureteral stones were found in 48.8% of patients, including 50.0% in whom medical expulsive therapy was prescribed. There was no significant difference between patients who did and did not receive medical expulsive therapy. Within 12 weeks of the initial emergency department visit there was no difference in the rate of urological procedures performed in those who received medical expulsive therapy or in the rate of return to the emergency department. Patients treated with medical expulsive therapy experienced a shorter time to spontaneous expulsion (7.1 vs 12.8 days, p = 0.048). Medical expulsive therapy for renal colic in the emergency setting remains underused. Half of the patients who met criteria for medical expulsive therapy in this study did not receive the standard of care. Patients treated with medical expulsive therapy achieved spontaneous passage more quickly but there was no difference in the requirement for a urological procedure. These results highlight the need for personnel at emergency departments to better standardize care for patients with ureteral stones. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Medication therapy management services in community pharmacy: a pilot programme in HIV specialty pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Rosenquist, Ashley; Best, Brookie M; Miller, Teresa A; Gilmer, Todd P; Hirsch, Jan D

    2010-12-01

    Pharmacist-provided medication therapy management services (MTMS) have been shown to increase patient's adherence to medications, improve health outcomes and reduce overall medical costs. The purpose of this study was to describe a pilot programme that provided pharmacy-based MTMS for patients with HIV/AIDS in the state of California, USA. Pharmacists from the 10 pilot pharmacies were surveyed using an online data collection tool. Information was collected to describe the types of MTMS offered, proportion of patients actively using specific MTMS, pharmacist beliefs regarding effect on patient outcomes and barriers to providing MTMS, ability to offer MTMS without pilot programme funding and specialized pharmacist or staff training. Each responding pharmacy (7 of 10) varied in the number of HIV/AIDS patients served and prescription volume. All pharmacists had completed HIV/AIDS-related continuing education programmes, and some had other advanced training. The type of MTMS being offered varied at each pharmacy with 'individualized counselling by a pharmacist when overuse or underuse was detected' and 'refill reminders by telephone' being actively used by the largest proportion of patients. Most, but not all, pharmacists cited reimbursement as a barrier to MTMS provision. Pharmacists believed the MTMS they provide resulted in improved satisfaction (patient and provider), medication usage, therapeutics response and patient quality of life. The type of MTMS offered, and proportion of patients actively using, varied among participating pilot pharmacies. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Patient characteristics predicting the frequency of medication therapy management visits for patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed M; Carlson, Angeline M; MacLehose, Richard F; Brummel, Amanda R; Schommer, Jon C

    2013-04-01

    Patient characteristics associated with a higher exposure to medication therapy management (MTM) and the relationship between frequency of MTM visits and meeting clinically defined goals of therapy have not been documented. The goal of this study was to evaluate factors predicting frequency of MTM visits for patients with diabetes and the impact of these visits on diabetes clinical outcomes. All patients with diabetes participating in a 2007 MTM demonstration project (N = 121) were included in the analysis. A negative binomial regression controlling for age, sex, presence of diabetes complications, taking insulin, Charlson score Index, and hypertension and cholesterol medication regimen composition was used to assess predictors of the number of MTM visits. Optimal diabetes management differences between the 2 groups defined according to median number of MTM visits (low frequency, ≤4; high frequency, >4) was compared by using Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney and χ(2) tests. Having diabetes complications (relative risk = 2.83 [95% CI, 1.3-6.17]; P = 0.0088) and taking insulin (relative risk = 1.43 [95% CI, 1.12-1.83]; P = 0.0038) were associated with a higher number of MTM visits. At baseline, the high-frequency group had a significantly higher proportion of patients with insulin therapy (P < 0.01), higher proportion with diabetes complications (P = 0.07), and higher mean Charlson score (P = 0.08). The rate of optimal diabetes care was significantly lower in the high-frequency group before MTM (P = 0.02) but not statistically different from the low-frequency group during and 1 year after the demonstration project. Patients with diabetes complications and using regimens that include insulin received more frequent MTM visits. MTM services delivered to a diabetes population with more complex disease or taking insulin have a positive impact on optimal diabetes care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal management for alcoholic liver disease: Conventional medications, natural therapy or combination?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Sun; Ong, Madeleine; Qu, Xianqin

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is the principal factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is defined by histological lesions on the liver that can range from simple hepatic steatosis to more advanced stages such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. As one of the oldest forms of liver injury known to humans, ALD is still a leading cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality and the burden is exerting on medical systems with hospitalization and management costs rising constantly worldwide. Although the biological mechanisms, including increasing of acetaldehyde, oxidative stress with induction of cytochrome p450 2E1, inflammatory cytokine release, abnormal lipid metabolism and induction of hepatocyte apoptosis, by which chronic alcohol consumption triggers serious complex progression of ALD is well established, there is no universally accepted therapy to prevent or reverse. In this article, we have briefly reviewed the pathogenesis of ALD and the molecular targets for development of novel therapies. This review is focused on current therapeutic strategies for ALD, including lifestyle modification with nutrition supplements, available pharmacological drugs and new agents that are under development, liver transplantation, application of complementary medicines, and their combination. The relevant molecular mechanisms of each conventional medication and natural agent have been reviewed according to current available knowledge in the literature. We also summarized efficacy vs safety on conventional and herbal medicines which are specifically used for the prevention and treatment of ALD. Through a system review, this article highlighted that the combination of pharmaceutical drugs with naturally occurring agents may offer an optimal management for ALD and its complications. It is worthwhile to conduct large-scale, multiple centre clinical trials to further prove the safety and benefits for

  8. Pediatric asthma medication therapy management through community pharmacy and primary care collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Courtney L; Luder, Heidi R; Beck, Andrew F; Bowen, Rachel; Heaton, Pamela C; Kahn, Robert S; Mansour, Mona; Obszarski, Stephen; Frede, Stacey M

    2016-01-01

    To design and implement a collaborative medication therapy management (MTM) program targeting pediatric patients with high-risk asthma in a community pharmacy. Underserved inner city of Cincinnati, OH. A large national grocery store chain pharmacy and an academic hospital developed a partnership aimed at improving asthma care for shared patients. An interdisciplinary project team was formed, including 2 clinical pharmacists, 1 pharmacy district clinical coordinator, 1 pharmacy division clinical coordinator, 1 associate professor at a college of pharmacy, 1 pharmacy resident, and 3 pediatric physicians. This pilot project involved 2 Kroger Pharmacy sites and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center's (CCHMC) 3 pediatric primary care centers. Kroger and CCHMC staff identified shared high-risk asthma patients (those cared for at the included primary care centers who used Kroger for their medication fills) with the use of information from validated symptom assessments (Asthma Control Test), refill history, and recent health care utilization. Community pharmacists recruited jointly identified patients and provided a targeted MTM intervention. Education focused on asthma diagnosis, types of asthma medications, appropriate medication administration, and environmental triggers. Pharmacists suggested medication changes to prescribers via facsimile. Pharmacists followed up with patients in 30 days to assess asthma control, provide additional education, and propose further recommendations. Outcomes evaluated included the average number of recommendations made to patients and prescribers and acceptance rates for each of those measures. Six patients completed the project. Pharmacists provided an average of 3.7 recommendations to each patient and 1.5 to prescribers for each patient; 77.3% and 100% recommendations were accepted, respectively. This pilot project describes the design and implementation of a pharmacist-physician collaborative program for high-risk pediatric

  9. Assessing Medicare Beneficiary Eligibility for Medication Therapy Management Programs Using PINNACLE, a National Cardiovascular Data Registry.

    PubMed

    Spinler, Sarah A; Cziraky, Mark J; Tang, Fengming; Dueñas, Gladys G; Thomas, Tyan; Reinhold, Jennifer A; Willey, Vincent J

    2013-09-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) is a mandated component of the 2003 Medicare Modernization Act for Part D prescription drug plans and Medicare Advantage plans, authorizing the pharmacist or other qualified provider to identify, resolve, and prevent medication-related problems for patients with chronic diseases. MTM programs have been shown to improve medication adherence and reduce medication errors while reducing overall costs in patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease; however, MTM has been greatly underutilized for patients with chronic diseases. To identify the proportion of Medicare beneficiaries who are eligible for, and who could potentially benefit from, participating in MTM among patients enrolled in the National Cardiovascular Data Registry's PINNACLE Registry. Patient MTM eligibility is based on the presence of multiple chronic diseases and meeting a minimum annual insurance medication costs. We used patient data from 462 academic and private cardiology practices in the United States who participated in the PINNACLE Registry between May 1, 2008, and September 30, 2010, to determine Medicare beneficiaries' eligibility to participate in an MTM program for patients meeting the MTM criteria of (1) a number of chronic diseases (in this case, the number of CV conditions) and (2) an estimated minimum annual medication expenses, using a weighted average cost calculated based on the average wholesale price of the most often prescribed medications, by class, as extracted from the HealthCore Integrated Research Database and weighted according to prescribing frequency within a class. Among the Medicare beneficiaries in the PINNACLE Registry, 93,089 (58%) had ≥3 chronic CV conditions, and the median annual estimated medication expenditure per patient enrolled in the PINNACLE Registry was $1329. Of the total of 93,089 Medicare beneficiaries, 21.4% were eligible for MTM, based on the 2010 minimum eligibility criterion of an annual insurer medication expenditure

  10. Medication therapy management services in North Carolina community pharmacies: current practice patterns and projected demand.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Richard A; Roth, Mary T; Brouwer, Emily S; Herndon, Susan; Christensen, Dale B

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the types of cognitive services offered and the number of patients being served in community pharmacies, determine the number of pharmacies that plan to offer medication therapy management (MTM) services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit, and assess whether current and expected practices will meet the potential needs of enrollees. Cross-sectional study. North Carolina in January 2005. 1,593 community pharmacy managers. Survey using a Web-based tool. Provision of cognitive services and number of patients for whom services are provided. A total of 262 (16%) pharmacy managers provided usable responses. Approximately 42% of respondents (n = 110) indicated that they provide some type of cognitive service. Comprehensive MTM services, or services consistent with the professionwide consensus definition, were provided by 31% of respondents (n = 81). Independent pharmacies were more likely to offer some type of service compared with chain pharmacies (58% versus 31%, respectively; P < .001). Pharmacy managers with a doctor of pharmacy degree were less likely than pharmacy managers with a bachelor's degree to offer services in their pharmacies (P = .02), and pharmacies with pharmacists on staff who had received certificate training were more likely to offer cognitive services (P = .03). Of all respondents, 28% (n = 73) indicated that they planned to offer MTM services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit. Comparing these results with those of a 1999 survey of North Carolina pharmacists that used some of the same items, the percentage of community pharmacies that provide cognitive services has increased in the intervening years but remains low. Among the services being offered in 2005, most were focused on patient education and training, coordinating and integrating care, and medication regimen reviews. Implementation of MTM services under the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit should hasten the development and offering of

  11. Using Natural Language Processing and Network Analysis to Develop a Conceptual Framework for Medication Therapy Management Research.

    PubMed

    Ogallo, William; Kanter, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a theory derivation process used to develop a conceptual framework for medication therapy management (MTM) research. The MTM service model and chronic care model were selected as parent theories. Review article abstracts targeting medication therapy management in chronic disease care were retrieved from Ovid Medline (2000-2016). Unique concepts in each abstract were extracted using MetaMap and their pairwise cooccurrence determined. The information was used to construct a network graph of concept co-occurrence that was analyzed to identify content for the new conceptual model. 142 abstracts were analyzed. Medication adherence is the most studied drug therapy problem and co-occurred with concepts related to patient-centered interventions targeting self-management. The enhanced model consists of 65 concepts clustered into 14 constructs. The framework requires additional refinement and evaluation to determine its relevance and applicability across a broad audience including underserved settings.

  12. Using Natural Language Processing and Network Analysis to Develop a Conceptual Framework for Medication Therapy Management Research

    PubMed Central

    Ogallo, William; Kanter, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a theory derivation process used to develop a conceptual framework for medication therapy management (MTM) research. The MTM service model and chronic care model were selected as parent theories. Review article abstracts targeting medication therapy management in chronic disease care were retrieved from Ovid Medline (2000-2016). Unique concepts in each abstract were extracted using MetaMap and their pairwise cooccurrence determined. The information was used to construct a network graph of concept co-occurrence that was analyzed to identify content for the new conceptual model. 142 abstracts were analyzed. Medication adherence is the most studied drug therapy problem and co-occurred with concepts related to patient-centered interventions targeting self-management. The enhanced model consists of 65 concepts clustered into 14 constructs. The framework requires additional refinement and evaluation to determine its relevance and applicability across a broad audience including underserved settings. PMID:28269895

  13. College of pharmacy-based medication therapy management program for a university system.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Timothy P; Cernohous, Tim; Hager, Keri; Bumgardner, Melissa; Traynor, Andrew; Worley, Marcia M; Isetts, Brian J; Larson, Tom; Seifert, Randall

    2012-01-01

    To document and evaluate the design and operation of a medication therapy management (MTM) benefit and associated MTM clinic developed by the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy as a covered health plan benefit for University of Minnesota, Duluth (UMD) employees, early retirees, and their dependents. Office-based, nondispensing pharmacy at UMD. College of Pharmacy, Duluth faculty developed and provided MTM services as a covered health benefit for UMD beneficiaries. Partnership between a university campus and a college of pharmacy to design and implement an MTM benefit as part of the university health plan covering current employees, early retirees, and dependents. MTM benefit design, MTM clinic implementation, patient complexity comparisons, and drug therapy problems identified and addressed. Of 1,000 eligible beneficiaries, 68 (∼7%) took advantage of the MTM benefit, consistent with national participation rates but lower than the 25% goal for participation. Beneficiaries receiving MTM services were three times more complex in terms of health resource use than the "typical" UMD beneficiary and were experiencing 7.22 drug therapy problems per patient. The UMD MTM clinic was successful in providing UMD beneficiaries access to MTM services. The MTM benefit was subsequently offered throughout the entire University of Minnesota system (Crookston, Duluth, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Morris).

  14. Medication therapy management services in West Virginia: pharmacists' perceptions of educational and training needs.

    PubMed

    Blake, Kimberly B; Madhavan, S Suresh; Scott, Virginia Ginger; Meredith Elswick, Betsy L

    2009-06-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 recognizes the challenges associated with drug therapy in elderly patients with multiple chronic diseases, and requires the development of medication therapy management services (MTMS) for such beneficiaries. To assess pharmacists' perception of educational and training needs necessary to implement MTMS in community pharmacies in West Virginia, USA. Self-administered mail surveys with an explanatory cover letter were mailed to the designated pharmacist-in-charge (PIC) of each licensed community pharmacy (506) in West Virginia. Main outcome measures included pharmacists' comfort level, perceptions of value to patients, barriers to provision of services, and pharmacists' interest in receiving education and training related to MTMS. Of the 503 surveys that were deliverable, 203 (40.4%) usable responses were received. Fifty-five (27.1%) PICs reported that MTMS are currently being provided in their pharmacy. Respondents were likely to use services that aid in the development of MTMS and disease-state management, felt relatively comfortable in providing MTMS, and had a favorable view of the value of services to patients, but reported that lack of time tended to be a barrier. PICs in West Virginia are interested in and open to their pharmacists receiving education and training for implementation of MTMS.

  15. Satisfaction With Medication Therapy Management Services at a University Ambulatory Care Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shiyun; Martin, Michelle T; Pierce, Andrea L; Zueger, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    A survey was issued to patients enrolled in the Medication Therapy Management Clinic (MTMC) at University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences (June 2011-January 2012) in order to assess satisfaction with pharmacy services provided by pharmacists. A 23-item survey was offered to 65 patients in the MTMC program before or after clinic visits. Since there is a paucity of data indicating the level of satisfaction with MTM services provided by pharmacists, this survey may contribute to the process of building a greater collaboration between the pharmacist and patient. Sixty-two of 65 patients completed the survey; satisfaction with MTMC pharmacists was demonstrated to be significantly positively correlated with overall satisfaction with the MTMC. Patient satisfaction is not significantly different according to age, gender, ethnicity, or number of disease states. Satisfaction with the pillbox service is not significantly different between younger and older patients. It was also noted that patients taking a greater number of medications had higher levels of satisfaction. Most patients indicated that they were satisfied with the MTMC pharmacists and services; further study linking patient satisfaction with MTM services to improved patient outcomes may allow our MTMC to serve as a model for other pharmacist-managed MTMCs serving similar patient populations.

  16. Role of Medical Nutrition Therapy in the Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Castilla, Cristina; Mauricio, Didac; Hernandez, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Medical nutrition therapy (MNT) plays an important role in the management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), and accordingly, it has a significant impact on women and newborns. The primary objective of MNT is to ensure adequate pregnancy weight gain and fetus growth while maintaining euglycemia and avoiding ketones. However, the optimal diet (energy content, macronutrient distribution, its quality and amount, among others) remains an outstanding question. Overall, the nutritional requirements of GDM are similar for all pregnancies, but special attention is paid to carbohydrates. Despite the classical intervention of restricting carbohydrates, the latest evidence, although limited, seems to favor a low-glycemic index diet. There is general agreement in the literature about caloric restrictions in the case of being overweight or obese. Randomized controlled trials are necessary to investigate the optimal MNT for GDM; this knowledge could yield health benefits and cost savings.

  17. Optimal diabetes care outcomes following face-to-face medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Amanda R; Soliman, Ahmed M; Carlson, Angeline M; de Oliveira, Djenane Ramalho

    2013-02-01

    Pharmacists play an integral role in influencing resolution of drug-related problems. This study examines the relationship between a pharmacist-led and delivered medication therapy management (MTM) program and achievement of Optimal Diabetes Care benchmarks. Data within Fairview Pharmacy Services were used to identify a group of patients with diabetes who received MTM services during a 2007 demonstration project (n=121) and a control group who were invited to receive MTM services but opted out (n=103). Rates of achieving optimal diabetes clinical management for both groups were compared using the D5 diabetes measure for years 2006, 2007, and 2008. The D5 components are: glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c<7%); low-density lipoprotein (<100 mg/dl); blood pressure (<130/80 mmHg); tobacco free; and daily aspirin use. Multivariate difference-in-differences (DID) estimation was used to determine the impact of 1 year of MTM services on each care component. Patients who opted in for MTM had higher Charlson scores, more complex medication regimens, and a higher percentage of diabetes with complications (P<0.05). In 2007, the percentage of diabetes patients optimally managed was significantly higher for MTM patients compared to 2006 values (21.49% vs. 45.45%, P<0.01). Nonlinear DID models showed that MTM patients were more likely to meet the HbA1c criterion in 2007 (odds ratio: 2.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-5.85, P=0.038). Linear DID models for HbA1c showed a mean reduction of 0.54% (95% CI: 0.091%-0.98%, P=0.018) for MTM patients. An MTM program contributed to improved optimal diabetes management in a population of patients with complex diabetes clinical profiles.

  18. Should eligibility for medication therapy management be based on drug adherence?

    PubMed

    Stuart, Bruce; Loh, Ellen; Miller, Laura; Roberto, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Medicare Part D prescription drug plans must offer medication therapy management (MTM) services to qualified enrollees. Eligibility criteria used by plan sponsors are restrictive, and fewer than 10% of Part D enrollees receive MTM services. The extent to which plan criteria identify beneficiaries most at risk for suboptimal medication use is unknown. To (a) evaluate potential underuse of and poor adherence to evidence-based medications used in the treatment of Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes, heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) over 3 years; (b) determine whether MTM eligibility criteria used by the modal Part D plan in 2011 (drug spending ≥ $3,000, ≥ 3 chronic conditions, ≥ 8 Part D medications) identified Part D enrollees at greatest risk for underuse of and poor adherence to these drugs; and (c) demonstrate how sensitive MTM eligibility is to variations in criteria levels. Study subjects were selected from a 5% random sample of Part D enrollees with 1 or more of these diseases in 2006 and followed through 2008 or death. Longitudinal patterns of exposure and adherence to angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and COPD controller drugs were tracked comparing patterns for enrollees meeting/not meeting the modal 2011 MTM eligibility criteria. Use of evidence-based medication was consistently suboptimal for every disease cohort studied. Higher rates of exposure and adherence were observed among those with high drug spending taking multiple Part D drugs. Current MTM criteria were found to target beneficiaries with above average utilization of evidence-based medication and to exclude those with more problematic utilization patterns. We estimate that lowering the maximum required drug count from 8 to 2 would increase the percentage of beneficiaries eligible for MTM by two thirds. Our findings suggest that MTM eligibility criteria are not optimally targeted to capture underuse of and

  19. Integrating home-based medication therapy management (MTM) services in a health system.

    PubMed

    Reidt, Shannon; Holtan, Haley; Stender, Jennifer; Salvatore, Toni; Thompson, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To describe the integration of home-based Medication Therapy Management (MTM) into the ambulatory care infrastructure of a large urban health system and to discuss the outcomes of this service. Minnesota from September 2012 to December 2013. The health system has more than 50 primary care and specialty clinics. Eighteen credentialed MTM pharmacists are located in 16 different primary care and specialty settings, with the greatest number of pharmacists providing services in the internal medicine clinic. Home-based MTM was promoted throughout the clinics within the health system. Physicians, advanced practice providers, nurses, and pharmacists could refer patients to receive MTM in their homes. A home visit had the components of a clinic-based visit and was documented in the electronic health record (EHR); however, providing the service in the home allowed for a more direct assessment of environmental factors affecting medication use. Number of home MTM referrals, reason for referral and type of referring provider, number and type of medication-related problems (MRPs). In the first 15 months, 74 home visits were provided to 53 patients. Sixty-six percent of the patients were referred from the Internal Medicine Clinic. Referrals were also received from the senior care, coordinated care, and psychiatry clinics. Approximately 50% of referrals were made by physicians. More referrals (23%) were made by pharmacists compared with advanced practice providers, who made 21% of referrals. The top 3 reasons for referral were: nonadherence, transportation barriers, and the need for medication reconciliation with a home care nurse. Patients had a median of 3 MRPs with the most common (40%) MRP related to compliance. Home-based MTM is feasibly delivered within the ambulatory care infrastructure of a health system with sufficient provider engagement as demonstrated by referrals to the service. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Developing a dashboard for benchmarking the productivity of a medication therapy management program.

    PubMed

    Umbreit, Audrey; Holm, Emily; Gander, Kelsey; Davis, Kelsie; Dittrich, Kristina; Jandl, Vanda; Odell, Laura; Sweeten, Perry

    To describe a method for internal benchmarking of medication therapy management (MTM) pharmacist activities. Multisite MTM pharmacist practices within an integrated health care system. MTM pharmacists are located within primary care clinics and provide medication management through collaborative practice. MTM pharmacist activity is grouped into 3 categories: direct patient care, nonvisit patient care, and professional activities. MTM pharmacist activities were tracked with the use of the computer-based application Pharmacist Ambulatory Resource Management System (PhARMS) over a 12-month period to measure growth during a time of expansion. A total of 81% of MTM pharmacist time was recorded. A total of 1655.1 hours (41%) was nonvisit patient care, 1185.2 hours (29%) was direct patient care, and 1190.4 hours (30%) was professional activities. The number of patient visits per month increased during the study period. There were 1496 direct patient care encounters documented. Of those, 1051 (70.2%) were face-to-face visits, 257 (17.2%) were by telephone, and 188 (12.6%) were chart reviews. Nonvisit patient care and professional activities also increased during the period. PhARMS reported MTM pharmacist activities and captured nonvisit patient care work not tracked elsewhere. Internal benchmarking data proved to be useful for justifying increases in MTM pharmacist personnel resources. Reviewing data helped to identify best practices from high-performing sites. Limitations include potential for self-reporting bias and lack of patient outcomes data. Implementing PhARMS facilitated internal benchmarking of patient care and nonpatient care activities in a regional MTM program. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. School of pharmacy-based medication therapy management program: development and initial experience.

    PubMed

    Lam, Annie; Odegard, Peggy Soule; Gardner, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    To describe a school of pharmacy-community pharmacy collaborative model for medication therapy management (MTM) service and training. University of Washington (UW) School of Pharmacy (Seattle), from July to December 2008. MTM services and training. A campus-based MTM pharmacy was established for teaching, practice, and collaboration with community pharmacies to provide comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) and MTM training. Number of collaborating pharmacies, number of patients contacted, number of CMRs conducted, and estimated cost avoidance (ECA). UW Pharmacy Cares was licensed as a Class A pharmacy (nondispensing) and signed "business associate" agreements with six community pharmacies. During July to December 2008, 10 faculty pharmacists completed training and 5 provided CMR services to 17 patients (5 telephonic and 12 face-to-face interviews). A total of 67 claims (17 CMRs and 50 CMR-generated claims) were submitted for reimbursement of $1,642 ($96.58/CMR case). Total ECA was $54,250, averaging $3,191.19 per patient. Seven student pharmacists gained CMR interview training. Interest in collaboration by community pharmacies was lower than expected; however, the campus-community practice model addressed unmet patient care needs, reduced outstanding MTM CMR case loads, increased ECA, and facilitated faculty development and training of student pharmacists.

  2. Disparity Implications of Medicare Eligibility Criteria for Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Mullins, C Daniel; Brown, Lawrence M; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Hong, Song Hee; Cushman, William C

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there would be racial and ethnic disparities in meeting eligibility criteria for medication therapy management (MTM) services implemented in 2006 for Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources/Study Setting Secondary data analyses of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2004–2005). Study Design Logistic regression and recycled predictions were used to test the disparities in meeting eligibility criteria across racial and ethnic groups. The eligibility thresholds used by health plans in 2006 and new thresholds recommended for 2010 were examined. Racial and ethnic disparities were examined by comparing non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) with non-Hispanic whites (whites) and comparing Hispanics with whites, respectively. Disparities were also examined among individuals with severe health problems. Principal Findings According to 2006 thresholds, the adjusted odds ratios for meeting eligibility criteria for blacks and Hispanics to whites were 0.36–0.60 (p<.05) and 0.13–0.46 (p<.05), respectively. Blacks and Hispanics would be 21–34 and 32–38 percent, respectively, less likely to be eligible than whites according to recycled predictions. Similar patterns were found using the 2010 eligibility thresholds and among individuals with severe health problems. Conclusions There would be racial and ethnic disparities in meeting MTM eligibility criteria. Future research is warranted to confirm the findings using data after MTM implementation. PMID:20500223

  3. Best practices: improving patient outcomes and costs in an ACO through comprehensive medication therapy management.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Amanda; Lustig, Adam; Westrich, Kimberly; Evans, Michael A; Plank, Gary S; Penso, Jerry; Dubois, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important and often overlooked challenges for accountable care organizations (ACOs) is ensuring the optimal use of pharmaceuticals, which can be accomplished by utilizing pharmacists' skillsets and leveraging their full clinical expertise. Developing capabilities that support, monitor, and ensure appropriate medication use, efficacy, and safety is critical to achieving optimal patient outcomes and, ultimately, to an ACO's success. The program described in this article highlights the best practices of Fairview Pharmacy Services' Medication Therapy Management (MTM) program with additional thoughts and considerations on this and similar MTM programs provided by The Working Group on Optimizing Medication Therapy in Value-Based Healthcare. Fairview Pharmacy Services utilizes 23 MTM pharmacists (approximately 18 full-time equivalents) working in 30 locations, who conduct pharmacotherapy workups as part of the MTM services that Fairview provides. Pharmacists focus on patients in a comprehensive manner and assess all of their diseases and medications. Responsibilities include (a) identification of a patient's drug-related needs with a commitment to meet those needs; (b) an assessment and confirmation that all of a patient's drug therapy is appropriately indicated, effective and safe, and that the patient is compliant; (c) achievement of therapy outcomes and ensuring documentation of those outcomes; and (d) collaboration with all members of a patient's care team. Since 1998, pharmacists have cared for more than 20,000 patients and resolved more than 107,000 medication-related problems which, if left unresolved, could have led to hospital readmissions and emergency visits. Since becoming a Pioneer ACO, Fairview pharmacists have focused on the highest-risk members and have seen over 670 ACO patients, resolving over 2,780 medication-related problems. In terms of clinical outcomes, MTM contributed to optimal care in complex patients with diabetes. A review of

  4. Best Practices: Improving Patient Outcomes and Costs in an ACO Through Comprehensive Medication Therapy Management.

    PubMed

    Brummel, Amanda; Lustig, Adam; Westrich, Kimberly; Evans, Michael A; Plank, Gary S; Penso, Jerry; Dubois, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important and often overlooked challenges for accountable care organizations (ACOs) is ensuring the optimal use of pharmaceuticals, which can be accomplished by utilizing pharmacists' skillsets and leveraging their full clinical expertise. Developing capabilities that support, monitor, and ensure appropriate medication use, efficacy, and safety is critical to achieving optimal patient outcomes and, ultimately, to an ACO's success. The program described in this article highlights the best practices of Fairview Pharmacy Services' Medication Therapy Management (MTM) program with additional thoughts and considerations on this and similar MTM programs provided by The Working Group on Optimizing Medication Therapy in Value-Based Healthcare. Fairview Pharmacy Services utilizes 23 MTM pharmacists (approximately 18 full-time equivalents) working in 30 locations, who conduct pharmacotherapy workups as part of the MTM services that Fairview provides. Pharmacists focus on patients in a comprehensive manner and assess all of their diseases and medications. Responsibilities include (a) identification of a patient's drug-related needs with a commitment to meet those needs; (b) an assessment and confirmation that all of a patient's drug therapy is appropriately indicated, effective and safe, and that the patient is compliant; (c) achievement of therapy outcomes and ensuring documentation of those outcomes; and (d) collaboration with all members of a patient's care team. Since 1998, pharmacists have cared for more than 20,000 patients and resolved more than 107,000 medication-related problems which, if left unresolved, could have led to hospital readmissions and emergency visits. Since becoming a Pioneer ACO, Fairview pharmacists have focused on the highest-risk members and have seen over 670 ACO patients, resolving over 2,780 medication-related problems. In terms of clinical outcomes, MTM contributed to optimal care in complex patients with diabetes. A review of

  5. Interprofessional collaborative model for medication therapy management (MTM) services to improve health care access and quality for underserved populations.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoai-An; Groves, C Nicole; Congdon, Heather Brennan; Botchway, Rosemary; Dang, Diem-Thanh Tanya; Clark, Nancy Ripp; Zarfeshan, Faramarz

    2012-08-01

    As part of the Health Resources and Services Administration Patient Safety and Clinical Pharmacy Services Collaborative (PSPC), an interprofessional model with medication therapy management documentation and outcomes tracking tools (MTM-DOTT) is established to improve health care access and quality for underserved populations. Despite limitations, there have been positive outcomes and national recognitions.

  6. Review of survey articles regarding medication therapy management (MTM) services/programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Oladapo, Abiola O; Rascati, Karen L

    2012-08-01

    To provide a summary of published survey articles regarding the provision of medication therapy management (MTM) services in the United States. A literature search was conducted to identify original articles on MTM-related surveys conducted in the United States, involving community and outpatient pharmacists, physicians, patients, or pharmacy students and published by the primary researchers who conducted the study. Search engines used included PubMed, Medline, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA). If MTM was in the keyword list, mesh heading, title, or abstract, the article was reviewed. References from these articles were searched to determine whether other relevant articles were available. A total of 405 articles were initially reviewed; however, only 32 articles met the study requirements. Of the 32 articles, 17 surveyed community/outpatient pharmacists, 3 surveyed pharmacy students, 4 surveyed physicians, and 8 surveyed patients. The survey periods varied across the different studies, with the earliest survey conducted in 2004 and the most recent survey conducted in 2009. The surveys were conducted via the telephone, US mail, interoffice mail, e-mails, Internet/Web sites, hand-delivered questionnaires, and focus groups. Despite the identified barriers to the provision of MTM services, pharmacists reportedly found it professionally rewarding to provide these services. Pharmacists claimed to have adequate clinical knowledge, experience, and access to information required to provide MTM services. Pharmacy students were of the opinion that the provision of MTM services was important to the advancement of the pharmacy profession and in providing patients with a higher level of care. Physicians supported having pharmacists adjust patients’ drug therapy and educate patients on general drug information but not in selecting patients’ drug therapy. Finally, patients suggested that alternative ways need to be explored in describing and marketing MTM

  7. Contingent Valuation and Pharmacists' Acceptable Levels of Compensation for Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Hong, Song Hee

    2012-01-01

    Background Pharmacists' acceptable level of compensation for medication therapy management (MTM) services needs to be determined using various economic evaluation techniques. Objectives Using contingent valuation method, determine pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for MTM services. Methods A mailing survey was used to elicit Tennessee (US) pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for a 30-minute MTM session for a new patient with 2 medical conditions, 8 medications, and an annual drug cost of $2,000. Three versions of a series of double-bounded, closed-ended, binary discrete choice questions were asked of pharmacists for their willingness-to-accept (WTA) for an original monetary value ($30, $60, or $90) and then follow-up higher or lower value depending on their responses to the original value. A Kaplan-Meier approach was taken to analyze pharmacists' WTA, and Cox's proportional hazards model was used to examine the effects of pharmacist characteristics on their WTA. Results Three hundred and forty-eight pharmacists responded to the survey. Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session had a mean of $63.31 and median of $60. The proportions of pharmacists willing to accept $30, $60, and $90 for the given MTM session were 30.61%, 85.19%, and 91.01%, respectively. Pharmacists' characteristics had statistically significant association with their WTA rates. Conclusions Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session is higher than current Medicare MTM programs' compensation levels of $15 to $50 and patients' willingness-to-pay of less than $40. Besides advocating for higher MTM compensation levels by third-party payers, pharmacists also may need to charge patients to reach sufficient compensation levels for MTM services. PMID:22436583

  8. Contingent valuation and pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Hong, Song Hee

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacists' acceptable level of compensation for medication therapy management (MTM) services needs to be determined using various economic evaluation techniques. Using contingent valuation method, determine pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for MTM services. A mailing survey was used to elicit Tennessee (U.S.) pharmacists' acceptable levels of compensation for a 30-minute MTM session for a new patient with 2 medical conditions, 8 medications, and an annual drug cost of $2000. Three versions of a series of double-bounded, closed-ended, binary discrete choice questions were asked of pharmacists for their willingness to accept (WTA) for an original monetary value ($30, $60, or $90) and then follow-up higher or lower value depending on their responses to the original value. A Kaplan-Meier approach was taken to analyze pharmacists' WTA, and Cox's proportional hazards model was used to examine the effects of pharmacist characteristics on their WTA. Three hundred and forty-eight pharmacists responded to the survey. Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session had a mean of $63.31 and median of $60. The proportions of pharmacists willing to accept $30, $60, and $90 for the given MTM session were 30.61%, 85.19%, and 91.01%, respectively. Pharmacists' characteristics had statistically significant association with their WTA rates. Pharmacists' WTA for the given MTM session is higher than current Medicare MTM programs' compensation levels of $15-$50 and patients' willingness to pay of less than $40. Besides advocating for higher MTM compensation levels by third-party payers, pharmacists also may need to charge patients to reach sufficient compensation levels for MTM services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Medication therapy management in pharmacy practice: core elements of an MTM service model (version 2.0).

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    To further develop the service model for medication therapy management (MTM) delivery by pharmacists in settings where patients or their caregivers can be actively involved in managing their medications. Peer-reviewed literature, structured discussions with pharmacy leaders from diverse patient care settings, input from pharmacists and pharmacy associations, recommendations on patient-centered documents (personal medication record and medication-related action plan) from experts in the field of health literacy, and incorporation of extensive feedback received during an extended public comment period open to all MTM stakeholders and interested parties. Built on an MTM consensus definition adopted by 11 national pharmacy organizations in July 2004, Medication Therapy Management in Community Pharmacy Practice: Core Elements of an MTM Service (Version 1.0) described core elements of an MTM service model that can be provided by pharmacists across the spectrum of community pharmacy. Version 2.0 of that model, presented in this article, maintains the original five core elements of an MTM service: medication therapy review (MTR), a personal medication record (PMR), a medication-related action plan (MAP), intervention and referral, and documentation and follow-up. The MTR can be comprehensive or targeted, depending on the needs of the patient. In Version 2.0, the PMR and MAP have been redesigned with the assistance of a health literacy expert to be more "patient friendly," effective, and efficient for patients to use in medication self-management. The developing service model presented in this article for use by pharmacists involved in providing MTM services in diverse patient care settings consists of five core elements. The service model provides a consistent and recognizable framework for MTM service delivery by pharmacists that enhances efficient delivery of the service and improves patient outcomes.

  10. Medical management with or without interventional therapy for unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations (ARUBA): a multicentre, non-blinded, randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, J P; Parides, Michael K; Stapf, Christian; Moquete, Ellen; Moy, Claudia S; Overbey, Jessica R; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Vicaut, Eric; Young, William L; Houdart, Emmanuel; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Stefani, Marco A; Hartmann, Andreas; von Kummer, Rüdiger; Biondi, Alessandra; Berkefeld, Joachim; Klijn, Catharina J M; Harkness, Kirsty; Libman, Richard; Barreau, Xavier; Moskowitz, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The clinical benefit of preventive eradication of unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations remains uncertain. A Randomised trial of Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous malformations (ARUBA) aims to compare the risk of death and symptomatic stroke in patients with an unruptured brain arteriovenous malformation who are allocated to either medical management alone or medical management with interventional therapy. Methods Adult patients (≥18 years) with an unruptured brain arteriovenous malformation were enrolled into this trial at 39 clinical sites in nine countries. Patients were randomised (by web-based system, in a 1:1 ratio, with random permuted block design [block size 2, 4, or 6], stratified by clinical site) to medical management with interventional therapy (ie, neurosurgery, embolisation, or stereotactic radiotherapy, alone or in combination) or medical management alone (ie, pharmacological therapy for neurological symptoms as needed). Patients, clinicians, and investigators are aware of treatment assignment. The primary outcome is time to the composite endpoint of death or symptomatic stroke; the primary analysis is by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00389181. Findings Randomisation was started on April 4, 2007, and was stopped on April 15, 2013, when a data and safety monitoring board appointed by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health recommended halting randomisation because of superiority of the medical management group (log-rank Z statistic of 4·10, exceeding the prespecified stopping boundary value of 2·87). At this point, outcome data were available for 223 patients (mean follow-up 33·3 months [SD 19·7]), 114 assigned to interventional therapy and 109 to medical management. The primary endpoint had been reached by 11 (10·1%) patients in the medical management group compared with 35 (30·7%) in the interventional therapy

  11. Impact of live medication therapy management on cholesterol values in patients with cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Thumar, Ricky; Zaiken, Kathy

    2014-01-01

    To compare the impact of clinical pharmacist (CP) recommendations through a live, primary care-based, medication therapy management (MTM) protocol on low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in patients who have cardiovascular disease (CVD) with standard, chart-review MTM. Patients with established CVD who were not at their LDL goal were identified and analyzed by either a chart-review MTM service or a live, one-on-one pharmacist-physician MTM service over a 6-month timeframe. For the chart-review MTM service, recommendations were communicated through an electronic medical record (EMR) that the physician and pharmacist had access to. Primary outcomes included mean LDL reduction from baseline, number of patients achieving their LDL goal, and percent of implemented CP recommendations. Mean LDL reduction from baseline in the chart-review MTM group and the live MTM group was 36 mg/dL ± 23.2 mg/dL (P = 0.001) and 62 mg/dL ± 28.3 mg/dL (P = 0.001), respectively. The difference between these two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.001). The chart-review MTM group had 30% of patients reach their LDL goal with 66.3% of CP recommendations implemented compared to 51.3% and 86.3% for the same parameters in the live MTM group (P = 0.006 and P = 0.003, respectively). Although both MTM services provide a significant LDL reduction from baseline in patients with CVD, live MTM provides significantly greater LDL reductions, implemented CP recommendations, and goal attainment than chart-review MTM. Thus, live MTM services are more effective than chart-review MTM services, at least within the clinics that these protocols were assessed for the purposes of this study.

  12. Potential effects of racial and ethnic disparities in meeting Medicare medication therapy management eligibility criteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Spivey, Christina A; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Wan, Jim Y; White-Means, Shelley I; Cushman, William C; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A

    2014-06-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) has the potential to play an instrumental role in reducing racial and ethnic disparities in health care. However, previous research has found that Blacks and Hispanics are less likely to be eligible for MTM. The purpose of the current study was to examine the potential effects of MTM eligibility criteria on racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes. The current study is a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey Cost and Use files for the years 2007 and 2008. A difference-in-differences model was used to compare disparities in outcomes between ineligible and eligible beneficiaries according to MTM eligibility criteria in 2010. This was achieved by including in regression models interaction terms between dummy variables for Blacks/Hispanics and MTM eligibility criteria. Interaction terms were interpreted on both multiplicative and additive terms. Various regression models were used depending on the types of variables. Whites were more likely to report self-perceived good health status than Blacks and Hispanics among both MTM-eligible and MTM-ineligible populations. Disparities were greater among MTM-ineligible than MTM-eligible populations (e.g., on additive term, difference in odds=1.94 and P<0.01 for Whites and Blacks; difference in odds=2.86 and P<0.01 for Whites and Hispanics). A few other measures also exhibited significant patterns. MTM eligibility criteria may exacerbate racial and ethnic disparities in health status and some measures of health services utilizations and costs and medication utilization. Future research should examine strategies to remediate the effects of MTM eligibility criteria on disparities.

  13. Disparity Implications of Proposed 2015 Medicare Eligibility Criteria for Medication Therapy Management Services.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Spivey, Christina A; Li, Christine; Clark, Caroline; Deng, Yuewen; Liu, Flora; Tillman, Jeffrey; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies found that racial and ethnic minorities may be less likely than non-Hispanic Whites (Whites) to meet existing Medicare medication therapy management (MTM) eligibility criteria. To address these issues, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed alternative Medicare MTM eligibility criteria for 2015. Due to opposition to other Part D reforms proposed simultaneously by various stakeholders, CMS rescinded all proposed reforms. This study was conducted to determine whether non-Hispanic Blacks (Blacks) and Hispanics have lower likelihood of meeting the proposed 2015 Medicare MTM eligibility criteria. This retrospective observational analysis used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data (2010-2011). The final study sample was comprised of 2,721 Whites (weighted to 37,185,896), 917 Blacks (weighted to 4,665,644), and 538 Hispanics (weighted to 3,532,882). Chi-square tests were used to examine racial and ethnic disparities in meeting proposed 2015 MTM eligibility criteria and each component of proposed 2015 MTM eligibility criteria. In multivariate analysis, a logistic regression model was used to control for population socio-demographic and health-related characteristics. Compared to Whites with a proportion of MTM eligibility of 58.82%, the eligible proportion was 57.09% (P=0.20) for Blacks, and 48.97% (P<0.0001) for Hispanics, respectively. According to multivariate logistic regression, odds ratios of meeting MTM eligibility for Blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites were 0.74 (95% Confidence Internal [CI] = 0.62-0.88) and 0.53 (95% CI=0.43-0.67), respectively. The proposed 2015 MTM eligibility criteria would not eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in MTM eligibility. Alternative MTM eligibility criteria should be devised.

  14. Potential effects of racial and ethnic disparities in meeting Medicare medication therapy management eligibility criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Spivey, Christina A.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Wan, Jim Y.; White-Means, Shelley I.; Cushman, William C.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Medication therapy management (MTM) has the potential to play an instrumental role in reducing racial and ethnic disparities in health care. However, previous research has found that Blacks and Hispanics are less likely to be eligible for MTM. The purpose of the current study was to examine the potential effects of MTM eligibility criteria on racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes. Methods The current study is a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey Cost and Use files for the years 2007 and 2008. A difference-in-differences model was used to compare disparities in outcomes between ineligible and eligible beneficiaries according to MTM eligibility criteria in 2010. This was achieved by including in regression models interaction terms between dummy variables for Blacks/Hispanics and MTM eligibility criteria. Interaction terms were interpreted on both multiplicative and additive terms. Various regression models were used depending on the types of variables. Key Findings Whites were more likely to report self-perceived good health status than Blacks and Hispanics among both MTM-eligible and MTM-ineligible populations. Disparities were greater among MTM-ineligible than MTM-eligible populations (e.g., on additive term, difference in odds=1.94 and P<0.01 for Whites and Blacks; difference in odds=2.86 and P<0.01 for Whites and Hispanics). A few other measures also exhibited significant patterns. Conclusions MTM eligibility criteria may exacerbate racial and ethnic disparities in health status and some measures of health services utilizations and costs and medication utilization. Future research should examine strategies to remediate the effects of MTM eligibility criteria on disparities. PMID:25045406

  15. Establishment and Implementation of a Required Medication Therapy Management Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gilliam, Eric; Thompson, Megan; Vande Griend, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To develop a community pharmacy-based medication therapy management (MTM) advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that provides students with skills and knowledge to deliver entry-level pharmacy MTM services. Design. The University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS) partnered with three community pharmacy chains to establish this three-week, required MTM APPE. Students completed the American Pharmacists Association MTM Certificate Course prior to entering the APPE. Students were expected to spend 90% or more of their time at this experience working on MTM interventions, using store MTM platforms. Assessment. All 151 students successfully completed this MTM APPE, and each received a passing evaluation from their preceptor. Preceptor evaluations of students averaged above four (entry-level practice) on a five-point Likert scale. The majority of students reported engagement in MTM services for more than 80% of the time on site. Students’ self-reporting of their ability to perform MTM interventions improved after participation in the APPE. Conclusion. The SSPPS successfully implemented a required MTM APPE, preparing students for entry-level delivery of MTM services. PMID:28381896

  16. Physicians' Preferences for Communication of Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management in Community Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Kendall D; Stoner, Steven C; Hartwig, D Matthew; May, Justin R; Nicolaus, Sara E; Schramm, Andrew M; DiDonato, Kristen L

    2017-02-01

    (1) To identify physicians' preferences in regard to pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) communication in the community pharmacy setting; (2) to identify physicians' perceived barriers to communicating with a pharmacist regarding MTM; and (3) to determine whether Missouri physicians feel MTM is beneficial for their patients. A cross-sectional prospective survey study of 2021 family and general practice physicians registered with MO HealthNet, Missouri's Medicaid program. The majority (52.8%) of physicians preferred MTM data to be communicated via fax. Most physicians who provided care to patients in long-term care (LTC) facilities (81.0%) preferred to be contacted at their practice location as opposed to the LTC facility. The greatest barriers to communication were lack of time and inefficient communication practices. Improved/enhanced communication was the most common suggestion for improvement in the MTM process. Approximately 67% of respondents reported MTM as beneficial or somewhat beneficial for their patients. Survey respondents saw value in the MTM services offered by pharmacists. However, pharmacists should use the identified preferences and barriers to improve their currently utilized communication practices in hopes of increasing acceptance of recommendations. Ultimately, this may assist MTM providers in working collaboratively with patients' physicians.

  17. Establishment and Implementation of a Required Medication Therapy Management Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience.

    PubMed

    Nuffer, Wesley; Gilliam, Eric; Thompson, Megan; Vande Griend, Joseph

    2017-03-25

    Objective. To develop a community pharmacy-based medication therapy management (MTM) advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) that provides students with skills and knowledge to deliver entry-level pharmacy MTM services. Design. The University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences (SSPPS) partnered with three community pharmacy chains to establish this three-week, required MTM APPE. Students completed the American Pharmacists Association MTM Certificate Course prior to entering the APPE. Students were expected to spend 90% or more of their time at this experience working on MTM interventions, using store MTM platforms. Assessment. All 151 students successfully completed this MTM APPE, and each received a passing evaluation from their preceptor. Preceptor evaluations of students averaged above four (entry-level practice) on a five-point Likert scale. The majority of students reported engagement in MTM services for more than 80% of the time on site. Students' self-reporting of their ability to perform MTM interventions improved after participation in the APPE. Conclusion. The SSPPS successfully implemented a required MTM APPE, preparing students for entry-level delivery of MTM services.

  18. Blood pressure kiosks for medication therapy management programs: business opportunity for pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Houle, Sherilyn K D; Chuck, Anderson W; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2012-01-01

    To develop an economic model based on the use of pharmacy-based blood pressure kiosks for case finding of remunerable medication therapy management (MTM) opportunities. Descriptive, exploratory, nonexperimental study. Ontario, Canada, between January 2010 and September 2011. More than 7.5 million blood pressure kiosk readings were taken from 341 pharmacies. A model was developed to estimate revenues achievable by using blood pressure kiosks for 1 month to identify a cohort of patients with blood pressure of 130/80 mm Hg or more and caring for those patients during 1 year. Revenue generated from MTM programs. Pharmacies could generate an average of $12,270 (range $4,523-24,420) annually in revenue from billing for MTM services. Blood pressure kiosks can be used to identify patients with elevated blood pressure who may benefit from reimbursable pharmacist cognitive services. Revenue can be reinvested to purchase automated dispensing technology or offset pharmacy technician costs to free pharmacists to provide pharmaceutical care. Improved patient outcomes, increased patient loyalty, and improved adherence are additional potential benefits.

