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Sample records for medicine curriculum vitae

  1. Writing your curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, S

    2001-09-01

    Your curriculum vitae (CV) is your gateway to shortlisting. A good CV takes a long time to prepare. It should not only record your training but, more importantly, should reflect your 'physicianly' qualities, management skills and knowledge of health-care systems.

  2. The digital curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Galdino, Greg M; Gotway, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The curriculum vitae (CV) has been the traditional method for radiologists to illustrate their accomplishments in the field of medicine. Despite its presence in medicine as a standard, widely accepted means to describe one's professional career and its use for decades as an accomplice to most applications and interviews, there is relatively little written in the medical literature regarding the CV. Misrepresentation on medical students', residents', and fellows' applications has been reported. Using digital technology, CVs have the potential to be much more than printed words on paper and offers a solution to misrepresentation. Digital CVs may incorporate full-length articles, graphics, presentations, clinical images, and video. Common formats for digital CVs include CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs containing articles (in Adobe Portable Document Format) and presentations (in Microsoft PowerPoint format) accompanying printed CVs, word processing documents with hyperlinks to articles and presentations either locally (on CD-ROMs or DVD-ROMs) or remotely (via the Internet), or hypertext markup language documents. Digital CVs afford the ability to provide more information that is readily accessible to those receiving and reviewing them. Articles, presentations, videos, images, and Internet links can be illustrated using standard file formats commonly available to all radiologists. They can be easily updated and distributed on an inexpensive media, such as a CD-ROM or DVD-ROM. With the availability of electronic articles, presentations, and information via the Internet, traditional paper CVs may soon be superseded by their electronic successors.

  3. Curriculum Vitae and Related Letters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Sharyl Bender

    This booklet, which was developed by a college career center, explains the purpose of and procedures for writing curriculum vitae (CV) and related letters. The following topics are covered: when a CV is appropriate, points to consider when writing a CV, items usually included, possible sections to include in a CV, and steps in writing cover…

  4. A curriculum vitae: making your best impression.

    PubMed

    Harvey, C

    1993-01-01

    Describing yourself on paper is an important marketing tool for the nurse for professional opportunities today. Using a curriculum vitae (CV) serves to best illustrate relevant experiences that a nurse has had toward fulfillment of a professional objective. A readable, truthful, and polished curriculum vitae and cover letter can help nurses present themselves in a very positive manner.

  5. The "Curriculum Vitae": An Imperfect Mirror.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    1992-01-01

    Curriculum vitae for college faculty can be ambiguous and even misleading: they can obscure an individual's primary teaching and instructional achievements, tell less than they appear to, and convey an unintended message. Faculty should evaluate the clarity and force with which their vitae express their accomplishments and mirror their abilities.…

  6. How to compile a curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Fish, J

    The previous article in this series tackled the best way to apply for a job. Increasingly, employers request a curriculum vitae as part of the application process. This article aims to assist you in compiling a c.v. by discussing its essential components and content.

  7. The curriculum vitae sending the right message.

    PubMed

    Shellenbarger, Teresa; Chunta, Kristy S

    2007-01-01

    When reviewing curriculum vitae (CV), it becomes clear that some CV information provides a better reflection of work completed than others do. The authors provide a description of common CV errors, propose strategies to avoid such problems, and suggest methods for developing an accurate and clear CV that highlights accomplishments and clearly represents the work. Tips for updating CV and suggestions for electronic formats are also provided.

  8. The computerized medical record in gastroenterology: part 4. Health curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Jeanty, C

    1978-12-01

    The health curriculum vitae consists mainly of a chronological sequence of diagnoses, which are the mainstays of the medical record. Each diagnosis is connected vertically in the health curriculum vitae with its aetiological factors and its medical or surgical treatments in a casual concatenation; and horizontally throughout the other three parts of the record with its relevant functional, morphological (descriptive) and numerical laboratory data in a diagnostic association. The health curriculum vitae uses the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED), the International Nomenclature of the Diseases of the Gastrointestinal Tract (CIOMS) and the International Standard Classification of Occupations of the Internationl Labour Office.

  9. How to present a curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J

    1985-10-01

    At times, as for example when candlelight flickers on bottle and glasses, it is not unpleasant to look into a pair of warm and friendly eyes and respond to the words "Tell me about yourself." Completing a curriculum vitae (CV), however, is a less attractive proposition, especially when applying for an appointment. Even those who are fond of talking about themselves can find it difficult. Some find it embarrassing. Some, judging from the poorly presented data which frequently accompany applications even for senior posts, are unaware of the important part the CV plays in the selection process.

  10. [Curriculum vitae organization: the Lattes software platform].

    PubMed

    Amorin, Cristiane V

    2003-05-01

    Curriculum vitae is a Latin expression meaning "career" or "life course". That means the data set concerning name, age, marital status, situation, studies, diplomas, published works and other activities of a student, an applicant for a position, for an exam or for a public office, and others. In short, it is the document that provides an outlook of the person as an individual; that is why this document must be carefully prepared as to precise and true contents, as to presentation and as to writing.

  11. A professional curriculum vitae will open career doors.

    PubMed

    Harper, D S

    1999-01-01

    In today's challenging healthcare environment, it is essential for nurse practitioners to be able to describe themselves professionally on paper to compete for practice and academic opportunities. Nurse practitioners are competing with physician assistants as well as physicians for primary and acute care positions. A carefully compiled curriculum vitae will present the individual in the best light possible to help open career doors and enhance chances of success. Preparing a curriculum vitae will serve to highlight relevant professional accomplishments, whatever the setting, toward the fulfillment of professional goals. This article reviews the current professional print and electronic literature on preparing a curriculum vitae to assist the nurse practitioner in developing this vital document.

  12. Rutherford's curriculum vitae, 1894-1907.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    1995-06-01

    A single page, handwritten document was discovered when the Macdonald Physics building of McGill University in Montreal was gutted in 1978. This proved to be the draft of Ernest Rutherford's curriculum vitae (C.V.) covering the years 1894-1907, probably written in the autumn of 1906 when Rutherford was preparing to leave McGill. The C.V. contains 21 headings in chronological order, referring to research and other activities of Rutherford and his coauthors (especially Soddy and Barnes), plus a further set of headings relating to the associated investigations of Rutherford's team, including Eve and Hahn. A transcript of the document is provided, although in several places, Rutherford's handwriting is difficult to interpret, and the significance of his abbreviations is not always clear. Each of the items in the C.V. is discussed briefly in this review, in the light both of Rutherford's personal career and of the contribution of his team to the development and understanding of radioactivity. This contribution included the cause and nature of radioactivity (with Soddy), energy aspects of radioactive decay (with Barnes), elucidation of the uranium-radium, thorium and actinium series (Godlewski and Hahn), the radioactivity of the earth and atmosphere (Eve), the nature of the gamma rays (Eve) and, perhaps most important of all, the nature and properties of the alpha particle (Rutherford himself). The latter investigations led directly to Rutherford's later work in Manchester, including the nuclear model of the atom and artificial disintegration of the nucleus.

  13. Rutherford's curriculum vitae, 1894-1907.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    1995-06-01

    A single page, handwritten document was discovered when the Macdonald Physics building of McGill University in Montreal was gutted in 1978. This proved to be the draft of Ernest Rutherford's curriculum vitae (C.V.) covering the years 1894-1907, probably written in the autumn of 1906 when Rutherford was preparing to leave McGill. The C.V. contains 21 headings in chronological order, referring to research and other activities of Rutherford and his coauthors (especially Soddy and Barnes), plus a further set of headings relating to the associated investigations of Rutherford's team, including Eve and Hahn. A transcript of the document is provided, although in several places, Rutherford's handwriting is difficult to interpret, and the significance of his abbreviations is not always clear. Each of the items in the C.V. is discussed briefly in this review, in the light both of Rutherford's personal career and of the contribution of his team to the development and understanding of radioactivity. This contribution included the cause and nature of radioactivity (with Soddy), energy aspects of radioactive decay (with Barnes), elucidation of the uranium-radium, thorium and actinium series (Godlewski and Hahn), the radioactivity of the earth and atmosphere (Eve), the nature of the gamma rays (Eve) and, perhaps most important of all, the nature and properties of the alpha particle (Rutherford himself). The latter investigations led directly to Rutherford's later work in Manchester, including the nuclear model of the atom and artificial disintegration of the nucleus. PMID:7565376

  14. Writing a curriculum vitae, resume or data sheet.

    PubMed

    Saltman, D

    1995-02-01

    This paper outlines a method for the preparation of a curriculum vitae, resume or data sheet, which is an essential document for professional people seeking employment or promotion. However, it needs to be accurate and relevant to the circumstances of the position, and requires regular updating.

  15. Curriculum vitae: An important tool for the nurse practitioner.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rodney W; Roberts, Mary Ellen E

    2016-07-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) should maintain a curriculum vitae (CV) that comprehensively reflects the individual's work and professional accomplishments. This article guides APNs through best practices for development of a CV. Tips are offered to help guide the content, format, and maintenance of the CV.

  16. A resume or curriculum vitae for success.

    PubMed

    Markey, B T; Campbell, R L

    1996-01-01

    Nurses who are searching for new positions can enhance their job employment potential with well-written resumes. Scholarship and award recognition also can be improved by creating well-written resumes and/or curricula vitae. Appropriate cover letters effectively introduce nurses to employers or review committees. This article presents a few basic suggestions that can simplify the creation of any of these documents and help nurses produce a quality product.

  17. A model curriculum vitae: what are the trainers looking for?

    PubMed

    Chambler, A F; Chapman-Sheath, P J; Pearse, M F

    1998-04-01

    In this new era of Calman, the curriculum vitae (CV) still remains the most important document in furthering the careers of doctors. A survey of postgraduate deans and college regional training advisors opinions on CVs was undertaken. The results have allowed a model CV to be compiled expressing the layout and most of the features which senior trainers feel are important when producing a CV.

  18. A curriculum vitae that gives you a competitive edge.

    PubMed

    Hinck, S M

    1997-07-01

    All nurses with advancing careers should maintain a current curriculum vitae (CV) to chronicle professional accomplishments. Whatever the work setting, a CV can showcase skills and achievements. It is used when applying for a new position, but also within one's current situation to inform other professionals of specific interests and abilities. This article reviews nursing literature regarding preparation of a CV and suggests a format for the advanced practice nurse to use when writing a CV.

  19. A balancing act: the curriculum vitae and the interview process.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, B A; Dickson, C J

    1994-01-01

    The authors believe that one possible solution to the dearth of minority nursing faculty in higher education is thorough preparation for the search process by the minority applicant. This article discusses the appointment/hiring process and provides the reader with authoritative and experiential information necessary for constructing a curriculum vitae (CV) and preparing for an interview. Armed with a proper CV and knowledge of potential interview questions, the authors believe that minority applicants will be able to maneuver their way through the maize of job interviews. In addition, suggestions are offered to those serving on promotion and tenure committees and administrators.

  20. Creating Curriculum Vitae for Understanding People on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Murakami, Harumi; Tatsumi, Shoji

    When users find information about people from the results of Web people searches, they often need to browse many obtained Web pages and check much unnecessary information. This task is time-consuming and complicates the understanding of the designated people. We investigate a method that integrates the useful information obtained from Web pages and displays them to understand people. We focus on curriculum vitae, which are widely used for understanding people. We propose a method that extracts event sentences from Web pages and displays them like a curriculum vita. The event sentence includes both time and events related to a person. Our method is based on the following: (1) extracting event sentences using heuristics and filtering them, (2) judging whether event sentences are related to a designated person by mainly using the patterns of HTML tags, (3) classifying these sentences to categories by SVM, and (4) clustering event sentences including both identical times and events. Experimental results revealed the usefulness of our proposed method.

  1. The Curriculum Vitae--What It Is and What It Is Not.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, B. Joan; Murphy, Patricia A.

    1979-01-01

    Presents guidelines to nurses for preparing curriculum vitae, narrower and more stylized than resumes, which outline qualifications for academic positions, committees, and honors. Lists categories and describes content of information to be included on a vita (a sample is shown) and notes what to avoid. (MF)

  2. Preparing a successful, role-specific curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2014-10-01

    An internet search reveals just how many articles there are on preparing a curriculum vitae (CV). The preparation of a CV should not be regarded as a 'one-off' event, to be updated periodically. A successful CV requires thoughtful preparation to ensure it is directed towards a specific post and should consider two important perspectives. First, an understanding of what is required of the practitioner in the nursing post (demand), and second, what the nurse can offer in terms of his or her skills, experience, qualities and qualifications (supply). The demands of the post will also include meeting professional standards, such as those that have emerged following consideration of the Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry (Francis 2013). This article explores how to prepare a successful CV for a specific role, using a demand and supply perspective--where a nurse seeks to match the specific requirements of the post by summarising what he or she has to offer.

  3. Preparing a successful, role-specific curriculum vitae.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2014-10-01

    An internet search reveals just how many articles there are on preparing a curriculum vitae (CV). The preparation of a CV should not be regarded as a 'one-off' event, to be updated periodically. A successful CV requires thoughtful preparation to ensure it is directed towards a specific post and should consider two important perspectives. First, an understanding of what is required of the practitioner in the nursing post (demand), and second, what the nurse can offer in terms of his or her skills, experience, qualities and qualifications (supply). The demands of the post will also include meeting professional standards, such as those that have emerged following consideration of the Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry (Francis 2013). This article explores how to prepare a successful CV for a specific role, using a demand and supply perspective--where a nurse seeks to match the specific requirements of the post by summarising what he or she has to offer. PMID:25270484

  4. Using the Curriculum Vita To Study the Career Paths of Scientists and Engineers: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Eliesh O'Neil; Dietz, James S.; Chompalov, Ivan; Bozeman, Barry; Park, Jongwon

    The usefulness of the curriculum vita (CV) as a data source for examining the career paths of scientists and engineers was studied. CVs were obtained in response to an e-mail message sent to researchers working in the area of biotechnology who were funded by the National Science Foundation (55 responses) or listed as authors (industry only) in the…

  5. Importance of components of the curriculum vitae in determining appointment to senior registrar posts.

    PubMed

    Conn, D A; Asbury, A J

    1994-07-01

    To evaluate the opinions of regional education advisers, academics and other consultants about features of the curriculum vitae, we undertook a small attitude survey. The response rate was 73%, which provided data from a total of 78 influential anaesthetists. The respondents' attitude to each feature of the curriculum vitae was reported using a linear visual analogue scale. The three groups had similar attitude scores to most features, but not to research time, training time, higher degrees and abstracts of papers presented to the Anaesthetic Research Society. Publications in the main anaesthesia journals, time in other major medical specialties, research and the possession of a higher degree were scored highly by all respondents. Papers in non-peer-reviewed journals, letters, unsubmitted papers, and time in training for general practice attracted lower scores. The free text comments of many respondents indicated a considerable disillusionment about the whole appointments process.

  6. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part II: the curriculum vitae, cover letter, and personal statement.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-09-01

    It is very important that a job seeker prepares an excellent curriculum vitae (CV) and cover letter. Often a personal statement is also needed. If these are not done well, often an interview is not granted. There are different formats and headings for the CV, depending on the type of job sought and the institution the job is located in. There are also some differences in how this is done between different countries. However, there are also many common elements of a proper CV.

  7. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part II: the curriculum vitae, cover letter, and personal statement.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-09-01

    It is very important that a job seeker prepares an excellent curriculum vitae (CV) and cover letter. Often a personal statement is also needed. If these are not done well, often an interview is not granted. There are different formats and headings for the CV, depending on the type of job sought and the institution the job is located in. There are also some differences in how this is done between different countries. However, there are also many common elements of a proper CV. PMID:23860367

  8. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Postsecondary Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The purpose of this curriculum guide is to assist administrators and instructors in establishing nuclear medicine technician programs that will meet the accreditation standards of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education. The guide has been developed to prepare nuclear medicine technicians (NMT's) in two-year…

  9. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents.

  10. [Curriculum vitae aortae].

    PubMed

    Solberg, S

    1998-12-10

    The Greek word aorta means lifter. The vessel was so termed because Aristotle, who first described it, assumed that the heart was lifted by/hanging in aorta. Leonardo da Vinci described the detailed anatomy of aorta. During the 17th century our present understanding of the aorta and the circulation of blood took form due to the descriptions given by William Harvey. The first known operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in London in 1817 by Sir Astley Cooper who ligated the infrarenal aorta above the aneurysm. Puncture with needles and application of electricity were later tried in order to induce thromboses in the aneurysm. In 1948 Albert Einstein was operated with wrapping of his abdominal aneurysm with cellophane. In 1955 he suffered rupture and died after having refused operation. In 1951 the first successful operation for abdominal aortic aneurysm was performed in Paris by Charles Dubost. With slight modifications, the same operative technique is used today.

  11. Family Medicine Curriculum Guide to Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liepman, Michael R., Ed.; And Others

    This curriculum guide on substance abuse is intended for teachers of family medicine. Comments, learning objectives, teaching hints, and evaluations of knowledge are provided for each area in all chapters. Chapter 1 focuses on the pharmacology of commonly abused drugs including depressants, opioids, stimulants, hallucinogens, inhalants, and…

  12. Veterinary Preventive Medicine Curriculum Development at Louisiana State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbert, William T.

    1976-01-01

    The program aims at training veterinarians, with interdepartmental faculty participation the rule rather than the exception. Included in the curriculum are: avian medicine, herd health management, veterinary public health, veterinary food hygiene, and regulatory veterinary medicine. (LBH)

  13. Nuclear Medicine Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, David

    This curriculum guide prescribes an educational program for training nuclear medicine technologists. Following a brief section on program development, the curriculum is both outlined and presented in detail. For each of the 44 courses, the following information is given: (1) sequential placement of the course in the curriculum; (2) course…

  14. Integration of evidence based medicine into a medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, A H

    2009-09-20

    The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum.

  15. International Federation for Emergency Medicine Model Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Specialists.

    PubMed

    Hobgood, Cherri; Anantharaman, Venkataraman; Bandiera, Glen; Cameron, Peter; Halpern, Pinchas; Holliman, C James; Jouriles, Nicholas; Kilroy, Darren; Mulligan, Terrence; Singer, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programmes in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training programme. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems, but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions' educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists. PMID:21995468

  16. International Federation for Emergency Medicine model curriculum for emergency medicine specialists.

    PubMed

    2011-03-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for emergency physicians and emergency medicine resources worldwide, physicians must be trained to deliver time-sensitive interventions and lifesaving emergency care. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard curriculum that defines the basic minimum standards for specialist trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) convened a committee of international physicians, health professionals, and other experts in emergency medicine and international emergency medicine development to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency medicine. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for educational programs in emergency medicine. The focus is on the basic minimum emergency medicine educational content that any emergency medicine physician specialist should be prepared to deliver on completion of a training program. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance physician education in basic emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to expand emergency medicine within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught. This variability will reflect the existing educational milieu, the resources available, and the goals of the institutions' educational leadership with regard to the training of emergency medicine specialists. PMID:21435317

  17. Family Medicine Curriculum Resource Project: the future.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Paulman, Paul M; Chessman, Alexander W; Davis, Ardis K; Sherwood, Roger A; Sheets, Kent J; Steele, David J; Matson, Christine C

    2007-01-01

    Under contract to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) created an undergraduate medical education curricular resource designed to train physicians to practice in the 21st century. An interdisciplinary group of more than 35 educators worked for 4 years to create the Family Medicine Curriculum Resource (FMCR). By consensus, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies were adopted as the theoretical framework for this project. The FMCR provides materials for the preclerkship years, the third-year family medicine clerkship, the postclerkship year, and faculty development, as well as guidance for integrating topics of special interest to the federal government (such as, geriatrics, Healthy People 2010, genetics, informatics) into a 4-year continuum of medical education. There are challenges inherent in implementing each component of the FMCR. For example, can the ACGME competency-based approach be adapted to undergraduate medical education? Can the densely packed preclerkship years be adapted to include more focused effort on developing these competencies, and whose job is it anyway? What is "core" to being a competent clinician, and what information can be obtained when needed from medical informatics sources? Will family medicine educators embrace the FMCR recommendations for their third-year clerkships? Will exit assessment of the competency levels of graduating medical students be achieved, and can it make them more capable residents? Can faculty in different clinical and educational settings integrate the teaching of "how to learn" into their repertoire? How will faculty development innovation progress in a time of increasing emphasis on clinical productivity? Developing a common language and adoption of core competencies for all levels of medical education is imperative in a society that is focusing on improving health care quality and outcomes. The FMCR Project

  18. Curriculum Guidelines for Postdoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' Curriculum Guidelines for oral diagnosis and medicine include a definition of the discipline, its interrelationships with other disciplines, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, a core content outline, specific behavioral objectives, and notes on sequencing, faculty, and…

  19. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) developed a musculoskeletal ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships in 2010. As the use of diagnostic and interventional ultrasound in sports medicine has evolved, it became clear that the curriculum needed to be updated. Furthermore, the name 'musculoskeletal ultrasound' was changed to 'sports ultrasound' (SPORTS US) to reflect the broad range of diagnostic and interventional applications of ultrasound in sports medicine. This document was created to outline the core competencies of SPORTS US and to provide sports medicine fellowship directors and others interested in SPORTS US education with a guide to create a SPORTS US curriculum. By completing this SPORTS US curriculum, sports medicine fellows and physicians can attain proficiency in the core competencies of SPORTS US required for the practice of sports medicine.

  20. [Compliance with the core curriculum of laboratory medicine (private school)].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Yasushi; Gomi, Kunihide

    2003-04-01

    A model core curriculum for medical education was proposed in March 2001. Medical schools have to revise their curriculum according to the guideline. Showa University School of Medicine revised its curriculum of lectures and clinical practice for laboratory medicine according to the guideline. The GIO of the lecture at 4th grade was for the clinical practice at 5th grade. The GIO of the clinical practice at 5th grade was for the post-graduate clinical training. This revision is expected to improve education and result in better doctors.

  1. Establishing a Professionalism Score in an Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Snider, Karen T

    2016-02-01

    As osteopathic medical education shifts to competency-based learning, course curriculums must adapt to measure behavioral milestones in addition to traditional knowledge and technical skills. Of the core competencies, medical professionalism or lack thereof has been shown to correlate with future state disciplinary board action; therefore, early identification of poor professionalism and intervention is imperative. However, performance indicators, such as humanistic behavior and primacy of patient need, are difficult to measure in most first- and second-year medical school courses. Therefore, A.T. Still University-Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine developed a rubric to objectively measure professionalism within the first- and second-year osteopathic manipulative medicine curriculum. The rubric assesses such measures as timeliness and professional appearance. In the present article, the author describes the grading rubric and the methods for implementing a professionalism score within an osteopathic manipulative medicine curriculum. PMID:26830527

  2. International Federation for Emergency Medicine point of care ultrasound curriculum.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Paul; Bowra, Justin; Lambert, Mike; Lamprecht, Hein; Noble, Vicki; Jarman, Bob

    2015-03-01

    To meet a critical and growing need for a standardized approach to emergency point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) worldwide, emergency physicians must be trained to deliver and teach this skill in an accepted and reliable format. Currently, there is no globally recognized, standard PoCUS curriculum that defines the accepted applications, as well as standards for training and practice of PoCUS by specialists and trainees in emergency medicine. To address this deficit, the International Federation for Emergency Medicine (IFEM) convened a sub-committee of international experts in PoCUS to outline a curriculum for training of specialists in emergency PoCUS. This curriculum document represents the consensus of recommendations by this sub-committee. The curriculum is designed to provide a framework for PoCUS education in emergency medicine. The focus is on the processes required to select core and enhanced applications, as well as the key elements required for the delivery of PoCUS training from introduction through to continuing professional development and skill maintenance. It is designed not to be prescriptive but to assist educators and emergency medicine leadership to advance PoCUS education in emergency medicine no matter the training venue. The content of this curriculum is relevant not just for communities with mature emergency medicine systems but in particular for developing nations or for nations seeking to develop PoCUS training programs within the current educational structure. We anticipate that there will be wide variability in how this curriculum is implemented and taught, reflecting the existing educational environment, resources and goals of educational programs. PMID:26052968

  3. Terror Medicine as Part of the Medical School Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Leonard A.; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D.; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training. PMID:25309891

  4. Terror medicine as part of the medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Cole, Leonard A; Wagner, Katherine; Scott, Sandra; Connell, Nancy D; Cooper, Arthur; Kennedy, Cheryl Ann; Natal, Brenda; Lamba, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Terror medicine, a field related to emergency and disaster medicine, focuses on medical issues ranging from preparedness to psychological manifestations specifically associated with terrorist attacks. Calls to teach aspects of the subject in American medical schools surged after the 2001 jetliner and anthrax attacks. Although the threat of terrorism persists, terror medicine is still addressed erratically if at all in most medical schools. This paper suggests a template for incorporating the subject throughout a 4-year medical curriculum. The instructional framework culminates in a short course for fourth year students, such as one recently introduced at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ, USA. The proposed 4-year Rutgers curriculum serves as a model that could assist other medical schools contemplating the inclusion of terror medicine in pre-clerkship and clerkship training.

  5. A Model Longitudinal Observation Medicine Curriculum for an Emergency Medicine Residency.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Matthew; Baugh, Christopher; Osborne, Anwar; Clark, Carol; Shayne, Philip; Ross, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The role of observation services for emergency department patients has increased in recent years. Driven by changing health care practices and evolving payer policies, many hospitals in the United States currently have or are developing an observation unit (OU) and emergency physicians are most often expected to manage patients in this setting. Yet, few residency programs dedicate a portion of their clinical curriculum to observation medicine. This knowledge set should be integrated into the core training curriculum of emergency physicians. Presented here is a model observation medicine longitudinal training curriculum, which can be integrated into an emergency medicine (EM) residency. It was developed by a consensus of content experts representing the observation medicine interest group and observation medicine section, respectively, from EM's two major specialty societies: the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). The curriculum consists of didactic, clinical, and self-directed elements. It is longitudinal, with learning objectives for each year of training, focusing initially on the basic principles of observation medicine and appropriate observation patient selection; moving to the management of various observation appropriate conditions; and then incorporating further concepts of OU management, billing, and administration. This curriculum is flexible and designed to be used in both academic and community EM training programs within the United States. Additionally, scholarly opportunities, such as elective rotations and fellowship training, are explored.

  6. Addiction medicine: a model osteopathic medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory; Wyatt, Stephen A; Przekop, Peter R

    2010-03-01

    The World Health Organization has identified nicotine, alcohol, and illicit drugs as among the top 10 contributors of morbidity and mortality in the world. Substance use disorders are preventable conditions that are major contributors to poor health, family dysfunction, and various social problems in the United States-problems that have a profound economic impact. The American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine seeks to promote teaching of addiction medicine at colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs), which-honoring the osteopathic concepts of holistic medicine and disease prevention-are well poised to develop a model addiction medicine curriculum. Educators and students at COMs can use guidelines from Project MAINSTREAM, a core addiction medicine curriculum designed to improve education of health professionals in substance abuse, for developing addiction medicine curricula and for gauging their professional growth. These guidelines should be incorporated into the first 2 years of osteopathic medical students' basic science didactics. The authors encourage the development of addiction medicine courses and curricula at all COMs. PMID:20386021

  7. [Design of a Curriculum Clinical Social Medicine].

    PubMed

    Gostomzyk, J G; Simoes, E; Mittelstaedt, G V

    2015-09-01

    The economic transformation of health care systems, which is supported by both the economic and the political sector, is in demand of constant humane correction. Legal regulations of social systems securing health corresponding to the code of social law are guard rails for a responsible use of limited resources and are subject to constant development. All doctors caring for patients should be in a position to reflect the real life context of their patients as both causal and modifying influence for health and disease from a social medical perspective, apart from their specific medical field of expertise.Accordingly 3 parts of sub-specialization training are suggested: clinical tasks of social medicine as detailed in the code of social law, clinical social medicine in health care according to the 5(th) book of the code of social law and social medicine in clinical social medicine/participation. Higher level-of-care hospitals, as well as rehabilitation clinics, should offer sub-specialization in social medicine without interruption of employment contracts. Corresponding criteria for the regulation on further education should be formulated by the German Society of Social Medicine and Prevention (DGSMP) as the competent scientific association and presented to the committee on further education of the Federal Medical Association. This aims at strengthening social medicine in clinical care. PMID:26154260

  8. American Medical Society for Sports Medicine recommended sports ultrasound curriculum for sports medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Finnoff, Jonathan T; Berkoff, David; Brennan, Fred; DiFiori, John; Hall, Mederic M; Harmon, Kimberly; Lavallee, Mark; Martin, Sean; Smith, Jay; Stovak, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The following sports ultrasound (SPORTS US) curriculum is a revision of the curriculum developed by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) in 2010. Several changes have been made to the curriculum with the primary aim of providing a pathway by which a sports medicine fellow can obtain sufficient SPORTS US training to become proficient in the core competencies of SPORTS US. The core competencies of SPORTS US are outlined in the learning objectives section of this document. The term "SPORTS US" was purposefully chosen rather than "musculoskeletal ultrasound" (MSK US) because it was recognized by the panel that the evolving field of SPORTS US encompasses non-MSK applications of ultrasound such as the FAST examination (focused assessment with sonography for trauma). Although the SPORTS US core competencies in this curriculum are all MSK in nature, they represent the minimum SPORTS US knowledge a sports medicine fellow should acquire during fellowship. However, additional training in more advanced MSK and non-MSK applications of ultrasound can be provided at the fellowship director's discretion. Completion of this SPORTS US curriculum fulfills the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine's (AIUM) requirements to perform an MSK US examination and the prerequisites for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography's (ARDMS) MSK sonography certification examination.

  9. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training.

  10. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    PubMed

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training

  11. Vita Genomics, Inc.

    PubMed

    Shih-Hsin Wu, Lawrence; Su, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ellson

    2007-06-01

    Vita Genomics, Inc., centered in Taiwan and China, aims to be a premier genomics-based biotechnological and biopharmaceutical company in the Asia-Pacific region. The company focuses on conducting pharmacogenomics research, in vitro diagnosis product development and specialty contract research services in both genomics and pharmacogenomics fields. We are now initiating a drug rescue program designed to resurrect drugs that have failed in the previous clinical trials owing to low efficacies. This program applies pharmacogenomics approaches using biomarkers to screen subsets of patients who may respond better or avoid adverse responses to the test drugs. Vita Genomics, Inc. has envisioned itself as an important player in the healthcare industry offering advanced molecular diagnostic products and services, revolutionizing thedrug-development process and providing pharmacogenomic solutions.

  12. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  13. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities. PMID:26477902

  14. Assimilating Traditional Healing Into Preventive Medicine Residency Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Denece O; Hopkins, L Olivia; Torres, Eliseo; Prasad, Arti

    2015-11-01

    Comprehensive cultural competency includes knowledge and awareness of culturally based healing and wellness practices. Healthcare providers should be aware of the individual patient's beliefs, culture, and use of culturally based health practices because patients may adopt such practices for general wellness or as adjunct therapies without the benefit of discussion with their healthcare provider. This article describes the culturally based traditional healing curriculum that has been implemented in the University of New Mexico Public Health and General Preventive Medicine Residency Program in order to fulfill this knowledge necessity. Curricular elements were added in a stepwise manner starting in 2011, with the full content as described implemented starting in 2013. Data were collected annually with evaluation of the full curriculum occurring in 2015. New Mexico has a diverse population base that includes predominantly Hispanic and Native American cultures, making the inclusion of curriculum regarding traditional healing practices very pertinent. Residents at the University of New Mexico were educated through several curricular components about topics such as Curanderismo, the art of Mexican Folk Healing. An innovative approach was used, with a compendium of training methods that included learning directly from traditional healers and participation in healing practices. The incorporation of this residency curriculum resulted in a means to produce physicians well trained in approaching patient care and population health with knowledge of culturally based health practices in order to facilitate healthy patients and communities.

  15. An investigation on social accountability of general medicine curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Emadzadeh, Ali; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Bazzaz, Mojtaba Mousavi; Karimi, Sharareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Experts consider social accountability as a new paradigm in medical education and a cultural change that is necessary to be studied and understood more deeply. One of the problems of medical education is the inadequacy of medicine graduates to meet the social accountability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the general medicine curriculum for social accountability. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on three groups of experts, faculty members, and general physicians working in health centers in Mashhad in 2014. According to the needs assessment and definition of need as a requirement or preference, the research was conducted in three stages using the Delphi method, in which the opinions of experts, lecturers, and practitioners were collected and classified based on the CARE model in four areas, i.e., clinical activities, advocacy, research, and educational categories, and, ultimately, the percentage of agreement was determined. Results As indicated by the results of the need analysis, in order to reach social accountability of medical students of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, the curriculum should cover four major areas, i.e., clinical activities, advocacy, research, and training. We found 38 items for social accountability that are required in the general medical curriculum, including clinical activities (12 items), advocacy (10 items), and scope of research (8 items). The educational area was comprised of 8 items. In this study, from 30 participants, only 19 people participated in the three-step Delphi, and there was a 70% response rate in the first stage and second stage, but 90.47% in the third stage. Conclusion There is a growing interest around the world for social accountability in medical schools and other health-related schools. It is expected that the results will be of interest to planners and policy-makers in this field so that we will observe a promotion in the culture of social accountability in

  16. An investigation on social accountability of general medicine curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Emadzadeh, Ali; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Bazzaz, Mojtaba Mousavi; Karimi, Sharareh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Experts consider social accountability as a new paradigm in medical education and a cultural change that is necessary to be studied and understood more deeply. One of the problems of medical education is the inadequacy of medicine graduates to meet the social accountability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the general medicine curriculum for social accountability. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on three groups of experts, faculty members, and general physicians working in health centers in Mashhad in 2014. According to the needs assessment and definition of need as a requirement or preference, the research was conducted in three stages using the Delphi method, in which the opinions of experts, lecturers, and practitioners were collected and classified based on the CARE model in four areas, i.e., clinical activities, advocacy, research, and educational categories, and, ultimately, the percentage of agreement was determined. Results As indicated by the results of the need analysis, in order to reach social accountability of medical students of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, the curriculum should cover four major areas, i.e., clinical activities, advocacy, research, and training. We found 38 items for social accountability that are required in the general medical curriculum, including clinical activities (12 items), advocacy (10 items), and scope of research (8 items). The educational area was comprised of 8 items. In this study, from 30 participants, only 19 people participated in the three-step Delphi, and there was a 70% response rate in the first stage and second stage, but 90.47% in the third stage. Conclusion There is a growing interest around the world for social accountability in medical schools and other health-related schools. It is expected that the results will be of interest to planners and policy-makers in this field so that we will observe a promotion in the culture of social accountability in

  17. Curriculum to enhance pharmacotherapeutic knowledge in family medicine

    PubMed Central

    Bordman, Risa; Bajcar, Jana; Kennie, Natalie; Fernandes, Lisa; Iglar, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed Prescribing is an essential skill for physicians. Despite the fact that prescribing habits are still developing in residency, formal pharmacotherapy curricula are not commonplace in postgraduate programs. Objective of program To teach first-year and second-year family medicine residents a systematic prescribing process using a medication prescribing framework, which could be replicated and distributed. Program description A hybrid model of Web-based (www.rationalprescribing.com) and in-class seminar learning was used. Web-based modules, consisting of foundational pharmacotherapeutic content, were each followed by an in-class session, which involved applying content to case studies. A physician and a pharmacist were coteachers and they used simulated cases to enhance application of pharmacotherapeutic content and modeled interprofessional collaboration. Conclusion This systematic approach to prescribing was well received by family medicine residents. It might be important to introduce the process in the undergraduate curriculum—when learners are building their therapeutic foundational knowledge. Incorporating formal pharmacotherapeutic curriculum into residency teaching is challenging and requires further study to identify potential effects on prescribing habits. PMID:24235207

  18. The integration of the "spirituality in medicine" curriculum into the osteopathic communication curriculum at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences.

