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Sample records for medicine training institute

  1. Duty hours in emergency medicine: balancing patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience: a consensus response to the 2008 institute of medicine resident duty hours recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Jo; Wolf, Stephen; Promes, Susan; McGee, Doug; Hobgood, Cheri; Doty, Christopher; McErlean, Mara Ann; Janssen, Alan; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Ling, Louis; Mattu, Amal; Tantama, Stephen; Beeson, Michael; Brabson, Thomas; Christiansen, Greg; King, Brent; Luerssen, Emily; Muelleman, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Representatives of emergency medicine (EM) were asked to develop a consensus report that provided a review of the past and potential future effects of duty hour requirements for EM residency training. In addition to the restrictions made in 2003 by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the potential effects of the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on resident duty hours were postulated. The elements highlighted include patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience. Many of the changes and recommendations did not affect EM as significantly as other specialties. Current training standards in EM have already emphasized patient safety by requiring continuous on-site supervision of residents. Resident fatigue has been addressed with restrictions of shift lengths and limitation of consecutive days worked. One recommendation from the IOM was a required 5-hour rest period for residents on call. Emergency department (ED) patient safety becomes an important concern with the decrease in the availability and in the patient load of a resident consultant that may result from this recommendation. Of greater concern is the already observed slower throughput time for admitted patients waiting for resident care, which will increase ED crowding and decrease patient safety in academic institutions. A balance between being overly prescriptive with duty hour restrictions and trying to improve resident wellness was recommended. Discussion is included regarding the appropriate length of EM training programs if clinical experiences were limited by new duty hour regulations. Finally, this report presents a review of the financing issues associated with any changes. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

  2. Duty hours in emergency medicine: balancing patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience: a consensus response to the 2008 Institute of Medicine resident duty hours recommendations.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Mary Jo; Wolf, Stephen; Promes, Susan; McGee, Doug; Hobgood, Cheri; Doty, Christopher; McErlean, Mara Ann; Janssen, Alan; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Ling, Louis; Mattu, Amal; Tantama, Stephen; Beeson, Michael; Brabson, Thomas; Christiansen, Greg; King, Brent; Luerssen, Emily; Muelleman, Robert

    2010-09-01

    Representatives of emergency medicine (EM) were asked to develop a consensus report that provided a review of the past and potential future effects of duty hour requirements for EM residency training. In addition to the restrictions made in 2003 by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the potential effects of the 2008 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on resident duty hours were postulated. The elements highlighted include patient safety, resident wellness, and the resident training experience. Many of the changes and recommendations did not affect EM as significantly as other specialties. Current training standards in EM have already emphasized patient safety by requiring continuous onsite supervision of residents. Resident fatigue has been addressed with restrictions of shift lengths and limitation of consecutive days worked. One recommendation from the IOM was a required 5-h rest period for residents on call. Emergency department (ED) patient safety becomes an important concern with the decrease in the availability and in the patient load of a resident consultant that may result from this recommendation. Of greater concern is the already observed slower throughput time for admitted patients waiting for resident care, which will increase ED crowding and decrease patient safety in academic institutions. A balance between being overly prescriptive with duty hour restrictions and trying to improve resident wellness was recommended. Discussion is included regarding the appropriate length of EM training programs if clinical experiences were limited by new duty hour regulations. Finally, this report presents a review of the financing issues associated with any changes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Swimmer-Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    This satirical essay proposes an institution of higher learning that would prepare students to become swimmers" and swimming instructors. Curriculum, teaching methods, student selection and evaluation are modelled on certain contemporary teacher-training institutes. (PD)

  4. Extended family medicine training

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Design Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Setting Canada. Participants All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Main outcome measures Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. Results The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS–Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of

  5. The Institute of Medicine's Report on "Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform"--Background, Results, and Follow Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Joel; Greden, John; Abrams, Michael; Riba, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) determined that declines in the psychiatrist-researcher workforce are harming public needs and that significant steps are necessary to alter current trends. Method: The NIMH commissioned the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to examine the undersupply and recommend solutions. The NIMH…

  6. Redesigning training for internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Steven E; Smith, Lawrence G; Collier, Virginia U

    2006-06-20

    The American College of Physicians supports the need for reform throughout the continuum of training in internal medicine. Today's internists must have the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to meet the challenges of an expanding body of medical knowledge and a rapidly evolving system of health care delivery. Suggested priorities for undergraduate medical education include redesigning curricular experiences to afford students earlier and more exposure to career opportunities in internal medicine, improving ambulatory education, exposing students to outstanding faculty role models in internal medicine, and incorporating educational experiences during the fourth year that optimize its value and relevance to the student's future career plans in internal medicine. Internal medicine residency training should remain a 3-year experience, with a component of core education common to all trainees and a component of customized training in the third year targeted toward the resident's career goals. Residency programs should be designed around educational rather than institutional service needs. The ambulatory component of training requires substantial reform in its structure, sites, content, and timing. Team-based models should be used both for patient care and for flexibility in design of residency training. Better faculty models must be developed that build on the concept of a "core faculty," improve the rewards for teaching faculty, and provide appropriate faculty development focusing on a necessary set of educator competencies.

  7. Osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions.

    PubMed

    Schmit, Steven F

    2008-03-01

    The Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution (OPTI) program was established by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) in 1995 as a support and accreditation structure for osteopathic graduate medical education. Since 1999, all AOA-approved postdoctoral training programs are required to take place in OPTIs. In a continuing effort to further define standards for quality and to promote program development, the AOA's 2007 Annual OPTI Workshop focused on recommended changes to the OPTI standards document. In addition, an OPTI Inspectors Workshop was held in January 2008 to increase interrater reliability in determining whether individual OPTIs have met specific criteria.