  19. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Plöckinger, U.

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs), dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided. PMID:22550484

  20. Effects of Medicare Part D on Disparity Implications of Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Jamison, JoEllen Jarrett; Spivey, Christina A.; Li, Liyuan; Wan, Jim Y.; White-Means, Shelley I.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Cushman, William C.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that there were greater racial and ethnic disparities among individuals who were ineligible for medication therapy management (MTM) services than among MTM-eligible individuals before the implementation of Medicare Part D in 2006. Objective To determine whether the implementation of Medicare Part D in 2006 correlates to changes in racial and ethnic disparities among MTM-ineligible and MTM-eligible beneficiaries. Methods Data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were analyzed in this retrospective observational analysis. To examine potential racial and ethnic disparities, non-Hispanic whites were compared with non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Three aspects of disparities were analyzed, including health status, health services utilization and costs, and medication utilization patterns. A generalized difference-in-differences analysis was used to examine the changes in difference in disparities between MTM-ineligible and MTM-eligible individuals from 2004–2005 to 2007–2008 relative to changes from 2001–2002 and 2004–2005. Various multivariate regressions were used based on the types of dependent variables. A main analysis and several sensitivity analyses were conducted to represent the ranges of MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans in 2010. Results The main analysis showed that Part D implementation was not associated with reductions in greater racial and ethnic disparities among MTM-ineligible than MTM-eligible Medicare beneficiaries. The main analysis suggests that after Part D implementation, Medicare MTM eligibility criteria may not consistently improve the existing racial and ethnic disparities in health status, health services utilization and costs, and medication utilization. By contrast, several sensitivity analyses showed that Part D implementation did correlate with a significant reduction in greater racial disparities among the MTM-ineligible group than the MTM-eligible group in

  1. Effects of medicare part d on disparity implications of medication therapy management eligibility criteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Jamison, JoEllen Jarrett; Spivey, Christina A; Li, Liyuan; Wan, Jim Y; White-Means, Shelley I; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Cushman, William C; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that there were greater racial and ethnic disparities among individuals who were ineligible for medication therapy management (MTM) services than among MTM-eligible individuals before the implementation of Medicare Part D in 2006. To determine whether the implementation of Medicare Part D in 2006 correlates to changes in racial and ethnic disparities among MTM-ineligible and MTM-eligible beneficiaries. Data from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey were analyzed in this retrospective observational analysis. To examine potential racial and ethnic disparities, non-Hispanic whites were compared with non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics. Three aspects of disparities were analyzed, including health status, health services utilization and costs, and medication utilization patterns. A generalized difference-in-differences analysis was used to examine the changes in difference in disparities between MTM-ineligible and MTM-eligible individuals from 2004-2005 to 2007-2008 relative to changes from 2001-2002 and 2004-2005. Various multivariate regressions were used based on the types of dependent variables. A main analysis and several sensitivity analyses were conducted to represent the ranges of MTM eligibility thresholds used by Medicare Part D plans in 2010. The main analysis showed that Part D implementation was not associated with reductions in greater racial and ethnic disparities among MTM-ineligible than MTM-eligible Medicare beneficiaries. The main analysis suggests that after Part D implementation, Medicare MTM eligibility criteria may not consistently improve the existing racial and ethnic disparities in health status, health services utilization and costs, and medication utilization. By contrast, several sensitivity analyses showed that Part D implementation did correlate with a significant reduction in greater racial disparities among the MTM-ineligible group than the MTM-eligible group in activities of daily living and in instrumental

  2. Impact of telephone medication therapy management on medication and health-related problems, medication adherence, and Medicare Part D drug costs: a 6-month follow up.

    PubMed

    Moczygemba, Leticia R; Barner, Jamie C; Lawson, Kenneth A; Brown, Carolyn M; Gabrillo, Evelyn R; Godley, Paul; Johnsrud, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 mandated the provision of medication therapy management (MTM) to eligible Part D beneficiaries to improve medication-related outcomes. As MTM programs evolve, evaluation is necessary to help inform MTM best practices. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of pharmacist-provided telephone MTM on: (1) medication and health-related problems (MHRPs); (2) medication adherence; and (3) Part D drug costs. This quasi-experimental study included Part D beneficiaries from a Texas health plan. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use served as the study framework. MTM utilization was the health behavior. Age, gender, and race were predisposing factors, and number of medications, chronic diseases, and medication regimen complexity were need factors. Outcomes were pre-to-post changes in: (1) MHRPs; (2) medication adherence, using the medication possession ratio (MPR); and (3) total drug costs. Multiple regression was used to analyze group differences while controlling for predisposing and need factors. At baseline, the intervention (n = 60) and control (n = 60) groups were not statistically different regarding predisposing and need factors, with the exception of gender. The intervention group had significantly (P = 0.009) more men compared with the control group (51.7% vs 28.3%). There were 4.8 (2.7) and 9.2 (2.9) MHRPs identified at baseline and 2.5 (2.0) and 7.9 (3.0) MHRPs remained at the 6-month follow up in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The intervention group (vs control) had significantly more MHRPs resolved (P = 0.0003). There were no significant predictors of change in MPR or total drug costs from baseline to follow up, although total drug costs decreased by $158 in the intervention group compared with a $118 increase in the control group. A telephone MTM program resolved significantly more MHRPs compared with a control group, but there were no significant changes in adherence and

  3. Medication Therapy Management in community pharmacy practice: core elements of an MTM service (version 1.0).

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    To develop a model framework of Medication Therapy Management (MTM) in community pharmacy designed to improve care, enhance communication among patients and providers, improve collaboration among providers, and optimize medication use that leads to improved patient outcomes. Peer-reviewed literature, structured discussions with community pharmacy leaders and representatives from pharmacy benefit providers and health plans, and input from pharmacists and pharmacy associations. Building on an MTM consensus definition adopted by 11 national pharmacy organizations in July 2004, this model describes core elements of an MTM service that can be provided by pharmacists across the spectrum of community pharmacy. The model is structured for pharmacists to use with all patients in need of MTM services, both in the private and public sector. The model describes five core elements of MTM in the community pharmacy setting: medication therapy review (MTR), a personal medication record (PMR), a medication action plan (MAP), intervention and referral, and documentation and follow-up. The MTR can be comprehensive or targeted, depending onthe needs of the patient. The PMR and MAP are patient-centered documents intended to be used by the patient to improve medication self-management. A collaborative approach to patient care involving patients, pharmacists, and physicians and other health care providers is advocated in the model. General patient eligibility considerations are also described. A model framework for consideration by community pharmacists in developing MTM services is described. The model consists of five core elements for MTM service delivery in community pharmacy practice.

  4. Accepting Medication Therapy Management Recommendations to Add ACEIs or ARBs in Diabetes Care.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, Jason T; Grizzle, Amy J; Augustine, Jill; Rehfeld, Rick; Wild, Ann; Abraham, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    National guidelines and initiatives have promoted the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) for patients with diabetes. The University of Arizona Medication Management Center (UA-MMC) is contracted by Medicare health plans, pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs), and multiple commercial health insurance plans to provide medication therapy management (MTM) services for plan members. As part of the MTM program, recommendations have been made for those patients who may benefit from the addition of an ACEI/ARB. Although the intervention benefits and guidelines for using ACEIs/ARBs are clear, real-world evidence is needed to understand and potentially increase uptake of guideline interventions among eligible patients. To (a) identify patient characteristics that predict acceptance of guideline recommendations to add ACEI/ARB medications to diabetic treatment via MTM services and (b) examine how well different case characteristics (i.e., patient age and sex, type and number of recommendation attempts, type of health care plan) predict the odds of adding ACEI/ARB medications to diabetic regimens when recommended through an MTM call center. This was a retrospective analysis of secondary data provided by the UA-MMC. The de-identified national data included adult plan members with diabetes who the UA-MMC recommended adding an ACEI/ARB prescription based on 2012 national guidelines. The UA-MMC made recommendations by either patient letters, patient phone calls, physician faxes, or any combination thereof. We conducted a binary logistic regression analysis to assess the impact of case characteristics on the likelihood of accepting recommendations to add ACEI/ARB medications. The outcome variable was recommendation acceptance (yes/no), defined as new prescription claims for an ACEI/ARB within 120 days following the recommendation. Five predictor variables were assessed: (1) patient's age quartile; (2) method of communicating

  5. Pharmacists’ perceptions of advancing public health priorities through medication therapy management

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Public health priorities can be addressed by pharmacists through channels such as medication therapy management (MTM) to optimize patient and population outcomes. However, no studies have specifically assessed pharmacists’ perceptions of addressing public health priorities through MTM. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess pharmacists’ opinions regarding the feasibility and appropriateness of addressing seven areas of public health priority through MTM services to impact public health in direct patient care settings. Methods: An anonymous 37-question electronic survey was conducted to evaluate Ohio pharmacists’ opinions of advancing seven public health priorities identified from Healthy People 2020 (family planning, preconception care, smoking cessation, immunizations, nutrition/biometric wellness assessments, point-of-care testing, fall prevention) through MTM activities; to identify potential barriers; and to collect demographic information. The cross-sectional survey was sent to a random sample of 500 pharmacists registered with the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy. Results: Seventy-six pharmacists responded to the survey, resulting in a 16% response rate. On average, it took respondents 5-10 minutes to complete the survey. The majority of respondents thought that each of the seven public health priorities were “important” or “very important” to patient health; the most commonly identified areas included smoking cessation, immunizations, and fall prevention (97.5%). When asked to indicate which of the seven areas they thought they could potentially have a role to provide services through MTM, on average pharmacists picked 4 of the priority areas. Only 6.6% indicated there was no role for pharmacists to provide MTM services for any of the listed categories. Staffing, time, and reimbursement represented the most commonly perceived barriers for pharmacists in providing MTM services. Fifty-seven percent indicated an interest in

  6. Pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) program impacts outcomes for employees with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sharrel L; Kumar, Jinender; Partha, Gautam; Bechtol, Robert A

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this prospective, pre-post longitudinal study was to assess the impact of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services on employees' health and well-being by evaluating their clinical and humanistic outcomes. City of Toledo employees and/or their spouses and dependents with diabetes with or without comorbid conditions were enrolled in the pharmacist-conducted MTM program. Participants scheduled consultations with the pharmacist at predetermined intervals. Overall health outcomes, such as clinical markers, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), disease knowledge, and social and process measures, were documented at these visits and assessed for improvement. Changes in patient outcomes over time were analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank and Friedman test at an a priori level of 0.05. Spearman correlation was used to measure the relationship between clinical and humanistic outcomes. A total of 101 patients enrolled in the program. At the end of 1 year, patients' A1c levels decreased on average by 0.27 from their baseline values. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure also decreased on average by 6.0 and 4.2 mmHg, respectively. Patient knowledge of disease conditions and certain aspects or components of HRQoL also improved. Improvements in social and process measures also were also observed. Improved clinical outcomes and quality of life can affect employee productivity and help reduce costs for employers by reducing disease-related missed days of work. Employers seeking to save costs and impact productivity can utilize the services provided by pharmacists.

  7. A structured patient identification model for medication therapy management services in a community pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Gina M; Groves, Brigid K; Kuhn, Catherine H; Porter, Kyle; Mehta, Bella H

    To describe the development and implementation of a structured patient identification model for medication therapy management (MTM) services within traditional dispensing activities of a community pharmacy to facilitate pharmacist-provided completion of MTM services. A daily clinical opportunity report was developed as a structured model to identify MTM opportunities daily for all MTM-eligible patients expecting to pick up a prescription. Pharmacy staff was trained and the standardized model was implemented at study sites. One hundred nineteen grocery store-based community pharmacies throughout Ohio, West Virginia, and Michigan. A structured patient identification model in a community pharmacy consists of reviewing a clinical opportunity report, identifying interventions for MTM-eligible patients, and possibly collaborating with an interdisciplinary team. This model allows pharmacists to increase MTM cases performed by providing a structured process for identifying MTM-eligible patients and completing MTM services. The development and implementation of a structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was completed and consists of pharmacists reviewing a clinical opportunity report to identify MTM opportunities and perform clinical interventions for patients. In a 3-month pre- and post-implementation comparison, there was a 49% increase in the number of MTM services provided by pharmacists (P < 0.001). A structured patient identification model in the community pharmacy was associated with an increase in the amount of MTM services provided by pharmacists. This method could be a useful tool at a variety of community pharmacies to solve challenges associated with MTM completion. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacists' perceptions of advancing public health priorities through medication therapy management.

    PubMed

    Casserlie, Lucas M; Mager, Natalie A Dipietro

    2016-01-01

    Public health priorities can be addressed by pharmacists through channels such as medication therapy management (MTM) to optimize patient and population outcomes. However, no studies have specifically assessed pharmacists' perceptions of addressing public health priorities through MTM. The objective of this study was to assess pharmacists' opinions regarding the feasibility and appropriateness of addressing seven areas of public health priority through MTM services to impact public health in direct patient care settings. An anonymous 37-question electronic survey was conducted to evaluate Ohio pharmacists' opinions of advancing seven public health priorities identified from Healthy People 2020 (family planning, preconception care, smoking cessation, immunizations, nutrition/biometric wellness assessments, point-of-care testing, fall prevention) through MTM activities; to identify potential barriers; and to collect demographic information. The cross-sectional survey was sent to a random sample of 500 pharmacists registered with the Ohio State Board of Pharmacy. Seventy-six pharmacists responded to the survey, resulting in a 16% response rate. On average, it took respondents 5-10 minutes to complete the survey. The majority of respondents thought that each of the seven public health priorities were "important" or "very important" to patient health; the most commonly identified areas included smoking cessation, immunizations, and fall prevention (97.5%). When asked to indicate which of the seven areas they thought they could potentially have a role to provide services through MTM, on average pharmacists picked 4 of the priority areas. Only 6.6% indicated there was no role for pharmacists to provide MTM services for any of the listed categories. Staffing, time, and reimbursement represented the most commonly perceived barriers for pharmacists in providing MTM services. Fifty-seven percent indicated an interest in learning more about MTM, with 98% of responders

  9. Impact of medication therapy management on underserved, primarily Hispanic patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Congdon, Heather B; Dowling, Thomas C; Cheng, Iliana; Truong, Hoai-An

    2013-05-01

    Diabetes-related complications are more pronounced in Hispanic patients versus patients of other ethnicities. It is documented that medication therapy management (MTM) can improve diabetes outcomes; however, data regarding Hispanic patients are limited. To evaluate the impact of MTM on hemoglobin A1c (A1C), blood pressure (BP), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in underserved, primarily Hispanic patients who use a safety-net clinic as their medical home. A retrospective, observational study of uninsured, primarily Hispanic patients with diabetes who received MTM from October 2009 through March 2011. Patients were stratified into 2 cohorts: A1C less than 9% and A1C greater than or equal to 9%. Patients were also stratified by frequency of MTM visits and insulin use, regardless of A1C. A chart review was conducted to evaluate diabetes-related outcomes pre- and postimplementation of MTM. The primary study outcome was reduction of A1C. Secondary outcomes included reduction of BP and LDL-C and reduction of A1C based on MTM visit frequency or insulin use. Sixty-four patients with at least 1 MTM visit and pre- and postimplementation A1C data were included. In the cohort with A1C greater than or equal to 9%, mean (SD) A1C values decreased from 10.9% (1.4%) to 8.8% (1.5%) versus the cohort with A1C less than 9%, whose A1C changed minimally, from 7.2% (0.9%) to 7.4% (1.4%). Regardless of their A1C, patients who were using insulin at baseline had a change in A1C of -0.8% (1.5%) versus -0.1% (1.6%) in those who were not using insulin at baseline (p = 0.04); patients who participated in multiple MTM visits had a significant reduction in A1C, from 9% to 8.3% (95% CI -1.26 to -0.03; p = 0.02) compared with patients participating in only 1 MTM visit. Pharmacist-provided MTM can significantly improve diabetes control in uninsured, primarily Hispanic patients with poorly controlled diabetes and in those who are using insulin. Multiple MTM visits also yielded

  10. Impact of Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management on Healthcare Quality and Utilization in Recently Discharged Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jordan D.; Davis, Amanda Z.; Hoel, Robert W.; Armon, Jeffrey J.; Odell, Laura J.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimization of medication use during care transitions represents an opportunity to improve overall health-related outcomes. The utilization of clinical pharmacists during care transitions has demonstrated benefit, although the optimal method of integration during the care transition process remains unclear. Objective To evaluate the impact of pharmacist-provided telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) on care quality in a care transitions program (CTP) for high-risk older adults. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted from December 8, 2011, through October 25, 2012, in a primary care work group at a tertiary care academic medical center in the midwestern United States. High-risk elderly (aged ≥60 years) patients were randomized to a pharmacist-provided MTM program via telephone or to usual care within an existing outpatient CTP. The primary outcome was the quality of medication prescribing and utilization based on the Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to the Right Treatment (START) and the Screening Tool of Older Persons’ Prescriptions (STOPP) scores. The secondary outcomes were medication utilization using a modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index, hospital resource utilization within 30 days of discharge, and drug therapy problems. Results Of 222 eligible high-risk patients, 25 were included in the study and were randomized to the pharmacist MTM intervention (N = 13) or to usual care (N = 12). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in medications meeting the STOPP or START criteria. At 30-day follow-up, no significant differences were found between the 2 cohorts in medication utilization quality indicators or in hospital utilization. At 30-day follow-up, 3 (13.6%) patients had an emergency department visit or a hospital readmission since discharge. In all, 22 patients completed the study. Medication underuse was common, with 20 START criteria absent medications evident for

  11. A Mass Merchandiser's Role in Enhancing Pharmacy Students’ Business Plan Development Skills for Medication Therapy Management Services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To develop a relationship between a pharmacy management course and a mass merchandiser and to determine whether involving pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser in the course would enhance student skills in developing a business plan for medication therapy management services. Design. The pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser participated in lectures, provided panel discussions, and conducted a business plan competition. Learning was assessed by means of 4 examinations and 1 project (ie, the business plan). At the conclusion of the semester, surveys were administered to solicit student input and gain insight from pharmacy managers on the perceived value of this portion of the course. Assessment. Students’ average grade on the business plan assignment, which included the oral presentation, the peer assessment, and the written proposal, was 92.2%. Approximately 60% (n = 53) of surveyed students agreed or strongly agreed that their management skills had improved because of the participation of pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser. All of the managers enjoyed participating in the experience. Conclusions. The involvement of pharmacy managers from a mass merchandiser enhanced student learning in the classroom, and managers felt that their participation was an important contribution to the development of future pharmacists. PMID:21969719

  12. A mass merchandiser's role in enhancing pharmacy students' business plan development skills for medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Moultry, Aisha Morris

    2011-09-10

    To develop a relationship between a pharmacy management course and a mass merchandiser and to determine whether involving pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser in the course would enhance student skills in developing a business plan for medication therapy management services. The pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser participated in lectures, provided panel discussions, and conducted a business plan competition. Learning was assessed by means of 4 examinations and 1 project (ie, the business plan). At the conclusion of the semester, surveys were administered to solicit student input and gain insight from pharmacy managers on the perceived value of this portion of the course. Students' average grade on the business plan assignment, which included the oral presentation, the peer assessment, and the written proposal, was 92.2%. Approximately 60% (n=53) of surveyed students agreed or strongly agreed that their management skills had improved because of the participation of pharmacy managers from the mass merchandiser. All of the managers enjoyed participating in the experience. The involvement of pharmacy managers from a mass merchandiser enhanced student learning in the classroom, and managers felt that their participation was an important contribution to the development of future pharmacists.

  13. Knowledge of tuberculosis management using directly observed treatment short course therapy among final year medical students in South Western Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olakunle, Olarewaju Sunday; Oladimeji, Olanrewaju; Olalekan, Adebimpe Wasiu; Olugbenga-Bello, Adenike; Akinleye, Callistus; Oluwatoyin, Olarewaju Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    Equipping medical graduates with the competence to manage tuberculosis is not just imperative but also urgent as the diseases have been consistently listed as one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria. However, there were no baseline studies done on knowledge of final year medical students on various aspects of TB diagnosis and management under directly observed treatment short course therapy (DOTS) which forms the basis of this study. A total of 241 final year medical students from three medical colleges in Nigeria were interviewed. The questions assessed their knowledge about various modes of transmission, symptoms and management of tuberculosis under DOTS. More than half of the respondents (i.e. 69%) had poor knowledge on TB disease. Only 33.6% mentioned sputum smear as the best tool of diagnosing TB according to guideline. Poor knowledge was also exhibited when asked of various categories under DOTS treatment regimen, as 46.1% correctly mentioned cat 1 and 2. Minority 18.7% and 6.7% had complete knowledge of 6 months duration for new TB cases and 8 months for re-treatment cases respectively. Less than one tenth, i.e. 4.6% and 2.9% could correctly defined what is called a new TB case and re-treatment cases according to standard guideline. The study reveals gross inadequacies in TB knowledge and management practices among Nigerian final year medical students. There is urgent need for incorporation of National TB guideline into existing undergraduate medical education curriculum as well as students rotation through activities in DOTS clinic.

  14. Adverse events in medical management--vigabatrin as a paradigm of forensic responsibility with novel therapy.

    PubMed

    Beran, R G

    2001-01-01

    The ethics of medical management are not always straightforward. There are many contributing factors: the condition treated; its effects on the patient; the required treatment; the effects of that treatment; and a cost/benefit ratio. Treatment of epilepsy with vigabatrin (VGB) exemplifies these problems. VGB has recently been reported to cause constricted visual fields. Formal testing of visual fields of patients attending an outpatient epilepsy service showed constriction with tunnel vision, even in patients who are asymptomatic. The ethical questions include: Should all reports of adverse events be subjected to tests of validity and subsequent quality assurance? Should treatment with VGB be stopped, risking recurrence of seizures? What are the legal consequences of continuing VGB? Does informed consent protect the doctor? After stopping VGB can the patient drive?

  15. Effect of an intervention to increase statin use in medicare members who qualified for a medication therapy management program.

    PubMed

    Stockl, Karen M; Tjioe, Daniel; Gong, Sherry; Stroup, Jenni; Harada, Ann S M; Lew, Heidi C

    2008-01-01

    The cardiovascular (CV) benefits of lipid-lowering therapy in older adults with hypercholesterolemia and underlying risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) have been well documented. Significant reductions in the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary death have been demonstrated with statin therapy, benefits that are of particular relevance in patients with diabetes. Managed care interventions with prescribers have increased the use of selected drugs such as statins. To (1) measure the increase in new users of statins associated with the implementation of a statin initiation intervention aimed at prescribers for Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management Program (MTMP) members with diabetes or CAD and (2) estimate the potential cost savings associated with the projected reduction in CV events based on published controlled trials. Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MA-PD) and prescription drug plan (PDP) members of a pharmacy benefits manager (PBM) were identified for the intervention who (1) met the criteria for MTMP (expected to incur at least dollars 4,000 in annual pharmacy expenditures for Part D-covered medications, filled at least 10 distinct Part D-covered medications, and had at least 3 of 5 chronic diseases of interest); (2) were identified as having diabetes or CAD (patients with a history of MI were considered to have CAD); and (3) had no pharmacy claims for a statin between January and June 2006. In August 2006, the primary prescribers for antidiabetic or CV medications of 1,144 identified members were sent educational materials and a report listing their patients with diabetes or CAD who were not receiving statin therapy. A comparison group of MA-PD members (N = 700) with diabetes or CAD was identified who did not receive the intervention but who met all of the MTMP criteria except the presence of at least 3 of 5 chronic diseases of interest. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate the intervention effectiveness after

  16. Assessing the effectiveness of pharmacist-directed medication therapy management in improving diabetes outcomes in patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Jeannine S; Poe, Brett; Hopper, Rebecca; Boyer, Alaina; Wilkins, Consuelo H

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare medication adherence rates and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) health outcomes in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM (A1C >7%) who had received pharmacist-directed medication therapy management (MTM) to those who had not received MTM. A retrospective review of 100 patient records was conducted. For the MTM group, a pharmacist engaged patients in patient-centered services to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Non-MTM patients received usual care. Outcomes were A1C, medication adherence, blood pressure, lipids, and creatinine. Group comparisons on clinical outcomes were analyzed before and after matching MTM and non-MTM patients on demographic characteristics. Before matching, the MTM group had a higher rate of medication adherence than the non-MTM group. The A1C levels were lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. Similarly, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol was lower in the MTM group compared to the non-MTM group. After matching, medication adherence rate remained higher in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. Similarly, A1C levels remained lower in the MTM group than the non-MTM group. There is a paucity of research focused on behavioral interventions for improving health outcomes in underserved communities. Our results advance the existing literature by demonstrating a positive association between pharmacist-directed MTM, medication adherence, and glycemic control in a sample of underserved patients with suboptimally controlled T2DM. A prospective pharmacy intervention and examination of long-term effects of MTM on medication adherence and T2DM health outcomes in this population is warranted. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Medical management of hypercalcaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, S H

    1992-01-01

    1. Hypercalcaemia is a common disorder, which frequently requires specific treatment either to control symptoms, or to prevent the development of irreversible organ damage or death. Although the best and most effective way of controlling hypercalcaemia in the long-term is to treat the underlying cause, medical antihypercalcaemic therapy is often required in clinical practice, either as a holding measure, or because the primary disease cannot itself be treated. 2. The mainstays of medical antihypercalcaemic therapy are firstly, to promote calcium excretion by the kidney by restoring extracellular volume with intravenous saline and secondly, to administer pharmacological agents which inhibit bone resorption. Measures which seek to reduce intestinal calcium absorption are seldom effective. 3. Intravenous bisphosphonates are the treatment of first choice for the initial management of hypercalcaemia, followed by continued oral, or repeated intravenous bisphosphonates to prevent relapse. These drugs have a relatively slow onset of action (1-3 days) but have potent and sustained inhibitory effects on bone resorption, resulting in a long duration of action (12-30 days). 4. Of the other agents available, calcitonin has an important place in the management of severe hypercalcaemia where a rapid effect is desirable; calcitonin is best used in conjunction with a bisphosphonate however, because of its short duration of action. Intravenous phosphate also has a place in the emergency management of severe hypercalcaemia, but is probably best reserved for patients in whom other less toxic therapies have failed. Corticosteroids are generally ineffective except in certain specific instances and are best avoided in the routine treatment of undiagnosed hypercalcaemia. PMID:1633063

  18. Medical management of blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Katherine; Jeng, Bennie H

    2015-07-01

    Blepharitis is one of the most common ocular pathologies encountered in the clinical setting. Despite its prevalence, successful treatment is often difficult. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the medical management of blepharitis. The available treatment options for blepharitis have expanded rapidly in recent years. Eyelid hygiene remains the foundation of most treatment regimens, but the addition of topical and oral antibiotics, steroids, and calcineurin inhibitors is showing promising results. Dietary considerations and interventional procedures may also play a role in the future of blepharitis management. Although a curative therapy for blepharitis is unlikely in the near future, several novel treatment options may result in better control of this chronic condition.

  19. Medical management of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Khalessi, Alexander A; Oh, Bryan C; Wang, Michael Y

    2008-01-01

    In the following literature review the authors consider the available evidence for the medical management of patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and they critically assess current treatment guidelines. Medical therapy for axial disease in AS emphasizes improvement in patients' pain and overall function. First-line treatments include individualized physical therapy and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in conjunction with gastroprotective therapy. After an adequate trial of therapy with two NSAIDs exceeding 3 months or limited by medication toxicity, the patient may undergo tumor necrosis factor-alpha blockade therapy. Response should occur within 6-12 weeks, and patients must undergo tuberculosis screening. Evidence does not currently support the use of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, corticosteroids, or radiotherapy in AS.

  20. Medication Therapy Management for Patients Receiving Oral Chemotherapy Agents at a Community Oncology Center: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Bertsch, Nathan S; Bindler, Ross J; Wilson, Poppy L; Kim, Anne P; Ward, Beverly

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of a pharmacist-driven medication therapy management (MTM) program for patients receiving oral chemotherapy agents. Methods: We assessed the impact of MTM consultations with a pharmacist for patients who were receiving a new prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent. Data were assessed for outcomes including (1) number of medication errors identified in electronic medical records (EMRs), (2) number of interventions performed by the pharmacist, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) patient satisfaction. Data were compared between patients who received their oral chemotherapy agents from the onsite specialty pharmacy or from a mail-order pharmacy. The data were also examined for correlations, and logistic regression was utilized to determine the largest variant cofactor to create an equation for estimating the number of errors in a patient's EMR. Results: Fifteen patients received an MTM consultation, and the pharmacists identified an average of 6 medication EMR errors per patient. There was an average of 3 pharmacist-led interventions per patient. Multiple significant correlations were noted between the variables: (1) total number of prescriptions a patient was taking, (2) total number of medication errors identified, (3) time spent on the MTM process, and (4) total number of interventions performed by the pharmacist. Patient satisfaction was favorable for the program. Conclusion: The implementation of a pharmacist-driven MTM program for patients receiving a prescription for an oral chemotherapy agent had a significant impact on patient care by improving medication reconciliation, identifying drug-related problems, and strengthening pharmacist-patient interactions in the oncology clinic.

  1. Antiretroviral therapy adherence, medication use, and health care costs during 3 years of a community pharmacy medication therapy management program for Medi-Cal beneficiaries with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jan D; Gonzales, Marco; Rosenquist, Ashley; Miller, Teresa Ann; Gilmer, Todd P; Best, Brookie M

    2011-04-01

    The types of pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services provided to patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and the effects of MTM on medication adherence and patient outcomes have only recently begun to be studied. Although available studies suggest that patients receiving MTM services have better antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and outcomes, only 1 study has examined a large group of patients with HIV/AIDS, and none has examined adherence or outcomes for more than 1 year. A pilot program conducted by the California Department of Health Care Services (DHCS) and Medi-Cal (California's Medicaid program) provided an opportunity to examine ART adherence and outcomes in a large patient population receiving MTM services in community pharmacies over 3 years. To examine an HIV/AIDS pharmacy MTM compensation pilot program over a 3-year period (2005- 2007) in a sample of Medi-Cal beneficiaries by describing the associations between use of pilot pharmacies and (a) adherence to ART regimens; (b) medication utilization, including number and type of ART medication regimens and use of contraindicated ART regimens; (c) occurrence of opportunistic infections; and (d) all-cause pharmacy and medical costs. This was a cohort study examining Medi-Cal pharmacy and medical claims data (2005-2007) for patients with HIV/AIDS who were served by pilot pharmacies versus other (nonpilot) pharmacies. The study groups, pilot and nonpilot pharmacy patients with HIV/AIDS, consisted of Medi-Cal beneficiaries aged 18 years or older as of January 1, 2005, who were continuously enrolled from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2007, and who received both a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS and at least 1 ART pharmacy claim during both the index period (2004) and the study period (January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2007). Pilot pharmacy patients were identified as having filled 50% or more of their ART prescriptions each year at 1

  2. Successful management of a pregnant woman with a TSH secreting pituitary adenoma with surgical and medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Chaiamnuay, Sumapa; Moster, Mark; Katz, M Richard; Kim, Young Nam

    2003-09-01

    We described a 39-yr-old asian female who was initially diagnosed with prolactinoma and presented with increase nervousness and weight loss. Laboratory evaluation revealed an inappropriately normal TSH level with elevated free T4, total T3, alpha-subunit and prolactin level. The alpha-subunit/TSH molar ratio was 4. MRI showed a macroadenoma extending to the suprasellar cistern. Treatment was begun with propylthiouracil and bromocriptine. After 5 months of therapy, she became pregnant. At 27 weeks of gestation, she developed headache and decreased visual acuity in her left eye. MRI showed a slightly increase in tumor size compressing the optic chaiasm. Transphenoid macroadenectomy was performed with immediate relief of the visual field abnormality. At 39 weeks gestation a baby with no malformations was delivered. This is the second case report of TSH secreting pituitary adenoma which was exarcerbated during pregnancy. In contrast to the first case, our case was managed with both surgical and medical approach. The judicious use of both medical and surgical therapy can result in a successful outcome to mother and fetus in a patient with TSH secreting pituitary adenoma.

  3. A digital health solution for using and managing medications: wirelessly observed therapy.

    PubMed

    DiCarlo, Lorenzo; Moon, Greg; Intondi, Allison; Duck, Robert; Frank, Jeremy; Hafazi, Hooman; Behzadi, Yashar; Robertson, Timothy; Costello, Ben; Savage, George; Zdeblick, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Taking oral medication on a prescribed schedule can be a nuisance, especially for elderly individuals and busy people with lots of things on their minds. Nonetheless, taking medication as prescribed is important for maintaining health and well-being. In cases where medication use is part of a clinical trial, taking prescribed medication is important to the entire investigation and outcome of the study, including the determination of whether a drug is effective and safe.

  4. Primary care-based, pharmacist-physician collaborative medication-therapy management of hypertension: a randomized, pragmatic trial.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jan D; Steers, Neil; Adler, David S; Kuo, Grace M; Morello, Candis M; Lang, Megan; Singh, Renu F; Wood, Yelena; Kaplan, Robert M; Mangione, Carol M

    2014-09-01

    A collaborative pharmacist-primary care provider (PharmD-PCP) team approach to medication-therapy management (MTM), with pharmacists initiating and changing medications at separate office visits, holds promise for the cost-effective management of hypertension, but has not been evaluated in many systematic trials. The primary objective of this study was to examine blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients managed by a newly formed PharmD-PCP MTM team versus usual care in a university-based primary care clinic. This randomized, pragmatic clinical trial was conducted in hypertensive patients randomly selected for PharmD-PCP MTM or usual care. In the PharmD-PCP MTM group, pharmacists managed drug-therapy initiation and monitoring, medication adjustments, biometric assessments, laboratory tests, and patient education. In the usual-care group, patients continued to see their PCPs. Participants were aged ≥ 18 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, had a most recent BP measurement of ≥ 140/≥ 90 mm Hg (≥ 130/≥ 80 mm Hg if codiagnosed with diabetes mellitus), were on at least 1 antihypertensive medication, and were English speaking. The primary outcome was the difference in the mean change from baseline in systolic BP at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included the percentage achieving therapeutic BP goal and the mean changes from baseline in diastolic BP and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A total of 166 patients were enrolled (69 men; mean age, 67.7 years; PharmD-PCP MTM group, n = 75; usual-care group, n = 91). Mean reduction in SBP was significantly greater in the PharmD-PCP MTM group at 6 months (-7.1 [19.4] vs +1.6 [21.0] mm Hg; P = 0.008), but the difference was no longer statistically significant at 9 months (-5.2 [16.9] vs -1.7 [17.7] mm Hg; P = 0.22), based on an intent-to-treat analysis. In the intervention group, greater percentages of patients who continued to see the MTM pharmacist versus those who returned to their PCP were

  5. An Analysis and Comparison of Medication Therapy Management Cost-Avoidance vs. Fee-for-Service Financial Models.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    To describe, compare, and contrast cost-avoidance and fee-for-service medication therapy management (MTM) financial models of practice to allow clinicians to better choose the type of MTM practice that best fits their particular practice environment. Literature regarding pharmacist practices providing MTM services and capstone projects of proposed and currently operating MTM pharmacist practices presented in the University of Florida Master of Science MTM program. Understanding the two major payment methods of sustaining a financially viable MTM pharmacist practice is critical to practice success. Survey was broad with regard to clinical models to compare differences because funding to support these services can be difficult to obtain. Despite differences in approach, various methods exist to financially sustain a pharmacist with an MTM practice. Each method or model has advantages and disadvantages in differing practice environments. With enough cost avoidance or revenue generation, financially dissimilar MTM financial models can be sustainable.

  6. Prediction of pharmacist intention to provide Medicare medication therapy management services using the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Kathleen E; Urmie, Julie M; Newland, Brand A; Farris, Karen B

    2006-09-01

    Medicare Part D is a voluntary prescription drug benefit for Medicare beneficiaries. As part of the coverage, medication therapy management services (MTMS) are mandated for beneficiaries with chronic diseases who take multiple medications covered under part D and who are likely to incur annual costs that exceed a specified level. To predict the behavioral intention of pharmacists to provide Medicare medication therapy management services (MTMS) using the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and to determine the relationship between pharmacists' characteristics and intention to provide MTMS. The population for this cross-sectional descriptive study consisted of all community pharmacists in Iowa. Data collection occurred through a self-administered anonymous mail survey. Two surveys each were mailed to 500 pharmacies selected through a stratified random sample, 1 survey for the pharmacy manager and 1 survey for a staff pharmacist if applicable. Descriptive statistics and scale reliability were calculated for each of the 4 TPB scales (attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention). Linear regression was used to predict intent as a function of the other 3 TPB factors, demographic factors, experience, and type of pharmacy. Out of 212 surveys received, 203 had usable data. The usable response rate ranged from 21% to 41%. Pharmacists' intent to provide MTMS was generally positive but varied in strength with a mean score of 22.47 (+/-4.00) and a range of 7-30. Pharmacists mostly agreed that they had appropriate training to provide MTMS but lacked time and support. The linear regression analysis found the constructs of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control to be significant predictors of intent (P<.05). Pharmacists with stronger intent to provide MTMS were those who felt they had more control over providing MTMS, felt their peers approved of the provision of MTMS, and had a positive attitude about providing MTMS. Type of pharmacy

  7. Medical management of canine and feline dystocia.

    PubMed

    Pretzer, S D

    2008-08-01

    When dystocia is diagnosed in the bitch or queen, two forms of treatment exist: medical or surgical therapy. Medical management of dystocia has the advantage of aiding completion of the parturition process without surgery or anesthesia. However, since not all cases of dystocia can be managed medically, educated and careful decision making is required prior to instituting medical management in cases of dystocia. Improper medical treatment, especially when surgical management is clinically indicated, can result in compromise and even death of the dam and fetuses. This paper focuses on the decision making necessary prior to instituting medical management for cases of dystocia in both bitches and queens, and describes available therapeutics.

  8. Development of an Effective Special Therapy Bed Management System at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    term care of the elderly , health care providers began looking for better bed surfaces for their high risk patients. The search for a pressure relieving...immobile patients at risk for pressure sore development is the role of proper positioning by nursing personnel. The repositioning of patients every...and efficacy of air-fluidized therapy in the treatment of pressure ulcers . Journal of Enterostomal Therapy, 15(6), 247-251. Hargest, T. S., & Artz, C

  9. Improving the economic and humanistic outcomes for diabetic patients: making a case for employer-sponsored medication therapy management

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Sharrel L; Kumar, Jinender; Partha, Gautam; Bechtol, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine the cost savings of a pharmacist-led, employer-sponsored medication therapy management (MTM) program for diabetic patients and to assess for any changes in patient satisfaction and self-reported medication adherence for enrollees. Methods Participants in this study were enrollees of an employer-sponsored MTM program. They were included if their primary medical insurance and prescription coverage was from the City of Toledo, they had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, and whether or not they had been on medication or had been given a new prescription for diabetes treatment. The data were analyzed on a prospective, pre-post longitudinal basis, and tracked for one year following enrollment. Outcomes included economic costs, patient satisfaction, and self-reported patient adherence. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the population, calculate the number of visits, and determine the mean costs for each visit. Friedman’s test was used to determine changes in outcomes due to the nonparametric nature of the data. Results The mean number of visits to a physician’s office decreased from 10.22 to 7.07. The mean cost of these visits for patients increased from $47.70 to $66.41, but use of the emergency room and inpatient visits decreased by at least 50%. Employer spending on emergency room visits decreased by $24,214.17 and inpatient visit costs decreased by $166,610.84. Office visit spending increased by $11,776.41. A total cost savings of $179,047.80 was realized by the employer at the end of the program. Significant improvements in patient satisfaction and adherence were observed. Conclusion Pharmacist interventions provided through the employer-sponsored MTM program led to substantial cost savings to the employer with improved patient satisfaction and adherence on the part of employees at the conclusion of the program. PMID:23610526

  10. Comparing the Efficacy of Surgery and Medical Therapy for Pain Management in Endometriosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaichian, Shahla; Kabir, Ali; Mehdizadehkashi, Adolfazl; Rahmani, Khaled; Moghimi, Mehrdad; Moazzami, Bahram

    2017-03-01

    Pain is considered as one of the main symptoms of endometriosis. The treatment for endometriosis remains controversial. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of medical or surgical treatments for pain-relief in patients with endometriosis. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Published papers about evaluating pain treatment in endometriosis in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. After searching all studies evaluating pain treatment in endometriosis in PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar, there were 23 related studies, containing 1,847 patients enrolled in our study. We used a variety of tests: fixed and random effects models, Q Cochrane test and I2 index, Egger and Begg tests, forest and funnel plots, Trim and fill method, and meta-regression in our analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in pain improvement between surgical and medical treatment. Interestingly, pain relief was more prominent longer after treatment. Both clinical trials and cross sectional studies showed higher improvement in pain than cohort studies. High quality studies and lower body mass index (BMI) had a greater effect on pain relief. All studies were heterogeneous, but there was no publication bias. There was a higher probability of risk of bias in blinding, random sequence generation, and selective outcome reporting in clinical trial studies entered in our meta-analysis. Our results could not demonstrate the preference of each medical or surgical treatment effect for dysmenorrhea in endometriosis. Additional data is required before a standardized medical protocol can be offered, but we believe this study may encourage clinicians to consider a less invasive alternative for treating their patients' chronic pelvic pain in the near future.Key words: Endometriosis, pain, meta-analysis, therapy, disease management.

  11. A Randomized, Controlled Pragmatic Trial of Telephonic Medication Therapy Management to Reduce Hospitalization in Home Health Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zillich, Alan J; Snyder, Margie E; Frail, Caitlin K; Lewis, Julie L; Deshotels, Donny; Dunham, Patrick; Jaynes, Heather A; Sutherland, Jason M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) service on reducing hospitalizations among home health patients. Setting Forty randomly selected, geographically diverse home health care centers in the United States. Design Two-stage, randomized, controlled trial with 60-day follow-up. All Medicare- insured home health care patients were eligible to participate. Twenty-eight consecutive patients within each care center were recruited and randomized to usual care or MTM intervention. The MTM intervention consisted of the following: (1) initial phone call by a pharmacy technician to verify active medications; (2) pharmacist-provided medication regimen review by telephone; and (3) follow-up pharmacist phone calls at day seven and as needed for 30 days. The primary outcome was 60-day all-cause hospitalization. Data Collection Data were collected from in-home nursing assessments using the OASIS-C. Multivariate logistic regression modeled the effect of the MTM intervention on the probability of hospitalization while adjusting for patients’ baseline risk of hospitalization, number of medications taken daily, and other OASIS-C data elements. Principal Findings A total of 895 patients (intervention n = 415, control n = 480) were block-randomized to the intervention or usual care. There was no significant difference in the 60-day probability of hospitalization between the MTM intervention and control groups (Adjusted OR: 1.26, 95 percent CI: 0.89–1.77, p = .19). For patients within the lowest baseline risk quartile (n = 232), the intervention group was three times more likely to remain out of the hospital at 60 days (Adjusted OR: 3.79, 95 percent CI: 1.35–10.57, p = .01) compared to the usual care group. Conclusions This MTM intervention may not be effective for all home health patients; however, for those patients with the lowest-risk profile, the MTM intervention prevented patients from being hospitalized at 60 days. PMID

  12. Assessment of biophysical therapy in the management of pain in current medical practice compared with ibuprofen and placebo: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Foletti, A; Baron, P; Sclauzero, E; Bucci, G; Rinaudo, A; Rocco, R

    2014-01-01

    Pain management is a daily part of current medical practice. The aim of this pilot study was to assess the efficacy of a biophysical procedure (Med Select 729) compared to a usual pain killer drug (Ibuprofen), and to placebo in order to disclose some effective procedures to be employed especially in elderly people with multiple comorbidities, in patients with allergy to chemical drugs or previous side effects, in non-responders to usual medications, and in chronic diseases to reduce overload. A total of 66 patients were divided in 3 groups. After one week of biophysical therapy they showed similar effect to ibuprofen and after one month the statistical significance was achieved with p less than 0.02 in comparison to placebo. We conclude that biophysical therapy was shown to be an effective and safe procedure for the management of pain in current medical practice.

  13. Evaluation of Prescriber Responses to Pharmacist Recommendations Communicated by Fax in a Medication Therapy Management Program (MTMP)

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Prasadini N.; Guy, Mignonne C.; Sweaney, Ashley M.; Boesen, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND As defined by the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, medication therapy management programs (MTMPs) must be designed to decrease adverse drug events and improve patient outcomes by promoting appropriate medication use. WellPoint Inc. contracted with the pharmacist-run University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Medication Management Center (UA MMC) to provide a pilot telephone-based MTMP to approximately 5,000 high-risk beneficiaries from among its nearly 2 million Medicare prescription drug plan (PDP) beneficiaries. Eligibility for the program was determined by a minimum of 2 of 6 chronic diseases (dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; at least 1 of the latter 2 diseases must be present), at least 3 Part-D covered medications, and greater than $4,000 per year in predicted drug spending. In addition to these criteria, WellPoint Inc. used the Johns Hopkins adjusted clinical groups (ACG) predictive model to identify the high-risk beneficiaries to be enrolled in the program. Medication therapy reviews were conducted for these patients. If any medication-related problems (MRPs) were identified, the patient’s prescribers were contacted via a fax communication with recommendation(s) to resolve these MRPs. The UA MMC fax interventions were categorized as cost saving, guideline adherence, or safety concerns. OBJECTIVES To (a) determine prescriber responses to pharmacist-initiated recommendations in an MTMP for the 3 intervention categories, (b) compare prescriber responses between intervention categories, and (c) compare prescriber response by prescriber type (primary care physician [PCP] vs. specialist) within each intervention category. METHODS A retrospective analysis of pharmacist-initiated interventions from August through December 2008 was performed using data collected from the UA MMC database. Data were collected on

  14. Evaluation of prescriber responses to pharmacist recommendations communicated by fax in a medication therapy management program (MTMP).

    PubMed

    Perera, Prasadini N; Guy, Mignonne C; Sweaney, Ashley M; Boesen, Kevin P

    2011-06-01

    As defined by the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003, medication therapy management programs (MTMPs) must be designed to decrease adverse drug events and improve patient outcomes by promoting appropriate medication use. WellPoint Inc. contracted with the pharmacist-run University of Arizona College of Pharmacy Medication Management Center (UA MMC) to provide a pilot telephone-based MTMP to approximately 5,000 high-risk beneficiaries from among its nearly 2 million Medicare prescription drug plan (PDP) beneficiaries. Eligibility for the program was determined by a minimum of 2 of 6 chronic diseases (dyslipidemia, cardiovascular disease, depression, diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; at least 1 of the latter 2 diseases must be present), at least 3 Part-D covered medications, and greater than $4,000 per year in predicted drug spending. In addition to these criteria, WellPoint Inc. used the Johns Hopkins adjusted clinical groups (ACG) predictive model to identify the high-risk beneficiaries to be enrolled in the program. Medication therapy reviews were conducted for these patients. If any medication-related problems (MRPs) were identified, the patient's prescribers were contacted via a fax communication with recommendation(s) to resolve these MRPs. The UA MMC fax interventions were categorized as cost saving, guideline adherence, or safety concerns. To (a) determine prescriber responses to pharmacist-initiated recommendations in an MTMP for the 3 intervention categories, (b) compare prescriber responses between intervention categories, and (c) compare prescriber response by prescriber type (primary care physician [PCP] vs. specialist) within each intervention category. A retrospective analysis of pharmacist-initiated interventions from August through December 2008 was performed using data collected from the UA MMC database. Data were collected on intervention category (cost saving

  15. Effect of an Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience on Medication Therapy Management Services in a Centralized Retail Pharmacy Program.