    PubMed

    Talley, Jan A; Magie, Richard

    2014-01-01

    With grant funding from the John Templeton Spirituality and Medicine Curricular Award to the George Washington Institute for Spirituality and Health, faculty at Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (KCUMB) developed the "Spirituality in Medicine" curriculum. In developing the curriculum, faculty took into consideration competencies required by the Association of American Medical Colleges and qualitative results from surveys of medical school applicants and enrolled students. Strategies for curriculum delivery included lectures, panel discussions, role-playing, and training in the use of a spirituality assessment tool. A majority of the 250 students who received the training in 2010-2011 were able to demonstrate the following competencies: (1) being sensitive to patients' spiritual and cultural needs, (2) assessing patients' and their own spiritual needs, (3) appropriately using chaplain services for patient care, and (4) understanding the effects of health disparities and ethical issues on patient care. Challenges to implementation included a reduction in chaplain availability due to the economic downturn, a lack of student exposure to direct patient care during shadowing, too little religious diversity among chaplains, and changes in assignment schedules. New competencies required by the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners overlap with and help ensure sustainability of the Spirituality in Medicine curriculum. KCUMB leaders have incorporated the use of the spirituality assessment tool into other parts of the curriculum and into service experiences, and they have introduced a new elective in palliative care. Synergistic efforts by faculty leaders for this initiative were critical to the implementation of this curriculum.

  19. Hospice and palliative medicine: curriculum evaluation and learner assessment in medical education.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra; Ross, Jeanette S

    2012-01-01

    Major efforts have been pursued to improve palliative care education for physicians at all levels of their training. Such changes include the incorporation of palliative care curriculum and guidelines, an established process for competency-based evaluation and certification, faculty development, innovative educational experiences, the improvement of textbooks, and the establishment of accredited palliative medicine fellowships. Hospice and palliative medicine (HPM) has been clearly defined as a subspecialty and a crucial area of medical education. As innovative curricular approaches have become available to educate medical and other interprofessional trainees, this article aims to describe different models and methods applied in curriculum evaluation, tailoring such approaches to the field of palliative medicine. A stepwise process of curriculum development and evaluation is described, focusing on available curriculum evaluation competency-based tools for each level of learners. As HPM evolves and its educational programs grow, curriculum evaluation will provides invaluable feedback to institutions and programs in many ways. PMID:22268408

  20. A behavioral science/behavioral medicine core curriculum proposal for Japanese undergraduate medical education.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral science and behavioral medicine have not been systematically taught to Japanese undergraduate medical students. A working group under the auspices of Japanese Society of Behavioral Medicine developed an outcome-oriented curriculum of behavioral science/behavioral medicine through three processes: identifying the curriculum contents, holding a joint symposium with related societies, and defining outcomes and proposing a learning module. The behavioral science/behavioral medicine core curriculum consists of 11 units of lectures and four units of practical study. The working group plans to improve the current core curriculum by devising formative assessment methods so that students can learn and acquire attitude as well as the skills and knowledge necessary for student-centered clinical practice.

  1. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  2. Using the Curriculum Vitae in Leadership Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bawazeer, Wazerah; Gunter, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Professional biography research with those who hold formal positions in educational organizations is an established approach to researching leaders, leading and leadership. A key focus is on the oral account of a life story, and this can include family and wider life experiences. What is less of a feature is how the respondent codifies their…

  3. The curriculum vitae: gateway to academia.

    PubMed

    Christenbery, Tom L

    2014-01-01

    A CV serves as formal documentation of the applicant’s career path and provides necessary demographic and historical information for career change or advancement. Therefore, each section of the CV should be a thorough accounting of the applicant’s academic, work, and professional responsibilities and attainments. The guidelines in this column also are relevant for nurse educators applying for positions in schools of nursing.

  4. Toward an aesthetic medicine: developing a core medical humanities undergraduate curriculum.

    PubMed

    Bleakley, Alan; Marshall, Robert; Brömer, Rainer

    2006-01-01

    The medical humanities are often implemented in the undergraduate medicine curriculum through injection of discrete option courses as compensation for an overdose of science. The medical humanities may be reformulated as process and perspective, rather than content, where the curriculum is viewed as an aesthetic text and learning as aesthetic and ethical identity formation. This article suggests that a "humanities" perspective may be inherent to the life sciences required for study of medicine. The medical humanities emerge as a revelation of value inherent to an aesthetic medicine taught and learned imaginatively.

  5. [Kampo Medicine in the New Model Core Curriculum of Pharmaceutical Education].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    What should we educate for Kampo medicine in the model core curriculum of pharmaceutical education? The curricular core should be discussed considering the points mentioned below. (1) Positioning of Kampo medicine in the Japanese medical care system. Kampo medicine is an authorized medical care category in the National Health Insurance (NHI) program in Japan. The NHI drug price list carries 148 Kampo formulations. According to the report of the Japan Kampo Medicines Manufacturers Association in 2011, approximately 90% of Japanese physicians prescribe Kampo medicines. (2) Differences between Kampo medicine and western medicine: In Kampo medicine, the most suitable formula among various Kampo formulas to normalize the psychophysical state of individual patients is selected. In other words, if there is a complaint, there are always some treatments. (3) A strong point of Kampo medicine: Kampo medicine enables physicians to deal with difficult-to-treat conditions by western medicine alone. Also, by using the scale of Kampo medicine, each patient can grasp his or her own systemic state and improve their lifestyle. To extend healthy life expectancy, a basic knowledge of Kampo medicine may play a significant role in integrated health care. "The guide book of the approval standards for OTC Kampo products", "the pharmaceutical advanced educational guideline", and "the manual of the exam questions preparation for registered sales clerks" should also be consulted before selecting the area and contents that should be covered. PMID:26935081

  6. Implementing a multidimensional geriatric curriculum in a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program.

    PubMed

    Faulk, Clinton E; Lee, Tae Joon; Musick, David

    2012-10-01

    Residency training in physical medicine and rehabilitation may not contain a formal curriculum in geriatric patient care. A multidimensional geriatric curriculum to third and fourth year physical medicine and rehabilitation residents was implemented to enhance their knowledge in and attitude toward geriatrics. The curriculum consisted of a 12-wk clinical rotation at various sites of geriatric care including outpatient geriatric clinic, skilled nursing facility, continuing care retirement community, and home visits. Six online self-learning modules and multiple didactic sessions were also created. The residents' knowledge and attitude were assessed by pretest and posttest design using the Geriatric Knowledge Test, the Geriatric Attitude Scale, and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. In addition, the residents completed rotation evaluations to rate their learning experiences. Ten postgraduate year 3 and 4 physical medicine and rehabilitation residents participated in the geriatric curriculum, which included a required rotation. The Geriatric Knowledge Test score at baseline was 67.2%. With the completion of the curriculum, the Geriatric Knowledge Test scores showed improvement to 72.7%, although not statistically significant. The residents showed more favorable attitudes toward the geriatric population and interdisciplinary teamwork as measured by the Geriatric Attitude Scale and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. Overall, they rated the learning experiences highly on a 1-9 rating scale, with 9 being the highest rating; the residents assigned an average rating of 7.06 to specific learning activities within the rotation and an average rating of 6.89 to the organizational aspects of the rotation itself. The implementation of this geriatric curriculum allowed for improved geriatric training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

  7. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University.

    PubMed

    Veitia, M; McCarty, S; Kelly, P; Szarek, J; Harvey, H

    2001-04-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum (IGC) Project was designed to enhance interest in and support of generalism during the first two years of medical education. The original goals at Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine at Marshall University included the design and implementation of a core curriculum, Introduction to Patient Care (IPC), and enhancement of teaching excellence through faculty development. The core curriculum facilitated integration with the basic sciences and early introduction of physical examination skills, which were further developed in longitudinal clinical experiences with mentors. Although it was not originally intended to include basic scientists in the preceptor groups, they became important additions and created additional opportunities for interdisciplinary teaching and reciprocal learning. The mentor program, another well-received and intended curriculum change, evolved from a structured experience to a more flexible component of the curriculum. The program met the requirements of the IGC Project but 53% of the originally intended mentor time was achievable, due to curriculum constraints. Faculty development, another success, was originally intended to target IPC faculty but ultimately became a university-wide effort. The changes implemented as a result of the IGC Project continue to flourish beyond the funding period and have become integral aspects of the curriculum and the medical school.

  8. Incorporation of Medicinal Chemistry into the Organic Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Application of concepts presented in organic chemistry lecture using a virtual project involving the sythesis of medicinally important compounds is emphasized. The importance of reinforcing the concepts from lecture in lab, thus providing a powerful instructional means is discussed.

  9. Building a Vita for the Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tentoni, Stuart C.

    Vita review is used by most prospective employers to determine which applicants will be interviewed for a particular position opening in clinical practice. Most graduate students have little knowledge and no training in this topic, which is vital for professional development. Specific examples of vitae construction are provided for one of the…

  10. Impact of a family medicine resident wellness curriculum: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Runyan, Christine; Savageau, Judith A.; Potts, Stacy; Weinreb, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background Up to 60% of practicing physicians report symptoms of burnout, which often peak during residency. Residency is also a relevant time for habits of self-care and resiliency to be emphasized. A growing literature underscores the importance of this; however, evidence about effective burnout prevention curriculum during residency remains limited. Objectives The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of a new, 1-month wellness curriculum for 12 second-year family medicine residents on burnout, empathy, stress, and self-compassion. Methods The pilot program, introduced during a new rotation emphasizing competencies around leadership, focused on teaching skills to cultivate mindfulness and self-compassion in order to enhance empathy and reduce stress. Pre-assessments and 3-month follow-up assessments on measures of burnout, empathy, self-compassion, and perceived stress were collected to evaluate the impact of the curriculum. It was hypothesized that this curriculum would enhance empathy and self-compassion as well as reduce stress and burnout among family medicine residents. Results Descriptive statistics revealed positive trends on the mean scores of all the measures, particularly the Mindfulness Scale of the Self-Compassion Inventory and the Jefferson Empathy Scale. However, the small sample size and lack of sufficient power to detect meaningful differences limited the use of inferential statistics. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrates how a residency wellness curriculum can be developed, implemented, and evaluated with promising results, including high participant satisfaction. PMID:27282276

  11. All Health Is Global Health, All Medicine Is Social Medicine: Integrating the Social Sciences Into the Preclinical Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer; Greene, Jeremy A; Farmer, Paul E; Jones, David S

    2016-05-01

    As physicians work to achieve optimal health outcomes for their patients, they often struggle to address the issues that arise outside the clinic. Social, economic, and political factors influence patients' burden of disease, access to treatment, and health outcomes. This challenge has motivated recent calls for increased attention to the social determinants of health. At the same time, advocates have called for increased attention to global health. Each year, more U.S. medical students participate in global health experiences. Yet, the global health training that is available varies widely. The discipline of social medicine, which attends to the social determinants of disease, social meanings of disease, and social responses to disease, offers a solution to both challenges. The analyses and techniques of social medicine provide an invaluable toolkit for providing health care in the United States and abroad.In 2007, Harvard Medical School implemented a new course, required for all first-year students, that teaches social medicine in a way that integrates global health. In this article, the authors argue for the importance of including social medicine and global health in the preclinical curriculum; describe Harvard Medical School's innovative, integrated approach to teaching these disciplines, which can be used at other medical schools; and explore the barriers that educators may face in implementing such a curriculum, including resistance from students. Such a course can equip medical students with the knowledge and tools that they will need to address complex health problems in the United States and abroad. PMID:26703416

  12. Development, implementation, and evaluation of a medical Spanish curriculum for an emergency medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Binder, L; Nelson, B; Smith, D; Glass, B; Haynes, J; Wainscott, M

    1988-01-01

    A 45-hour medical Spanish curriculum for an emergency medicine residency program was implemented in response to a need for "functionally bilingual" physicians in our practice setting, and to reduce reliance on translation assistance from nursing and clerical personnel. Course goals were to achieve a vocabulary level of 5,000-10,000 words for participants, and to achieve sufficient language capabilities for basic information exchange, obtaining uncomplicated medical histories, conducting unassisted physical examinations, and giving patient discharge instructions. Feedback obtained from post course interviews and instructor assessment indicated that the curriculum employed resulted in the attainment of the above goals for fully participating physicians.

  13. Integrating Complementary and Alternative Medicine into the Health Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Sheila M.; Graf, Helen M.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the popularity of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) approaches in health education, suggesting a proposed CAM course for health education professional preparation and offering a course outline which can be used as a self- standing course or integrated into existing courses. It includes a proposed course description and goals,…

  14. Curriculum Guidelines for Predoctoral Oral Diagnosis/Oral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Oral diagnosis is the area of dental practice that deals with gathering, recording, and evaluating information contributing to the identification of abnormalities of the head and neck region. A statement of general curricular goals in oral diagnosis/oral medicine is presented. (MLW)

  15. Nutrition education curriculum at the University of Nevada School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    St Jeor, S T; Scott, B J; MacKintosh, F R; Daugherty, S A; Goodman, P H; Lazerson, J

    1989-01-01

    This article describes a developing nutrition education curriculum for the University of Nevada School of Medicine, a small and progressive, community-based medical school. The curriculum has been planned to reflect the longitudinal, interdisciplinary, and comprehensive integration of nutrition into new required and existing courses so that timely delivery of knowledge and development of skills will occur in the basic science years followed by direct application in the clinical clerkships. The availability of the "Nutrition and Cancer Education Objectives" is timely and provides overall direction and curricular goals for the simultaneous development of nutrition-cancer education. The coordination of the four-year curriculum of the entire medical school can be specifically targeted for the incorporation of this needed information synergistically at a most opportune time.

  16. Designing a Competency-Based Program in Veterinary Public Health and Preventive Medicine for the Professional Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selby, Lloyd A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    A five-day workshop was successful in fulfilling its prime objective, development of a competency-based curriculum for veterinary public health and preventive medicine (VPH & PM). The model now may be used to re-evaluate and, where necessary, revise existing curriculums. (LBH)

  17. [The 2010 curriculum of the faculty of medicine at the National University of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Morales-López, Sara; Lozano-Sánchez, Rogelio; Martínez-González, Adrián; Graue Wiechers, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 undergraduate medical degree curriculum at the faculty of medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) constitutes an important curricular reform of medical education in our country. It is the result of an institutional reflective process and academic dialog, which culminated in its approval by UNAM’s Academic Council for the Biology, Chemistry, and Health Sciences areas on February 2nd, 2010. Some distinguishing characteristics of the new academic curriculum are: organization by courses with a focus on outcome competencies; three curricular axes that link three knowledge areas; four educational phases with achievement profiles; new courses (biomedical informatics, basic-clinical and clinical-basic integration, among others); and core curriculum. The aforementioned curriculum was decided within a framework of effective teaching strategies, competency oriented learning assessment methods, restructuring of the training of teaching staff, and establishment of a curriculum committee follow-up and evaluation of the program. Curricular change in medical education is a complex process through which the institution can achieve its mission and vision. This change process faces challenges and opportunities, and requires strategic planning with long-term foresight to guarantee a successful dynamic transition for students, teachers, and for the institution itself.

  18. [The 2010 curriculum of the faculty of medicine at the National University of Mexico].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Mendiola, Melchor; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Morales-López, Sara; Lozano-Sánchez, Rogelio; Martínez-González, Adrián; Graue Wiechers, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 undergraduate medical degree curriculum at the faculty of medicine of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM) constitutes an important curricular reform of medical education in our country. It is the result of an institutional reflective process and academic dialog, which culminated in its approval by UNAM’s Academic Council for the Biology, Chemistry, and Health Sciences areas on February 2nd, 2010. Some distinguishing characteristics of the new academic curriculum are: organization by courses with a focus on outcome competencies; three curricular axes that link three knowledge areas; four educational phases with achievement profiles; new courses (biomedical informatics, basic-clinical and clinical-basic integration, among others); and core curriculum. The aforementioned curriculum was decided within a framework of effective teaching strategies, competency oriented learning assessment methods, restructuring of the training of teaching staff, and establishment of a curriculum committee follow-up and evaluation of the program. Curricular change in medical education is a complex process through which the institution can achieve its mission and vision. This change process faces challenges and opportunities, and requires strategic planning with long-term foresight to guarantee a successful dynamic transition for students, teachers, and for the institution itself. PMID:21527971

  19. The evolution of Nutrition in Medicine, a computer-assisted nutrition curriculum.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Karen C; Adams, Kelly M; Kohlmeier, Martin; Zeisel, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    The primary mission of the Nutrition in Medicine (NIM) project is to provide tools to facilitate the nutrition training of undergraduate medical students. NIM has developed and distributed a CD-ROM-based nutrition curriculum to medical schools since 1995. However, the medical school environment is changing rapidly; there is pressure to do more in less time, and many schools are emphasizing independent and integrated learning. The need for a nutrition curriculum that is more flexible and more accessible has driven the evolution of the NIM curriculum from CD-ROM-based delivery into a more modular curriculum with Web delivery. Such changes facilitate access and eliminate the need for installation of CD-ROMs and the associated technical support issues. In addition, the instructional units are smaller and more modular. Eventually, the authoring system will allow instructors to put together a course to meet their specific instructional needs. Our future plans also include custom-tailoring that will allow students to opt out of learning material on the basis of pretest scores if they are already proficient in the content. In this update, we provide a detailed description of the new system and the rationale for the modifications we made. Furthermore, we describe how each change addresses barriers to nutrition education as identified from our surveys and others and from direct user feedback. These innovative strategies should allow a better fit of NIM within diverse medical school environments and help to promote incorporation of the curriculum into more medical schools.

  20. Social media in the emergency medicine residency curriculum: social media responses to the residents' perspective article.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Bryan D; Kobner, Scott; Trueger, N Seth; Yiu, Stella; Lin, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant innovations revolving around the featured article and made possible by the immediacy of social media technologies. Six online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and YouTube, which featured 3 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through various Web analytic tools, and themes were identified by content curation. The dialogue resulted in 1,222 unique page views from 325 cities in 32 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 569,403 Twitter impressions, and 120 views of the video interview with the authors. Five major themes we identified in the discussion included curriculum design, pedagogy, and learning theory; digital curation skills of the 21st-century emergency medicine practitioner; engagement challenges; proposed solutions; and best practice examples. The immediacy of social media technologies provides clinicians the unique opportunity to engage a worldwide audience within a relatively short time frame.

  1. Social media in the emergency medicine residency curriculum: social media responses to the residents' perspective article.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Bryan D; Kobner, Scott; Trueger, N Seth; Yiu, Stella; Lin, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    In July to August 2014, Annals of Emergency Medicine continued a collaboration with an academic Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host an online discussion session featuring the 2014 Annals Residents' Perspective article "Integration of Social Media in Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum" by Scott et al. The objective was to describe a 14-day worldwide clinician dialogue about evidence, opinions, and early relevant innovations revolving around the featured article and made possible by the immediacy of social media technologies. Six online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and YouTube, which featured 3 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through various Web analytic tools, and themes were identified by content curation. The dialogue resulted in 1,222 unique page views from 325 cities in 32 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 569,403 Twitter impressions, and 120 views of the video interview with the authors. Five major themes we identified in the discussion included curriculum design, pedagogy, and learning theory; digital curation skills of the 21st-century emergency medicine practitioner; engagement challenges; proposed solutions; and best practice examples. The immediacy of social media technologies provides clinicians the unique opportunity to engage a worldwide audience within a relatively short time frame. PMID:25725591

  2. Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR): Description of a New Online Educational Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary; Dodds, Sally; Brooks, Audrey J.; Brenner, Michelle G.; Brown, Melanie L.; Frazer, Paige; Mark, John D.; Weydert, Joy A.; Wilcox, Graciela M. G.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Maizes, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Use of integrative medicine (IM) is prevalent in children, yet availability of training opportunities is limited. The Pediatric Integrative Medicine in Residency (PIMR) program was designed to address this training gap. The PIMR program is a 100-hour online educational curriculum, modeled on the successful Integrative Medicine in Residency program in family medicine. Preliminary data on site characteristics, resident experience with and interest in IM, and residents’ self-assessments of perceived knowledge and skills in IM are presented. The embedded multimodal evaluation is described. Less than one-third of residents had IM coursework in medical school or personal experience with IM. Yet most (66%) were interested in learning IM, and 71% were interested in applying IM after graduation. Less than half of the residents endorsed pre-existing IM knowledge/skills. Average score on IM medical knowledge exam was 51%. Sites endorsed 1–8 of 11 site characteristics, with most (80%) indicating they had an IM practitioner onsite and IM trained faculty. Preliminary results indicate that the PIMR online curriculum targets identified knowledge gaps. Residents had minimal prior IM exposure, yet expressed strong interest in IM education. PIMR training site surveys identified both strengths and areas needing further development to support successful PIMR program implementation. PMID:27417353

  3. A Simulation-Based Curriculum To Address Relational Crises in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Eleanor B.; Porter, Melissa B.; Calhoun, Aaron W.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Preparing health care professionals for challenging communication tasks such as delivering bad news to patients and families is an area where a need for improved teaching has been identified. Objectives We developed a simulation-based curriculum to enhance the skills of health care professionals, with an emphasis on the communication of difficult or bad news, which we termed relational crises. Methods Our approach was based on a review of existing simulation-based curricula, with the addition of unique features, including a learner-focused needs assessment to shape curriculum development, use of 360-degree evaluations, and provision of written feedback. Development and implementation of our curriculum occurred in 3 phases. Phase I involved a multidisciplinary needs assessment, creation of a clinical scenario based on needs assessment results, and training of standardized patients. In Phase II we implemented the curriculum with 36 pediatric and internal medicine-pediatrics residents, 20 nurses, and 1 chaplain. Phase III consisted of the provision of written feedback for learners, created from the 360-degree evaluations compiled from participants, observers, faculty, and standardized patients. Results Participants felt the scenarios were realistic (average rating of 4.7 on a 5-point Likert scale) and improved their practice and preparedness for these situations (average rating, 4.75/5 and 4.18/5, respectively). Our curriculum produced a statistically significant change in participants' pre- and postcurriculum self-reported perceptions of skill (2.42/5 vs. 3.23/5, respectively, P < .001) and level of preparedness (2.91/5 vs. 3.72/5, respectively, P < .001). Discussion A simulation-based curriculum using standardized patients, learner-identified needs, 360-degree evaluations, and written feedback demonstrated a statistically significant change in participants' self-perceived skills and preparedness for communicating difficult news in pediatrics. PMID

  4. The Doctoring Curriculum at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine: Leadership and Participant Roles for Psychiatry Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, James A.; Ton, Hendry; Onate, John; McCarthy, Tracy; Stevenson, Frazier T.; Servis, Mark E.; Wilkes, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe in detail the 3-year model of the Doctoring curriculum plus an elective fourth-year Doctoring course at University of California, Davis School of Medicine (UCDSOM) and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine and the critical role for psychiatry faculty leadership and participation. Methods:…

  5. The new formal competency-based curriculum and informal curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine: overview and five-year analysis.

    PubMed

    Litzelman, Debra K; Cottingham, Ann H

    2007-04-01

    There is growing recognition in the medical community that being a good doctor requires more than strong scientific knowledge and excellent clinical skills. Many key qualities are essential to providing comprehensive care, including the abilities to communicate effectively with patients and colleagues, act in a professional manner, cultivate an awareness of one's own values and prejudices, and provide care with an understanding of the cultural and spiritual dimensions of patients' lives. To ensure that Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM) graduates demonstrate this range of abilities, IUSM has undertaken a substantial transformation of both its formal curriculum and learning environment (informal curriculum). The authors provide an overview of IUSM's two-part initiative to develop and implement a competency-based formal curriculum that requires students to demonstrate proficiency in nine core competencies and to create simultaneously an informal curriculum that models and supports the moral, professional, and humane values expressed in the formal curriculum. The authors describe the institutional and curricular transformations that have enabled and furthered the new IUSM curricular goals: changes in education administration; education implementation, assessment, and curricular design; admissions procedures; performance tracking; and the development of an electronic infrastructure to facilitate the expanded curriculum. The authors address the cost of reform and the results of two progress reviews. Specific case examples illustrate the interweaving of the formal competency curriculum through the students' four years of training, as well as techniques that are being used to positively influence the IUSM informal curriculum.

  6. [Curriculum reform at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Marcela; Rivera, Solange; Sirhan, Marisol; Thone, Natalie; Valdés, Claudia; Pertuzé, Julio; Puschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The career of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile was established from the beginning (1929), with a classical Flexner curriculum design. In seven years, the career is divided in three cycles: basic sciences, clinics and internship. It obtained Chilean accreditation and fulfilled American Association of Medical Colleges accreditation requirements. Changes in the Chilean epidemiological profile and health system, and new teaching methods in medicine, stimulated a process of deep curricular analysis, identifying strengths and weaknesses of the medical career. The curricular strengths were well-developed scientific and clinical components, fully committed students and faculties, well defined learning objectives and excellent clinical campuses. Curricular weaknesses included a poor vertical and horizontal integration, few student centered methodologies and a weak emphasis concerning doctor’s professionalism. Subsequently, the whole community of teachers, students and medical educators worked on the design of a new curriculum, establishing a new graduate profile and designed it oriented by learning objectives, of six years of duration, with an optimized course sequence that melds basic science and clinical concepts, with strong emphasis on humanities and professionalism. It prioritizes an early contact with patients from the first year and expands teaching methods. The main objective of this process was to achieve a new curriculum with an integrative structure. This was implemented in 2015 with an approved protocol to evaluate the outcomes.

  7. [Curriculum reform at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile School of Medicine].

    PubMed

    Cisternas, Marcela; Rivera, Solange; Sirhan, Marisol; Thone, Natalie; Valdés, Claudia; Pertuzé, Julio; Puschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The career of Medicine at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile was established from the beginning (1929), with a classical Flexner curriculum design. In seven years, the career is divided in three cycles: basic sciences, clinics and internship. It obtained Chilean accreditation and fulfilled American Association of Medical Colleges accreditation requirements. Changes in the Chilean epidemiological profile and health system, and new teaching methods in medicine, stimulated a process of deep curricular analysis, identifying strengths and weaknesses of the medical career. The curricular strengths were well-developed scientific and clinical components, fully committed students and faculties, well defined learning objectives and excellent clinical campuses. Curricular weaknesses included a poor vertical and horizontal integration, few student centered methodologies and a weak emphasis concerning doctor’s professionalism. Subsequently, the whole community of teachers, students and medical educators worked on the design of a new curriculum, establishing a new graduate profile and designed it oriented by learning objectives, of six years of duration, with an optimized course sequence that melds basic science and clinical concepts, with strong emphasis on humanities and professionalism. It prioritizes an early contact with patients from the first year and expands teaching methods. The main objective of this process was to achieve a new curriculum with an integrative structure. This was implemented in 2015 with an approved protocol to evaluate the outcomes. PMID:26998988

  8. Historical and biochemical aspects of a seventeenth century gold-based aurum vitae recipe.

    PubMed

    Rubbiani, Riccardo; Wahrig, Bettina; Ott, Ingo

    2014-08-01

    The medicinal chemistry and biomedical applications of gold complexes have been intensively studied over the last decades. Some complexes have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and a considerable number of new metallodrug candidates have been developed as new anticancer drugs and anti-infectives. However, the therapeutic use of gold and its complexes goes back to ancient times and was also of great importance for alchemists until the modern age. In this report, we give an overview of the alchemic medicine between the sixteenth and the early eighteenth century and describe the cytotoxicity and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibition of a typical "aurum vitae" medicine, which was prepared according to a recipe by Bartholomäus Kretschmar from the seventeenth century. "Aurum vitae" consists of a mixture of gold, mercury and antimony complexes and shows the expected cytotoxic and TrxR inhibitory properties providing some rationale for therapeutic effects of this kind of historical medicinal preparation.

  9. Defining a core curriculum for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Clarke, Samuel; Jordan, Jaime; Guth, Todd; Santen, Sally A; Yarris, Lalena M

    2012-12-01

    A trained cadre of medical education scholars with a focus on methodologically sound research techniques is needed to ensure development of innovations that can be translated to educational practice, rigorous evaluation of instructional strategies, and progress toward improving patient care outcomes. Most established educational programs are aimed at existing faculty members and focus primarily on the development of teaching and leadership skills. At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success," a breakout session was convened to develop training recommendations for postgraduate fellowship programs in medical education scholarship that would enable residency graduates to join academic faculties armed with the skills needed to perform research in medical education. Additionally, these graduates would enjoy the benefits of established mentorships. A group of 23 medical education experts collaborated to address the following objectives: 1) construct a formal needs assessment for fellowship training in medical education scholarship in emergency medicine (EM), 2) compare and contrast current education scholarship programs in both EM and non-EM specialties, and 3) develop a set of core curriculum guidelines for specialized fellowship training in medical education scholarship in EM. Fellowship-trained faculty need to be proficient in learner instruction and assessment, organizational leadership, curriculum development, educational methodology, and conducting generalizable hypothesis-driven research to improve patient care.

  10. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges

    PubMed Central

    Memon, M.A.; Shmalberg, J.; Adair, H.S.; Allweiler, S.; Bryan, J.N.; Cantwell, S.; Carr, E.; Chrisman, C.; Egger, C.M.; Greene, S.; Haussler, K.K.; Hershey, B.; Holyoak, G.R.; Johnson, M.; Jeune, S. Le; Looney, A.; McConnico, R.S.; Medina, C.; Morton, A.J.; Munsterman, A.; Nie, G.J.; Park, N.; Parsons-Doherty, M.; Perdrizet, J.A.; Peyton, J.L.; Raditic, D.; Ramirez, H.P.; Saik, J.; Robertson, S.; Sleeper, M.; Dyke, J. Van; Wakshlag, J.

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative. PMID:27200270

  11. Integrative veterinary medical education and consensus guidelines for an integrative veterinary medicine curriculum within veterinary colleges.

    PubMed

    Memon, M A; Shmalberg, J; Adair, H S; Allweiler, S; Bryan, J N; Cantwell, S; Carr, E; Chrisman, C; Egger, C M; Greene, S; Haussler, K K; Hershey, B; Holyoak, G R; Johnson, M; Jeune, S Le; Looney, A; McConnico, R S; Medina, C; Morton, A J; Munsterman, A; Nie, G J; Park, N; Parsons-Doherty, M; Perdrizet, J A; Peyton, J L; Raditic, D; Ramirez, H P; Saik, J; Robertson, S; Sleeper, M; Dyke, J Van; Wakshlag, J

    2016-01-01

    Integrative veterinary medicine (IVM) describes the combination of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional care and is guided by the best available evidence. Veterinarians frequently encounter questions about complementary and alternative veterinary medicine (CAVM) in practice, and the general public has demonstrated increased interest in these areas for both human and animal health. Consequently, veterinary students should receive adequate exposure to the principles, theories, and current knowledge supporting or refuting such techniques. A proposed curriculum guideline would broadly introduce students to the objective evaluation of new veterinary treatments while increasing their preparation for responding to questions about IVM in clinical practice. Such a course should be evidence-based, unbiased, and unaffiliated with any particular CAVM advocacy or training group. All IVM courses require routine updating as new information becomes available. Controversies regarding IVM and CAVM must be addressed within the course and throughout the entire curriculum. Instructional honesty regarding the uncertainties in this emerging field is critical. Increased training of future veterinary professionals in IVM may produce an openness to new ideas that characterizes the scientific method and a willingness to pursue and incorporate evidence-based medicine in clinical practice with all therapies, including those presently regarded as integrative, complementary, or alternative.

  12. The Maps in Medicine program: An evaluation of the development and implementation of life sciences curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Jennifer

    There has been a downward trend in both science proficiency and interest in science in the United States, especially among minority students and students of a disadvantaged background. This has led to a downturn in the number of individuals within these groups considering a career in the sciences or a related field. Studies have identified many potential causes for this problem including the current structure of science curriculum, lack of teacher preparedness, and the lack of quality education and support for those students currently underrepresented in the sciences. Among the solutions to this problem include redesigning the science curriculum, offering high-quality professional development opportunities to teachers, and creating programs to give support to individuals currently underrepresented in the sciences, so that they may have a better chance of pursuing and obtaining a science career. The Maps in Medicine program (MiM) has been designed to incorporate all of the aforementioned solutions and apply them to the current science education problem. The Maps in Medicine (MiM) program was established at the University of Missouri -- Columbia, and is funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Newly developed MiM curricula and student activities are intended to promote positive attitude changes in those students who are currently underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields, with the program also providing professional development to high school science teachers. It was important to determine if the MiM program's solution to the science education problem has been successful, and so the program evaluation piece was integral. A mixed-methods approach was used to evaluate the MiM program. Formative evaluation results indicated a positive response from teachers and students regarding curriculum and professional development, and student activities. These results have also lead to the identification of appropriate improvements

  13. How we developed a comprehensive resuscitation-based simulation curriculum in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; McGraw, Robert; Howes, Daniel; Messenger, David; Bruder, Eric; Hall, Andrew; Chaplin, Timothy; Szulewski, Adam; Kaul, Tom; O'Brien, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, simulation-based education has emerged as a new and exciting adjunct to traditional bedside teaching and learning. Simulation-based education seems particularly relevant to emergency medicine training where residents have to master a very broad skill set, and may not have sufficient real clinical opportunities to achieve competence in each and every skill. In 2006, the Emergency Medicine program at Queen's University set out to enhance our core curriculum by developing and implementing a series of simulation-based teaching sessions with a focus on resuscitative care. The sessions were developed in such as way as to satisfy the four conditions associated with optimum learning and improvement of performance; appropriate difficulty of skill, repetitive practice, motivation, and immediate feedback. The content of the sessions was determined with consideration of the national training requirements set out by the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. Sessions were introduced in a stepwise fashion, starting with a cardiac resuscitation series based on the AHA ACLS guidelines, and leading up to a more advanced resuscitation series as staff became more adept at teaching with simulation, and as residents became more comfortable with this style of learning. The result is a longitudinal resuscitation curriculum that begins with fundamental skills of resuscitation and crisis resource management (CRM) in the first 2 years of residency and progresses through increasingly complex resuscitation cases where senior residents are expected to play a leadership role. This paper documents how we developed, implemented, and evaluated this resuscitation-based simulation curriculum for Emergency Medicine postgraduate trainees, with discussion of some of the challenges encountered.