  8. Evidence-based medicine training in a resource-poor country, the importance of leveraging personal and institutional relationships

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Cristina; Taramona, Claudia; Rizo-Patrón, Emiliana; Hernández, Fiorela; Rodríguez, Patricia; Piscoya, Alejandro; Gonzales, Elsa; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Heudebert, Gustavo; Centor, Robert M.; Estrada, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Efforts to implement evidence-based medicine (EBM) training in developing countries are limited. We describe the results of an international effort to improve research capacity in a developing country; we conducted a course aimed at improving basic EBM attitudes and identified challenges. Method Between 2005 and 2009, we conducted an annual 3-day course in Perú consisting of interactive lectures and case-based workshops. We assessed self-reported competence and importance in EBM using a Likert scale (1 = low, 5 = high). Results Totally 220 clinicians participated. For phase I (2005–2007), self-reported EBM competence increased from a median of 2 to 3 (P < 0.001) and the perceived importance of EBM did not change (median = 5). For phase II (2008–2009), before the course, 8–72% graded their competence very low (score of 1–2). After the course, 67–92% of subjects graded their increase in knowledge very high (score of 4–5). The challenges included limited availability of studies relevant to the local reality written in Spanish, participants’ limited time and lack of long-term follow-up on practice change. Informal discussion and written evaluation from participants were universally in agreement that more training in EBM is needed. Conclusions In an EBM course in a resource-poor country, the baseline self-reported competence and experience on EBM were low, and the course had measurable improvements of self-reported competence, perceived utility and readiness to incorporate EBM into their practices. Similar to developed countries, translational research and building the research capacity in developing countries is critical for translating best available evidence into practice. PMID:21276140

  9. Evidence-based medicine training in a resource-poor country, the importance of leveraging personal and institutional relationships.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Cristina; Taramona, Claudia; Rizo-Patrón, Emiliana; Hernández, Fiorela; Rodríguez, Patricia; Piscoya, Alejandro; Gonzales, Elsa; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Heudebert, Gustavo; Centor, Robert M; Estrada, Carlos A

    2011-08-01

    Efforts to implement evidence-based medicine (EBM) training in developing countries are limited. We describe the results of an international effort to improve research capacity in a developing country; we conducted a course aimed at improving basic EBM attitudes and identified challenges. Between 2005 and 2009, we conducted an annual 3-day course in Perú consisting of interactive lectures and case-based workshops. We assessed self-reported competence and importance in EBM using a Likert scale (1 = low, 5 = high). Totally 220 clinicians participated. For phase I (2005-2007), self-reported EBM competence increased from a median of 2 to 3 (P < 0.001) and the perceived importance of EBM did not change (median = 5). For phase II (2008-2009), before the course, 8-72% graded their competence very low (score of 1-2). After the course, 67-92% of subjects graded their increase in knowledge very high (score of 4-5). The challenges included limited availability of studies relevant to the local reality written in Spanish, participants' limited time and lack of long-term follow-up on practice change. Informal discussion and written evaluation from participants were universally in agreement that more training in EBM is needed. In an EBM course in a resource-poor country, the baseline self-reported competence and experience on EBM were low, and the course had measurable improvements of self-reported competence, perceived utility and readiness to incorporate EBM into their practices. Similar to developed countries, translational research and building the research capacity in developing countries is critical for translating best available evidence into practice. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. INSTITUT FUER FLUGMEDIZIN (Institute for Flight Medicine),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AVIATION MEDICINE , SCIENTIFIC ORGANIZATIONS), PERFORMANCE(HUMAN), HIGH ALTITUDE, RESPIRATION, DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS, CONTROLLED ATMOSPHERES, WEST...GERMANY, TRACER STUDIES, PSYCHOLOGY, ACCELERATION, PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS, AEROSPACE MEDICINE , SPACE CREWS

  11. Quantitative ethnomedicinal survey of medicinal plants given for cardiometabolic diseases by the non-institutionally trained siddha practitioners of Tiruvallur district, Tamil Nadu, India.

    PubMed

    Esakkimuthu, S; Mutheeswaran, S; Arvinth, S; Paulraj, M Gabriel; Pandikumar, P; Ignacimuthu, S

    2016-06-20

    The burden of cardiometabolic diseases such as dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, visceral obesity and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases and the use of traditional medicine for the management of such diseases are high in India; hence there is a need to document and analyze such therapies. This study documented and analyzed the medicinal plants prescribed for cardiometabolic diseases by the non-institutionally trained siddha practitioners of Tiruvallur district of Tamil Nadu, India. The field survey was conducted between December 2014 to November 2015. Successive free listing assisted with field-walks was used to interview the informants. After assessing the sampling sufficiency using rarefaction curve analysis, indices such as Informant Consensus Factor (Fic) and Index of Agreement on Remedies (IAR) were calculated for the data. The indicators of informant's medicinal plant knowledge such as Shannon's index, equitability index, etc., were regressed with the demographic profile of the informants. For this study 70 non-institutionally trained Siddha medical practitioners were approached; the data from 36 practitioners who were treating cardiometabolic diseases were documented. This study recorded the use of 188 species which were used to prepare 368 formulations to treat illnesses categorized under cardiometabolic diseases. In this, 53.04% claims were singletons. Regression analysis showed that single species dominance was reduced and the diversity of medicinal plants was increased with the increase in the age and experience. Increase in the years of formal education increased the equitability in the uses. The plants such as Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. (cardiovascular diseases), Allium sativum L. (dyslipidemia), Cuminum cyminum L. (hypertension), Macrotyloma uniflorum Verdc. (obesity) and Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (type 2 diabetes) were the highly cited medicinal plants. This survey has identified the plants most commonly used by Siddha practitioners of

  12. Internal Medicine Training in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Di Francesco; Pistoria, Michael J; Auerbach, Andrew D; Nardino, Robert J; Holmboe, Eric S

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE Although the inpatient setting has served as the predominant educational site of internal medicine training programs, many changes and factors are currently affecting education in this setting. As a result, many educational organizations are calling for reforms in inpatient training. This report reviews the available literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and proposes recommendations for improving internal medicine training in this setting. METHOD We searched Medline for articles published between 1966 and August 2004 which focused on internal medicine training interventions in the inpatient setting; bibliographies of Medline-identified articles, as well as articles suggested by experts in the field provided additional citations. We then reviewed, classified, and abstracted only articles where an assessment of learner outcomes was included. RESULTS Thirteen studies of inpatient internal medicine educational interventions were found that included an outcome assessment. All were single institution studies. The majority of these studies was of poor methodological quality and focused on specific content areas of internal medicine. None assessed the effectiveness or impact of internal medicine core inpatient experiences or curriculum. CONCLUSION This review identifies significant gaps in our understanding of what constitutes effective inpatient education. The paucity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to formally define and study what constitutes an effective “core” inpatient curriculum. PMID:16423111

  13. Revising the formal, retrieving the hidden: Undergraduate curricular reform in medicine and the scientific, institutional, & social transformation of the clinical training environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagosh, Justin J.