    PubMed

    Vande Griend, Joseph P; Rodgers, Melissa; Nuffer, Wesley

    2017-05-01

    Medication therapy management (MTM) delivery is increasingly important in managed care. Successful delivery positively affects patient health and improves Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services star ratings, a measure of health plan quality. As MTM services continue to grow, there is an increased need for efficient and effective care models. The primary objectives of this project were to describe the delivery of MTM services by fourth-year Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) students in a centralized retail pharmacy system and to evaluate and quantify the clinical and financial contributions of the students. The secondary objective was to describe the engagement needed to complete comprehensive medication reviews (CMRs) and targeted interventions. From May 2015 to December 2015, thirty-five APPE students from the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy provided MTM services at Albertsons Companies using the OutcomesMTM and Mirixa platforms. Students delivered patient care services by phone at the central office and provided face-to-face visits at pharmacies in the region. With implementation of the MTM APPE in 2015, the team consisted of 2 MTM pharmacists and pharmacy students, as compared with 1 MTM pharmacist in 2014. The number of CMRs and targeted interventions completed and the estimated additional revenue generated during the 2015 time period were compared with those completed from May through December 2014. The patient and provider engagement needed to complete the CMRs and targeted interventions was summarized. 125 CMRs and 1,918 targeted interventions were billed in 2015, compared with 13 CMRs and 767 targeted interventions in 2014. An estimated $16,575-$49,272 of additional revenue was generated in 2015. To complete the interventions in 2015, the team engaged in 1,714 CMR opportunities and 4,686 targeted intervention opportunities. In this MTM rotation, students provided real-life care to patients, resulting in financial and clinical

  16. Polymyositis: Medical Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... email share facebook twitter google plus linkedin Medical Management Polymyositis (PM) is a highly treatable disease. Some ... works Comments corticosteroids prednisone tablets (Deltasone); intravenous methylprednisolone sodium succinate (Solu-Medrol) Dampens inflammation and immune response ...

  17. A new progestogen-only medical therapy for outpatient management of acute, abnormal uterine bleeding: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ammerman, Stacy R; Nelson, Anita L

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study short-term efficacy and feasibility of a new progestogen-only treatment for outpatient management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding. This was a prospective, single-arm, pilot clinical trial of a progestogen-only bridging treatment for acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant, premenopausal women in the Gynecologic Urgent Care Clinic at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Subjects were administered a depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscular injection and given medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg to be taken orally every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measures included a percentage of women who stopped bleeding in 5 days, time to bleeding cessation, reduction in numbers of pads used, side effects, and patient satisfaction. All 48 women stopped bleeding within 5 days; 4 women had spotting only at the time of their last contact during the 5 day follow-up. Mean time to bleeding cessation was 2.6 days. Side effects were infrequent and patient satisfaction was high. Injection of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscularly combined with 3 days of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg every 8 hours for 9 doses is an effective outpatient therapy for acute abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparison of nifedipine and tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy for the management of lower ureteral stones without ESWL

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dehong; Yang, Lu; Liu, Liangren; Yuan, Haichao; Qian, Shenqiang; Lv, Xiao; Han, Pin; Wei, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Administration of nifedipine or tamsulosin has been suggested to augment stone expulsion rates. We aimed to compare the stone expulsion rates and adverse effects associated with the use of nifedipine or tamsulosin as medical expulsive therapy (MET) for the management of lower ureteral stones (LUS) without extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) via a literature review and meta-analysis. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from the Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL, and Google Scholar databases. Finally, a total of 7 RCTs with 3897 patients were included. Our meta-analysis showed that tamsulosin could significantly increase the stone expulsion rate relative to nifedipine in patients with LUS (random-effects model; risk ratio [RR] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75–0.88; P < 0.00001). The subgroup analysis indicated no statistically significant difference between the drugs with regard to minor or major adverse effects (fixed-effect model; RR = 1.19, 95% CI = 0.91–1.54, P = 0.20; and RR = 1.63, 95% CI = 0.22–11.82, P = 0.63, respectively). This meta-analysis demonstrated that tamsulosin was more effective than nifedipine in patients with LUS, as evidenced by the higher stone expulsion rate. Tamsulosin treatment should therefore be considered for patients with LUS. PMID:24919112

  19. Medical waste management plan.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; VanderNoot, Victoria A.

    2004-12-01

    This plan describes the process for managing research generated medical waste at Sandia National Laboratories/California. It applies to operations at the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL), Building 968, and other biosafety level 1 or 2 activities at the site. It addresses the accumulation, storage, treatment and disposal of medical waste and sharps waste. It also describes the procedures to comply with regulatory requirements and SNL policies applicable to medical waste.

  20. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 3: oral therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-12-01

    Parts 1 and 2 of this 3-part series provided an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women and reviewed the role of proper skin care and topical therapies in this patient population. In Part 3, oral therapies including combination oral contraceptives, spironolactone, antibiotics, and isotretinoin are discussed along with important considerations that clinicians should keep in mind when selecting oral agents for management of AV in adult women.

  1. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  2. Medical therapy, calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruml, L. A.; Pearle, M. S.; Pak, C. Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of diagnostic protocols that identify specific risk factors for calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis has led to the formulation of directed medical regimens that are aimed at correcting the underlying metabolic disturbances. Initiation of these treatment programs has reduced markedly the rate of stone formation in the majority of patients who form stones. This article discusses the rationale that underlies the choice of medical therapy for the various pathophysiologic causes of calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and the appropriate use of available medications.

  3. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Hanauer, S B

    2000-07-01

    Last year was not a banner year for developments in medical therapy for ulcerative colitis. In contrast to the expansion of therapies for Crohn disease, treatment for ulcerative colitis was evolutionary, at best, leading many patients to seek alternative medical approaches. Nevertheless, there have been advances in the application of aminosalicylates and immune modifiers for ulcerative colitis. Additional, nonconventional approaches include nicotine, probiotics, dietary therapies, and heparins. Several novel approaches have arisen from animal models, including additional means of inhibiting nuclear factor-kappaB and targeting of tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

  4. Medical Yoga Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for strengthening the body, medical yoga also incorporates appropriate breathing techniques, mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness, depression and anxiety. PMID:28208599

  5. Mycetoma medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Oliverio; Al-Abdely, Hail Mater; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar; Fahal, Ahmed Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma.

  6. Mycetoma Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Medical treatment of mycetoma depends on its fungal or bacterial etiology. Clinically, these entities share similar features that can confuse diagnosis, causing a lack of therapeutic response due to inappropriate treatment. This review evaluates the response to available antimicrobial agents in actinomycetoma and the current status of antifungal drugs for treatment of eumycetoma. PMID:25330342

  7. Medical management of autism.

    PubMed

    De Ocampo, Anna C; Jacobs, Jeannine M

    2006-10-01

    The primary care physician should be knowledgeable about the medical issues that children with ASD encounter and also be aware of available treatment options. Included among these are: identification of seizures, treatment of sleep problems, aggressive management of chronic constipation and GERD as well as timely referral for preventive dental care. Due to the scarcity of sub-specialists (Pediatric Neurologist, Developmental Pediatrician, Child Psychiatrist/ Psychologist) managing children with ASD, the primary care physician should likewise be familiar with medication options for challenging behaviors. More importantly, there needs to be a close collaboration and communication between the family, the sub-specialist and the child's primary care physician.

  8. Mapping the route to medication therapy management documentation and billing standardization and interoperabilility within the health care system: meeting proceedings.

    PubMed

    Millonig, Marsha K

    2009-01-01

    To convene a diverse group of stakeholders to discuss medication therapy management (MTM) documentation and billing standardization and its interoperability within the health care system. More than 70 stakeholders from pharmacy, health information systems, insurers/payers, quality, and standard-setting organizations met on October 7-8, 2008, in Bethesda, MD. The American Pharmacists Association (APhA) organized the invitational conference to facilitate discussion on strategic directions for meeting current market need for MTM documentation and billing interoperability and future market needs for MTM integration into electronic health records (EHRs). APhA recently adopted policy that specifically addresses technology barriers and encourages the use and development of standardized systems for the documentation and billing of MTM services. Day 1 of the conference featured six foundational presentations on health information technology (HIT) trends, perspectives on MTM from the profession and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, health care quality and medication-related outcome measures, integrating MTM workflow in EHRs, and the current state of MTM operalization in practice. After hearing presentations on day 1 and having the opportunity to pose questions to each speaker, conference participants were divided into three breakout groups on day 2. Each group met three times for 60 minutes each and discussed five questions from the perspective of a patient, provider, or payer. Three facilitators met with each of the groups and led discussion from one perspective (i.e., patient, provider, payer). Participants then reconvened as a complete group to participate in a discussion on next steps. HIT is expected to assist in delivering safe, effective, efficient, coordinated care as health professionals strive to improve the quality of care and outcomes for individual patients. The pharmacy profession is actively contributing to quality patient care through MTM services

  9. Guide to conservative, medical, and procedural therapies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, R I; Chopra, P; Upshur, C

    2001-11-01

    For patients without a specific diagnosis, treatment of low back pain begins with strategies to avoid re-injury and exacerbation. Most patients benefit from some form of medical therapy, guided by the three-step World Health Organization analgesic ladder. Opioid therapy is appropriate when needed for low back pain, especially in the acute period. Adjuvant medication (eg, an anticonvulsant or antidepressant) may help reduce or eliminate the need for opioid therapy. Side effects are common with opioid medications, although many resolve with time. Patient education in exercise, back protection, nutrition, and sexual concerns is an important component of treatment. Some patients may benefit from referral to a pain center for multidisciplinary management. Those with a structural or mechanical cause of pain may do well with surgery.

  10. Medical therapy for spermatogenic failure

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Stahl, Peter J; Schlegel, Peter N

    2012-01-01

    Medical treatment of men with primary spermatogenic failure remains largely ineffective in contrast to those with secondary testicular failure. Treatment has been attempted with a multitude of agents ranging from hormones to nutritional supplements (antioxidants). While some studies have demonstrated benefit to some treatments, no treatments have consistently demonstrated efficacy nor has it been possible to reliably identify patients likely to benefit. Idiopathic spermatogenic failure likely results from multiple discrete defects in sperm production that are as yet unidentified. A better understanding of these defects will yield more effective treatment options and appropriate triage of patients to specific therapeutic regimens. This review focuses on the rationale and current evidence for hormonal and antioxidant therapy in medical treatment of male infertility, spermatogenic failure in particular. Although empiric medical therapy for spermatogenic failure has been largely replaced by assisted reproductive techniques, both treatment modalities could play a role, perhaps as combination therapy. PMID:22179517

  11. Evaluation of medication therapy management services for patients with cardiovascular disease in a self-insured employer health plan.

    PubMed

    Wittayanukorn, Saranrat; Westrick, Salisa C; Hansen, Richard A; Billor, Nedret; Braxton-Lloyd, Kimberly; Fox, Brent I; Garza, Kimberly B

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in the United States, representing the highest total expenditures among major diseases. To improve CVD-associated outcomes, medication therapy management (MTM) services have been included in essential health benefit packages offered by various health plans. Nevertheless, the impact of such MTM services on outcomes is still unclear, especially from the perspective of the self-insured employer.  To (a) compare economic outcomes between patients who received and those who did not receive MTM services from the self-insured employer's perspective and (b) compare clinical outcomes before and after receiving MTM services.  This study consisted of 2 pre- and post-retrospective designs: (1) a cohort study with comparison groups and (2) a cohort study within group comparison. Patients were beneficiaries aged 19 years or older who were diagnosed with CVD conditions according to ICD-9-CM codes and continuously enrolled in a public university-sponsored insurance plan between 2008-2010. Patients were divided into MTM and non-MTM groups. The first MTM encounter was assigned as the index date for the MTM group. Match-paired patients who did not receive MTM services were randomly assigned the index date based on age category, gender, and comorbidity. Measures for pharmacy, medical, and total expenditures were obtained from medical and pharmacy claims. Paired t-tests and independent t-tests using data generated from 1000 bootstraps compared mean cost difference within and between groups. The return on investment (ROI) was calculated by dividing the average net benefit from MTM services by the average cost of MTM services. Clinical parameters, including blood pressure (BP) and body mass index (BMI), were retrieved from electronic medical records from a pharmacist-provided clinic where MTM services took place. Paired-t tests were used to compare the mean difference between baseline and endpoint values. Further, this study

  12. Long-term medical management of primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension in the UK: optimizing cost-effectiveness and clinic resources by minimizing therapy switches.

    PubMed

    Orme, Michelle; Collins, Sarah; Loftus, Jane

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to assess the long-term economic consequences of the medical management of glaucoma in the UK. The economic evaluation was conducted using the results from a 10-year Markov model based around 3 key triggers for a switch in medical therapy for glaucoma, namely: lack of tolerance (using hyperemia as a proxy); intraocular pressure (IOP) not meeting treatment benchmark; and glaucoma progression. Clinical data from a comprehensive systematic literature review and meta-analysis were used. Direct costs associated with glaucoma treatment are considered (at 2008/9 prices) from the perspective of the UK NHS as payer (outpatient/secondary care setting). Using this model, the economic consequences of 3 prostaglandin-based treatment sequences were compared. Drug acquisition costs account for around 8% to 13% of the total cost of glaucoma and, if ophthalmologist visits are included, amount to approximately £0.80 to £0.90 per day of medical therapy. The total long-term costs of all prostaglandin strategies are similar because of a shift in resources: increased drug costs are offset by fewer clinic visits to instigate treatment switches, and by avoiding surgery or costs associated with managing low vision. Under the latanoprost-based strategy, patients would have longer intervals between the need to switch therapies, which is largely due to a reduction in hyperemia, seen as a proxy for tolerance. This leads to a delay in glaucoma progression of 12 to 13 months. For every 1000 clinic appointments, 719 patients can be managed for 1 year with a latanoprost-based strategy compared with 586 or 568 with a bimatoprost or travoprost-based strategy. Drug acquisition costs are not a key driver of the total cost of glaucoma management and the cost of medical therapy is offset by avoiding the cost of managing low vision. Economic models of glaucoma should include the long-term consequences of treatment as these will affect cost-effectiveness. This analysis supports the

  13. Effectiveness of a Clinical Pharmacist Medication Therapy Management Program in Discontinuation of Drugs to Avoid in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Caffiero, Nicole; Delate, Thomas; Ehizuelen, Mercy D; Vogel, Kris

    2017-05-01

    Despite evidence of fall risk associated with some drugs to avoid in the elderly (DAEs), many aged patients continue to receive them. To assess the effectiveness of a clinical pharmacist medication therapy management program (MTM) on discontinuation of prescribed DAEs. This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at an integrated health care delivery system. Kaiser Permanente Colorado beneficiaries aged ≥65 years who were MTM-eligible and targeted for a DAE dispensing between 01/01/2015 and 09/30/2015 were included in the observation group. Medicare beneficiaries who were not eligible for MTM but had a targeted DAE dispensing during the same time period were included in the control group. The percentage of patients with another DAE dispensing of the same specified medication (no matter the strength) during the 100 days following index DAE dispensing was assessed. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted. A total of 9,059 Medicare beneficiaries were included, with 226 beneficiaries in the MTM group and 8,833 beneficiaries in the non-MTM group. Beneficiaries were primarily female and white and had a high burden of chronic disease. The percentages of patients with another dispensing of the specified DAE were 7.1% (95% CI = 3.7%-10.4%) for the MTM beneficiaries and 35.3% (95% CI 34.2%-36.2%) for the non-MTM beneficiaries (P < 0.001). The OR for the MTM group to have received another dispensing of the specified DAE was 0.12 (95% CI = 0.08-0.22) with adjustment for potential confounders. A clinical pharmacist-provided MTM intervention was associated with decreased DAE dispensing in Medicare beneficiaries. Future studies should evaluate means to further decrease DAE use in the aged. This study was funded by the Kaiser Permanente Colorado Pharmacy Department. The funder had no role in the study design, collection, analysis and interpretation of data, writing of the report, or the decision to submit the manuscript for publication. Delate

  14. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGISTS AND AMERICAN COLLEGE OF ENDOCRINOLOGY DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: MANAGEMENT OF ACROMEGALY PATIENTS: WHAT IS THE ROLE OF PRE-OPERATIVE MEDICAL THERAPY?

    PubMed

    Fleseriu, Maria; Hoffman, Andrew R; Katznelson, Laurence

    2015-06-01

    Acromegaly is a complex disease characterized by growth hormone (GH) excess originating in most cases from a pituitary tumor. The goals of treatment include removing the tumor or reducing tumor burden, normalizing GH secretion and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels, and preserving normal pituitary function if possible. Surgery by an experienced neurosurgeon is still considered first-line therapy, especially in cases with small tumors. In the last few decades, significant progress in the development of selective pharmacologic agents has greatly facilitated the management of active acromegaly, with agents such as somatostatin-receptor ligands (SRLs), GH-receptor antagonists, and dopamine agonists. In addition to adjuvant treatment, pre-operative medical therapy and primary therapy in de novo patients are increasingly employed. A United States National Library of Medicine PubMed search (through July 2014) was conducted for the following terms: acromegaly, pre-operative medical therapy, somatostatin-receptor ligands, and somatostatin analogs. Articles not in English and those not in peer-reviewed journals were excluded. In reviewing pertinent articles, focus was placed on biochemical and other postoperative outcomes of medical therapy. An analysis of the full effect of pre-operative use of SRLs on surgical outcomes (remission rates and peri-operative complications) is limited by heterogeneity of methodology, low overall surgical cure rates, and different study designs. The assumption that SRL use prior to surgery reduces peri-operative surgical risk has yet to be proven. A variable degree of tumor shrinkage with preoperative SRLs is observed. Likewise, SRL treatment 3 months before surgery may improve surgical remission rates in the short term; however, positive results do not persist in the long term. We consider that medical therapy before surgery could play a role in carefully selected patients, but treatment should be individualized. Primary medical therapy with a

  15. BC Medication Management Project

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Natalie; Tsao, Nicole; Gastonguay, Louise; Lynd, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Background: The BC Medication Management Project (BCMMP) was developed by the BC Ministry of Health and the BC Pharmacy Association. This pilot project ran from September 2010 to January 2012. Pharmacists reviewed patients’ medication histories, discussed best use of medications, provided education and monitored for adverse effects, developed a plan to deal with medication issues and created a best possible medication history. Methods: To evaluate the experience of participating in the BCMMP, challenges and strengths of the project and the alignment of these experiences with the overarching goals, focus groups and interviews were conducted with 6 stakeholder groups. Themes were compared within and across stakeholder type and descriptively analyzed. Results: A total of 88 people participated in the focus groups/interviews. Pharmacists stated that providing BCMMP services was professionally satisfying and concurred with patients that the service did benefit them. However, participating in the BCMMP was not seen as financially sustainable by pharmacy owners, and there were concerns about patient selection. Physicians expressed concerns about increased workload associated with the BCMMP, for which they were not compensated. The computer system and burden of documentation were identified as the greatest problems. Conclusions: The BCMMP pilot project was enthusiastically received by pharmacists and patients who felt that it benefited patients and moved the pharmacy profession in a positive direction. It was widely felt that the BCMMP could be successful and sustainable if the identified challenges are addressed. PMID:25983759

  16. Assessment of Assistance in Smoking Cessation Therapy by Pharmacies in Collaboration with Medical Institutions- Implementation of a Collaborative Drug Therapy Management Protocol Based on a Written Agreement between Physicians and Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Fumiyuki; Shinohara, Kuniko; Dobashi, Akira; Amagai, Kenji; Hara, Kazuo; Kurata, Kaori; Iizima, Hideo; Shimakawa, Kiyoshi; Shimada, Masahiko; Abe, Sakurako; Takei, Keiji; Kamei, Miwako

    2016-01-01

    This study built a protocol for drug therapy management (hereinafter "the protocol") that would enable continuous support from the decision making of smoking cessation therapy to the completion of therapy through the collaboration of physicians and community pharmacists, after which we evaluated whether the use of this protocol would be helpful to smoking cessation therapy. This study utilized the "On the Promotion of Team-Based Medical Care", a Notification by the Health Policy Bureau as one of the resources for judgment, and referred to collaborative drug therapy management (CDTM) in the United States. After the implementation of this protocol, the success rate of smoking cessation at the participating medical institutions rose to approximately 70%, approximately 28-point improvement compared to the rate before the implementation. In addition to the benefits of the standard smoking cessation program, this result may have been affected by the intervention of pharmacists, who assisted in continuing cessation by advising to reduce drug dosage as necessary approximately one week after the smoking cessation, when side effects and the urge to smoke tend to occur. Additionally, the awareness survey for the intervention group revealed that all respondents, including patients who failed to quit smoking, answered that they were satisfied to the question on general satisfaction. The question about the reason for successful cessation revealed that the support by pharmacists was as important as, or more important than, that by physicians and nurses. This infers that the pharmacists' active engagement in drug therapy for individual patients was favorably acknowledged.

  17. Status report from the American Acne & Rosacea Society on medical management of acne in adult women, part 2: topical therapies.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Harper, Julie C; Graber, Emmy M; Thiboutot, Diane; Silverberg, Nanette B; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2015-11-01

    In part 1 of this 3-part series, an overview of the epidemiology, visible patterns, and important considerations for clinical and laboratory evaluation of acne vulgaris (AV) in adult women was provided. Proper selection and integration of skin care products is important in the management of AV in this patient population. Part 2 of this series includes a discussion of over-the-counter and prescription topical therapies for adult women with AV. A summary of key randomized controlled trials also is provided. Further well-designed studies are needed, as data on the use of topical agents in this subpopulation are limited.

  18. Medical nutrition therapy is the essential cornerstone for effective treatment of "refractory" severe hypertriglyceridemia regardless of pharmaceutical treatment: Evidence from a Lipid Management Program.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Katherine S; Weintraub, Martha; Marchlewicz, Elizabeth H; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    Patients with refractory severe hypertriglyceridemia are at risk of pancreatitis and cardiovascular disease. The role of individualized nutrition therapy in these patients independent of pharmaceutical treatment has not been documented. To document the effect of nutrition intervention on severe hypertriglyceridemia regardless of medication status or prior nutrition counseling. Outcomes of new patients with triglycerides ≥ 500 mg/dL presenting to a Lipid Management Program over a 6-year period were tracked. Patients received comprehensive laboratory assessment, nutrition assessment, and initiation of an individualized diet intervention before seeing the lipidologist. Clinical and behavioral outcomes were recorded. In all, 168 patients (117 men; mean age, 49.03 ± 11.22 years; body mass index, 32.61 ± 5.85 kg/m(2); 110 (65.5%) on lipid-lowering medications) returned for assessment of nutrition intervention. Triglycerides were reduced from median (interquartile range) 961.5 (611.5-1785.3) to 493.0 (337-736.3) mg/dL (P < .0001 for log transformation of triglycerides). There was no difference in median percentage reduction in triglycerides after nutrition intervention between those not on lipid-lowering medication, on a fibric acid derivative, on other lipid-lowering medication, or on a combination of lipid-lowering medications (P = .376) in a median (interquartile range) of 5 (3-7) weeks. Effect was independent of prior nutrition counseling (P = .260). Reported percentage fat in the diet at second visit correlated with log-transformed triglycerides achieved, independent of initial triglycerides level (r = 0.290; P = .001). Individualized nutrition therapy results in changes in eating behavior and reductions in triglyceride levels in patients with refractory severe hypertriglyceridemia independent of lipid-lowering medication(s) and prior nutrition counseling. Copyright © 2015 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Surgery for endometriosis: beyond medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhbir S; Suen, Michael W H

    2017-03-01

    Endometriosis-associated pelvic pain and subfertility may be managed medically in many cases; however, the surgical management of this insidious disease remains a necessary part of the treatment algorithm. Laparoscopy for diagnosis alone is rarely indicated with the advancements in preoperative imaging. When surgery is performed, the ideal goal would be a therapeutic and effective surgical intervention based on the preoperative evaluation. Surgery for women with pain due to endometriosis may be indicated in patients who cannot or do not wish to take medical therapies; acute surgical or pain events; deep endometriosis; during concomitant management of other gynecologic disorders; and patients seeking fertility with pain. The role of surgery for endometriosis-related subfertility may be considered in those with hydrosalpinges undergoing IVF; management of ovarian endometriomas in specific circumstances; and when a patient requests surgery as an alternative to assisted reproductive technology (ART). Surgery for ovarian endometriomas requires special attention due to the risk of potential harm on future fertility. Finally, a combined approach of surgery followed by postoperative medical therapy offers the best long-term outcomes for recurrence of disease and symptoms. A patient-centered approach and a goal-oriented approach are essential when determining the options for care in this population. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Managing Complex Medication Regimens.

    PubMed

    Harvath, Theresa A; Lindauer, Allison; Sexson, Kathryn

    2017-05-01

    : This article is the first in a series, Supporting Family Caregivers: No Longer Home Alone, published in collaboration with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Results of focus groups conducted as part of the AARP Public Policy Institute's No Longer Home Alone video project supported evidence that family caregivers aren't being given the information they need to manage the complex care regimens of their family members. This series of articles and accompanying videos aims to help nurses provide caregivers with the tools they need to manage their family member's medications. Each article explains the principles nurses should consider and reinforce with caregivers and is accompanied by a video for the caregiver to watch. The first video can be accessed at http://links.lww.com/AJN/A74.

  1. Medical Nutrition Therapy Is Effective in the Management of Hypoglycemia Caused by Insulin Antibodies: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongrong; Mao, Jiangfeng; Yu, Kang; Wang, Lilin; Hu, Mingming; Xu, Lingling

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune antibodies, induced by exogenous insulin preparations, may result in labile glucose control and frequent hypoglycemia in some rare cases. In addition to insulin cessation, immune suppressants and/or plasmapheresis have been used as the primary remedies for these patients. Some previous studies also indicate that the condition tends to remit spontaneously after discontinuation of insulin exposure. Because of this, the clinical importance of nutritional interventions and behavioral approaches, which may play a role in ameliorating the symptoms, should also be emphasized. Herein, we report on a 64-year-old man with hypoglycemia induced by insulin antibodies (IAs), whose hypoglycemic symptoms significantly improved after the implementation of nutrition therapy. This rare case expands our knowledge of the management of hypoglycemia, and for the first time highlights the significance of nutritional and lifestyle intervention in treatment of IA-induced hypoglycemia.

  2. Acne vulgaris in the context of complex medical co-morbities: the management of severe acne vulgaris in a female with retinitis pigmentosa - utilizing pulse dye laser in conjunction with medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Shariff, Ayesha; Keck, Laura; Zlotoff, Barrett

    2014-03-17

    Acne vulgaris is a pervasive inflammatory disorder of the skin, with multiple etiologies and treatment options. Although first-line therapies exist, it is often the case that a patient will present with an underlying disorder that prohibits the use of most currently accepted treatment modalities. We present a patient with severe acne vulgaris and a history of retinitis pigmentosa who was treated with 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser therapy, in conjunction with therapeutic alternatives to first-line acne medications. Our patient exhibited a significant and sustained improvement with the combined use of 595 nanometer pulsed dye laser, Yaz (drospirenone-ethinyl estradiol), dapsone, topical metronidazole, sodium-sulfacetamide wash, and topical azelaic acid. The positive results in this case, suggest that this combined treatment modality may serve as an example of a safe and effective treatment alternative in the management of acne vulgaris complicated by medical co-morbidities that contraindicate the use of most first-line treatment options.

  3. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  4. Medical management of adult transsexual persons.

    PubMed

    Knezevich, Emily L; Viereck, Laura K; Drincic, Andjela T

    2012-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), or transsexualism, is an increasingly recognized medical condition with an expanding body of medical literature to support the use of established therapeutic guidelines. Transsexualism can be effectively managed through exogenous cross-sex hormone administration used to induce development of desired sex characteristics, as well as use of other agents, such as aldosterone antagonists, aimed at decreasing physical characteristics of the undesired sex. Many complications can arise with the use of the available therapies, and these must be considered before determining the appropriate course of action. This review describes methods, including both pharmacotherapy and surgical interventions, for effective medical management of both male and female adults with GID. In addition, specific goals of therapy as well as safety aspects with long-term use of pharmacotherapeutic agents are discussed. This review also discusses some special considerations for treating patients with significant, yet common, comorbid diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, and viral hepatitis, as these conditions may complicate the clinical course and preclude some patients from using certain therapies. Pharmacist involvement in the management of transsexualism can be extremely beneficial to patients and other health care providers. Pharmacists can help determine the appropriate therapy, optimize dosages, monitor for adverse effects, and educate patients on what to expect during their therapy. Pharmacists should become knowledgeable about guidelines and current literature on transsexualism, understand the monitoring parameters for safe and effective therapy, and establish themselves as partners in the collaborative management of this disorder.

  5. Using disease-state management as the key to promoting employer sponsorship of medical nutrition therapy (continuing education credit).

    PubMed

    Israel, D A; McCabe, M

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to design, implement, and improve a nationwide medical nutrition therapy (MNT) intervention program for nutritionally at-risk employees and their dependents and retirees (hereinafter referred to as clients) with a Fortune 100 company (Texas Instruments, Dallas, Tex) with a dispersed population of 80,000. Preferred Nutrition Therapists (PNT), a network of registered dietitians, with the assistance of the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department, identified International Classification of Diseases, 9th ed (ICD-9), codes for which MNT intervention was appropriate. PNT then negotiated a contract with the Texas Instruments Health Promotion and Benefits Department and implemented clients' self-referral process. The main challenge was to promote utilization of a new service from an outside vendor (PNT) and to measure outcomes in meaningful ways. The goal was to use MNT as a tool to prevent the progression of clients' diseases to states that require more costly treatments. PNT used a continuous quality improvement process to refine the system and improve information gathering and reporting, by providing quarterly reports to the Health Promotion and Benefits Department. These reports summarized the outcomes for all clients seen at least 3 times during the quarter. The cost was less than $0.35 per member per month (less than the employer spent on advertising the program), and 0.5% of the population requested MNT during the first year of implementation (about what was expected for a new carveout benefit).

  6. Medical management of venous ulcers.

    PubMed

    Pascarella, Luigi; Shortell, Cynthia K

    2015-03-01

    Venous disease is the most common cause of chronic leg ulceration and represents an advanced clinical manifestation of venous insufficiency. Due to their frequency and chronicity, venous ulcers have a high socioeconomic impact, with treatment costs accounting for 1% of the health care budget in Western countries. The evaluation of patients with venous ulcers should include a thorough medical history for prior deep venous thrombosis, assessment for an hypercoagulable state, and a physical examination. Use of the CEAP (clinical, etiology, anatomy, pathophysiology) Classification System and the revised Venous Clinical Severity Scoring System is strongly recommended to characterize disease severity and assess response to treatment. This venous condition requires lifestyle modification, with affected individuals performing daily intervals of leg elevation to control edema; use of elastic compression garments; and moderate physical activity, such as walking wearing below-knee elastic stockings. Meticulous skin care, treatment of dermatitis, and prompt treatment of cellulitis are important aspects of medical management. The pharmacology of chronic venous insufficiency and venous ulcers include essentially two medications: pentoxifylline and phlebotropic agents. The micronized purified flavonoid fraction is an effective adjunct to compression therapy in patients with large, chronic ulceration.

  7. Medical Art Therapy: Defining a Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malchiodi, Cathy A.

    Although art therapy has traditionally focused on the use of art expression in psychotherapy, the practice of medical art therapy has begun to grow rapidly. This paper provides a brief overview of the emerging specialty of medical art therapy and its importance as a counseling tool with people suffering from serious health problems. The paper…

  8. [Discussion on logistics management of medical consumables].

    PubMed

    Deng, Sutong; Wang, Miao; Jiang, Xiali

    2011-09-01

    Management of medical consumables is an important part of modern hospital management. In modern medical behavior, drugs and medical devices act directly on the patient, and are important factors affecting the quality of medical practice. With the increasing use of medical materials, based on practical application, this article proposes the management model of medical consumables, and discusses the essence of medical materials logistics management.

  9. The Asheville Project: long-term clinical, humanistic, and economic outcomes of a community-based medication therapy management program for asthma.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Barry A; Cranor, Carole W

    2006-01-01

    To assess clinical, humanistic, and economic outcomes of a community-based medication therapy management (MTM) program for 207 adult patients with asthma over 5 years. Quasi-experimental, longitudinal pre-post study. 12 pharmacy locations in Asheville, N.C. PATIENTS/OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Patients with asthma covered by two self-insured health plans; professional educator at Mission Hospitals; 18 certificate-trained community and hospital pharmacists. Education by a certified asthma educator; regular long-term follow-up by pharmacists (reimbursed for MTM by health plans) using scheduled consultations, monitoring, and recommendations to physicians. Changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), asthma severity, symptom frequency, the degree to which asthma affected people's lives, presence of an asthma action plan, asthma-related emergency department/hospital events, and changes in asthma-related costs over time. All objective and subjective measures of asthma control improved and were sustained for as long as 5 years. FEV1 and severity classification improved significantly. The proportion of patients with asthma action plans increased from 63% to 99%. Patients with emergency department visits decreased from 9.9% to 1.3%, and hospitalizations from 4.0% to 1.9%. Spending on asthma medications increased; however, asthma-related medical claims decreased and total asthma-related costs were significantly lower than the projections based on the study population's historical trends. Direct cost savings averaged 725 dollars/patient/year, and indirect cost savings were estimated to be 1230 dollars/patient/year. Indirect costs due to missed/nonproductive workdays decreased from 10.8 days/year to 2.6 days/year. Patients were six times less likely to have an emergency department/hospitalization event after program interventions. Patients with asthma who received education and long-term medication therapy management services achieved and maintained significant improvements

  10. Comprehensive Medical Management of Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Rosacea is a common inflammatory facial dermatosis seen in adults that exhibits considerable variety in clinical presentation. Multiple medical therapeutic options are available including topical and oral treatments. Optimal medical management of rosacea includes assessment of subtype and disease severity and use of appropriate skin care to reduce epidermal barrier dysfunction. This article provides an overall discussion of the medical management of rosacea and reviews interim results from a study evaluating the role of designated skin care in rosacea treatment. PMID:21103305

  11. Medication management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Slipp, Marlene; Burnham, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Background: The prevalence of chronic pain is high and increasing. Medication management is an important component of chronic pain management. There is a shortage of physicians who are available and comfortable providing this service. In Alberta, pharmacists have been granted an advanced scope of practice. Given this empowerment, their availability, training and skill set, pharmacists are well positioned to play an expanded role in the medication management of chronic pain sufferers. Objective: To compare the effectiveness and cost of a physician-only vs a pharmacist-physician team model of medication management for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers. Method: Data was analyzed for 89 patients who had received exclusively medication management at a rural Alberta multidisciplinary clinic. 56 were managed by a sole physician. 33 were managed by a team (pharmacist + physician). In the team model, the physician did the medical assessment, diagnosis, and established a treatment plan in consultation with the patient and pharmacist. The pharmacist then provided the ongoing follow-up including education, dose titration and side effect management and consulted with the physician as needed. Change in pain (Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Pain Interference Questionnaire) over the course of treatment were recorded. The treatment duration and number of visits were used to calculate cost of care. Results: Both models of medication management resulted in significant and comparable improvements in pain, disability and patient perception of medication effectiveness. Patients in the physician-only group were seen more frequently and at a greater cost. The pharmacist-physician team approach was markedly more cost-effective, and patients expressed a high level of satisfaction with their medication management. Conclusions: The pharmacist-physician team model of medication management results in significant reductions of pain and disability for chronic nonmalignant pain sufferers

  12. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  13. Physical therapy modalities in management of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Gur, Ali

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) is uncertain and the prognosis for symptomatic recovery is generally poor. A wide variety of interventions are used in the management of FM. There is, however, no clear consensus on the treatment of choice and FM remains relatively refractory to treatment. Therefore, prevention, causal therapy and rehabilitation are not possible. FM patients frequently use alternative therapies, indicating dissatisfaction or ineffectiveness of traditional medical therapy. Alternative therapies are generally perceived to be more "natural" and as a result, to have fewer adverse effects. Despite the positive results found, the number of publications related to the application of physical therapy modalities such as acupuncture, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, laser, biofeedback, electrotherapy and magnetic field is still scant, especially concerning FM treatment. The demonstration of a long-term effective intervention for managing the symptoms associated with FM is needed. Multidisciplinary approaches to management include physical and medical therapeutic strategies. Treatment modalities should be individualised for patients based on target symptoms and impairment in functioning. Patience and positive attitude on part of the physician and active involvement of patients and their families in treatment are likely to enhance improvement. It can be concluded that there is a need for larger, more systematic and methodologically sound randomised controlled clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of physical therapy modalities of managing FM. We will review some of the existing studies of physical therapy relevant in the treatment of FM and give some practical advice for their use.

  14. Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy. Management of serious infections. Part I: Medical, socioeconomic, and legal issues. Legal issues.

    PubMed

    Lawton, S E

    1993-06-01

    The tremendous growth of outpatient services has spurred closer legal scrutiny of patient referrals to physician-owned companies (self-referral). Federal "safe harbor" regulations protect certain arrangements, but much of the law remains vague. Future legislation is likely to be more specific, however. Physicians should obtain legal counsel before entering into any ownership or investment opportunities in home infusion therapy.

  15. The Asheville Project: clinical and economic outcomes of a community-based long-term medication therapy management program for hypertension and dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Bunting, Barry A; Smith, Benjamin H; Sutherland, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    Assess clinical and economic outcomes of a community-based, long-term medication therapy management (MTM) program for hypertension (HTN)/dyslipidemia. Quasi-experimental, longitudinal, pre-post study. 12 community and hospital pharmacy clinics in Asheville, N.C., over a 6-year period from 2000 through 2005. Patients covered by two self-insured health plans; educators at Mission Hospitals; 18 certificate-trained pharmacists. Cardiovascular or cerebrovascular (collectively abbreviated as CV) risk reduction education; regular, long-term follow-up by pharmacists (reimbursed by health plans) using scheduled consultations, monitoring, and recommendations to physicians. Clinical and economic parameters. Sufficient data were available for 620 patients in the financial cohort and 565 patients in clinical cohort. Several indicators of cardiovascular health improved over the course of the study: mean systolic blood pressure, from 137.3 to 126.3 mm Hg; mean diastolic blood pressure, from 82.6 to 77.8 mm Hg; percentage of patients at blood pressure goal, from 40.2% to 67.4%; mean low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, from 127.2 to 108.3 mg/dL; percentage of patients at LDL cholesterol goal, from 49.9% to 74.6%; mean total cholesterol, from 211.4 to 184.3 mg/dL; and mean serum triglycerides, from 192.8 to 154.4 mg/dL. Mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol decreased from 48 to 46.6 mg/dL. The CV event rate during the historical period, 77 per 1,000 person-years, declined by almost one-half (38 per 1,000 person-years) during the study period. Mean cost per CV event in the study period was $9,931, compared with $14,343 during the historical period. During the study period, CV medication use increased nearly threefold, but CV-related medical costs decreased by 46.5%. CV-related medical costs decreased from 30.6% of total health care costs to 19%. A 53% decrease in risk of a CV event and greater than 50% decrease in risk of a CV-related emergency department (ED

  16. Evaluation of Eligibility Criteria Used to Identify Patients for Medication Therapy Management Services: A Retrospective Cohort Study in a Medicare Advantage Part D Population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Janet S; Yang, Jianing; Stockl, Karen M; Lew, Heidi; Solow, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    General eligibility criteria used by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to identify patients for medication therapy management (MTM) services include having multiple chronic conditions, taking multiple Part D drugs, and being likely to incur annual drug costs that exceed a predetermined threshold. The performance of these criteria in identifying patients in greatest need of MTM services is unknown. Although there are numerous possible versions of MTM identification algorithms that satisfy these criteria, there are limited data that evaluate the performance of MTM services using eligibility thresholds representative of those used by the majority of Part D sponsors. To (a) evaluate the performance of the 2013 CMS MTM eligibility criteria thresholds in identifying Medicare Advantage Prescription Drug (MAPD) plan patients with at least 2 drug therapy problems (DTPs) relative to alternative criteria threshold levels and (b) identify additional patient risk factors significantly associated with the number of DTPs for consideration as potential future MTM eligibility criteria. All patients in the Medicare Advantage Part D population who had pharmacy eligibility as of December 31, 2013, were included in this retrospective cohort study. Study outcomes included 7 different types of DTPs: use of high-risk medications in the elderly, gaps in medication therapy, medication nonadherence, drug-drug interactions, duplicate therapy, drug-disease interactions, and brand-to-generic conversion opportunities. DTPs were identified for each member based on 6 months of most recent pharmacy claims data and 14 months of most recent medical claims data. Risk factors examined in this study included patient demographics and prior health care utilization in the most recent 6 months. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize patient characteristics and to evaluate unadjusted relationships between the average number of DTPs identified per patient and each risk factor. Quartile

  17. Managing Costs and Medical Information

    Cancer.gov

    People with cancer may face major financial challenges and need help dealing with the high costs of care. Cancer treatment can be very expensive, even when you have insurance. Learn ways to manage medical information, paperwork, bills, and other records.

  18. Medical Information Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  19. Long-term medical management of endometriosis with dienogest and with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and add-back hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Bedaiwy, Mohamed A; Allaire, Catherine; Alfaraj, Sukinah

    2017-03-01

    Endometriosis can recur after either surgical or medical therapy. Long-term medical therapy is implemented to treat symptoms or prevent recurrence. Dienogest and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues with hormone add-back therapy seem to be equally effective for long-term treatment of pain symptoms associated with endometriosis. There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of one therapy over the other. However, add-back hormone therapy (HT) is recommended for patients using GnRH agonists. The treatment selection depends on therapeutic effectiveness, tolerability, drug cost, the physician's experience, and expected patient compliance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect evaluation of an interprofessional medication therapy management approach for multimorbid patients in primary care: a cluster-randomized controlled trial in community care (WestGem study protocol).

    PubMed

    Rose, Olaf; Schaffert, Corinna; Czarnecki, Kathrin; Mennemann, Hugo S; Waltering, Isabel; Hamacher, Stefanie; Felsch, Moritz; Herich, Lena; Köberlein, Juliane

    2015-07-22

    Pharmaceutical practice worldwide is developing towards patient care. Medication Review (MR) and Medication Therapy Management (MTM) are evolving as the most prominent services in pharmaceutical care and have a strong potential to provide a large benefit for patients and society. MTMs can only be performed in an interprofessional, collaborative setting. Several international studies have explored the effects of a MTM on the quality of therapy and costs. For Germany the data is still deficient. This study aims to provide data on the effects of an interprofessional MTM regarding quality of therapy, quality of life, costs and cost-effectiveness. The study is designed as a cluster-randomized controlled trial in primary care, involving 12 outpatient clinics (clusters) and 165 patients. Primary care units are allocated to interventions using a Stepped Wedge Design. All units are initially assigned to the control group. After a 6 month observation period, general practitioners (GP) are randomly allocated to one of three groups and the interprofessional medication therapy management approach is implemented sequentially per each group with a lag of 3 months between. The primary outcome is the change in the quality of therapy measured by the MAI (Medication Appropriateness Index). Secondary outcomes include changes in the number of drug related problems, medication complexity, changes in drug-adherence, changes in health-status and function, quality of life, direct costs and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio. The acceptance of the interprofessional Medication Therapy Management approach is assessed by qualitative methods. The patient interview and brown bag review are activities, typically provided by the pharmacist. In this trial the patient is blinded to the pharmacist. The strength of having the patient blinded to the pharmacists is to exclude skepticism of the patient toward unknown pharmacies, which might be a major confounder in a regional and community setting

  1. Medical evaluation and management of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Semins, Michelle Jo; Matlaga, Brian R

    2010-02-01

    Nephrolithiasis is a highly prevalent condition with a high recurrence rate that has a large impact on the quality of life of those affected. It also poses a great financial burden on society. There have been great advancements in the surgical treatment of stone disease over the past several decades. The evolution of surgical technique appears to have overshadowed the importance of prevention of stone disease despite evidence showing medical therapies significantly decreasing stone recurrence rates. Herein we review the metabolic evaluation of stone formers with the use of specific blood and urine tests. We complete our discussion with a review of the medical management of stone formers providing both general recommendations as well as reviewing focused therapies for specific metabolic abnormalities and medical conditions.

  2. Space Management for Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agro, Dino

    1978-01-01

    A reference on current methods and procedures for managing space in academic medical centers is provided. Focus is on elements of space management systems that can enhance the effectiveness of space allocation decisions. These include: space inventory, space standards, evaluation of space utilization, and space allocation. A bibliography is…

  3. Adjuvant therapy after surgical stone management.

    PubMed

    Ferrandino, Michael N; Monga, Manoj; Preminger, Glenn M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article was to review the most widely researched adjuvant medical therapies for the surgical management of urolithiasis. Articles were identified and reviewed from PubMed and Medline databases with MeSH headings focusing on the various surgical treatments of urolithiasis and adjuvant therapy. Additional articles were retrieved from references and conference proceedings. Surgical treatments reviewed included shockwave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy. Adjuvant therapy was considered medical or complementary therapy as an adjunct to these surgical interventions. Adjuvant therapy for the surgical management of urolithiasis has been documented to increase stone-free rates, reduce stone remission rates, prevent renal damage, and decrease postoperative morbidity. A variety of agents have been studied, ranging from antioxidants to alpha-blockers and to alkalinizing agents. Additionally, there is increasing interest in complementary adjuvant therapy (ie, acupuncture). Adjuvant therapy is a fertile area for research in the surgical management of urolithiasis. The optimal agents have yet to be determined and therefore further investigation is warranted and necessary.

  4. Medical waste management - A review.

    PubMed

    Windfeld, Elliott Steen; Brooks, Marianne Su-Ling

    2015-11-01

    This paper examines medical waste management, including the common sources, governing legislation and handling and disposal methods. Many developed nations have medical waste legislation, however there is generally little guidance as to which objects can be defined as infectious. This lack of clarity has made sorting medical waste inefficient, thereby increasing the volume of waste treated for pathogens, which is commonly done by incineration. This review highlights that the unnecessary classification of waste as infectious results in higher disposal costs and an increase in undesirable environmental impacts. The review concludes that better education of healthcare workers and standardized sorting of medical waste streams are key avenues for efficient waste management at healthcare facilities, and that further research is required given the trend in increased medical waste production with increasing global GDP.

  5. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  6. Medical-Information-Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterescu, Sidney; Friedman, Carl A.; Frankowski, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Medical Information Management System (MIMS) computer program interactive, general-purpose software system for storage and retrieval of information. Offers immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases required. User quickly and efficiently extracts, displays, and analyzes data. Used in management of medical data and handling all aspects of data related to care of patients. Other applications include management of data on occupational safety in public and private sectors, handling judicial information, systemizing purchasing and procurement systems, and analyses of cost structures of organizations. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  7. Tuberculosis: medical management update.

    PubMed

    Yepes, Juan F; Sullivan, Jennifer; Pinto, Andres

    2004-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious chronic disease. After decades of steadily declining prevalence, the disease has reemerged in the last 5 years. Symptoms of TB are mild and not specific and can be classified as either systemic or localized to target organs. Microscopic examination of the sputum remains an inexpensive and rapid way to identify highly infectious patients. Four different antimicrobial agents-rifampin, ethambutol, pirazinamide, and isoniazid-form the basis of currently recommended antituberculosis therapy. Tuberculosis could be an occupational risk for health care workers. Dentists must be involved in the health promotion and early detection of TB.

  8. Medical Management of Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Portalatin, Meredith; Winstead, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Constipation is a common clinical problem. Initial management of chronic constipation should include lifestyle maneuvers, and increased fiber and fluids. Polyethylene glycol, sodium picosulfate, bisacodyl, prucalopride, lubiprostone, and linaclotide were all more effective than placebo for treating chronic idiopathic constipation. Many commonly used agents lack quality evidence supporting their use. PMID:23449608

  9. Medical equipment management strategies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binseng; Furst, Emanuel; Cohen, Ted; Keil, Ode R; Ridgway, Malcolm; Stiefel, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Clinical engineering professionals need to continually review and improve their management strategies in order to keep up with improvements in equipment technology, as well as with increasing expectations of health care organizations. In the last 20 years, management strategies have evolved from the initial obsession with electrical safety to flexible criteria that fit the individual institution's needs. Few hospitals, however, are taking full advantage of the paradigm shift offered by the evolution of joint Commission standards. The focus should be on risks caused by equipment failure, rather than on equipment with highest maintenance demands. Furthermore, it is not enough to consider risks posed by individual pieces of equipment to individual patients. It is critical to anticipate the impact of an equipment failure on larger groups of patients, especially when dealing with one of a kind, sophisticated pieces of equipment that are required to provide timely and accurate diagnoses for immediate therapeutic decisions or surgical interventions. A strategy for incorporating multiple criteria to formulate appropriate management strategies is provided in this article.