  14. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned. PMID:26477903

  15. Public Health and Preventive Medicine Meet Integrative Health: Applications of Competency Mapping to Curriculum Education at the University of Michigan.

    PubMed

    Wells, Eden V; Benn, Rita K; Warber, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    The University of Michigan School of Public Health Preventive Medicine Residency (UMSPH PMR) Integrative Medicine Program (IMP) was developed to incorporate integrative medicine (IM), public health, and preventive medicine principles into a comprehensive curriculum for preventive medicine residents and faculty. The objectives of this project were to (1) increase the preventive medicine workforce skill sets based in complementary and alternative medicine and IM that would address individual and population health issues; (2) address the increasing demand for evidence-based IM by training physicians to implement cost-effective primary and secondary prevention services and programs; and (3) share lessons learned, curriculum evaluations, and best practices with the larger cohort of funded IM PMR programs. The UMSPH PMR collaborated with University of Michigan IM faculty to incorporate existing IM competencies with those already established for preventive medicine and public health residency training as the first critical step for IMP curriculum integration. Essential teaching strategies incorporated didactic and practicum methods, and made use of seasoned IM faculty, along with newly minted preventive medicine integrative teaching faculty, and PMR resident learners as IM teachers. The major components of the IMP curriculum included resident participation in IMP Orientation Sessions, resident leadership in epidemiology graduate IM seminars, resident rotations in IM month-long clinical practicums, resident participation in interprofessional health system-wide IM clinical case conferences, and PMR faculty enrollment in the renowned Faculty Scholars Program in Integrative Healthcare. This paper describes the novel interdisciplinary collaborations and key curriculum components that resulted in the IMP, as well as evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, and lessons learned.

  16. A Day in the Life at DaVita Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company name means "giving life," the bar for learning and development programs is held high. In this article, the author describes what it takes to graduate from DaVita Academy, the soft skills training program dialysis services company DaVita offers all its employees. DaVita's chief executive officer, Kent Thiry, states that the Academy…

  17. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guides for Pediatrics Faculty: Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series, Medicine 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milman, Doris H.; And Others

    This document provides two separate curriculum guides for pediatrics faculty to use in teaching medical students. The first section contains the alcohol abuse curriculum guide; the second section contains the drug abuse curriculum guide. The drug abuse guide concentrates on cannabis as a paradigm for all nonalcoholic drugs of abuse. Each guide…

  18. Integration of genomic medicine into pathology residency training: the stanford open curriculum.

    PubMed

    Schrijver, Iris; Natkunam, Yasodha; Galli, Stephen; Boyd, Scott D

    2013-03-01

    Next-generation sequencing methods provide an opportunity for molecular pathology laboratories to perform genomic testing that is far more comprehensive than single-gene analyses. Genome-based test results are expected to develop into an integral component of diagnostic clinical medicine and to provide the basis for individually tailored health care. To achieve these goals, rigorous interpretation of high-quality data must be informed by the medical history and the phenotype of the patient. The discipline of pathology is well positioned to implement genome-based testing and to interpret its results, but new knowledge and skills must be included in the training of pathologists to develop expertise in this area. Pathology residents should be trained in emerging technologies to integrate genomic test results appropriately with more traditional testing, to accelerate clinical studies using genomic data, and to help develop appropriate standards of data quality and evidence-based interpretation of these test results. We have created a genomic pathology curriculum as a first step in helping pathology residents build a foundation for the understanding of genomic medicine and its implications for clinical practice. This curriculum is freely accessible online.

  19. Genetics in medical school curriculum: A look at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Deanne M.; Fong, Chin-To

    2008-01-01

    Genetics is assuming an increasingly important role in medicine. As a result, the teaching of genetics should also be increased proportionally to ensure that future physicians will be able to take advantage of the new genetic technology, and to understand the associated ethical, legal and social issues. At the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, we have been able to incorporate genetic education into a four-year medical curriculum in a fully integrated fashion. This model may serve as a template for other medical curriculum still in development. PMID:18196607

  20. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of an Application § 3402.15 Faculty...

  1. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of an Application § 3402.15 Faculty...

  2. PHP-HT (VitaResc Biotech).

    PubMed

    Baldwin, A; Wiley, E

    2001-04-01

    VitaResc (formerly Apex) is developing PHP-HT, pyridoxalated hemoglobin polyoxyethylene conjugate, for the potential treatment of nitric oxide-induced shock (characterized by hypotension), associated with various etiologies, initially in septic shock. A phase I safety study and an initial phase I/II patient trial for NO-induced shock have been completed, and VitaResc has enrolled patients in three of five planned cohorts in a continuation of these trials to include a protocol of continuous infusion and dose escalation [330680,349187,390918]. The results from the dose escalation trials are expected to provide the basis for a randomized, controlled phase II/III pivotal trial of PHP-HT [390918]. VitaResc has licensed PHP-HT exclusively from Ajinomoto for all indications, worldwide, except Japan [275263]. Ajinomoto originally developed the human derived and chemically modified hemoglobin preparation as a blood substitute, but no development has been reported by the company since 1997 [275277,303577]. The other potential indications of PHP-HT include shock associated with burns, pancreatitis, hemodialysis and cytokine therapies [275277]. VitaResc expects the annual market potential of PHP-HT to exceed 1 billion dollars [330680].

  3. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE FELLOWSHIP GRANTS PROGRAM Preparation of an Application § 3402.15 Faculty...

  4. 7 CFR 3402.15 - Faculty vitae.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Faculty vitae. 3402.15 Section 3402.15 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES NATIONAL NEEDS GRADUATE AND...

  5. Educational outcomes from a novel house call curriculum for internal medicine residents: report of a 3-year experience.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Jennifer; Christmas, Colleen; Durso, Samuel C

    2011-07-01

    Physician house calls are an important mode of healthcare delivery to frail homebound older adults and positively affect patient outcomes and learner education, but most physicians receive scant training in home care medicine. A novel longitudinal curriculum in house call medicine for internal medicine residents was implemented in July 2006, and educational outcomes were evaluated over the following 3 years. The 2-year curriculum included didactic and experiential components. Residents made house calls with preceptors and alone and completed a series of computer modules outlining knowledge essential to providing home-based care. They discussed the important features of the modules in regularly scheduled small groups throughout the 2-year experience, and each taught a "house call morning report" in their senior resident year. Evaluation methods included surveys before, during, and at the end of the 2-year curriculum (knowledge and attitudes); direct observation by preceptors during house calls (skills); and an online, anonymous survey at the end of each year (attitudes). Results show statistically significant increases in residents' knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to home care medicine. Residents describe educationally significant and positive effects from their house call experiences. This novel curriculum improved medical residents' knowledge, attitudes, and skills in performing house calls for frail elderly individuals. The longer-term outcomes of this intervention will continue to be studied, with the hope that it may be used to help provide educational opportunities to prepare the physician workforce to meet the service needs of a growing segment of the population.

  6. The undergraduate curriculum of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak in terms of Harden's 10 questions.

    PubMed

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2002-11-01

    The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS) is designed particularly to cater for the health needs of the State of Sarawak, Malaysia. The framework of the curriculum is built on four strands: biological knowledge, clinical skills, behavioural and population aspects. The training is community based and a graduate of FMHS is expected to possess the ability to deal with many ethnic groups with different cultures and beliefs; expertise in tropical infectious diseases; skills to deal with emergencies such as snakebite and near drowning; qualities of an administrator, problem-solver and community leader; and proficiency in information and communication technology. The content of the curriculum strives for commitment to lifelong learning and professional values. The FMHS has adopted a 'mixed economy' of education strategies and a 'mixed menu approach' to test a wide range of curriculum outcomes. The FMHS fosters intellectual and academic pursuits, encourages friendliness and a sense of social responsibility and businesslike efficiency.

  7. Determination of clinically relevant content for a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

    PubMed

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F; Loh, Eldon Y; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M R; Woods, Nicole N

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi method to identify clinically relevant content to incorporate in a musculoskeletal anatomy curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) residents. A two round modified Delphi involving PM&R experts was used to establish the curricular content. The anatomical structures and clinical conditions presented to the expert group were compiled using multiple sources: clinical musculoskeletal anatomy cases from the PM&R residency program at the University of Toronto; consultation with PM&R experts; and textbooks. In each round, experts rated the importance of each curricular item to PM&R residency education using a five-point Likert scale. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) was used to determine consensus at the end of each round and agreement scores were used as an outcome measure to determine the content to include in the curriculum. The overall internal consistency in both rounds was 0.99. A total of 37 physiatrists from across Canada participated and the overall response rate over two rounds was 97%. The initial curricular list consisted of 361 items. After the second iteration, the list was reduced by 44%. By using a national consensus method we were able to objectively determine the relevant anatomical structures and clinical musculoskeletal conditions important in daily PM&R practice.

  8. [From stand-alone solution to longitudinal communication curriculum--development and implementation at the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg].

    PubMed

    Sator, Marlene; Jünger, Jana

    2015-05-01

    At the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg, implementation of an interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum was started in 2001 with the goal of achieving sustained promotion of communicative and clinical competences. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Heidelberg's longitudinal communication curriculum. Furthermore, innovative aspects and strategies are discussed. The methodological approaches for development and implementation were Kern's "Six-step Approach" and a SWOT analysis. The process resulted in an innovative communication curriculum that starts with an integrated curriculum for developing clinical and communicative competence in the pre-clinical phase and continues in the clinical phase with medical communication and interactive training. Satisfaction with the communication curriculum and its effectiveness were rated highly by students. Residents who had graduated from Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg rated the extent to which they had communicative competencies at the time of their graduation at their disposal significantly higher than residents who had graduated from the other 4 medical faculties in Baden-Württemberg. The experiences gained in Heidelberg can be applied by other faculties.

  9. [From stand-alone solution to longitudinal communication curriculum--development and implementation at the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg].

    PubMed

    Sator, Marlene; Jünger, Jana

    2015-05-01

    At the Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg, implementation of an interdisciplinary longitudinal curriculum was started in 2001 with the goal of achieving sustained promotion of communicative and clinical competences. The aim of this paper is to describe the development and implementation of Heidelberg's longitudinal communication curriculum. Furthermore, innovative aspects and strategies are discussed. The methodological approaches for development and implementation were Kern's "Six-step Approach" and a SWOT analysis. The process resulted in an innovative communication curriculum that starts with an integrated curriculum for developing clinical and communicative competence in the pre-clinical phase and continues in the clinical phase with medical communication and interactive training. Satisfaction with the communication curriculum and its effectiveness were rated highly by students. Residents who had graduated from Faculty of Medicine in Heidelberg rated the extent to which they had communicative competencies at the time of their graduation at their disposal significantly higher than residents who had graduated from the other 4 medical faculties in Baden-Württemberg. The experiences gained in Heidelberg can be applied by other faculties. PMID:25941988

  10. Combining clinical microsystems and an experiential quality improvement curriculum to improve residency education in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Tess, Anjala V; Yang, Julius J; Smith, C Christopher; Fawcett, Caitlin M; Bates, Carol K; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2009-03-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's internal medicine residency program was admitted to the new Education Innovation Project accreditation pathway of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to begin in July 2006. The authors restructured the inpatient medical service to create clinical microsystems in which residents practice throughout residency. Program leadership then mandated an active curriculum in quality improvement based in those microsystems. To provide the experience to every graduating resident, a core faculty in patient safety was trained in the basics of quality improvement. The authors hypothesized that such changes would increase the number of residents participating in quality improvement projects, improve house officer engagement in quality improvement work, enhance the culture of safety the residents perceive in their training environment, improve work flow on the general medicine ward rotations, and improve the overall educational experience for the residents on ward rotations.The authors describe the first 18 months of the intervention (July 2006 to January 2008). The authors assessed attitudes and the educational experience with surveys and evaluation forms. After the intervention, the authors documented residents' participation in projects that overlapped with hospital priorities. More residents reported roles in designing and implementing quality improvement changes. Residents also noted greater satisfaction with the quality of care they deliver. Fewer residents agreed or strongly agreed that the new admitting system interfered with communication. Ongoing residency program assessment showed an improved perception of workload, and educational ratings of rotations improved. The changes required few resources and can be transported to other settings. PMID:19240439

  11. Feasibility of Spanish-language acquisition for acute medical care providers: novel curriculum for emergency medicine residencies

    PubMed Central

    Grall, Kristi H; Panchal, Ashish R; Chuffe, Eliud; Stoneking, Lisa R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Language and cultural barriers are detriments to quality health care. In acute medical settings, these barriers are more pronounced, which can lead to poor patient outcomes. Materials and methods We implemented a longitudinal Spanish-language immersion curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) resident physicians. This curriculum includes language and cultural instruction, and is integrated into the weekly EM didactic conference, longitudinal over the entire 3-year residency program. Language proficiency was assessed at baseline and annually on the Interagency Language Roundtable (ILR) scale, via an oral exam conducted by the same trained examiner each time. The objective of the curriculum was improvement of resident language skills to ILR level 1+ by year 3. Significance was evaluated through repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results The curriculum was launched in July 2010 and followed through June 2012 (n=16). After 1 year, 38% had improved over one ILR level, with 50% achieving ILR 1+ or above. After year 2, 100% had improved over one level, with 90% achieving the objective level of ILR 1+. Mean ILR improved significantly from baseline, year 1, and year 2 (F=55, df =1; P<0.001). Conclusion Implementation of a longitudinal, integrated Spanish-immersion curriculum is feasible and improves language skills in EM residents. The curriculum improved EM-resident language proficiency above the goal in just 2 years. Further studies will focus on the effect of language acquisition on patient care in acute settings. PMID:26929679

  12. 75 FR 22437 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available... Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Demonstration Program for tax return preparation is...

  13. 76 FR 30243 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority for the Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching...

  14. Ten Tips for Engaging the Millennial Learner and Moving an Emergency Medicine Residency Curriculum into the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Toohey, Shannon L.; Wray, Alisa; Wiechmann, Warren; Lin, Michelle; Boysen-Osborn, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Millennial learners are changing the face of residency education because they place emphasis on technology with new styles and means of learning. While research on the most effective way to teach the millennial learner is lacking, programs should consider incorporating educational theories and multimedia design principles to update the curriculum for these new learners. The purpose of the study is to discuss strategies for updating an emergency medicine (EM) residency program’s curriculum to accommodate the modern learner. Discussion These 10 tips provide detailed examples and approaches to incorporate technology and learning theories into an EM curriculum to potentially enhance learning and engagement by residents. Conclusion While it is unclear whether technologies actually promote or enhance learning, millennials use these technologies. Identifying best practice, grounded by theory and active learning principles, may help learners receive quality, high-yield education. Future studies will need to evaluate the efficacy of these techniques to fully delineate best practices. PMID:27330668

  15. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people’s perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program’s objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent’s reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient’s parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows’ self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent

  16. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-01-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  17. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-05-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  18. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guide for Psychiatry Faculty. Medicine 2. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resource Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Donald S.

    This guide, one of a series of publications written for medical school faculty to use in designing substance abuse instruction, focuses on curriculum content for drug and alcohol abuse instruction. Following a brief introduction, discussions of positive attitude development toward substance abuse patients, and the psychological, cultural, and…

  19. A curriculum vitae of teeth: evolution, generation, regeneration.

    PubMed

    Koussoulakou, Despina S; Margaritis, Lukas H; Koussoulakos, Stauros L

    2009-01-01

    The ancestor of recent vertebrate teeth was a tooth-like structure on the outer body surface of jawless fishes. Over the course of 500,000,000 years of evolution, many of those structures migrated into the mouth cavity. In addition, the total number of teeth per dentition generally decreased and teeth morphological complexity increased. Teeth form mainly on the jaws within the mouth cavity through mutual, delicate interactions between dental epithelium and oral ectomesenchyme. These interactions involve spatially restricted expression of several, teeth-related genes and the secretion of various transcription and signaling factors. Congenital disturbances in tooth formation, acquired dental diseases and odontogenic tumors affect millions of people and rank human oral pathology as the second most frequent clinical problem. On the basis of substantial experimental evidence and advances in bioengineering, many scientists strongly believe that a deep knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of a given tooth in its natural position, in vivo, will be useful in the near future to prevent and treat teeth pathologies and malformations and for in vitro and in vivo teeth tissue regeneration.

  20. A Curriculum Vitae of Teeth: Evolution, Generation, Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koussoulakou, Despina S.; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Koussoulakos, Stauros L.

    2009-01-01

    The ancestor of recent vertebrate teeth was a tooth-like structure on the outer body surface of jawless fishes. Over the course of 500,000,000 years of evolution, many of those structures migrated into the mouth cavity. In addition, the total number of teeth per dentition generally decreased and teeth morphological complexity increased. Teeth form mainly on the jaws within the mouth cavity through mutual, delicate interactions between dental epithelium and oral ectomesenchyme. These interactions involve spatially restricted expression of several, teeth-related genes and the secretion of various transcription and signaling factors. Congenital disturbances in tooth formation, acquired dental diseases and odontogenic tumors affect millions of people and rank human oral pathology as the second most frequent clinical problem. On the basis of substantial experimental evidence and advances in bioengineering, many scientists strongly believe that a deep knowledge of the evolutionary relationships and the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the morphogenesis of a given tooth in its natural position, in vivo, will be useful in the near future to prevent and treat teeth pathologies and malformations and for in vitro and in vivo teeth tissue regeneration. PMID:19266065

  1. Humanae Vitae and education for chastity.

    PubMed

    Lopez Trujillo, A

    1994-01-01

    In order to teach children to live chaste lives, their parents must also be living in accordance with the tenets expressed in the Pope's "Humanae Vitae." Periodic continence from sexual intercourse affords tranquility and peace to married life and allows parents to have a deeper influence on the education of their children. Living according to the encyclical promotes a reverence for life; it enhances communication in the family and allows children to witness a stable marriage. In addition to supporting the vocation to a stable marriage, the encyclical also promotes the ability of the family to nourish religious vocations in the children. The encyclical also reiterates the rights of parents to provide sex education to their children at home instead of surrendering this right to other institutions. Sex education (or, preferably, education for chastity) must be positive (and not reduce everything to biology), prudent and clear (holding moral values), and delicate (rather than explicit). By mid- to late-adolescence, young people should know that natural ways of spacing children are available, but they do not need to have the extensive counseling afforded to engaged couples. "Humanae Vitae" presents a bridge across the generations in family life which provides hope for the future.

  2. "Genes to society"--the logic and process of the new curriculum for the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Charles M; Thomas, Patricia A; Goodspeed, Elizabeth; Valle, David; Nichols, David G

    2010-03-01

    In August 2009, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine implemented a new curriculum, "Genes to Society" (GTS), aimed at reframing the context of health and illness more broadly, to encourage students to explore the biologic properties of a patient's health within a larger, integrated system including social, cultural, psychological, and environmental variables. This approach presents the patient's phenotype as the sum of internal (genes, molecules, cells, and organs) and external (environment, family, and society) factors within a defined system. Unique genotypic and societal factors bring individuality and variability to the student's attention. GTS rejects the phenotypic dichotomy of health and illness, preferring to view patients along a phenotypic continuum from "asymptomatic and latent" to "critically ill." GTS grew out of a perceived need to reformulate the student experience to meet the oncoming revolution in medicine that recognizes individuality from the genome to the environment. This article describes the five-year planning process that included the definition of objectives, development of the new curriculum, commission of a new education building, addition of enhancements in student life and faculty development, and creation of a vertical and horizontal structure, all of which culminated in the GTS curriculum. Critical ingredients in meeting the challenges of implementing GTS were leadership support, dialogue with faculty, broad engagement of the institutional community, avoidance of tunnel vision, and the use of pilot courses to test concepts and methods. GTS can be viewed as the foundation for the scientific and clinical career development of future physicians. PMID:20182127

  3. Communication skills curriculum for foreign medical graduates in an internal medicine residency program.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-11-01

    Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy, and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. The workshop consisted of two interactive sessions in a small group with two learners and one or two facilitators, during the 4-week geriatrics block in IM internship training year. Twenty-three IM interns at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence, and skill in communication and asked about challenges to effective communication with older adults. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. On a 4-point Likert scale, there was average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which was sustained 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician, and system barriers to effective communication. Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in a sustained increase in overall confidence in IM interns in communication with older adults and may help overcome certain patient- and physician-specific communication barriers.

  4. From the community to the classroom: the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jacklin, Kristen; Strasser, Roger; Peltier, Ian

    2014-01-01

    More undergraduate medical education programs are including curricula concerning the health, culture and history of Aboriginal people. This is in response to growing international recognition of the large divide in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and the role medical education may play in achieving health equity. In this paper, we describe the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). We describe a process for curriculum development and delivery, which includes ongoing engagement with Aboriginal communities as well as faculty expertise. Aboriginal health is delivered as a core curriculum, and learning is evaluated in summative assessments. Aboriginal health objectives are present in 4 of 5 required courses, primarily in years 1 and 2. Students attend a required 4-week Aboriginal cultural immersion placement at the end of year 1. Resources of Aboriginal knowledge are integrated into learning. In this paper, we reflect on the key challenges encountered in the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum. These include differences in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal knowledge; risk of reinforcing stereotypes in case presentations; negotiation of curricular time; and faculty readiness and development. An organizational commitment to social accountability and the resulting community engagement model have been instrumental in creating a robust, sustainable program in Aboriginal health at NOSM.

  5. From the community to the classroom: the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jacklin, Kristen; Strasser, Roger; Peltier, Ian

    2014-01-01

    More undergraduate medical education programs are including curricula concerning the health, culture and history of Aboriginal people. This is in response to growing international recognition of the large divide in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people, and the role medical education may play in achieving health equity. In this paper, we describe the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM). We describe a process for curriculum development and delivery, which includes ongoing engagement with Aboriginal communities as well as faculty expertise. Aboriginal health is delivered as a core curriculum, and learning is evaluated in summative assessments. Aboriginal health objectives are present in 4 of 5 required courses, primarily in years 1 and 2. Students attend a required 4-week Aboriginal cultural immersion placement at the end of year 1. Resources of Aboriginal knowledge are integrated into learning. In this paper, we reflect on the key challenges encountered in the development and delivery of the Aboriginal health curriculum. These include differences in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal knowledge; risk of reinforcing stereotypes in case presentations; negotiation of curricular time; and faculty readiness and development. An organizational commitment to social accountability and the resulting community engagement model have been instrumental in creating a robust, sustainable program in Aboriginal health at NOSM. PMID:25291039

  6. Historical and biochemical aspects of a seventeenth century gold-based aurum vitae recipe.

    PubMed

    Rubbiani, Riccardo; Wahrig, Bettina; Ott, Ingo

    2014-08-01

    The medicinal chemistry and biomedical applications of gold complexes have been intensively studied over the last decades. Some complexes have been used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and a considerable number of new metallodrug candidates have been developed as new anticancer drugs and anti-infectives. However, the therapeutic use of gold and its complexes goes back to ancient times and was also of great importance for alchemists until the modern age. In this report, we give an overview of the alchemic medicine between the sixteenth and the early eighteenth century and describe the cytotoxicity and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) inhibition of a typical "aurum vitae" medicine, which was prepared according to a recipe by Bartholomäus Kretschmar from the seventeenth century. "Aurum vitae" consists of a mixture of gold, mercury and antimony complexes and shows the expected cytotoxic and TrxR inhibitory properties providing some rationale for therapeutic effects of this kind of historical medicinal preparation. PMID:24748221

  7. Innovation in veterinary medical education: the concept of 'One World, One Health' in the curriculum of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Calgary.

    PubMed

    Cribb, A; Buntain, B

    2009-08-01

    'One World, One Health' is a foundation concept in veterinary medicine, much like comparative medicine. However, teachers of veterinary medicine often fail to identify it or speak of its importance within the veterinary curriculum. The resurgence of interest in the 'One World, One Health' concept aligns well with the underlying principles on which the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) has been newly founded. This concept is therefore a key component of the UCVM programme, and one that is well highlighted for those studying in the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) course and graduate students.

  8. Special series on "The meaning of behavioral medicine in the psychosomatic field" establishment of a core curriculum for behavioral science in Japan: The importance of such a curriculum from the perspective of psychology.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Akihito; Nakao, Mutsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the core curriculum for behavioral science, from the perspective of psychology, recommended by the Japanese Society of Behavioral Medicine and seeks to explain how the curriculum can be effectively implemented in medical and health-related departments. First, the content of the core curriculum is reviewed from the perspective of psychology. We show that the curriculum features both basic and applied components and that the basic components are closely related to various aspects of psychology. Next, we emphasize two points to aid the effective delivery of the curriculum: 1) It is necessary to explain the purpose and significance of basic components of behavioral science to improve student motivation; and 2) it is important to encourage student self-efficacy to facilitate application of the acquired knowledge and skills in clinical practice.

  9. [Benefits of the Curriculum "Social Medicine for the Rehabilitation Team" in Rehabilitation Practise].

    PubMed

    Worringen, U; Hoppe, A; Derra, C; Kalwa, M; Brüggemann, S

    2016-08-01

    The Federal German Pension Insurance in cooperation with professional organisations developed a curriculum for further socio-medical education of psychologists/psychotherapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, sports therapists and social workers/social pedagogues involved in medical rehabilitation. This curriculum aims to improve the professional competence of the therapeutic groups named above with regards to their contributions to the socio-medical capacity evaluation and related communication within the rehabilitation team. The curriculum was implemented for the first time in 2013. Using the results of the usibility evaluation the continued education concept was revised and manualised. The manual allows for a wide dissemination of the education concept. PMID:27529301

  10. Engineering curriculum change at a private Midwest school of dental medicine: a faculty innovation.

    PubMed

    Pyle, Marsha A; Goldberg, Jerold S

    2008-03-01

    The national dental educational environment has been sensitized to the changing needs of the profession and students, resulting in an agenda for curriculum change in a number of dental schools. This report discusses the impetus for change at a private Midwestern school that has begun a multiyear implementation of an innovative curriculum. The process by which the innovations have been instituted, while unique to this school, may provide insights for change at other dental schools.

  11. An Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum Improves General Surgery Residents' Standardized Test Scores in Research and Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Trickey, Amber W.; Crosby, Moira E.; Singh, Monika; Dort, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The application of evidence-based medicine to patient care requires unique skills of the physician. Advancing residents' abilities to accurately evaluate the quality of evidence is built on understanding of fundamental research concepts. The American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination (ABSITE) provides a relevant measure of surgical residents' knowledge of research design and statistics. Objective We implemented a research education curriculum in an independent academic medical center general residency program, and assessed the effect on ABSITE scores. Methods The curriculum consisted of five 1-hour monthly research and statistics lectures. The lectures were presented before the 2012 and 2013 examinations. Forty residents completing ABSITE examinations from 2007 to 2013 were included in the study. Two investigators independently identified research-related item topics from examination summary reports. Correct and incorrect responses were compared precurriculum and postcurriculum. Regression models were calculated to estimate improvement in postcurriculum scores, adjusted for individuals' scores over time and postgraduate year level. Results Residents demonstrated significant improvement in postcurriculum examination scores for research and statistics items. Correct responses increased 27% (P < .001). Residents were 5 times more likely to achieve a perfect score on research and statistics items postcurriculum (P < .001). Conclusions Residents at all levels demonstrated improved research and statistics scores after receiving the curriculum. Because the ABSITE includes a wide spectrum of research topics, sustained improvements suggest a genuine level of understanding that will promote lifelong evaluation and clinical application of the surgical literature. PMID:26140115

  12. A curricular model for the training of physician scientists: the evolution of the Duke University School of Medicine curriculum.

    PubMed

    O'Connor Grochowski, Colleen; Halperin, Edward Charles; Buckley, Edward George

    2007-04-01

    Duke University School of Medicine offers an unusual doctor of medicine educational program. The core basic sciences are taught in year one, core clinical clerkships are completed in the second year, the entire third year is devoted to scholarly investigation, and elective rotations are fulfilled in the fourth year. The creation of this unique structure presented many challenges and is the product of a desire of key faculty 40 years ago to change radically the way medical education was taught. Over the years, improvements have been made, but the underlying principles of these visionary leaders have been retained: inquire not just acquire, flexibility of choice, and in-depth exploration. In the spirit of innovation that was established 40 years ago, leaders and faculty at Duke developed a new curricular model in 2004, called Foundation for Excellence, which is anchored in integrated, interdisciplinary innovation. The authors describe the process of curricular reform and provide a detailed overview of this unique approach to medical education. In keeping with Duke's mission to graduate clinician-researchers and clinician-educators, reducing the basic science curriculum to one year created a year saved, which students are now required to devote to scholarly pursuits. The authors argue that adopting a similar one-year basic science curriculum would make instructional time available for other schools to achieve their own institutional goals. PMID:17414195

  13. Exploring the Realities of Curriculum-by-Random-Opportunity: The Case of Geriatrics on the Internal Medicine Clerkship Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Diachun, Laura; Charise, Andrea; Goldszmidt, Mark; Hui, Yin; Lingard, Lorelei

    2014-01-01

    Background While major clerkship blocks may have objectives related to specialized areas such as geriatrics, gay and lesbian bisexual transgender health, and palliative care, there is concern that teaching activities may not attend sufficiently to these objectives. Rather, these objectives are assumed to be met “by random opportunity”.(1) This study explored the case of geriatric learning opportunities on internal medicine clinical teaching units, to better understand the affordances and limitations of curriculum by random opportunity. Methods Using audio-recordings of morning case review discussions of 13 patients > 65 years old and the Canadian geriatric core competencies for medical students, we conducted a content analysis of each case for potential geriatric and non-geriatric learning opportunities. These learning opportunities were compared with attendings’ case review teaching discussions. The 13 cases contained 40 geriatric-related and 110 non-geriatric-related issues. While many of the geriatric issues (e.g., delirium, falls) were directly relevant to the presenting illness, attendings’ teaching discussions focused almost exclusively on non-geriatric medical issues, such as management of diabetes and anemia, many of which were less directly relevant to the reason for presenting to hospital. Results The authors found that the general medicine rotation provides opportunities to acquire geriatric competencies. However, the rare uptake of opportunities in this study suggests that, in curriculum-by-random-opportunity, presence of an opportunity does not justify the assumption that learning objectives will be met. Conclusions More studies are required to investigate whether these findings are transferrable to other vulnerable populations about which undergraduate students are expected to learn through curriculum by random opportunity. PMID:25452825

  14. Can Social Semantic Web Techniques Foster Collaborative Curriculum Mapping In Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Sonja; Cremer, Jan; Schenkat, Hennig

    2013-01-01

    Background Curriculum mapping, which is aimed at the systematic realignment of the planned, taught, and learned curriculum, is considered a challenging and ongoing effort in medical education. Second-generation curriculum managing systems foster knowledge management processes including curriculum mapping in order to give comprehensive support to learners, teachers, and administrators. The large quantity of custom-built software in this field indicates a shortcoming of available IT tools and standards. Objective The project reported here aims at the systematic adoption of techniques and standards of the Social Semantic Web to implement collaborative curriculum mapping for a complete medical model curriculum. Methods A semantic MediaWiki (SMW)-based Web application has been introduced as a platform for the elicitation and revision process of the Aachen Catalogue of Learning Objectives (ACLO). The semantic wiki uses a domain model of the curricular context and offers structured (form-based) data entry, multiple views, structured querying, semantic indexing, and commenting for learning objectives (“LOs”). Semantic indexing of learning objectives relies on both a controlled vocabulary of international medical classifications (ICD, MeSH) and a folksonomy maintained by the users. An additional module supporting the global checking of consistency complements the semantic wiki. Statements of the Object Constraint Language define the consistency criteria. We evaluated the application by a scenario-based formative usability study, where the participants solved tasks in the (fictional) context of 7 typical situations and answered a questionnaire containing Likert-scaled items and free-text questions. Results At present, ACLO contains roughly 5350 operational (ie, specific and measurable) objectives acquired during the last 25 months. The wiki-based user interface uses 13 online forms for data entry and 4 online forms for flexible searches of LOs, and all the forms are

  15. Globalizing the Science Curriculum: An Undergraduate Course on Traditional Chinese Medicine as a Complementary Approach to Western Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Robert; Lin, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    A course has been created to examine the ways in which China and the West have approached human health and medicine. Though fundamentally different, these two systems are complementary in a number of ways. This course is a model for a global science course in an educational initiative that incorporates Asian themes into science and engineering…

  16. Nationwide program of education for undergraduates in the field of disaster medicine: development of a core curriculum centered on blended learning and simulation tools.