    2009-12-01

    In 2004, members of the McGill University Faculty of Medicine began implementing a new curriculum for undergraduate medical education entitled, Physicianship: The Physician as Professional and Healer. The initiative underscores the idea that physician training entails cultivating not only scientific knowledge and technical skill, but a mindset guided by intrinsic principles of doctoring. Although the McGill case exemplifies a wide-spread paradigm shift in medical teaching, there is a dearth of analysis concerning the degree of congruency between the objectives of formal undergraduate curricular revision and the so-called 'hidden curriculum' of the hospital training environment. With Physicianship as a point of departure, this dissertation maps evolutionary patterns in clinical medicine and, using qualitative methods, analyzes the perspectives of twenty physician-educators on curricular reform and the transforming clinical training environment. Physicians interviewed were generally supportive of the new curricular initiative. Concerns were raised, however, that many recent changes within the teaching hospital environment interfere with students' cultivation of professional and healer attributes. These changes were organized into three main themes: scientific, institutional, and social. Physicians expressed concern that what is often considered beneficial for patients is often detrimental for medical training. For example, increased use of diagnostic technologies has improved patient care but reduces opportunities for trainees' clinical skill development. Concern was raised that the concept of selfless service has been undermined through recent shift-work regulations and a culture gap between older and younger generation physicians. Alternatively, some perceived new policies of the clinical environment to be more conducive to physicians' self-care and quality of life. Younger trainees were often described as more competent in managing medical information, more open

  14. Nuclear Medicine Training: What Now?

    PubMed

    Mankoff, David; Pryma, Daniel A

    2017-10-01

    Although the multidisciplinary nature of nuclear medicine (NM) and clinical molecular imaging is a key strength of the specialty, the breadth of disciplines involved in the practice of NM creates challenges for education and training. The evolution of NM science and technology-and the practice of clinical molecular imaging and theranostics-has created a need for changes in the approach to specialty training. The broader U.S. community of imaging physicians has been slow to accept this change, in good part due to historical divides between the NM and nuclear radiology (NR) communities. In this Journal of Nuclear Medicine Hot Topics discussion, we review the historical pathways to training; discuss the training needs for the modern practice of NM, clinical molecular imaging, and radionuclide therapy; and suggest a path forward for an approach to training that matches the needs of the evolving clinical specialty. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  15. New aspects on critical care medicine training.

    PubMed

    Grenvik, Ake; Schaefer, John J; DeVita, Michael A; Rogers, Paul

    2004-08-01

    Recently, three fundamental changes have been introduced in medical education, all of particular importance to critical care medicine: (1) clinical teaching and medical practice now emphasize evidence-based medicine, (2) patient safety aspects are increasingly stressed, and (3) use of simulation in medical training is spreading rapidly. In 1999, the disturbingly high frequency of life-threatening or even lethal medical complications was emphasized by the Institute of Medicine in the book To Err Is Human. The Institute of Medicine recommended establishing interdisciplinary team training programs incorporating efficient methods such as simulation. Although simulation has been used by the aviation industry and the military for several decades, only during the past decade has this become a teaching method in medicine. Currently, two full-scale computerized simulators are available: METI, provided by Medical Education Technologies, Sarasota, Florida, and SimMan, manufactured by Laerdal Medical, in Stavanger, Norway. The simulation center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center was established in 1994 and has grown quickly to its current large facility, where, in academic year 2003 to 2004, approximately 8000 healthcare professionals were trained on the SimMan. Courses taught include clinical procedures and decision making in perioperative medicine, acute medicine, pharmacology, anesthesiology, airway management, bronchoscopy, pediatric versus adult crisis management, critical events in obstetrics, and crisis team training. Advantages of simulation training over traditional medical education methods include (1) provision of a safe environment for both patient and student during training in risky procedures, (2) unlimited exposure to rare but complicated and important clinical events, (3) the ability to plan and shape training opportunities rather than waiting for a suitable situation to arise clinically, (4) the ability to provide immediate feedback, (5) the

  16. Accrediting osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    All postdoctoral training programs approved by the American Osteopathic Association are required to be part of an Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution (OPTI) consortium. The author reviews recent activities related to OPTI operations, including the transfer the OPTI Annual Report to an electronic database, revisions to the OPTI Accreditation Handbook, training at the 2010 OPTI Workshop, and new requirements of the American Osteopathic Association Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation. The author also reviews the OPTI accreditation process, cites common commendations and deficiencies for reviews completed from 2008 to 2010, and provides an overview of plans for future improvements.

  17. [Training in tropical medicine in France].

    PubMed

    Touze, Jean-Étienne; Laroche, Roland

    2013-10-01

    Tropical medicine was a key element of the medical structures provided by France to our former colonies and, later; to countries within the scope of our international cooperation. hI recent decades, France has drastically reduced its bilateral commitments to countries in the tropics, and especially in sub-Saharan Africa. At the same time, the teaching of tropical medicine, which was highly regarded even beyond our borders, has lost a good deal of its expertise. Initially available in a few large French centers, and ensured by teachers with extensive field experience, training in tropical medicine is now offered in many universities. However; their programs and educational objectives, focusing mainly on infectious and parasitic diseases, no longer meet the healthcare priorities of southern countries, which are facing an epidemiological transition and the rise of non communicable diseases. Few teachers now have recognized expertise in tropical medicine. These changes have had negative consequences for research programs in tropical medicine and for the image of French assistance to developing countries. In this context, the followving perspectives should be considered: 1) training in tropical medicine should be enhanced by the creation of a national diploma recognized by international bodies. 2) The creation of a doctoral course in tropical medicine is a prerequisite for achieving this goal, and the future diploma must include a significant research component. 3) Teaching in tropical medicine must become more practical and be ensured by teachers with extensive field experience. 4) Training in tropical medicine should be part of a bilateral relationship with countries in the tropics, each party contributing its expertise while respecting that of its partners. 5) Training in tropical medicine should be backed uip by high-level scientific research based on enhanced synergy of our current networks (Institute for Research and Development, Network of overseas Pasteur