  10. An Online Virtual-Patient Program to Teach Pharmacists and Pharmacy Students How to Provide Diabetes-Specific Medication Therapy Management

    PubMed Central

    Kieser, Mara A.; Bruskiewitz, Ruth H.; Pitterle, Michael E.; Thorpe, Joshua M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and assess the effectiveness of an online medication therapy management (MTM) program to train pharmacists and pharmacy students in providing MTM services for patients with diabetes and to increase their intent to perform these services. Design. An online program was created using an Internet-based learning platform to simulate 4 MTM meetings between a pharmacist and a virtual patient diagnosed with diabetes. Assessment. Eighty students and 42 pharmacists completed the program. After completing the program, scores on post-intervention assessments showed significant improvement in 2 areas: control over performing MTM, and knowledge of how to perform MTM. Students had a significantly less-positive attitude about MTM and a decline in their perception of the social expectation that MTM is part of the practice of pharmacy, while pharmacists’ attitudes did not change significantly in these areas. Conclusion. This online program using a virtual patient improved both participants’ belief that they have control over performing MTM, and their knowledge of how to perform MTM for diabetic patients, which may increase the likelihood that pharmacists and pharmacy students will perform MTM in the future. PMID:23049103

  11. Management of Chronic Total Coronary Occlusion in Stable Ischemic Heart Disease by Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Versus Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Versus Medical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Shuvy, Mony; Qiu, Feng; Chee-A-Tow, Alyssandra; Graham, John J; Abuzeid, Wael; Buller, Christopher; Strauss, Bradley H; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    2017-09-01

    Coronary chronic total occlusions (CTOs) are found in approximately 20% of angiograms. We sought to assess the variation in the management of patients with CTOs and to compare the clinical outcomes of CTO lesions with those of non-CTO lesions. We conducted a population-based cohort study and included all patients with stable angina who underwent cardiac catheterization from October 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, in Ontario, Canada. The primary outcome was a composite of mortality and hospitalization for myocardial infarction. A total of 7,864 patients were included, of whom 2,279 (29%) had a CTO. There were substantial differences in revascularization rates for patients with CTOs across hospitals in Ontario (44.9% to 94.1%). Revascularization was associated with improved outcomes in the overall cohort. Although the advantage of coronary artery bypass grafting over medical therapy was consistent in both patients with CTOs and patients without CTOs, the benefit of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was limited to patients without CTOs (hazard ratio 0.56, 95% confidence interval 0.40- to 0.78), with no difference in patients with CTOs. The CTO lesion, however, was revascularized in few of the PCI cases (41.1%), with PCI limited to the non-CTO lesion in most patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Laser radiations in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Richand, P; Boulnois, J L

    1983-06-30

    The therapeutic effects of various types of laser beams and the various techniques employed are studied. Clinical and experimental research has shown that Helio-Neon laser beams are most effective as biological stimulants and in reducing inflammation. For this reasons they are best used in dermatological surgery cases (varicose ulcers, decubital and surgical wounds, keloid scars, etc.). Infrared diode laser beams have been shown to be highly effective painkillers especially in painful pathologies like postherpetic neuritis. The various applications of laser therapy in acupuncture, the treatment of reflex dermatologia and optic fibre endocavital therapy are presented. The neurophysiological bases of this therapy are also briefly described.

  13. TFOS DEWS II Management and Therapy Report.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lyndon; Downie, Laura E; Korb, Donald; Benitez-Del-Castillo, Jose M; Dana, Reza; Deng, Sophie X; Dong, Pham N; Geerling, Gerd; Hida, Richard Yudi; Liu, Yang; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Tauber, Joseph; Wakamatsu, Tais H; Xu, Jianjiang; Wolffsohn, James S; Craig, Jennifer P

    2017-07-01

    The members of the Management and Therapy Subcommittee undertook an evidence-based review of current dry eye therapies and management options. Management options reviewed in detail included treatments for tear insufficiency and lid abnormalities, as well as anti-inflammatory medications, surgical approaches, dietary modifications, environmental considerations and complementary therapies. Following this extensive review it became clear that many of the treatments available for the management of dry eye disease lack the necessary Level 1 evidence to support their recommendation, often due to a lack of appropriate masking, randomization or controls and in some cases due to issues with selection bias or inadequate sample size. Reflecting on all available evidence, a staged management algorithm was derived that presents a step-wise approach to implementing the various management and therapeutic options according to disease severity. While this exercise indicated that differentiating between aqueous-deficient and evaporative dry eye disease was critical in selecting the most appropriate management strategy, it also highlighted challenges, based on the limited evidence currently available, in predicting relative benefits of specific management options, in managing the two dry eye disease subtypes. Further evidence is required to support the introduction, and continued use, of many of the treatment options currently available to manage dry eye disease, as well as to inform appropriate treatment starting points and understand treatment specificity in relation to dry eye disease subtype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using an array of implementation strategies to improve success rates of pharmacist-initiated medication therapy management services in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Rachel; Thomas, Jeremy; Payakachat, Nalin; Diemer, Tiffany; Lang, Michele; Kordsmeier, Brooke; Curran, Geoffrey

    With the introduction of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Stars Measure program has come a greater expectation of Medication Therapy Management (MTM) services from community pharmacies. To meet the growing demand of these services, pharmacies have sought out various methods of engaging pharmacists to provide MTM. Barriers for completing MTM include inadequate time to complete the services, insufficient staffing, lack of sufficient compensation, billing difficulty, lack of interest among patients (including refusing MTM services when offered), inadequate training/experience, and lack of support from management. To evaluate the impact of a financial incentive alone versus the incentive plus a package of individualized implementation strategies on the success rate of MTM services. To increase MTM completion rates, The Kroger Company implemented a financial incentive for pharmacists in one of its market services areas. The following year the incentive was continued and an array of training and support strategies were implemented. The numbers of MTM claims and success rates for 2013 (no intervention), 2014 (financial incentive alone), and 2015 (incentive plus required training and ongoing support) were compared. A total of 7038 claims were extracted from 2013 to 2015. The number of completed claims had increased from 1385 in 2013 to 3265 in 2015. The total MTM success rates rose significantly from 42.9% in 2013 to 49.0% in 2014 (p = 0.001) and to 64.0% in 2015 (p < 0.001). A financial incentive plus a package of individualized implementation strategies increases success rates of MTM services compared to a financial incentive alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antiradiation UV Vaccine: UV Radiation, Biological effects, lesions and medical management - immune-therapy and immune-protection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Jones, Jeffrey; Maliev, Slava

    Key Words: Ultraviolet radiation,Standard Erythema Dose(SED), Minimal Erythema Dose(MED), Sun Burns, Solar Dermatitis, Sun Burned Disease, DNA Damage,Cell Damage, Antiradiation UV Vaccine, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burned Diseases, Immune-Prophylaxis of Sun Burns, Immune-Therapy of Sun-Burned Disease and Sun Burns,Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC), Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC), Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis(TEN). Introduction: High doses of UV generated by solar source and artificial sources create an exposure of mammals and other species which can lead to ultraviolet(UV)radiation- associated disease (including erythema, epilation, keratitis, etc.). UV radiation belongs to the non-ionizing part of the electromagnetic spectrum and ranges between 100 nm and 400 nm with 100 nm having been chosen arbitrarily as the boundary between non-ionizing and ionizing radiation, however EMR is a spectrum and UV can produce molecular ionization. UV radiation is conventionally categorized into 3 areas: UV-A (>315-400 nm),UV-B (>280-315 nm)and UV-C (>100-280 nm) [IARC,Working Group Reports,2005] An important consequence of stratospheric ozone depletion is the increased transmission of solar ultraviolet (UV)radiation to the Earth's lower atmosphere and surface. Stratospheric ozone levels have been falling, in certain areas, for the past several decades, so current surface ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation levels are thought to be close to their modern day maximum. [S.Madronich et al.1998] Overexposure of ultraviolet radiation a major cause of skin cancer including basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) { collectively referred to as “non-melanoma" skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma as well, with skin cancers being the most common cancer in North America. [Armstrong et al. 1993, Gallagher et al. 2005] Methods and Experimental Design: Our experiments and testing of a novel UV “Antiradiation Vaccine” have employed a wide variety of laboratory animals which include : Chinchilla

  16. A Smartwatch-Driven Medication Management System Compliant to the German Medication Plan.

    PubMed

    Keil, Andreas; Gegier, Konstantin; Pobiruchin, Monika; Wiesner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Medication adherence is an important factor for the outcome of medical therapies. To support high adherence levels, smartwatches can be used to assist the patient. However, a successful integration of such devices into clinicians' or general practitioners' information systems requires the use of standards. In this paper, a medication management system supplied with smartwatch generated feedback events is presented. It allows physicians to manage their patients' medications and track their adherence in real time. Moreover, it fosters interoperability via a ISO/IEC 16022 data matrix which encodes related medication data in compliance with the German Medication Plan specification.

  17. Medical therapy for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Niraj; Regueiro, Miguel D

    2002-03-01

    Although newer therapeutic agents are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, aminosalicylates and corticosteroids remain the mainstay of treatment for UC (Tables 2-5). Patients who do not respond to these agents or become steroid dependent require immunomodulatory therapy or curative surgery. Cyclosporine represents the greatest treatment advance for UC in 10 years. The role of nicotine, heparin, antibiotics, probiotics, and SCFA in the treatment of UC is less clear, but these agents may offer an alternative therapeutic approach for patients intolerant or nonresponsive to standard therapy.

  18. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  19. Medical complex for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, Anatoly N.; Domanov, Michail S.; Lyabin, Nikolay A.; Chursin, Alexandr D.; Mirza, Sergey Y.; Sukhanov, Viktor B.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Ivanov, Aleksandr I.; Kirilov, Anatoly E.; Rubanov, Sergey N.

    2002-03-01

    Experimental results of initial testing dye-laser 'MLK-02' pumped by a copper vapor laser 'Kulon-10' are presented. Output parameters obtained are the following: average power - 1 and 1.5 W, efficiency - 17.6 and 18.7% at the wavelengths of 670 and 725 nm, respectively. The laser apparatus is supposed to be used for methods of photodynamic therapy.

  20. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  1. Errors in fluid therapy in medical wards.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Maryam; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2012-04-01

    Intravenous fluid therapy remains an essential part of patients' care during hospitalization. There are only few studies that focused on fluid therapy in the hospitalized patients, and there is not any consensus statement about fluid therapy in patients who are hospitalized in medical wards. The aim of the present study was to assess intravenous fluid therapy status and related errors in the patients during the course of hospitalization in the infectious diseases wards of a referral teaching hospital. This study was conducted in the infectious diseases wards of Imam Khomeini Complex Hospital, Tehran, Iran. During a retrospective study, data related to intravenous fluid therapy were collected by two clinical pharmacists of infectious diseases from 2008 to 2010. Intravenous fluid therapy information including indication, type, volume and rate of fluid administration was recorded for each patient. An internal protocol for intravenous fluid therapy was designed based on literature review and available recommendations. The data related to patients' fluid therapy were compared with this protocol. The fluid therapy was considered appropriate if it was compatible with the protocol regarding indication of intravenous fluid therapy, type, electrolyte content and rate of fluid administration. Any mistake in the selection of fluid type, content, volume and rate of administration was considered as intravenous fluid therapy errors. Five hundred and ninety-six of medication errors were detected during the study period in the patients. Overall rate of fluid therapy errors was 1.3 numbers per patient during hospitalization. Errors in the rate of fluid administration (29.8%), incorrect fluid volume calculation (26.5%) and incorrect type of fluid selection (24.6%) were the most common types of errors. The patients' male sex, old age, baseline renal diseases, diabetes co-morbidity, and hospitalization due to endocarditis, HIV infection and sepsis are predisposing factors for the

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Microscopic and Endoscopic Transsphenoidal Surgery Versus Medical Therapy in the Management of Microprolactinoma in the United States.

    PubMed

    Jethwa, Pinakin R; Patel, Tapan D; Hajart, Aaron F; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Couldwell, William T; Liu, James K

    2016-03-01

    Although prolactinomas are treated effectively with dopamine agonists, some have proposed curative surgical resection for select cases of microprolactinomas to avoid life-long medical therapy. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing transsphenoidal surgery (either microsurgical or endoscopic) and medical therapy (either bromocriptine or cabergoline) with decision analysis modeling. A 2-armed decision tree was created with TreeAge Pro Suite 2012 to compare upfront transsphenoidal surgery versus medical therapy. The economic perspective was that of the health care third-party payer. On the basis of a literature review, we assigned plausible distributions for costs and utilities to each potential outcome, taking into account medical and surgical costs and complications. Base-case analysis, sensitivity analysis, and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine the cost-effectiveness of each strategy at 5-year and 10-year time horizons. In the base-case scenario, microscopic transsphenoidal surgery was the most cost-effective option at 5 years from the time of diagnosis; however, by the 10-year time horizon, endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery became the most cost-effective option. At both time horizons, medical therapy (both bromocriptine and cabergoline) were found to be more costly and less effective than transsphenoidal surgery (i.e., the medical arm was dominated by the surgical arm in this model). Two-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated that endoscopic resection would be the most cost-effective strategy if the cure rate from endoscopic surgery was greater than 90% and the complication rate was less than 1%. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for endoscopic surgery versus microscopic surgery at both time horizons. This analysis produced an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $80,235 per quality-adjusted life years at 5 years and $40,737 per quality-adjusted life years at 10 years, implying that with increasing time intervals, endoscopic

  3. Burns Caused by Medical Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Insensate skin and chronic medical illness such as diabetes mellitus were common risk factors. The scald potential from hydrotherapy in patients with...anesthetized, unconscious, or immobilized patients by the use of hydrotherapy , heating blankets, hot water bonlcs, or other warm- 272 Bnrillo cr a/ ing de...Hwang JC, Himel HN, Edlich RF. Bilateral amputations foUowing hydrotherapy t:lnk burns in a. paraplegic patient. Burns 1995;21:70-L 53. Simonsen K

  4. Radiation Therapy: Preventing and Managing Side Effects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation Therapy (Brachytherapy) Systemic Radiation Therapy Coping With Radiation Treatment Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is made ...

  5. Potential Health Implications of Medication Therapy Management Eligibility Criteria in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Across Racial and Ethnic Groups.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junling; Qiao, Yanru; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Jarrett-Jamison, JoEllen; Spivey, Christina A; Wan, Jim Y; White-Means, Shelley I; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Cushman, William C; Chisholm-Burns, Marie

    2015-11-01

    The Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act requires Part D plans to establish programs to provide medication therapy management (MTM) services starting from 2006. MTM services have been found to improve patient outcomes from pharmacotherapy, reduce emergency room visits and hospitalizations, and reduce health care costs in a cost-effective fashion. However, previous research found that non-Hispanic blacks (blacks) and Hispanics may be less likely to be eligible for MTM services than non-Hispanic whites (whites) among the Medicare population, according to current Medicare MTM eligibility criteria. This finding is because Medicare MTM eligibility criteria are predominantly based on medication use and costs, and blacks and Hispanics tend to use fewer prescription medications and incur lower prescription medication costs. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) laid out a set of MTM eligibility criteria for eligible entities to target patients for MTM services: "(1) take 4 or more prescribed medications ...; (2) take any 'high risk' medications; (3) have 2 or more chronic diseases ... or (4) have undergone a transition of care, or other factors ... that are likely to create a high risk of medication-related problems." To (a) examine racial/ethnic disparities in meeting the eligibility criteria for MTM services in PPACA among the Medicare population and (b) determine whether there would be greater disparities in health and economic outcomes among MTM-ineligible than MTM-eligible groups. This was a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of the Medicare Current Beneficiaries Survey (2007-2008). To determine medication characteristics, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Electronic Orange Book was also used. Proportions of the population eligible for MTM services based on PPACA MTM eligibility criteria were compared across racial and ethnic groups using a chi-square test; a logistic regression model was used to adjust for

  6. Research in the field of drug therapy safety management

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Horst; Aly, Amin-Farid

    2013-01-01

    In August 2011, the Coordination Group for the implementation and continuation of the agenda for improving medication safety in Germany published a memorandum on the development of research in the field of drug therapy safety management (Memorandum on Drug Therapy Safety Management Research). The memorandum highlights the need for research into this field for the German health care system. It describes current research objectives, thematic priorities and the characteristics of the methodology of drug therapy safety management research. After presenting the current state of research into drug therapy safety management, suggestions are made regarding further necessary activities. PMID:24007447

  7. Variability in state Medicaid medication management initiatives.

    PubMed

    Neyarapally, George A; Smith, Marie A

    Many U.S. states have expanded Medicaid programs, with over 70 million beneficiaries now enrolled. States' interest in improving care quality and lowering costs has spurred experimentation with several medication management (MM) programs. The implementation of MM programs for beneficiaries has been sporadic, and program elements and implementation methods have been heterogeneous. A survey was conducted to: (1) determine covered MM services in state Medicaid programs, (2) report innovative MM program findings, and (3) identify challenges in creating sustainable MM programs. The survey was sent to state Medicaid pharmacy directors in February 2015. The survey data focused on the type and extent of pharmacist-provided MM services, MM provider qualifications, patient eligibility criteria and enrollment strategies, MM delivery settings and referral patterns, MM program evaluations, program costs and sustainability models, key implementation challenges, and future program enhancements. Many Medicaid programs generally followed Medicare Part D Medication Therapy Management requirements. Highly variable findings were due to different Medicaid eligibility criteria, pharmacist integration with health teams, access to electronic medical records (EMRs), and MM delivery methods/settings to optimize drug therapy regimens. Several implementation challenges were identified. Pharmacist integration on care teams and access to EMRs improves MM implementation. MM program evaluation funding and data support must be secured prior to program implementation. The findings and discussion here can assist states with limited or preliminary Medicaid MM experience to progress toward sustainable programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management studies in medical education.

    PubMed

    Noor Ghani, S; Saimy, I

    2005-08-01

    In 1977, the World Health Assembly (WHA) set the social target--the "Health For All" goal and in 1995, urged member states to "re-orientate medical education and medical practice for "Health For All" (resolution WHA 48.8). This led to World Health Organisation to enunciate the "5-star doctor" needing skills in healthcare management, quality assurance and health economics. The Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya introduced the New Integrated Curriculum (NIC) in 1995. The objective was aimed at producing a competent doctor with a holistic approach to the practice of medicine. This was to be achieved by having 3 strands of studies i.e. The Scientific Basis of Medicine (SBM), the Doctor, Patient, Health and Society (DPHS), and Personal and Professional Development (PPD) over the 5-year programme, split into 3 phases. Elements of the "5-star doctor" were introduced in strand 2--DPHS and strand 3--PPD. Management studies were introduced in the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) strand. This led to an instructional module--"Principles of Management in Health Care Services (PMGT)" comprising of the Management of Self, Resources and People and incorporating a three week field programme. Evaluation is undertaken at the end of the phase IIIA of the studies. This NIC approach will be able to produce a "5-star doctor", a team player, leader, communicator and an effective manager.

  9. Concordance in cancer medication management.

    PubMed

    Chewning, Betty; Wiederholt, Joseph B

    2003-05-01

    This article explores how the concept of concordance can help to identify gaps and opportunities for research on consumer-provider communication related to cancer medication management. The relationship of concordance, patient-centered care and shared decision making is examined. Research on unmet patient agendas, quality of life issues related to symptom management and tools to assist communication about patient somatic experience are discussed. The need for research on patient communication with pharmacists, nurses and other health team members beyond physicians is noted. Research implications for longitudinal, descriptive and intervention studies are offered.

  10. Medical management of hunger strikers.

    PubMed

    Chalela, Julio A; Lopez, J Ivan

    2013-02-01

    Hunger strikes are not infrequent occurrences in military and civilian prisons. Although practicing clinicians are familiar with the management of patients who have limited oral intake, managing hunger strikers is unfamiliar to most. The psychological, physiological, and social events that surround hunger strikes are very complex and need to be understood by those caring for hunger strike patients. To provide adequate medical care to hunger strike patients, clinicians most understand the physiological events that ensue after prolonged starvation. Careful vigilance for development of refeeding syndrome is of key importance. A multidisciplinary approach to hunger strikes is of utmost importance, and involvement of a multidisciplinary clinical team as well as prison officials is essential.

  11. [Transfer factors in medical therapy].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Dolores J; Sosa-Luna, Carlos A; Vásquez-Moctezuma, Ismael

    2011-09-10

    Transfer factor (TF) consists of messenger peptides produced by activated T lymphocytes as part of cellular immunity, and it acts in virgin lymphocytes through TF inducers, suppressors and specific antigens. TF is not immunogenic because it is not species-specific, since it contains a consensus sequence of amino acids LLYAQDL/VEDN. TF extracted from leukocytes can transfer immunity from a human to another species. TF extracts are complex, containing more than 200 molecules with molecular weights ranging from 1 to 20 kDa. The antigen specific transfer factors (STF) have molecular weights between 3,5 and 5 kDa. TF is easy to prepare and well tolerated. It does not contain HL-A antigens against potential receptors and it can used as adjuvant therapy in several diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Medical management of motor fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Richard B

    2008-08-01

    Given the magnitude of the problem of motor fluctuations in patients who have Parkinson's disease treated with levodopa, a significant effort has been expended by physicians, researchers, and pharmaceutical manufacturers over the years to find effective treatments. This article briefly reviews the medical options for managing motor fluctuations that are in common use in the United States or that are expected to be available soon.

  13. Diabetes Self-Management Education and Medical Nutrition Therapy Improve Patient Outcomes: A Pilot Study Documenting the Efficacy of Registered Dietitian Nutritionist Interventions through Retrospective Chart Review.

    PubMed

    Marincic, Patricia Z; Hardin, Amie; Salazar, Maria V; Scott, Susan; Fan, Shirley X; Gaillard, Philippe R

    2017-08-01

    Diabetes self-management education (DSME) and medical nutrition therapy (MNT) improve patient outcomes; poor reimbursement limits access to care. Our aim was to develop methodology for tracking patient outcomes subsequent to registered dietitian nutritionist interventions, document outcomes for patients with type 2 diabetes attending an American Diabetes Association-recognized program, and obtain outcome data to support reimbursement and public policy initiatives to improve patient access to DSME and MNT. Retrospective chart review. A random sample of 100 charts was chosen from the electronic medical records of patients with type 2 diabetes completing DSME and individualized MNT, June 2013 to 2014. Data were extracted on body mass index (calculated as kg/m(2)), weight, hemoglobin A1c, blood glucose, and lipids. Mixed-model analysis of variance was used to determine differences between means for continuous variables; McNemar's tests and γ-statistic trend analysis were used to assess frequency of patients reaching glycemic targets. Significant weight loss was observed from baseline (94.3±21.1 kg) to end of program (91.7±21.2 kg [-1.6±3.9 kg]; P<0.001); weight loss in whites (-5.0±8.4 kg; P<0.001) exceeded that of African Americans (-0.8±9.0 kg; P>0.05). Significant hemoglobin A1c reduction was observed from baseline (8.74%±2.30%) to end of program (6.82%±1.37% [-1.92%±2.25%]; P<0.001) and retained at 1 year (6.90%±1.16%; P<0.001). Comparatively, 72% of patients reached hemoglobin A1c targets (≤7.0%) vs 27% at baseline (P=0.008). When stratified by diet alone and diet plus drug therapy, patients exhibited a 1.08%±1.20% (P<0.001) and 2.36%±2.53% (P<0.001) reduction in hemoglobin A1c, respectively. Triglycerides decreased from baseline 181.6±75.5 mg/dL (2.0±0.9 mmol/L) to 115.8±48.1 mg/dL (1.3±0.5mmol/L) (P=0.023). High-density lipoprotein increased from 41.4±12.4 mg/dL (1.1±0.3 mmol/L) to 47.3±12.4 mg/dL (1.2±0.3 mmol/L) (P=0.007). Retrospective

  14. Decision-making during initiation of medication therapy.

    PubMed

    Schommer, Jon C; Worley, Marcia M; Kjos, Andrea L

    2014-01-01

    Individuals' frequent and consistent interaction with medications can serve as a unifying element to help coordinate individuals' health care services. Despite its potential to improve coordination of heath care, initiation of medication therapy from the perspective of individuals' experiences remains largely unexamined. The objectives for this study were to describe the viewpoints of consumers, physicians, pharmacists, and social workers regarding initiation of medication therapy in terms of: (1) activation and engagement, (2) information processing, and (3) economic factors. Data were collected via mailed survey methodology from random samples of 400 adults, 400 physicians, 400 pharmacists, and 400 social workers residing in Minnesota. Responses to open-ended questions were coded using content analysis and summarized with descriptive statistics. The findings showed that consumer views of (1) activation and engagement, (2) information processing, and (3) economic factors differed from the views of physicians, pharmacists, and social workers. Consumers typically view initiation of medication therapy within the context of their overall lives. Physicians view it as a biomedical puzzle in which diagnosis, drug product selection, and risk assessment are main concerns. Pharmacists view it as a health care systems puzzle in which insurance coverage, cost, and risk management are main concerns. Social workers view it as a social systems puzzle in which access to care, cost, and social support are main concerns. Initiation of medication therapy is a disjointed experience for many consumers. The best timing for providing information about prescription drugs to individuals depends largely on what kinds of thoughts and impressions they have about a new therapy at various stages of the medication use process. The findings from this study can be useful for (1) developing consumer-centered approaches for medication use and (2) coordinating health care through the integration of

  15. Medical management of thoracic aortic aneurysm disease.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan C

    2013-03-01

    The patient with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease requires careful evaluation and management over his or her lifetime. This includes assessment for the presence of an underlying genetic disorder, such as Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve disease, or a familial aortic aneurysm syndrome. Screening family members is necessary, inasmuch as up to 20% of first-degree relatives of the patient with a thoracic aortic aneurysm will also have aneurysm disease. Medical therapy is often prescribed, and beta-blocker therapy to reduce the stress on the aortic wall is usually recommended. However, very few clinical trials of pharmacologic therapy in humans with thoracic aortic aneurysm disease have been conducted. Mouse models have led to important discoveries and insight into the pathogenesis of aneurysm syndromes, and there is hope these may lead to effective therapy in people. Several studies are ongoing that examine the role of angiotensin receptor blockers in Marfan syndrome. Lifestyle modification is also important for patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, including restrictions on physical activity, weight lifting, and recommendations about the management of pregnancy. Long-term surveillance of the aorta, even after successful surgery, is necessary for timing of prophylactic surgery and to evaluate for late complications. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Finding the heart of medical family therapy: a content analysis of medical family therapy casebook articles.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Richard J; Springer, Paul R; Felix, Daniel S; Hollist, Cody S

    2011-09-01

    In an effort to identify the essential ingredients of medical family therapy, a content analysis of 15 peer-reviewed case studies in medical family therapy was conducted. The case studies were published from 1996 to 2007 in Families, Systems, & Health. Through a qualitative content analysis, three main themes emerged that describe the essence of the practice of medical family therapy: (1) The patient's multisystemic experience of disease, (2) treatment is about caring, not just caregiving, and (3) elevating the patient as collaborator in the care team.

  17. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  18. Medical Waste Management Implications for Small Medical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrns, George; Burke, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the Medical Waste Management Act of 1988 for small medical facilities, public health, and the environment. Reviews health and environmental risks associated with medical waste, current regulatory approaches, and classifications. Concludes that the health risk of medical wastes has been overestimated; makes…

  19. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  20. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  1. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  2. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  3. 21 CFR 892.5300 - Medical neutron radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical neutron radiation therapy system. 892.5300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5300 Medical neutron radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical neutron radiation therapy system is a device intended...

  4. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT services...

  5. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT services...

  6. 42 CFR 410.132 - Medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical nutrition therapy. 410.132 Section 410.132... PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical Nutrition Therapy § 410.132 Medical nutrition therapy. (a) Conditions for coverage of MNT services. Medicare Part B pays for MNT services...

  7. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  8. MIMS - MEDICAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankowski, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    MIMS, Medical Information Management System is an interactive, general purpose information storage and retrieval system. It was first designed to be used in medical data management, and can be used to handle all aspects of data related to patient care. Other areas of application for MIMS include: managing occupational safety data in the public and private sectors; handling judicial information where speed and accuracy are high priorities; systemizing purchasing and procurement systems; and analyzing organizational cost structures. Because of its free format design, MIMS can offer immediate assistance where manipulation of large data bases is required. File structures, data categories, field lengths and formats, including alphabetic and/or numeric, are all user defined. The user can quickly and efficiently extract, display, and analyze the data. Three means of extracting data are provided: certain short items of information, such as social security numbers, can be used to uniquely identify each record for quick access; records can be selected which match conditions defined by the user; and specific categories of data can be selected. Data may be displayed and analyzed in several ways which include: generating tabular information assembled from comparison of all the records on the system; generating statistical information on numeric data such as means, standard deviations and standard errors; and displaying formatted listings of output data. The MIMS program is written in Microsoft FORTRAN-77. It was designed to operate on IBM Personal Computers and compatibles running under PC or MS DOS 2.00 or higher. MIMS was developed in 1987.

  9. Use of mind-body medical therapies.

    PubMed

    Wolsko, Peter M; Eisenberg, David M; Davis, Roger B; Phillips, Russell S

    2004-01-01

    Research demonstrating connections between the mind and body has increased interest in the potential of mind-body therapies. Our aim was to examine the use of mind-body therapies, using data available from a national survey. Analysis of a large nationally representative dataset that comprehensively evaluated the use of mind-body therapies in the last year. United States households. A total of 2055 American adults in 1997-1998. Random national telephone survey. We obtained a 60% weighted overall response rate among eligible respondents. We found that 18.9% of adults had used at least 1 mind-body therapy in the last year, with 20.5% of these therapies involving visits to a mind-body professional. Meditation, imagery, and yoga were the most commonly used techniques. Factors independently and positively associated with the use of mind-body therapies in the last year were being 40 to 49 years old (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33 to 3.10), being not married (AOR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.34 to 2.36), having an educational level of college or greater (AOR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.57 to 3.09), having used self-prayer for a medical concern (AOR, 2.53; 95% CI, 1.87 to 3.42), and having used another complementary medicine therapy in the last year (AOR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.74 to 5.20). While used for the full array of medical conditions, they were used infrequently for chronic pain (used by 20% of those with chronic pain) and insomnia (used by 13% of those with insomnia), conditions for which consensus panels have concluded that mind-body therapies are effective. They were also used by less than 20% of those with heart disease, headaches, back or neck pain, and cancer, conditions for which there is strong research support. Mind-body therapies were generally used concomitantly with conventional care: 90% of those using a mind-body therapy in the last year had seen a physician and 80% of mind-body therapies used were discussed with a physician. Although mind

  10. Outpatient management of oral vitamin K antagonist therapy: defining and measuring high-quality management.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine W; Ansell, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation therapy with warfarin is the mainstay of prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease. However, it remains one of the leading causes of harmful medication errors and medication-related adverse events. The beneficial outcomes of oral anticoagulation therapy are directly dependent upon the quality of dose and anticoagulation management, but the literature is not robust with regards to what constitutes such management. This review focuses on, and attempts to define, the parameters of high-quality anticoagulation management and identifies the appropriate outcome measures constituting high-quality management. Elements discussed include the most fundamental measure, time in therapeutic range, along with other parameters including therapy initiation, time to therapeutic range, dosing management when patients are not in therapeutic range, perioperative dosing management, patient education, and other important outcome measures. Healthcare providers who manage oral anticoagulation therapy should utilize these parameters as a measure of their performance in an effort to achieve high-quality anticoagulation management.

  11. Complementary and alternative medical therapies in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Sarac, Aysegul Jale; Gur, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the studies that have been performed evaluating complementary or alternative medical (CAM) therapies for efficacy and some adverse events fibromyalgia (FM). There is no permanent cure for FM; therefore, adequate symptom control should be goal of treatment. Clinicians can choose from a variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities. Unfortunately, controlled studies of most current treatments have failed to demonstrate sustained, clinically significant responses. CAM has gained increasing popularity, particularly among individuals with FM for which traditional medicine has generally been ineffective. Some herbal and nutritional supplements (magnesium, S- adenosylmethionine) and massage therapy have the best evidence for effectiveness with FM. Other CAM therapies such as chlorella, biofeedback, relaxation have either been evaluated in only one randomised controlled trials (RCT) with positive results, in multiple RCTs with mixed results (magnet therapies) or have positive results from studies with methodological flaws (homeopathy, botanical oils, balneotherapy, anthocyanidins and dietary modifications). Another CAM therapy such as chiropractic care has neither well-designed studies nor positive results and is not currently recommended for FM treatment. Once CAM therapies have been better evaluated for safety and long-term efficacy in randomised, placebo-controlled trials, they may prove to be beneficial in treatments for FM. It would then be important to assess studies assessing cost-benefit analyses comparing conventional therapies and CAM.

  12. Medical management of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Alexandroff, A B; Johnston, G A

    2009-10-01

    Allergic and irritant contact dermatitis are important dermatological problems. Although the frequencies of positive reactions to a number of allergens have decreased during last 30 years because of better avoidance (and at least in part due to improved legislation), contact allergy to other agents is rising. The medical treatment starts from a correct identification of triggers of contact dermatitis which could allow patients to reduce or avoid exposure to these agents in future. A good clinical history, examination and immunological tests including patch testing are of crucial importance at this stage. Further management includes emollients, topical and oral corticosteroids, topical calcineurin inhibitors, azathioprine and ciclosporin. Methotrexate and alitretinoin are recent additions to the armamentarium of dermatologists who manage contact dermatitis.

  13. Medical and dietary therapy for kidney stone prevention.

    PubMed

    Gul, Zeynep; Monga, Manoj

    2014-12-01

    The prevalence of kidney stone disease is increasing, and newer research is finding that stones are associated with several serious morbidities. These facts suggest that emphasis needs to be placed not only on stone treatment but also stone prevention. However, there is a relative dearth of information on dietary and medical therapies to treat and avoid nephrolithiasis. In addition, studies have shown that there are many misconceptions among both the general community and physicians about how stones should be managed. This article is meant to serve as a review of the current literature on dietary and drug therapies for stone prevention.

  14. Disease management and medication compliance.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua; Christensen, Kathyrn; Feldman, Lanna

    2012-02-01

    Lack of medication compliance is harmful to health care systems from both a clinical and economic perspective. This study examines the methods that disease management organizations employ to identify nonadherent patients and to measure effectiveness of compliance programs for patients with diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and cystic fibrosis. In addition, this study investigates the degree to which disease managers assume risk in their contracts, and whether compliance strategies are being coordinated with payers' use of value-based insurance design, in which patient cost sharing is a function of the relative value of pharmaceuticals. This study's findings suggest that disease management may be falling short in terms of: (a) comprehensive commitment to expert-recommended at-home devices used to self-diagnose and measure health indicators; (b) early adoption of expert-recommended new technologies to measure and improve compliance; (c) intensity of use of standard tests in outpatient clinics; (d) coordination of compliance strategies with payers' use of value-based insurance design; and (e) the proportion of risk assumed in disease management contracts.

  15. Medicalizations and demedicalizations of sexuality therapies.

    PubMed

    Tiefer, Leonore

    2012-01-01

    This article complicates recent discussions about the expanding zones and influences of medicalization and biomedicalization on sexuality and sex therapy by contextualizing them with competing nonmedicalizing trends. These latter developments include an escalating nonexpert commercial sexuality sector on the Internet, as well as a long history of anarchic and democratizing social politics, such as "the counterculture" and "free love movements." What these nonmedicalizing trends have in common is the view of sexual problems and solutions as far broader than sexual dysfunctions and sex therapies, a belief in the social determinants of individuals' sexual experiences, and a deep concern regarding the socially harmful consequences of medicalization. With the quantity of sexuality information and advice available to the public through the Internet only likely to expand, a long era of clashing claims about relations between sexuality and health and about the role of expertise in sexual life can be foreseen.

  16. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  17. [Multimodal pain therapy - implementation of process management - an attempt to consider management approaches].

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Marion; Kramp, Melanie

    2012-07-01

    The combination of medical and economical proceedings allows new perspectives in the illustration of medical workflows. Considering structural and developmental aspects multimodal therapy programs show similarities with typical subjects of economic process systems. By pointing out the strategic appearance of the multimodal pain therapy concept multimodal approaches can be described to some extent by using management approaches. E. g., an economic process landscape can be used to represent procedures of a multimodal pain therapy program. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Intensive insulin therapy in the medical ICU.

    PubMed

    Van den Berghe, Greet; Wilmer, Alexander; Hermans, Greet; Meersseman, Wouter; Wouters, Pieter J; Milants, Ilse; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Bobbaers, Herman; Bouillon, Roger

    2006-02-02

    Intensive insulin therapy reduces morbidity and mortality in patients in surgical intensive care units (ICUs), but its role in patients in medical ICUs is unknown. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study of adult patients admitted to our medical ICU, we studied patients who were considered to need intensive care for at least three days. On admission, patients were randomly assigned to strict normalization of blood glucose levels (80 to 110 mg per deciliter [4.4 to 6.1 mmol per liter]) with the use of insulin infusion or to conventional therapy (insulin administered when the blood glucose level exceeded 215 mg per deciliter [12 mmol per liter], with the infusion tapered when the level fell below 180 mg per deciliter [10 mmol per liter]). There was a history of diabetes in 16.9 percent of the patients. In the intention-to-treat analysis of 1200 patients, intensive insulin therapy reduced blood glucose levels but did not significantly reduce in-hospital mortality (40.0 percent in the conventional-treatment group vs. 37.3 percent in the intensive-treatment group, P=0.33). However, morbidity was significantly reduced by the prevention of newly acquired kidney injury, accelerated weaning from mechanical ventilation, and accelerated discharge from the ICU and the hospital. Although length of stay in the ICU could not be predicted on admission, among 433 patients who stayed in the ICU for less than three days, mortality was greater among those receiving intensive insulin therapy. In contrast, among 767 patients who stayed in the ICU for three or more days, in-hospital mortality in the 386 who received intensive insulin therapy was reduced from 52.5 to 43.0 percent (P=0.009) and morbidity was also reduced. Intensive insulin therapy significantly reduced morbidity but not mortality among all patients in the medical ICU. Although the risk of subsequent death and disease was reduced in patients treated for three or more days, these patients could not be identified

  19. Medical field management of the injured diver.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, K

    1999-03-01

    This article discusses the history of medical field management of the injured diver, and presents a comprehensive medical equipment list for field treatment as well as treatment protocols. Case reports are used to illustrate the principles and outcome of medical field management.

  20. [Medical audit: a modern undervalued management tool].

    PubMed

    Osorio, Guido; Sayes, Nilda; Fernández, Lautaro; Araya, Ester; Poblete, Dennis

    2002-02-01

    Medical audit is defined as the critical and periodical assessment of the quality of medical care, through the revision on medical records and hospital statistics. This review defines the work of the medical auditor and shows the fields of action of medical audit, emphasizing its importance and usefulness as a management tool. The authors propose that every hospital should create an audit system, should provide the necessary tools to carry out medical audits and should form an audit committee.

  1. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule in...

  2. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee schedule in...

  3. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee...

  4. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee...

  5. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician fee...

  6. Medical management of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ubee, Sarvpreet S.; Manikandan, Ramaswamy; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-01-01

    Overactive bladder (OAB), as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat. PMID:20877608

  7. Perioperative Management of Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, James D.; Spyropoulos, Alex C.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Mayr, Michael; Jaffer, Amir K.; Eckman, Mark H.; Dunn, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This guideline addresses the management of patients who are receiving anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy and require an elective surgery or procedure. Methods: The methods herein follow those discussed in the Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines. Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines article of this supplement. Results: In patients requiring vitamin K antagonist (VKA) interruption before surgery, we recommend stopping VKAs 5 days before surgery instead of a shorter time before surgery (Grade 1B). In patients with a mechanical heart valve, atrial fibrillation, or VTE at high risk for thromboembolism, we suggest bridging anticoagulation instead of no bridging during VKA interruption (Grade 2C); in patients at low risk, we suggest no bridging instead of bridging (Grade 2C). In patients who require a dental procedure, we suggest continuing VKAs with an oral prohemostatic agent or stopping VKAs 2 to 3 days before the procedure instead of alternative strategies (Grade 2C). In moderate- to high-risk patients who are receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and require noncardiac surgery, we suggest continuing ASA around the time of surgery instead of stopping ASA 7 to 10 days before surgery (Grade 2C). In patients with a coronary stent who require surgery, we recommend deferring surgery > 6 weeks after bare-metal stent placement and > 6 months after drug-eluting stent placement instead of undertaking surgery within these time periods (Grade 1C); in patients requiring surgery within 6 weeks of bare-metal stent placement or within 6 months of drug-eluting stent placement, we suggest continuing antiplatelet therapy perioperatively instead of stopping therapy 7 to 10 days before surgery (Grade 2C). Conclusions: Perioperative antithrombotic management is based on risk assessment for thromboembolism and

  8. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-24

    There are fewer significant changes in the medical therapy of ulcerative colitis (UC) compared to Crohn's disease. The most important factors that determine therapy are disease extent and severity. 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) constitute the treatment of choice in mild-to-moderate UC. The efficacy of new compounds (e.g. mesalazine) is only mildly improved compared to sulphasalazine; however, their use has become more frequent due to a more favorable side effects profile. Topical medication is more effective in proctitis and distal colitis, and the combination of topical and orally-administered drugs is superior to oral therapy alone also in extensive disease. Thus, this latter regimen should be considered for cases where the escalation of treatment is required. Systemic steroids still represent the first line therapy in acute, severe UC, while in patients who do not respond to steroids, cyclosporine and infliximab should be considered as a second line therapy and as alternatives for colectomy. Maintenance treatment is indicated in all UC cases. 5-ASA compounds are suggested as first line maintenance therapy with the optimal dose still being under investigation. Topical compounds are effective also for maintenance in distal colitis or proctitis, if accepted by the patients. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, should be considered in chronically active, steroid dependent or resistant patients. According to recent publications, azathioprine is almost equally effective in UC and CD. The question of chemoprevention is important during maintenance. There are increasing data supporting the notion that aminosalicylates may lower the risk for UC-associated colorectal cancer. The most important changes in the management of UC are the more frequent use of topical aminosalicylates and azathioprine, the availability of infliximab in severe UC, and increasing use of aminosalicylates for chemoprevention of colorectal carcinoma. Furthermore, adequate attention is needed to

  9. [Ethical "flashes" of medical care management].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo

    2009-01-01

    This document demonstrates in a simple way the depth and variety of ethical topics in medical care management, which are subjects not often addressed. Every medical administrator should be aware that all actions and decisions have ethical dimensions. Ethics applies to management of medical services according to honesty, transparency and decency. The behavior of those persons administering medical services is based on ethical values, principles and theories.

  10. Medical and surgical therapy for advanced chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Word, Ronnie

    2010-12-01

    Venous ulceration is the most serious consequence of chronic venous insufficiency. The disease has been known for more than 3.5 millennia with wound care centers established as early as 1500 bc. Unfortunately, still today it is a very poorly managed medical condition by most physicians despite that a great deal has been learned about the pathogenesis and treatment for venous ulcerations. We find that many wound care clinics treat the wound and not the cause of the problem. In this article, we review the basic pathophysiology of advanced chronic venous insufficiency and review the most up-to-date information with regard to medical therapy and different options of surgical therapy to address the underlying venous pathology responsible for chronic ulcers.

  11. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  12. Forging a novel provider and payer partnership in Wisconsin to compensate pharmacists for quality-driven pharmacy and medication therapy management services.

    PubMed

    Trapskin, Kari; Johnson, Curtis; Cory, Patrick; Sorum, Sarah; Decker, Chris

    2009-01-01

    To describe the Wisconsin Pharmacy Quality Collaborative (WPQC), a quality-based network of pharmacies and payers with the common goals of improving medication use and safety, reducing health care costs for payers and patients, and increasing professional recognition and compensation for pharmacist-provided services. Wisconsin between 2006 and 2009. Community (independent, chain, and health-system) pharmacies and private and public health care payers/purchasers with support from the McKesson Corporation. This initiative aligns incentives for pharmacies and payers through implementation of 12 quality-based pharmacy requirements as conditions of pharmacy participation in a practice-advancement pilot. Payers compensate network pharmacies that meet the quality-based requirements for two levels of pharmacy professional services (level 1, intervention-based services; level 2, comprehensive medication review and assessment services). The pilot project is designed to measure the following outcomes: medication-use quality improvements, frequency and types of services provided, drug therapy problems, patient safety, cost savings, identification of factors that facilitate pharmacist participation, and patient satisfaction. The Pharmacy Society of Wisconsin created the WPQC network, which consists of 53 pharmacies, 106 trained pharmacists, 45 student pharmacists, 6 pharmacy technicians, and 2 initial payers. A quality assurance process is followed approximately quarterly to audit the 12 network quality requirements. An evaluation of this collaboration is being conducted. This program demonstrates that collaboration among payers and pharmacists is possible and can result in the development of an incentive-aligned program that stresses quality patient care, standardized services, and professional service compensation for pharmacists. This combination of a quality-based credentialing process with a professional services reimbursement schedule is unique and has the promise to

  13. Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes.

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  14. [Medical training therapy in lumbar syndromes].

    PubMed

    Broll-Zeitvogel, E; Grifka, J; Bauer, J; Roths, P H; Degryse, P

    1999-11-01

    Chronic low back pain can be considered to be one of the most frequently treated and most costly diseases in modern industrial societies. Dysfunctions and imbalances of the spine-supporting muscles increase the risk of low back pain. Consequently preventive treatment and rehabilitation have to aim at preserving and restoring the full capacity of the spine-supporting muscles as well as training coordination and spine-friendly behaviour. In addition to various measures of pain therapy, physiotherapeutic treatment including neuro-physiotherapy, physical treatment (eg electrotherapy), balneotherapy and supportive behavioural training, medical rehabilitation therapy (MRT) ranks among the most effective ways of treating low back pain. MRT applies guidelines and methods of exercise methodology within medically indicated programmes of preventive treatment and rehabilitation. Various objectives of MRT are outlined with special regard to the stages of MRT treatment, emphasizing positive adaptation of the neuro-muscular system in the course of rehabilitation. Physicians are responsible for MRT diagnosis and control. Taking into account the base disorder and the progress of therapy physiotherapists and the physicians in charge determine MRT objectives and treatment strategies.

  15. Medical management of pediatric chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, L L; Brown, K R

    2000-10-01

    Pediatric sinusitis can be a challenging disease to treat, whether by a primary care physician or an otolaryngologist. When initial appropriate therapy fails to resolve the disorder, frustration may develop on the part of the patient, the family, and the physician. In addition to treatment with appropriate antibiotics for a sufficient length of time, other associated conditions that can exacerbate the condition must be considered and addressed as necessary. These may include viral upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, immune deficiencies, asthma, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Unless all associated conditions have been optimized, treatment of chronic sinusitis will often be unsuccessful. Recognition that there may be another factor contributing to the patient's continuing illness should prompt appropriate evaluation and occasionally referral to appropriate specialists. Except for the unusual pediatric patient with a truly anatomic disorder or an underlying chronic illness such as cystic fibrosis, proper medical management will almost always resolve chronic sinusitis.

  16. Microwave resonance therapy in medical practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumskoy, L. L.

    1994-08-01

    Consideration is being given to the problems of organizing treatment of patients with quantum medicine methods by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko at 660 hospitals of Ukraine and Russia. Analyzed are teaching of doctors and treatment of 250,000 patients for 82 nozologic cases in 1990 through 1993. In the State of Ukraine, the Government has adopted a State Target-oriented Program of Large- scale Promotion of Microwave Resonance Therapy Into Medical Practice as presented by the Ministry of Health care in 1989. According to the Program, it was planned, during the three year period, to provide MRT rooms in 325 medical institutions. The Program was based on a discovery by Prof. S.P. Sit'ko DSc (Physics & Mathematics), of a new non-morphological structure of man, i.e. an electromagnetic framework that is manifested by eigenfrequencies in the millimeter range and disturbance of which results in disease while repair returns the organism to health. This idea was subjected to national and international expert evaluation. This evaluation was done by a panel of 12 universally acknowledged scientists headed by the founder of the theory of superconductivity, professor of the Liverpool University (Great Britain) h. Frohlich and director of the Madrid medical center Prof. Alzina. The USA was represented by Dr. W. Rogers, chief of the Center of Radiation, Institute of Bioinformation Research. The stated that Professor S.P. Sit'ko and his coworkers had established a new line of inquiry in medicine, i.e. microwave resonance therapy. To implement the State Target-oriented Program, the Government chose the Interbranch Scientific and Engineering Center on Physics of the Alive and Microwave Resonance Therapy 'Vidhuk'.