    PubMed

    Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Tengattini, Marco; Carenzo, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, effective models of disaster medicine curricula for medical schools have been established. However, only a small percentage of medical schools worldwide have considered at least basic disaster medicine teaching in their study program. In Italy, disaster medicine has not yet been included in the medical school curriculum. Perceiving the lack of a specific course on disaster medicine, the Segretariato Italiano Studenti in Medicina (SISM) contacted the Centro di Ricerca Interdipartimentale in Medicina di Emergenza e dei Disastri ed Informatica applicata alla didattica e alla pratica Medica (CRIMEDIM) with a proposal for a nationwide program in this field. Seven modules (introduction to disaster medicine, prehospital disaster management, definition of triage, characteristics of hospital disaster plans, treatment of the health consequences of different disasters, psychosocial care, and presentation of past disasters) were developed using an e-learning platform and a 12-hour classroom session which involved problem-based learning (PBL) activities, table-top exercises, and a computerized simulation (Table 1). The modules were designed as a framework for a disaster medicine curriculum for undergraduates and covered the three main disciplines (clinical and psychosocial, public health, and emergency and risk management) of the core of "Disaster Health" according to the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) international guidelines for disaster medicine education. From January 2011 through May 2013, 21 editions of the course were delivered to 21 different medical schools, and 524 students attended the course. The blended approach and the use of simulation tools were appreciated by all participants and successfully increased participants' knowledge of disaster medicine and basic competencies in performing mass-casualty triage. This manuscript reports on the designing process and the initial outcomes with respect to learners

  17. Evolution of Students' Reasoning Skills on a Two Year Basis in a PBL Curriculum in Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedard, Denis; And Others

    A 2-year study at the University of Sherbrooke (Quebec) investigated the changes in six medical students' clinical reasoning processes as they participated in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum. In each year, students performed a think-aloud protocol with two medical case problems to solve, one in cardiology and one in urology. In the…

  18. Determination of Clinically Relevant Content for a Musculoskeletal Anatomy Curriculum for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisk, Kristina; Flannery, John F.; Loh, Eldon Y.; Richardson, Denyse; Agur, Anne M. R.; Woods, Nicole N.

    2014-01-01

    To address the need for more clinical anatomy training in residency education, many postgraduate programs have implemented structured anatomy courses into their curriculum. Consensus often does not exist on specific content and level of detail of the content that should be included in such curricula. This article describes the use of the Delphi…

  19. Buoyed by a Rising Tide: Information Literacy Sails into the Curriculum on the Currents of Evidence-Based Medicine and Professional Competency Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Richard B.; Whelan, Julia S.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how information literacy efforts at the Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences have been supported by national trends within health science education to incorporate evidence-based medicine and problem-based learning into the curriculum. Describes effects on librarians, including requests for more instruction, creating…

  20. 77 FR 20694 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available....Office@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority for the Community Volunteer Income Tax...

  1. 78 FR 17776 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Volunteer Income Tax ] Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. DATES: Application packages are available....Office@irs.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Authority for the Community Volunteer Income Tax...

  2. Curriculum Development of a Research Laboratory Methodology Course for Complementary and Integrative Medicine Students

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Nicole; Schafer, Morgan; Tibbitts, Deanne; Wright, Kirsten; Zwickey, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Training in fundamental laboratory methodologies is valuable to medical students because it enables them to understand the published literature, critically evaluate clinical studies, and make informed decisions regarding patient care. It also prepares them for research opportunities that may complement their medical practice. The National College of Natural Medicine's (NCNM) Master of Science in Integrative Medicine Research (MSiMR) program has developed an Introduction to Laboratory Methods course. The objective of the course it to train clinical students how to perform basic laboratory skills, analyze and manage data, and judiciously assess biomedical studies. Here we describe the course development and implementation as it applies to complementary and integrative medicine students. PMID:26500806

  3. Review of three decades of laboratory exercises in the preclinical curriculum at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Genuth, S; Caston, D; Lindley, B; Smith, J

    1992-03-01

    The authors reviewed the use of preclinical curricular time for laboratory exercises at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine from 1955-56 to 1988-89. Total hours decreased from over 1,000 in 1960-61 to just under 300 in 1988-89. From 1955-56 to 1985-86, laboratory hours devoted to animal and human physiology declined by 92%. Although the precise reasons for these changes--which have occurred in medical schools across the country--are difficult to document, the authors view them with concern. After considering the advantages and disadvantages of preclinical laboratory exercises, they conclude that the former still outweigh the latter. The further disappearance of laboratory exercises from the curriculum should be halted by efforts to revitalize them.

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Competencies of Nursing Students and Faculty: Results of Integrating CAM Into the Nursing Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Booth-LaForce, Cathryn; Scott, Craig S.; Heitkemper, Margaret M.; Cornman, B. Jane; Lan, Ming-Chih; Bond, Eleanor F.; Swanson, Kristen M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) R25 Education Grant Program, a faculty development program for integrating CAM into the nursing curriculum was instituted in 2003-2006. The Integrating CAM program comprised a number of elements; the primary strategy included a series of 4-week didactic and experiential summer CAM “camps,” attended by a total of 27 faculty members. Camps were designed to influence faculty integration of CAM material into course offerings. The Integrating CAM program was evaluated via a series of faculty and student surveys regarding CAM competencies, attitudes, and perceptions. For more than half of the faculty (out of the 43 who responded), the program yielded a moderate-to-strong influence on incorporation of CAM material into course content; and moderate-to-great increases in both enthusiasm for CAM and perceived CAM knowledge gains. Students at all levels (undergraduate, masters, doctoral; n = 184) reported that their courses contained CAM content; for 70% of students, their CAM knowledge increased; for 50% of students, level of CAM interest increased. Self-reported student CAM competencies were significantly greater in 2006-2007 (n = 191) than in 2003-2004 (n = 143). Results support the strategy of broadly infusing the nursing curriculum with CAM content via faculty development. PMID:20869029

  5. An evaluation of the elements of internal medicine physiopathology curriculum in general practice based on the perspectives of faculty members of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    ESLAMI, JAMSHID; KHADEMI, MOHSEN

    2015-01-01

    Introduction An evaluation of the curriculum elements can be recognized as a necessity in curriculum dynamic and improvement. This study aimed at evaluating five main elements of a physiopathology curriculum in internal medicine (objectives, content, methods, evaluation, and management). Method The present study is of a descriptive-analytical type, and the studypopulation consisted of a total of 48 faculty members of internal medicine physiopathology departmentat Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Participants wereselected using Cochran’s sample size formula andthrough simple random sampling.Thedatawere collected using a 58-item questionnaire devised by the researcher, usingcurriculum planning experts. Face and content validity of the scale were obtained throughexpert views and modifications provided by 10 professors and experts in medical curriculum evaluation. Also, research reliability was calculated using Alpha Cronbachto be 0.99. Reliability value and coefficient was acceptable.Moreover, One-sample t-test, Independent t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for data analysis. Results Based on the faculty members’ views, of the five curriculum elements, objectives and content were in relatively good conditions (at an average level) while other elements including method, evaluation and management were in poor conditions (lower than average). According to results oftwo-way ANOVA, there wasa significant relationship between faculty members with various work experiencein terms of curriculum evaluation. Conclusion According to research findings, a comparative examination of the curriculum elements and their characteristics in physiopathology course can be conducted, resulting in identification of curriculum weaknesses and their pitfalls. Also, with regard to teaching, evaluation, management methods, weak and strong pointsof the course,efficiency, and effectiveness of the elements were identified. PMID:25927069

  6. Mitigating the risk of opioid abuse through a balanced undergraduate pain medicine curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Morley-Forster, Patricia K; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Axford-Gatley, Robert A; Sellers, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain is highly prevalent in the United States and Canada, occurring in an estimated 30% of the adult population. Despite its high prevalence, US and Canadian medical schools provide very little training in pain management, including training in the safe and effective use of potent analgesics, most notably opioids. In 2005, the International Association for the Study of Pain published recommendations for a core undergraduate pain management curriculum, and several universities have implemented pilot programs based on this curriculum. However, when outcomes have been formally assessed, these initiatives have resulted in only modest improvements in physician knowledge about chronic pain and its treatment. This article discusses strategies to improve undergraduate pain management curricula and proposes areas in which those efforts can be augmented. Emphasis is placed on opioids, which have great potency as analgesics but also substantial risks in terms of adverse events and the risk of abuse and addiction. The authors conclude that the most important element of an undergraduate pain curriculum is clinical experience under mentors who are capable of reinforcing didactic learning by modeling best practices. PMID:24353438

  7. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Results Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Conclusions Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit. PMID:24883163

  8. 75 FR 25314 - Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program-Availability of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program... Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program, which was published in the Federal Register on... packages for the 2011 Community Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Matching Grant Program. FOR...

  9. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  10. Implicit bias against sexual minorities in medicine: cycles of professional influence and the role of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fallin-Bennett, Keisa

    2015-05-01

    Despite many recent advances in rights for sexual and gender minorities in the United States, bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people still exists. In this Commentary, the author briefly reviews disparities with regard to LGBT health, in both health care and medical education, and discusses the implications of Burke and colleagues’ study of implicit and explicit biases against lesbian and gay people among heterosexual first-year medical students, published in this issue of Academic Medicine. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which physicians’ implicit bias against LGBT people can create a cycle that perpetuates a professional climate reinforcing the bias. The hidden curriculum in academic health centers is discussed as both a cause of this cycle and as a starting point for a research and intervention agenda. The findings from Burke and colleagues’ study, as well as other evidence, support raising awareness of LGBT discrimination, increasing exposure to LGBT individuals as colleagues and role models in academic health centers, and modifying medical education curricula as methods to break the cycle of implicit bias in medicine.

  11. Implicit bias against sexual minorities in medicine: cycles of professional influence and the role of the hidden curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fallin-Bennett, Keisa

    2015-05-01

    Despite many recent advances in rights for sexual and gender minorities in the United States, bias against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people still exists. In this Commentary, the author briefly reviews disparities with regard to LGBT health, in both health care and medical education, and discusses the implications of Burke and colleagues’ study of implicit and explicit biases against lesbian and gay people among heterosexual first-year medical students, published in this issue of Academic Medicine. Emphasis is placed on the ways in which physicians’ implicit bias against LGBT people can create a cycle that perpetuates a professional climate reinforcing the bias. The hidden curriculum in academic health centers is discussed as both a cause of this cycle and as a starting point for a research and intervention agenda. The findings from Burke and colleagues’ study, as well as other evidence, support raising awareness of LGBT discrimination, increasing exposure to LGBT individuals as colleagues and role models in academic health centers, and modifying medical education curricula as methods to break the cycle of implicit bias in medicine. PMID:25674911

  12. Training Family Medicine Residents in Effective Communication Skills While Utilizing Promotoras as Standardized Patients in OSCEs: A Health Literacy Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Pagels, Patti; Kindratt, Tiffany; Arnold, Danielle; Brandt, Jeffrey; Woodfin, Grant; Gimpel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Future health care providers need to be trained in the knowledge and skills to effectively communicate with their patients with limited health literacy. The purpose of this study is to develop and evaluate a curriculum designed to increase residents' health literacy knowledge, improve communication skills, and work with an interpreter. Materials and Methods. Family Medicine residents (N = 25) participated in a health literacy training which included didactic lectures and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Community promotoras acted as standardized patients and evaluated the residents' ability to measure their patients' health literacy, communicate effectively using the teach-back and Ask Me 3 methods, and appropriately use an interpreter. Pre- and postknowledge, attitudes, and postdidactic feedback were obtained. We compared OSCE scores from the group that received training (didactic group) and previous graduates. Residents reported the skills they used in practice three months later. Results. Family Medicine residents showed an increase in health literacy knowledge (p = 0.001) and scored in the adequately to expertly performed range in the OSCE. Residents reported using the teach-back method (77.8%) and a translator more effectively (77.8%) three months later. Conclusions. Our innovative health literacy OSCE can be replicated for medical learners at all levels of training. PMID:26491565

  13. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    PubMed Central

    Lamba, Sangeeta; Wilson, Bryan; Natal, Brenda; Nagurka, Roxanne; Anana, Michael; Sule, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing number of students rank Emergency Medicine (EM) as a top specialty choice, requiring medical schools to provide adequate exposure to EM. The Core Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) for Entering Residency by the Association of American Medical Colleges combined with the Milestone Project for EM residency training has attempted to standardize the undergraduate and graduate medical education goals. However, it remains unclear as to how the EPAs correlate to the milestones, and who owns the process of ensuring that an entering EM resident has competency at a certain minimum level. Recent trends establishing specialty-specific boot camps prepare students for residency and address the variability of skills of students coming from different medical schools. Objective Our project’s goal was therefore to perform a needs assessment to inform the design of an EM boot camp curriculum. Toward this goal, we 1) mapped the core EPAs for graduating medical students to the EM residency Level 1 milestones in order to identify the possible gaps/needs and 2) conducted a pilot procedure workshop that was designed to address some of the identified gaps/needs in procedural skills. Methods In order to inform the curriculum of an EM boot camp, we used a systematic approach to 1) identify gaps between the EPAs and EM milestones (Level 1) and 2) determine what essential and supplemental competencies/skills an incoming EM resident should ideally possess. We then piloted a 1-day, three-station advanced ABCs procedure workshop based on the identified needs. A pre-workshop test and survey assessed knowledge, preparedness, confidence, and perceived competence. A post-workshop survey evaluated the program, and a posttest combined with psychomotor skills test using three simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results Students (n=9) reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1), thoracostomy (1.1–1.9), and central venous

  14. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  15. What Are the Appropriate Curriculum Contents for Biochemistry Courses in Veterinary Medicine?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, A. A. D.; Correia, J. H. R. D.

    1995-01-01

    Presents an overview of the important items that the author's suggest should be included in a biochemistry course given to students in veterinary medicine. Presents a broad range of specific topics in biochemistry and strategies for covering as many topics as possible in one course. (LZ)

  16. VITA Experiential, Service-Learning, Learned Competencies, and Changed Mindsets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boneck, Robin; Barnes, Jeffrey N.; Stillman, Tyler F.

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe how Southern Utah University has integrated the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Voluntary Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program as an experiential servicelearning activity for over a decade and a half. First, we describe the value of experiential servicelearning. Second, we detail the program, its oversight, its student…

  17. Barriers to integration of behavioral and social sciences in the general medicine curriculum and recommended strategies to overcome them: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    TABATABAEI, ZAHRA; YAZDANI, SHAHRAM; SADEGHI, RAMIN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The integration of behavioral and social sciences (BSS) into the curriculum of medical students in order to equip them with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes is an essential issue, emphasized in many researches. Our aim is to investigate the barriers to integrate BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the recommended strategies to overcome such barriers through a systematic review of literature. Methods PubMed, ERIC, Scopus, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and OPENGREY were searched for studies on the barriers to integration of BSS into the general medicine curriculum as well as the strategies employed to overcome them until August 28, 2015. Results Sixteen relevant studies were included and the related domains were categorized as barriers and some strategies were recommended to overcome them. In addition, the quality of the included studies was assessed. Conclusion Despite the prominent role of BSS in the effectiveness of health care, these sciences have not been included in the curriculum of medical students effectively. The identified barriers and the strategies used to overcome them should be considered for all integration programs. Future studies should focus on the process of BSS integration in the medical curricula and should evaluate the efficacy of this integration in more detail. PMID:27382578

  18. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  19. Connecting resident education to patient outcomes: the evolution of a quality improvement curriculum in an internal medicine residency.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad A; Diers, Tiffiny; Schauer, Daniel P; Warm, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    As part of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System, residency programs must connect resident-physician education to improved patient care outcomes. Residency training programs, however, face multiple obstacles in doing so. Results from residency quality improvement (QI) curricula tend to show improvement in simple process-based measures but not in more complex outcomes of care such as diabetes or blood pressure control. In this article, the authors describe the evolution of their QI educational program for internal medicine residents at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center within the structure of a novel training model called the Ambulatory Long Block. They discuss a resident-run project that led to reduced rates of patients with uncontrolled diabetes as an example of improvement in outcome measures. Despite favorable results from that particular resident group, the successful intervention did not spread practice-wide. Using this example, they detail the phases of evolution and lessons learned from their curriculum from 2006 to 2014 within a framework of previously published general principles for successful QI education, including those of exemplary care and learning sites. Successful programs require leadership, faculty expertise and mentorship, data management, learner buy-in, and patient engagement. Their experience will hopefully be of help to others as they attempt to simultaneously improve care and education. Further research and innovation are needed in this area, including optimizing strategies for strengthening resident-driven projects through partnership with nursing, allied health, and longitudinally engaged faculty members.

  20. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirilova, N. V. Fomenko, A. N. Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  1. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  2. Student Developed Curriculum--Recognising and Meeting Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Robert G. S.; Hughes, David C.

    1992-01-01

    To make a third-year communications-for-engineers course meet student needs, students were asked to identify training needs and to devise an appropriate delivery and assessment method for a course to teach oral presentations, control of meetings, teamwork skills, interview skills, curriculum vitae, and telephone skills. Industry experts were…

  3. Conditional sampling schemes based on the Variable Interval Time Averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    1986-08-01

    The variable interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm was tested in a variety of boundary layers for its ability to detect motions principally involved in the production of shear stress. A VITA+LEVEL scheme (which uses a variance and level criterion) was devised and is shown to produce length scale statistics that are independent of the conditioning criteria, where those from the VITA scheme are not.

  4. [Anesthesiological systems "Polinarkon-Vita" with microprocessor for artificial lung ventilation apparatuses and monitoring].

    PubMed

    Trushin, A I; Uliakov, G I; Reĭderman, E N

    2005-01-01

    The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita for adults and children are described. These systems were developed at VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. on the basis of basic model of the anesthesiological system Polinarkon-E-Vita. The following new important units of the fifth generation apparatuses for inhalation anesthesia (IA) are described: Anestezist-4 monocomponent evaporator for liquid anesthetics (enfluran and isofluran); Diana, Diana-Det, and Elan-NR apparatuses for mechanical lung ventilation (MLV); dosimeters of medical gases, etc. These systems implement monitoring of vitally important functions of patient and parameters of IN and MLV. The anesthesiological systems Polinarkon-Vita are recommended for medical practice and commercially available from VNIIMP-VITA, Ltd. as small lots.

  5. The impact of 25 years of "Humanae Vitae".

    PubMed

    1993-08-01

    In 1968, Pope Paul VI reinforced the Catholic Church's position forbidding contraception in an encyclical known as "Humanae Vitae." The current Pope, John Paul II, has reiterated this position and stated that use of condoms is forbidden, even to prevent HIV transmission. Several public figures, including the IPPF President and the British Overseas Development Minister, have sought to initiate a dialogue with the Pope to express concern about population growth in developing countries. The Catholic Church is currently opposing efforts on the part of the Presidents of Peru and the Philippines to expand access to family planning (FP) programs. Many of the 500,000 women who die each year of pregnancy complications would have used contraceptives and lived, and an estimated 300 million developing world couples have no access to modern contraception, yet desire no more children. Many Catholics disagree with the Church's stance; 87% of US Catholics surveyed in 1992 stated that FP is the couple's choice. After 25 years of "Humanae Vitae," it is time for the Church to enter into dialogue and join efforts to improve life on earth in the next century. PMID:12345157

  6. Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... better. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration is in charge of assuring the safety ... prescription and over-the-counter medicines. Even safe drugs can cause unwanted side effects or interactions with ...

  7. Documentation of quality improvement exposure by internal medicine residency applicants

    PubMed Central

    Kolade, Victor O.; Sethi, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality improvement (QI) has become an essential component of medical care in the United States. In residency programs, QI is a focus area of the Clinical Learning Environment Review visits conducted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. The readiness of applicants to internal medicine residency to engage in QI on day one is unknown. Purpose To document the reporting of QI training or experience in residency applications. Methods Electronic Residency Application Service applications to a single internal medicine program were reviewed individually looking for reported QI involvement or actual projects in the curriculum vitae (CVs), personal statements (PSs), and letters of recommendation (LORs). CVs were also reviewed for evidence of education in QI such as completion of Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) modules. Results Of 204 candidates shortlisted for interview, seven had QI items on their CVs, including one basic IHI certificate. Three discussed their QI work in their PSs, and four had recommendation letters describing their involvement in QI. One applicant had both CV and LOR evidence, so that 13 (6%) documented QI engagement. Conclusion Practice of or instruction in QI is rarely mentioned in application documents of prospective internal medicine interns. PMID:26908376

  8. The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: An Innovative Geriatric Longitudinal Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy A.; Thornhill, Joshua T., IV; Corwin, Sara J.; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and…

  9. Using direct observation, formal evaluation, and an interactive curriculum to improve the sign-out practices of internal medicine interns.

    PubMed

    Gakhar, Bhavna; Spencer, Abby L

    2010-07-01

    The safe transfer (handoff) of responsibility for patient care from one physician to another requires that health care facilities have rigorous sign-out systems and that physicians develop effective communication skills. In 2007 and 2008, to improve the spoken and written sign-out practices of the 25 interns at Allegheny General Hospital (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), the authors designed and administered Likert scale surveys about training in and satisfaction with current sign-out practices; directly observed and evaluated interns performing spoken sign-outs; assessed and graded interns' sign-out sheets; and compared sign-out sheets with patient records to evaluate their accuracy. On the basis of their findings, the authors developed a new curriculum with didactic and interactive components to target intern-level and system-level problems. The curriculum emphasized the importance of complete and accurate sign-outs, provided examples of good and poor sign-outs, and assigned interns to work in small groups to practice sign-out skills and receive feedback from peers and program leaders. Reevaluation of interns two months after curriculum implementation revealed not only better performance on each of the seven items evaluated for spoken sign-out but also substantial improvement in the completeness of sign-out sheets and the accuracy of reporting of identification data, code status, and medications data. The curriculum was well received by interns, and it helped them develop skills required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, including competencies in communication, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice. PMID:20375830

  10. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! - Risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine. PMID:23467440

  11. Study of medicine 2.0 due to Web 2.0?! -- risks and opportunities for the curriculum in Leipzig.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Gunther; Neef, Martin; Rotzoll, Daisy; Heinke, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Web 2.0 is changing the study of medicine by opening up totally new ways of learning and teaching in an ongoing process. Global social networking services like Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, Google Drive and Xing already play an important part in communication both among students and between students and teaching staff. Moreover, local portals (such as the platform [http://www.leipzig-medizin.de] established in 2003) have also caught on and in some cases eclipsed the use of the well-known location-independent social media. The many possibilities and rapid changes brought about by social networks need to be publicized within medical faculties. Therefore, an E-learning and New Media Working Group was set up at the Faculty of Medicine of Universität Leipzig in order to harness the opportunities of Web 2.0, analyse the resulting processes of change in the study of medicine, and curb the risks of the Internet. With Web 2.0 and the social web already influencing the study of medicine, the opportunities of the Internet now need to be utilized to improve the teaching of medicine.

  12. Impact resistance of oil-immersed lignum vitae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Shan, Lei; Lu, Hongyu; Zheng, Yelong; Han, Zhiwu; Tian, Yu

    2016-07-18

    Biological materials immersed in vegetable and mineral oil, such as rattan armor and wooden sleepers, have been extensively used since ancient times because of their excellent mechanical properties. This study quantitatively investigated the viscoelasticity and tribological performance of lignum vitae immersed in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and tung oils (Aleuritesfordii Hemsl.) to reveal the mechanism of impact resistance. The acceleration of samples immersed in tung oil was higher than that of dry and PAO-immersed samples in the first impact. The elastic modulus of the samples immersed in tung oil increased slightly. The impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was reduced because of the low friction coefficient (0.07) resulted in a low wear rate. The extent of impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was approximately 34% and 58% lower than that on the dry and PAO oil-immersed samples, respectively, under an angle of 20° and a height of 10 cm. The impact damage on the PAO-immersed samples was reduced because of low friction coefficient. However, impact damage increased because of large elastic modulus. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for the application of modified biological materials with high strength and wear resistance.

  13. Impact resistance of oil-immersed lignum vitae

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wei; Shan, Lei; Lu, Hongyu; Zheng, Yelong; Han, Zhiwu; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biological materials immersed in vegetable and mineral oil, such as rattan armor and wooden sleepers, have been extensively used since ancient times because of their excellent mechanical properties. This study quantitatively investigated the viscoelasticity and tribological performance of lignum vitae immersed in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and tung oils (Aleuritesfordii Hemsl.) to reveal the mechanism of impact resistance. The acceleration of samples immersed in tung oil was higher than that of dry and PAO-immersed samples in the first impact. The elastic modulus of the samples immersed in tung oil increased slightly. The impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was reduced because of the low friction coefficient (0.07) resulted in a low wear rate. The extent of impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was approximately 34% and 58% lower than that on the dry and PAO oil-immersed samples, respectively, under an angle of 20° and a height of 10 cm. The impact damage on the PAO-immersed samples was reduced because of low friction coefficient. However, impact damage increased because of large elastic modulus. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for the application of modified biological materials with high strength and wear resistance. PMID:27425829

  14. Impact resistance of oil-immersed lignum vitae.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wei; Shan, Lei; Lu, Hongyu; Zheng, Yelong; Han, Zhiwu; Tian, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Biological materials immersed in vegetable and mineral oil, such as rattan armor and wooden sleepers, have been extensively used since ancient times because of their excellent mechanical properties. This study quantitatively investigated the viscoelasticity and tribological performance of lignum vitae immersed in poly-alpha-olefin (PAO) and tung oils (Aleuritesfordii Hemsl.) to reveal the mechanism of impact resistance. The acceleration of samples immersed in tung oil was higher than that of dry and PAO-immersed samples in the first impact. The elastic modulus of the samples immersed in tung oil increased slightly. The impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was reduced because of the low friction coefficient (0.07) resulted in a low wear rate. The extent of impact damage on the samples immersed in tung oil was approximately 34% and 58% lower than that on the dry and PAO oil-immersed samples, respectively, under an angle of 20° and a height of 10 cm. The impact damage on the PAO-immersed samples was reduced because of low friction coefficient. However, impact damage increased because of large elastic modulus. The findings of this study can serve as a reference for the application of modified biological materials with high strength and wear resistance. PMID:27425829

  15. Toward a national core course in agricultural medicine and curriculum in agricultural safety and health: the "building capacity" consensus process.

    PubMed

    Rudolphi, Josie M; Donham, Kelley J

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The agricultural industry poses specific hazards and risks to its workers. Since the 1970s, the University of Iowa has been establishing programs to educate rural health care and safety professionals who in turn provide education and occupational health and safety services to farm families and farm workers. This program has been well established in the state of Iowa as a program of Iowa's Center for Agricultural Safety and Health (I-CASH). However, the National 1989 Agriculture at Risk Report indicated there was a great need for agricultural medicine training beyond Iowa's borders. In order to help meet this need, Building Capacity: A National Resource of Agricultural Medicine Professionals was initiated as a project of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)-funded Great Plains Center for Agricultural Health in 2006. Before the first phase of this project, a consensus process was conducted with a group of safety and health professionals to determine topics and learning objectives for the course. Over 300 students attended and matriculated the agricultural medicine course during first phase of the project (2007-2010). Beginning the second phase of the project (2012-2016), an expanded advisory committee (38 internationally recognized health and safety professionals) was convened to review the progress of the first phase, make recommendations for revisions to the required topics and competencies, and discuss updates to the second edition of the course textbook (Agricultural Medicine: Occupational and Environmental Health for the Health Professions). A formal consensus process was held and included an online survey and also a face-to-face meeting. The group was charged with the responsibility of developing the next version of this course by establishing best practices and setting an agenda with the long-term goal of developing a national course in agricultural medicine.

  16. From "junk" to gene: curriculum vitae of a primate receptor isoform gene.

    PubMed

    Singer, Silke S; Männel, Daniela N; Hehlgans, Thomas; Brosius, Jürgen; Schmitz, Jürgen

    2004-08-20

    Exonization of Alu retroposons awakens public opinion, particularly when causing genetic diseases. However, often neglected, alternative "Alu-exons" also carry the potential to greatly enhance genetic diversity by increasing the transcriptome of primates chiefly via alternative splicing.Here, we report a 5' exon generated from one of the two alternative transcripts in human tumor necrosis factor receptor gene type 2 (p75TNFR) that contains an ancient Alu-SINE, which provides an alternative N-terminal protein-coding domain. We follow the primate evolution over the past 63 million years to reconstruct the key events that gave rise to a novel receptor isoform. The Alu integration and start codon formation occurred between 58 and 40 million years ago (MYA) in the common ancestor of anthropoid primates. Yet a functional gene product could not be generated until a novel splice site and an open reading frame were introduced between 40 and 25 MYA on the catarrhine lineage (Old World monkeys including apes).

  17. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  18. Antimicrobial Potential and Chemical Characterization of Serbian Liverwort (Porella arboris-vitae): SEM and TEM Observations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar Tyagi, Amit; Bukvicki, Danka; Gottardi, Davide; Veljic, Milan; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Malik, Anushree; Marin, Petar D.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of Porella arboris-vitae extracts was determined by solid phase microextraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPME GC-MS), and 66 constituents were identified. The dominant compounds in methanol extract of P. arboris-vitae were β-caryophyllene (14.7%), α-gurjunene (10.9%), α-selinene (10.8%), β-elemene (5.6%), γ-muurolene (4.6%), and allo-aromadendrene (4.3%) and in ethanol extract, β-caryophyllene (11.8%), α-selinene (9.6%), α-gurjunene (9.4%), isopentyl alcohol (8.8%), 2-hexanol (3.7%), β-elemene (3.7%), allo-aromadendrene (3.7%), and γ-muurolene (3.3%) were the major components. In ethyl acetate extract of P. arboris-vitae, undecane (11.3%), β-caryophyllene (8.4%), dodecane (6.4%), α-gurjunene (6%), 2-methyldecane (5.1%), hemimellitene (4.9%), and D-limonene (3.9%) were major components. The antimicrobial activity of different P. arboris-vitae extracts was evaluated against selected food spoilage microorganisms using microbroth dilution method. The Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) varied from 0.5 to 1.5 mg/mL and 1.25 to 2 mg/mL for yeast and bacterial strains, respectively. Significant morphological and ultrastructural alterations due to the effect of methanolic and ethanolic P. arboris-vitae extracts on S. Enteritidis have also been observed by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope, respectively. The results provide the evidence of antimicrobial potential of P. arboris-vitae extracts and suggest its potential as natural antimicrobial agents for food preservation. PMID:23365607

  19. A New Work Sample Battery for Vocational Assessment of the Disadvantaged: VITAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrams, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Describes the development of a work sample battery designed for assessment of vocational aptitudes, interests, and temperament in a disadvantaged client population. VITAS provides information about factors most related to success on the job: interest in the job, temperament for the job, and aptitudes for physical and cognitive components of the…

  20. The Vita Activa as Compass: Navigating Uncertainty in Teaching with Hannah Arendt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carrie Ann Barnes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is an exploration of stories of uncertainty in the lives of elementary teachers and the value that the ideas of Hannah Arendt lend to the discussion around uncertainty. In "The Human Condition" (1958) Hannah Arendt theorizes the life of action, the "vita activa". Arendtian action is inherently uncertain because to be "capable of…

  1. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system. PMID:20196683

  2. Structural and redox behavior of OxyVita, a zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin: comparison with natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Harrington, John P; Orlik, Kseniya; Orlig, Kseniya; Zito, Samantha L; Wollocko, Jacek; Wollocko, Hanna

    2010-04-01

    A zero-linked polymeric hemoglobin (OxyVita Hb) has been developed for application as an acellular therapeutic hemoglobin-based-oxygen-carrier (HBOC). For effective and safe oxygen binding, transport and delivery, an HBOC must meet essential molecular requirements related to its structural integrity and redox stability. OxyVita is a super polymer possessing an average M.wt. of 17 x 10(6) Da. Structural integrity was determined by unfolding studies of OxyVita in the presence of increasing concentrations of urea. The unfolding midpoints (D(1/2)) of different preparations of OxyVita (solution and powder forms) were compared to Lumbricus Hb (LtHb) and Arenicola Hb (ArHb), natural acellular polymeric hemoglobins, which are serving as models for an effective and safe acellular HBOC. Reduction studies of OxyVita Hb using endogenous reducing agents were also investigated. Results from these studies indicate that: 1) OxyVita Hb exhibits greater resistance to conformational change than either LtHb or ArHb in the reduced (oxyHb) state; and 2) the reduction of met OxyVita Hb to oxyHb occurs slowly in the presence of either ascorbic acid (70% reduction in 560 min.) or beta-NADH (40% reduction in 90 min.). These studies provide consistent evidence that OxyVita Hb possesses physiochemical properties that exhibit structural integrity and redox behavior necessary for functioning as an effective and safe HBOC within clinical applications. These results are in agreement with observations made by other investigators as to the reduction in heme-loss of OxyVita Hb, essential for the reversible binding/release of molecular oxygen within the circulatory system.

  3. Conditional-sampling schemes for turbulent flow, based on the variable-interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    The variable-interval time-averaging ('VITA') algorithm has been tested in a variety of turbulent boundary layers for its ability to detect shear-stress-producing motions from hot-wire signals. A 'VITA+LEVEL' scheme (which uses criteria for both short-time variance and short-time average, i.e., 'level') has been devised, and used in several different boundary layers. This scheme yields length-scale statistics that are acceptably independent of the conditioning criteria, which the VITA scheme does not.

  4. Preparing for Fellowship in Internal Medicine. Steps for Success with a Focus on Pulmonary and/or Critical Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Bosslet, Gabriel T; Burkart, Kristin M; Miles, Matthew C; Lenz, Peter H; Huebert, Candace A; McCallister, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    This paper outlines specific tips for those applying to pulmonary and/or critical care medicine fellowship training in the United States using the PAIR-Match steps: preparation, application, interview, ranking, and match. Preparation for fellowship begins long before the application process with an assessment of one's long-term goals (to the extent that these are known). The cornerstone of the application is the curriculum vitae, which should highlight applicants' pulmonary and critical care-related experiences and scholarly work. Applicants should obtain letters of recommendation from faculty members who know them well and can write a letter that speaks to their strengths in clinical, scholarly, or leadership areas. The personal statement is an opportunity to share experiences not otherwise shared in the application and is an opportunity to explain any breaks in training or performance lapses. When selecting programs to which they will apply, applicants should pay close attention to the areas of education and curriculum, clinical experience, scholarly opportunity, and personal factors. Preparing for interviews should include a review of the program at which one is interviewing and development of relevant questions regarding details of the program. The interview day is the applicant's opportunity to see the "personality" of the program by meeting with the program director, faculty, and current fellows and to assess whether the program is a good fit for their goals. Applicants should only rank those programs they are willing to attend, in order of preference; they should be aware that the match process is binding.

  5. Preparing for Fellowship in Internal Medicine. Steps for Success with a Focus on Pulmonary and/or Critical Care Programs.