  18. Rural family medicine training site

    PubMed Central

    Liskowich, Sarah; Walker, Kathryn; Beatty, Nicolas; Kapusta, Peter; McKay, Shari; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a framework for a successful rural family medicine training program and to assess the potential for a rural family medicine residency training program using the Weyburn and Estevan areas of Saskatchewan as test sites. Design A mixed-method design was used; however, the focus of this article was on the qualitative data collected. Questions formulated for the semistructured interviews evolved from the literature. Setting Rural Saskatchewan. Participants Community physicians and representatives from the Sun Country Regional Health Authority, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Health, and the University of Saskatchewan. Methods The data were documented during the interviews using a laptop computer, and the responses were reviewed with participants at the end of their interviews to ensure accuracy. The qualitative data collected were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Main findings Through the analysis of the data several themes emerged related to implementing a rural family medicine residency training program. Key predictors of success were physical resources, physician champions, physician teachers, educational support, administrative support, and other specialist support. Barriers to the development of a rural family medicine training site were differing priorities, lack of human resources, and lack of physical resources. Conclusion A project of this magnitude requires many people at different levels collaborating to be successful. PMID:26380856

  19. Training pathways for occupational medicine.

    PubMed

    Harber, Philip; Ducatman, Alan

    2006-04-01

    Consider the funding, organization, and applicant pool for occupational medicine residency training positions concerns in the United States. Postgraduate training models are compared for responsiveness to competence and workforce needs, including traditional residency, nontraditional residency, postdoctoral fellowship, extended courses, multiple certificate preparation, continuing medical education, "executive MPH," and implicit education (learning from consultants in the course of practice). Educational models differ in comprehensiveness, crossdisciplinary experience, socialization to core professional values, financial requirements, accessibility to physicians currently in practice, potential number of trainees, and short- and long-term impact on training outcomes. There are tradeoffs between the benefits of comprehensive program standards and the benefit of facilitated training access by reducing barriers or requirements. Recognizing and understanding assumptions about training in our discipline may inform future choices.

  20. OPTImizing osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Thomas; Martinez, Bulmaro

    2009-03-01

    Since 1999, all postdoctoral training programs approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) have been required to be part of an Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution (OPTI) consortium. The AOA is improving OPTI operations by revising the OPTI Annual Report, by providing provisional status for new OPTIs, and by using the Residency Management Suite software program (New Innovations Inc, Uniontown, Ohio). The revised OPTI Annual Report is being modeled after the OPTI Standards Inspectors Worksheet (ie, Standards Crosswalk). Onsite inspections using the new scoring tool in 2008 highlighted OPTI best practices by demonstrating that OPTIs received commendations for faculty and curriculum development. Inspections have also shown that OPTIs with accreditation awards of 4 or 5 years are more likely than other OPTIs to be composed of 4- or 5-year postdoctoral training programs.

  1. Correctional Training. Institution Familiarization. Part II: The Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Prisons (Dept. of Justice), Washington, DC.

    Designed to assist training coordinators in the initial institution familiarization training for new employees in correctional institutions, this manual consists of two documents: a training coordinator's guide (Part I - CE 017 285) and this document, the training program (Part II). Four training areas are treated: (1) an introduction consisting…

  2. How Institutions Respond to Training Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boorman, Andrew

    The impact of the transition to training packages (TPs) on institutionally based training in Australia was examined. Information was gathered from 14 case studies of registered trade organizations (RTOs) delivering qualifications to institutionally based students in TPs in the following areas: administration, beauty therapy, community services,…

  3. Project ASPIRE: Incorporating Integrative Medicine Into Residency Training

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Haq; Via, Christina M.; Ali, Ather; Rosenberger, Lisa D.

    2016-01-01

    Griffin Hospital, a community hospital affiliated with Yale School of Public Health and Yale School of Medicine, received Health Resources and Services Administration funding to strengthen and improve its combined internal medicine and general preventive medicine residency program by incorporating an integrative medicine curriculum. The purpose of project ASPIRE (Advancing Skills of Preventive medicine residents through Integrative medicine Education, Research and Evaluation) was to create, implement, and evaluate a needs-based, innovative training curriculum in integrative medicine. Through this robust new training, the authors aimed to produce preventive medicine-trained physicians with competencies in integrative medicine to collaboratively work with other integrative medicine practitioners in interdisciplinary teams to provide holistic, patient-centered care. The multifaceted collaborative curriculum was composed of didactics, grand rounds, journal club, objective structured clinical examinations, and two new practicum rotations in integrative medicine. The new practicum rotations included block rotations at the Integrative Medicine Center at Griffin Hospital and the Yale Stress Center. Between 2012 and 2014, three cohorts participated in the curriculum; two of these cohorts included three advanced preventive medicine residents each and the fourth included four residents. Project faculty conducted 14 lectures and journal clubs, and two grand rounds. Six of the ten participating residents (60%) completed integrative medicine clinical rotations. Residents’ attitudes toward integrative medicine were evaluated through self-assessment using the Complementary, Alternative, and Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire; data were analyzed in 2015. This article describes the results of this prospective observational study based on single-institution experience over the course of the 2-year project period. PMID:26477907

  4. Teaching evidence-based medicine at complementary and alternative medicine institutions: strategies, competencies, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zwickey, Heather; Schiffke, Heather; Fleishman, Susan; Haas, Mitch; Cruser, des Anges; LeFebvre, Ron; Sullivan, Barbara; Taylor, Barry; Gaster, Barak

    2014-12-01

    As evidence-based medicine (EBM) becomes a standard in health care, it is essential that practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) become experts in searching and evaluating the research literature. In support of this goal, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) provided R25 funding to nine CAM colleges to develop individual programs focused on teaching EBM. An overarching goal of these research education grants has been to provide CAM faculty and students with the skills they need to apply a rigorous evidence-based perspective to their training and practice. This paper reviews the competencies and teaching strategies developed and implemented to enhance research literacy at all nine R25-funded institutions. While each institution designed approaches suitable for its research culture, the guiding principles were similar: to develop evidence-informed skills and knowledge, thereby helping students and faculty to critically appraise evidence and then use that evidence to guide their clinical practice. Curriculum development and assessment included faculty-driven learning activities and longitudinal curricular initiatives to encourage skill reinforcement and evaluate progress. As the field of integrative medicine matures, the NIH-NCCAM research education grants provide essential training for future clinicians and clinician-researchers. Building this workforce will facilitate multidisciplinary collaborations that address the unique needs for research that informs integrative clinical practice.