  17. [Preventive medical effects of nature therapy].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yoshifumi; Lee, Juyoung; Park, Bum-Jin; Tsunetsugu, Yuko; Matsunaga, Keiko

    2011-09-01

    Five million years has passed since a subset of primates recognizably became human. Because we have already spent more than 99.99% of our evolutionary history in natural environments, it is thought that we are essentially adaptive to nature. However, we live in a society characterized by urbanization and artificiality, despite our physiological functions still being adapted to nature. We conducted experiments involving 420 subjects at 35 different forests throughout Japan. As a result, these subjects sitting in natural surroundings showed decreases in the following physiological indices compared with the urban control group: 12.4% decrease in cortisol level, 7.0% decrease in sympathetic nervous activity, 1.4% decrease in systolic blood pressure, and 5.8% decrease in heart rate. This shows that stressful states can be relieved by forest therapy. It should also be noted that parasympathetic nerve activity increased by 55.0%, indicating a relaxed state. The results of walking experiments were also similar. Li et al. demonstrated that immune functions are enhanced by forest therapy. Middle-aged employees volunteered to participate in these experiments. NK (natural killer cells) activity, as an indicator of immune function, increased by 56% on the second day and returned to normal levels. A significant increase of 23% was maintained for 1 month even after these subjects returned to urban life, clearly illustrating the preventive medical effects of nature therapy. We expect nature therapy to play an increasingly important role in preventive medicine in the future.

  18. Stress Management in Medical Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Shauna L.; Shapiro, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Gary E. R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of clinical studies providing empirical data on stress management programs in medical education found that student participants in such programs demonstrated improved immunologic functioning, decreased depression and anxiety, increased spirituality and empathy, enhanced knowledge of alternative therapies, improved knowledge of stress…

  19. Stress Management in Medical Education: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Shauna L.; Shapiro, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Gary E. R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of clinical studies providing empirical data on stress management programs in medical education found that student participants in such programs demonstrated improved immunologic functioning, decreased depression and anxiety, increased spirituality and empathy, enhanced knowledge of alternative therapies, improved knowledge of stress…

  20. Pharmacogenetics in electroconvulsive therapy and adjunctive medications.

    PubMed

    Mirzakhani, Hooman; van Noorden, Martijn S; Swen, Jesse; Nozari, Ala; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has shown apparent efficacy in treatment of patients with depression and other mental illnesses who do not respond to psychotropic medications or need urgent control of their symptoms. Pharmacogenetics contributes to an individual's sensitivity and response to a variety of drugs. Clinical insights into pharmacogenetics of ECT and adjunctive medications not only improves its safety and efficacy in the indicated patients, but can also lead to the identification of novel treatments in psychiatric disorders through understanding of potential molecular and biological mechanisms involved. In this review, we explore the indications of pharmacogenetics role in safety and efficacy of ECT and present the evidence for its role in patients with psychiatric disorders undergoing ECT.

  1. [Proper disposal(management) of medical wastes--the appropriate management of medical waste in laboratory].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, S

    2000-05-01

    In accordance with "The Manual for Management of Infectious Waste" which is based on the "Waste Management Law", a counterplan for the appropriate management of medical waste must be carried out in every hospital. This requires establishing "a committee for the appropriate management of medical waste" and to assign a "responsible person for management of medical waste" (an administrator for managing industrial waste under special control) inside the hospital. Since the law requires hospitals to take responsibility for discharging medical waste, hospitals must adopt a prudent policy for waste management. It becomes a most critical issue for hospitals, because medical waste is the subject of spot inspection under the supervision of MHW, and also the subject of border transgression prohibition between countries(both import and export) by the Bazel Treaty (1989) that Japan ratified in 1993. In this study, we discuss medical waste management in the central laboratory based upon the counterplan for appropriate management of medical waste at our hospital.

  2. Considerations in glaucoma therapy: fixed combinations versus their component medications

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Eve J

    2010-01-01

    Fixed combinations of medications that lower intraocular pressure (IOP) are increasingly used in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension and offer several potential advantages over combined use of the separate component medications including enhanced convenience, improved adherence, reduced exposure to preservatives, and possible cost savings. This review aims to examine the current role of IOP-lowering fixed combinations in disease management. The results of studies that compared the efficacy and safety of IOP-lowering fixed combinations with their component medications are summarized, including those fixed combinations that consist of a prostaglandin analog and timolol. The fixed combinations currently available for use in the United States are fixed-combination dorzolamide/timolol (FCDT) and fixed-combination brimonidine/timolol (FCBT). Both of these fixed combinations reduce IOP more effectively than their component medications used separately as monotherapy. FCBT therapy also demonstrates a more favorable safety profile and reduced ocular allergy compared to monotherapy with brimonidine, a component medication. Few studies have directly compared the efficacy and safety of FCDT and FCBT, but available evidence suggests that FCBT is at least as effective as FCDT in lowering IOP and is more comfortable and better tolerated. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of FCDT and FCBT in the management of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. PMID:20169043

  3. Considerations in glaucoma therapy: fixed combinations versus their component medications.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Eve J

    2010-02-02

    Fixed combinations of medications that lower intraocular pressure (IOP) are increasingly used in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension and offer several potential advantages over combined use of the separate component medications including enhanced convenience, improved adherence, reduced exposure to preservatives, and possible cost savings. This review aims to examine the current role of IOP-lowering fixed combinations in disease management. The results of studies that compared the efficacy and safety of IOP-lowering fixed combinations with their component medications are summarized, including those fixed combinations that consist of a prostaglandin analog and timolol. The fixed combinations currently available for use in the United States are fixed-combination dorzolamide/timolol (FCDT) and fixed-combination brimonidine/timolol (FCBT). Both of these fixed combinations reduce IOP more effectively than their component medications used separately as monotherapy. FCBT therapy also demonstrates a more favorable safety profile and reduced ocular allergy compared to monotherapy with brimonidine, a component medication. Few studies have directly compared the efficacy and safety of FCDT and FCBT, but available evidence suggests that FCBT is at least as effective as FCDT in lowering IOP and is more comfortable and better tolerated. Additional studies are needed to further evaluate the comparative efficacy and tolerability of FCDT and FCBT in the management of glaucoma and ocular hypertension.

  4. Carotid Disease Management: Surgery, Stenting, or Medication.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Priyank; Chaturvedi, Seemant

    2015-09-01

    Internal carotid artery stenosis accounts for about 7-10 % of ischemic strokes. Conventional risk factors such as aging, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and smoking increase the risk for carotid atherosclerosis. All patients with carotid stenosis should receive aggressive medical therapy. Carotid revascularization with either endarterectomy or stenting can benefit select patients with severe stenosis. New clinical trials will examine the contemporary role of carotid revascularization relative to optimal medical therapy.

  5. [A medical consumable material management information system].

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Hu, Liang

    2014-05-01

    Medical consumables material is essential supplies to carry out medical work, which has a wide range of varieties and a large amount of usage. How to manage it feasibly and efficiently that has been a topic of concern to everyone. This article discussed about how to design a medical consumable material management information system that has a set of standardized processes, bring together medical supplies administrator, suppliers and clinical departments. Advanced management mode, enterprise resource planning (ERP) applied to the whole system design process.

  6. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Text Messaging Intervention Versus Medical Management for HIV-Infected Substance Users: Study Protocol for a Pilot Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Glasner-Edwards, Suzette; Patrick, Kevin; Ybarra, Michele L; Reback, Cathy J; Rawson, Richard A; Chokron Garneau, Helene; Chavez, Kathryn; Venegas, Alexandra

    2016-06-24

    Evidence-based psychosocial interventions for addictions and related conditions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are underutilized. Obstacles to implementation of CBT in clinical settings include limited availability of quality training, supervision, and certification in CBT for clinicians; high rates of clinician turnover and high caseloads; and limited qualifications of the workforce to facilitate CBT expertise. Mobile phone-based delivery of CBT, if demonstrated to be feasible and effective, could be transformative in broadening its application and improving the quality of addiction treatment. No experimental interventions that deliver CBT targeting both drug use and medication adherence using text messaging have been previously reported; as such, the objective of this study is to develop and test an SMS-based treatment program for HIV-positive adults with comorbid substance use disorders. With user input, we developed a 12-week CBT-based text messaging intervention (TXT-CBT) targeting antiretroviral (ART) adherence, risk behaviors, and drug use in a population of HIV-infected substance users. The intervention has been developed and is presently being tested in a pilot randomized clinical trial. Results will be reported later this year. This investigation will yield valuable knowledge about the utility of a cost-effective, readily deployable text messaging behavioral intervention for HIV-infected drug users.

  7. Successful medical management of neutropenic enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gandy, W.; Greenberg, B.R.

    1983-04-15

    The medical management of neutropenic enterocolitis has been associated with a 100% mortality rate according to recent reports. This report describes two cases which were successfully managed without colonic resection. In one case, /sup 67/Ga radionuclide scanning was utilized as an aid in the diagnosis. The incidence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and previously reported cases of medical management of neutropenic enterocolitis are reviewed, and the role of granulocyte transfusions and /sup 67/Ga scanning are discussed.

  8. Stenting versus aggressive medical therapy for intracranial arterial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chimowitz, Marc I; Lynn, Michael J; Derdeyn, Colin P; Turan, Tanya N; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F; Janis, L Scott; Lutsep, Helmi L; Barnwell, Stanley L; Waters, Michael F; Hoh, Brian L; Hourihane, J Maurice; Levy, Elad I; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Harrigan, Mark R; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P; Clark, Joni M; McDougall, Cameron G; Johnson, Mark D; Pride, G Lee; Torbey, Michel T; Zaidat, Osama O; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J

    2011-09-15

    Atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is an important cause of stroke that is increasingly being treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) to prevent recurrent stroke. However, PTAS has not been compared with medical management in a randomized trial. We randomly assigned patients who had a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke attributed to stenosis of 70 to 99% of the diameter of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management alone or aggressive medical management plus PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system. The primary end point was stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during the follow-up period or stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. Enrollment was stopped after 451 patients underwent randomization, because the 30-day rate of stroke or death was 14.7% in the PTAS group (nonfatal stroke, 12.5%; fatal stroke, 2.2%) and 5.8% in the medical-management group (nonfatal stroke, 5.3%; non-stroke-related death, 0.4%) (P=0.002). Beyond 30 days, stroke in the same territory occurred in 13 patients in each group. Currently, the mean duration of follow-up, which is ongoing, is 11.9 months. The probability of the occurrence of a primary end-point event over time differed significantly between the two treatment groups (P=0.009), with 1-year rates of the primary end point of 20.0% in the PTAS group and 12.2% in the medical-management group. In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, aggressive medical management was superior to PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system, both because the risk of early stroke after PTAS was high and because the risk of stroke with aggressive medical therapy alone was lower than expected. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; SAMMPRIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00576693.).

  9. Paperless medical physics QA in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Yau, S; White, S; Wilfert, L

    2012-06-01

    Physics quality assurance (QA) is an integral part of a medical physicist's role in the radiotherapy centre. Management of physics QA documents is an issue with a long-term accumulation. Storage space, archive administration and paper consumption are just some of the difficulties faced by physicists. Plotting trends and drawing meaningful conclusions from these results can be challenging using traditional QA methods. Remote checking of QA within a hospital network can also be problematic. The aim of this project is introduce a paperless QA system that will provide solutions to many of these issues.

  10. Case manager as therapy extender for cognitive behavior therapy of serious mental illness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pinninti, Narsimha R; Schmidt, Lisa T; Snyder, Richard P

    2014-05-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based intervention for individuals with serious mental illness and potentiates standard medication management. Americans receiving publicly funded treatment for serious mental illnesses have limited access to CBT and hence we need to devise innovative ways of providing access to this important intervention. We present a case of a man who had severe disability, was medication resistant, and diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder. After being home bound for many years he was provided CBT utilizing his existing case manager as a therapy extender. The specific roles of the primary therapist and case manager as well as the improvement in quality of life of the individual are delineated. This case report opens up the possibility of further studying case managers as therapy extenders for treating serious mental illnesses.

  11. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Jen; Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R Webster; Liu, Kenneth C; Southerland, Andrew M; Worrall, Bradford B

    2015-12-01

    To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits-Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0-2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.39; p < 0.00001). No

  12. Endovascular vs medical management of acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Dale; Starke, Robert M.; Mehndiratta, Prachi; Crowley, R. Webster; Liu, Kenneth C.; Southerland, Andrew M.; Worrall, Bradford B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the outcomes between endovascular and medical management of acute ischemic stroke in recent randomized controlled trials (RCT). Methods: A systematic literature review was performed, and multicenter, prospective RCTs published from January 1, 2013, to May 1, 2015, directly comparing endovascular therapy to medical management for patients with acute ischemic stroke were included. Meta-analyses of modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and mortality at 90 days and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage (sICH) for endovascular therapy and medical management were performed. Results: Eight multicenter, prospective RCTs (Interventional Management of Stroke [IMS] III, Local Versus Systemic Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke [SYNTHESIS] Expansion, Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy [MR RESCUE], Multicenter Randomized Clinical Trial of Endovascular Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke in the Netherlands [MR CLEAN], Evaluation Study of Congestive Heart Failure and Pulmonary Artery Catheterization Effectiveness [ESCAPE], Extending the Time for Thrombolysis in Emergency Neurological Deficits–Intra-Arterial [EXTEND-IA], Solitaire With the Intention For Thrombectomy as Primary Endovascular Treatment [SWIFT PRIME], and Endovascular Revascularization With Solitaire Device Versus Best Medical Therapy in Anterior Circulation Stroke Within 8 Hours [REVASCAT]) comprising 2,423 patients were included. Meta-analysis of pooled data demonstrated functional independence (mRS 0–2) at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.71; p = 0.005). Subgroup analysis of the 6 trials with large vessel occlusion (LVO) criteria also demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy (OR = 2.23; p < 0.00001). Subgroup analysis of the 5 trials that primarily utilized stent retriever devices (≥70%) in the intervention arm demonstrated functional independence at 90 days in favor of endovascular therapy

  13. Integrated therapy safety management system

    PubMed Central

    Podtschaske, Beatrice; Fuchs, Daniela; Friesdorf, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim is to demonstrate the benefit of the medico-ergonomic approach for the redesign of clinical work systems. Based on the six layer model, a concept for an ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted. This concept could serve as a basis to improve resilience. Methods The concept is developed through a concept-based approach. The state of the art of safety and complexity research in human factors and ergonomics forms the basis. The findings are synthesized to a concept for ‘integrated therapy safety management’. The concept is applied by way of example for the ‘medication process’ to demonstrate its practical implementation. Results The ‘integrated therapy safety management’ is drafted in accordance with the six layer model. This model supports a detailed description of specific work tasks, the corresponding responsibilities and related workflows at different layers by using the concept of ‘bridge managers’. ‘Bridge managers’ anticipate potential errors and monitor the controlled system continuously. If disruptions or disturbances occur, they respond with corrective actions which ensure that no harm results and they initiate preventive measures for future procedures. The concept demonstrates that in a complex work system, the human factor is the key element and final authority to cope with the residual complexity. The expertise of the ‘bridge managers’ and the recursive hierarchical structure results in highly adaptive clinical work systems and increases their resilience. Conclusions The medico-ergonomic approach is a highly promising way of coping with two complexities. It offers a systematic framework for comprehensive analyses of clinical work systems and promotes interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:24007448

  14. Intelligent distributed medical image management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hong-Mei C.; Yun, David Y.

    1995-05-01

    The rapid advancements in high performance global communication have accelerated cooperative image-based medical services to a new frontier. Traditional image-based medical services such as radiology and diagnostic consultation can now fully utilize multimedia technologies in order to provide novel services, including remote cooperative medical triage, distributed virtual simulation of operations, as well as cross-country collaborative medical research and training. Fast (efficient) and easy (flexible) retrieval of relevant images remains a critical requirement for the provision of remote medical services. This paper describes the database system requirements, identifies technological building blocks for meeting the requirements, and presents a system architecture for our target image database system, MISSION-DBS, which has been designed to fulfill the goals of Project MISSION (medical imaging support via satellite integrated optical network) -- an experimental high performance gigabit satellite communication network with access to remote supercomputing power, medical image databases, and 3D visualization capabilities in addition to medical expertise anywhere and anytime around the country. The MISSION-DBS design employs a synergistic fusion of techniques in distributed databases (DDB) and artificial intelligence (AI) for storing, migrating, accessing, and exploring images. The efficient storage and retrieval of voluminous image information is achieved by integrating DDB modeling and AI techniques for image processing while the flexible retrieval mechanisms are accomplished by combining attribute- based and content-based retrievals.

  15. Acne: the role of medical nutrition therapy.

    PubMed

    Burris, Jennifer; Rietkerk, William; Woolf, Kathleen

    2013-03-01

    Acne is a common disease in Westernized nations, particularly among adolescents and young adults. Acne has substantial effects on quality of life, making treatment essential. Medical nutrition therapy as a potential treatment for acne is not new, although the literature examining diet and acne during the past 100 years is mixed. During the late 1800s and early 1900s, diet was commonly used as an adjunct treatment for acne. During the 1960s, however, the diet-acne connection fell out of favor. In recent years, dermatologists and registered dietitians have revisited the idea and become increasingly interested in the role of medical nutrition therapy in acne treatment. This article reviews the history and existing literature examining the association between diet and acne. Although the total number of studies conducted within the past 40 years is relatively small, the growing body of epidemiologic and experimental evidence suggests a relationship between diet and acne. Compared with other dietary factors, more research examines dietary glycemic load. The evidence is more convincing for high glycemic load diets, compared with other dietary factors. To date there are no randomized controlled trials investigating the relationship between frequent dairy or milk consumption and acne. Similarly, the number of research studies examining the relationship between dietary fat and/or n-3 fatty acids is sparse and the evidence is less robust. Taken together, several methodologic limitations need to be addressed, and additional research, preferably randomized controlled trials, is warranted before comprehensive evidence-based guidelines can be established. While dermatologists and registered dietitians continue to debate and research the potential relationship between diet and acne, the best dietary approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by

  16. Medical and Health Services Managers

    MedlinePlus

    ... LEVEL EDUCATION 2016 MEDIAN PAY Human Resources Managers Human resources managers plan, direct, and coordinate the administrative functions of an organization. They oversee the recruiting, interviewing, and hiring of ...

  17. Medication information management: capturing multiprofessional perspective.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication information management (MIM) is a crucial activity for good quality of medication, but unfortunately not without problems. In order to improve medication information management the core activity of medication as a cooperative activity is to be studied as a whole, and the multiprofessional viewpoint for the improvement needs must be captured. In this paper we present our approach to gain such shared understanding, based on our regional development project experiences in Northern Savonia, Finland. The central features of the approach include thematic interviews supported by activity-driven models and a workshop with professionally mixed groups. Participants agreed strongly on the usefulness of the approach.

  18. Contemporary medical therapy for polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lanham, M S M; Lebovic, D I; Domino, S E

    2006-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multi-system endocrinopathy with long-term metabolic and cardiovascular health consequences. Patients typically present due to symptoms of irregular menstruation, hair growth, or infertility; however, recent management options are aimed at further treating underlying glucose-insulin abnormalities as well as androgen excess for proactive control of symptoms. By a 2003 international consensus conference, diagnosis is made by two out of three criteria: chronic oligoovulation or anovulation after excluding secondary causes, clinical or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism (but not necessarily hirsutism due to inter-patient variability in hair follicle sensitivity), and radiological evidence of polycystic ovaries. Traditional medical treatment options include oral contraceptive pills, cyclic progestins, ovulation induction, and anti-androgenic medications (aldosterone antagonist, 5alpha-reductase antagonist, and follicle ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor). Recent pharmacotherapies include insulin-sensitizing medications metformin and two thiazolidinediones (rosiglitazone/Avandia and pioglitazone/Actos), a CYP19 aromatase inhibitor (letrozole/Femara), and statins to potentially lower testosterone levels.

  19. Lead User Design: Medication Management in Electronic Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Price, Morgan; Weber, Jens H; Davies, Iryna; Bellwood, Paule

    2015-01-01

    Improvements in medication management may lead to a reduction of preventable errors. Usability and user experience issues are common and related to achieving benefits of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). This paper reports on a novel study that combines the lead user method with a safety engineering review to discover an innovative design for the medication management module in EMRs in primary care. Eight lead users were recruited that represented prescribers and clinical pharmacists with expertise in EMR design, evidence-based medicine, medication safety and medication research. Eight separate medication management module designs were prototyped and validated, one with each lead user. A parallel safety review of medicaiton management was completed. The findings were synthesized into a single common set of goals, activities and one interactive, visual prototype. The lead user method with safety review proved to be an effective way to elicit diverse user goals and synthesize them into a common design. The resulting design ideas focus on meeting the goals of quality, efficiency, safety, reducing the cognitive load on the user, and improving communication wih the patient and the care team. Design ideas are being adapted to an existing EMR product, providing areas for further work.

  20. Structuring medication related activities for information management.

    PubMed

    Luukkonen, Irmeli; Mykkänen, Juha; Kivekäs, Eija; Saranto, Kaija

    2014-01-01

    Medication treatment and the related information management are central parts of a patient's health care. As a cross-organizational and cooperative process, medication information management is a complex domain for development activities. We studied medication activities and related information management in a regional project in order to produce a shared broad picture of its processes and to understand the main issues and the needs for improvement. In this paper we provide a summary of the findings in a structured form, based on a six-dimensioned framework for design and analysis of activities and processes.

  1. Neuroprotection of medical IOP-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lamparter, Julia; Gericke, Adrian; Grus, Franz H; Hoffmann, Esther M; Wahl, Jochen

    2013-08-01

    Intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering therapy has been shown to arrest or retard the progression of optic neuropathy typical for glaucoma and can, thus, be described as neuroprotective. At present, six classes of medical therapy are employed, namely parasympathomimetics, alpha/beta-sympathomimetics, β-blockers, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, α2-adrenergic receptor agonists and prostaglandin analogues. For several of these substances, some experimental evidence exists of a possible neuroprotective mechanism, beyond their IOP-lowering activity. β-Blockers are involved in the up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and can decrease glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor activation. Not only systemic but also topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors are able to increase retinal blood flow. α2-Adrenergic receptor agonists can up-regulate the formation of BDNF and anti-apoptotic factors. Prostaglandin analogues increase blood flow to the eye, possibly including the retina. To date, evidence for a neuroprotective effect independent of IOP regulation in human glaucoma is scarce and has only been shown to be likely for the α2-adrenergic receptor agonist, brimonidine.

  2. Carotid revascularization and medical management for asymptomatic carotid stenosis: Protocol of the CREST-2 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Howard, Virginia J; Meschia, James F; Lal, Brajesh K; Turan, Tanya N; Roubin, Gary S; Brown, Robert D; Voeks, Jenifer H; Barrett, Kevin M; Demaerschalk, Bart M; Huston, John; Lazar, Ronald M; Moore, Wesley S; Wadley, Virginia G; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Moy, Claudia S; Chimowitz, Marc; Howard, George; Brott, Thomas G

    2017-10-01

    Rationale Trials conducted decades ago demonstrated that carotid endarterectomy by skilled surgeons reduced stroke risk in asymptomatic patients. Developments in carotid stenting and improvements in medical prevention of stroke caused by atherothrombotic disease challenge understanding of the benefits of revascularization. Aim Carotid Revascularization and Medical Management for Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Trial (CREST-2) will test whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus contemporary intensive medical therapy is superior to intensive medical therapy alone in the primary prevention of stroke in patients with high-grade asymptomatic carotid stenosis. Methods and design CREST-2 is two multicenter randomized trials of revascularization plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. One trial randomizes patients to carotid endarterectomy plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone; the other, to carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy versus intensive medical therapy alone. The risk factor targets of centrally directed intensive medical therapy are LDL cholesterol <70 mg/dl and systolic blood pressure <140 mmHg. Study outcomes The primary outcome is the composite of stroke and death within 44 days following randomization and stroke ipsilateral to the target vessel thereafter, up to four years. Change in cognition and differences in major and minor stroke are secondary outcomes. Sample size Enrollment of 1240 patients in each trial provides 85% power to detect a treatment difference if the event rate in the intensive medical therapy alone arm is 4.8% higher or 2.8% lower than an anticipated 3.6% rate in the revascularization arm. Discussion Management of asymptomatic carotid stenosis requires contemporary randomized trials to address whether carotid endarterectomy or carotid stenting plus intensive medical therapy is superior in preventing stroke beyond intensive medical therapy alone

  3. Medical management of parapneumonic pleural disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N P; Hull, J; Thomson, A H

    2005-02-01

    Considerable heterogeneity exists in the management of parapneumonic pleural disease. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the effectiveness of small-catheter drainage with fibrinolysis, but surgical devotees suggest this may only be applicable to "early" cases. We examined evidence-based medical management in "all-comers." We performed a retrospective database analysis of the management of all children with complex pleural effusion admitted to the John Radcliffe Hospital over the 7-year period 1996-2003. One hundred and ten children were admitted. Ten were excluded as they were part of a multicenter RCT and had received intrapleural saline instead of urokinase. Of the remaining 100, 51 were female and 49 male. Median age on admission was 5.8 years (range, 0.3-16.5). Symptoms preadmission averaged 11 days, with December the most common month for presentation. Ninety-six underwent chest ultrasound, confirming an effusion in all, described as loculated/septated (68) or echogenic (11). In 17 cases, no specific comment was made regarding the nature of the fluid seen on ultrasound. Ninety-five had subsequent chest tube drainage and then received intrapleural fibrinolysis with urokinase. An etiological organism was identified in 21 cases (21%) (Streptococcus pneumoniae in 10, group A Streptococcus in 5, Staphylococcus aureus in 4, Haemophilus influenzae in 1, and coliform in 1). In a further 9 cases (9%), Gram-positive organisms were seen on pleural fluid microscopy, but did not grow on culture. Two (2%) required surgery due to the persistence of symptoms and an inadequate response to medical management. Median duration of admission was 7 days (range, 2-21 days); median duration of stay from intervention was 5 days (range, 2-19 days). At median follow-up of 8 weeks (range, 3-20 weeks), all children were symptom-free, with minimal pleural thickening on chest X-ray. In conclusion, antibiotic therapy with chest drain insertion and intrapleural urokinase is

  4. Total quality management approach improves medication replacement.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L K

    1994-07-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is based on understanding customer needs, improving key processes that affect customer satisfaction, and creating cross-functional teams to resolve process problems. This article describes application of TQM principles and problem-solving processes to improve one OR's medication exchange system. The problem was excessive monthly pharmacy medication replacement costs. The goal was to reduce the monthly medication replacement costs by 50%. Within four months, monthly medication replacement charges decreased from $656 to $302, and by one year, monthly charges decreased to $160. The new process had fewer steps, fewer staff members involved, and fewer delays in medication replacement.

  5. [Design and application of implantable medical device information management system].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shaoping; Yin, Chunguang; Zhao, Zhenying

    2013-03-01

    Through the establishment of implantable medical device information management system, with the aid of the regional joint sharing of resources, we further enhance the implantable medical device traceability management level, strengthen quality management, control of medical risk.

  6. Medical management of glaucoma: Principles and practice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kuldev; Shrivastava, Anurag

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma care is more an art than science. The introduction of several new classes of glaucoma medications and the completion of many large randomized clinical trials have not changed this fact. While we now have better choices when initiating glaucoma therapy relative to our predecessors, the principles of glaucoma therapy have not changed much during this period. Debates continue regarding the utility of concepts such as “the monocular therapeutic trial,” “target intraocular pressure (IOP),” and “maximal medical therapy.” Our tools for detecting and following glaucomatous disease have improved but are not precise enough for us to prospectively predict which patients will do better or worse than others. Much attention has been given to disease stage, rate of progression, and compliance with medications but regular patient follow-up, an area that has received little attention, may be among the most important predictors of patient outcomes. PMID:21150040

  7. Managing a new medication administration process.

    PubMed

    Englebright, Jane D; Franklin, Michelle

    2005-09-01

    The national focus on medication errors has stimulated rapid adoption of medication administration technologies with bar code verification. The effectiveness of these technologies in preventing errors is directly related to how consistently practitioners use the technology to verify both patient identity and drug identity with each administration. The authors discuss management strategies that have proven effective at increasing staff compliance with using bar code-enabled medication systems.

  8. Dental management of patients taking antiplatelet medications.

    PubMed

    Henry, Robert G

    2009-07-01

    Antiplatelet medications are drugs which decrease platelet aggregation and inhibit thrombus (clot) formation. They are widely used in primary and secondary prevention of thrombotic cerebrovascular or cardiovascular disease. The most common antiplatelet medications are the cyclooxygenase inhibitors (aspirin) and the adenosine disphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitors clopidogrel (Plavix) and ticlopidine (Ticlid). The dental management of patients taking these drugs is reviewed here.

  9. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  10. Medical therapy cost considerations for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Richard G; Green, Amy; Patuszynski, Daniel H; Wilensky, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    To determine the calculated daily patient cost (cost minimization) of medical glaucoma therapy and review cost trends. Experimental, controlled, prospective study. The actual volume of various glaucoma medications or glaucoma medications with redesigned bottles was determined for most commercially available sizes of the tested products. The drops per milliliter based on the actual volume and the daily costs of the dosage schedules recommended by the manufacturers were compared. The cost of each bottle of medication was determined from the average wholesale price (AWP) in the United States. A comparison to 1999 prices where applicable will be analyzed to review costing trends. The generic timolol products (range, US dollars 0.38-US dollars 0.46 per day) were similar on a cost per day basis vs Betimol (Santen, Napa Valley, California, USA), Optipranolol (Bausch and Lomb Pharmaceuticals, Tampa, Florida, USA) and Timoptic (Merck, West Point, Pennsylvania, USA). Their percentage cost increase ranged from 5% to 22% since 1999, except for generic timolol XE gel-forming solution (48%). Betagan (Allergan, Irvine, California, USA), Betoptic S (Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas, USA), and Ocupress (Novartis, Duluth, Georgia, USA) ranged from US dollars 0.88 to US dollars 1.11 per day, and their percentage cost increase ranged from 33% to 53%. Some brand-only products have raised their AWPs a greater percentage, including Betoptic S (37%), Iopidine (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, USA) (50%), Ocupress (Novartis Ophthalmics, Duluth, Georgia, USA) (53%), and Pilopine gel (Alcon, Fort Worth, Texas, USA) (32%). The mean cost per day for the topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors Azopt (Alcon Laboratories; US dollars 1.33 per day) and Trusopt (Merck; US dollars 1.05 per day) differed from 1999 when prices were almost identical. Cosopt (Merck; timolol 0.5% plus dorzolamide 2%, US dollars 1.04 per day) was less than the cost of separate bottles of a topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor

  11. New medical therapies for heart failure.

    PubMed

    von Lueder, Thomas G; Krum, Henry

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) can rightfully be called the epidemic of the 21(st) century. Historically, the only available medical treatment options for HF have been diuretics and digoxin, but the capacity of these agents to alter outcomes has been brought into question by the scrutiny of modern clinical trials. In the past 4 decades, neurohormonal blockers have been introduced into clinical practice, leading to marked reductions in morbidity and mortality in chronic HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Despite these major advances in pharmacotherapy, our understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms of HF from epidemiological, clinical, pathophysiological, molecular, and genetic standpoints remains incomplete. This knowledge gap is particularly evident with respect to acute decompensated HF and HF with normal (preserved) LVEF. For these clinical phenotypes, no drug has been shown to reduce long-term clinical event rates substantially. Ongoing developments in the pharmacotherapy of HF are likely to challenge our current best-practice algorithms. Novel agents for HF therapy include dual-acting neurohormonal modulators, contractility-enhancing agents, vasoactive and anti-inflammatory peptides, and myocardial protectants. These novel compounds have the potential to enhance our armamentarium of HF therapeutics.

  12. Drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies during care transitions in super-utilizers.

    PubMed

    Surbhi, Satya; Munshi, Kiraat D; Bell, Paula C; Bailey, James E

    First, to investigate the prevalence and types of drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies among super-utilizers, and associated patient characteristics. Second, to examine the outcomes of pharmacist recommendations and estimated cost avoidance through care transitions support focused on medication management. Retrospective analysis of the pharmacist-led interventions as part of the SafeMed Program. A large nonprofit health care system serving the major medically underserved areas in Memphis, Tennessee. Three hundred seventy-four super-utilizing SafeMed participants with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy. Comprehensive medication review, medication therapy management, enhanced discharge planning, home visits, telephone follow-up, postdischarge medication reconciliation, and care coordination with physicians. Types of drug therapy problems, outcomes of pharmacist recommendations, estimated cost avoided, medication discrepancies, and self-reported medication adherence. Prevalence of drug therapy problems and postdischarge medication discrepancies was 80.7% and 75.4%, respectively. The most frequently occurring drug therapy problems were enrollee not receiving needed medications (33.4%), underuse of medications (16.9%), and insufficient dose or duration (11.2%). Overall 50.8% of the pharmacist recommendations were accepted by physicians and patients, resulting in an estimated cost avoidance of $293.30 per drug therapy problem identified. Multivariate analysis indicated that participants with a higher number of comorbidities were more likely to have medication discrepancies (odds ratio 1.23 [95% CI 1.05-1.44]). Additional contributors to postdischarge medication discrepancies were difficulty picking up and paying for medications and not being given necessary prescriptions before discharge. Drug therapy problems and medication discrepancies are common in super-utilizers with multiple chronic conditions and polypharmacy during transitions of care

  13. Acute Aortic Syndromes: Update in Current Medical Management.

    PubMed

    Morris, Jacqueline H; Mix, Doran; Cameron, Scott J

    2017-04-01

    Advances in medical therapy and non-surgical percutaneous options to manage the specter of acute aortic syndromes have improved both patient morbidity and mortality. There are key features in the patient history and initial exam which physicians should be attuned to in order to diagnose acute aortic syndromes such as aortic dissection, penetrating aortic ulcer, and intramural hematoma. Once recognized, early initiation of the appropriate pharmacologic therapy is important, and further appreciating the limitations of such therapy before considering a surgical approach is critical to improve patient outcomes. For the undifferentiated patient with acute aortic dissection presenting to facilities who do not routinely manage this condition, adding pharmacologic agents in the correct sequence assures the best chance for a satisfactory outcome.

  14. Pros and Cons of Medical Management of Ulcerative Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Udayakumar; Shen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by diffuse mucosal inflammation limited to the colon and rectum. Although a complete medical cure may not be possible, UC can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. The medical management of this disease continues to evolve with a goal to avoid colectomy and ultimately alter the natural history of UC. Emergence of antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) agents has expanded the medical armamentarium. 5-Aminosalicylates continue to be used in mild to moderate UC and corticosteroids are mainly used for induction of remission with immunomodulators (6-mercaptopurine/azathiopurine/methotrexate) being applied as steroid-sparing agents for maintenance therapy. Infliximab has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and used in the treatment of moderate to severe UC; nevertheless, its use may be associated with significant adverse effects and have a negative impact on the postoperative course should the patients undergo restorative proctocolectomy. In addition, there is always a concern about patients' compliance to medical therapy, cost of medications, and risk for UC-associated dysplasia. The authors discuss the pros and cons of medications used in the treatment of UC. PMID:22131893

  15. Mobile Diabetes Management for USAF Active and Retired Military Spouses: Lessons Learned in the Integration of Mobile Integrated Therapies (MIT) into Electronic Medical Records (EMR)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    2010 ; 2009 US Census Bureau. Accessed 11/09/2012. 11 McCall N, Cromwell J. Results of the Medicare Health Support disease-management pilot program. N...14 McCall N, Cromwell J., Results of the Medicare Health Support disease-management pilot program. N Engl J Med

  16. [Physiotherapy and physical therapy in pain management].

    PubMed

    Egan, M; Seeger, D; Schöps, P

    2015-10-01

    Patients attend physiotherapy and physical therapy (PT) due to pain problems and/or functional impairments. Although the main focus for therapists has traditionally been physical examination and treatment of tissue structures and biomechanics, over the last few decades a growing body of research has highlighted the importance of central nervous system processing and psychosocial contributors to pain perception. Treatment with PT aims to reduce disability and suffering by reducing pain and increasing tolerance to movement. In Germany, pain management conducted by physiotherapists is currently undergoing major changes. Firstly, PT education is transitioning from a vocational to a degree level and additionally new concepts for improved multidisciplinary treatment approaches are being developed. However, there still remain substantial differences between therapists working in multidisciplinary pain clinics and those following medical referral in private practices. This article provides information on how national and international impulses have contributed to the development of different concepts of passive therapies and active/functional pain rehabilitation in Germany. In the future PT will need to provide more evidence about efficiency and modes of actions for different treatment options to selectively reason the application to patients with acute, subacute and chronic pain.

  17. Cost considerations of medical therapy for glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, R G; Geller, J L; Gryz, L L; Wilensky, J; Viana, M

    1999-10-01

    To determine the calculated daily patient cost (cost minimization) of medical glaucoma therapy. The actual volume of various glaucoma medications was determined for all commercially available sizes of the tested products. The drops per ml on the basis of the actual volume and the daily costs of the dosage schedules recommended by the manufacturers were compared. The cost of each bottle of medication was determined from the average wholesale price in the United States. The generic timolol products dosed twice daily and the once-daily gel-forming solutions (range, $0.30 to $0.46/day) were similar on a cost-per-day basis compared with the brand name metipranolol (Optipranolol; Bausch & Lomb Pharmaceuticals, Tampa, Florida, at $0.43/day) and timolol (Timoptic; Merck, West Point, Pennsylvania, at $0.46/day and Timoptic XE at $0.38/ day). Betaxolol (Betoptic S; Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas, at $0.65/day), carteolol (Ocupress; CibaVision, Duluth, Georgia, at $0.57/day), levobunolol ($0.61/day), and brand name levobunolol (Betagan; Allergan, Irvine, California, at $0.81/day) all were dosed twice daily and were more costly on a per-day basis. The topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitors brinzolamide (Azopt; Alcon, at $0.96/day) and dorzolamide (Trusopt; Merck, at $1.02/day) were dosed three times daily and were similar on a cost-per-day basis. The combination product Cosopt (timolol 0.5% + dorzolamide 2.0%, Merck, at $1.12/day) was less costly than separate bottles of a topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor (three times daily dosing) and a beta-blocker ($1.26 to $1.83/day), often even if the topical carbonic anhydrase inhibitor was dosed two times daily ($0.94 to $1.49). The selective alpha2-agonist brimonidine (Alphagan; Allergan, at $0.90/day) twice daily and the prostaglandin analog latanoprost (Xalatan; Pharmacia & Upjohn, Kalamazoo, Michigan, at $0.92/day) once daily were similarly priced. All generic timolol, Optipranolol, Timoptic, and Timoptic XE ranged between

  18. Medical emergency management among Iranian dentists.

    PubMed

    Khami, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Reza; Afzalimoghaddam, Mohammad; Razeghi, Samaneh; Moscowchi, Anahita

    2014-11-01

    More than 18,000 patients need medical emergencies management in dental offices in Iran annually. The present study investigates medical emergencies management among Iranian dentists. From the list of the cell phone numbers of the dentists practicing in the city of Tehran, 210 dentists were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as the data collection instrument. The questionnaire requested information on personal and professional characteristics of the dentists, as well as their knowledge and self-reported practice in the field of medical emergency management, and availability of required drugs and equipments to manage medical emergencies in their offices. Totally, 177 dentists (84%) completed the questionnaire. Less than 60% of the participants were knowledgeable about characteristics of hypoglycemic patient, chest pain with cardiac origin, and true cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practice. Regarding practice, less than one quarter of the respondents acquired acceptable scores. In regression models, higher practice scores were significantly associated with higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001). The results call for a need to further education on the subject for dentists. Continuing education and changing dental curriculum in the various forms seems to be useful in enhancement of the self-reported knowledge and practice of dentists. To successful control of medical emergencies in the dental office, dentists must be prepared to recognize and manage a variety of such conditions. In addition to dentist's knowledge and skill, availability of necessary equipments and trained staff is also of critical importance.

  19. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia

    SciTech Connect

    Marinkovic, Natalija Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavic, Tomo

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  20. Medication Management in Primary and Secondary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Reutzel, Thomas; Watkins, Melissa

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To identify whether and how pharmacy faculty members are addressing the issue of medication management in primary or secondary schools in their teaching, research, and service activities, and to ascertain the extent to which they think the issue is an important one. Methods Four hundred ninety-nine faculty members completed a questionnaire inquiring about the research, teaching, and service activities in which they participated that related to medication management in schools. Results Only 33 subjects (6.6%) addressed the topic of medication management in schools in their courses; only 13 (2.6%) conducted research on the topic; and only 30 (6%) were involved in service in this area. On the other hand, 432 respondents (86.6%) believed that the issue of medication management in schools was either somewhat or extremely important. Conclusions There is a large gap between the number of subjects that think medication management in schools is an important topic and the number who actually include the topic in teaching, research, and or service. PMID:17136150

  1. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Marinković, Natalija; Vitale, Ksenija; Janev Holcer, Natasa; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavić, Tomo

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  2. Critical limb ischemia: medical and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Slovut, David Paul; Sullivan, Timothy M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI), defined as > 2 weeks of rest pain, ulcers, or tissue loss attributed to arterial occlusive disease, is associated with great loss of both limb and life. Therapeutic goals in treating patients with CLI include reducing cardiovascular risk factors, relieving ischemic pain, healing ulcers, preventing major amputation, improving quality of life and increasing survival. These aims may be achieved through medical therapy, revascularization, or amputation. Medical therapy includes administration of analgesics, local wound care and pressure relief, treatment of infection, and aggressive therapy to modify atherosclerotic risk factors. For patients who are not candidates for revascularization, and who are unwilling or unable to undergo amputation, treatments such as intermittent pneumatic compression or spinal cord stimulation may offer symptom relief and promote wound healing. Revascularization offers the best option for limb salvage. The decision to perform surgery, endovascular therapy, or a combination of the two modalities ('hybrid' therapy) must be individualized. Patients who are relatively fit and able to withstand the rigors of an open procedure may benefit from the long-term durability of surgical repair. In contrast, frail patients with a limited life expectancy may experience better outcomes with endovascular reconstruction. Hybrid therapy is an attractive option for patients with limited autologous conduit, as it permits complete revascularization with a less extensive procedure, shorter duration of operation, and decreased risk of peri-operative complications. Amputation should be considered for patients who are non-ambulatory, demented, or unfit to undergo revascularization.

  3. Mind-body therapies for the management of pain.

    PubMed

    Astin, John A

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for mind-body therapies (eg, relaxation, meditation, imagery, cognitive-behavioral therapy) in the treatment of pain-related medical conditions and suggests directions for future research in these areas. Based on evidence from randomized controlled trials and in many cases, systematic reviews of the literature, the following recommendations can be made: 1) multi-component mind-body approaches that include some combination of stress management, coping skills training, cognitive restructuring and relaxation therapy may be an appropriate adjunctive treatment for chronic low back pain; 2) multimodal mind-body approaches such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, particularly when combined with an educational/informational component, can be an effective adjunct in the management of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis; 3) relaxation and thermal biofeedback may be considered as a treatment for recurrent migraine while relaxation and muscle biofeedback can be an effective adjunct or stand alone therapy for recurrent tension headache; 4) an array of mind-body therapies (eg, imagery, hypnosis, relaxation) when employed pre-surgically, can improve recovery time and reduce pain following surgical procedures; 5) mind-body approaches may be considered as adjunctive therapies to help ameliorate pain during invasive medical procedures.

  4. Communicating Medical Needs to Non-Medical Managers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacal, Kira; Miller, Robert; Doerr, Harold

    2004-01-01

    Differences in communication styles and languages between groups often lead to miscommunication, confusion, and/or frustration. Engineers, computer specialists, clinicians, and managers often utilize the English language in very different ways, with different groups using the same words to represent different concepts ("complaint" is a typical example). In addition, medical issues are often perceived as "off-nominal" and not "primary mission tasks" by managers, which can cause them to assign lower priorities to medical training time and resources. Knowledge bases differ due to variations in training and skill sets, and the goals (both immediate and long-term) of the communicators may also vary, with managers being primarily concerned with overall mission objectives, while clinicians focus on individual or group health issues. Furthermore, true communication is only possible when clinicians possess a deep understanding of mission requirements as well as the ability to communicate medical requirements on a priority basis using risk assessment, added value, and cost benefit analysis. These understandable differences may contribute to difficulties in expressing concerns and ideas in an efficient manner, particularly in projects, such as the space program or many military operations, where these varied groups must collaborate, and where the final decisions must be made by fully informed mission commanders. Methods: Three scenario-based approaches were developed utilizing decision trees and problem based learning, to help define and integrate these concepts. Results: Use of these techniques by NASA and military personnel will be presented. Discussion: To enhance communication, particularly of medical needs, one must identify the concerns and motivating factors for the other groups; for example, members of management may focus on financial concerns, a desire for risk mitigation, public perceptions, mission objectives, etc. Training clinicians to frame issues in these

  5. Specialty pharmacy: an emerging area of interest for medical management.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoli; Fetterolf, Donald

    2005-04-01

    Specialty pharmaceuticals are expensive injectable and infusion therapies used to treat patients with chronic or life-threatening diseases. The high cost of these agents and their frequent usage in chronic diseases represent not only challenges, but also opportunities for medical management programs to improve the quality of care and moderate the rapid cost escalation seen in the industry. The number and variety of these agents have been increasing significantly, with hundreds of drug candidates in the development pipeline. The specialty pharmacy industry also is going through a consolidation stage, both horizontally and vertically. Industry approaches to medical management include the acquisition of specialty pharmacy companies, restrictive contracting to achieve concentrated buying power, and the development of utilization management strategies.

  6. Medical management of genitourinary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Sharma, Surendra K

    2008-07-01

    Antimycobacterial chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB). A large body of evidence from clinical trials suggests that short-course chemotherapy regimens, employing four drugs including rifampicin and pyrazinamide, achieve cure in most of the patients with tuberculosis (TB) and are associated with the lowest rates of relapse. Standard six-month regimens are adequate for the treatment of GUTB. Directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) is the internationally recommended comprehensive strategy to control TB, and directly observed treatment is just one of its five elements. DOTS cures not only the individual with TB but also reduces the incidence of TB as well as the prevalence of primary drug-resistance in the community. Corticosteroids have no proven role in the management of patients with GUTB. Errors in prescribing anti-TB drugs are common in clinical practice. Standardized treatment regimens at correct doses and assured completion of treatment have made DOTS the present-day standard of care for the management of all forms of TB including GUTB.

  7. Correlation Research of Medical Security Management System Network Platform in Medical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Wang; Fan, Zhang; Jian, Hao; Li-nong, Yu; Jun, Fei; Ping, Hao; Ya-wei, Shen; Yue-jin, Chang

    Objective-The related research of medical security management system network in medical practice. Methods-Establishing network platform of medical safety management system, medical security network host station, medical security management system(C/S), medical security management system of departments and sections, comprehensive query, medical security disposal and examination system. Results-In medical safety management, medical security management system can reflect the hospital medical security problem, and can achieve real-time detection and improve the medical security incident detection rate. Conclusion-The application of the research in the hospital management implementation, can find hospital medical security hidden danger and the problems of medical disputes, and can help in resolving medical disputes in time and achieve good work efficiency, which is worth applying in the hospital practice.