    PubMed

    Bosslet, Gabriel T; Burkart, Kristin M; Miles, Matthew C; Lenz, Peter H; Huebert, Candace A; McCallister, Jennifer W

    2015-04-01

    This paper outlines specific tips for those applying to pulmonary and/or critical care medicine fellowship training in the United States using the PAIR-Match steps: preparation, application, interview, ranking, and match. Preparation for fellowship begins long before the application process with an assessment of one's long-term goals (to the extent that these are known). The cornerstone of the application is the curriculum vitae, which should highlight applicants' pulmonary and critical care-related experiences and scholarly work. Applicants should obtain letters of recommendation from faculty members who know them well and can write a letter that speaks to their strengths in clinical, scholarly, or leadership areas. The personal statement is an opportunity to share experiences not otherwise shared in the application and is an opportunity to explain any breaks in training or performance lapses. When selecting programs to which they will apply, applicants should pay close attention to the areas of education and curriculum, clinical experience, scholarly opportunity, and personal factors. Preparing for interviews should include a review of the program at which one is interviewing and development of relevant questions regarding details of the program. The interview day is the applicant's opportunity to see the "personality" of the program by meeting with the program director, faculty, and current fellows and to assess whether the program is a good fit for their goals. Applicants should only rank those programs they are willing to attend, in order of preference; they should be aware that the match process is binding. PMID:25742296

  6. Curriculum Animation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gose, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-five teachers with reputations for artistry in curriculum planning were interviewed about their "curriculum animation" plans or how they ensured their curriculum was brought to life. Their statements indicated that much of their planning is informal and intuitive, and that the criteria they use for their curriculum includes: (1) it is…

  7. Pros and cons of vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum: examples and experiences from Linköping, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dahle, L O; Brynhildsen, J; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL), combined with early patient contact, multiprofessional education and emphasis on development of communications skills, has become the basis for the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping (FHS), Sweden, which was started in 1986. Important elements in the curriculum are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science parts of the curriculum and horizontal integration between different subject areas. This article discusses the importance of vertical integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to experiences from the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping, and also give examples on how it has been implemented during the latest 15 years. Results and views put forward in published articles concerning vertical integration within undergraduate medical education are discussed in relation to the experiences in Linköping. Vertical integration between basic sciences and clinical medicine in a PBL setting has been found to stimulate profound rather than superficial learning, and thereby stimulates better understanding of important biomedical principles. Integration probably leads to better retention of knowledge and the ability to apply basic science principles in the appropriate clinical context. Integration throughout the whole curriculum entails a lot of time and work in respect of planning, organization and execution. The teachers have to be deeply involved and enthusiastic and have to cooperate over departmental borders, which may produce positive spin-off effects in teaching and research but also conflicts that have to be resolved. The authors believe vertical integration supports PBL and stimulates deep and lifelong learning.

  8. Attitudes among students and teachers on vertical integration between clinical medicine and basic science within a problem-based undergraduate medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Brynhildsen, J; Dahle, L O; Behrbohm Fallsberg, M; Rundquist, I; Hammar, M

    2002-05-01

    Important elements in the curriculum at the Faculty of Health Sciences in Linköping are vertical integration, i.e. integration between the clinical and basic science sections of the curriculum, and horizontal integration between different subject areas. Integration throughout the whole curriculum is time-consuming for both teachers and students and hard work is required for planning, organization and execution. The aim was to assess the importance of vertical and horizontal integration in an undergraduate medical curriculum, according to opinions among students and teachers. In a questionnaire 102 faculty teachers and 106 students were asked about the importance of 14 different components of the undergraduate medical curriculum including vertical and horizontal integration. They were asked to assign between one and six points to each component (6 points = extremely important for the quality of the curriculum; 1 point = unimportant). Students as well as teachers appreciated highly both forms of integration. Students scored horizontal integration slightly but significantly higher than the teachers (median 6 vs 5 points; p=0.009, Mann-Whitney U-test), whereas teachers scored vertical integration higher than students (6 vs 5; p=0.019, Mann-Whitney U-test). Both students and teachers considered horizontal and vertical integration to be highly important components of the undergraduate medical programme. We believe both kinds of integration support problem-based learning and stimulate deep and lifelong learning and suggest that integration should always be considered deeply when a new curriculum is planned for undergraduate medical education.

  9. Effective Design and Evaluation of Serious Games: The Case of the e-VITA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappa, Dimitra; Pannese, Lucia

    Learning and training are presently facing new challenges and a strong transformation. The use of electronic games for education (game-based learning) promotes an agile, immersive and stimulating form of learning that fosters learner engagement and motivation. Nonetheless, the design of effective and engaging educational games is a creative process that is unique to each situation. This paper discusses the inherent challenges of building intellectually appropriate and engaging games and presents the methodology adopted in the case of the e-VITA project that applies GBL to promote knowledge sharing and transfer for intergenerational learning. The paper analyses the e-VITAframework for SGs evaluation, which is central to the project's iterative development approach. Early findings stemming from the validation of the e-VITA prototype game are also presented.

  10. Curriculum Alignment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowell, Ronald; Tissot, Paula

    Curriculum alignment (CA) refers to the congruence of all the elements of a school's curriculum: curriculum goals; instructional program--what is taught and the materials used; and tests used to judge outcomes. CA can be a very powerful can be a very powerful factor in improving schools. Although further research is needed on CA, there is…

  11. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Asim A.; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2016-01-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine’s dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site’s competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees’ work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine

  12. Design and implementation of a longitudinal ambulatory clerkship in the first-year curriculum at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Rosalyn; Dlhosh, Sharon; Marino, Christine; Thomas, Patricia; McGuire, Maura J.

    2011-01-01

    In response to calls for medical education reform we designed and implemented a new Longitudinal Ambulatory Clerkship (LAC) at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. The LAC provides first-year medical students with their initial exposure to clinical medicine during a 12-month experience consisting of weekly clinic sessions with a practicing physician-mentor (preceptor) and longitudinal experience with a population of patients. The LAC allows students to experience firsthand many of the personal, professional, and organizational issues that impact the practice of medicine. This paper reviews the rationale, development, and challenges during implementation of this clerkship. PMID:23882320

  13. Design, implementation and evaluation of a community health training program in an integrated problem-based medical curriculum: a fifteen-year experience at the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chastonay, Philippe; Vu, Nu Viet; Humair, Jean-Paul; Mpinga, Emmanuel Kabengele; Bernheim, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Background In the literature the need for relevance in medical education and training has been stressed. In the last 40 years medical schools have been challenged to train doctors competent to respond to community health needs. In the mid-90s the University of Geneva Faculty of Medicine introduced an integrated medical curriculum. In this initiative a particular emphasis was put in introducing a 6-year longitudinal and multidisciplinary Community Health Program (CHP). Objectives The aims of the present article are to describe the conception, elaboration and implementation of the CHP as well as its evolution over 15 years and the evaluation of its outcomes. Methods The CHP was at its origin elaborated by a small group of highly motivated teachers and later on developed by a multi-disciplinary group of primary care physicians, epidemiologists, public health and bio-ethics specialists, occupational health professionals, lawyers and historians. Evaluation of the program outcomes included educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Results The CHP learning objectives and teaching modalities were defined by the multi-disciplinary group in consensus meetings which triggered a collaborative spirit among teachers and facilitated further developments. The evaluation procedures allowed the monitoring of students’ satisfaction which remained high over the years, students’ active participation which decreased over time and success at certifying exams which was globally as good as in basic life sciences. The evaluation also assessed outcomes such as educational innovations, new developments of the curriculum and interactions between students and the community. Conclusion As suggested in the literature, our experience shows that the students’ direct exposure and practice in the community health environment is an effective training approach to broaden students’ education by offering them a community

  14. A Writing Curriculum for Physician Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Constance C.; Bland, Carole J.

    1987-01-01

    Presented are the results of a faculty development project in which the domain of written communication was analyzed and incorporated into a training curriculum for family medicine faculty members. A wealth of literature was found to support 47 requisite competencies. The recommended curriculum integrates expert consultation with seminars,…

  15. Conditional-sampling schemes for turbulent flow, based on the variable-interval time averaging (VITA) algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, J. F.; Tsai, H. M.; Bradshaw, P.

    1988-12-01

    The variable-interval time-averaging (“VITA”) algorithm has been tested in a variety of turbulent boundary layers for its ability to detect shear-stress-producing motions from hot-wire signals. A “VITA + LEVEL” scheme (which uses criteria for both short-time variance and short-time average, i.e.“level”) has been devised, and used in several different boundary layers. This scheme yields length-scale statistics that are acceptably independent of the conditioning criteria, which the VITA scheme does not.

  16. International Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  17. The Professoriate in the Field of Educational Administration: Insights from an Analysis of Journal Authors' Curricula Vitae

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oplatka, Izhar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Based on a qualitative content analysis of 57 curricula vitae of authors who published their work in the major journals of the educational administration (EA) field, this paper seeks to display the career of EA authors and to suggest some epistemological implications for the field. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on…

  18. Alumni-Faculty Feedback for Curriculum Revision, Final Report. Appendix A: Report on Survey of Graduates (1969-73) Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA.

    A survey of 270 graduates of Tulane University's School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM) during 1969 to 1973 was conducted to determine what graduates did in their jobs and how their SPHTM learning experiences related to their jobs. The methodology used in the survey is described and results are presented in tabular form with…

  19. Curriculum Autonomy through Curriculum Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pimley, Gareth

    2011-01-01

    The author argues that the decisions primary teachers make about the curriculum need to be informed by well-developed expertise in the subjects they are planning and teaching. This expertise is necessary when teachers are exercising professional autonomy in areas such as curriculum design, securing breadth and balance, and managing curriculum…

  20. Out of their comfort zone. Dialysis provider DaVita needs to integrate big physician practice to move toward integrated care.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-09-16

    DaVita's acquisition of multispecialty group HealthCare Partners hasn't come without growing pains. But the deal has put the dialysis provider in a position to go beyond kidneys to serving the whole patient. The goal of the merger, says DaVita Co-chairman and CEO Kent Thiry, left, is to prepare for a time when DaVita is expected not only to provide dialysis, but also help keep nephrology patients out of the hospital and manage their other chronic conditions.

  1. Curriculum Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, David H.

    1977-01-01

    A review of the materials included in the Self-Paced Investigations for Elementary Science (SPIES) program, developed by Silver Burdett Company, is provided. In summary SPIES strongly reflects the strategies and format of Intermediate Science Curriculum Study (ISCS). (SL)

  2. Integrative Medical Education: Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Curriculum at the University of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maizes, Victoria; Schneider, Craig; Bell, Iris; Weil, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Describes the University of Arizona's approach to developing and implementing a comprehensive curriculum in integrative medicine, which integrates the best of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with the best of conventional medicine. Describes the curriculum, educational programs, clinical education, goals, and results, and suggests…

  3. Giving curriculum planners an edge

    PubMed Central

    Oandasan, Ivy F.; Archibald, Douglas; Authier, Louise; Lawrence, Kathrine; McEwen, Laura April; Palacios, Maria; Parkkari, Marie; Plant, Heidi; Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To pilot a survey of family medicine residents entering residency, describing their exposure to family medicine and their perspectives related to their future intentions to practise family medicine, in order to inform curriculum planners; and to test the methodology, feasibility, and utility of delivering a longitudinal survey to multiple residency programs. Design Pilot study using surveys. Setting Five Canadian residency programs. Participants A total of 454 first-year family medicine residents were surveyed. Main outcome measures Residents’ previous exposure to family medicine, perspectives on family medicine, and future practice intentions. Results Overall, 70% of first-year residents surveyed responded (n = 317). Although only 5 residency programs participated, respondents included graduates from each of the medical schools in Canada, as well as international medical graduates. Among respondents, 92% felt positive or strongly positive about their choice to be family physicians. Most (73%) indicated they had strong or very strong exposure to family medicine in medical school, yet more than 40% had no or minimal exposure to key clinical domains of family medicine like palliative care, home care, and care of underserved groups. Similar responses were found about residents’ lack of intention to practise in these domains. Conclusion Exposure to clinical domains in family medicine could influence future practice intentions. Surveys at entrance to residency can help medical school and family medicine residency planners consider important learning experiences to include in training. PMID:26052601

  4. Integrating Discovery-Based Research Experiences into the Undergraduate STEM Curriculum: A Convocation Report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, L. A.; Ambos, E. L.; Brenner, K.; Asher, P. M.; Ryan, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    New possibilities and challenges to providing and scaling up opportunities for large numbers of undergraduates to engage in discovery-based research and related activities reflect both the evidence base and the current systemic infrastructure of higher education. The National Research Council hosted a Convocation in May 2015 on this very topic, inspired by the 2012 PCAST report "Engage to Excel," which urged the STEM education community and funding agencies to "advocate and provide support for replacing standard laboratory courses with discovery-based research courses." The Convocation report "Integrating Discovery-Based Research into the Undergraduate STEM Curriculum" on which this session is based explores a number of critical issues: Is our current knowledge base robust enough to recommend best practices? Is offering such experiences actually beneficial for all undergraduates? What institutional changes will be required to make such opportunities available to large numbers of students? Can such programs drive institutional change? How can we manage the cost/benefit parameters of such programs? Exploring these important and connected issues is critical for allowing undergraduates to participate in meaningful and relevant research through their coursework, for faculty and administrators to examine and document the evidence for their impact, and institutions to identify variations in what works at different types of colleges and universities.

  5. [Core competencies in internal medicine].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Casademont, J; Conthe, P; Pinilla, B; Pujol, R; García-Alegría, J

    2011-06-01

    The working group of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) on "Competencies of the Internist" has defined the basic medical knowledge, skills and attitudes that all internists in Spain should have. This list of competencies represents the Internal Medicine core curriculum within the context of the future educational framework of medical specialties in Health Sciences.

  6. 50 Years: Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narlesky, Lynn

    1998-01-01

    Describes the history, research, teaching strategies, and specialties of the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Documents effects of changing societal attitudes toward wildlife, pets, working animals, and food animals on curriculum, the systems approach to disease, comparative genetics, biotechnology, the ecology of…

  7. Medicine as our liberal arts.

    PubMed

    Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit

    2010-01-01

    An undergraduate education in liberal arts is viewed by many, especially in North America, as a desirable preparation for medical school. In countries where such a pre-medicine curriculum is not available, an introduction of 'humanities in medicine' has recently been emphasized. Few, however, has entertained the idea that Medicine already possesses many elements of a liberal arts education. In this article, the author discussed how Medicine may be treated as a liberal arts curriculum, and how the very awareness of this possibility should be articulated and shared by both medical students and teachers. Medical education in countries without a pre-medical curriculum may be transformed from doctor-training to a new level of an explicit and complete education for the individuals.

  8. Electronics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prickett, Charlotte

    This document presents results of research conducted by industry representatives regarding tasks performed by electronic technicians and line manufacturing electro-mechanical technicians in Arizona electronics industries. Based on this research, a competency-based curriculum was developed for training entry-level electronics technicians. Twelve…

  9. Tourism Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of tourism education programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan tourism employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various components of the…

  10. Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karolides, Nicholas J., Ed.; Quinn, Laura, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Incorporating diverse viewpoints and featuring articles by teachers and administrators on both the university and the elementary-secondary levels, this focused journal issue offers useful practical suggestions and pragmatic guidance for all levels of curriculum development. The articles and their authors are as follows: (1)"Teaching Students to…

  11. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  12. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  13. Representing Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaztambide-Fernandez, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    Handbooks denote representative authority, which gives their content normative value and through which editors and authors can emphasize certain views and orientations within a field. The representative authority of a handbook is reinforced in various ways, both obvious and subtle. The "SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" is no exception…

  14. Core content for wilderness medicine fellowship training of emergency medicine graduates.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Weichenthal, Lori; Stuart Harris, N; McIntosh, Scott E; Cushing, Tracy; Caudell, Michael J; Macias, Darryl J; Weiss, Eric A; Lemery, Jay; Ellis, Mark A; Spano, Susanne; McDevitt, Marion; Tedeschi, Christopher; Dow, Jennifer; Mazzorana, Vicki; McGinnis, Henderson; Gardner, Angela F; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Wilderness medicine is the practice of resource-limited medicine under austere conditions. In 2003, the first wilderness medicine fellowship was established, and as of March 2013, a total of 12 wilderness medicine fellowships exist. In 2009 the American College of Emergency Physicians Wilderness Medicine Section created a Fellowship Subcommittee and Taskforce to bring together fellowship directors, associate directors, and other interested stakeholders to research and develop a standardized curriculum and core content for emergency medicine (EM)-based wilderness medicine fellowships. This paper describes the process and results of what became a 4-year project to articulate a standardized curriculum for wilderness medicine fellowships. The final product specifies the minimum core content that should be covered during a 1-year wilderness medicine fellowship. It also describes the structure, length, site, and program requirements for a wilderness medicine fellowship.

  15. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Kindergarten Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this kindergarten nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (learning to identify foods and food sources); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing the relationship between body growth and the ingestion of food); (3) Food is made up of…

  16. Curriculum in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, A. I., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Four articles on higher education curriculum are presented. In "The Articulate Curriculum" an approach to curriculum description is presented that is designed to have minimal ambiguity concerning the intention, content, and processes of the curriculum and that will lead to questioning several discrete factors in the curriculum planning process. It…

  17. Putting It All Together: Building a Four-Year Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dismuke, S. Edwards; McClary, Alicia M.

    2000-01-01

    Offers a four-part plan for developing a four-year curriculum in preventive medicine: (1) develop the desired objectives or competencies; (2) present the basics in years 1 and 2; (3) focus on health promotion/disease prevention and population health in years 3 and 4; and (4) develop a mechanism to evaluate and improve the curriculum. (DB)

  18. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  19. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  20. Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  1. Vita-Assay™ Method of Enrichment and Identification of Circulating Cancer Cells/Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs).

    PubMed

    Tulley, Shaun; Zhao, Qiang; Dong, Huan; Pearl, Michael L; Chen, Wen-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The ability to capture, enrich, and propagate circulating cancer cells/circulating tumor cells (CTCs) for downstream analyses such as ex vivo drug-sensitivity testing of short-term cultures of CTCs, single cell sorting of CTCs by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), animal injection tumor and/or metastasis formation studies, next generation sequencing (NGS), gene expression profiling, gene copy number determination, and epigenomic analyses is of high priority and of immense importance to both the basic research and translational/clinical research communities. Vitatex Inc.'s functional cell separation technology, constructed as Vita-Assay™ (AG6W, AN6W, AR6W) culture plates, is based on the preferential adhesion of invasive rare blood cells of tissue origin to a tissue or tumor microenvironment mimic-the so-called cell adhesion matrix (CAM), which has a demonstrated ability to enrich viable CTCs from blood up to one-million fold.The CAM-scaffold allows for the functional capture and identification of invasive CTCs (iCTCs) including invasive tumor progenitor (TP) cells from cancer-patients' blood. CAM-captured CTCs are capable of ingesting the CAM (CAM+) itself. Green and red fluorescent versions of Vita-Assay™ (AG6W and AR6W) allow for direct visualization of CAM-uptake by cancer cells. Vita-Assay™ CAM-enrichment has allowed for sensitive multiplex flow cytometric and microscopic detection of iCTCs from patients with cancers of the breast, ovary, prostate, pancreas, colorectum, and lung; it has also been successfully utilized for ex vivo drug-sensitivity testing of ovarian-cancer patient CTCs. The CAM enrichment method is equally suitable for the separation of iCTCs and TP cells in ascites and pleural fluid.

  2. Delivering Better Quality of Care: Relentless Focus and Starting with the End in Mind at DaVita.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, Allen R

    2016-01-01

    The care of patients with end-stage renal disease has been evolving since the implementation of the Medicare entitlement for ESRD in 1973. Over the past 43 years, patients with ESRD have become increasingly complex with multiple comorbid conditions and the average age of new ESRD patients has continued to climb. Despite these challenges, progress has been made in improving mortality and morbidity, but the pace has generally been slow. The consolidation of the US dialysis industry has afforded large providers to achieve economies of scale and efficiencies. By reinvesting resources in innovative programs, the improvements in outcomes have accelerated. At DaVita, we have reimagined care for our ESRD patients by creating a Patient-Focused Quality Pyramid, an approach to holistic, patient-centered care that builds on the foundation of well-known dialysis metrics like adequacy and anemia management to drive more complex programs like fluid, medication, diabetes, and infection management. The ultimate goal is to improve survival, keep patients healthy and out of the hospital, enhance the patient experience of care, and thereby achieve optimal health-related quality of life. For two consecutive years, DaVita facilities, using this approach, have achieved superior performance in the CMS 5-Star rating program, most recently with 46% of facilities achieving 4 or 5 stars compared with only 23% of facilities outside of DaVita receiving 4 or 5 stars. This rating system has components of fundamentals, and more complex outcomes and our results are an external validation of the success of our approach in improving the lives of patients. PMID:26749498

  3. Emergency medicine in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Holmes, John L

    2010-02-01

    The Dutch health-care system provides high-quality inpatient care, but emergency care apart from trauma is poorly developed. A model for emergency medicine based on Anglo-American and Australasian principles was introduced in 2000, and a national integrated training curriculum was introduced in 2007. There exist many impediments and opposition to the acceptance of emergency medicine as a defined discipline. Despite this emergency medicine became a recognized specialty this year (2009). The present paper gives an overview of the Dutch health-care system and the history, current status, training and future development of emergency medicine in the Netherlands. PMID:20152006

  4. Accuracy of shade matching performed by colour blind and normal dental students using 3D Master and Vita Lumin shade guides.

    PubMed

    Vafaee, F; Rakhshan, V; Vafaei, M; Khoshhal, M

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 3D Master or VitaLumin shade guides could improve colour selection in individuals with normal and defective colour vision. First, colour perception of 260 dental students was evaluated. Afterwards, 9 colour blind and 9 matched normal subjects tried to detect colours of 10 randomly selected tabs from each kit and the correct/false answers were counted. Of the colour-defective subjects, 47.8% and 33.3% correctly detected the shade using 3D Master and VitaLumin, respectively. These statistics were 62.2% and 42.2% in normal subjects. In normal participants, but not in colour blind ones, 3D Master significantly improved shade matching accuracy compared to VitaLumin.

  5. The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Betsy Lindeman

    The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum is designed to be used in a multi-level adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) family literacy class. There are four modules to choose from: Introductory (self, family, and community); Government (schools and community); Health (medicine and stress); and Consumerism (shopping and making a…

  6. Optometric Education's Challenge: AIDS in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Roger J.

    1988-01-01

    A national survey of schools of optometry suggests that acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) needs to be more thoroughly addressed in some curricula. Suggestions are made for curriculum development in the areas of public health, basic coursework, immunology, clinical medicine, psychology, ocular manifestations, and contact lenses. (MSE)

  7. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  8. A Study Skills Curriculum for Pipeline Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saks, Norma Susswein, Ed.; Killeya, Ley A., Ed.; Rushton, Joan, Ed.

    This study skills curriculum is part of a "pipeline" program designed to recruit, matriculate, and graduate educationally disadvantaged students at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (UMDNJ-RWJMS). It is an integral part of the Biomedical Careers Program (BCP) and the Science Enrichment…

  9. Knowledge and Curriculum in Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkinson, Tim

    2002-01-01

    Although medical curricula are perceived as scientifically based, much discipline-based material is used as procedural knowledge. Educators must ensure that students have both enough certainty to be effective diagnosticians and enough doubt to question assumptions about the nature of scientific knowledge. (Contains 60 references.) (SK)

  10. Elementary Integrated Curriculum Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Elementary Integrated Curriculum (EIC) Framework is the guiding curriculum document for the Elementary Integrated Curriculum and represents the elementary portion of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools (MCPS) Pre-K-12 Curriculum Frameworks. The EIC Framework contains the detailed indicators and objectives that describe what…

  11. Revisiting Curriculum Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the notion of curriculum potential by revisiting the ideas of Miriam Ben-Peretz and Joseph Schwab. Invoking the German "Didaktik" tradition and by way of a curriculum-making framework, the paper argues that interpreting curriculum materials for curriculum potential requires a careful analysis and unpacking of the meanings and…

  12. Contemporary Readings in Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Barbara Slater; Kysilka, Marcella L.

    2008-01-01

    This book provides beginning teachers and educational leaders with a series of articles that can help them build their curriculum knowledge base. Features include: (1) Provides a historical context of the curriculum field, giving educators a solid foundation for curriculum knowledge; (2) Describes the political nature of curriculum and how we must…

  13. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Diabetes Medicines What do diabetes medicines do? Over time, high levels of blood glucose, ... your diabetes medicines, food choices, and physical activity. Medicines for My Diabetes Ask your doctor what type ...

  14. Comprehensive ambulatory medicine training for categorical internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Bharel, Monica; Jain, Sharad; Hollander, Harry

    2003-04-01

    It is challenging to create an educational and satisfying experience in the outpatient setting. We developed a 3-year ambulatory curriculum that addresses the special needs of our categorical medicine residents with distinct learning objectives for each year of training and clinical experiences and didactic sessions to meet these goals. All PGY1 residents spend 1 month on a general medicine ambulatory care rotation. PGY2 residents spend 3 months on an ambulatory block focusing on 8 core medicine subspecialties. Third-year residents spend 2 months on an advanced ambulatory rotation. The curriculum was started in July 2000 and has been highly regarded by the house staff, with statistically significant improvements in the PGY2 and PGY3 evaluation scores. By enhancing outpatient clinical teaching and didactics with an emphasis on the specific needs of our residents, we have been able to reframe the thinking and attitudes of a group of inpatient-oriented residents. PMID:12709096

  15. [Approach to Teaching Kampo Medicine at Kyoto Pharmaceutical University].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    An approach to educating our pharmaceutical students about Kampo medicine in the six-year system of undergraduate pharmacy education at Kyoto Pharmaceutical University is introduced, including the author's opinions. Curriculum revisions have been made in our university for students entering after 2012. In teaching Kampo medicine at present, a medical doctor and an on-site pharmacist share information difficult to give in a lecture with the teaching staff in my laboratory. For example, before the curriculum revision, we conferred with a pharmacist and a doctor in the course "Kampo Medicine A, B" for 4th year students, in which students were presented a basic knowledge of Kampo medicine, the application of important Kampo medicines, combinations of crude drugs, etc. Further, in our "Introduction to Kampo Medicine" for 6th year students, presented after they have practiced in hospitals and community pharmacies, we again lecture on the pharmacological characteristics of Kampo medicines, on "pattern (Sho)", and on evidence-based medicine (EBM) and research studies of important Kampo medicines. After our curriculum revision, "Kampo Medicine A, B" was rearranged into the courses "Kampo and Pharmacognosy" and "Clinical Kampo Medicine". "Kampo and Pharmacognosy" is now provided in the second semester of the 3rd year, and in this course we lecture on the basic knowledge of Kampo medicine. An advanced lecture will be given on "Clinical Kampo Medicine" in the 6th year. We are searching for the best way to interest students in Kampo medicine, and to counteract any misunderstandings about Kampo medicine.

  16. Prudentia: A Medical School's Solution to Curriculum Mapping and Curriculum Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steketee, Carole

    2015-01-01

    During early accreditation visits by the Australian Medical Council (AMC), staff in the School of Medicine (SoM) were asked to demonstrate how and when AMC student outcome statements were being integrated into the MBBS course. As a result, the School Executive committed to developing a curriculum mapping system (CMS) that could systematically…

  17. Curriculum Reform in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.; Crawley, Frank E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes a curriculum development project that took place in the San Benito Consolidated Independent School District. Explains what a curriculum guide is and provides a six-step approach to developing guides. (PR)

  18. Systematic Curriculum Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feisel, Lyle D.; Schmitz, Ronald J.

    1979-01-01

    Among the benefits derived from a detailed curriculum analysis is the actual analysis process itself. Creating a curriculum diagram can lead to better understanding of what can and should be taught. (Author/BB)

  19. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  20. Problematic Curriculum Development: Normative Inquiry in Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Louise M.

    1988-01-01

    Normative inquiry in curriculum (NIC) is concerned with a substantive, integrative approach to values so that the curriculum possesses integrity, consistency, and congruity. This article explores definitions and characteristics of NIC, analyzes the role of curricular influences and realities, provides suggestions for getting started, and answers…

  1. Integrated Career Development Curriculum: Curriculum Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrell, Russell G.; Steffens, Herbert R.

    The Integrated Career Development Curriculum Project was designed to improve career preparation opportunities for youth who attend small, rural schools by developing a curriculum for grades 9 through 12 that would enhance career opportunities for these youth. The rationale and specifications for the project were discussed in terms of basic…

  2. Cultures of Curriculum. Studies in Curriculum Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Pamela Bolotin; Bravmann, Stephanie Luster; Windschitl, Mark A.; Mikel, Edward R.; Green, Nancy Stewart

    This book is designed to foster awareness, examination, and deliberation about the curricula planned for and carried out in classrooms and schools. The framework of inquiry elucidates the concept of curriculum as culture; highlights patterns of curricular thinking that have influenced the development of the concept of cultures of curriculum; gives…

  3. Curriculum Development: Teacher Involvement in Curriculum Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2016-01-01

    In order for curriculum development to be effective and schools to be successful, teachers must be involved in the development process. An effective curriculum should reflect the philosophy, goals, objectives, learning experiences, instructional resources, and assessments that comprise a specific educational program ("Guide to curriculum…

  4. Toward a Contact Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantini, Mario D.; Weinstein, Gerald

    A series of eight summary statements, expressed as "from-to" movements for the improvement of curriculum design, serves as an outline for a discussion of efforts to relate curriculums more meaningfully to the education of disadvantaged youth: (1) From a curriculum that is rigidly scheduled and uniform to one that is flexible and geared to the…

  5. Automotive Technology Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction in automotive technology. The document begins with a list of all tasks covered by the curriculum, a short course outline, and a curriculum framework that explains major content, laboratory activities, and intended outcomes.…

  6. Autobody Technology Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction in auto body technology. Following a curriculum framework that explains major content, laboratory activities, and intended outcomes, the document lists all tasks covered in the curriculum. The bulk of the document consists of…

  7. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  8. Competence, Curriculum, and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Nancy S.

    1988-01-01

    Draws upon a case study of a community college program review to examine the application of a competency-based approach to the process of curriculum design. Suggests that competency-based curriculum development shifts the basis for decision making from teacher knowledge to an objectified accounting system of employers and curriculum technicians.…

  9. Marketing Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching marketing education in Alaska. The handbook is organized in seven sections. Section 1 introduces the competency-based curriculum, while Section 2 provides the scope and sequence and hierarchy of marketing education competencies. Section 3, the core of the curriculum, includes the…

  10. Assessing the National Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hear, Philip, Ed.; White, John, Ed.

    In this collection, educators from the United Kingdom debate the history, purposes, achievements, and future direction of the National Curriculum. Differing points of view about the value of the National Curriculum are expressed. More than half of the essays focus on specific aspects of the curriculum. The selections are: (1) "What Place for…

  11. Curriculum on Resident Education in Care of Older Adults in Acute, Transitional and Extended Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Chandrika; Bensadon, Benjamin A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Cooney, Leo M.

    2016-01-01

    Most geriatric care is provided in non-hospital settings. Internal Medicine and Family Medicine residents should therefore learn about these different clinical sites and acuity levels of care. To help facilitate this learning, a geriatrics training curriculum for internal medicine residents was developed that focused on cognition, function, goals…

  12. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michaud, Vince

    2015-01-01

    NASA Aerospace Medicine overview - Aerospace Medicine is that specialty area of medicine concerned with the determination and maintenance of the health, safety, and performance of those who fly in the air or in space.

  13. Nuclear Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  14. A learner developed longitudinal interprofessional education curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Amber; Cisneros, Breanne; Samore, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Increased patient safety requires interprofessional collaboration, now critical given rising healthcare costs and an aging population with complex and chronic conditions. One way in which to educate future health care team members about team dynamics is to have them learn through active participation on a team. Six students representing the five health professions programs at the University of California, San Francisco formed a curriculum development team that created a novel yearlong interprofessional education curriculum and assessed its impact on knowledge, skills and attitudes of first-year learners in medicine, physical therapy, dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy (n = 480). Through their participation on the curriculum development team and reflection on their roles, responsibilities, communication and negotiation, the six students developed the inter-personal and intra-personal skills required for successful interprofessional collaboration.

  15. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  16. Evaluation of Teaching Veterinary Medicine at the University of Nairobi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, U. B.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya in the field of veterinary medicine is reported. Areas covered include curriculum; teaching techniques; quality of faculty; and examinations. (JMF)

  17. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  18. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  19. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    PubMed

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  20. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  1. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period.

  2. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M.; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents’ attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  3. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D

    2015-11-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents' attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  4. Comparative assessment of the organization of the colors of the Vita Classical color pallet by digital images and visual analysis for dental bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira-Júnior, O. B.; Cioffi, Mariana S.; Cesnik, R. M.; Florez, Fernando L. E.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Corrêa-dos-Santos, Diego R.; Fornazari, Fabio P.

    2009-02-01

    New formularizations, techniques and devices have become the dental whitening most safe and with better results. Although this, the verification of the levels whitening is being continued for visual comparison, that is an empirical, subjective method, subject to errors and dependent of the individual interpretation. Normally the result of the whitening is express for the amplitude of displacement between the initial and the final color, being take like reference the tonalities of a scale of color commanded of darkest for more clearly. Although to be the most used scale , the ordinance of the Vita Classical ® - Vita, according to recommendations of the manufacturer, reveals inadequate for the evaluation of the whitening. From digital images and of algorithm OER (ordinance of the reference scale), especially developed for the ScanWhite ©, the ordinance of the tonalities of the scale Vita Classical® was made. For such, the values of the canals of color R, G, and B of medium part average of the crowns was adopted as reference for evaluation. The images had been taken with the camera Sony Cybershoot DSC F828. The results of the computational ordinance had been compared with the sequence proposal for the manufacturer and with the earned one for the visual evaluation, carried through by 10 volunteers, under standardized conditions of illumination. It statistics analyzes demonstrated significant differences between the ordinances.

  5. Design and Implementation of a Competency-Based Transfusion Medicine Training Program in Canada.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Sherbino, Jonathan; Whitman, Lucinda; Skeate, Robert; Arnold, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion medicine training in Canada is currently undergoing a transformation from a time- and process-based curriculum to a competency-based medical education framework. Transfusion medicine is the first accredited postgraduate medical education training program in Canada to adopt a purely competency-based curriculum. It is serving as an example for a number of other postgraduate medical training programs undergoing a similar transition. The purpose of this review is to highlight the elements of competency-based medical education, describe its application to transfusion medicine training, and report on the development and implementation of the new transfusion medicine curriculum in Canada.