  5. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine at Complementary and Alternative Medicine Institutions: Strategies, Competencies, and Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Schiffke, Heather; Fleishman, Susan; Haas, Mitch; Cruser, des Anges; LeFebvre, Ron; Sullivan, Barbara; Taylor, Barry; Gaster, Barak

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: As evidence-based medicine (EBM) becomes a standard in health care, it is essential that practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) become experts in searching and evaluating the research literature. In support of this goal, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) provided R25 funding to nine CAM colleges to develop individual programs focused on teaching EBM. An overarching goal of these research education grants has been to provide CAM faculty and students with the skills they need to apply a rigorous evidence-based perspective to their training and practice. Methods/Results: This paper reviews the competencies and teaching strategies developed and implemented to enhance research literacy at all nine R25-funded institutions. While each institution designed approaches suitable for its research culture, the guiding principles were similar: to develop evidence-informed skills and knowledge, thereby helping students and faculty to critically appraise evidence and then use that evidence to guide their clinical practice. Curriculum development and assessment included faculty-driven learning activities and longitudinal curricular initiatives to encourage skill reinforcement and evaluate progress. Conclusion: As the field of integrative medicine matures, the NIH-NCCAM research education grants provide essential training for future clinicians and clinician-researchers. Building this workforce will facilitate multidisciplinary collaborations that address the unique needs for research that informs integrative clinical practice. PMID:25380144

  6. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program: impact and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2009-03-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining National Institutes of Health funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well-developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. We describe the original and revised structure of the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 yrs of training.

  7. Status of general medicine training and education in psychiatry residency.

    PubMed

    Annamalai, Aniyizhai; Rohrbaugh, Robert M; Sernyak, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    With the current emphasis on integrated care, the role of psychiatrists is expanding to either directly provide medical care or coordinate its delivery. The purpose of this study was to survey general psychiatry programs on the extent of general medicine training provided during residency. A short web-based survey was sent to 173 residency program directors to recruit participants for a larger survey. Thirty-seven participants were recruited and surveyed, and of these, 12 (32.4%) responded. The survey assessed the extent of general medicine training and didactics during and after the first postgraduate year and attitudes towards enhancing this training in residency. This study was approved by the local institutional review board. Seventy-five percent of programs require only the minimum 4 months of primary care in the first postgraduate year, and didactics during these months is often not relevant to psychiatry residents. Some programs offer elective didactics on chronic medical conditions in the fourth postgraduate year. Respondents are in favor of enhancing general medicine training in psychiatry but indicate some resistance from their institutions. These results suggest that very few programs require additional clinical training in relevant medical illnesses after the first postgraduate year. Respondents indicated favorable institutional support for enhancing training, but also expected resistance. The reasons for resistance should be an area of future research. Also important is to determine if enhancing medical didactics improves patient care and outcomes. The changing role of psychiatrists entails a closer look at resident curricula.

  8. Interprofessional Integrative Medicine Training for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Thomas, Pauline A; Gould-Fogerite, Susan E; Passannante, Marian R; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2015-11-01

    Integrative medicine training was incorporated into the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Preventive Medicine residency at the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences Newark Campus as a collaboration between the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and the School of Health Related Professions. Beginning in 2012, an interdisciplinary faculty team organized an Integrative Medicine program in a Preventive Medicine residency that leveraged existing resources across Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. The overarching aim of the programs was to introduce residents and faculty to the scope and practice of integrative medicine in the surrounding Newark community and explore evidence-based research on integrative medicine. The faculty team tapped into an interprofessional network of healthcare providers to organize rotations for the preventive medicine residents that reflected the unique nature of integrative medicine in the greater Newark area. Residents provided direct care as part of interdisciplinary teams at clinical affiliates and shadowed health professionals from diverse disciplines as they filled different roles in providing patient care. The residents also participated in research projects. A combination of formal and informal programs on integrative medicine topics was offered to residents and faculty. The Integrative Medicine program, which ran from 2013 through 2014, was successful in exposing residents and faculty to the unique nature of integrative medicine across professions in the community served by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characteristics of pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and training programs.

    PubMed

    Freed, Gary L; Dunham, Kelly M

    2009-03-01

    To explore the structure, components, and training goals of pediatric hospitalist fellowship programs in North America. We constructed a 17-item structured questionnaire to be administered by phone. Questionnaire items focused on documenting goals, training, requirements, and clinical duties of pediatric hospitalist training programs. From February through June 2007, research staff contacted directors of the programs. Responses were analyzed to determine program characteristics, including goals, formal training requirements, clinical rotations, and participation in hospital administrative activities. All 8 training programs completed the survey. There appear to be 2 distinct tracks for pediatric hospitalist training programs: clinical or academic specialization. Currently there are no standards or requirements for fellowship training from an external accrediting body and the curriculum for these programs is likely driven by service requirements and speculation on the needs of a future generation of pediatric hospitalists. The stated goals of the programs were quite similar. Seven reported that the provision of advanced training in the clinical care of hospitalized patients, quality improvement (QI), and hospital administration are central goals of their training program. Six reported training in the education of medical students and residents to be a primary goal, while 5 indicated training in health services research as a primary goal. Pediatric hospitalist fellowships are in the very early stages of their development. In time, greater structure across institutions will need to be put in place if they are to succeed in becoming a necessary prerequisite to the practice of hospital medicine. (c) 2009 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  10. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rosário; Costa, Gracinda

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine in Portugal has been an autonomous speciality since 1984. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, 5 years of training are necessary. The curriculum is very similar to the one approved under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, namely concerning the minimum recommended number of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. There is a final assessment, and during the training the resident is in an approved continuing education programme. Departments are accredited by the Medical College in order to verify their capacity to host nuclear medicine residencies.