  8. Contemporary management of uterine fibroids: focus on emerging medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhbir Sony; Belland, Liane

    2015-01-01

    This review provides an overview of therapeutic options, with a specific focus on the emerging role of medical options for UF management. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Systematic Reviews were searched for articles published between 1980 and 2013. Relevant articles were identified using the following terms: 'uterine fibroids', 'leiomyoma', 'heavy menstrual bleeding', and 'menorrhagia'. The reference lists of articles identified were also searched for other relevant publications. Because of the largely benign nature of UFs, the most conservative options that minimize morbidity/risk and optimize outcomes should be considered. Watchful waiting, or no immediate intervention combined with regular follow-up, is an appropriate option for the majority of UF patients who experience no symptoms. For women with symptomatic UFs, the optimal treatment should restore quality of life through rapid relief of UF signs and symptoms, reduce tumor size for a sustained period, and maintain or improve fertility. Invasive surgical treatments, such as hysterectomy, have historically been the mainstay of UF treatment. Less invasive surgical and interventional techniques, such as myomectomy, uterine artery embolization, endometrial ablation, and myolysis provide alternatives to hysterectomy. Until recently, medical management of UFs was characterized by short-term treatments and therapies that provided symptomatic control. In addition to controlling abnormal uterine bleeding, newer medical therapies, including the recently Health-Canada-approved ulipristal acetate, act directly to shrink the tumor. Although no agent is currently approved for such use, emerging evidence suggests the potential for long-term medical management of UFs. The advent of novel medical therapies may diminish the long-held reliance on more invasive surgical UF treatment options.

  9. Medical management of paraquat ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Gawarammana, Indika B; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2011-01-01

    Poisoning by paraquat herbicide is a major medical problem in parts of Asia while sporadic cases occur elsewhere. The very high case fatality of paraquat is due to inherent toxicity and lack of effective treatments. We conducted a systematic search for human studies that report toxicokinetics, mechanisms, clinical features, prognosis and treatment. Paraquat is rapidly but incompletely absorbed and then largely eliminated unchanged in urine within 12–24 h. Clinical features are largely due to intracellular effects. Paraquat generates reactive oxygen species which cause cellular damage via lipid peroxidation, activation of NF-κB, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis in many organs. Kinetics of distribution into these target tissues can be described by a two-compartment model. Paraquat is actively taken up against a concentration gradient into lung tissue leading to pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Paraquat also causes renal and liver injury. Plasma paraquat concentrations, urine and plasma dithionite tests and clinical features provide a good guide to prognosis. Activated charcoal and Fuller's earth are routinely given to minimize further absorption. Gastric lavage should not be performed. Elimination methods such as haemodialysis and haemoperfusion are unlikely to change the clinical course. Immunosuppression with dexamethasone, cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone is widely practised, but evidence for efficacy is very weak. Antioxidants such as acetylcysteine and salicylate might be beneficial through free radical scavenging, anti-inflammatory and NF-κB inhibitory actions. However, there are no published human trials. The case fatality is very high in all centres despite large variations in treatment. PMID:21615775

  10. Medical Management of Premenstrual Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Carolyn; Steinberg, Susan K.; Sylvester, William H.

    1986-01-01

    Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is characterized by a wide variety of symptoms occurring over several days before menstruation. In the differential diagnosis, family physicians should consider other conditions such as chronic yeast infection, allergy, stress, hypoglycemia and primary dysmenorrhea. Each patient should complete a daily menstrual diary for two to three monthly cycles. This diary may help the physician to determine the cyclical nature of PMS and specific symptoms. For most PMS sufferers, initial treatment involves the physician's acknowledgement of the problem and advice about lifestyle, dietary modification and vitamin supplements (e.g., pyridoxine). Seven steps are recommended to assist the family physician in the practical office management of most women with PMS. The potential role of progesterone and other agents in the treatment of PMS is described. Referral to a psychiatrist or psychologist, or the use of drugs such as lithium, danazol or bromocriptine may be required for women suffering from severe PMS. PMID:21267135

  11. Implementing an integrated care management program in community pharmacies: A focus on medication management services.

    PubMed

    Smith, Megan G; Ferreri, Stefanie P; Brown, Patrick; Wines, Kristen; Shea, Christopher M; Pfeiffenberger, Trista M

    To describe the initiation of a community pharmacy medication management service within a statewide integrated care management program. One hundred twenty-three community and community health center pharmacies in 58 counties of North Carolina. Independent and community health center pharmacies offering medication management as part of an integrated care management program to Medicaid, Medicare, dually eligible Medicare-Medicaid, and NC Health Choice beneficiaries in North Carolina. Community pharmacies joined an enhanced service network created by Community Care of North Carolina to provide medication management services as part of an integrated care management program. During the first 3 months of the program, 41% of pharmacies consistently documented the medication management services. Interviews were conducted with pharmacists from the inconsistent pharmacies to drive program improvements. Pharmacists at 73 community and community health center pharmacies were interviewed. The majority of pharmacists reported that challenges in "initiating services" and "documenting" were due to increased intensity of service and documentation compared with Medicare Part D medication therapy management requirements. Program changes to improve participation included revision of documentation requirements, authorization of technicians to transcribe pharmacists' interventions, additional documentation templates, workflow consultations, and feedback on documentation quality. Community pharmacies are capable of providing medication management integrated with care management. Some pharmacies have more difficulty initiating new services in the current workflow landscape. To facilitate implementation, it is important to minimize administrative burden and provide mechanisms for direct feedback. Pharmacy owners, managers, and leaders in pharmacy policy can use these findings to aid implementation of new services in community pharmacies. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association

  12. Effectiveness of conservative interventions including exercise, manual therapy and medical management in adults with shoulder impingement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs

    PubMed Central

    Steuri, Ruedi; Sattelmayer, Martin; Elsig, Simone; Kolly, Chloé; Tal, Amir; Taeymans, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of conservative interventions for pain, function and range of motion in adults with shoulder impingement. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. Data sources Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro were searched from inception to January 2017. Study selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including participants with shoulder impingement and evaluating at least one conservative intervention against sham or other treatments. Results For pain, exercise was superior to non-exercise control interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.94, 95% CI −1.69 to −0.19). Specific exercises were superior to generic exercises (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −0.99 to −0.32). Corticosteroid injections were superior to no treatment (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −1.04 to −0.26), and ultrasound guided injections were superior to non-guided injections (SMD −0.51, 95% CI −0.89 to −0.13). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) had a small to moderate SMD of −0.29 (95% CI −0.53 to −0.05) compared with placebo. Manual therapy was superior to placebo (SMD −0.35, 95% CI −0.69 to −0.01). When combined with exercise, manual therapy was superior to exercise alone, but only at the shortest follow-up (SMD −0.32, 95% CI −0.62 to −0.01). Laser was superior to sham laser (SMD −0.88, 95% CI −1.48 to −0.27). Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ECSWT) was superior to sham (−0.39, 95% CI −0.78 to –0.01) and tape was superior to sham (−0.64, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.12), with small to moderate SMDs. Conclusion Although there was only very low quality evidence, exercise should be considered for patients with shoulder impingement symptoms and tape, ECSWT, laser or manual therapy might be added. NSAIDS and corticosteroids are superior to placebo, but it is unclear how these treatments compare to exercise. PMID:28630217

  13. AVMA guide for veterinary medical waste management.

    PubMed

    Brody, M D

    1989-08-15

    Lawmakers have enacted a variety of laws and regulations to ensure proper disposal of certain potentially infectious or otherwise objectionable waste. The veterinary medical profession supports scientifically based regulations that benefit public health. In 1988, Congress passed the Medical Waste Tracking Act, a federal program that mandates tracking certain regulated waste. Several types of waste generated in the typical clinical veterinary medical practice are considered regulated veterinary medical waste. Discarded needles, syringes, and other sharps; vaccines and vials that contained certain live or attenuated vaccines; cultures and stocks of infectious agents and culture plates; research animals that were exposed to agents that are infectious to human beings and their associated waste; and other animal waste that is known to be potentially harmful to human beings should be handled as regulated veterinary medical waste. Regulated veterinary medical waste should be handled with care. It should be decontaminated prior to disposal. The most popular, effective methods of decontamination are steam sterilization (autoclaving) and incineration. Chemical decontamination is appropriate for certain liquid waste. Waste should be packaged so that it does not spill. Sharps require rigid puncture- and leak-resistant containers that can be permanently sealed. Regulated veterinary medical waste that has not been decontaminated should be labeled with the universal biohazard symbol. Generators retain liability for waste throughout the entire disposal process. Therefore, it is essential to ensure that waste transporters and disposal facilities comply with state and federal requirements. Veterinary practices should maintain a written waste management program and accurate records of regulated veterinary medical waste disposal. Contingency planning and staff training are other important elements of a veterinary medical waste management program. The guide includes a model veterinary

  14. An update on the role of medical treatment including antioxidant therapy in varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Harshit; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele-associated male infertility has classically been managed using surgery or assisted reproductive techniques. With increasing evidence of oxidative stress as a pathophysiological factor in varicocele-associated infertility, medical therapy especially antioxidants might become a treatment option with lower risks. We reviewed the existing literature on the role of various medical agents in the management of male infertility attributed to varicoceles. Medical therapy is typically evaluated in three different situations such as (a) comparison of two drugs or one drug with placebo, (b) comparison of drugs versus surgery, and (c) comparison of drugs as adjuvant therapy with surgery versus drug therapy alone. Due to heterogeneity of data and lack of well-conducted studies, there is insufficient data to recommend routine use of medical therapy for men with varicocele-associated infertility and surgery remains the treatment of choice. Pregnancy and live birth rates are usually not reported in most studies and mere improvement in sperm parameters or antioxidant capacity is insufficient to support its routine use. Antioxidant therapy is a potential option due to its theoretical benefit, data from preclinical studies, and lack of major side effects. Adjuvant therapy with antioxidants after surgical repair of varicocele may improve the outcome and is a potential area for further research. PMID:26763549

  15. The perfect marriage: solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing in medical family therapy.

    PubMed

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy.

  16. The Perfect Marriage: Solution-Focused Therapy and Motivational Interviewing in Medical Family Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stermensky, Gage; Brown, Kristina S.

    2014-01-01

    Medical family therapy has many potential uses in behavioral medicine and primary care. Current research was reviewed to determine the most advantageous way to apply solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as a perfect marriage in medical family therapy. An extensive literature review was done in the following databases for medical family therapy: Proquest, EBSCO, Medline, and PsychInfo. The search resulted in 86 relevant articles, of which 46 of the most recent were selected for review. Medical family therapy lacks current research that supports solution-focused therapy or motivational interviewing. However, evidence supports the use of solution-focused therapy as a brief format, as well as the closely related intervention, motivational interviewing. While medical family therapy presents many hopeful possibilities in the fields of behavioral medicine, psychology, and marriage and family therapy, little evidence currently exists for the most effective implementation. This review found evidence supporting solution-focused therapy and motivational interviewing as the perfect marriage of the collaborative team approaches for the future implementation and use of specific interventions in medical family therapy. PMID:25657948

  17. The medical management of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, D S

    1995-01-01

    There are many different approaches to treat Graves' hyperthyroidism. Medical therapy is used short-term to prepare patients for radioiodine or surgery, or it is used long term with the hope of achieving a remission. b-adrenergic blocking agents are useful in all patients without a contraindication, especially selective long-acting agents such as atenalol. Thionamides are the mainstay of medical treatment. Methimazole is more potent, may be used as a single daily dose, and may have less toxicity than PTU. Severe hyperthyroidism or thyroid storm may be treated with methimazole and ipodate. Patients are prepared for surgery with methimazole and SSKI, or b-adrenergic blocking agents and ipodate.

  18. Medical therapy in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Book, Wendy M; Shaddy, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common late complication in adults with congenital heart defects, both repaired and unrepaired. The onset of clinical heart failure is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Some patients with congenital heart disease may benefit from medications shown to improve survival in the population with acquired heart failure, but these same therapies may be of no benefit to other patients. Further studies are needed to better guide the choice of medical therapies.

  19. Medical technology management: from planning to application.

    PubMed

    David, Y; Jahnke, E

    2005-01-01

    Appropriate deployment of technological innovation contributes to improvement in the quality of healthcare delivered, the containment of cost, and access to the healthcare system. Hospitals have been allocating a significant portion of their resources to procuring and managing capital assets; they are continuously faced with demands for new medical equipment and are asked to manage existing inventory for which they are not well prepared. To objectively manage their investment, hospitals are developing medical technology management programs that need pertinent information and planning methodology for integrating new equipment into existing operations as well as for optimizing costs of ownership of all equipment. Clinical engineers can identify technological solutions based on the matching of new medical equipment with hospital's objectives. They can review their institution's overall technological position, determine strengths and weaknesses, develop equipment-selection criteria, supervise installations, train users and monitor post procurement performance to assure meeting of goals. This program, together with cost accounting analysis, will objectively guide the capital assets decision-making process. Cost accounting analysis is a multivariate function that includes determining the amount, based upon a strategic plan and financial resources, of funding to be allocated annually for medical equipment acquisition and replacement. Often this function works closely with clinical engineering to establish equipment useful life and prioritization of acquisition, upgrade, and replacement of inventory within budget confines and without conducting time consuming, individual financial capital project evaluations.

  20. Purchasing a decentralized medication management system.

    PubMed

    2006-03-01

    Decentralized medication management systems (DMMSs) are used in hospitals, long-term care facilities, prisons, outpatient clinics, surgery centers, and other places to manage the distribution of drugs. DMMSs consist of storage compartments for medications, with an internal computer that controls and records the administration of drugs. Some DMMSs are stationary cabinets and others are mobile carts. There have been important advances in DMMS technology since we evaluated these products in 1996, including enhanced computer memory and processing power, wider adoption of wireless networking, better user interfaces, and greater integration with other hospital information systems. To get the most out of a DMMS purchase or upgrade, facilities will need careful planning that involves assessing their own needs, selecting hardware and software configurations that meet those needs, and then choosing the right vendor and model. A properly selected DMMS can help to enforce medication distribution policies, prevent errors, and streamline processes.

  1. Update on the medical management of stone disease.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Chad R; Pearle, Margaret S

    2009-03-01

    Recurrent nephrolithiasis is a burden to the individual patient as well as the healthcare system. A lack of new medications for treatment of stone disease and continued poor compliance with drug therapy has led to a growing interest in dietary manipulation and novel therapies aimed at preventing recurrent stone formation. Despite initial enthusiasm for lemonade therapy, recent metabolic studies suggest that beverages with a high potassium citrate content, rather than citric acid, may be more effective in reducing stone risk because of the alkali load and citraturic response. In addition, there is increasing epidemiologic and metabolic evidence that obesity and dietary excess, including fructose-rich and purine-rich foods, are associated with increased stone risk. Finally, alternative measures for reducing urinary risk factors, such as probiotics, show promise in reducing urinary oxalate and may be effective in the treatment of primary and enteric hyperoxaluria or even idiopathic calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Although changes in urinary stone risk factors may reduce the need for surgical treatment of stone disease, the best management for recurrent nephrolithiasis is likely a combination of surgical and medical therapy. Dietary measures and novel probiotic therapy are promising adjuncts for preventing recurrent nephrolithiasis.

  2. Medical management of pyometra in three red wolves (Canis rufus).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kadie; Wolf, Karen N

    2013-12-01

    Pyometra is a serious, life-threatening disease of both domestic and non-domestic species often requiring ovariohysterectomy to preserve the life of the animal. Medical management of pyometra has been successful in domestic and non-domestic species, and the consideration of such treatment is of marked importance in a critically endangered species. Of the canids, the red wolf (Canis rufus) is second only to African hunting dogs (Lycaon pictus) in terms of the prevalence of both cystic endometrial hyperplasia and pyometra. In this report, three red wolves were medically managed for pyometra. Aside from vaginal discharge, none of the wolves exhibited clinical signs, nor were there reflective inflammatory changes in the laboratory findings. All wolves received standard treatment for pyometra, including prostaglandin F2alpha and antibiotic therapy, while one wolf was more aggressively managed with uterine lavage. Pyometra recurred in two of the treated wolves, while the most aggressively managed wolf continues to show ultrasonographic resolution 2 yr posttreatment. Aggressive medical management of pyometra should be considered a treatment option in certain red wolf females, as it may preserve the animal's reproductive potential.

  3. Evolving medical therapies for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Russell D

    2002-12-01

    Therapies for patients with ulcerative colitis have, until recently, been limited in scope and efficacy. New formulations of mesalamine and corticosteroids have challenged the older therapies with respect to both efficacy and safety. The application of 6-mercaptopurine and azathioprine for steroid-refractory disease and maintenance of remission has resulted in studies of other candidate immunomodulatory agents. Biologic therapies targeting tumor necrosis factor, adhesion molecules, or other cytokines are under intense scrutiny as potential disease-altering agents that may even replace currently available products. Other approaches, including such wide-ranging products as heparin, nicotine, and probiotics, suggest that control of ulcerative colitis may require an individualized approach for each patient.

  4. Medical physics aspects of particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver

    2009-11-01

    Charged particle beams offer an improved dose conformation to the target volume when compared with photon radiotherapy, with better sparing of normal tissue structures close to the target. In addition, beams of heavier ions exhibit a strong increase of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg peak when compared with the entrance region. These physical and biological properties make ion beams more favourable for radiation therapy of cancer than photon beams. As a consequence, particle therapy with protons and heavy ions has gained increasing interest worldwide. This contribution summarises the physical and biological principles of charged particle therapy with ion beams and highlights some of the developments in the field of beam delivery, the principles of treatment planning and the determination of absorbed dose in ion beams. The clinical experience gathered so far with carbon ion therapy is briefly reviewed.

  5. AACE/ACE Disease State Clinical Review: Medical Management of Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Hamrahian, Amir H; Yuen, Kevin C J; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    To review available medical therapies for patients with Cushing disease and to provide a roadmap for their use in clinical practice. PubMed searches were performed to identify all of the available published data on medical management of Cushing disease. Medical therapy is usually not the first-line treatment for patients with Cushing disease but may be used to improve clinical manifestations of Cushing disease in patients who are not suitable candidates for surgery, following unsuccessful surgery or recurrence, or as a "bridge therapy" in those who have undergone radiotherapy. Medical therapy may also be used in preoperative preparation of patients with severe disease. Current available medical options for patients with Cushing disease include centrally acting agents, steroidogenesis inhibitors, and a glucocorticoid receptor antagonists. At present, there are no head-to-head studies comparing the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of different U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)- and non-FDA-approved drugs in patients with Cushing disease. With the initiation of new studies and the completion of ongoing clinical trials, the number of FDA-approved drugs for medical treatment of Cushing disease is expected to increase. Medical therapy has an important adjunctive role in the management of patients with Cushing disease. The decision to initiate medical treatment depends on many factors, including patient characteristics and preference. Long-term studies are needed to better define the clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of medical treatment of Cushing disease, including the role of combination therapies.

  6. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315 Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification. A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications software, a medication delivery unit...

  7. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315 Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification. A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications software, a medication delivery unit...

  8. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315 Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification. A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications software, a medication delivery unit...

  9. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315 Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification. A remote medication management system is a device composed of clinical and communications software, a medication delivery unit...

  10. The Importance of Teacher Involvement in Medication Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Katsiyannis, Antonis

    2009-01-01

    Over the past several decades, there has been a steady increase in the use of medication therapy to help control student behavior within schools. While psychotropic medications do not "cure" mental illnesses, they have demonstrated efficacy in helping children function better at school and within their home environment. However, it is important…

  11. The dental management of medically compromised patients.

    PubMed

    Goss, A N

    1984-12-01

    There is an increasing population of apparently well, but in fact medically compromised people in the community. Most will require dental treatment at some stage and will usually seek it away from a hospital environment. In a recent survey of a general dental practice in Australia it was found that up to 55 per cent of some age groups had concurrent medical problems. Thus there is a real risk that adverse interactions between medical conditions and dental treatment may occur--on some occasions, even fatal ones. It is not possible for any one individual to know the details of all medical conditions, their treatment and the possible interactions with dental treatment. However, by the application of some sound general principles the risks of any potential interactions can be evaluated. The essential steps are: knowledge of the medical history of all patients; knowledge of the potential interactions; and knowledge of the management of medical emergencies. These principles will be discussed and illustrated by examples of medically compromised patients who may experience common or potentially serious sequelae as a result of dental treatment.

  12. Prolactinomas, Cushing's disease and acromegaly: debating the role of medical therapy for secretory pituitary adenomas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are associated with a variety of clinical manifestations resulting from excessive hormone secretion and tumor mass effects, and require a multidisciplinary management approach. This article discusses the treatment modalities for the management of patients with a prolactinoma, Cushing's disease and acromegaly, and summarizes the options for medical therapy in these patients. First-line treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacotherapy with dopamine agonists; recent reports of cardiac valve abnormalities associated with this class of medication in Parkinson's disease has prompted study in hyperprolactinemic populations. Patients with resistance to dopamine agonists may require other treatment. First-line treatment of Cushing's disease is pituitary surgery by a surgeon with experience in this condition. Current medical options for Cushing's disease block adrenal cortisol production, but do not treat the underlying disease. Pituitary-directed medical therapies are now being explored. In several small studies, the dopamine agonist cabergoline normalized urinary free cortisol in some patients. The multi-receptor targeted somatostatin analogue pasireotide (SOM230) shows promise as a pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease; further studies will determine its efficacy and safety. Radiation therapy, with medical adrenal blockade while awaiting the effects of radiation, and bilateral adrenalectomy remain standard treatment options for patients not cured with pituitary surgery. In patients with acromegaly, surgery remains the first-line treatment option when the tumor is likely to be completely resected, or for debulking, especially when the tumor is compressing neurovisual structures. Primary therapy with somatostatin analogues has been used in some patients with large extrasellar tumors not amenable to surgical cure, patients at high surgical risk and patients who decline surgery. Pegvisomant is indicated in patients who have not responded to

  13. The Role of Medical Expulsive Therapy for Ureteral Stones: Pro MET.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Thomas; Türk, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Medical expulsive therapy is efficacious in patients with ureteric stones who are amenable to conservative management. The greatest benefit might be among those with larger stones. Therefore, the European Association of Urology Guideline Panel has kept the recommendation to offer α-blockers for patients with distal ureteral stones of 5-10mm. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. [Medical devices classification: principles and quality management].

    PubMed

    Ventura, M

    2011-09-01

    Medical device market covers a large rank of references and is characterized by a lack of standardization in products naming. Using a specific classification is the first step to ensure a good analysis and a specific follow up of this market. CLADIMED is the classification for medical device used in France and Belgium. It is a five level classification, similar to the Anatomical Therapeutical Chemical classification (ATC) for drugs (WHO). CLADIMED association, gathering users and suppliers, manage this classification. A scientific committee is in charge to guarantee quality and respect of the classification principles. 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Management of cancer pain with complementary therapies.

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    Pain is one of the most feared consequences of cancer. Pain is a major symptom in 75% of hospitalized cancer patients. Poorly relieved pain contributes to the suffering of the patient and family, which may motivate them to seek additional complementary and alternative therapies. Evidence-based complementary therapies are being used for symptom control and to improve quality of life. There is recent research on several complementary therapies-acupuncture, mind-body therapies, massage, reflexology, and Reiki--that provides evidence for pain management. These therapies are not well utilized due to a lack of information on benefits, risks, and resources. There is a call for education to alert patients, families, nurses, and physicians to the benefits of evidence-based complementary therapies and to the dangers of "unproven" cancer therapies. Oncology nurses are ideally positioned to assess patients' pain, to educate patients, to determine with the patient and physician the most appropriate and safe complementary therapy for pain, to refer patients to appropriate resources, and in some cases to provide the therapy itself. This article will discuss specific complementary therapies for pain control and will arm nurses with the confidence to intervene with knowledge, referrals, and ideas for hands-on implementation.

  16. The medical management of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.J.; Buchanan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The text is brief and directed primarily to the breast cancer specialist. Topics include epidemiology, screening, prognostic factors, pre- and postoperative assessment, surgery, radiotherapy adjuvant endocrine therapy, and management of advanced disease. Brief chapters also address nonspecific symptoms of advanced disease, male breast cancer, and psychological considerations. Emphasis is on clinical management and review of many published controlled trials. Chapters conclude with short lists of recommendations and long alphabetic lists of reference material from the world literature. Since breast cancer continues to increase gradually in incidence and is most common in the United States, it commands attention.

  17. Interest in medical therapy for celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Christina A.; Simpson, Suzanne; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Lewis, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A gluten-free diet is the treatment for celiac disease, but pharmaceutical agents are being developed. The level of interest amongst patients in using a medication to treat celiac disease is unknown. This study examined the level of interest amongst patients in medication to treat celiac disease. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to celiac disease patients and data were collected on demographics, presentation, and interest in medication. Three validated celiac disease-specific instruments were incorporated: Celiac Disease Associated Quality of Life, the Celiac Symptom Index, and the Celiac Dietary Adherence Test. Results: Responses were received from 365 individuals with biopsy-proven celiac disease. Respondents were 78% (n = 276) female, 48% (n = 170) over 50 years of age, and experienced a classical (diarrhea predominant) presentation in 44% (n = 154). Of the 339 individuals answering the question regarding use of a medication to treat celiac disease, 66% were interested. Interest was greatest in older individuals (71% >50 years of age versus 60% <50 years of age, p = 0.0415), men (78% men versus 62% women, p = 0.0083), frequent restaurant customers (76% versus 58%, p = 0.0006), those dissatisfied with their weight (73% versus 51%, p = 0.0003) and those concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet (77% versus 64%, p = 0.0176). Length of time since diagnosis, education, presentation, and symptoms with gluten exposure did not demonstrate any effect. Interest in medication was associated with a worse quality of life (CD-QOL 69.4 versus 80.1, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Most individuals with celiac disease are interested in using a medication. Interest was highest among men, older individuals, frequent restaurant customers, individuals dissatisfied with their weight or concerned with the cost of a gluten-free diet, and those with a worse quality of life. PMID:24003336

  18. Bilateral Deep Brain Stimulation vs Best Medical Therapy for Patients With Advanced Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Frances M.; Follett, Kenneth; Stern, Matthew; Hur, Kwan; Harris, Crystal; Marks, William J.; Rothlind, Johannes; Sagher, Oren; Reda, Domenic; Moy, Claudia S.; Pahwa, Rajesh; Burchiel, Kim; Hogarth, Penelope; Lai, Eugene C.; Duda, John E.; Holloway, Kathryn; Samii, Ali; Horn, Stacy; Bronstein, Jeff; Stoner, Gatana; Heemskerk, Jill; Huang, Grant D.

    2010-01-01

    Context Deep brain stimulation is an accepted treatment for advanced Parkinson disease (PD), although there are few randomized trials comparing treatments, and most studies exclude older patients. Objective To compare 6-month outcomes for patients with PD who received deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy. Design, Setting, and Patients Randomized controlled trial of patients who received either deep brain stimulation or best medical therapy, stratified by study site and patient age (<70 years vs ≥70 years) at 7 Veterans Affairs and 6 university hospitals between May 2002 and October 2005. A total of 255 patients with PD (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≥2 while not taking medications) were enrolled; 25% were aged 70 years or older. The final 6-month follow-up visit occurred in May 2006. Intervention Bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (n=60) or globus pallidus (n=61). Patients receiving best medical therapy (n=134) were actively managed by movement disorder neurologists. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time spent in the “on” state (good motor control with unimpeded motor function) without troubling dyskinesia, using motor diaries. Other outcomes included motor function, quality of life, neurocognitive function, and adverse events. Results Patients who received deep brain stimulation gained a mean of 4.6 h/d of on time without troubling dyskinesia compared with 0 h/d for patients who received best medical therapy (between group mean difference, 4.5 h/d [95% CI, 3.7-5.4 h/d]; P<.001). Motor function improved significantly (P<.001) with deep brain stimulation vs best medical therapy, such that 71% of deep brain stimulation patients and 32% of best medical therapy patients experienced clinically meaningful motor function improvements (≥5 points). Compared with the best medical therapy group, the deep brain stimulation group experienced significant improvements in the summary measure of quality of life and on 7 of 8 PD

  19. In-Flight Personalized Medication Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peletskaya, E.; Griko, Y. V.

    2016-01-01

    , technologies capable of predicting and managing medication side effects, interactions, and toxicity of drugs during spaceflight are needed. We propose to develop and customize for NASAs applications available on the market Personalized Prescribing System (PPS) that would provide a comprehensive, non-invasive solution for safer, targeted medication management for every crew member resulting in safer and more effective treatment and, consequently, better performance. PPS will function as both decision support and record-keeping tool for flight surgeons and astronauts in applying the recommended medications for situations arising in flight. The information on individual drug sensitivity will translate into personalized risk assessment for adverse drug reactions and treatment failures for each drug from the medication kit as well as predefined outcome of any combination of them. Dosage recommendations will also be made individually. The mobile app will facilitate ease of use by crew and medical professionals during training and flight missions.

  20. Medical management of diabetes after bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, J-L; Pradignac, A; Luca, F; Meyer, L; Rohr, S

    2009-12-01

    Several studies indicate that bariatric surgery frequently leads to resolution or improvement of type 2 diabetes in overweight patients. However, the medical postoperative management requires lifelong counselling, monitoring and nutrient supplements in patients in remission as well as in patients who continue to be diabetic. The aim of such management is to avoid nutritional deficiencies, and to delay diabetes relapse by optimizing the control of risk factors. To this end, diet and pharmacological prescriptions, including vitamin and mineral supplements, are indispensable, despite the fact that specific recommendations, until now, have been lacking for these particular patients. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. EMS incident management: emergency medical logistics.

    PubMed

    Maniscalco, P M; Christen, H T

    1999-01-01

    If you had to get x amount of supplies to point A or point B, or both, in 10 minutes, how would you do it? The answer lies in the following steps: 1. Develop a logistics plan. 2. Use emergency management as a partner agency for developing your logistics plan. 3. Implement a push logistics system by determining what supplies/medications and equipment are important. 4. Place mass casualty/disaster caches at key locations for rapid deployment. Have medication/fluid caches available at local hospitals. 5. Develop and implement command caches for key supervisors and managers. 6. Anticipate the logistics requirements of a terrorism/tactical violence event based on a community threat assessment. 7. Educate the public about preparing a BLS family disaster kit. 8. Test logistics capabilities at disaster exercises. 9. Budget for logistics needs. 10. Never underestimate the importance of logistics. When logistics support fails, the EMS system fails.

  2. Medical management after indoor fires: a review.

    PubMed

    Welling, L; van Harten, S M; Patka, P; Bierens, J J L M; Boers, M; Luitse, J S K; Mackie, D P; Trouwborst, A; Gouma, D J; Kreis, R W

    2005-09-01

    Fires involving mass burn casualties require extreme efforts and flexibility from the regular health care system. The café fire in Volendam, which occurred shortly after midnight on the first of January 2001, resulted in the worst indoor mass burns incident in Dutch history. During the extensive medical evaluation of this disaster, it became obvious that information on similar incidents is relatively scarce in the literature. This article systematically reviews the existing information in the medical literature on indoor fires and provides findings and knowledge used in the evaluation of the medical management after indoor fires and for future mass burn casualty preparedness, mitigation and response. A literature review was undertaken for burn disasters with characteristics similar to the indoor Volendam fire disaster. In all fires, the following aspects were investigated: characteristics of the fire; the initial emergency response; triage and on-site treatment; primary and secondary distribution; hospital admission; severity of the sustained injuries and mortality. A total of nine similar indoor fires were selected. The number of people involved was reported in seven fires (range 137-6000). All reports provided the mortality rate (range 1.4% to over 50%). Data regarding the emergency response could be collected in half of the studies. On-scene triage was performed in five fires. The number of hospitals participating in the primary distribution ranged from 1 to 19. Except for the Volendam fire, all patients were primarily distributed to general hospitals. Characteristics of indoor fires, which are relevant for disaster preparedness, mitigation and response are not frequently reported in medical literature. The current articles on indoor fires, mainly report on numbers of casualties and the mortality. Limited data are available to provide insight in the characteristics of management and medical treatment and to come up with suggestions for improvement of future

  3. Medical cannabis and chronic opioid therapy.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M

    2010-12-01

    Fourteen states and the District of Columbia have legalized the use of cannabis for medical purposes. A small, high-quality literature supports the efficacy of medical cannabis for the treatment of neuropathic pain. The smoked botanical product, however, is associated with a number of adverse medical and psychiatric consequences. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that acute use of cannabis results in impairment of every important metric related to the safe operation of a motor vehicle. Epidemiological data show associations between recent cannabis use and both psychomotor impairment and motor vehicle crashes, associations that are strengthened by the concomitant use of alcohol and other central nervous system depressants. Finally, data from pain clinics reveals an unusually high prevalence of cannabis use in nearly all age groups and an association between cannabis use and opioid and other substance misuse. Based on available data and expert opinion, concomitant use of cannabis and opioids is an absolute contraindication to the operation of a motor vehicle. In patients who use cannabis and are prescribed opioids, heightened vigilance for opioid- and other substance-related problems is warranted. It is appropriate to refrain from prescribing opioids to individuals using medical cannabis if there is reasonable suspicion that the combination will pose a risk to the patient or others.

  4. In-ear medical devices for acoustic therapies in tinnitus treatments, state of the art.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, David; Tavira-Sanchez, Francisco; Recuero-Lopez, Manuel; Anthony, Brian W

    2017-04-21

    Cochrane reviews indicate there is very limited support for all forms of sound therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy has the strongest support. American Academy of Otolaryngology (AAO) recently published some guidelines which recommends Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for tinnitus intervention, and only indicates that sound therapy should be considered an "option" for intervention. Nevertheless, acoustic therapy could lead to cause changes in the tinnitus perception and has been appreciated by the affected people for years. In the last decades, the use of sound or sound enrichment has become a central part of many tinnitus management programs used by audiologists, whether the intention was to mask tinnitus, suppress tinnitus, or interrupt the tinnitus generating neural activity. Several acoustic therapies have been developed and implemented in the last 40 years, but how can we determine which one is the most effective? We can determine the effects based on the results reported in many research studies, but in those studies are many factors that differ from one study to another, like in-ear medical devices used to apply acoustic therapy for tinnitus treatment. In this article, we review and analyze the different types of in-ear medical devices used in the most recently acoustic therapies in treatments against tinnitus, allowing us to identify the pros and cons. By our analysis, an optimal medical device could be characterized to enhance the application of acoustic therapies and in consequence the global results of the sound therapies that already exist. In this review, it was considered acoustic therapies, the technology implemented in medical devices and the clinical needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Prosthodontic management of implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Ghadeer; Bryington, Matthew; De Kok, Ingeborg J; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2014-01-01

    Implant-supported dental restorations can be screw-retained, cement-retained, or a combination of both, whereby a metal superstructure is screwed to the implants and crowns are individually cemented to the metal frame. Each treatment modality has advantages and disadvantages. The use of computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture technologies for the manufacture of implant superstructures has proved to be advantageous in the quality of materials, precision of the milled superstructures, and passive fit. Maintenance and recall evaluations are an essential component of implant therapy. The longevity of implant restorations is limited by their biological and prosthetic maintenance requirements.

  6. [Immunotherapies and targeted therapies in medical oncology].

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Benoît; Champiat, Stéphane; Loirat, Delphine; Arrondeau, Jennifer; Lemoine, Nathalie; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    New immunotherapies, also called "immune checkpoints", are promising and showed interesting antitumoral activities in particular in advanced setting of melanoma, clear cell renal cancer or non-small cell lung carcinoma. These treatments include ipilimumab, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1. There is a strong rational for combination of immunotherapies and targeted therapies. This review is dedicated to expose the theorical issues and preclinical data of such combinations. This review examined the impact of immunotherapies on transduction pathways and modification of immunity related to targeted therapies. First clinical data form early drug development studies showed the difficulties observed with such combination and limitating toxicities. Finally, potential interesting combinations are overviewed with an emphasis on sequential treatments.

  7. Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Weisberg, Risa B

    2014-11-01

    This article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part Special Series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation.

  8. Medical and noninvasive therapy for Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Simon L; Nedzelski, Julian M

    2010-10-01

    Nonoperative therapy continues to be the mainstay of treatment of patients suffering from Meniere disease. Despite extensive research, the exact pathogenesis of Meniere disease remains elusive. The poorly understood nature of this condition has made it nearly impossible to develop treatments that are curative. Most modern treatments are aimed at controlling symptoms. This article reviews the various nonoperative treatments that have been used to treat Meniere disease historically as well as outlining the authors' clinical treatment paradigm. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Music therapy in pain and symptom management.

    PubMed

    Magill-Levreault, L

    1993-01-01

    The use of music therapy in pain and symptom management in the care of patients with long-term and life-threatening illnesses can be an effective non-pharmacologic approach to help ameliorate pain and suffering. By altering affective, cognitive, and sensory processes, music may decrease pain perception by distraction, change in mood, increased control, use of prior skills, and relaxation. This article reviews the background of the use of music therapy in pain management, explores a theoretical framework, and describes methods and techniques. Three case studies are provided to demonstrate the work.

  10. Medical Yoga Therapy.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Ina

    2017-02-10

    Medical yoga is defined as the use of yoga practices for the prevention and treatment of  medical conditions. Beyond the physical elements of yoga, which are important and effective for  strengthening  the  body,  medical  yoga  also  incorporates  appropriate  breathing  techniques,  mindfulness, and meditation in order to achieve the maximum benefits. Multiple studies have  shown that yoga can positively impact the body in many ways, including helping to regulate blood  glucose levels, improve musculoskeletal ailments and keeping the cardiovascular system in tune. It  also has been shown to have important psychological benefits, as the practice of yoga can help to  increase mental energy and positive feelings, and decrease negative feelings of aggressiveness,  depression and anxiety.

  11. Opt-in medical management strategies.

    PubMed

    Fetterolf, Donald; Olson, Marty

    2008-02-01

    Historically, health plans and disease management companies have employed "opt-out" strategies for evaluating medical management outcomes across larger populations, targeting the entire population of eligible individuals and allowing those not interested to opt out. Recent observations that the predominant effort of these programs is on high-risk patients has lead some managers to suggest that the focus be on only those individuals with an anticipated higher effectiveness and lower cost to the payers of such services. They believe such "opt-in" models, in which only higher risk participants are targeted and enrolled, will deliver higher value. The use of common opt-in models, however, is not only methodologically unsound, but experience in the field suggests there may be less overall effect as well. Calculation methods for developing impact remain extremely sensitive to methodology

  12. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of Jaws: A Low-Level Laser Therapy and Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Case Approach

    PubMed Central

    Minamisako, Mariana Comparotto; Lisboa, Mariáh Luz; Mariela Rodríguez Cordeiro, Mabel; Grando, Liliane Janete

    2016-01-01

    Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ) can be considered an inability of the alveolar bone to respond to an injury, which frequently leads to severe local and systemic complications. Once the problem is installed, dentist must use all therapeutic approaches recommended. This manuscript reports a successful management of MRONJ handled with antibiotics, conservative debridement, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), and photodynamic therapy (PDT) up to 12 months. As healing of MRONJ may be very slow, combined therapeutic approaches are required. Besides the recommended conventional treatment protocol, LLLT and PDT are important tools to contribute to healing and improvement of patient's quality of life. PMID:27668100

  13. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan [Wading River, NY

    2012-05-08

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of fixed field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing fixed field magnets.

  14. Gantry for medical particle therapy facility

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2013-04-23

    A particle therapy gantry for delivering a particle beam to a patient includes a beam tube having a curvature defining a particle beam path and a plurality of superconducting, variable field magnets sequentially arranged along the beam tube for guiding the particle beam along the particle path. In a method for delivering a particle beam to a patient through a gantry, a particle beam is guided by a plurality of variable field magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube of the gantry and the beam is alternately focused and defocused with alternately arranged focusing and defocusing variable field magnets.

  15. Medical waste management training for healthcare managers - a necessity?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers) regarding bio-medical waste management. Methods The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June – August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions). A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups. Results 67.5% (162) of participants were female. 42.5% (102) are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers. A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test) and others who had not (p<0.01). It was observed that information levels of all healthcare managers who had received training on waste management had risen at the completion of that training session. Conclusion On the subject of waste management, to have trained healthcare employees who are responsible for the safe disposal of wastes in hospitals is both a necessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country. PMID:24499642

  16. Plasmonic nanoprobes: from chemical sensing to medical diagnostics and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Fales, Andrew M.; Griffin, Guy D.; Khoury, Christopher G.; Liu, Yang; Ngo, Hoan; Norton, Stephen J.; Register, Janna K.; Wang, Hsin-Neng; Yuan, Hsiangkuo

    2013-10-01

    This article provides an overview of the development and applications of plasmonics-active nanoprobes in our laboratory for chemical sensing, medical diagnostics and therapy. Molecular Sentinel nanoprobes provide a unique tool for DNA/RNA biomarker detection both in a homogeneous solution or on a chip platform for medical diagnostics. The possibility of combining spectral selectivity and high sensitivity of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) process with the inherent molecular specificity of nanoprobes provides an important multiplex diagnostic modality. Gold nanostars can provide an excellent multi-modality platform, combining two-photon luminescence with photothermal therapy as well as Raman imaging with photodynamic therapy. Several examples of optical detection using SERS and photonics-based treatments are presented to illustrate the usefulness and potential of the plasmonic nanoprobes for theranostics, which seamlessly combines diagnostics and therapy.

  17. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initial medical evaluation and management... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3) Urinalysis...

  18. [Application of information management system about medical equipment].

    PubMed

    Hang, Jianjin; Zhang, Chaoqun; Wu, Xiang-Yang

    2011-05-01

    Based on the practice of workflow, information management system about medical equipment was developed and its functions such as gathering, browsing, inquiring and counting were introduced. With dynamic and complete case management of medical equipment, the system improved the management of medical equipment.

  19. Medical association supports studies on marijuana therapy.

    PubMed

    1995-06-16

    The Gay and Lesbian Medical Association (GLMA) issued a statement on May 19, 1995, announcing its support of clinical trials of the therapeutic uses of marijuana. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has continued to resist permitting clinical trials of marijuana despite evidence that it can relieve symptoms of cancer, multiple sclerosis, and glaucoma. According to Dr. Alvin Novick, head of GLMA's AIDS Task Force, the Clinton Administration is being asked to not let its political fears blind it to the positive and legitimate scientific research designed to alleviate the suffering of thousands of AIDS patients.

  20. A Total Information Management System For All Medical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouimette, Donald; Nudelman, Sol; Ramsby, Gale; Spackman, Thomas

    1985-09-01

    A PACS has been designed for the University of Connecticut Health Center to serve all departments acquiring images for diagnosis, surgery and therapy. It incorporates a multiple community communications architecture to provide complete information management for medical images, medical data and departmental administrative matter. The system is modular and expandable. It permits an initial installation for radiology and subsequent expansion to include other departments at the Health Center, beginning with internal medicine, surgery, ophthalmology and dentistry. The design permits sufficient expansion to offer the potential for accepting the additional burden of a hospital information system. Primary parameters that led to this system design were based on the anticipation that departments in time could achieve generating 60 to 90% of their images suited to insertion in a PACS, that a high network throughput for large block image transfers would be essen-tial and that total system reliability was fundamental to success.

  1. Medical and alternative therapies in urinary tract stone disease.

    PubMed

    Yuvanc, Ercan; Yilmaz, Erdal; Tuglu, Devrim; Batislam, Ertan

    2015-11-06

    Nephrolithiasis is a serious problem for both patients and the health system. Recurrence stands out as a significant problem in urinary system stone disease, the prevalence of which is increasing gradually. If recurrence is not prevented, patients may go through recurrent operations due to nephrolithiasis. While classical therapeutic options are available for all stone types, the number of randomized controlled studies and extensive meta-analyses focusing on their efficiency are inadequate. Various alternative therapeutic options to these medical therapies also stand out in recent years. The etiology of urolithiasis is multifactorial and not always related to nutritional factors. Nutrition therapy seems to be useful, either along with pharmacological therapy or as a monotherapy. General nutrition guidelines are useful in promoting public health and developing nutrition plans that reduce the risk or attenuate the effects of diseases affected by nutrition. Nutrition therapy involves the evaluation of a patient's nutritional state and intake, the diagnosis of nutrition risk factors, and the organization and application of a nutrition program. The main target is the reduction or prevention of calculus formation and growth via decreasing lithogenic risk factors and increasing lithogenic inhibitors in urine. This review focuses briefly on classical medical therapy, along with alternative options, related diets, and medical expulsive therapy.

  2. Traditional Chinese medical therapy for erectile dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Jiang, Hongyang

    2017-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), including acupuncture and Chinese herbs, is used as an alternative therapy to increase the curative effect for erectile dysfunction (ED). A large number of studies have been conducted to investigate the effect and mechanism of TCM for treating ED. The therapeutic effect of acupuncture on ED is still controversial at present. However, some Chinese herbs exhibited satisfying outcomes and they might improve erectile function by activating nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, increasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) expression, elevating testosterone level, reducing intracellular Ca2+ concentration, down-regulating transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1)/Smad2 signaling pathway, or ameliorating the oxidative stress. PMID:28540226

  3. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  4. Augmenting Antidepressant Medication Treatment of Depressed Women with Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples: A Randomized Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Wayne H.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.; Golden, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first study to evaluate adding emotionally focused therapy for couples (EFT) to antidepressant medication in the treatment of women with major depressive disorder and comorbid relationship discord. Twenty-four women and their male partners were randomized to 6 months of medication management alone (MM) or MM augmented with EFT (MM +…

  5. Management of noninfectious posterior uveitis with intravitreal drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Hui Yi; Agarwal, Aniruddha; Lee, Cecilia S; Chhablani, Jay; Gupta, Vishali; Khatri, Manoj; Nirmal, Jayabalan; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh

    2016-01-01

    Uveitis is an important cause of vision loss worldwide due to its sight-threatening complications, especially cystoid macular edema, as well as choroidal neovascularization, macular ischemia, cataract, and glaucoma. Systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy for noninfectious posterior uveitis; however, various systemic side effects can occur. Intravitreal medication achieves a therapeutic level in the vitreous while minimizing systemic complications and is thus used as an exciting alternative. Corticosteroids, antivascular endothelial growth factors, immunomodulators such as methotrexate and sirolimus, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently available for intravitreal therapy. This article reviews the existing literature for efficacy and safety of these various options for intravitreal drug therapy for the management of noninfectious uveitis (mainly intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis). PMID:27789936

  6. Biocompatible metallic stent for medical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathuria, Yash P.

    2003-12-01

    In the stent theory for the medical applications, especially in coronary heart disease, the metallic stent of high quality demands the ability for precision micromaterial processing. It possesses an inherent advantage of adequate radio opacity. This paper describes the current status as well as fabrication of such metallic stent of length 20 mm and dia. 2.1 mm with an annular tube thickness of 0.2 mm, by using the short pulse Nd-YAG laser. Fine structures with slit width of 0.1 mm and pitch better than 0.2 mm are created with sharpness and low roughness in the cut surface. Some features of the reduced heat affected zone and dross removal process of the cut surfaces are also discussed.