  6. Building a Sense of Ownership to Facilitate Change: The New Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elizondo-Montemayor, Leticia; Hernandez-Escobar, Claudia; Ayala-Aguirre, Francisco; Aguilar, Graciela Medina

    2008-01-01

    Just as trends in medical education are changing continuously, so must curricula. To keep pace with such trends the School of Medicine Tec de Monterrey, Mexico, underwent a curriculum reform process with the goal of developing a new educational model and reducing resistance to change. The Curriculum Committee created seven subcommittees involving…

  7. A Competency-Based Medical Student Curriculum Targeting Key Geriatric Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zuilen, Maria H.; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; Mintzer, Michael J.; Paniagua, Miguel A.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Ruiz, Jorge G.; Kaiser, Robert M.; Roos, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (UMMSM) has developed and implemented a competency-based undergraduate medical education (UME) curriculum that targets 61 learning objectives for three geriattic syndromes: dementia, falls, and delirium. This curriculum redesign changed the educational focus from what is taught to what is learned.…

  8. Undergraduate Medical Education and the Elective System: Experience with the Duke Curriculum, 1966-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, James F., Jr., Ed.; And Others

    In view of increased public demand since 1965 for medical curriculum re-evaluation, the Duke University School of Medicine offered the first new model of medical education responsive to social pressures for change. The new Duke curriculum included presentation by each basic science department of the core of principles and information considered…

  9. What Makes the Learning of Physiology in a PBL Medical Curriculum Challenging? Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tufts, Mark A.; Higgins-Opitz, Susan B.

    2009-01-01

    Physiology is an integral component of any medical curriculum. Traditionally, the learning of physiology has relied heavily on systems-based didactic lectures. In 2001, the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (NRMSM; Durban, South Africa) embarked on a problem-based curriculum in which the learning of physiology was integrated with relevant…

  10. For an indeterministic ethics. The emptiness of the rule in dubio pro vita and life cessation decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dragan; Lehmann, Christian; Wendt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    It is generally claimed that there exist exceptional circumstances when taking human life may be approved and when such actions may be justified on moral grounds. Precise guidelines in the medical field for making such decisions concerning patients who are terminally ill or have irreparable injuries incompatible with a bearable life, are difficult to establish. Recommendations that take the particular logical form of a rule, such as "in dubio pro vita", "when in doubt favour life") have been suggested and in some countries incorporated into legal texts (Germany). We claim here that such a rule is of no value since it is open-ended and always allows for doubt, and a decision to employ measures that would support human life could always be argued to be a valid choice. Preservation of this rule could be encouraged, but giving it the force of law may put physicians at risk, as they may be challenged for choosing to terminate life in otherwise ethically and medically uncontroversial circumstances. PMID:19442284

  11. Theoretical model for VITA-educed coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landahl, Marten T.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments on wall-bounded shear flows (channel flows and boundary layers) have indicated that the turbulence in the region close to the wall exhibits a characteristic intermittently formed pattern of coherent structures. For a quantitative study of coherent structures it is necessary to make use of conditional sampling. One particularly successful sampling technique is the Variable Integration Time Averaging technique (VITA) first explored by Blackwelder and Kaplan (1976). In this, an event is assumed to occur when the short time variance exceeds a certain threshold multiple of the mean square signal. The analysis presented removes some assumptions in the earlier models in that the effects of pressure and viscosity are taken into account in an approximation based on the assumption that the near-wall structures are highly elongated in the streamwise direction. The appropriateness of this is suggested by the observations but is also self consistent with the results of the model which show that the streamwise dimension of the structure grows with time, so that the approximation should improve with the age of the structure.

  12. Population medicine in a curricular revision at Case Western Reserve.

    PubMed

    Ornt, Daniel B; Aron, David C; King, Nicholas B; Clementz, Laura M; Frank, Scott; Wolpaw, Terry; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy; Wolpaw, Daniel; Allan, Terrence M; Carroll, Matthew; Thompson-Shaheen, Karen; Altose, Murray D; Horwitz, Ralph I

    2008-04-01

    Inclusion of population medicine in a medical school curriculum has received growing attention. Recently, the Association of American Medical Colleges has highlighted this issue through support of the Regional Medicine and Public Health Education Centers initiative. The Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine joined this consortium while implementing a new curriculum in which population medicine would be an underlying theme woven with the classic science elements of disease. The organization for the first two years of the new curriculum, which was implemented in 2006, is a six-block structure during which the basic sciences are learned with key concepts of population medicine woven throughout. The focus for this article is Block One, in which population medicine is the major emphasis of the introduction to medicine. The first week, students learn social determinants, impact on communities, and social aspects of diabetes mellitus, even before addressing a patient's clinical presentation. Emphasis on student-centered learning is undertaken as part of the new curriculum, using a series of weekly, case-based, small-group sessions. This type of group learning is used throughout Block One as students encounter key components of population medicine. A thesis requirement was also introduced as a mechanism to emphasize research with opportunities for research in population medicine as well as other medical sciences. A variety of mechanisms are described to measure the outcomes of Block One. PMID:18367889

  13. Family Medicine Residency Program Directors Attitudes and Knowledge of Family Medicine CAM Competencies

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Paula; Filippelli, Amanda C.; Lebensohn, Patricia; Bonakdar, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Context Little is known about the incorporation of integrative medicine (IM) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into family medicine residency programs. Objective The Society for Teachers of Family Medicine (STFM) approved a set of CAM/IM competencies for family medicine residencies. We hope to evaluate with an online survey tool, whether residency programs are implementing such competencies into their curriculum. We also hope to assess the knowledge and attitudes of Residency Directors (RDs) on the CAM/IM competencies. Design A survey was distributed by the CAFM (Council of Academic Family Medicine) Educational Research Alliance to RDs via email. The survey was distributed to 431 RDs. Of those who received it, 212 responded for a response rate of 49.1%. Questions assessed the knowledge and attitudes of CAM/IM competencies and incorporation of CAM/IM into residency curriculum. Results Forty-five percent of RDs were aware of the competencies. In term of RD attitudes, 58% reported that CAM/IM is an important component of residents' curriculum yet, 60% report not having specific learning objectives for CAM/IM in their residency curriculum. Among all programs, barriers to CAM/IM implementation included: time in residents' schedules (77%); faculty training (75%); access to CAM experts (43%); lack of reimbursement (43%), and financial resources (29%). Conclusions While many RDs are aware of the STFM CAM/IM competencies and acknowledge their role in residence education, there are many barriers preventing residencies to implementing the STFM CAM/IM competencies. PMID:24021471

  14. [Guidance for education on medicines in school].

    PubMed

    Kito, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    To promote the education on medicines in school, guidance is, as a rule, to be given in the health education of the Subject, "Health and Physical Education" indicated as a curriculum standard in lower and upper secondary school, and in the health guidance, which carry out in Special Activities and Integrated Studies, etc. Guidance is mainly carried by the teacher for health and physical in health education and school nurse teacher (yogo teacher) in health guidance. In health education we have only limited school hours, and generally use the text book. Some teachers feel resistance to teach medicines because of needs on the special knowledge, however teachers should deal with medicines based on curriculum standard. School pharmacist is a member of school, and has a special knowledge for medicines, and he/she can support teachers as a provider of teaching materials, an adviser, and for a guest teacher. It is important for school pharmacist to understand the contents indicated in curriculum standard and to use glossary to be able to understand for children. In the guidance of health, it is not necessary to teach based on curriculum standard, and it can deal with advanced contents on medicines. However it is important to understand for children what are appropriate contents according to the development stage. To use the packages and instructions for medicines provided at home are good materials for children to have interest the medicines in their guidance. The objectives of education on medicines enable children to cultivate practical abilities for the maintenance and improvement of health. PMID:24292178

  15. Diabetes Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends ...

  16. Perspectives of Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, M. Frances; And Others

    A model has been developed that proposes five different perspectives on the curriculum--the ideal, formal, perceived, operational, and experiential. Each perspective has a different data source, and it is hypothesized that each perspective will produce a different picture of "the curriculum." Data collection for a national study of schooling will…

  17. Curriculum Reviews: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Joseph P.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Solar Energy Education Project (SEEP), a set of 10 curriculum guides emphasizing process skills as well as content for grades K-9. Solar concepts are taught almost exclusively through process activities and, although developed in Australia, the curriculum is easily adaptable to American classrooms. (Author/JN)

  18. A Curriculum for 2020

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the kinds of knowledge and range of skills that will be needed to teach the curriculum of 2020. He contends that young people will need to prepare themselves for occupations different from those known today, and that the vocationally-focused, narrowly-instrumental curriculum in which secondary pupils acquire…

  19. Illinois Manufacturing Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliffe, Roger; And Others

    This manufacturing technology curriculum involves students in learning problem-solving, communication, team building, quality control, safety, math, science, and technical skills. The document begins with a section on implementation, which gives background information on the purposes and development of the curriculum, explains its rationale,…

  20. A Critical Humanist Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magill, Kevin; Rodriguez, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a critical humanist discussion of curriculum; a departure from the technicist view of education [education meant to support a global capitalist economy] and an analysis of curriculum considering critical humanism, political economy and critical race theory among other modes of critical analysis and inquiry. Our discussion supports a…

  1. The West: Curriculum Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Broadcasting Service, Alexandria, VA.

    This document consists of the printed components only of a PBS curriculum package intended to be used with the 9-videotape PBS documentary series entitled "The West." The complete curriculum package includes a teacher's guide, lesson plans, a student guide, audio tapes, a video index, and promotional poster. The teacher's guide and lesson plans…

  2. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  3. Brownstone Afterschool Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Children and Poverty, New York, NY.

    Acknowledging the changes that poor and homeless students have experienced, this curriculum guide uses change to focus on the challenges found in transitioning into a new environment. The premise underlying the curriculum is that the forces that shape human life are constantly changing, and in order to give meaning to these changes, students must…

  4. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  5. Comp Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsberg, Sara J.; And Others

    This curriculum guide describes and gives procedures for implementing the Comp Curriculum, which is composed of objectives categorized by age (birth to 5) and domains of developmental tasks (communication, self care, motor and problem solving), for handicapped and nonhandicapped children. (The objectives themselves are listed in a separate…

  6. Cosmetology. Secondary Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moye, Michael D.; And Others

    This curriculum guide is designed to offer guidelines along with supporting resources and teaching ideas from which the local secondary instructor can extract a cosmetology curriculum that meets local needs. Following an outline of the philosophy and goals underlying state and local vocational education programs in Georgia, the purpose and…

  7. Training Student Organizers Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamm, Michael; Hurtado, Denise

    The purpose of this curriculum is to help teachers and field supervisors at the college, high school, and advanced junior high school level train students to organize environmental improvement projects. It can also be used by graduate/undergraduate students who are supervising secondary school students. The curriculum may be started at any point…

  8. Fire Science Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem.

    This curriculum guide, developed in cooperation with the State Advisory Committee on Fireman Training for Post-High School Preparatory Programs, summarizes the need for formal training programs in fire protection and offers guidelines for their establishment. It is also a practical handbook for the planning of fire protection curriculums and…

  9. Consumer Mathematics Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    This guide for high school consumer mathematics (one in a set of curriculum guides developed by Louisiana statewide mathematics curriculum committees) contains a course outline, performance objectives, and coordinated activities designed to teach skills that students will need as citizens and consumers. Background on the development,…

  10. Business Mathematics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    This curriculum guide for teaching business mathematics in the Connecticut Vocational-Technical School System is based on the latest thinking of instructors in the field, suggestions from mathematics authorities, and current instructional approaches in education. The curriculum guide consists of six sections: (1) career relationships and…

  11. Indian Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lu Celia, Ed.

    Designed in Oklahoma as a teaching aid for teachers in Indian education, this booklet is organized according to the subject areas of the curriculum. It provides a ready resource on Indian culture and should thus be of value to teachers who work with both Indian and non-Indian students. Guidelines for curriculum development in multicultural…

  12. Medical Services Assistant Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeman, Phyllis A.

    Designed to develop 12th-grade multiple competencies courses, this curriculum prepares the student to assist a physician, dentist, or other health professional with the management of a medical office and to perform basic health services procedures. Course descriptions are provided for the two courses in the curriculum: medical services assistant…

  13. Designing a Bilingual Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Anita Bradley

    Several things need to be considered when designing a bilingual curriculum for and with the Navajo community. The major consideration should be the involvement of Navajo parents and the leadership of Navajo school boards. The curriculum should be developed from the Navajo point of view about their world. Designers of a bilingual education…

  14. Law Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seminole County Board of Public Instruction, Sanford, FL. Dept. of Curriculum Services.

    This law studies curriculum guide describes a course designed to provide secondary students with the opportunity to acquire an understanding of the U.S. legal process. The law studies course is intended to develop corresponding concepts and skills in conjunction with the content presented. The content areas of the curriculum include: (1)…

  15. Handbook of Curriculum Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewy, Arieh, Ed.

    This book is designed to meet the needs of experts working on curriculum planning and evaluation throughout the world, with special attention to the needs of developing countries. It presents both a model for curriculum evaluation and practical guidelines for evaluating new instructional materials. Part 1 contains a single chapter that briefly…

  16. Writing across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara Leigh, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The writing across the curriculum movement is discussed in six articles. Barbara Leigh Smith's introductory article, "Writing Across the Curriculum: What's at Stake?" reviews the rationale for this movement, including the declining emphasis on writing in high schools and colleges. In the "Winds of Change: Thomas Kuhn and the Revolution in the…

  17. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  18. Curriculum Guides for SSSQ.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Lawrence; And Others

    The curriculum guide was designed to teach prevocational and independent living skills to students with a wide range of handicapping conditions. The SSSQ (Street Survival Skills Questionnaire) curriculum presents information on objectives, materials, suggested performance criteria, teacher strategies, and specific students activities for the…

  19. Standard Curriculum Underestimates Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPike, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Compares two social studies textbooks for second graders, one standard curriculum (SC) text and the other from the Core Knowledge Curriculum (CKC). It argues that the SC textbook is boring and overly simplified, while the CKC textbook is interesting and considerably more informative. It suggests that elementary school students are fully capable of…

  20. Marketing Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide is intended to provide a common core of competencies from which to design an effective secondary marketing education program. Introductory materials include a definition of marketing education, objectives, outline of instructional content, and questions and answers regarding the curriculum guide. These practical materials are…

  1. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  2. AIDS Education Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horry County Board of Education, Conway, SC.

    This curriculum guide was developed, based on sound principles of human growth and development, to present the most recently available information on AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). The curriculum presents information on the known facts about AIDS and the AIDS virus infection. It also addresses the potential for adolescents and adults…

  3. A Curriculum for Curiosity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cushman, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Michael Gove has correctly lambasted the current curriculum for information and communication technology (ICT): his proposed solution is as wrong as the current curriculum, as findings from the Penceil Research Project on how to engage non-users of ICTs demonstrate. Learning how to use a word processor and a spreadsheet is a useful low-level…

  4. Mechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train mechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of mechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard mechanical engineering…

  5. Rhizomatic Explorations in Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smitka, Julie A. M.

    2012-01-01

    A visual and theatrical exercise anchored in the Grades 11 and 12 Ontario Curriculum for Media Arts and Interdisciplinary Studies was enacted and recorded as individual experiences of each participant. The event was re-mastered in a graphic representation that depicts the forces, pushes and pulls of curriculum and students' needs which educators…

  6. Elementary Drama Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    Intended for elementary school teachers, this curriculum guide intends to (1) show that drama is a unique body of knowledge with a definite place in the curriculum; (2) demonstrate the use of drama as an effective teaching tool; (3) alleviate fears teachers have about introducing drama and provide experienced teachers with further rationale,…

  7. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities designed for specific curriculum units. Curriculum areas represented include reading and language arts (proverbs and fables, letters of the alphabet, and biographies); science (the study of Gregor Mendel and genetics, oil resources); and social studies (global awareness). (LRW)

  8. Soviet Arts Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Diego County Office of Education, CA.

    This extensive curriculum guide was written in conjunction with the San Diego Arts Festival of Soviet Arts in 1989. It aimed to provide teachers with insights and ideas about arts in the Soviet Union before, during, and after the Arts Festival. A curriculum model is presented at the beginning of the guide to illustrate how the lessons were…

  9. Measuring Curriculum Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Using curriculum-specific tools for measuring fidelity of implementation is an essential yet often overlooked aspect of examining relationships among textbooks, teaching, and student learning. This "Brief Report" describes the variety of ways that curriculum implementation is measured and argues that there is an urgent need to develop…

  10. Hearing Impaired: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    The curriculum guide is intended to assist families, school administrators, and teachers providing educational services to hearing impaired (HI) children in regular and special classes in Alberta, Canada. Explained in the introduction are such curriculum aspects as goals and purpose, population to be served, eligibility criteria, three…

  11. Constituting the Workplace Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper advances some bases for a workplace curriculum. These are premised on conceptions of curriculum as intents directed to individual's progression towards full and effective workplace performance, yet whose enactment is shaped by workplace factors and is ultimately experienced by workers as learners. So whether the intentions will be…

  12. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Plumbing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    This document is a curriculum guide for instructors teaching vocational preparation for plumbing to special needs students. The purpose of the curriculum guide is to provide minimum skills for disadvantaged and handicapped students entering the mainstream; to supplement vocational skills of those students already in a regular training program…

  13. A Curriculum Orientation Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babin, Patrick

    The Curriculum Orientation Profile was designed to assist in the identification of individual perspectives on curriculum and curricular decision-making. It contains 57 items, with which one agrees or disagrees. Each item is also given a code to be used in interpreting the score. Items with which one agrees are assigned to one of five codes,…

  14. Curriculum Summaries, Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA. K-12 Mathematics Curriculum Center.

    This document compiles information about 13 comprehensive mathematics curriculum programs that were developed specifically to address the recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics' (NCTM) Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics. Three of the programs are elementary programs, five are for middle school,…

  15. Unified Studies Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Univ., Gainesville. P. K. Yonge Lab. School.

    A humanistic education curriculum program is described. The major objective of the project is to enhance the self-concept of each student. The interdisciplinary humanistic curriculum contains six components. The first component describes Unified Studies departmental ideas, beliefs, and goals which will further humanistic objectives, including…

  16. Curriculum Guide Construction Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Ken

    As part of a model construction cluster curriculum development project, this guide was developed and implemented in the Beaverton (Oregon) School District. The curriculum guide contains 16 units covering the following topics: introduction to construction jobs; safety and first aid; blueprint readings; basic mathematics; site work; framing; roofing…

  17. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process.

  18. Medicine Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.; Jeanotte, Holly, Ed.

    Described as a survival manual for Indian women in medicine, this collected work contains diverse pieces offering inspiration and practical advice for Indian women pursuing or considering careers in medicine. Introductory material includes two legends symbolizing the Medicine or Spirit Woman's role in Indian culture and an overview of Indians Into…

  19. Developing and Implementing a Multispecialty Graduate Medical Education Curriculum on Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Jeanette M.; Green, Michael L.; Martino, Steve; Thung, Stephen F.; Degutis, Linda C.; Ryan, Sheryl A.; Martel, Shara; Pantalon, Michael V.; Bernstein, Steven L.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; Fiellin, David A.; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The authors sought to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of initiating a Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use curriculum across multiple residency programs. SBIRT project faculty in the internal medicine (traditional, primary care internal medicine, medicine/pediatrics),…

  20. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education in United States Pharmacy Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Donna M.; Kroll, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Survey of 50 pharmacy schools investigated the degree to which instruction in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) was included in the pharmacy curriculum, and use of alternative practitioners as instructors. Almost three-quarters offered coursework in herbal medicine or other areas of CAM; about half offered other alternative medicine…

  1. Community-Based Curriculum Development: What Does It Really Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snadden, David; Mowat, Donald

    1995-01-01

    Outlines the efforts of the Department of General Practice to develop a clear educational philosophy on which to build its curriculum. Also illustrates the application of this philosophy in developing a community-based early clinical contact course for first-year students. The philosophy was constructed from the basis of whole-person medicine and…

  2. A Preventive Health Care and Safety Curriculum for an Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Kathleen R.

    The preventive health care curriculum described in this paper was designed for the employees of Autotech Automatic Test Equipment Division in Los Angeles, California. First, the paper describes Autotech, and its health insurance and on-site health facilities. Next, a rationale is provided for offering employees classes on preventive medicine and…

  3. Dermatologic Practice: Implications for a Primary Care Residency Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, William T., Jr.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The problems encountered, diagnostic procedures performed, and treatments prescribed in dermatology were studied in a primary care practice and in a dermatology clinic. It is proposed that the findings of this study be the basis for designing a curriculum in dermatology for residents in primary care medicine. (Author/MLW)

  4. Residents’ perceptions of an integrated longitudinal curriculum: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, Rebecca; Lee, Joseph; Hillier, Loretta M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore family medicine residents’ perceptions of a newly restructured integrated longitudinal curriculum. Method A purposeful sample of 16 family medicine residents participated in focus group interviews conducted from a grounded theory perspective to identify the characteristics of this training model that contribute to and that challenge learning. Results Eight key themes were identified: continuity of care, relevance to family medicine, autonomy, program-focused preparation, professional development as facilitated by role modeling, patient volume, clarity of expectations for learners, and logistics. Positive learning experiences were marked by high levels of autonomy, continuity, and relevance to family medicine. Less favorable learning experiences were characterized by limited opportunities for continuity of care, limited relevance to family medicine practice and unclear expectations for the resident’s role. Family physician-led learning experiences contributed to residents’ understanding of the full scope of family medicine practice, more so than specialist-led experiences. The logistics of implementing the integrated block were challenging and negatively impacted continuity and learning. Conclusions This study suggests that an integrated longitudinalized family medicine block training model has the potential to support the principles of a longitudinal integrated competency-based curriculum to effectively prepare residents for family medicine practice. PMID:27004074

  5. Clinical nutrition in the hepatogastroenterology curriculum.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Chris J J; Wanten, Geert J A; Semrad, Carol E; Jeppesen, Palle B; Kruizenga, Hinke M; Wierdsma, Nicolette J; Grasman, Matthijs E; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A

    2016-02-01

    Gastroenterology (GE) used to be considered a subspecialty of internal medicine. Today, GE is generally recognized as a wide-ranging specialty incorporating capacities, such as hepatology, oncology and interventional endoscopy, necessitating GE-expert differentiation. Although the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology has defined specific expertise areas in Advanced endoscopy, hepatology, digestive oncology and clinical nutrition, training for the latter topic is lacking in the current hepatogastroenterology (HGE) curriculum. Given its relevance for HGE practice, and being at the core of gastrointestinal functioning, there is an obvious need for training in nutrition and related issues including the treatment of disease-related malnutrition and obesity and its associated metabolic derangements. This document aims to be a starting point for the integration of nutritional expertise in the HGE curriculum, allowing a central role in the management of malnutrition and obesity. We suggest minimum endpoints for nutritional knowledge and expertise in the standard curriculum and recommend a focus period of training in nutrition issues in order to produce well-trained HGE specialists. This article provides a road map for the organization of such a training program. We would highly welcome the World Gastroenterology Organisation, the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterology Association and other (inter)national Gastroenterology societies support the necessary certifications for this item in the HGE-curriculum.

  6. Clinical nutrition in the hepatogastroenterology curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Chris JJ; Wanten, Geert JA; Semrad, Carol E; Jeppesen, Palle B; Kruizenga, Hinke M; Wierdsma, Nicolette J; Grasman, Matthijs E; van Bodegraven, Adriaan A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroenterology (GE) used to be considered a subspecialty of internal medicine. Today, GE is generally recognized as a wide-ranging specialty incorporating capacities, such as hepatology, oncology and interventional endoscopy, necessitating GE-expert differentiation. Although the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology has defined specific expertise areas in Advanced endoscopy, hepatology, digestive oncology and clinical nutrition, training for the latter topic is lacking in the current hepatogastroenterology (HGE) curriculum. Given its relevance for HGE practice, and being at the core of gastrointestinal functioning, there is an obvious need for training in nutrition and related issues including the treatment of disease-related malnutrition and obesity and its associated metabolic derangements. This document aims to be a starting point for the integration of nutritional expertise in the HGE curriculum, allowing a central role in the management of malnutrition and obesity. We suggest minimum endpoints for nutritional knowledge and expertise in the standard curriculum and recommend a focus period of training in nutrition issues in order to produce well-trained HGE specialists. This article provides a road map for the organization of such a training program. We would highly welcome the World Gastroenterology Organisation, the European Board of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the American Gastroenterology Association and other (inter)national Gastroenterology societies support the necessary certifications for this item in the HGE-curriculum. PMID:26855532

  7. [Military tract of medicine--the need and the vision].

    PubMed

    Shapira, Shmuel C; Vinker, Shlomo; Razin, Ehud; Ash, Nachman

    2010-02-01

    Establishing the Military Tract in the Hebrew University School of Medicine is an opportunity to enrich the medical curriculum with contents relevant to better training of military physicians. Subjects such as hyperbaric medicine, hypobaric physiology, terror medicine, mass casualty event (MCE) and management of non-conventional injuries will be added to the regular M.D. curriculum. Medical education based on the elements of excellence: Judaism, Zionism, humanism and leadership, will be the foundations for the future generation of medical leaders in Israel for both the military and civilian systems. This leadership will be articulated in the clinical, research and administrative fields.

  8. Classroom-Level Curriculum Development: EFL Teachers as Curriculum-Developers, Curriculum-Makers and Curriculum-Transmitters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad F.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to explore teacher curriculum approaches and the strategies attached to each approach because they influence the taught curriculum, teacher development and student learning. The study was therefore grounded in teacher curriculum development, curriculum implementation, teacher development, student cognitive and…

  9. Oregon Agriculture I Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum package was developed to be used as a guide for high school vocational agriculture teachers in Oregon preparing a curriculum to meet local community/regional needs. A second goal of this curriculum is to eliminate sex-bias or sex-role stereotyping in vocational agriculture classes. The curriculum contains 20 units. Topics covered…

  10. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Third Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this third grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups, classifying processed foods into basic food groups, and identifying food varieties produced locally); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how food…

  11. Nutrition Education Curriculum. First Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this first grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups and classifying processed foods into basic food groups); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how food choices are related to a healthy body,…

  12. Nutrition Education Curriculum. Second Grade Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Education, Little Rock.

    Six major concepts form the framework for this second grade nutrition education curriculum: (1) Food is essential for all living things (identifying basic food groups, classifying processed foods into basic food groups, and identifying food varieties produced locally); (2) Nutrition is the food you eat and how the body uses it (recognizing how…

  13. Core Curriculum. A Workplace Specific Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, Ann; And Others

    This core curriculum is designed for use in helping employees participating in a workplace-specific basic skills program develop basic team-building skills while simultaneously developing basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills. Although many of the instructional materials and sample forms included are applicable to employees in most…

  14. Custodial Curriculum. Curriculum Development Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ellen R.

    This curriculum guide contains 10 units on custodial training that have been prepared for use by students who are academically disadvantaged. The packets, suitable for individualized instruction, have been written at an average reading level of seventh grade. Each packet contains an overview, learning objectives, pretest, written exercises,…

  15. The design of a medical school social justice curriculum.

    PubMed

    Coria, Alexandra; McKelvey, T Greg; Charlton, Paul; Woodworth, Michael; Lahey, Timothy

    2013-10-01

    The acquisition of skills to recognize and redress adverse social determinants of disease is an important component of undergraduate medical education. In this article, the authors justify and define "social justice curriculum" and then describe the medical school social justice curriculum designed by the multidisciplinary Social Justice Vertical Integration Group (SJVIG) at the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth. The SJVIG addressed five goals: (1) to define core competencies in social justice education, (2) to identify key topics that a social justice curriculum should cover, (3) to assess social justice curricula at other institutions, (4) to catalog institutionally affiliated community outreach sites at which teaching could be paired with hands-on service work, and (5) to provide examples of the integration of social justice teaching into the core (i.e., basic science) curriculum. The SJVIG felt a social justice curriculum should cover the scope of health disparities, reasons to address health disparities, and means of addressing these disparities. The group recommended competency-based student evaluations and advocated assessing the impact of medical students' social justice work on communities. The group identified the use of class discussion of physicians' obligation to participate in social justice work as an educational tool, and they emphasized the importance of a mandatory, longitudinal, immersive, mentored community outreach practicum. Faculty and administrators are implementing these changes as part of an overall curriculum redesign (2012-2015). A well-designed medical school social justice curriculum should improve student recognition and rectification of adverse social determinants of disease.

  16. Meaning from curriculum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finegold, Menahem; Mackeracher, Dorothy

    This paper reports on the analysis of science curricula carried out across Canada within the framework of the Second International Science Study (SISS). The organization of Canadian education in twelve autonomous educational jurisdictions is briefly described and problems are noted in relation to the analysis of curricula on a national scale. The international design for curriculum analysis is discussed and an alternative design, more suited to the diversity of science education in Canada, is introduced. The analysis of curriculum documents is described and three patterns which emerge from this analysis are identified. These derive from the concepts of commonality, specificity and prescriptiveness. Commonality relates to topics listed in curriculum guideline documents by a number of jurisdictions. Specificity refers to the richness of curriculum documents. Prescriptiveness is a measure of the extent to which jurisdictions do or do not make provision for local options in curriculum design. The Canadian analysis, using the concepts of the common curriculum, specificity and prescriptiveness, is described and research procedures are exemplified. Outcomes of curriculum analysis are presented in graphical form.

  17. The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project: A National Medical School Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Norman B., Jr.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum Project was developed to encourage schools of medicine and colleges of osteopathic medicine to implement interdisciplinary generalist curricula in the preclinical years. Five sites were competitively established as demonstration projects, and rigorous attention to creating and maintaining an…

  18. Nanomedicine concepts in the general medical curriculum: initiating a discussion

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Aldrin E

    2015-01-01

    Various applications of nanoscale science to the field of medicine have resulted in the ongoing development of the subfield of nanomedicine. Within the past several years, there has been a concurrent proliferation of academic journals, textbooks, and other professional literature addressing fundamental basic science research and seminal clinical developments in nanomedicine. Additionally, there is now broad consensus among medical researchers and practitioners that along with personalized medicine and regenerative medicine, nanomedicine is likely to revolutionize our definitions of what constitutes human disease and its treatment. In light of these developments, incorporation of key nanomedicine concepts into the general medical curriculum ought to be considered. Here, I offer for consideration five key nanomedicine concepts, along with suggestions regarding the manner in which they might be incorporated effectively into the general medical curriculum. Related curricular issues and implications for medical education also are presented. PMID:26677322

  19. Nanomedicine concepts in the general medical curriculum: initiating a discussion.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Aldrin E

    2015-01-01

    Various applications of nanoscale science to the field of medicine have resulted in the ongoing development of the subfield of nanomedicine. Within the past several years, there has been a concurrent proliferation of academic journals, textbooks, and other professional literature addressing fundamental basic science research and seminal clinical developments in nanomedicine. Additionally, there is now broad consensus among medical researchers and practitioners that along with personalized medicine and regenerative medicine, nanomedicine is likely to revolutionize our definitions of what constitutes human disease and its treatment. In light of these developments, incorporation of key nanomedicine concepts into the general medical curriculum ought to be considered. Here, I offer for consideration five key nanomedicine concepts, along with suggestions regarding the manner in which they might be incorporated effectively into the general medical curriculum. Related curricular issues and implications for medical education also are presented.

  20. [SPORT MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Constantini, Naama; Mann, Gideon

    2016-06-01

    Sports Medicine is a relatively new subject in medicine and includes a variety of medical and paramedical fields. Although sports medicine is mistakenly thought to be mainly for sports professionals/athletes, it actually encompasses the entire population, including the active and non-active healthy populations, as well as the sick. Sports medicine also engages amateur sportsmen and strives to promote physical activity and quality of life in the general population. Hence, the field involves all ages from childhood to old age, aiming to preserve and support every person at every age. Sports medicine, which started developing in the 19th century, is today a specialty, primary or secondary, in many countries, while in others it is a fellowship or under the jurisdiction of local or sports authorities. In Israel, the field exists since the 1950's and is advanced. The Sports Medicine Society founded a 3-year course of continued education in sport medicine as part of the Tel-Aviv University Faculty of Medicine. Later on, a fellowship in general Sports Medicine and in Orthopedic Sports Medicine were developed within the Israel Medical Association. A year ago, Israel formally became a member of the global "Exercise is Medicine" foundation, and under this title promotes education for health care providers on exercise prescription. The understanding of the importance of physical activity and fitness as part of a healthy lifestyle is increasing in Israel, as well as the number of amateur athletes, and the profession of sports medicine takes a big part in this process. PMID:27544982

  1. Curriculum Guidelines for Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Guidelines developed by the Section on Physiology of the American Association of Dental Schools for use by educational institutions as curriculum development aids are presented. Primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, and specific behavioral objectives are discussed. (MLW)

  2. Curriculum and Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  3. The Didactic Therapeutics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Jimmy D.

    1986-01-01

    Considerations to be made in designing an optometry curriculum for treating patients with eye diseases are reviewed, including the scope of practice and specific areas of instruction in the biomedical, basic vision, and clinical vision sciences. (MSE)

  4. Converting Curriculum to Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancu, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Examines the process of developing a school design, from the curriculum plan to building schematics. General phases discussed include advance preparation, educational specifications development, steering committee feedback, and architectural design review and critique. (GR)

  5. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  6. 75 FR 30832 - National Biodefense Science Board; Call for Nominees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... accepting resumes or curricula vitae from qualified individuals who wish to be considered for membership on... organizations representing other appropriate stakeholders. Submit a resume or curriculum vitae to...

  7. Use Medicines Safely

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medicines Safely Print This Topic En español Use Medicines Safely Browse Sections The Basics Overview Prescription Medicines ... Medicines 1 of 7 sections The Basics: Prescription Medicines There are different types of medicine. The 2 ...