  11. A Training Manual for Nuclear Medicine Technologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Guy H.; Alexander, George W.

    This manual was prepared for a training program in Nuclear Medicine Technology at the University of Cincinnati. Instructional materials for students enrolled in these courses in the training program include: Nuclear Physics and Instrumentation, Radionuclide Measurements, Radiation Protection, and Tracer Methodology and Radiopharmaceuticals. (CS)

  12. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  13. Hazardous Materials Emergency Response Training: The Colorado Training Institute. Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Leslie

    The Colorado Training Institute (CTI), established in 1980, is a non-profit, instructional program devoted to promoting hazardous materials safety through education. It has trained over 3,000 emergency response personnel and industry officials and is a unique example of the private and public sectors working together to protect the public from…

  14. Development of an academic training program in insurance medicine.

    PubMed

    Donceel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We outline the aims and content of an inter-university academic training program in insurance medicine in Flanders, Belgium. The program leads to the diploma of "Master of Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise." The program was re-organized in 2005-2006 and is accessible for physicians who want to practice social and/or private insurance medicine as their main medical profession or as an accessory activity. The aim of education is to prepare insurance physicians to provide high quality assessments, advice and decisions. The combined education in both social and private insurance medicine offers a broad perspective on the discipline and promotes collaboration within the specialty. The recent recognition of Insurance Medicine as a medical specialty in Belgium strengthens the position of insurance physicians as they collaborate with other medical specialists and with the management of insurance companies or the social security institute.

  15. Sleep Medicine Training Across the Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There is now a new pathway and examination for sleep medicine, sponsored by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and a number of accredited sleep medicine fellowship programs through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. This review takes an historical approach to discuss the process of education for sleep physiology and disorders not only in the postgraduate period but also at all levels of instruction. In reality, there is a continuum of knowledge that needs to be reinforced up and down the educational system, of which Sleep Medicine subspecialty training is just one part. Although progress has been made at all educational levels up to this point, the future of training and education will depend on a sustained effort at several levels from undergraduate to postgraduate continuing medical education and will be facilitated by professional societies and other specialties who will collectively promote the value of and outcomes for clinical sleep medicine. PMID:21540220

  16. Core curricular elements for fellowship training in international emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Jamil; Rosborough, Stephanie; Bartels, Susan; Lis, Julian; VanRooyen, Michael J; Kapur, G Bobby; Anderson, Philip D

    2010-07-01

    The objective was to describe the common educational goals, curricular elements, and methods of evaluation used in international emergency medicine (IEM) fellowship training programs currently. IEM fellowship programs have been developed to provide formal training for emergency physicians (EPs) interested in pursuing careers in IEM. Those fellowships are variable in scope, objectives, and duration. Previously published articles have suggested a general curriculum structure for IEM fellowships. A search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases from 1950 to June 2008 was performed, combining the terms international, emergency medicine, and fellowship. Online curricula and descriptive materials from IEM fellowships listed by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) were reviewed. Knowledge and skill areas common to multiple programs were organized in discrete categories. IEM fellowship directors were contacted for input and feedback. Eight articles on IEM fellowships were identified. Two articles described a general structure for fellowship curriculum. Sixteen of 20 IEM fellowship programs had descriptive materials posted online. These information sources, plus input from seven fellowship program directors, yielded the following seven discrete knowledge and skill areas: 1) emergency medicine systems development, 2) humanitarian relief, 3) disaster management, 4) public health, 5) travel and field medicine, 6) program administration, and 7) academic skills. While IEM fellowships vary with regard to objectives and structure, this article presents an overview of the current focus of IEM fellowship training curricula that could serve as a resource for IEM curriculum development at individual institutions. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine

  17. Satisfaction with civilian family medicine residency training

    PubMed Central

    Wolfrom, Brent; Hodgetts, Geoff; Kotecha, Jyoti; Pollock, Emily; Martin, Mary; Han, Han; Morissette, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate satisfaction with civilian residency training programs among serving general duty medical officers within the Canadian Armed Forces. Design A 23-item, cross-sectional survey face-validated by the office of the Surgeon General of the Canadian Armed Forces. Setting Canada. Participants General duty medical officers serving in the Canadian Armed Forces as of February 2014 identified through the Directorate of Health Services Personnel of the Canadian Forces Health Services Group Headquarters. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with and time spent in 7 domains of training: trauma, critical care, emergency medicine, psychiatry, occupational health, sports medicine, and base clinic training. Overall preparedness for leading a health care team, caring for a military population, working in isolated and challenging environments, and being deployed were evaluated on a 5-point Likert scale. Results Among the survey respondents (n = 135, response rate 54%), 77% agreed or strongly agreed that their family medicine residency training was relevant to their role as a general duty medical officer. Most respondents were either satisfied or very satisfied with their emergency medicine training (77%) and psychiatry training (63%), while fewer were satisfied or very satisfied with their sports medicine (47%), base clinic (41%), and critical care (43%) training. Even fewer respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with their trauma (26%) and occupational health (12%) training. Regarding overall preparedness, 57% believed that they were adequately prepared to care for a military patient population, and 52% of respondents believed they were prepared for their first posting. Fewer respondents (38%) believed they were prepared to work in isolated, austere, or challenging environments, and even fewer (32%) believed that residency training prepared them to lead a health care team. Conclusion General duty medical officers were satisfied with many aspects of