  7. Kaposi sarcoma: review and medical management update.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved, the true nature of Kaposi sarcoma remains an enigma. Four clinical variants have been described for the disease, differing in natural history, site of predilection, and prognosis. All forms of Kaposi sarcoma may manifest in the oral cavity and Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus appears essential to development of all clinical variants. The spectrum of therapeutic strategies is broad and selection of appropriate intervention mandates a thorough understanding of disease spread and the patient's symptomatology, as well as risks and benefits of therapy. This article provides an overview of epidemiology, subtypes, clinical course, pathogenesis, and management strategies for Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Complementary therapies in addition to medication for patients with nonchronic, nonradicular low back pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Samantha; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2017-01-01

    A total of 2.7 million patients present to US emergency departments annually for management of low back pain (LBP). Despite optimal medical therapy, more than 50% remain functionally impaired 3 months later. We performed a systematic review to address the following question: Among patients with nonchronic LBP, does spinal manipulation, massage, exercise, or yoga, when combined with standard medical therapy, improve pain and functional outcomes more than standard medical therapy alone? We used published searches to identify relevant studies, supplemented with our own updated search. Studies were culled from the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Index to Chiropractic Literature. Our goal was to identify randomized studies that included patients with nonradicular LBP of <12 weeks' duration that compared the complementary therapy to usual care, sham therapy, or interventions known not to be efficacious, while providing all patients with standard analgesics. The outcomes of interest were improvement in pain scores or measures of functionality. We identified 2 randomized controlled trials in which chiropractic manipulation + medical therapy failed to show benefit vs medical therapy alone. We identified 4 randomized controlled trials in which exercise therapy + medical therapy failed to show benefit vs medical therapy alone. We did not identify any eligible studies of yoga or massage therapy. In conclusion, for patients with nonchronic, nonradicular LBP, available evidence does not support the use of spinal manipulation or exercise therapy in addition to standard medical therapy. There is insufficient evidence to determine if yoga or massage is beneficial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Managing acute medical admissions: a survey of acute medical services and medical assessment and planning units in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Providence, C; Gommans, J; Burns, A

    2012-01-01

    To determine the current provision of acute medical services, including the development of medical assessment and planning units (MAPUs), by district health boards (DHBs) throughout New Zealand (NZ). A questionnaire-based survey about organisation of acute medical services and establishment of MAPUs was sent to all 21 DHBs in NZ. All 21 DHBs responded. Seven DHBs serving 42% of the population have established MAPUs since 2003 and a further six have plans to do so over the next 3 years, potentially expanding service to 73% of the NZ population. All seven current MAPUs are in close proximity to and accept patients directly from emergency departments. Each MAPU has a documented target length of stay, four units have referral protocols, five provide guidelines for management of common medical emergencies and five routinely audit unit performance. Five MAPUs have cardiac monitored beds and isolation rooms. Rapid access is available to computed tomography scanning (six units), ultrasound (five) and echocardiography (four). Two units have no nominated physician leadership and two lack dedicated therapy resources. General physicians are involved in provision of acute medical services in 20 of 21 DHBs. Medical assessment and planning units have become an important component of acute medical service provision in NZ. The established units largely comply with Australasian recommendations, although important deficiencies exist. Training of physicians must combine the needs of acute medical patients and clinical roles of physicians within MAPUs with local DHB requirements for services to be most effective. © 2010 The Authors. Internal Medicine Journal © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  10. Stenting and medical therapy for atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christopher J; Murphy, Timothy P; Cutlip, Donald E; Jamerson, Kenneth; Henrich, William; Reid, Diane M; Cohen, David J; Matsumoto, Alan H; Steffes, Michael; Jaff, Michael R; Prince, Martin R; Lewis, Eldrin F; Tuttle, Katherine R; Shapiro, Joseph I; Rundback, John H; Massaro, Joseph M; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Dworkin, Lance D

    2014-01-02

    Atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis is a common problem in the elderly. Despite two randomized trials that did not show a benefit of renal-artery stenting with respect to kidney function, the usefulness of stenting for the prevention of major adverse renal and cardiovascular events is uncertain. We randomly assigned 947 participants who had atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and either systolic hypertension while taking two or more antihypertensive drugs or chronic kidney disease to medical therapy plus renal-artery stenting or medical therapy alone. Participants were followed for the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular and renal events (a composite end point of death from cardiovascular or renal causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for congestive heart failure, progressive renal insufficiency, or the need for renal-replacement therapy). Over a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 31 to 55), the rate of the primary composite end point did not differ significantly between participants who underwent stenting in addition to receiving medical therapy and those who received medical therapy alone (35.1% and 35.8%, respectively; hazard ratio with stenting, 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.17; P=0.58). There were also no significant differences between the treatment groups in the rates of the individual components of the primary end point or in all-cause mortality. During follow-up, there was a consistent modest difference in systolic blood pressure favoring the stent group (-2.3 mm Hg; 95% CI, -4.4 to -0.2; P=0.03). Renal-artery stenting did not confer a significant benefit with respect to the prevention of clinical events when added to comprehensive, multifactorial medical therapy in people with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis and hypertension or chronic kidney disease. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00081731.).

  11. Ulcerative Colitis: Update on Medical Management.

    PubMed

    Iskandar, Heba N; Dhere, Tanvi; Farraye, Francis A

    2015-11-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease whose pathogenesis is multifactorial and includes influences from genes, the environment, and the gut microbiome. Recent advances in diagnosis and treatment have led to significant improvement in managing the disease. Disease monitoring with the use of therapeutic drug monitoring, stool markers, and assessment of mucosal healing have garnered much attention. The recent approval of vedolizumab for treatment of moderate to severe UC has been a welcome addition. Newer biologics, including those targeting the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK) pathway, are on the horizon to add to the current armamentarium of anti-TNF alpha and anti-integrin therapies. The recent publication of the SCENIC consensus statement on surveillance and management of dysplasia in UC patients supports the use of chromoendoscopy over random biopsies in detecting dysplasia. This review highlights these recent advances along with others that have been made with ulcerative colitis.

  12. Medical therapy of peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, K R; Isenberg, J I

    1992-04-01

    The gastric duodenal mucosa normally is protected from the damaging effects of gastric acid and pepsin by ill-defined mechanisms. Ulcers may arise when there is an imbalance between the aggressive and defensive factors that renders the mucosa susceptible to damage. A variety of factors have been identified that may favor the development of peptic ulcers, but no single pathophysiologic defect applies in all ulcer patients. In duodenal ulcers, gastric acid hypersecretion is observed in as many as one third of patients; however, most patients with duodenal ulcers secrete normal amounts of gastric acid. Decreased mucosal bicarbonate secretion may be important in at least some duodenal ulcer patients. Use of NSAIDs may cause either gastric or duodenal ulcers, probably through the inhibition of mucosal prostaglandin synthesis and disruption of mucosal defenses. Finally, a recently identified bacterium, H. pylori, causes a chronic gastritis that is found in the overwhelming majority of patients with duodenal ulcers and non-NSAID-associated gastric ulcers. This bacterium may play a pivotal role in ulcer pathogenesis and, especially, in ulcer recurrences. A number of drugs of proved efficacy are available for the treatment of acute duodenal and gastric ulcers. The H2 receptor antagonists administered once daily remain the mainstay of ulcer therapy because of their efficacy, ease of use, and excellent safety profile. More thorough and long-lasting acid inhibition is afforded by the H+/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor omeprazole. This agent also promotes more rapid ulcer healing, but in most patients, this minor advantage may not justify the higher cost. It is not known whether more rapid healing will translate into lower ulcer complication rates. Until further data are available, this drug may be preferable in patients with large or complicated ulcers. In patients with refractory ulcers, omeprazole is clearly superior to other available agents. Agents that promote mucosal defense

  13. Description of Antihypertensive Medication Use in a Pediatric Practice: Single and Multiple Antihypertensive Medication Therapy.

    PubMed

    Binka, Edem; Mendley, Susan; Gaskin, Peter; Himes, Carisa; Jinadu, Laide; Baker-Smith, Carissa M

    2017-01-01

    Prescription of multiple antihypertensive medications for the treatment of essential hypertension (HTN) has been well described in adults but not in children and adolescents. The authors describe the frequency with which children with essential HTN are prescribed a single vs two or more concomitantly administered antihypertensive medications. They also describe demographic features and comorbidities associated with the prescription of a single vs multiple antihypertensive medications. Multiple antihypertensive medication use in the management of pediatric HTN, as in the management of adult HTN, is not uncommon. In this single-center, retrospective study of 113 children with essential HTN, 28% of children were concomitantly prescribed two or more antihypertensive medications for poorly controlled blood pressure following prescription of a single medication. Demographic and comorbid conditions associated with the prescription of more than one antihypertensive medication include advanced hypertensive stage, race, and a family history of HTN. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Smart financial management of medical office space.

    PubMed

    Shactman, D

    1993-06-01

    In a healthcare environment of strained resources and scarce profits, hospital administrators must seek revenue from all available sources. Some potential revenue sources are capital intensive, however, requiring large initial investments for new construction and modern equipment. Other potential revenue sources may require starting new programs and recruiting additional staff. Few potentially income-producing alternatives can be funded from existing assets, require little additional investment, and yield significant revenue. But hospitals that own and lease medical office buildings, will find that with proper management these existing assets can become sources of additional revenue.

  15. Coagulopathy, following medical therapy, for carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bern, Murray M

    2005-02-01

    Cancer of the prostate can be associated with coagulopathy characterized as primary fibrinolysis or diffuse intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) with secondary fibrinolysis. These complications are usually associated with surgical manipulation of the prostate or with advanced metastatic disease. This report describes a patient with DIC and fibrinolysis following medical management of advanced prostate cancer with gonadotropin-releasing hormone leuprolide, while receiving the androgen receptor blocking agent flutamide. This report suggests that release of procoagulant material from prostatic carcinoma may be so rapid following hormonal management that consumptive coagulopathy with fibrinolysis can follow. Shortened Abstract: Medical management with gonadotropin releasing hormone allowed the expression of consumptive coagulopathy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

  16. Improvement in medication adherence and self-management of diabetes with a clinical pharmacy program: a randomized controlled trial in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Cani, Catarina Gomes; da Silva Girão Lopes, Laura; Queiroz, Márcia; Nery, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a clinical pharmacy program on health outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy at a teaching hospital in Brazil. METHOD: A randomized controlled trial with a 6-month follow-up period was performed in 70 adults, aged 45 years or older, with type 2 diabetes who were taking insulin and who had an HbA1c level ≥8%. Patients in the control group (CG) (n = 36) received standard care, patients in the intervention group (IG) (n = 34) received an individualized pharmacotherapeutic care plan and diabetes education. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c. Secondary outcomes included diabetes and medication knowledge, adherence to medication, insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques and diabetes-related quality of life. Outcomes were evaluated at baseline and 6 months using questionnaires. RESULTS: Diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, adherence to medication and correct insulin injection and home blood glucose monitoring techniques significantly improved in the intervention group but remained unchanged in the control group. At the end of the study, mean HbA1c values in the control group remained unchanged but were significantly reduced in the intervention group. Diabetes-related quality of life significantly improved in the intervention group but worsened significantly in the control group. CONCLUSION: The program improved health outcomes and resulted in better glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes undergoing insulin therapy. PMID:25789518

  17. Medical Management of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Doosoo

    2015-07-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is still a major threat worldwide. However, recent scientific advances in diagnostic and therapeutic tools have improved the management of drug-resistant TB. The development of rapid molecular testing methods allows for the early detection of drug resistance and prompt initiation of an appropriate treatment. In addition, there has been growing supportive evidence for shorter treatment regimens in multidrug-resistant TB; and for the first time in over 50 years, new anti-TB drugs have been developed. The World Health Organization has recently revised their guidelines, primarily based on evidence from a meta-analysis of individual patient data (n=9,153) derived from 32 observational studies, and outlined the recommended combination and correct use of available anti-TB drugs. This review summarizes the updated guidelines with a focus on the medical management of drug-resistant TB.

  18. MRIdb: medical image management for biobank research.

    PubMed

    Woodbridge, Mark; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; O'Regan, Declan P

    2013-10-01

    Clinical picture archiving and communications systems provide convenient, efficient access to digital medical images from multiple modalities but can prove challenging to deploy, configure and use. MRIdb is a self-contained image database, particularly suited to the storage and management of magnetic resonance imaging data sets for population phenotyping. It integrates a mature image archival system with an intuitive web-based user interface that provides visualisation and export functionality. In addition, utilities for auditing, data migration and system monitoring are included in a virtual machine image that is easily deployed with minimal configuration. The result is a freely available turnkey solution, designed to support epidemiological and imaging genetics research. It allows the management of patient data sets in a secure, scalable manner without requiring the installation of any bespoke software on end users' workstations. MRIdb is an open-source software, available for download at http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/bioinfsupport/resources/software/mridb .

  19. Medication Management for People with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, Allison; Sexson, Kathryn; Harvath, Theresa A

    2017-05-01

    : This article is the fourth in a series, Supporting Family Caregivers: No Longer Home Alone, published in collaboration with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Results of focus groups conducted as part of the AARP Public Policy Institute's No Longer Home Alone video project supported evidence that family caregivers aren't being given the information they need to manage the complex care regimens of their family members. This series of articles and accompanying videos aims to help nurses provide caregivers with the tools they need to manage their family member's medications. Each article explains the principles nurses should consider and reinforce with caregivers and is accompanied by a video for the caregiver to watch. The fourth video can be accessed at http://links.lww.com/AJN/A78.

  20. Medication Management for People with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, Allison; Sexson, Kathryn; Harvath, Theresa A

    2017-02-01

    This article is the fourth in a series, Supporting Family Caregivers: No Longer Home Alone, published in collaboration with the AARP Public Policy Institute. Results of focus groups conducted as part of the AARP Public Policy Institute's No Longer Home Alone video project supported evidence that family caregivers aren't being given the information they need to manage the complex care regimens of their family members. This series of articles and accompanying videos aims to help nurses provide caregivers with the tools they need to manage their family member's medications. Each article explains the principles nurses should consider and reinforce with caregivers and is accompanied by a video for the caregiver to watch. The fourth video can be accessed at http://links.lww.com/AJN/A78.

  1. Developing risk management behaviours for nurses through medication incident analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Maree; Tran, Duong Thuy; Young, Helen

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to define risk management behaviours related to medication safety. Mixed methods were used to analyze 318 nursing related medication incidents reported in an Australian metropolitan hospital. Most incidents did not result in patient harm (93%). Omission of medications was the most frequent often related to patient absences from the unit or nurses failing to sign for medications. Thematic analysis resulted in the Medication Safety Subscales including 29 behavioural statements within three domains-administering medications, storage and management of medications, managing adverse events related to medications. The Medication Safety Subscales can be used by managers, educators and clinicians to reinforce the importance of medication safety. Early action by nurses may reduce patient injury.

  2. Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: current management and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Amir A; Weisbrod, Allison B; Dillhoff, Mary; Schmidt, Carl; Pawlik, Timothy M

    2017-05-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA) is a malignancy with an increasing incidence and a high-case fatality. While surgery offers the best hope at long-term survival, only one-third of tumors are amenable to surgical resection at the time of the diagnosis. Unfortunately, conventional chemotherapy offers limited survival benefit in the management of unresectable or metastatic disease. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of iCCA and the use of next-generation sequencing techniques have provided a chance to identify 'target-able' molecular aberrations. These novel molecular therapies offer the promise to personalize therapy for patients with iCCA and, in turn, improve the outcomes of patients. Area covered: We herein review the current management options for iCCA with a focus on defining both established and emerging therapies. Expert commentary: Surgical resection remains as an only hope for cure in iCCA patients. However, frequently the diagnosis is delayed till advanced stages when surgery cannot be offered; signifying the urge for specific diagnostic tumor biomarkers and targeted therapies. New advances in genomic profiling have contributed to a better understanding of the landscape of molecular alterations in iCCA and offer hope for the development of novel diagnostic biomarkers and targeted therapies.

  3. Medical Management of Acute Radiation Syndromes : Immunoprophylaxis by Antiradiation Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Vecheslav; Jones, Jeffrey; Casey, Rachael; Kedar, Prasad

    Introduction: Traditionally, the treatment of Acute Radiation Syndrome (ARS) includes supportive therapy, cytokine therapy, blood component transfusions and even stem cell transplantation. Recommendations for ARS treatment are based on clinical symptoms, laboratory results, radiation exposure doses and information received from medical examinations. However, the current medical management of ARS does not include immune prophylaxis based on antiradiation vaccines or immune therapy with hyperimmune antiradiation serum. Immuneprophylaxis of ARS could result from stimulating the immune system via immunization with small doses of radiation toxins (Specific Radiation Determinants-SRD) that possess significant immuno-stimulatory properties. Methods: Principles of immuno-toxicology were used to derive this method of immune prophylaxis. An antiradiation vaccine containing a mixture of Hematotoxic, Neurotoxic and Non-bacterial (GI) radiation toxins, underwent modification into a toxoid forms of the original SRD radiation toxins. The vaccine was administered to animals at different times prior to irradiation. The animals were subjected to lethal doses of radiation that induced different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. Survival rates and clinical symptoms were observed in both control and vaccine-treated animals. Results: Vaccination with non-toxic doses of Radiation toxoids induced immunity from the elaborated Specific Radiation Determinant (SRD) toxins. Neutralization of radiation toxins by specific antiradiation antibodies resulted in significantly improved clinical symptoms in the severe forms of ARS and observed survival rates of 60-80% in animals subjected to lethal doses of radiation expected to induce different forms of ARS at LD 100/30. The most effective vaccination schedule for the antiradiation vaccine consisted of repeated injections 24 and 34 days before irradiation. The vaccine remained effective for the next two years, although the specific immune memory probably

  4. Adverse effects of acne medications: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Oudenhoven, Mollie D; Kinney, Megan A; McShane, Diana B; Burkhart, Craig N; Morrell, Dean S

    2015-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin. The clinical features of acne range from non-inflammatory comedones to inflammatory nodules. While often perceived as an adolescent disease, the prevalence remains high into adulthood, and the manifestations can have detrimental psychosocial effects. It is therefore not surprising that many patients are motivated to seek treatment. The existing treatment strategies for acne are complex due to the multifactorial pathogenesis of the disease. Although it is difficult to cure, four categories of medications have proved efficacious in reducing acne lesions: topical agents, systemic antibiotics, systemic retinoids, and hormonal agents. Unfortunately, these medications can cause adverse effects that may limit their use. Typically, these adverse effects are mild and transient and can be remedied by altering the dose or frequency of the offending agent. However, more serious adverse effects can occur that pose a significant health risk to the patient. Understanding how to recognize and manage the adverse effects of common acne therapies is imperative to providing the safest and most appropriate treatment for each patient. This article focuses on the recognition and management of adverse effects associated with current acne medications.

  5. Psychological therapies for the management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Sturgeon, John A

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a complex stressor that presents a significant challenge to most aspects of functioning and contributes to substantial physical, psychological, occupational, and financial cost, particularly in its chronic form. As medical intervention frequently cannot resolve pain completely, there is a need for management approaches to chronic pain, including psychological intervention. Psychotherapy for chronic pain primarily targets improvements in physical, emotional, social, and occupational functioning rather than focusing on resolution of pain itself. However, psychological therapies for chronic pain differ in their scope, duration, and goals, and thus show distinct patterns of treatment efficacy. These therapies fall into four categories: operant-behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The current article explores the theoretical distinctiveness, therapeutic targets, and effectiveness of these approaches as well as mechanisms and individual differences that factor into treatment response and pain-related dysfunction and distress. Implications for future research, dissemination of treatment, and the integration of psychological principles with other treatment modalities are also discussed. PMID:24748826

  6. Psychological therapies for the management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Sturgeon, John A

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a complex stressor that presents a significant challenge to most aspects of functioning and contributes to substantial physical, psychological, occupational, and financial cost, particularly in its chronic form. As medical intervention frequently cannot resolve pain completely, there is a need for management approaches to chronic pain, including psychological intervention. Psychotherapy for chronic pain primarily targets improvements in physical, emotional, social, and occupational functioning rather than focusing on resolution of pain itself. However, psychological therapies for chronic pain differ in their scope, duration, and goals, and thus show distinct patterns of treatment efficacy. These therapies fall into four categories: operant-behavioral therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. The current article explores the theoretical distinctiveness, therapeutic targets, and effectiveness of these approaches as well as mechanisms and individual differences that factor into treatment response and pain-related dysfunction and distress. Implications for future research, dissemination of treatment, and the integration of psychological principles with other treatment modalities are also discussed.

  7. The aging woman: the role of medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilken-Jensen, C; Ottesen, B

    2003-09-01

    The growth of the postmenopausal population demands a change in the medical profession's approach to health and disease. Especially in the developed world, lifespan is increasing, and at the age of 60 the majority of women will still have at least 20 years to live. There will, therefore, be an increasing need for health programs that lead to more years of disability free life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is but one example of the dilemmas medical therapy of the aging woman poses. In the sixties, estrogen was considered a wonder drug, effective for a multitude of postmenopausal problems and illnesses. Recent research has placed this notion into a more balanced perspective, emphasizing that every medical treatment should be based on evidence. It is therefore worrisome if the decline in the use of HRT is followed by an increased use of alternative medicine with mostly undocumented effects.

  8. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema

    Tijana Rajh

    2016-07-12

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  9. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Tijana Rajh

    2009-10-14

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology – an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  10. Managing medicinal risks in self-medication.

    PubMed

    Fainzang, Sylvie

    2014-05-01

    The practice of self-medication is exemplary in raising the question of medicinal uses and risks. In contrast to the biomedical or pharmacological view of self-medication, the anthropological approach looks to understand the logics that underpin it. Therefore, I wished to question how users choose the medicines they take and how they construct the modalities of their use. However, not only are the users conscious of the risks associated with pharmaceutical use, they even devise strategies that specifically aim to reduce these risks. Based on research carried out in France on how people use medicines in the context of self-medication, I examined the strategies they adopt in order to reduce the risks connected with such use. This study relies on qualitative research. It combines interviews with users and anthropological observation, both conducted at the participants' homes, to reveal their uses, their decisions, their hesitations and the precautions they take regarding their medicines. The logics underpinning the management of risks associated with medicinal consumption are varied. Thus we find quantitative and qualitative logics, in virtue of which users choose to limit their medicines depending on the number of different medicines or on their intrinsic qualities. Their choices hinge on a logic of cumulation and a logic of identity, where, in the former, users seek to increase or reduce their medicinal consumption to augment the efficacy of a medicine or, in the latter case, they aim to reduce the risks in relation to their personal characteristics. In the same way, the perception of risk that underpins consumption practices is organised according to the notions of risk in itself and risk for oneself, where risk is either considered to be inherent to the medicine or to be linked to the incompatibility between a given substance and a person's body. Managing risk is thus done in parallel to managing efficacy, where a balance is sought between maximising the latter

  11. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future.

  12. Iatrogenic glaucoma therapy failure: the adverse effects of topical antiglaucoma medication treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Sophia K; Higginbotham, Eve J

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma, a group of eye diseases that share a characteristic pattern of deterioration of the optic nerve, is a leading cause of blindness internationally. The treatment options for this optic neuropathy continue to remain limited considering that patients may become refractory to either medical therapy or surgical intervention. The initial treatment of choice for most ophthalmologists is topical medical therapy. The goal of medical therapy is to reduce the intraocular pressures in an effort to either halt or slow the progressive deterioration of the optic nerve. However, topical therapy causes a spectrum of cellular responses that may lead to chronic conjunctivitis after the use of multimedication and/or long-term therapy. This chronic conjunctivitis may not only lead to intolerance to therapy, but is also attributed to a significant proportion of trabeculectomy failures due to scarring of the bleb. Since incisional surgery is a primary option for long-term management of glaucoma, particularly those patients with end-stage disease, it is important to investigate the presence of topical drug- mediated inflammation and its effects on further surgical failure.

  13. [Medical therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2007-06-17

    The therapy of inflammatory bowel diseases is based on 5-aminosalicylates (5-ASAs) that are the forefront of treatment of mild-to-moderate active disease and maintenance; steroids are used for the treatment of moderate-to-severe active disease; immunosuppressives and sometimes antibiotics in moderate-to-severe disease; maintenance and for the treatment of selected complications. The last few years have witnessed a significant change in the treatment of Crohn's disease. Based on evidence from new clinical studies and recent meta-analyses, the role of and indications for conventional therapy have been reassessed. The 5-ASAs are nowadays less frequently used in both active disease and maintenance therapy. Instead, budesonide has been introduced in the treatment of mild-to-moderate ileal disease. Besides the modest use of 5-ASAs, steroids are prescribed for active colonic disease. Immunosuppressives, especially azathioprine, are more commonly used in moderate-to-severe disease as well as in maintenance. The preferred maintenance regimen following medically- and surgically-induced remission, in addition to relationship between medical and surgical therapies, has also changed. The recent introduction of new "biological" therapy represents a major, promising change in the therapy of resistant and penetrating disease.

  14. Old medications and new targeted therapies in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vivek; Denton, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    SSc is a multiorgan disease with significant morbidity that is associated with poor health-related quality of life. Treatment of this condition is often organ based and non-curative. However, there are newer, potentially disease-modifying therapies available to treat certain aspects of the disease. This review focuses on old and new therapies in the management of SSc in clinical practice. PMID:25065013

  15. Management of Newer Medications for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder In Commercial Health Plans

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Horgan, Constance M.; Quinn, Amity E.; Merrick, Elizabeth; Stewart, Maureen T.; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In the US, many individuals with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) pay for their medications using private health insurance coverage. As in other drug classes, private insurers are actively seeking to influence utilization and costs, particularly for newer and costlier medications. The approaches that insurers use may have important effects on patients’ access to medications. This paper examines approaches (e.g., copayments, prior authorization, and step therapy) that commercial health plans are employing to manage newer medications used to treat ADHD and changes in approaches since 2003. Methods Data are from a nationally representative survey of commercial health plans in 60 market areas regarding alcohol, drug abuse and mental health services in 2010. Responses were obtained from 389 plans (89% response rate), reporting on 925 insurance products. For each of six branded ADHD medications, respondents were asked whether the plan covered the medication and if so, on what copayment tier each medication was placed, and whether it was subject to prior authorization or step therapy. Measures of management approach were constructed for each medication and for the group of medications. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to test for association of the management approach with various health plan characteristics. Findings There was considerable variation across these 6 medications in how tightly they were managed by health plans, with newer medications being subject to more stringent management. The proportion of insurance products relying solely on copay tiering to manage novel ADHD medications appears to have decreased since 2003. Less than half of insurance products (43%) managed these 6 medications solely by use of Tier 3/4 placement, and most of the remainder (48%) used other restrictions (with or without Tier 3/4 placement). The average insurance product restricted access to at least 3 of the 6 brand-only medications examined

  16. Illustrated Medication Instructions as a Strategy to Improve Medication Management Among Latinos: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Arun; Riley, Brian; Boyington, Dane; Kripalani, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    Although illustrated medication instructions may improve medication management among vulnerable populations, little prior research has evaluated their use among Latinos. We conducted focus groups and interviews with Latino patients with diabetes at two safety net clinics in Tennessee to understand medication taking practices and perceptions of illustrated medication instructions. Patients reported confidence in being able to take medications, but demonstrated a lack of understanding of medication instructions. On further probing, they described several barriers to effective medication management rooted in poor communication. Patients expressed preference for illustrated medication instructions which could address several of the challenges raised by patients. PMID:22453163

  17. Medical management of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Norbert; Rodionov, Roman N; Mahlmann, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are the most common arterial aneurysms. Endovascular or open surgical aneurysm repair is indicated in patients with large AAA ≥ 5.5 cm in diameter as this prevents aneurysm rupture. The presence even of small AAAs not in need of immediate repair is associated with a very high cardiovascular risk including myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. This risk by far exceeds the risk of aneurysm rupture. These patients therefore should be considered as high-risk patients and receive optimal medical treatment and life-style modification of their cardiovascular risk factors to improve their prognosis. In addition, these patients should be followed-up for aneurysm growth and receive medical treatment to decrease aneurym progression and rupture rate. Treatment with statins has been shown to reduce cardiovascular mortality in these patients, and also slows the rate of AAA growth. Use of beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and AT1-receptor antagonists does not affect AAA growth but may be indicated for comorbidities. Antibiotic therapy with roxithromycin has a small effect on AAA growth, but this effect must be critically weighed against the potential risk of wide-spread use of antibiotics.

  18. Medical Management of Metabolic Complications of Liver Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Abbey; Konyn, Peter; Saab, Sammy

    2016-10-01

    Improved short- and long-term survival of liver transplant recipients has led to increased focus on complications of both the early and late posttransplant periods. A variety of metabolic complications have been observed in the post-orthotopic liver transplant population, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Although only a small proportion of patients experience metabolic complications prior to transplantation, the prevalence of these complications posttransplantation reaches or exceeds that of the general population. This is of particular concern, as cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in the late transplant period. A number of mechanisms mediate these metabolic complications, including reversal of cirrhosis pathophysiology, patient lifestyle factors, and immunosuppressive medications. Titration and modification of immunosuppression have been demonstrated to improve and sometimes even eliminate these conditions. Therefore, given the multiple etiologies contributing to the metabolic derangements, an effective management approach must incorporate lifestyle modifications, immunosuppression titration, and medical management. Best practices and understanding of the mechanisms underlying these complications allow for discussion of initial therapies and strategies; however, further study is necessary to determine the optimal management of metabolic complications over time.

  19. Medical Management of Osteoporosis for Elective Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Dalkin, Alan C

    2016-05-01

    Over 50 million Americans have low bone mass. Poor bone quality is known to complicate spinal fusion surgery, which relies on strong bony purchase to be effective. Unfortunately, many spine surgeons do not perform routine workups for either osteoporosis or osteomalacia. Effective screening and risk factor assessment can allow for appropriate medical management of osteoporosis in the perioperative setting, improving outcomes. Medical management can be grouped into several different categories: vitamins and minerals, bisphosphonates, recombinant parathyroid hormone, estrogen replacement or modification, inhibitors of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL), and calcitonin. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are the least expensive to prescribe, with minimal side effects and promising animal studies, and thus should be provided to most osteoporotic patients. Recombinant parathyroid hormone can also be considered, as clinical studies have demonstrated impressive results in spine fusion patients. Bisphosphonates, estrogen therapy or selective estrogen receptor modulators, and calcitonin should all be avoided in this patient population given unproven benefit and potentially harmful side-effect profiles. Denosumab is potentially an option, but may not be first line given the general lack of supporting data for its use in perioperative management of spine surgery patients.

  20. Stable angina pectoris: the medical management of symptomatic myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Parker, John D; Parker, John O

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality and is a serious public health problem. Over the last 4 decades there have been dramatic advances in the both the prevention and treatment of CAD. The management of CAD was revolutionized by the development of effective surgical and percutaneous revascularization techniques. In this review we discuss the importance of the medical management of symptomatic, stable angina. Medical management approaches to both the treatment and prevention of symptomatic myocardial ischemia are summarized. In Canada, organic nitrates, β-adrenergic blocking agents, and calcium channel antagonists have been available for the therapy of angina for more than 25 years. All 3 classes are of proven benefit in the improvement of symptoms and exercise capacity in patients with stable angina. Although there is no clear first choice within these classes of anti-anginal agents, the presence of prior or concurrent conditions (for example, prior myocardial infarction and/or hypertension) plays an important role in the choice of anti-anginal class in individual patients. For some patients, combinations of different anti-anginal agents can be effective; however it is recommended that this approach be individualized. Although not currently available in Canada, other classes of anti-anginal agents have been developed; their mechanism of action and clinical efficacy is discussed. Patients with stable angina have an excellent prognosis. Patients in this category who obtain relief from symptomatic myocardial ischemia may do well without invasive intervention.

  1. Medical Management of Metabolic Complications of Liver Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Barnard, Abbey; Konyn, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Improved short- and long-term survival of liver transplant recipients has led to increased focus on complications of both the early and late posttransplant periods. A variety of metabolic complications have been observed in the post–orthotopic liver transplant population, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, diabetes mellitus, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Although only a small proportion of patients experience metabolic complications prior to transplantation, the prevalence of these complications posttransplantation reaches or exceeds that of the general population. This is of particular concern, as cardiovascular disease is the second leading cause of death in the late transplant period. A number of mechanisms mediate these metabolic complications, including reversal of cirrhosis pathophysiology, patient lifestyle factors, and immunosuppressive medications. Titration and modification of immunosuppression have been demonstrated to improve and sometimes even eliminate these conditions. Therefore, given the multiple etiologies contributing to the metabolic derangements, an effective management approach must incorporate lifestyle modifications, immunosuppression titration, and medical management. Best practices and understanding of the mechanisms underlying these complications allow for discussion of initial therapies and strategies; however, further study is necessary to determine the optimal management of metabolic complications over time. PMID:27917074

  2. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-28

    L 2 8 , 2 0 1 6 Report No. DODIG-2016-079 Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management...Service Accounts at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight Visit us at www.dodig.mil April 28, 2016 Objective Our...objective was to determine whether Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) effectively managed accounts delinquent over 120 days by properly

  3. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-11-27

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2) and those with BMI > 35 kg/m(2) with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review.

  4. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery: Principles and guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Elrazek, Abd Elrazek Mohammad Ali Abd; Elbanna, Abduh Elsayed Mohamed; Bilasy, Shymaa E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major and growing health care concern. Large epidemiologic studies that evaluated the relationship between obesity and mortality, observed that a higher body-mass index (BMI) is associated with increased rate of death from several causes, among them cardiovascular disease; which is particularly true for those with morbid obesity. Being overweight was also associated with decreased survival in several studies. Unfortunately, obese subjects are often exposed to public disapproval because of their fatness which significantly affects their psychosocial behavior. All obese patients (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2) should receive counseling on diet, lifestyle, exercise and goals for weight management. Individuals with BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2 and those with BMI > 35 kg/m2 with obesity-related comorbidities; who failed diet, exercise, and drug therapy, should be considered for bariatric surgery. In current review article, we will shed light on important medical principles that each surgeon/gastroenterologist needs to know about bariatric surgical procedure, with special concern to the early post operative period. Additionally, we will explain the common complications that usually follow bariatric surgery and elucidate medical guidelines in their management. For the first 24 h after the bariatric surgery, the postoperative priorities include pain management, leakage, nausea and vomiting, intravenous fluid management, pulmonary hygiene, and ambulation. Patients maintain a low calorie liquid diet for the first few postoperative days that is gradually changed to soft solid food diet within two or three weeks following the bariatric surgery. Later, patients should be monitored for postoperative complications. Hypertension, diabetes, dumping syndrome, gastrointestinal and psychosomatic disorders are among the most important medical conditions discussed in this review. PMID:25429323

  5. Rosacea: update on management and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Fallen, Robyn S; Gooderham, Melinda

    2012-12-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic skin disorder that has significant impact on the self-esteem and quality of life of affected individuals. Currently understood as an inflammatory condition that occurs in the context of an altered innate immune response, the available topical and systemic therapies function as immunomodulators to restore cutaneous homeostasis. The goals of therapy include reduction of papules, pustules, erythema and physical discomfort with improvement in quality of life. Standard topical treatments include metronidazole and azelaic acid, although many other agents and regimens have been presented. Subantimicrobial/antiinflammatory dose oral doxycycline was US FDA approved in 2006 for the management of rosacea, but Health Canada clearance was only recently granted for this indication. Furthermore, renewed research interest has led to the development of other emerging therapies including topical ivermectin, brimonidine and oxymetazoline that hold promise for patients suffering from this condition.

  6. BUPRENORPHINE-NALXONE THERAPY IN PAIN MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone®, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggests that bup/nal may provide pain relief in chronic pain patients with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent chronic pain patients may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia as well as improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management. PMID:24509068

  7. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management.

  8. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  9. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  10. 21 CFR 880.6315 - Remote Medication Management System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Remote Medication Management System. 880.6315... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6315 Remote Medication Management System. (a) Identification. A remote medication... clinic. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The special control is: The FDA guidance...

  11. Optimizing medication use with a pharmacist-provided comprehensive medication management service for patients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Carla D

    2014-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate a pharmacist-delivered comprehensive medication management (CMM) service provided to patients with psychiatric disorders. We conducted a retrospective review and analysis of medication-related data, and a return on investment cost analysis. The project consisted of 154 patients with psychiatric disorders who were referred to the CMM service by physicians, therapists, case managers, friends, or family, and were seen by the service between April 2011 and July 2013. CMM evaluates a patient's medications to ensure that they are appropriate, effective, safe, and convenient. Patients were seen by pharmacists trained in CMM and the treatment of mental illnesses, including one board-certified psychiatric pharmacist. All medications were reviewed including prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, and nutritional supplements. The patients' medication-related concerns, goals of treatment, vital signs, and laboratory studies were reviewed. Drug therapy problems such as adverse reactions, unnecessary medications, excessive doses, and poor medication adherence were identified, and written recommendations were mailed to patients and physicians within 1 week. Patients were offered follow-up in 4-6 weeks and were seen as many times as needed to resolve drug therapy problems. The 154 patients completed 256 CMM visits. A mean of 10.1 medical and psychiatric conditions and 13.7 medications/person were assessed. A mean of 5.6 drug therapy problems/patient were identified. A total net cost savings was estimated to be $90,484.00, with a mean savings of $586.55/patient. The cost of providing the service was estimated at $32,185.93. The return on investment was estimated to be 2.8; thus for every dollar spent on providing the service, $2.80 was estimated to be saved. Patients with mental illnesses may benefit from pharmacist-delivered CMM to help resolve drug therapy problems. Medication management may improve clinical outcomes and reduce costs. In

  12. Implementing cognitive behavioral therapy in specialty medical settings

    PubMed Central

    Magidson, Jessica F.; Weisberg, Risa B.

    2016-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the second issue of a two-part Special Series on integrating cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) into medical settings. The first issue focused on integrating CBT into primary care, and this issue focuses on implementing CBT in other specialty medical settings, including cancer treatment, HIV care, and specialized pediatric medical clinics. Models for treatment delivery to improve ease of implementation are also discussed, including telehealth and home-delivered treatment. The six articles in this series provide examples of how to transport CBT techniques that are largely designed for implementation in outpatient mental health settings to specialized medical settings, and discuss unique considerations and recommendations for implementation. PMID:27471371

  13. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D H; Sutterland, A L; Otten, J; Becker, H E; Drent, M L; van der Gaag, M; Birchwood, M; de Haan, L

    2011-02-09

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe command hallucinations remained. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was added which reduced the impact of the hallucinations to a great extent, indicating that CBT can have an additional positive effect in prolactinoma patients with psychosis that shows incomplete recovery after antipsychotic medication. Future research should be aimed at the severe and prolonged side effects of dopamine agonists in the treatment of prolactinoma patients with multiple risk factors for a psychotic decompensation.

  14. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, DH; Sutterland, AL; Otten, J; Becker, HE; Drent, ML; van der Gaag, M; Birchwood, M; de Haan, L

    2011-01-01

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe command hallucinations remained. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was added which reduced the impact of the hallucinations to a great extent, indicating that CBT can have an additional positive effect in prolactinoma patients with psychosis that shows incomplete recovery after antipsychotic medication. Future research should be aimed at the severe and prolonged side effects of dopamine agonists in the treatment of prolactinoma patients with multiple risk factors for a psychotic decompensation. PMID:22715200

  15. The Role of Medical Therapy for Variceal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Bhutta, Abdul Q; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe

    2015-07-01

    Acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH) is a lethal complication of portal hypertension and should be suspected in every patient with liver cirrhosis who presents with upper gastrointestinal bleed. AVH-related mortality has decreased in the last few decades from 40% to 15%-20% due to advances in the general and specific management of variceal hemorrhage. This review summarizes current management of AVH and prevention of recurrent hemorrhage with a focus on pharmacologic therapy.

  16. Immune‐mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) and biologic therapy: a medical revolution

    PubMed Central

    Kuek, Annabel; Hazleman, Brian L; Östör, Andrew J K

    2007-01-01

    Targeted biologic therapies have revolutionised treatment of immune‐mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) due to their efficacy, speed of onset and tolerability. The discovery that clinically unrelated conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease, share similar immune dysregulation has led to a shift in the management of IMIDs from one of organ‐based symptom relief to mechanism‐based treatment. The fact that anticytokine therapy has been effective in treating multiple orphan inflammatory conditions confirms the IMID paradigm. In this review we examine the biologic agents currently licensed for use in the US and Europe: infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, rituximab, abatacept, anakinra, alefacept and efalizumab. We also discuss the rationale behind the management of IMIDs using rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis as examples. For the medical profession, IMID represents a breakthrough in the way pathology is classified. In this burgeoning era of biologic therapy the prospect of complete disease remission is conceivable. PMID:17403952

  17. Monitoring of girls undergoing medical therapy for isosexual precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Ambrosino, M M; Hernanz-Schulman, M; Genieser, N B; Sklar, C A; Fefferman, N R; David, R

    1994-07-01

    We evaluated the use of sonography in monitoring the efficacy of suppressive therapy with a gonadotropin releasing hormone analogue in girls being treated for isosexual precocious puberty. Ten girls 5 to 9 years of age underwent serial sonography and hormonal stimulation tests on the same day. Sonographic trends of decreasing ovarian volume and uterine length indicated early suppression even when absolute values were above threshold. Changes in ovarian volume were the most sensitive predictor of pituitary-gonadal suppression. Sonography is a sensitive and accurate method of monitoring medical therapy; ovarian volume and analysis of interval change are the most sensitive barometers of change.

  18. Nature and management of duplicate medication alerts.

    PubMed

    Heringa, Mette; Floor, Annemieke; Meijer, Willemijn M; De Smet, Peter A G M; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the nature of duplicate medication (DM) alerts, their management by community pharmacists, and potential characteristics of DM alerts that lead to interventions by pharmacists. Observational study in 53 community pharmacies. Each pharmacist registered the nature and management of 24 DM alerts on a structured form. On average, the clinical decision support systems generated 20.4 DM alerts per 100 dispensed drugs. In half of the 1272 registered alerts, the pharmacists judged that there was no risk for concurrent use of both prescriptions. In 32% of the alerts, the DM alert was generated for an intentional combination. In 17% of the alerts, there was a risk for unintentional concurrent use. In 32% of the alerts the pharmacists decided that one or more actions were needed: the electronic patient record was updated in 15% of the alerts and in 19% of the alerts the pharmacists performed an external action-for example, informing the patient or modifying the prescription (including 5 therapeutic prescription modifications and 22 logistic prescription modifications). Alerts concerning first dispensing were more likely to be followed by an external action than alerts concerning refills (40% vs 14%, P < .001). In community pharmacy, prescription modifications based on DM alerts are rare, but DM alerts lead with some regularity to other actions-for example, patient instruction and update of the electronic patient record. As the current DM alerts are diverse and nonspecific in detecting situations where external action is considered relevant, other ways of alerting should therefore be considered. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Medical and endovascular management of critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Lumsden, Alan B; Davies, Mark G; Peden, Eric K

    2009-04-01

    Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is the term used to designate the condition in which peripheral artery disease has resulted in resting leg or foot pain or in a breakdown of the skin of the leg or foot, causing ulcers or tissue loss. If not revascularized, CLI patients are at risk for limb loss and for potentially fatal complications from the progression of gangrene and the development of sepsis. The management of CLI requires a multidisciplinary team of experts in different areas of vascular disease, from atherosclerotic risk factor management to imaging, from intervention to wound care and physical therapy. In the past decade, the most significant change in the treatment of CLI has been the increasing tendency to shift from bypass surgery to less invasive endovascular procedures as first-choice revascularization techniques, with bypass surgery then reserved as backup if appropriate. The goals of intervention for CLI include the restoration of pulsatile, inline flow to the foot to assist wound healing, the relief of rest pain, the avoidance of major amputation, preservation of mobility, and improvement of patient function and quality of life. The evaluating physician should be fully aware of all revascularization options in order to select the most appropriate intervention or combination of interventions, while taking into consideration the goals of therapy, risk-benefit ratios, patient comorbidities, and life expectancy. We discuss the incidence, risk factors, and prognosis of CLI and the clinical presentation, diagnosis, available imaging modalities, and medical management (including pain and ulcer care, pharmaceutical options, and molecular therapies targeting angiogenesis). The endovascular approaches that we review include percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (with or without adjunctive stenting); subintimal angioplasty; primary femoropopliteal and infrapopliteal deployment of bare nitinol, covered, drug-eluting, or bioabsorbable stents; cryoplasty; excimer

  20. Anonymous Peer Assessment of Medication Management Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Greg; Woulfe, Jim; Bartimote-Aufflick, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether pharmacy students' anonymous peer assessment of a medication management review (MMR) was constructive, consistent with the feedback provided by an expert tutor, and enhanced the students' learning experience. Design Fourth-year undergraduate pharmacy students were randomly and anonymously assigned to a partner and participated in an online peer assessment of their partner's MMR. Assessment An independent expert graded a randomly selected sample of the MMR's using a schedule developed for the study. A second expert evaluated the quality of the peer and expert feedback. Students also completed a questionnaire and participated in a focus group interview. Student peers gave significantly higher marks than an expert for the same MMR; however, no significant difference between the quality of written feedback between the students and expert was detected. The majority of students agreed that this activity was a useful learning experience. Conclusions Anonymous peer assessment is an effective means of providing additional constructive feedback on student performance on the medication review process. Exposure to other students' work and the giving and receiving of peer feedback were perceived as valuable by students. PMID:20798808

  1. The role of combination medical therapy in the treatment of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Lim, Dawn Shao Ting; Fleseriu, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Uncontrolled acromegaly results in approximately 2-fold excess mortality. Pituitary surgery is first-line therapy, and medical treatment is indicated for persistent disease. While cabergoline and pegvisomant are used in select patients, somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) remain the cornerstone of medical treatment. Management of patients poorly responsive to SRLs is therefore, challenging. The purpose of this review is to highlight the options for combination medical therapy in the treatment of acromegaly, with an emphasis on efficacy and safety. All original articles/abstracts detailing combination medical therapy in acromegaly were identified from a PubMed search. Studies reviewed included retrospective and open-label prospective studies. While the combination of SRL and cabergoline was generally well tolerated, a lower baseline insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) level was the best predictor of efficacy; this combination may be most effective in patients with mildly elevated IGF-1. SRL-pegvisomant combination normalized IGF-1 in the majority of patients; continued efficacy despite individual drug dosing reduction was also reported. The risk of significant liver enzyme elevation was, however, higher than that reported with SRL monotherapy; close monitoring is recommended. Data on pegvisomant-cabergoline combination is limited, but this may be an option in the setting of SRL intolerance. Reports on temozolomide used in combination with other medical therapies in patients with aggressive GH-secreting tumors are also summarized. While more prospective, randomized controlled trials on long-term efficacy and safety are needed, combination medical therapy remains a treatment strategy that should be considered for acromegaly patients poorly responsive to SRLs.

  2. Weight Loss and Medication in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tolstoi, Linda G.; Josimovich, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome, which is a complex syndrome, affects approximately 6% of reproductive-age women. Many abnormalities are associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, but confusion still exists about their causation. Diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome is by exclusion. Management of the metabolic aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome focuses on minimizing insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia with diet therapy or insulin-lowering drugs.

  3. Nonadherence to Medication Therapy in Haemodialysis Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Saurav; Castelino, Ronald L.; Lioufas, Nicole M.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Zaidi, Syed Tabish R.

    2015-01-01

    Background End-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients are often prescribed multiple medications. Together with a demanding weekly schedule of dialysis sessions, increased number of medicines and associated regimen complexity pre-dispose them at high risk of medication nonadherence. This review summarizes existing literature on nonadherence and identifies factors associated with nonadherence to medication therapy in patients undergoing haemodialysis. Methods A comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews covering the period from 1970 through November 2014 was performed following a predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Reference lists from relevant materials were reviewed. Data on study characteristics, measures of nonadherence, prevalence rates and factors associated with nonadherence were collected. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines was followed in conducting this systematic review. Results Of 920 relevant publications, 44 were included. The prevalence of medication nonadherence varied from 12.5% to 98.6%, with widespread heterogeneity in measures and definitions employed. Most common patient-related factors significantly associated with nonadherence were younger age, non-Caucasian ethnicity, illness interfering family life, being a smoker, and living single and being divorced or widowed. Similarly, disease-related factors include longevity of haemodialysis, recurrent hospitalization, depressive symptoms and having concomitant illness like diabetes and hypertension. Medication-related factors such as daily tablet count, total pill burden, number of phosphate binders prescribed and complexity of medication regimen were also associated with poor adherence. Conclusions A number of patient-, disease-, and medication-related factors are associated with medication nonadherence in haemodialysis patients. Clinicians should be aware of such factors so that

  4. Medication management activities performed by informal caregivers of older adults.

    PubMed

    Look, Kevin A; Stone, Jamie A

    2017-05-16

    Medication management is commonly performed by informal caregivers, yet they are often unprepared and ill-equipped to manage complex medication regimens for their older adult care recipients. In order to develop interventions that will enhance the caregiver's ability to safely and confidently manage medications, it is critical to first understand caregiver challenges and unmet needs related to medication management. To explore how informal caregivers manage medications for their older adult care recipients by identifying the activities involved in medication management and the tools or strategies used to facilitate these activities. Four focus groups with caregivers of older adults were conducted with 5-9 caregivers per group. Participants were asked to describe the medication management activities performed and the tools or strategies used to facilitate these activities. Focus groups were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed for themes using an inductive approach. Caregivers were commonly involved in 2 types of activities: direct activities requiring physical handling of medications such as obtaining medications, preparing pill boxes, and assisting with medication administration; and indirect activities that were more complex and required more of a cognitive effort by the caregiver, such as organizing and tracking medications, gathering information, and making treatment decisions. They utilized a variety of tools and strategies to support these medication management activities; however, these approaches often needed to be modified or personalized to meet the specific needs of their caregiving situation. Informal caregivers play a vital role in ensuring safe and appropriate medication use by older adults. Medication management is complex and involves many activities that are supported through the use of a variety of tools and strategies that have been adapted and individualized to each specific caregiving scenario. Caregivers should be an important

  5. Medical management of urinary calculi: up to date 2016.

    PubMed

    Marangella, Martino

    2016-09-26

    Nephrolithiasis (NL) is one of the most prevalent nontransmissible diseases in western countries. It is being associated with other frequent diseases, including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, through a putative common link with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance or altered mineral metabolism. This review will focus on classification, physicochemical basis, risk factors, laboratory and imaging investigations, medical management.Classification as to stone composition includes calcium, uric acid (UA), cystine (Cys), infected, 2-8 dihydroxyadenine and rare NL. According to pathophysiology, NL is classified as primary, secondary to systemic diseases or drugs, caused by renal or metabolic hereditary disorders.A stone can only form in supersaturated environment, and this is sufficient in UA, Cys and infected NL, but not in Ca-NL, which results from the imbalance between supersaturation and inhibition. All types are characterized by derangements of peculiar risk factors. Laboratory investigations aim at identifying type of NL, underlying risk factors and state of saturation, and pathophysiology. This justifies a rationale therapy able to dissolve some types of stones and/or produce reduction in recurrence rate in others.Medical management includes alkali and allopurinol for UA nephrolithiasis (UA-NL), thiols and alkali in Cys-NL, dietary and pharmacological intervention for Ca-NL. Thiazides and alkaline citrate salts are the most widely used drugs in Ca-NL, where they proved efficient to prevent new stones. Other drugs have only been used in particular subsets.Proper medical management and modern urological approaches have already notably improved clinical outcomes. Future studies will further clarify mechanisms of NL with expected new and targeted therapeutic options.