  8. In Vivo Evaluations of Inter-Observer Reliability Using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    KNEZOVIĆ, Dubravka; ZLATARIĆ, Davor; Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-observer reliability of dental shade-matching device using an in vivo model. Materials and methods Four observers who were well trained in color assessment and handling of the dental shade-matching device determined teeth color and CIE-Lab values on maxillary right central incisors in 10 patients with completely healthy and intact dentitions. VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was utilized to measure the central region of the labial surface of all investigated teeth, twice by each observer. The inter-observer reliability of the measurements was observed and deviations between Lab and ∆E values between the observers were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze inter-observer reliability. Results One-way ANOVA showed no statistically significant differences in color measurement of four observers in all the measured values (p>0.05). Delta E values ranged from 3.018 to 5.234. Although some small differences existed, statistically significant differences between the observers were not found (p>0.05). Inter-observer ICCs were very high for all observers (from 0.651 to 0.992). Conclusion Inter-examiner reliability of measurements using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was acceptable. Apart from the digital equipment, a well trained observer seems to be crucial in order to achieve correct dental color measurement.

  9. In Vivo Evaluations of Inter-Observer Reliability Using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    KNEZOVIĆ, Dubravka; ZLATARIĆ, Davor; Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-observer reliability of dental shade-matching device using an in vivo model. Materials and methods Four observers who were well trained in color assessment and handling of the dental shade-matching device determined teeth color and CIE-Lab values on maxillary right central incisors in 10 patients with completely healthy and intact dentitions. VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was utilized to measure the central region of the labial surface of all investigated teeth, twice by each observer. The inter-observer reliability of the measurements was observed and deviations between Lab and ∆E values between the observers were calculated. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze inter-observer reliability. Results One-way ANOVA showed no statistically significant differences in color measurement of four observers in all the measured values (p>0.05). Delta E values ranged from 3.018 to 5.234. Although some small differences existed, statistically significant differences between the observers were not found (p>0.05). Inter-observer ICCs were very high for all observers (from 0.651 to 0.992). Conclusion Inter-examiner reliability of measurements using VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 shade-matching device was acceptable. Apart from the digital equipment, a well trained observer seems to be crucial in order to achieve correct dental color measurement. PMID:27688424

  10. Holistic medicine.

    PubMed

    Ward, B

    1995-05-01

    When the author completed medical school in 1981, the importance of psychoneuroimmunology, treating patients as a 'whole person', and experiencing meditation as a form of stress management, were not covered in the medical curriculum as they are now. This article gives a brief overview of these topics and presents several case histories and studies to illustrate the benefits of a holistic approach.

  11. The Digestive System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum presents a framework for alcohol education that…

  12. The Central Nervous System and Alcohol Use. Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians. Training Unit [and] Participant Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Cecelia; And Others

    The Science of Alcohol Curriculum for American Indians uses the Medicine Circle and the "new science paradigm" to study the science of alcohol through a culturally relevant holistic approach. Intended for teachers and other educational personnel involved with American Indians, this curriculum aims to present a framework for alcohol education that…

  13. Vulnerable Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochner, Arthur P.

    2009-01-01

    In "Narrative Medicine: Honoring the Stories of Illness," Rita Charon paints an original and humane portrait of what it can mean to be a doctor, to live a life immersed in sickness and dedicated to wellness. Charon drops the veil, inviting readers to look at the secret, subjective, emotional face of medicine, a zone of self-censored feelings and…

  14. Aerospace Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2006-01-01

    This abstract describes the content of a presentation for ground rounds at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. The presentation contains three sections. The first describes the history of aerospace medicine beginning with early flights with animals. The second section of the presentation describes current programs and planning for future missions. The third section describes the medical challenges of exploration missions.

  15. Behavioral Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfield, Sol L., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains 18 articles discussing the uses of behavioral medicine in such areas as obesity, smoking, hypertension, and headache. Reviews include discussions of behavioral medicine and insomnia, chronic pain, asthma, peripheral vascular disease, and coronary-prone behavior. Newly emerging topics include gastrointestinal disorders, arthritis,…

  16. [Sport medicine].

    PubMed

    Epstein, Yoram

    2012-02-01

    It is only since the late 20th century that Sport and Exercise Medicine has emerged as a distinct entity in health care. In Israel, sports medicine is regulated by a State Law and a sport physician is certified after graduating a structured program. In the past, sports medicine was related to the diagnosis and treatment of injuries encountered by top athletes. In recent years, the scope of sport medicine has broadened to reflect the awareness of modern society of the dangers of physical inactivity. In this perspective the American College of Sport Medicine (ACSM) recently launched a program--"Exercise is Medicine", to promote physical activity in order to improve health and well-being and prevention of diseases through physical activity prescriptions. This program is from doctors and healthcare providers, adjusted to the patient or trainee. The sport physician does not replace a medical specialist, but having a thorough understanding about the etiology of a sport-related injury enables him to better focus on treatment and prevention. Therefore, Team Physicians in Elite Sport often play a role regarding not only the medical care of athletes, but also in the physiological monitoring of the athlete and correcting aberrations, to achieve peak physical performance. The broad spectrum of issues in sport and exercise medicine cannot be completely covered in one issue of the Journal. Therefore, the few reports that are presented to enhance interest and understanding in the broad spectrum of issues in sports and exercise medicine are only the tip of the iceberg.

  17. [Acceptance to the incorporation of liberal arts in the curriculum of the Medical School at the University of Puerto Rico].

    PubMed

    Irizarry Castro, A

    1993-04-01

    The acceptance of incorporating courses in liberal arts to the present curriculum of the School of Medicine was assessed. A survey was suministred to 400 subjects that belonged to academic and professional fields of medicine. The results from the survey showed that those who played an acting role in the current curriculum were receptive to innovations. The professors of the clinical aspect of medicine and the practicing physicians were more receptive to curricular change. First year medical students were more receptive than seniors. This positive view constitutes a strong argument for eliciting curricular creativity. These results allow future changes around the medical education of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine.

  18. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Implementation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Dee; Trask, Jennifer; Sandvold, Irene; Amr, Sania; Chaudry, Sajida S; Debay, Marc

    2015-11-01

    In September 2012, the Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 preventive medicine residency programs to participate in a 2-year project aimed at incorporating integrative medicine (IM) into their residency training programs. The grantees were asked to incorporate competencies for IM into their respective preventive medicine residency curricula and to provide for faculty development in IM. The analysis conducted in 2014-2015 used the following evidence to assess residency programs' achievements and challenges in implementation: progress and performance measures reports, curriculum mapping of program activities to IM competencies, records of webinar participation, and post-project individual semi-structured phone interviews with the 12 grantee project leaders. Key findings are: (1) IM activities offered to residents increased by 50% during the 2 years; (2) Accessing IM resources already in existence at local grantee sites was the primary facilitator of moving the integration of IM into preventive medicine residencies forward; (3) Among all activities offered residents, rotations were perceived by grantees as by far the most valuable contributor to acquiring IM competencies; (4) Online training was considered a greater contributor to preventive medicine residents' medical knowledge in IM than faculty lectures or courses; (5) Faculty were offered a rich variety of opportunities for professional development in IM, but some programs lacked a system to ensure faculty participation; and (6) Perceived lack of evidence for IM was a barrier to full program implementation at some sites. Grantees expect implemented programs to continue post-funding, but with decreased intensity owing to perceived faculty and curriculum time constraints.

  19. Wilderness medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sward, Douglas G.; Bennett, Brad L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human activity in wilderness areas has increased globally in recent decades, leading to increased risk of injury and illness. Wilderness medicine has developed in response to both need and interest. METHODS: The field of wilderness medicine encompasses many areas of interest. Some focus on special circumstances (such as avalanches) while others have a broader scope (such as trauma care). Several core areas of key interest within wilderness medicine are discussed in this study. RESULTS: Wilderness medicine is characterized by remote and improvised care of patients with routine or exotic illnesses or trauma, limited resources and manpower, and delayed evacuation to definitive care. Wilderness medicine is developing rapidly and draws from the breadth of medical and surgical subspecialties as well as the technical fields of mountaineering, climbing, and diving. Research, epidemiology, and evidence-based guidelines are evolving. A hallmark of this field is injury prevention and risk mitigation. The range of topics encompasses high-altitude cerebral edema, decompression sickness, snake envenomation, lightning injury, extremity trauma, and gastroenteritis. Several professional societies, academic fellowships, and training organizations offer education and resources for laypeople and health care professionals. CONCLUSIONS: The future of wilderness medicine is unfolding on multiple fronts: education, research, training, technology, communications, and environment. Although wilderness medicine research is technically difficult to perform, it is essential to deepening our understanding of the contribution of specific techniques in achieving improvements in clinical outcomes. PMID:25215140

  20. The Effects of Curriculum Organizational Structure on Curriculum Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Dennis G.

    The purpose of this project was to study the relationship of certain organizational variables (standardization, formalization, and centralization) to curriculum innovation. It was hypothesized that increasing the formalization of curriculum guidelines and the standardization of curriculum procedures would lead to a decrease in role ambiguity and…

  1. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  2. Hidden Curriculum as One of Current Issue of Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsubaie, Merfat Ayesh

    2015-01-01

    There are several issues in the education system, especially in the curriculum field that affect education. Hidden curriculum is one of current controversial curriculum issues. Many hidden curricular issues are the result of assumptions and expectations that are not formally communicated, established, or conveyed within the learning environment.…

  3. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, D; Stroud, P; Fyfe, A

    1998-01-01

    The widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine techniques, often explored by patients without discussion with their primary care physician, is seen as a request from patients for care as well as cure. In this article, we discuss the reasons for the growth of and interest in complementary and alternative medicine in an era of rapidly advancing medical technology. There is, for instance, evidence of the efficacy of supportive techniques such as group psychotherapy in improving adjustment and increasing survival time of cancer patients. We describe current and developing complementary medicine programs as well as opportunities for integration of some complementary techniques into standard medical care. PMID:9584661

  4. Curriculum Guidelines foe Dental Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' curriculum guidelines for dental nutrition include an overview of the curriculum, primary educational objectives, suggested prerequisites, a core content outline, and suggestions for sequencing and faculty qualifications. (MSE)

  5. Curriculum Guidelines for Removable Prosthodontics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1986

    1986-01-01

    American Association of Dental Schools curriculum guidelines for oral prosthodontics include an introduction to the field, a curriculum overview, primary educational goals, prerequisites, specific behavioral objectives for program segments, and information on sequencing and faculty and facilities requirements. (MSE)

  6. Issues Forum: National Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Edward M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Includes "On the Common Core of Learning" (Kennedy); "Constitutional Implications of National Curriculum Standards" (Arons); "Arguments against National Performance Standards" (Fulk, Mantzicopoulos, Hirth); and "The Painful Lessons of Introducing the National Curriculum in England" (Foster). (SK)

  7. Theme: In-Agriculture Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Seven theme articles review the history and philosophy of vocational agriculture, its relationship to the national goals for education, the place of sustainable agriculture and supervised experience in the curriculum, diversifying the curriculum, and fisheries education programs in Alaska. (SK)

  8. Humane Education: A Curriculum Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Robert W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a curriculum-based approach to humane education and addresses the role of humane education in the school curriculum as well as the relationship's of education to other facets of animal welfare work. (Author/DS)

  9. Bibliography: Citations Obtained through the National Library of Medicine's MEDLARS Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Approximately 370 references are cited in the following areas of medical education: accreditation, computers, continuing education, curriculum, educational measurement, research and evaluation, faculty, foreign graduates, forensic medicine, history, minority groups, foreign education, specialties, teaching methods, etc. (LBH)

  10. Bibliography: Citations Obtained through the National Library of Medicine's MEDLARS Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Approximately 180 references are presented dealing with: continuing education, curriculum, educational measurement, faculty, foreign graduates, forensic medicine, graduate education and students, history, minority groups, schools, philosophy specialism, teaching methods, teaching hospitals, and undergraduate education. (LBH)

  11. Bibliography. Citations Obtained Through the National Library of Medicine's MEDLARS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Approximately 200 MEDLARS references are cited dealing with: accreditation and licensure; computers; continuing education; curriculum; educational measurement, and research and development; forensic medicine; graduate education; history; internship and residency; foreign medical education; minority groups; schools; specialism; students; teaching…

  12. Bibliography: Citations Obtained Through the National Library of Medicine's MEDLARS Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Approximately 130 references obtained through MEDLARS are cited, dealing with such topics as accreditation, computers, continuing education, curriculum, educational measurement, faculty, foreign graduates, forensic medicine, graduate education, history, minority groups, medical schools, specialism, students, teaching hospitals, teaching methods,…

  13. Bibliography: Citations Obtained through the National Library of Medicine's MEDLARS Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Medical Education, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Among the approximately 480 references on medical education, the following topics are covered: accreditation and certification, computers, continuing education, curriculum, educational measurement, research and evaluation, foreign graduates, forensic medicine, graduate education, history, internships, foreign education, schools, minority groups,…

  14. Anatomy education in a changing medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Drake, R L

    1999-08-01

    How we educate students in the first two years of medical school is changing at many institutions. Effective medical education should be viewed as a continuum, integration of the basic sciences and clinical medicine should occur throughout the curriculum, and self-directed, life-long learning should be emphasized. Curricular revision may be appropriate if these fundamental concepts are absent. The principles of three curricular models are discussed: traditional, problem-based, and systems-oriented. The ideal curriculum may draw from each of these: A truly integrated curriculum. However, the curricular model chosen must meet the needs of the institution and its students. As anatomists we should not shy away from this process of change. With progressive educational approaches, we can be leaders in this climate of curricular reform. Anatomy courses are laboratory based and the laboratory is an outstanding small group, faculty/student interactive opportunity. However, we must show flexibility and innovation in our educational approaches whatever the curricular design being proposed. PMID:10496094

  15. Anatomy education in a changing medical curriculum.

    PubMed

    Drake, R L

    1998-02-01

    How we educate students in the first two years of medical school is changing at many institutions. Effective medical education should be viewed as a continuum, integration of the basic sciences and clinical medicine should occur throughout the curriculum, and self-directed, life-long learning should be emphasized. Curricular revision may be appropriate if these fundamental concepts are absent. The principles of three curricular models are discussed: traditional, problem-based, and systems-oriented. The ideal curriculum may draw from each of these: A truly integrated curriculum. However, the curricular model chosen must meet the needs of the institution and its students. As anatomists we should not shy away from this process of change. With progressive educational approaches, we can be leaders in this climate of curricular reform. Anatomy courses are laboratory based and the laboratory is an outstanding small group, faculty/student interactive opportunity. However, we must show flexibility and innovation in our educational approaches whatever the curricular design being proposed. PMID:9556023

  16. The Growing Need To Teach about Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Questions and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Moshe; Ben Ayre, Eran

    2001-01-01

    Reports on curriculum developments in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in Germany, Canada, and the United States that illustrate various approaches to the question, "What should be taught in a CAM course?" In most cases, the approach is to teach about CAM therapies, although some curriculum planners are integrating such therapies when…

  17. Family Medicine in Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Michael; Wootton, J.S.C.

    1990-01-01

    Recruitment of physicians for rural communities is a continuing problem in Canada. Medical schools can be involved through preferential admission policies. Departments of family medicine across the country are including on-site training in rural communities and are seeking to improve their rural program curriculum. The McGill rural program is described from its origins to its present state. A rural coordinator oversees 12 sites at which both residents and students are trained. One site at Shawville, Que, is described from a rural physician's point of view. Imagesp2011-ap2012-ap2014-a PMID:21233945

  18. Herbal Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    An herb is a plant or plant part used for its scent, flavor, or therapeutic properties. Herbal medicines are ... go through the testing that drugs do. Some herbs, such as comfrey and ephedra, can cause serious ...

  19. ASTRO's 2007 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E. . E-mail: eklein@radonc.wustl.edu; Gerbi, Bruce J.; Price, Robert A.; Balter, James M.; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  20. ASTRO's 2007 core physics curriculum for radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eric E; Gerbi, Bruce J; Price, Robert A; Balter, James M; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Hughes, Lesley; Huang, Eugene

    2007-08-01

    In 2004, the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) published a curriculum for physics education. The document described a 54-hour course. In 2006, the committee reconvened to update the curriculum. The committee is composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions. Simultaneously, members have associations with the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, ASTRO, Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, American Board of Radiology, and American College of Radiology. Representatives from the latter two organizations are key to provide feedback between the examining organizations and ASTRO. Subjects are based on Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements (particles and hyperthermia), whereas the majority of subjects and appropriated hours/subject were developed by consensus. The new curriculum is 55 hours, containing new subjects, redistribution of subjects with updates, and reorganization of core topics. For each subject, learning objectives are provided, and for each lecture hour, a detailed outline of material to be covered is provided. Some changes include a decrease in basic radiologic physics, addition of informatics as a subject, increase in intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and migration of some brachytherapy hours to radiopharmaceuticals. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in late 2006. It is hoped that physicists will adopt the curriculum for structuring their didactic teaching program, and simultaneously, the American Board of Radiology, for its written examination. The American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee added suggested references, a glossary, and a condensed version of lectures for a Postgraduate Year 2 resident physics orientation. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, subject matter will be updated

  1. Oregon Agriculture III Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Agricultural Education.

    This curriculum package is designed to be used as a guide for vocational agricultural teachers to use in preparing a third-year curriculum to meet local community or regional needs. The introductory section of the guide is a teacher orientation that covers such topics as the use of these curriculum materials with disadvantaged and handicapped…

  2. Teacher Perceptions of Curriculum Autonomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Alan

    This study first provides a review of literature relevant to curriculum autonomy and school-based curriculum development, with special emphasis on Australian secondary schools. The second part of the report analyzes Australian secondary school staff's perceptions of: 1) the meaning of curriculum autonomy, 2) the advantages and disadvantages of…

  3. Manufacturing Curriculum Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scarborough, Jule Dee

    A manufacturing curriculum for secondary vocational programs was designed to bridge the gap between grades 9-10 level courses and the community college-level curriculum of the Illinois Plan for Industrial Education. During the project, a literature review of manufacturing curriculum materials was conducted, a manufacturing conceptual framework was…

  4. Curriculum Orientations of Virtual Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, Nicole Y.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the curriculum orientation preferences of K-12 public school teachers who provided instruction in virtual settings (n = 47) in a midwestern state. Curriculum orientations were explored using a mixed-methods design. Quantitative assessments data revealed a pattern of curriculum orientations similar to teachers working in…

  5. Process Accountability in Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooler, Dennis D.; Grotelueschen, Arden

    This paper urges the curriculum developer to assume the accountability for his decisions necessitated by the actual ways our society functions. The curriculum developer is encouraged to recognize that he is a salesman with a commodity (the curriculum). He is urged to realize that if he cannot market the package to the customers (the various…

  6. Curriculum Inquiry, Theory, and Politics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumet, Madeleine R.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a review of four chapters in "Part III, Section F: Inquiring into Curriculum" of "The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction" (F. M. Connelly, M. F. He, J. I. Phillion, Eds.; Sage Publications, 2008). In her review of these chapters ["Curriculum Inquiry" (William H. Schubert. Chapter 19, pp. 399-419); "Reenvisioning the…

  7. Forestry Occupations. A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, R. J., Ed.

    Developed as a part of a larger project to revise the total agricultural education curriculum in South Carolina, this curriculum guide is designed for a 2-year course in forestry occupations. A paradigm accompanies the document and illustrates a possible time frame and sequence. The units covered by the curriculum include an orientation to…

  8. Emerging Paradigm for Curriculum Theorizing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Russell L.; Dobson, Judith E.

    Curriculum knowledge cannot be legitimized until its method of construction is examined. Dominant curriculum theories, those that are well established by tradition, usually provide research results reflecting a deterministic or imposed reality. The basic premise of this paper is that curriculum theorizing has, for the most part, been a utilitarian…

  9. Curriculum Process in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamčíková, Veronika; Tarábek, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Physics/science education in the communicative conception is defined as the continuous transfer of the knowledge and methods of physics into the minds of individuals who have not participated in creating them. This process, called the educational communication of physics/science, is performed by various educational agents—teachers, curriculum makers, textbook designers, university teachers and does not mean only a simple transfer of information, but it also involves teaching and instruction at all levels of the school system, the study, learning, and cognition of pupils, students and all other learners, the assessment and evaluation of learning outcomes, curriculum composition and design, the production of textbooks and other means of educational communication and, in addition, university education and the further training of teachers. The educational communication is carried out by the curriculum process of physics/science, which is a sequence of variant forms of curriculum mutually interconnected by curriculum transformations. The variant forms of curriculum are as follows: conceptual curriculum, intended curriculum, project (written) curriculum, operational curriculum, implemented curriculum, and attained curriculum.

  10. Student Curriculum Choice and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Norris

    This study investigated changes in student curriculum choice at Seminole Junior College (Florida) A code system was developed for 72 curriculum choices (23 in terminal degree areas), grouped into 19 broad clusters. A computerized Student Flow Matrix was then constructed to display the first and second term curriculum choices of 1,391 students who…

  11. A 4-year integrated curriculum in palliative care for medical undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Radwany, Steven M; Stovsky, Erica J; Frate, Dean M; Dieter, Kevin; Friebert, Sarah; Palmisano, Barbara; Sanders, Margaret

    2011-12-01

    In order to graduate physicians prepared to effectively address clinical issues in palliative medicine and to comply with LCME requirements, the Northeastern Ohio Universities Colleges of Medicine and Pharmacy (NEOUCOM) integrated a coordinated four-year palliative care (PC) curriculum. This report describes the development of the longitudinal curriculum and provides helpful resources and strategies to guide clinicians and administrators undertaking similar efforts. This is a retrospective, descriptive report based on data collected throughout development of the new curriculum. A Palliative Care Advisory Committee initiated development of curricula in PC. An Office of Palliative Care was established to assess and coordinate offerings. Curriculum transformation was based on best practices. Two cornerstone pieces are highlighted: a mandatory hospice experience and a case based small group discussion prior to graduation.

  12. Voices of innovation: building a model for curriculum transformation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Janet M; Resnick, Jerelyn; Boni, Mary Sharon; Bradley, Patricia; Grady, Janet L; Ruland, Judith P; Stuever, Nancy L

    2013-05-07

    Innovation in nursing education curriculum is critically needed to meet the demands of nursing leadership and practice while facing the complexities of today's health care environment. International nursing organizations, the Institute of Medicine, and; our health care practice partners have called for curriculum reform to ensure the quality and safety of patient care. While innovation is occurring in schools of nursing, little is being researched or disseminated. The purposes of this qualitative study were to (a) describe what innovative curricula were being implemented, (b) identify challenges faced by the faculty, and (c) explore how the curricula were evaluated. Interviews were conducted with 15 exemplar schools from a variety of nursing programs throughout the United States. Exemplar innovative curricula were identified, and a model for approaching innovation was developed based on the findings related to conceptualizing, designing, delivering, evaluating, and supporting the curriculum. The results suggest implications for nursing education, research, and practice.

  13. Moral imperatives for academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J N

    1997-12-01

    As the health care system becomes dominated by managed care, academic medicine must do more than simply learn how to continue to offer the same level of care with ever-tightening resources and in new practice environments. Three moral imperatives must guide how medicine is practiced and taught: (1) patients' health and well-being must always be foremost, centered in quality of care and respect for life; (2) the emotional and spiritual needs of patients must be considered, not just the physical needs; (3) academic medicine must instill in its trainees discipline, passion, and skills to meet their obligation to be lifelong learners. These imperatives make it more important than ever for medical educators to tackle two crucial questions: What kind of person makes the best possible physician? And what constitutes the best possible training for that person? Taking these questions seriously in the new era of health care may mean that medical educators need to rethink the teaching of medicine. One example of how this might be done is the Curriculum for 2002 Committee recently formed at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine. It is becoming clear that medical educators can do a better and more comprehensive job of helping future physicians uncover and strengthen their own morality and, in the face of managed care's pressures, renew their loyalty to medicine as a service rather than a business. Morally sensitized physicians can better deal with the hard issues of medicine, such as euthanasia and abortion, and can help their students examine these issues. Most important, they can show their students that physicians are members of a moral community dedicated to something other than its own self-interest.

  14. Curriculum Study, Curriculum History, and Curriculum Theory: The Reason of Reason

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popkewitz, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the intersection of curriculum studies/curriculum history/curriculum theory through the study of systems of reason that order reflection and action. Words about "learning", "empowerment", "problem-solving", "self-realization", "community", and so on, are not merely there in order that educators should "grasp" some reality to…

  15. Reinventing the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.; Van Scotter, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    For many, the dominant model of curriculum development in science includes generating a topic, clarifying science content, identifying activities associated with the topic, and figuring out an assessment. Unfortunately, this approach tends to overemphasize activities and underemphasize mastery of science concepts and the process of scientific…

  16. Solar Curriculum Guides, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This document contains an outline for a curriculum to train solar energy technicians in community colleges. The guide contains eight courses, each of which is divided into one to five modules. Modules, in turn, are divided into units, and units contain student handouts appropriate to the material. The following eight courses are included in this…

  17. Internationalizing the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypris, Theo, Ed.

    Prepared as a resource for community college practitioners seeking to internationalize their courses, this report presents 50 internationalized course modules in 22 subject areas developed as part of curriculum development project undertaken at Michigan's Kalamazoo Valley Community College. The 50 modules are presented in the areas of accounting,…

  18. Manufacturing Technology. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This guide provides the basic foundation to develop a one-semester course based on the cluster concept, manufacturing technology. One of a set of six guides for an industrial arts curriculum at the junior high school level, it suggests activities that allow students (1) to become familiar with and use some of the tools, materials, and processes…

  19. Energy Awareness Curriculum, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains course content for a series of "mini-courses" that can be presented in an adult continuing education program in area technical-vocational schools and community colleges. The program consists of nine modules, each divided into units and including learning objectives and student handouts. The modules cover the…

  20. Grasshopping across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Blanche F.

    A writing across the curriculum project at Trumbull High School (Connecticut) is based on a cross section of English, science, and career education courses: advanced composition, science fiction, physics, chemistry, biology, and vocational agriculture. It focuses on writing as a mode of learning; extending and refining the students' processes of…

  1. Child Care Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum is designed to be a handbook for the development of child care programs. It details the competencies, developed through a survey of child care provider-employers in Alaska, that students will require in a vocational child care program. The handbook is organized in seven sections. Section I introduces the concept of…

  2. Across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmet, Gerry; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Several elementary teachers share across-the-curriculum ideas for the classroom. The article presents suggestions for completing Columbus Day book projects, Columbus commemorative displays, planet activities, archaeology projects, letter writing activities, student-generated profiles, number challenges, book reviews, and critical thinking…

  3. A Curriculum for Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Richard LaDoyt

    The objective of this research was to identify the necessary educational organization required to form a curriculum plan for the field of purchasing and to investigate the nature of the industrial purchasing function. The dissertation delineates the critical areas of business operation: industrial purchasing, procurement, and material management.…

  4. Construction Trades Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum is designed to be a handbook for the construction trades. It includes all competencies a student will acquire in the course of building a complete house. Based on a survey of Alaskan construction employers and employees, the handbook stresses both principles and skills. The 23 units are presented in the sequence…

  5. Accounting & Computing Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avani, Nathan T.; And Others

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in teaching a competency-based accounting and computing course that is designed to prepare students for employability in the following occupational areas: inventory control clerk, invoice clerk, payroll clerk, traffic clerk, general ledger bookkeeper, accounting clerk, account information clerk,…

  6. Psychopharmacology Curriculum Field Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Benjamin, Sheldon; Beresin, Eugene; Goldberg, David A.; Jibson, Michael D.; Thrall, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Objective: As part of an effort to improve psychopharmacology training in psychiatric residency programs, a committee of residency training directors and associate directors adapted an introductory schizophrenia presentation from the American Society of Clinical Psychopharmacology's Model Psychopharmacology Curriculum to develop a multimodal,…

  7. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  8. Adult Numeracy Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeds, Andrew, Ed.

    Designed primarily for adult literacy teachers and tutors, this curriculum describes the content of what should be taught in numeracy programs in order to meet the individual needs of adults through the selection and teaching of skills appropriate to those adults' needs. An introduction describes national standards and qualifications, learners,…

  9. Biology Curriculum Support Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This biology curriculum supplement includes the North Carolina Standard Course of Study Goals, helpful resources, and suggested activities supported by inquiry-based laboratory activities. Contents include a detailed description of content which provides the goals and standards being sough), a materials list for inquiry support labs and…

  10. Drafting. Competency Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Al; And Others

    This competency based drafting curriculum is presented in seven specialization sections with units in each section containing a competency statement, performance objective, learning activities, evaluation, and quiz or problem sheets. Some units also contain answer sheets and/or handout sheets. Sections and number of units presented are (1) basic…

  11. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  12. Women's History Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruthsdotter, Mary, Ed.; Eisenberg, Bonnie, Ed.

    This curriculum guide is designed to facilitate teachers' first efforts to introduce information about women in U.S. history. The guide promotes a multicultural awareness of women's history beginning with the Native Americans and proceeding to current issues of diversity. Activities are divided for grades 1-6 and 7-12 but may be adapted as…

  13. Ecological Investigations, Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington City Board of Education, NC.

    Activities which stress ecological concepts make up the major portion of this curriculum guide. Designed as a 12 week mini-course for students in grades eight and nine, the guide first presents the course schedule, including time requirements, lists the ecological concepts to be studied, and correlates the concepts with the activities. Following…

  14. Music Curriculum for Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picht, Harriet

    This kindergarten music curriculum provides a year-long program of a sequenced series of activities designed to develop music concepts. Topics of the units in this guide are: self-concept (beginning of the year), fall, Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, winter, a circus, Valentine's Day, spring, and farms. A scope and sequence chart of concepts…

  15. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used with specific curriculum units. Highlights include elementary school activities for reading and language arts (using the "World Almanac," identifying a story's sequence of events, and using autobiographies); science (causes of wind and learning about squirrels); and…

  16. Offshore Outsourcing Drives Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Dewey A.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction to Application Development was completely reworked. Less emphasis was placed on programming and more emphasis on developing and communicating user requirements. Many items used in training industry were incorporated into the CPT 180 course. The paper will detail the change in focus in this course and overall how our curriculum is…

  17. Engine & Vehicle Mechanics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum includes all competencies a student will acquire in an engine and vehicle mechanics educational program. It follows guidelines established for automobile technician training programs leading toward certification and addresses requirements of the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). The…

  18. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities, most of which are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units, on the following topics: (1) "Health: Sleep and Sleeping Habits"; (2) "Industrial Arts: E-Z 4 U!"; (3) "Social Studies: Our Town Database"; and (4) "Social Studies: American Inventors and Inventions." (SD)

  19. Business Education Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This revised curriculum gives information on the skills and knowledge students should acquire through a business education program. The competencies listed reflect the skills that employers see as necessary for success in clerical and accounting occupations. The handbook is organized in seven sections that cover the following: (1) the concept of…

  20. Systems of Justice Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Phil James, Comp.

    The high school curriculum guide on law consists of an outline of the American legal system. A major objective is to provide students with legal knowledge in order to better understand the reasons for keeping the law. Both the public and individual's responsibilities toward law enforcement are dealt with. The guide is divided into five units. Unit…

  1. Aquatic Resources Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, C. Boyd; Sosin, Mark

    Fishing is one of the oldest and most popular outdoor activities. Like most activities, fishing requires basic knowledge and skill for success. The Aquatic Resources Education Curriculum is designed to assist beginning anglers in learning the basic concepts of how, when, and where to fish as well as what tackle to use. The manual is designed to be…

  2. An Adult ESL Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina Literacy Resource Center, Columbia.

    This curriculum framework for adult literacy was written by 21 South Carolina adult English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instructors, as submitted to the South Carolina Literacy Resource Center. It is based on current theories in the fields of adult education and second language acquisition and is designed to be flexible so that it may be adapted to…

  3. Curriculum Challenges in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Louise

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a longitudinal study that examined the extent and types of challenges to curriculum in California school districts. A survey of school districts conducted in 1990 yielded 421 usable responses. The second survey, sent in 1991, elicited 379 responses, a 37.5 percent response rate. Findings indicate that the number…

  4. A Media Technology Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Curriculum Lab.

    This curriculum guide is designed to train students who will assist in planning, designing, producing, and using media and multimedia materials. It offers a 2-year, competency-based, post-secondary program of studies in media technology, and uses an interdisciplinary approach drawn from the broad areas of art, business management, drafting,…

  5. Forestry. A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ed

    The curriculum guide was developed to prepare high school students for positions as forestry aides or for enrollment in higher education forestry programs. It provides a basic core of instruction in forestry in 20 instructional units grouped according to six areas: Orientation, Related Information, Forest Measurements, Forest Ecology and…

  6. Handbook on Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    This study examines current problems surrounding curriculum development in the classroom. Part one describes the state of the art in terms of definition, theory and practices, methods, types, and unresolved questions. Part two contains descriptions of the following 12 selected innovative projects: (a) "Learning Objectives for Vocational Schools:…

  7. Pharmacy Technician Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddox, Ray R.

    This Idaho state curriculum guide provides lists of tasks, performance objectives, and enabling objectives for instruction designed to prepare entry-level pharmacy technicians or help already employed pharmacy technicians retain their jobs or advance in their field. Following a list of tasks and an introduction, the bulk of the document consists…

  8. Industrial Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook contains a competency-based curriculum for teaching industrial education in Alaska. Competencies are listed for the following areas: employability, auto maintenance, building maintenance, commercial fishing, communications, construction, drafting, electronics, energy and power, forestry and logging, graphics, high technology,…

  9. Language & Literature. Curriculum Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livonia Public Schools, MI.

    The global education curriculum presented in this booklet is offered as a model, of integrated, interdisciplinary English studies, that involves participants in cultural, scientific, ecological, and economic issues while promoting student awareness of the nature and development of world literature, languages, the arts, and their…

  10. The Disappearing Moral Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Dennis

    1997-01-01

    Compares the stated educational philosophy of several colleges and universities in 1896-97 with the contemporary version, focusing on the role of moral values in the curriculum. Institutions discussed include the University of Maine, University of North Dakota, Washington State University, Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania), Stetson University…

  11. GRASS ROOTS CURRICULUM IMPROVEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHIELDS, MILDRED B.

    THE EXPRESSED DESIRE OF NEWARK LANGUAGE ARTS TEACHERS FOR PERSONAL INVOLVEMENT IN CURRICULUM ASSESSMENT AND SHAPING LED TO THE FRAMING OF A QUESTIONNAIRE TO GIVE TEACHERS A MEANS OF EVALUATING LANGUAGE ARTS PROGRAMS AND OF SUGGESTING IMPROVEMENTS. AN ANALYSIS OF THEIR RESPONSES IDENTIFIED "CLEARLY EMERGING NEEDS" FOR--(1) A SOUND PHILOSOPHY ON…

  12. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides six library media activities designed for use in connection with specific curriculum units in art, science, and social studies. The activities focus on appreciating Georgia O'Keefe, sound travel, rock identification, Thanksgiving customs, state road maps, and world religions. The descriptions include objectives, grade levels,…

  13. Picture This Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet of teacher-developed lesson plans, intended for use with students in middle and/or high schools, focuses on student involvement in community projects. The first lesson plan, "Physics Park" (Scott McQuerry), aims for students to construct a playground and the examine the physics behind the playground's equipment. Students use…

  14. K-6 Science Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blueford, J. R.; And Others

    A unified science approach is incorporated in this K-6 curriculum mode. The program is organized into six major cycles. These include: (1) science, math, and technology cycle; (2) universe cycle; (3) life cycle; (4) water cycle; (5) plate tectonics cycle; and (6) rock cycle. An overview is provided of each cycle's major concepts. The topic…

  15. Designing a Mathematics Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Lee Peng

    2010-01-01

    A decade of PMRI saw the changes in the classroom in some of the primary schools in Indonesia. Based on observation, we can say that though the mathematics syllabus in Indonesia did not change, its curriculum has changed under the movement of PMRI. In this article, we put in writing some of the experience gained through the involvement in…

  16. EMH Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwinnett County Schools, GA.

    The guide consists of behaviorally stated, developmentally sequenced curriculum objectives for mentally retarded students from preprimary through high school levels. Five major sections present detailed skill objectives in the following areas: (1) basic academic skills (motor development, perceptual development, language development, reading,…

  17. The Changing Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Science, as a curriculum area, has gone through many changes recently with the oncoming of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), as well as the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Science is a part of everyday life which individuals experience. Even the drying up of a puddle of…

  18. School Curriculum in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  19. ESL VI Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flander, Leonard

    This curriculum guide for English as a Second Language (ESL) Level VI is the sixth of six in a Guam Community College ESL project series. The other five guides, a companion teacher's guide and pre- and post-tests are available separately (see note). The entire project centers around the Peabody Kits P, Level P, Level 1, Level 2, Level 3, and the…

  20. Precision Optics Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Robert L.; And Others

    This guide outlines the competency-based, two-year precision optics curriculum that the American Precision Optics Manufacturers Association has proposed to fill the void that it suggests will soon exist as many of the master opticians currently employed retire. The model, which closely resembles the old European apprenticeship model, calls for 300…

  1. Listening across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2014-01-01

    Listening as a skills objective must be emphasized throughout the curriculum of school subjects. There are a variety of learning opportunities which stress the art and skills of listening. In conversation, it might be embarrassing if the sender of the message needs to repeat content due to faulty listening habits. Or, the responder in response…

  2. The Curriculum Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of updating curriculum to align with Common Core State Standards is a national one felt by states, districts, and teachers alike. Teachers generally express enthusiasm for the Common Core, but consistently cite a lack of high-quality curricula as an impediment to teaching them. The demand for core-aligned quality materials has far…

  3. Preventive Law Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Martha V.; Gullatt, David E.; Hardin, Dawn T.; Jannik, Catherine; Tollett, John R.