  18. Canadian rural family medicine training programs

    PubMed Central

    Krupa, Lisa K.; Chan, Benjamin T.B.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To document the proliferation of rural family medicine residency programs and to note differences in design as they affect rural recruitment. DESIGN Descriptive study using semistructured telephone interviews. SETTING All family medicine residency programs in Canada in 2002. PARTICIPANTS Directors of Canadian family medicine residency programs. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of rural training programs and positions; months of rural exposure, degree of remoteness, and specialist support of rural communities within rural training programs. RESULTS The number of rural training programs rose from one in 1973 to 12 in 2002. Most medical schools now offer dedicated rural training streams. From 1989 to 2002, the number of rural residency positions quadrupled from 36 to 144; large jumps in capacity occurred from 1989 to 1991 and then from 1999 to 2001. Rural positions now represent 20% of all family medicine residency positions. Among rural programs, minimum rural exposure ranged from 4 to 12 months, and the median distance between rural training communities and referral sites ranged from 50 to 440 km (median 187 km). Rotations in communities with no hospital were mandatory in five of 12 rural programs, optional in five, and unavailable in two. The proportion of training communities used by rural programs that had family physicians only (ie, no immediate specialty backup) ranged from 0 to 78% (mean 44%). Most training communities (78%) used by rural programs had fewer than 10 000 residents. Four of 12 rural programs offered various specialty medicine rotations in small communities. CONCLUSION Rural residency programs have proliferated in Canada. The percentage of residency positions that are rural now equals the proportion of the general population in Canada living in rural areas. National guidelines for rural programs recommend at least 6 months of rural rotations and at least some training in communities without hospitals. Major variations among programs exist

  19. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A.; Lindeman, Neal I.; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2016-01-01

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today’s trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills. PMID:26751479

  20. Training the Future Leaders in Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mason-Suares, Heather; Sweetser, David A; Lindeman, Neal I; Morton, Cynthia C

    2016-01-07

    The era of personalized medicine has arrived, and with it a need for leaders in this discipline. This generation of trainees requires a cadre of new skill sets to lead the implementation of personalized medicine into mainstream healthcare. Traditional training programs no longer provide trainees with all the skills they will need to optimize implementation of this revolution now underway in medicine. Today's trainees must manage clinical teams, act as clinical and molecular diagnostic consultants, train other healthcare professionals, teach future generations, and be knowledgeable about clinical trials to facilitate genomic-based therapies. To prepare trainees for the transition to junior faculty positions, contemporary genomic training programs must emphasize the development of these management, teaching, and clinical skills.

  1. OSHA Training Institute Catalog of Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Fredric C., Comp.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Training Institute's series of courses for 1978 is presented in this catalog. Most courses are designed for occupational safety or health professionals who are federal or state employees; two are available for personnel from the private sector. The schedule includes courses required for newly hired…

  2. Institute for Training in Libraries, Selected Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian State Univ., Boone, NC.

    At an institute held in July 1970 at Appalachian State University four papers, reproduced here, discussed training in libraries. Louise Giles spoke about planning guidelines in "Planning Community College Library/Learning Resource Centers: The Key is Flexibility." Stephen F. McKeon presents his ideal for a library in "Living Room Library" which…

  3. European survey on training objectives in disaster medicine.

    PubMed

    Delooz, Herman; Debacker, Michel; Moens, Guido; Johannik, Kristien

    2007-02-01

    As part of the I SEE (Interactive Simulation Exercise for Emergencies) project, financially supported by the Leonardo da Vinci Programme 2000-2006 of the European Commission, a study was planned to assess the type of disaster and to establish the tasks to be included in an emergency exercise to be developed, according to the possible target groups, physicians, nurses, ambulance personnel, dispatchers and first responders. A secondary objective was a description of the actual computer-based training situation in the training centres. A study involving different actors or target groups has not yet been conducted. A questionnaire was developed, validated and subsequently distributed to the training centres for the different target groups in the partner countries. Each partner had to contact and interview the person responsible for the training in disaster medicine in the training institution. Data entry and analysis was carried out using the SPSS software on Apple Macintosh. Apart from descriptive statistics of the variables, differences between groups were analysed using analysis of variance and the Kruskal-Wallis test. In 75 questionnaires out of a total of 206, the combination of a major road traffic accident and a chemical accident was indicated as the first choice (36.4%). These priorities were present for the different countries and all target groups. Concerning the medical procedures to be included in the training exercise, the highest priority was given to medical coordination, medical management on site, medical alert procedures, assessment of immediate needs, medical resources management, victim transport and protection and safety procedures. Only minor differences were noted between countries, different target groups and the institutions irrespective of whether they are involved in response in case of a major accident or disaster. With regard to the secondary objective, 27% of the institutions used computer-based training in disaster medicine and, of those

  4. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients.

  5. [Coaching development: specialist training in Intellectual Disability Medicine].

    PubMed

    Ewals, Frans

    2014-01-01

    In the Netherlands the specialization Intellectual Disability Medicine started in 2000. The main reasons for its existence are the unmet health needs of people with intellectual disability. The discipline has developed rapidly, from general practitioner-plus to a specialist in comorbidity next to the general practitioner. The specialization takes 3 years. Training hospitals can be found all over the Netherlands. The trainees follow the weekly educational activities at the national training institute that is linked to the Erasmus Medical Centre in Rotterdam. Given the great diversity of health questions that specialists in intellectual disability medicine (Dutch acronym: AVGs) have to deal with in their training, aside from clinical issues, a lot of attention is devoted to such topics as how to work methodically, medical-ethical questions and network development. About 220 AVGs are currently registered.

  6. Future directions in training zoological medicine veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, James W; Miller, R Eric

    2006-01-01

    The American College of Zoological Medicine (ACZM) is dedicated to excellence in furthering the health and well-being of both captive and free-ranging wild animals. Currently there are 14 ACZM-approved residency programs in zoological medicine. In addition, eight non-approved residencies and 15 internships in North America provide training opportunities in this field. This article outlines some of the training opportunities for both veterinary students and graduate veterinarians that would best position them for entry into a zoological medicine training program. Although there is a growing number of opportunities for individuals to serve in captive and free-ranging wildlife health positions, existing training programs are inadequate to meet these needs. It is also acknowledged that there is an increasing number of veterinary students entering veterinary schools with an interest in zoological medicine and that the job market is still limited. However, positions and opportunities in zoological medicine are available for those individuals with the drive, dedication, and passion to succeed.

  7. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  8. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... technician, medical records administrator, physical therapist or dental technician shall be assessed as... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other than residencies in podiatric medicine), dental residencies, and osteopathic internships...