  6. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers for medical imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Oralkan, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have been subject to extensive research for the last two decades. Although they were initially developed for air-coupled applications, today their main application space is medical imaging and therapy. This paper first presents a brief description of CMUTs, their basic structure, and operating principles. Our progression of developing several generations of fabrication processes is discussed with an emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each process. Monolithic and hybrid approaches for integrating CMUTs with supporting integrated circuits are surveyed. Several prototype transducer arrays with integrated frontend electronic circuits we developed and their use for 2-D and 3-D, anatomical and functional imaging, and ablative therapies are described. The presented results prove the CMUT as a MEMS technology for many medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:21860542

  7. The medical and surgical therapy of pseudofolliculitis barbae.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman-Shah, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Pseudofolliculitis barbae (PFB) is a common, chronic, inflammatory skin disorder seen mainly in individuals with curly hair. This condition is seen most frequently in black men who shave their beards but may also be seen in women of all races who wax or shave the axillary and pubic skin. The etiology of PFB is multifactorial, and heretofore a cure has been considered impossible for those desiring a clean-shaven face. The following article serves to discuss the current medical and surgical therapies available for this condition. Medical treatments for this condition include various combinations of topical antibiotics, corticosteroids, and retinoids. In the surgical arena, laser therapy has revolutionized the treatment of PFB and has enabled cure for the first time for those plagued by this disorder and for whom a beardless face is acceptable.

  8. Revascularization versus medical therapy for renal-artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Keith; Ives, Natalie; Gray, Richard; Kalra, Philip A; Moss, Jonathan G; Baigent, Colin; Carr, Susan; Chalmers, Nicholas; Eadington, David; Hamilton, George; Lipkin, Graham; Nicholson, Anthony; Scoble, John

    2009-11-12

    Percutaneous revascularization of the renal arteries improves patency in atherosclerotic renovascular disease, yet evidence of a clinical benefit is limited. In a randomized, unblinded trial, we assigned 806 patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease either to undergo revascularization in addition to receiving medical therapy or to receive medical therapy alone. The primary outcome was renal function, as measured by the reciprocal of the serum creatinine level (a measure that has a linear relationship with creatinine clearance). Secondary outcomes were blood pressure, the time to renal and major cardiovascular events, and mortality. The median follow-up was 34 months. During a 5-year period, the rate of progression of renal impairment (as shown by the slope of the reciprocal of the serum creatinine level) was -0.07x10(-3) liters per micromole per year in the revascularization group, as compared with -0.13x10(-3) liters per micromole per year in the medical-therapy group, a difference favoring revascularization of 0.06x10(-3) liters per micromole per year (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.002 to 0.13; P=0.06). Over the same time, the mean serum creatinine level was 1.6 micromol per liter (95% CI, -8.4 to 5.2 [0.02 mg per deciliter; 95% CI, -0.10 to 0.06]) lower in the revascularization group than in the medical-therapy group. There was no significant between-group difference in systolic blood pressure; the decrease in diastolic blood pressure was smaller in the revascularization group than in the medical-therapy group. The two study groups had similar rates of renal events (hazard ratio in the revascularization group, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.67 to 1.40; P=0.88), major cardiovascular events (hazard ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.75 to 1.19; P=0.61), and death (hazard ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.18; P=0.46). Serious complications associated with revascularization occurred in 23 patients, including 2 deaths and 3 amputations of toes or limbs. We found substantial risks but

  9. [Management of adverse effects of opioid therapy].

    PubMed

    Wirz, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    More than 6 million people in Germany suffer from chronic pain which greatly impairs their wellbeing. Often the only therapeutic option is to use class 2 or 3 analgesic opioids in the WHO classification, as class 1 analgesics may be toxic or of limited efficacy. However, the high incidence of opioid side effects leads to high discontinuation rates. Thus, the success of opioid treatment is also highly dependent on the management of the safety and tolerability of the treatment. Most opioid side effects, such as nausea and sedation, predominantly occur in the initial phase of therapy. In contrast, opioid-induced constipation can last throughout opioid therapy. First-line treatment with laxatives does not solve the problem in all patients. Possible second-line therapies include opioid receptor antagonists, such as Naloxone, oral-administered Naloxegol, or subcutaneously given Methylnaltrexone. The discussion also covers the management of other common side effects of opioids, such as nausea, vomiting, sedation, pruritus, micturition disorder, and further symptoms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Medical and surgical therapies for alopecias in black women.

    PubMed

    Callender, Valerie D; McMichael, Amy J; Cohen, George F

    2004-01-01

    Hair loss is a common problem that challenges the patient and clinician with a host of cosmetic, psychological and medical issues. Alopecia occurs in both men and women, and in all racial and ethnic populations, but the etiology varies considerably from group to group. In black women, many forms of alopecia are associated with hair-care practices (e.g., traction alopecia, trichorrhexis nodosa, and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia). The use of thermal or chemical hair straightening, and hair braiding or weaving are examples of styling techniques that place African American women at high risk for various "traumatic" alopecias. Although the exact cause of these alopecias is unknown, a multifactorial etiology including both genetic and environmental factors is suspected. A careful history and physical examination, together with an acute sensitivity to the patient's perceptions (e.g., self-esteem and social problems), are critical in determining the best therapy course. Therapeutic options for these patients range from alteration of current hair grooming practices or products, to use of specific medical treatments, to hair replacement surgery. Since early intervention is often a key to preventing irreversible alopecia, the purpose of the present article is to educate the dermatologist on all aspects of therapy for hair loss in black women--including not only a discussion of the main medical and surgical therapies but also an overview of ethnic hair cosmetics, specific suggestions for alterations of hair-care practices, and recommendations for patient education and compliance.

  11. Bacteriophages and medical oncology: targeted gene therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-08-01

    Targeted gene therapy of cancer is of paramount importance in medical oncology. Bacteriophages, viruses that specifically infect bacterial cells, offer a variety of potential applications in biomedicine. Their genetic flexibility to go under a variety of surface modifications serves as a basis for phage display methodology. These surface manipulations allow bacteriophages to be exploited for targeted delivery of therapeutic genes. Moreover, the excellent safety profile of these viruses paves the way for their potential use as cancer gene therapy platforms. The merge of phage display and combinatorial technology has led to the emergence of phage libraries turning phage display into a high throughput technology. Random peptide libraries, as one of the most frequently used phage libraries, provide a rich source of clinically useful peptide ligands. Peptides are known as a promising category of pharmaceutical agents in medical oncology that present advantages such as inexpensive synthesis, efficient tissue penetration and the lack of immunogenicity. Phage peptide libraries can be screened, through biopanning, against various targets including cancer cells and tissues that results in obtaining cancer-homing ligands. Cancer-specific peptides isolated from phage libraries show huge promise to be utilized for targeting of various gene therapy vectors towards malignant cells. Beyond doubt, bacteriophages will play a more impressive role in the future of medical oncology.

  12. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: A review of medical therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-01

    Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC. PMID:18200659

  13. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a review of medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Kozuch, Patricia L; Hanauer, Stephen B

    2008-01-21

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. While a cure remains elusive, both can be treated with medications that induce and maintain remission. With the recent advent of therapies that inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha the overlap in medical therapies for UC and CD has become greater. Although 5-ASA agents have been a mainstay in the treatment of both CD and UC, the data for their efficacy in patients with CD, particularly as maintenance therapy, are equivocal. Antibiotics may have a limited role in the treatment of colonic CD. Steroids continue to be the first choice to treat active disease not responsive to other more conservative therapy; non-systemic steroids such as oral and rectal budesonide for ileal and right-sided CD and distal UC respectively are also effective in mild-moderate disease. 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and its prodrug azathioprine are steroid-sparing immunomodulators effective in the maintenance of remission of both CD and UC, while methotrexate may be used in both induction and maintenance of CD. Infliximab and adalimumab are anti-TNF agents approved in the US and Europe for the treatment of Crohn's disease, and infliximab is also approved for the treatment of UC.

  14. In-depth Medical Nutrition Therapy for a Woman with Diabetes: From Pregnancy to Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with higher rates of miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, preterm labor, and fetal malformation. To prevent these obstetric and perinatal complications, women with diabetes have to control levels of blood sugar, both prior to and during pregnancy. Thus, individualized medical nutrition therapy for each stage of pregnancy is essential. We provided in-depth medical nutrition therapy to a 38-year-old pregnant woman with diabetes at all stages of pregnancy up to delivery. She underwent radiation therapy after surgery for breast cancer and was diagnosed with diabetes. At the time of diagnosis, her glycated hemoglobin level was 8.3% and she was planning her pregnancy. She started taking an oral hypoglycemic agent and received education regarding the management of diabetes and preconception care. She became pregnant while maintaining a glycated hemoglobin level of less than 6%. We provided education program for diabetes management during the pregnancy, together with insulin therapy. She experienced weight loss and ketones were detected; furthermore, she was taking in less than the recommended amount of foods for the regulation of blood sugar levels. By giving emotional support, we continued the counseling and achieved not only glycemic control but also instilled an appreciation of the importance of appropriate weight gain and coping with difficulties. Through careful diabetes management, the woman had a successful outcome for her pregnancy, other than entering preterm labor at 34 weeks. This study implicated that the important things in medical nutrition therapy for pregnant women with diabetes are frequent follow-up care and emotional approach through the pregnancy process. PMID:27812519

  15. Biologic therapy in the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Jennifer L; Tripple, Julia W; Calhoun, William J

    2016-08-01

    Current asthma management relies on inhaled corticosteroids, but some asthma is not well controlled with inhaled steroids alone or in combination with long-acting bronchodilators or leukotriene pathway inhibitors. The field of biologic therapy has grown dramatically in the past two decades, with current availability of three molecules, with two distinct and highly selective approaches to interfering with the allergic and eosinophilic airway inflammation common to most asthma. This review summarizes current and future options for incorporating biologic therapy into the overall management of asthma. Two new biologic agents have been recently introduced in the United States market, supported by well controlled, randomized clinical trials. These trials have provided insight into the types of patients who are most likely to benefit from these novel agents. In asthma patients with frequent exacerbations, the addition of a biologic agent targeting the interleukin-5 pathway, or immunoglobulin E, can significantly reduce exacerbations and improve asthma control. The clinical predictors of utility of specific agents overlap with one another, highlighting the importance of clinical judgment in the overall management of this complex disorder.

  16. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-04

    and Surgery CAC Common Access Card CRS Centralized Receivables Service DoD FMR DoD Financial Management Regulation MSA Medical Service Account MTF...H 4 , 2 0 1 5 Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth Need Additional Management Oversight Report No. DODIG-2015...04 MAR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Naval

  17. The role of medical physics in prostate cancer radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fiorino, Claudio; Seuntjens, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics, both as a scientific discipline and clinical service, hugely contributed and still contributes to the advances in the radiotherapy of prostate cancer. The traditional translational role in developing and safely implementing new technology and methods for better optimizing, delivering and monitoring the treatment is rapidly expanding to include new fields such as quantitative morphological and functional imaging and the possibility of individually predicting outcome and toxicity. The pivotal position of medical physicists in treatment personalization probably represents the main challenge of current and next years and needs a gradual change of vision and training, without losing the traditional and fundamental role of physicists to guarantee a high quality of the treatment. The current focus issue is intended to cover traditional and new fields of investigation in prostate cancer radiation therapy with the aim to provide up-to-date reference material to medical physicists daily working to cure prostate cancer patients. The papers presented in this focus issue touch upon present and upcoming challenges that need to be met in order to further advance prostate cancer radiation therapy. We suggest that there is a smart future for medical physicists willing to perform research and innovate, while they continue to provide high-quality clinical service. However, physicists are increasingly expected to actively integrate their implicitly translational, flexible and high-level skills within multi-disciplinary teams including many clinical figures (first of all radiation oncologists) as well as scientists from other disciplines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk-benefit trade-offs, revealing patients' preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their preferences, learning about CAT risks, benefits, and

  19. Complex antithrombotic therapy: determinants of patient preference and impact on medication adherence

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Neena S; Naik, Aanand D; Street, Richard L; Castillo, Diana L; Deswal, Anita; Richardson, Peter A; Hartman, Christine M; Shelton, George; Fraenkel, Liana

    2015-01-01

    Purpose For years, older patients have been prescribed multiple blood-thinning medications (complex antithrombotic therapy [CAT]) to decrease their risk of cardiovascular events. These therapies, however, increase risk of adverse bleeding events. We assessed patient-reported trade-offs between cardioprotective benefit, gastrointestinal bleeding risk, and burden of self-management using adaptive conjoint analysis (ACA). As ACA could be a clinically useful tool to obtain patient preferences and guide future patient-centered care, we examined the clinical application of ACA to obtain patient preferences and the impact of ACA on medication adherence. Patients and methods An electronic ACA survey led 201 respondents through medication risk–benefit trade-offs, revealing patients’ preferences for the CAT risk/benefit profile they valued most. The post-ACA prescription regimen was categorized as concordant or discordant with elicited preferences. Adherence was measured using VA pharmacy refill data to measure persistence of use prior to and 1 year following preference-elicitation. Additionally, we analyzed qualitative interviews of 56 respondents regarding their perception of the ACA and the preference elicitation experience. Results Participants prioritized 5-year cardiovascular benefit over preventing adverse events. Medication side effects, medication-associated activity restrictions, and regimen complexity were less important than bleeding risk and cardioprotective benefit. One year after the ACA survey, a 15% increase in adherence was observed in patients prescribed a preference-concordant CAT strategy. An increase of only 6% was noted in patients prescribed a preference-discordant strategy. Qualitative interviews showed that the ACA exercise contributed to increase inpatient activation, patient awareness of preferences, and patient engagement with clinicians about treatment decisions. Conclusion By working through trade-offs, patients actively clarified their

  20. Combined medication and cognitive therapy for generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newman, Michelle G; Rickels, Karl; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Hamilton, Jessica L; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Pastva, Amy M

    2011-12-01

    The current study assessed efficacy of combined cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and venlafaxine XR compared to venlafaxine XR alone in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within settings where medication is typically offered as the treatment for this disorder. Patients with DSM-IV-diagnosed GAD who were recently enrolled in a long-term venlafaxine XR study were randomly offered (n=77), or not offered (n=40), the option of adding 12 sessions of CBT. Of those offered CBT, 33% (n=26) accepted and attended at least one treatment session. There were no differences between the combined treatment group and the medication only group on primary or secondary efficacy measures in any of the sample comparisons. Many patients who present in medical/psychopharmacology settings seeking treatment for GAD decline the opportunity to receive adjunctive treatment. Of those that receive CBT, there appears to be no additional benefit of combined treatment compared to venlafaxine XR alone.

  1. Combined Medication and Cognitive Therapy for Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Crits-Christoph, Paul; Newman, Michelle G.; Rickels, Karl; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Pastva, Amy M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study assessed efficacy of combined cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and venlafaxine XR compared to venlafaxine XR alone in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) within settings where medication is typically offered as the treatment for this disorder. Patients with DSM-IV–diagnosed GAD who were recently enrolled in a long-term venlafaxine XR study were randomly offered (n=77), or not offered (n=40), the option of adding 12 sessions of CBT. Of those offered CBT, 33% (n=26) accepted and attended at least one treatment session. There were no differences between the combined treatment group and the medication only group on primary or secondary efficacy measures in any of the sample comparisons. Many patients who present in medical/psychopharmacology settings seeking treatment for GAD decline the opportunity to receive adjunctive treatment. Of those that receive CBT, there appears to be no additional benefit of combined treatment compared to venlafaxine XR alone. PMID:21840164

  2. Changing Initial Glaucoma Medical Therapy Increases Healthcare Resource Utilization.

    PubMed

    Trese, Matthew G J; Lewis, Andrew W; Blachley, Taylor S; Stein, Joshua D; Moroi, Sayoko E

    2017-10-01

    To determine the frequency and economic impact of changing initial glaucoma therapy for patients with newly diagnosed open-angle glaucoma (OAG) or ocular hypertension (OHT). This retrospective longitudinal cohort study identified individuals within a large managed care network in the United States, who were newly diagnosed with OAG or OHT from 2001 to 2012 and were prescribed either a topical beta blocker (BB) or a prostaglandin analog (PGA). Claims data were analyzed over the 12-month period following their index prescription to determine physician prescribing habits, healthcare resource utilization patterns, and sociodemographic factors which may have contributed to changing the initial treatment strategy. A total of 15,019 beneficiaries were identified with newly diagnosed OAG or OHT and whose index therapy was either a topical BB or PGA. Among these enrollees 80.9% were started on PGAs, while 19.1% were started on BBs. Of these beneficiaries, 29.2% of those started on PGAs and 39.5% of those started on BBs underwent a change in therapy within 12 months of their index prescription. Those in the topical BB treatment group had a 38% increased odds of changing glaucoma therapy relative to those started on PGAs (odds ratio [OR] 0.61, 95% CI:0.56-0.68). Patients who changed therapy required more frequent office visits (P < 0.0001) and incurred higher median eye care related charges (P < 0.0001) compared to those who remained on the index therapy unchanged. Changing initial ocular hypotensive therapy is common. Individuals who undergo a change in therapy required more frequent face-to-face monitoring and incurred higher healthcare related costs. Identifying strategies capable of optimizing the process of initiating ocular hypotensive therapy are appealing and possess the potential to improve patient outcomes and reduce healthcare costs.

  3. Medication in the elderly - considerations and therapy prescription guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vrdoljak, Davorka; Borovac, Josip Anđelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to integrate and present pertinent findings from the literature dealing with the treatment of the elderly within a primary care setting. Medical care for the elderly is an integral part of a general practitioner's (GPs) everyday work and is challenging for many reasons. Older people often experience multiple chronic diseases concurrently (comorbidity, multimorbidity) and they often have deteriorated organ function and decreased physiological reserves due to the natural aging process. The choice of appropriate medication for each particular disease is a complex process and can cause "therapeutic confusion", especially among younger GPs in the field. Elderly people are prone to develop adverse side-effects to usual dosages of medications and the side-effects are even 7 times more frequent in elderly than in younger patients. Moreover, in therapy for elder patients, a responsible clinician always needs to think about potential drug to drug interactions and possible compromised pharmacokinetic dynamics in the aging body. Professional geriatric societies in many countries (USA, Germany, UK) have developed lists of potentially inappropriate medications for the elderly, and they update them systematically. Lists such as The Beers Criteria list and STOPP/START criteria should always be consulted when administering therapy to elderly patients. In this paper we emphasized the importance of medication lists as an important practical support in a GP's everyday work. Implementation of such therapeutic aids reduces the possibility of medical error and minimizes the chance of an inappropriate prescription for this vulnerable population stratum. When prescribing drugs for the elderly, GPs should take into account the specificities of the elderly, their biological and chronological framework and should always apply the principles of rational, conservative and evidence-based pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and

  4. [Opioid Therapy and Management of Side Effects Associated with Opioids].

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Opioids are very useful medications to reduce suffering of cancer patients such as refractory pain and dyspnea. We physicians have to use opioids to have good management of pain and suffering associated with cancer including management of side effects caused by opioids. Opioids couple opioid receptors and affect several pharmacological effects. Other than analgesic effect, opioids have some side effects of constipation, nausea and vomiting, respiratory depression. In this chapter, I take important side effects of constipation, nausea and vomiting and respiratory depression. Next, serotonin syndrome caused by tramadol combined with anti-depressants is remarked as assignable syndrome. As advancing in chemotherapy for cancer treatment, cancer survivors live longer with opioid therapy. We have to pay attention to the side effects and another dysfunction caused by long use of opioids. It is important that we physician use opioids effectively to keep activity of daily living(ADL) of patients and families as team approach.

  5. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  6. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  7. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  8. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and...

  9. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P < 0.05). Time to reinitiation was significantly shorter in the intervention group, 59.5 (+/- 69.0) days vs. 107.4 (+/- 109) days for the control group (P < 0.05). This initiative demonstrated that a targeted disease management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a

  10. Predicting relapse following medical therapy for Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKillop, J.H.; Wilson, R.; Pearson, D.W.; Cuthbert, G.F.; Jenkins, C.; Caine, S.; Thomson, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 40 patients with Graves' disease (35 female, 5 male; mean age at presentation = 38 yrs) the authors examined the ability of thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake and serum thyroid stimulating immunoglobins (TSI) to identify patients who would relapse after a course of medical therapy. Serum TSI and 20 minute thyroidal /sup 99m/Tc uptake were estimated every 3 months during a 12 month course of carbimazole and tri iodothyronine. TSI levels were estimated by inhibition of receptor binding and expressed as an index (normal value <25). 17 patients (Group 1) remained biochemically euthyroid for at least 1 year after cessation of therapy. 23 (Group II) developed recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid hormone level did not differ between Groups I and II at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake did not differ significantly in the two groups at presentation and overlap of values persisted throughout therapy. 3 patients had undetectable TSI levels at presentation and throughout follow-up. In the remaining 37, TSI levels at presentation were significantly higher in Group II and all 7 patients with initial values >80 relapsed. After 12 months therapy a TSI level of >25 was present in 1 Group I patient and 16 Group II patients who had detectable TSI at presentation. /sup 99m/Tc uptake was a poor predictor of relapse of thyrotoxicosis. A very high TSI level at presentation (>80) was associated with relapse. An abnormal TSI on completion of 12 months medical therapy had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 94% for prediction of relapse of thyrotoxicosis in the subsequent year.

  11. [Management of rheumatoid arthritis medications and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Funakubo Asanuma, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects mainly women during their childbearing years. As aging of childbirth advances in Japan, women who plan pregnancy would increase after they developed RA. Recent findings showed that high disease activity of RA might impair fertility. Planning pregnancy is preferable after female patients achive and maintain low disease activity or remission of RA. Women on methotrexate, which is the anchor drug for RA, need to discontinue the medication with a high risk of causing birth defects during conception and pregnancy. Data of RA patients exposed TNF inhibitors during pregnancy has been accumulating in recent years. These data suggest that increased risk of spontaneous abortion and congenital abnomalies has not been observed. Although there is insufficient data about safety of breastfeeding while using TNF inhibitors, the secretion of the drugs in breast milk is very little and fetal toxicity has not been observed. Since long term safety of children exposed TNF inhibitors in uterus has not been established, we should discontinue the drugs as soon as pregnancy is recognized. TNF inhibitors may be an useful tools for management of active RA resistant to conventional DMARDs in women who desire to bear children.

  12. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3) Urinalysis... weight and vital signs at least once every 24 hours while the inmate is on a hunger strike....

  13. 28 CFR 549.63 - Initial medical evaluation and management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANAGEMENT MEDICAL SERVICES Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.63 Initial medical evaluation and management. (a... hunger strike: (1) Measure and record height and weight; (2) Take and record vital signs; (3) Urinalysis... weight and vital signs at least once every 24 hours while the inmate is on a hunger strike....

  14. Atopic profile of patients failing medical therapy for chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bruce K; Zirkle, Whitney; Chandra, Rakesh K; Lin, David; Conley, David B; Peters, Anju T; Grammer, Leslie C; Schleimer, Robert P; Kern, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is an inflammatory condition of the nasal airway and paranasal sinuses that can broadly be classified into CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and CRS without nasal polyps (CRSsNP). The relationship between CRS and atopy to inhalant allergens remains unclear. We sought to examine the presence of atopy in patients failing medical therapy for both types of CRS. The objective of this research was to analyze the frequency and distribution of allergen sensitivity in patients failing medical therapy for CRSwNP and CRSsNP in comparison to rhinitis patients without CRS and the general population. A prospectively collected database of 334 consecutive CRS patients who had surgery after failing maximal medical therapy was queried to identify those who met inclusion criteria: a sinus computed tomography (CT), an endoscopy consistent with CRS, and skin-prick testing with 24 common inhalant allergens in 8 classes at our institution (n = 125). Additionally, data from these CRS patients were compared to a group of 50 patients diagnosed with rhinitis who had similar symptoms but radiologically normal CT scans, as well as published normative population skin-prick testing data obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Study III (NHANES III). The relationship between atopy, as assessed by the frequency of skin test positivity, and radiological disease severity, was assessed for several allergen classes in CRSwNP, CRSsNP and rhinitis patients. One or more positive skin results were observed in 103 of 125 (82.4%) CRS patients who underwent surgery--a prevalence significantly higher than that found in the NHANES III study (p < 0.05) but not different from the rhinitis control group (36/50, 72.0%). The most prevalent positive skin test results were to dust mites and ragweed in CRSwNP, CRSsNP, and rhinitis patients. Comparing these 3 patient groups, there were no significant differences in the rates of positive skin-test results to any single

  15. [Appliancation of logistics in resources management of medical asset].

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Iu V; Goriachev, A B; Bunin, S A

    2011-06-01

    The usage of basic regulations of logistics in practical activity for providing joints and military units with medical asset is theoretically justified. The role of logistics in organizing, building and functioning of military (armed forces) medical supply system is found out. The methods of solving urgent problems of improvement the resources management of medical asset on the basis of logistics are presented.

  16. Cast Study: National Naval Medical Center, A Graduate Management Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-10

    of Health Sciences), the Naval Medical Research Institute (now the Naval Medical Research Center), and the Naval Dental School (now the National...Naval Dental Center) (History, 2000). The NNMC mission became regional on January 1, 1973 with the establishment of the National Naval Medical Center...General Surgery Material Management Inpatient Surgery Postal Operations Ophthalmology Oerations Service Oral & Maxillo- Bahelor Housing facial/ Dental

  17. Critique of "Stenting versus aggressive medical therapy for intracranial arterial stenosis" by Chimowitz et al in the new England Journal of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abou-Chebl, Alex; Steinmetz, Helmuth

    2012-02-01

    Symptomatic intracranial stenoses are an important cause of stroke and have a high risk of recurrent stroke with medical therapy. The Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Arterial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial unexpectedly showed a higher-than-expected rate of complications with intracranial stenting and a lower-than-expected recurrence rate with medical therapy. In this commentary, the authors review possible explanations for these findings and suggest future strategies for study.

  18. Perioperative management of antithrombotic therapy in cardiovascular patients.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Marc T; Rodgers, George M

    2011-01-01

    Many patients with underlying cardiovascular disease require long-term anticoagulation. The perioperative or periprocedural management of patients who require temporary interruption of anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications is a common and often challenging clinical problem. It requires a fine balance between the risk of thromboembolic events during anticoagulant interruption and the risk of bleeding in the setting of antithrombotic therapy administered around the time of surgery. Interruption of anticoagulation is associated with an increased risk of thromboembolic events. Stratifying patients into thromboembolic risk groups may be helpful in directing anticoagulation management in the perioperative setting. Bridging anticoagulation, generally with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), is often an integral part of perioperative thrombosis risk reduction. Perioperative anticoagulation management varies depending on the indication for anticoagulation and the anticoagulant or antiplatelet agent being used by the patient. In this article, we review some of the general principles involved with perioperative anticoagulation and discuss the perioperative management of patients taking vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), bridging regimens for anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, and strategies for managing patients on the newer oral anticoagulants.

  19. Managing issues related to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Lesho, Emil P; Gey, Daniela C

    2003-08-15

    Antiretroviral regimens are complicated and difficult for patients to follow, and they can have serious side effects, such as osteonecrosis and bone demineralization. Protease inhibitor therapy has been associated with hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, gastrointestinal symptoms, and body-fat distribution abnormalities. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors can cause rashes and hepatotoxicity, and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors can cause lactic acidosis, hypersensitivity reactions, neuropathies, pancreatitis, anemia, and neutropenia. Malabsorption can occur if antiretroviral agents are taken improperly with regard to meals or if they are taken with certain other drugs or herbal remedies. Some commonly prescribed drugs can cause dangerous drug toxicities if they are taken by patients who are also taking certain antiretroviral medications. Suboptimal exposure to antiretrovirals because of noncompliance or malabsorption can result in viral resistance and loss of future treatment options.

  20. Medication management in older adults: a critique of concordance.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Austyn

    This article shows that the terms compliance, adherence and concordance are used interchangeably in the medication management literature. As such, it is argued that nurses should focus on those interventions that are demonstrably effective in enhancing medication management for the older adult rather than attempt to make sense of a meaningless ideal. In this article the concepts of concordance, compliance and adherence are first critiqued and it is then argued that all the terms remain valid for practical purposes. That is, a literature search of all the terms is required to comprehensively discuss medication management. Focus then switches to factors that have been shown to be beneficial as well as detrimental to medication management in older adults. While many factors appear to correlate with good and bad management of medication the conclusion is that individual, tailored approaches are most effective. For the purpose of this article, the term 'older adult' refers to those over 65 years where not otherwise specified.

  1. Medication management for nurses working in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wendy; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Baxter, Pamela; Ploeg, Jenny

    2012-09-01

    In long-term care (LTC), the complexity of residents' conditions and their treatment requirements present challenges for nurses managing medications. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to explore medication management as described by licensed nurses working in LTC. A total of 22 licensed nurses from 2 LTC facilities located in the Canadian province of Ontario participated in 4 focus groups. Thematic content analysis was used to organize data into themes and a conceptual model was developed. The overarching theme was that nurses are "racing against time" to manage medications and 3 subthemes described how they coped with this important care process: preparing to race, running the race, and finishing the race. Barriers to safe medication management included time restraints, knowledge limitations, interruptions and distractions, and poor communication. The findings can be used to better inform health-care providers and to guide future research. They also have the potential to directly impact outcomes related to safe medication management in LTC.

  2. Medical Therapies for Adult Chronic Sinusitis: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rudmik, Luke; Soler, Zachary M

    2015-09-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common inflammatory condition defined by persistent symptomatic inflammation of the sinonasal cavities lasting longer than 3 months. It accounts for 1% to 2% of total physician encounters and is associated with large health care expenditures. Appropriate use of medical therapies for chronic sinusitis is necessary to optimize patient quality of life (QOL) and daily functioning and minimize the risk of acute inflammatory exacerbations. To summarize the highest-quality evidence on medical therapies for adult chronic sinusitis and provide an evidence-based approach to assist in optimizing patient care. A systematic review searched Ovid MEDLINE (1947-January 30, 2015), EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases. The search was limited to randomized clinical trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, and meta-analyses. Evidence was categorized into maintenance and intermittent or rescue therapies and reported based on the presence or absence of nasal polyps. Twenty-nine studies met inclusion criteria: 12 meta-analyses (>60 RCTs), 13 systematic reviews, and 4 RCTs that were not included in any of the meta-analyses. Saline irrigation improved symptom scores compared with no treatment (standardized mean difference [SMD], 1.42 [95% CI, 1.01 to 1.84]; a positive SMD indicates improvement). Topical corticosteroid therapy improved overall symptom scores (SMD, -0.46 [95% CI, -0.65 to -0.27]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), improved polyp scores (SMD, -0.73 [95% CI, -1.0 to -0.46]; a negative SMD indicates improvement), and reduced polyp recurrence after surgery (relative risk, 0.59 [95% CI, 0.45 to 0.79]). Systemic corticosteroids and oral doxycycline (both for 3 weeks) reduced polyp size compared with placebo for 3 months after treatment (P < .001). Leukotriene antagonists improved nasal symptoms compared with placebo in patients with nasal polyps (P < .01). Macrolide antibiotic for 3 months was associated with improved QOL at a single time point (24 weeks

  3. Medical and surgical management of spinal epidural abscess: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arko, Leopold; Quach, Eric; Nguyen, Vincent; Chang, Daniel; Sukul, Vishad; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that has previously been treated with urgent surgical decompression and antibiotics. Recent availability of MRI makes early diagnosis possible and allows for the nonoperative treatment of SEA in select patients. The first retrospective review of medically and surgically managed SEA was published in 1999, and since that time several other retrospective institutional reports have been published. This study reviews these published reports and compares pooled data with historical treatment data. A PubMed keyword and Boolean search using ("spinal epidural abscess" OR "spinal epidural abscesses" AND [management OR treatment]) returned 429 results. Filters for the English language and publications after 1999 were applied, as the first study comparing operative and nonoperative management was published that year. Articles comparing operative to nonoperative treatment strategies for SEA were identified, and the references were further reviewed for additional articles. Studies involving at least 10 adult patients (older than 18 years) were included. Case reports, studies reporting either medical or surgical management only, studies not reporting indications for conservative management, or studies examining SEA as a result of a specific pathogen were excluded. Twelve articles directly comparing surgical to nonsurgical management of SEA were obtained. These articles reported on a total of 1099 patients. The average age of treated patients was 57.24 years, and 62.5% of treated patients were male. The most common pathogens found in blood and wound cultures were Staphylococcus aureus (63.6%) and Streptococcus species (6.8%). The initial treatment was surgery in 59.7% of cases and medical therapy in 40.3%. This represented a significant increase in the proportion of medically managed patients in comparison with the historical control prior to 1999 (p < 0.05). Patients with no neurological deficits were significantly more likely to

  4. The effect of mirror therapy on the management of phantom limb pain.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Meltem; Kanan, Nevin

    2016-07-01

    In the last two decades, mirror therapy has become a frequently used method of managing phantom limb pain (PLP). However, the role of nurses in mirror therapy has not yet been well defined. This study examined the effect of mirror therapy on the management of PLP, and discusses the importance of mirror therapy in the nursing care of amputee patients. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in the pain management department of a university hospital and a prosthesis clinic in İstanbul, Turkey, with 15 amputee patients who had PLP. Forty minutes of practical mirror therapy training was given to the patients and they were asked to practice at home for 4 weeks. Patients were asked to record the severity of their PLP before and after the therapy each day using 0-10 Numeric Pain Intensity Scale. Mirror therapy practiced for 4 weeks provided a significant decrease in severity of PLP. There was no significant relationship between the effect of mirror therapy and demographic, amputation or PLP-related characteristics. Patients who were not using prosthesis had greater benefit from mirror therapy. Mirror therapy can be used as an adjunct to medical and surgical treatment of PLP. It is a method that patients can practice independently, enhancing self-control over phantom pain. As mirror therapy is a safe, economical, and easy-to-use treatment method, it should be considered in the nursing care plan for patients with PLP.

  5. Information therapy: The strategic role of prescribed information in disease self-management.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Molly; Kemper, Donald W

    2006-01-01

    Imagine this: evidence-based medical information specifically written for and prescribed to a patient with chronic illness, targeted to that patient's specific "moment in care" and designed to help that patient manage his or her illness. Imagine "information therapy" built into every clinical encounter that a patient has with a physician or other health care service. Information therapy is defined as the timely prescription and availability of evidence-based health information to meet individuals' specific needs and support sound decision making. Information therapy is a new disease management tool that provides cost-effective disease management support to a much larger portion of the chronically ill population than is generally reached. This paper is a practical presentation of information therapy, its role in predictive modeling and disease self-management, and its potential for improving the outcomes of chronic care.

  6. [The application of total quality management (TQM) in quality management of radiation therapy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui-yao; Fu, Shen; Li, Bin

    2009-03-01

    The strategies and methods of the total quality management (TQM) need to applied in quality management of radiation therapy. We should improve the level of quality control and quality assurance in radiation therapy. By establishing quality control system in radiation therapy, standardization of radiation therapy workflow, strengthening quality control of devices and physical technique and paying attention to safety protection and staff training.

  7. A selective review of medical cannabis in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Blake, Alexia; Wan, Bo Angela; Malek, Leila; DeAngelis, Carlo; Diaz, Patrick; Lao, Nicholas; Chow, Edward; O'Hearn, Shannon

    2017-08-23

    Insufficient management of cancer-associated chronic and neuropathic pain adversely affects patient quality of life. Patients who do not respond well to opioid analgesics, or have severe side effects from the use of traditional analgesics are in need of alternative therapeutic op-tions. Anecdotal evidence suggests that medical cannabis has potential to effectively manage pain in this patient population. This review presents a selection of representative clinical studies, from small pilot studies conducted in 1975, to double-blind placebo-controlled trials conducted in 2014 that evaluated the efficacy of cannabinoid-based therapies containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) for reducing cancer-associated pain. A review of literature published on Medline between 1975 and 2017 identified five clinical studies that evaluated the effect of THC or CBD on controlling cancer pain, which have been reviewed and summarised. Five studies that evaluated THC oil capsules, THC:CBD oromucosal spray (nabiximols), or THC oromucosal sprays found some evidence of cancer pain reduction associated with these therapies. A variety of doses ranging from 2.7-43.2 mg/day THC and 0-40 mg/day CBD were administered. Higher doses of THC were correlated with increased pain relief in some studies. One study found that significant pain relief was achieved in doses as low as 2.7-10.8 mg THC in combination with 2.5-10.0 mg CBD, but there was conflicting evidence on whether higher doses provide superior pain relief. Some reported side effects include drowsiness, hypotension, mental clouding, and nausea and vomiting. There is evidence suggesting that medical cannabis reduces chronic or neu-ropathic pain in advanced cancer patients. However, the results of many studies lacked statistical power, in some cases due to limited number of study subjects. Therefore, there is a need for the conduct of further double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with large sample sizes in order to

  8. Advances in the medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jeffry A

    2002-07-01

    The medical therapy of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has advanced significantly over the past year. Serologic markers of IBD have been further investigated and better defined, showing some discriminatory power with potential therapeutic implications. Studies of azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine metabolites will make it easier and safer to use these effective drugs. Clinical data using other immunomodulators, including 6-thioguanine, mycophenolate mofetil, cyclosporine, and tacrolimus, continue to accrue with positive results. Infliximab has become even more firmly established as a reliable and effective therapy for active and fistulizing Crohn disease and may even be helpful in some patients with resistant ulcerative colitis. However, the recognition of potential complications of infliximab therapy has increased with the accumulated clinical experience. Results from trials of other biologic therapies directed at tumor necrosis factor alpha have been disappointing so far, although preliminary studies with biologics directed at adhesion molecules are encouraging. Growing appreciation of the importance of the enteric microflora in IBD has led to a considerable interest in manipulating intestinal bacteria for therapeutic benefit, and trials of both probiotics and prebiotics show promise.

  9. Pituitary-directed medical therapy in Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Petersenn, Stephan; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery remains the first line therapy in Cushing's disease, but a large number of patients will not be cured or disease will recur over time. Repeat pituitary surgery, bilateral adrenalectomy, and radiation have limitations with respect to efficacy and/or side effects. Therefore, there is a clear need for an effective medical treatment. The studies reviewed here suggest a role for pituitary-directed therapies, applying multireceptor ligand somatostatin analogs like pasireotide or second-generation dopamine agonists. Retinoic acid has been also studied in a small prospective study. These compounds target ACTH-secretion at the pituitary level and possibly inhibit corticotrope proliferation. Specific side effects of these compounds need to be considered, especially when used as long-term therapy. These novel approaches could provide options for treatment of patients in whom surgery has failed or is not possible, and while awaiting effects of radiation therapy. Preoperative use to decrease cortisol excess, potentially reducing perioperative complications, needs to be further studied.

  10. Evaluation and medical management of kidney stones in children.

    PubMed

    Tasian, Gregory E; Copelovitch, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    We review the current literature on the diagnostic evaluation and dietary and pharmacological management of children with nephrolithiasis. We searched MEDLINE(®), Embase(®) and the Cochrane Library from their inceptions to March 2014 for published articles in English on kidney stones and therapy in children 0 to 18 years old. Based on review of the titles and abstracts, 110 of the 1,014 articles (11%) were potentially relevant to the diagnostic evaluation and medical management of nephrolithiasis in children. We summarized this literature and drew on studies performed in adult populations to augment areas in which no studies of sufficient quality have been performed in children, and to highlight areas in need of research. During the last 25 years the incidence of nephrolithiasis in children has increased by approximately 6% to 10% annually and is now 50 per 100,000 adolescents. Kidney stones that form during childhood have a similar composition to those that form in adulthood. Approximately 75% to 80% of stones are composed of predominantly calcium oxalate, 5% to 10% are predominantly calcium phosphate, 10% to 20% are struvite and 5% are pure uric acid. The recurrence rate of nephrolithiasis in patients with stones that form during childhood is poorly defined. Ultrasound should be used as the initial imaging study to evaluate children with suspected nephrolithiasis, with noncontrast computerized tomography reserved for those in whom ultrasound is nondiagnostic and the suspicion of nephrolithiasis remains high. Current treatment strategies for children with kidney stone disease are based largely on extrapolation of studies performed in adult stone formers and single institution cohort or case series studies of children. Tamsulosin likely increases the spontaneous passage of ureteral stones in children. Increased water intake and reduction of salt consumption should be recommended for all children with a history of kidney stones. Potassium citrate is a

  11. [Marketing as a tool in the medical institution management].

    PubMed

    Petrova, N G; Balokhina, S A

    2009-01-01

    The contemporary social economic conditions dictate the necessity to change tactics and strategy of functioning of medical institutions of different property forms. Marketing, alongside with management is to become a leading concept of administration of medical institutions. It should be a framework for systematic collection, registration and analysis of data relevant to the medical services market. The issues of the implementation of marketing concept in the practical everyday activities of commercial medical organization providing cosmetology services to population of metropolis.

  12. Clinical considerations for an effective medical therapy in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Karl Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessively inherited copper overload disorder that leads to hepatic and/or neurologic symptoms. More than a century after the first description of Wilson's disease, the available medical treatment options have not been standardized. The efficacy of the commonly used drugs is satisfactory for hepatic disease, but disappointing in the neurologic patients, including the risk of neurologic deterioration after the initiation of chelation therapy. An approach to overcome this problem is the careful and systematic assessment of biochemical response patterns and the quantitative monitoring of symptoms using validated rating scales. Standardized dosage strategies that address changes in copper pools might improve adherence and reduce side effects. Such an approach may reduce long-term morbidity. In this paper, we discuss considerations for an effective medical treatment and requirements for future studies in Wilson's disease. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Medically managing obesity: Offering hope or a disincentive to change?

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jane; Arulgnanaseelan, Juliet

    2017-01-01

    As weight loss in primary care remains minimal, Health Professionals are advised to medically manage obesity-related risk factors including blood pressure and cholesterol. This experimental study evaluated the impact of medically managing risk factors on obese patients' motivation to change their behaviour. A vignette study with two arms: successful medical management (ie risk factors have improved) vs failed medical management (ie no change) set in three General Practices in the South of England. Overweight and obese patients (n=170) rated their behavioural intentions and beliefs after reading a vignette describing an overweight patient who had received either successful or failed medical management of their risk factors (blood pressure and cholesterol). Following successful medical management overweight and obese patients reported increased intentions to lose weight and a greater understanding of their condition. Medical management may change patient's understanding of their weight problem and motivate them to lose weight. Successful management relating to improvements in blood pressure and cholesterol may offer renewed hope and motivate obese patients to change their behaviour. This could be used as a teachable moment to encourage patients to see that obesity need not be an inevitable part of their lives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving medication compliance of a patient with schizophrenia through collaborative behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Heinssen, Robert K

    2002-03-01

    Introduction by the column editors: Numerous factors influence a patient's decision to accept or reject prescribed medications, including the patient's personal values, environmental conditions, and the quality of the patient-physician relationship (1). Guidelines for evaluating and managing noncompliance with medication regimens by patients with schizophrenia take this multidimensional perspective into account, emphasizing functional assessment of nonadherence behaviors and individualized behavior-change strategies to secure and maintain the patient's cooperation (2). Moreover, a collaborative approach to planning pharmacotherapy is required to ensure medication compliance, with a particular emphasis on linking the positive effects of medications with the patient's personal goals and desires for better functioning and quality of life (3). The following case study illustrates the application of principles for enhancing medication compliance in the treatment of a woman diagnosed as having schizophrenia, paranoid type. Strategies presented by Dr. Heinssen include collaborative treatment contracts, analysis of adherence behaviors, and techniques for boosting medication cues and reinforcers in the patient's home. The therapy described was provided in the Life Skills partial hospitalization and psychiatric rehabilitation program, a multidisciplinary, multilevel outpatient service of the now-closed Chestnut Lodge Hospital in Rockville, Maryland. The program integrated medical, social-learning, and cognitive-behavioral interventions for psychosis within a psychiatric rehabilitation framework.

  15. Current Medical Management of Peptic Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lukie, Bryan E.

    1989-01-01

    Peptic ulceration occurs when the digestive action of gastric secretions overcomes gastroduodenal mucosal defences. The therapeutic strategy used to correct this imbalance uses drugs that either reduce gastric secretion or increase mucosal resistance. Traditional therapies of dietary manipulation and antacid administration no longer play major roles in peptic ulcer therapy. Uncomplicated peptic ulcers respond quite well to drug treatment, although recurrences are common and may require long-term maintenance therapy. Drug-induced gastric ulcers have represented a challenging problem, for which effective therapy is now available. PMID:21249091

  16. Physical evaluation system to determine medical risk and indicated dental therapy modifications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, F M; Malamed, S F

    1979-08-01

    The physical evaluation system allows the practitioner to rapidly classify each patient according to medical risk and thus to provide dental treatment comfortably and safely. The evaluation system serves as a guide to the level of dental therapy, deisions of management, and modification of treatment for the medically compromised patient. Extensive use of the ADA physical status classification system in dentistry would allow meaningful studies of morbidity and mortality that are related to various management protocols and could conceivably have an impact on insurance schedules associated with psychosedation modalities and general anethesia on an out patient basis. A physical evaluation system cannot substitute for knowledge and good judgment. Recommended categories of physical status and modification of treatment should not be considered as absolutes, but as guides. Wheras the guidelines may appear to be inflexible, they should not be considered as such. Deviation from recommendations is often justified and is expected.

  17. Medical waste management in China: a case study of Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Yong, Zhang; Gang, Xiao; Guanxing, Wang; Tao, Zhou; Dawei, Jiang

    2009-04-01

    Medical waste management is of great importance due to its infectious and hazardous nature that can cause undesirable effects on humans and the environment. The objective of this study was to analyze and evaluate the present status of medical waste management in the light of medical waste control regulations in Nanjing. A comprehensive inspection survey was conducted for 15 hospitals, 3 disposal companies and 200 patients. Field visits and a questionnaire survey method were implemented to collect information regarding different medical waste management aspects, including medical waste generation, segregation and collection, storage, training and education, transportation, disposal, and public awareness. The results indicated that the medical waste generation rate ranges from 0.5 to 0.8 kg/bed day with a weighted average of 0.68 kg/bed day. The segregated collection of various types of medical waste has been conducted in 73% of the hospitals, but 20% of the hospitals still use unqualified staff for medical waste collection, and 93.3% of the hospitals have temporary storage areas. Additionally, 93.3% of the hospitals have provided training for staff; however, only 20% of the hospitals have ongoing training and education. It was found that the centralized disposal system has been constructed based on incineration technology, and the disposal cost of medical waste is about 580 US$/ton. The results also suggested that there is not sufficient public understanding of medical waste management, and 77% of respondents think medical waste management is an important factor in selecting hospital services. The problematic areas of medical waste management in Nanjing are addressed by proposing some recommendations that will ensure that potential health and environmental risks of medical waste are minimized.

  18. [Application of HIS Hospital Management System in Medical Equipment].

    PubMed

    Li, Yucheng

    2015-07-01

    To analyze the effect of HIS hospital management system in medical equipment. From April 2012 to 2013 in our hospital 5 100 sets of medical equipment as the contro