    This curriculum guide presents a context for preservice education and/or professional development in education law for teachers. Section 1, "Teacher Liability," discusses "Duty to Supervise,""Providing Reasonable Care,""Duty,""Preventing Student-to-Student Sexual Harassment,""Reporting Child Abuse,""Issuing Permission Slips,""Defense for…

  4. Engineering Technology Curriculum Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershon, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Summarizes curriculum guidelines for the following engineering technologies: chemical, industrial, mining, petroleum, nuclear, civil, mechanical, electrical, automotive, and manufacturing. In a few years, these Engineering Council for Professional Development committee guidelines are intended to become the criteria by which programs will be judged…

  5. Writing across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Margaret, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Noting that in order to introduce and maintain writing across the curriculum programs in the schools English teachers must unite with colleagues to stress learning of all kinds, and that recommendations for the use of writing in content areas do not frighten away students who are apprehensive about writing, the articles in this focused journal…

  6. The Shifting Kindergarten Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egertson, Harriet A.

    The curriculum now being taught in many kindergartens is profoundly different from what it was two decades ago. The kindergarten classroom, once conceived of as a play- and group adjustment-oriented setting, may now also be a classroom with an "academic" approach, characterized by direct teaching of discrete skills with specific expectations for…

  7. Curriculum Guide for Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed through a cooperative effort by industry and education, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the broad field of metals, or for entrance into an apprenticeship, post-high school, or university program. This guide is one of several developed for Oregon's new approach to…

  8. Beauvoir Health Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sylvia, Ed.

    This health curriculum, developed by an elementary school faculty, provides three sets of lesson plans. Lesson plans include lessons taught by the school nurse, resource teachers, and classroom teachers. The topics considered in the lessons taught by the school nurse include hygiene, germs and diseases, safety, nutrition, and drugs. Topics…

  9. Supercalculators and the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumway, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are supercalculator capabilities and possible teaching implications. Included are six examples that use a supercalculator for topics that include volume, graphing, algebra, polynomials, matrices, and elementary calculus. A short review of the research on supercomputers in education and the impact they could have on the curriculum is…

  10. Vocational Preparation Curriculum: Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usoro, Hogan

    Designed to be a workable guide for instructors serving the occupational needs of various categories of disadvantaged and handicapped students, this welding curriculum contains fourteen units of self-paced and self-contained instructional materials. The instructional units cover the following topics: job opportunities in welding, safety rules in…

  11. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  12. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Provides five fully developed library media activities designed for use with specific curriculum units in art, health and nutrition, mathematics, science, and social studies. Library media skills, objectives, grade levels, instructional roles, procedures, evaluation, and follow-up are described for each activity. Specific topics include aardvarks,…

  13. Into the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Provides fully developed library media activities that are designed to be used in connection with specific curriculum units, including foreign language (Spanish); reading and language arts (expository writing and use of a thesaurus); science and social studies (land biomes, state birds, and country's flags). (LRW)

  14. Exploratory Business Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for Arkansas ninth-grade students to explore business careers through the use of competency-based instructional materials. Exploratory business teachers are asked to incorporate the twenty-three units of study into a sequence best suited to their teaching style. Units include such topics as "Social Security,""What…

  15. Food Service Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This handbook presents a competency-based curriculum that provides information to teachers and administrators planning a secondary food service program in Alaska. The organization of the handbook is similar to the work stations commonly found in food service operations, although some competency areas, such as sanitation and safety and the care and…

  16. The Curriculum Conundrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jimmie

    1994-01-01

    Argues that political debates over the influence of Christian fundamentalism or secular humanism on school curriculum often overshadow the real deficiencies in public school education in the United States, such as 6-hour school days and 180-day school years, which deprive American children of the learning opportunities they need to compete in the…

  17. Arts throughout the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manner, Jane Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes how curriculum integration can help art enhance learning during times when the arts may be considered dispensable and removed from education, presenting examples of how classroom teachers have examined art as a link to expanded understanding of history, science, math, reading, current events, geography, cultural studies, emotions,…

  18. Insight: An Energy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohl, Herb

    1979-01-01

    The author explains some of the activities he uses in his upper elementary energy curriculum when dealing with these topics: the definition of energy; gasoline consumption; energy conversion; solar energy; and the politics of energy. Resource agencies to which students may write for information are listed. (SJL)

  19. The Shadow Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela U.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter will explore the "shadow curriculum" (a term used by those who question the assumption that direct selling to students who are compelled to attend school is questionable on several levels--ethical, moral, and democratic) and its connection to media literacy. The author first summarizes the kinds of marketing in schools that have…

  20. Community Connection Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Understanding the Built Environment, Prairie Village, KS.

    This curriculum packet contains two teacher-developed lesson plans, for use in the upper elementary grades, which focus on urban life. The first lesson plan, "Connecting Downtown" (Michael Gray), studies how engineering and design can make cities more efficient places. It provides a brief discussion on how people travel within large urban cores,…

  1. The Business Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha; Meggison, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The business education curriculum encompasses the educational experiences of business students at all levels. Business education curricula include a variety of programs, courses, units, course objectives, student competencies, assessments, and extracurricular activities that have evolved over the years. Curricula are driven by numerous internal…

  2. Degrassi Health Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Robin J.

    This health curriculum is intended to help teachers deal with some of today's adolescent health issues: (1) alcoholism (issues surrounding family alcoholism); (2) relationships (stereotyping and teen friendships); (3) Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) (insight into what it is like to live with HIV);…

  3. A Cooking Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Wynn D., Ed.

    This cooking curriculum, issued by the Washington District Early Childhood Council, details specific ways in which language arts, math, science, and social studies may be taught through cooking specific recipes. Cooking activities and recipes are presented for the fall, winter, and spring months, and guidelines are provided for preparing…

  4. Curriculum in Counselor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinkmeyer, Don

    1989-01-01

    States that counselor education programs should provide more opportunities for demonstration and observation. Suggests that counselor educators and counselors-in-training meet in multiple-counseling sessions with clients and that curriculum include comprehensive theory courses and opportunities to have in-depth training in a specific counseling…

  5. Cognition, Curriculum, and Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, John T., Ed.

    The papers in this volume were initially presented at a seminar on the development of reading comprehension, which explored basic research and the teaching of reading comprehenison. Researchers in cognitive psychology and psycholinguistics and experts in curriculum design in reading gave presentations and reacted to one another's ideas. Each…

  6. Child Safety Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Safety Center, Malibu, CA.

    This document presents a set of child safety curriculum guidelines intended to help prevent child victimization and to promote safer living and learning environments for children and adolescents across America. These guidelines were developed to help educators, law enforcement personnel, and members of other youth-serving agencies teach children…

  7. Across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Across-the-curriculum articles focus on four areas. A math activity describes optical illusions and the properties of shapes. A hands-on science activity presents the chemistry of secret messages. A writing lesson helps students capture the essence of character. An art lesson presents a project on medieval castles. (SM)

  8. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  9. Designing a Comprehensive Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, T. L.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive rural "agribusiness industry" curriculum might include: (1) The World of Work (Grade 7 or 8), (2) Vocational Orientation (Grade 9), (3) Basic Agriculture and Industry (Grade 10), (4) Specialized Agribusiness Industry (Grade 11), and (5) Advanced Agribusiness Industry (Grade 12). (DM)

  10. Managing Curriculum Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cheryl A.; Anderson, Mike

    This document, which is intended for mangers at post-16 educational institutions in the United Kingdom, presents guidelines for managing curriculum change that were developed on the basis of case studies of the following further education (FE) colleges: Grey Skies College; Midshire College; and Happy Days College. The introduction explains how the…

  11. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  12. Uncovering the Math Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Teachers often express to Marulyn Burns their worry about the need to "cover the curriculum." In response, she draws on one of her favorite quotes: "You don't want to cover a subject; you want to uncover it." This quote is from "The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning" by Eleanor…

  13. Freshman English Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kershner, Ivan; Holt, Pol

    This leveled curriculum guide, composed of assignment and evaluation sheets, is divided into five different sections. Freshmen Grammar deals with such topics as subject-verb agreement, punctuation and capitalization, possessives, complete sentences, parts of speech, correct verb form, simple and complex sentences, and correct word form. Freshman…

  14. Distributive Education. Selling. Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankford, Dave; Comte, Don

    Nineteen lesson plans on selling are presented in this performance-based curriculum unit for distributive education. This unit is self-contained and consists of the following components: introduction (provides overview of unit content and describes why mastery of the objectives is important); performance objectives; pre-assessment instrument…

  15. Vocational Carpentry Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg. Dept. of Education.

    The carpentry curriculum guide was developed as a basic guide to be used by instructors in formulating their own courses of study. The material is designed for use in vocational carpentry classes at grade levels 10, 11, and 12. Planned as a two-year sequence, it incorporates 1080 class hours of instruction and emphasizes light or residential type…

  16. The Second Language Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Keith, Ed.

    The aim of this collection is to present "state of the art" papers in language curriculum studies by writers who have been actively involved in shaping theory in the field and who, between them, have applied that theory in almost every part of the world and in a variety of contexts. Papers include the following: "A Decision-Making Framework for…

  17. EMR Curriculum Guide: Primary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruschmeier, Veronica M., Ed.; Rockwell, Linda, Ed.

    Presented is a curriculum guide for educable mentally retarded children in primary and intermediate grades which specifies behavioral and interim objectives in the areas of basic verbal and arithmetic skills, vocational competencies, social competencies, and physical skills. Objectives such as the following are identified at the primary level:…

  18. Plumbing and Heating Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    Theory and experience in the following areas are included in this plumbing curriculum: (1) plumbing fixtures and heating; (2) city water service; (3) fixture roughing; (4) venting; and (5) solar heating systems. The plumbing program manual includes the following sections: (1) general objectives for grades 10, 11, and 12; (2) a list of 33 major…

  19. In Vivo and in Vitro Evaluations of Repeatability and Accuracy of VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the intra-device repeatability and accuracy of dental shade-matching device (VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0) using both in vitro and in vivo models. Materials and methods For the repeatability assessment, the in vivo model utilized shade-matching device to measure the central region of the labial surface of right maxillary central incisors of 10 people twice. The following tooth colors were measured: B1, A1, A2, A3, C1 and C3. The in vitro model included the same six Vitapan Classical tabs. Two measurements were made of the central region of each shade tab. For the accuracy assessment, each shade tab from 3 Vitapan Classical shade guides was measured once. CIE L*a*b* values were determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze the in vitro and in vivo intra-device repeatability of the shade-matching device. The difference between in vitro and in vivo models was analyzed. Accuracy of the device tested was calculated. Results The mean color differences for in vivo and in vitro models were 3.51 and 1.25 E units, respectively. The device repeatability ICCs for in vivo measurements ranged from 0.858 to 0.971 and for in vitro from 0.992 to 0.994. Accuracy of the device tested was 93.75%. Conclusion Within the limitations of the experiment, VITA Easyshade®Advance 4.0 dental shade-matching device enabled reliable and accurate measurement. It can be a valuable tool for the determination of tooth colours.

  20. An in vitro investigation to compare the surface roughness of auto glazed, reglazed and chair side polished surfaces of Ivoclar and Vita feldspathic porcelain.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Sumit; Kakade, Dilip; Jambhekar, Shantanu; Jain, Vinay

    2013-12-01

    The change in surface roughness after different surface finishing techniques has attracted the attention of several prosthodontists regarding wear of opposing teeth or restorative material and the strength; plaque retention and appearance of the restoration. However, there is considerable controversy concerning the best methods to achieve the smoothest and strongest porcelain restorations after chair side clinical adjustments. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the average surface roughness of a self-glazed surface, a chair side polished surface and a reglazed surface of ceramic. Two feldspathic porcelain, namely VITA VMK94 (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Sachingen, Germany) and IVOCLAR CLASSIC (Vivadent AG, FL-9494 Schaan, Liechtenstein) were selected to fabricate 20 specimens of each in the shape of shade guide tabs. A medium-grit diamond rotary cutting instrument was used to remove the glaze layer, and then the surface of half the specimens were re-glazed and the other half were polished using a well-defined sequence of polishing comprising of: Shofu porcelain polishing system, White gloss disc/polishing wheel, Silicone cone with diamond polishing paste and finally with small buff wheel with pumice slurry. The surface roughness (Ra) (μm) of the specimens was evaluated using a profilometer and scanning electron microscope. The data were statistically analyzed by using Student's t test. The results had shown that there is no statistically significant difference both quantitatively and qualitatively, between the surface roughness of reglazed and chair-side polished surface. In addition, both reglazed and chair-side polished surfaces are better than the autoglazed surface. Within all the groups, there is no significant difference between companies. Polishing an adjusted porcelain surface with the suggested sequence of polishing will lead to a finish similar to a re-glazed surface. Therefore chair-side polishing can be a good alternative to reglazing for

  1. In Vivo and in Vitro Evaluations of Repeatability and Accuracy of VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0 Dental Shade-Matching Device

    PubMed Central

    Illeš, Iva Ž.; Alajbeg, Maja; Žagar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the intra-device repeatability and accuracy of dental shade-matching device (VITA Easyshade® Advance 4.0) using both in vitro and in vivo models. Materials and methods For the repeatability assessment, the in vivo model utilized shade-matching device to measure the central region of the labial surface of right maxillary central incisors of 10 people twice. The following tooth colors were measured: B1, A1, A2, A3, C1 and C3. The in vitro model included the same six Vitapan Classical tabs. Two measurements were made of the central region of each shade tab. For the accuracy assessment, each shade tab from 3 Vitapan Classical shade guides was measured once. CIE L*a*b* values were determined. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to analyze the in vitro and in vivo intra-device repeatability of the shade-matching device. The difference between in vitro and in vivo models was analyzed. Accuracy of the device tested was calculated. Results The mean color differences for in vivo and in vitro models were 3.51 and 1.25 E units, respectively. The device repeatability ICCs for in vivo measurements ranged from 0.858 to 0.971 and for in vitro from 0.992 to 0.994. Accuracy of the device tested was 93.75%. Conclusion Within the limitations of the experiment, VITA Easyshade®Advance 4.0 dental shade-matching device enabled reliable and accurate measurement. It can be a valuable tool for the determination of tooth colours. PMID:27688393

  2. Mesopotamian medicine.

    PubMed

    Retief, F P; Cilliers, L

    2007-01-01

    Although the Mesopotamian civilisation is as old as that of Egypt and might even have predated it, we know much less about Mesopotamian medicine, mainly because the cuneiform source material is less well researched. Medical healers existed from the middle of the 3rd millennium. In line with the strong theocratic state culture, healers were closely integrated with the powerful priestly fraternity, and were essentially of three main kinds: barû (seers) who were experts in divination, âshipu (exorcists), and asû (healing priests) who tended directly to the sick. All illness was accepted as sent by gods, demons and other evil spirits, either as retribution for sins or as malevolent visitations. Treatment revolved around identification of the offending supernatural power, appeasement of the angry gods, for example by offering amulets or incantations, exorcism of evil spirits, as well as a measure of empirical therapy aimed against certain recognised symptom complexes. Medical practice was rigidly codified, starting with Hammurabi's Code in the 18th century BC and persisting to the late 1st millennium BC. Works like the so-called Diagnostic Handbook, the Assyrian Herbal and Prescription Texts describe the rationale of Mesopotamian medicine, based predominantly on supernatural concepts, although rudimentary traces of empirical medicine are discernible. There is evidence that Egyptian medicine might have been influenced by Mesopotamian practices, but Greek rational medicine as it evolved in the 5th/4th centuries BC almost certainly had no significant Mesopotamian roots. PMID:17378276

  3. Travel medicine

    PubMed Central

    Aw, Brian; Boraston, Suni; Botten, David; Cherniwchan, Darin; Fazal, Hyder; Kelton, Timothy; Libman, Michael; Saldanha, Colin; Scappatura, Philip; Stowe, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To define the practice of travel medicine, provide the basics of a comprehensive pretravel consultation for international travelers, and assist in identifying patients who might require referral to travel medicine professionals. Sources of information Guidelines and recommendations on travel medicine and travel-related illnesses by national and international travel health authorities were reviewed. MEDLINE and EMBASE searches for related literature were also performed. Main message Travel medicine is a highly dynamic specialty that focuses on pretravel preventive care. A comprehensive risk assessment for each individual traveler is essential in order to accurately evaluate traveler-, itinerary-, and destination-specific risks, and to advise on the most appropriate risk management interventions to promote health and prevent adverse health outcomes during travel. Vaccinations might also be required and should be personalized according to the individual traveler’s immunization history, travel itinerary, and the amount of time available before departure. Conclusion A traveler’s health and safety depends on a practitioner’s level of expertise in providing pretravel counseling and vaccinations, if required. Those who advise travelers are encouraged to be aware of the extent of this responsibility and to refer all high-risk travelers to travel medicine professionals whenever possible. PMID:25500599

  4. Raising awareness of the hidden curriculum in veterinary medical education: a review and call for research.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Tiffany L

    2014-01-01

    The hidden curriculum is characterized by information that is tacitly conveyed to and among students about the cultural and moral environment in which they find themselves. Although the hidden curriculum is often defined as a distinct entity, tacit information is conveyed to students throughout all aspects of formal and informal curricula. This unconsciously communicated knowledge has been identified across a wide spectrum of educational environments and is known to have lasting and powerful impacts, both positive and negative. Recently, medical education research on the hidden curriculum of becoming a doctor has come to the forefront as institutions struggle with inconsistencies between formal and hidden curricula that hinder the practice of patient-centered medicine. Similarly, the complex ethical questions that arise during the practice and teaching of veterinary medicine have the potential to cause disagreement between what the institution sets out to teach and what is actually learned. However, the hidden curriculum remains largely unexplored for this field. Because the hidden curriculum is retained effectively by students, elucidating its underlying messages can be a key component of program refinement. A review of recent literature about the hidden curriculum in a variety of fields, including medical education, will be used to explore potential hidden curricula in veterinary medicine and draw attention to the need for further investigation. PMID:25335646

  5. What shall we do for family medicine?

    PubMed

    Grainge Biggs, John Sydney

    2016-06-01

    In November 2014 the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council directed that Family Medicine should be taught to final year medical students. Family Medicine will be strengthened as a result. This paper considers some implications of the decision, identifying first the need for more information on primary care services, especially in the private sector, to enable planning of the curriculum and attachments to public and private units. The challenges to medical colleges in providing what will be largely experiential learning are described and the importance of training practitioners is emphasised. The urgent need to overcome the virtual absence in Pakistan of postgraduate training in Family Medicine described, and the quality standards of primary care are explored and the need for attention in the face of student learning is described. Recommendations are offered, including an advisory board on Family Medicine to audit its introduction and performance. PMID:27339579

  6. Reading, writing, and doctoring: literature and medicine.

    PubMed

    Charon, R

    2000-05-01

    Literature and medicine share an inherently enduring relationship. Doctors turn to literature--both its plots and its forms--to understand what occurs in their patients' lives, to increase their own narrative competence, to interpret accurately the texts of medicine, to develop empathy, and to deepen their capacities for reflection and self-knowledge. Together, these skills, attitudes, and bodies of knowledge contribute to the effective practice of medicine. Literature is now taught in almost three quarters of the medical schools in the United States. Different goals, agendas, and methods are appropriate at each developmental stage of a physician's training, from the premedical curriculum to the continuing education of a practicing physician. A vigorous and growing scholarship and body of experience is propelling the field of literature and medicine to understand all the more clearly how acts of reading and acts of writing might illuminate acts of doctoring.

  7. Rural family medicine training in Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Rourke, J. T.; Rourke, L. L.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the status of postgraduate family medicine training that occurs in rural family practice settings in Canada and to identify problems and how they are addressed. DESIGN: A retrospective questionnaire sent to all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs followed by a focus group discussion of results. SETTING: Canadian university family medicine training programs. PARTICIPANTS: Chairs or program directors of all 18 Canadian family medicine training programs and people attending a workshop at the Section of Teachers of Family Medicine annual meeting. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Extent of training offered, educational models used, common problems for residents and teachers. RESULTS: Nine of 18 programs offer some family medicine training in a rural practice setting to some or all of their first-year family medicine residents, and 99 of 684 first-year family medicine residents did some training in a rural practice. All programs offer some training in a rural practice to some or all of the second-year residents, and 567 of 702 second-year residents did some training in a rural setting. In 12 of 18 programs, a rural family medicine block is compulsory. Education models for training for rural family practice vary widely. Isolation, accommodation, and supervision are common problems for rural family medicine residents. Isolation and faculty development are common problems for rural physician-teachers. Programs use various approaches to address these problems. CONCLUSIONS: The variety of postgraduate training models for rural family practice used in the 18 training programs reflects different regional health care needs and resources. There is no common rural family medicine curriculum. Networking through a rural physician-teachers group or a faculty of rural medicine could further the development of education for rural family practice. PMID:7780331

  8. [Alternative medicine].

    PubMed

    Mitello, L

    2001-01-01

    In a critical situation of world official medicine, we can find different alternatives therapies: natural therapy traditional and complementary, survival sometimes, of antique stiles and conditions of life. New sciences presented for them empiricism to the margin of official science. Doctors and sorcerer do the best to defeat the horrible virus that contribute to build symbols categories of sick. The alternatives put dangerously in game the scientific myth of experiment and exhume, if they got lost, antique remedy, almost preserved like cultural wreck very efficient where the medicine is impotent. Besides alternatives and complementary therapies, that are remedies not recognized conventional from official medicine, there are the homeopathic, phytotherapy, pranotherapy, nutritional therapy, the ayurveda, the yoga, ecc. Italians and internationals research show a composite picture of persons that apply that therapies. Object of this work is to understand and know the way that sick lighten their sufferings and role that have o that can assume the nurses to assist this sick. PMID:12146072

  9. The American Society for Radiation Oncology's 2010 Core Physics Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residents

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Ying; De Amorim Bernstein, Karen; Chetty, Indrin J.; Eifel, Patricia; Hughes, Lesley; Klein, Eric E.; McDermott, Patrick; Prisciandaro, Joann; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Price, Robert A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: In 2004, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) published its first physics education curriculum for residents, which was updated in 2007. A committee composed of physicists and physicians from various residency program teaching institutions was reconvened again to update the curriculum in 2009. Methods and Materials: Members of this committee have associations with ASTRO, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), and the American College of Radiology. Members reviewed and updated assigned subjects from the last curriculum. The updated curriculum was carefully reviewed by a representative from the ABR and other physics and clinical experts. Results: The new curriculum resulted in a recommended 56-h course, excluding initial orientation. Learning objectives are provided for each subject area, and a detailed outline of material to be covered is given for each lecture hour. Some recent changes in the curriculum include the addition of Radiation Incidents and Bioterrorism Response Training as a subject and updates that reflect new treatment techniques and modalities in a number of core subjects. The new curriculum was approved by the ASTRO board in April 2010. We anticipate that physicists will use this curriculum for structuring their teaching programs, and subsequently the ABR will adopt this educational program for its written examination. Currently, the American College of Radiology uses the ASTRO curriculum for their training examination topics. In addition to the curriculum, the committee updated suggested references and the glossary. Conclusions: The ASTRO physics education curriculum for radiation oncology residents has been updated. To ensure continued commitment to a current and relevant curriculum, the subject matter will be updated again in 2 years.

  10. A retrospective analysis of veterinary medical curriculum development in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, Debbie A D C; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van Beukelen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Utrecht University (FVMU) has introduced major curriculum changes to keep pace with modern veterinary educational developments worldwide. Changes to program outcomes have been proposed according to professional and societal demands, with more attention paid to generic competencies and electives and species/sector differentiation. Furthermore, changes in educational approaches and the educational organization have been proposed, aiming at a transition from teacher-centered education toward more student-centered education. Curriculum development is a complex and difficult process, with many elements interacting. For a new curriculum to become valid, curriculum elements and their interrelation-such as statements of intent (also called outcomes, goals, or objectives), content, teaching and learning strategies, assessment strategies, and context-need to be addressed in the educational philosophy (i.e., the intended curriculum). This paper describes a document analysis of the major curriculum reforms of the FVMU. Curriculum committee reports were critically analyzed to gain insight into the intentions of the curriculum designers and the match between the curriculum elements, as described by Prideaux. The results show that the reports paid considerable attention to generic competency training, especially to academic training, and to the introduction of more student-centered teaching and learning strategies. However, little attention was paid to assessment strategies and the statements of intent were defined rather broadly. Curriculum evaluation (i.e., what is delivered to the students and how is the curriculum experienced) is needed at all curriculum levels. Possible mismatches between levels need to be identified.

  11. Interdisciplinary development of a preconception health curriculum for four medical specialties.

    PubMed

    Freda, Margaret Comerford; Chazotte, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter; Harrison, Ellen

    2002-02-01

    A group of obstetricians and gynecologists, along with physicians from three other medical specialties, nurses, and midwives, developed a curriculum on preconception health care for women. This curriculum was specifically aimed at residents in obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine. The curriculum was designed to convince these physicians that they needed to participate in promotion of preconception health for many reasons, such as the need to teach women to take folic acid daily because it significantly decreases the incidence of neural tube defects. Because over 50% of all pregnancies are unplanned, it is imperative that all physicians think of themselves as preconception health providers. Our group then taught the curriculum to medical students, residents, fellows, and attending physicians in all specialties at four hospitals affiliated with the medical college. Evaluation of the curriculum in 171 physicians who participated revealed that only a small percentage of physicians took folic acid daily themselves. Almost 36% of the obstetricians did not currently provide preconception care for their patients. Most physicians in all specialties believed that the curriculum provided them with useful information for their practice. The March of Dimes is currently distributing this curriculum on its Web site.

  12. Interdisciplinary development of a preconception health curriculum for four medical specialties.

    PubMed

    Freda, Margaret Comerford; Chazotte, Cynthia; Bernstein, Peter; Harrison, Ellen

    2002-02-01

    A group of obstetricians and gynecologists, along with physicians from three other medical specialties, nurses, and midwives, developed a curriculum on preconception health care for women. This curriculum was specifically aimed at residents in obstetrics and gynecology, internal medicine, pediatrics, and family medicine. The curriculum was designed to convince these physicians that they needed to participate in promotion of preconception health for many reasons, such as the need to teach women to take folic acid daily because it significantly decreases the incidence of neural tube defects. Because over 50% of all pregnancies are unplanned, it is imperative that all physicians think of themselves as preconception health providers. Our group then taught the curriculum to medical students, residents, fellows, and attending physicians in all specialties at four hospitals affiliated with the medical college. Evaluation of the curriculum in 171 physicians who participated revealed that only a small percentage of physicians took folic acid daily themselves. Almost 36% of the obstetricians did not currently provide preconception care for their patients. Most physicians in all specialties believed that the curriculum provided them with useful information for their practice. The March of Dimes is currently distributing this curriculum on its Web site. PMID:11814512

  13. Complementary medicine.

    PubMed

    Schimpff, S C

    1997-07-01

    Complementary medicine can be described as additional approaches to care outside of mainstream medical practice but frequently based on traditional practices of nonwestern cultures. These include acupuncture, meditation, massage, diet manipulation, and many others. Recent reviews demonstrate wide and frequent use of these measures, often without concurrent discussion with the patient's physician. One estimate is that more than $13 billion is spent annually on complementary techniques in the United States alone. Many patients with cancer turn to these techniques. Care givers need to recognize this trend, learn about complementary medicine, and guide patients in their proper application when appropriate.

  14. Wilderness Medicine.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Whitney; Bright, Steven; Burns, Patrick; Townes, David

    2016-03-01

    Wilderness medicine encompasses prevention and treatment of illness and injury, education and training, emergency medical services, and search and rescue in the wilderness. Although traumatic injuries, including minor injuries, outnumber medical illness as the cause of morbidity in the wilderness, basic understanding of the prevention and management of injury and illness, including recognition, identification, treatment, initial management, and stabilization, is essential, in addition to the ability to facilitate evacuation of affected patients. An important theme throughout wilderness medicine is planning and preparation for the best- and worst-case scenarios, and being ready for the unexpected.

  15. Wilderness Medicine.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Whitney; Bright, Steven; Burns, Patrick; Townes, David

    2016-03-01

    Wilderness medicine encompasses prevention and treatment of illness and injury, education and training, emergency medical services, and search and rescue in the wilderness. Although traumatic injuries, including minor injuries, outnumber medical illness as the cause of morbidity in the wilderness, basic understanding of the prevention and management of injury and illness, including recognition, identification, treatment, initial management, and stabilization, is essential, in addition to the ability to facilitate evacuation of affected patients. An important theme throughout wilderness medicine is planning and preparation for the best- and worst-case scenarios, and being ready for the unexpected. PMID:26900118

  16. Is old medicine new medicine?

    PubMed

    Montaocean, K

    1991-07-01

    By the year 2000, over 90% of cases of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are expected in Third World countries where Western medicine is often unavailable, unaffordable, or culturally unacceptable. Thus, there is a need for greater attention to the potential role of traditional medicine and healers in the prevention and treatment of AIDS. A US-based nongovernmental organization, Green Cross Inc, is examining cross-cultural healing traditions and seeking areas of convergence between scientific bio-medicine and indigenous traditional healing systems. At a street clinic operated by Green Cross in Washington DC, both Western medicine and traditional Chinese practices such as acupuncture, herbal remedies, and meditation are offered to AIDS patients at those at risk of infection. Although the individualized nature of Chinese medicine makes it difficult to evaluate through use of Western research methods, there is anecdotal evidence that it reduces the stress, anxiety, depression, and fatigue that accompany AIDS. Health care systems in all parts of the world could benefit from the concept that illness cannot be treated in isolation from individuals and communities.

  17. An ethics curriculum for short-term global health trainees

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interest in short-term global health training and service programs continues to grow, yet they can be associated with a variety of ethical issues for which trainees or others with limited global health experience may not be prepared to address. Therefore, there is a clear need for educational interventions concerning these ethical issues. Methods We developed and evaluated an introductory curriculum, “Ethical Challenges in Short-term Global Health Training.” The curriculum was developed through solicitation of actual ethical issues experienced by trainees and program leaders; content drafting; and external content review. It was then evaluated from November 1, 2011, through July 1, 2012, by analyzing web usage data and by conducting user surveys. The survey included basic demographic data; prior experience in global health and global health ethics; and assessment of cases within the curriculum. Results The ten case curriculum is freely available at http://ethicsandglobalhealth.org. An average of 238 unique visitors accessed the site each month (standard deviation, 19). Of users who had been abroad before for global health training or service, only 31% reported prior ethics training related to short-term work. Most users (62%) reported accessing the site via personal referral or their training program; however, a significant number (28%) reported finding the site via web search, and 8% discovered it via web links. Users represented different fields: medicine (46%), public health (15%), and nursing (11%) were most common. All cases in the curriculum were evaluated favorably. Conclusions The curriculum is meeting a critical need for an introduction to the ethical issues in short-term global health training. Future work will integrate this curriculum within more comprehensive curricula for global health and evaluate specific knowledge and behavioral effects, including at training sites abroad. PMID:23410089

  18. [Osteopathic medicine].

    PubMed

    Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

    2011-09-01

    Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

  19. Nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-10-17

    In 1985 and 1986 nuclear medicine became more and more oriented toward in vov chemistry, chiefly as a result of advances in positron emission tomography (PET). The most important trend was the extension of PET technology into the care of patients with brain tumors, epilepsy, and heart disease. A second trend was the increasing use of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

  20. Medicine Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    New York State education law, rules, and regulations concerning the practice of medicine are presented, along with requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a physician. State statutory provisions cover: duration and registration of a license, practice and regulation of the profession, supervision by the Board…