  9. Pediatric training in emergency medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, S; Fleisher, G; Henretig, F; Ruddy, R

    1982-04-01

    Endorsed emergency medicine (EM) residency programs were surveyed as to the nature and extent of training they provided in pediatric emergency care (PEC). In the surveys returned (82%) there were several important findings. The amount of time in PEC training was generally two months per year of training. This accounted for 16% of training time. However, the volume of pediatric patients was 25% of the overall patient population. There was wide variation in the sites of PEC training. Didactic sessions often did not cover even core topics. The training program directors were equally divided in their satisfaction with this aspect of their programs. Changes were recommended by 80% of the directors. Changes most often suggested were increasing pediatric patient exposure and obtaining PEC specialists as trainers.

  10. Internal medicine residency training and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C H; Rich, E C; Hillson, S D; Wilson, J F

    1997-06-01

    To review the impact of the clinical education of internal medicine residents on patients' outcomes. English-language studies of the relation between internal medicine housestaff training and patients' outcomes were systematically identified by a MEDLINE search and from bibliographies and reference lists of recently published articles. We hypothesized that the primary impact of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes would be the result of: (1) the inexperience of the residents; (2) the heavy workload these inexperienced residents are expected to manage: or (3) some structural feature of the internal medicine teaching services, such as the discontinuity of patient care inherent in night float systems and the fact that residents rotate to different services each month. We also hypothesized that residents may in may ways provide superior care, and many actually improve certain patient outcomes. Housestaff inexperience, workload, and structural features that promote discontinuity have been shown to affect especially outcomes of resource utilization, length of stay, and patient satisfaction. No study has demonstrated that internal medicine residents contribute to excess patient morbidity or mortality. However, the published studies in this area are for the most part retrospective and were conducted 10 to 15 years ago. The full extent of the untoward (or the beneficial) effects of internal medicine residency training on patients' outcomes is unknown. Multisite, prospective studies would remedy the deficiencies in the published research in this area and would yield the most valid insight into the range and extent of the effects of housestaff training on patients' outcomes. In the absence of such studies and in a rapidly changing managed care environment, academic medical centers and departments of medicine need to be aware of those aspects of the clinical education of residents that are most likely to affect patients' outcomes.

  11. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses, and... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other...) of this section. If the course is not so accredited such practical or on-the-job training or...

  12. Trends in American nuclear medicine training: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, E B

    2000-07-01

    As soon as the capability to produce radioactive atoms was achieved in the 1930s, physician-scientists gravitated as apprentices toward important research centers, such as those at Berkeley, Washington University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.)/Massachusetts General Hospital. After World War II, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) trained many of the founders of the specialty of nuclear medicine. The initial ORAU preparatory course lasted only 3 weeks. Over the 20 years after World War II, only 100 to 200 physicians had learned radioisotopic techniques and their clinical applications from their older preceptors. The founding of the conjoint American Board of Nuclear Medicine in 1971 (cosponsored by the American Boards of Internal Medicine, Pathology, and Radiology) marked a new era in certifying the quality of graduates of a growing number of nuclear medicine residency programs. Future trends in nuclear medicine education include the following: greater availability of jobs for physicians with board certification in radiology and nuclear medicine; an increased emphasis on training in positron-emission tomography (PET); and recertification and documentation of maintenance of professional competence as certainties.

  13. Behavioral Medicine Training in Postdoctoral Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Peter B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Carolinas Medical Center (North Carolina) initiated a behavioral training program for general practice dental residents to develop skills in handling patient anxiety/stress, obesity, and depression. The program includes monthly seminars, a clinical rotation in behavioral medicine with additional related seminars, and a month-long clinical rotation…

  14. Community-Oriented Training in Family Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ouchterlony, David P.

    1991-01-01

    Family medicine educators are challenged by the need to introduce community experiences into residency training programs. This paper describes one inner-city program's preliminary efforts to join with community-oriented health service agencies in the development of meaningful educational experiences and discusses problems and possible solutions. Imagesp1622-a PMID:21228976

  15. Behavioral Medicine Training in Postdoctoral Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, Peter B.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Carolinas Medical Center (North Carolina) initiated a behavioral training program for general practice dental residents to develop skills in handling patient anxiety/stress, obesity, and depression. The program includes monthly seminars, a clinical rotation in behavioral medicine with additional related seminars, and a month-long clinical rotation…

  16. Evidence-based medicine Training: Kazakhstan experience.

    PubMed

    Kamalbekova, G; Kalieva, M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine is of vital importance for improving quality of care, promoting public health and health system development. Understanding principles of evidence-based medicine allows using the most powerful information source, which have ever existed in medicine. To evaluate the effectiveness of teaching Evidence-Based Medicine, including long-term outcomes of training. The study was conducted at the Medical University of Astana, where the Scientific and Educational Center of Evidence-Based Medicine was established in 2010 with the help of the corresponding project of the World Bank. The participants of the study were the faculty trained in Evidence-Based Medicine at the workshop "Introduction to Evidence-Based Medicine" for the period of 2010-2015 years. There were a total of 16 workshops during the period, and 323 employees were trained. All participants were asked to complete our questionnaire two times: before the training - pre-training (to determine the initial level of a listener) and after the training - post-training (to determine the acquired level and get the feedback). Questionnaires were prepared in such a way, that the majority of questions before and after training were identical. Thus, it provided a clear picture of the effectiveness of training. Questions in the survey were open-ended so that the respondents had the opportunity to freely and fully express their views. The main part of the questionnaires included the following questions: "Do you understand what evidence-based medicine is", "how do you understand what the study design means", "what is randomization", "how research is classified", "do you know the steps of decision-making according to Evidence-Based Medicine, list them", "what literature do you prefer to use when searching for information (print, electronic, etc.)", "what resources on the Internet do you prefer to use". Only 30-35% of respondents gave correct answers to the questions on

  17. Aspects of higher training in emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, D

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To devise and develop a structured questionnaire addressing important issues relating to specialist registrar training in emergency medicine in the UK, and to then administer this questionnaire nationally to higher trainees in order to establish current practice and opinion regarding those issues. Methods: Informal interviews with current trainees were undertaken to identify themes which might be of wider importance in relation to training. The transcriptions were incorporated into a discussion questionnaire which was circulated to other trainees and to members of the Joint Committee on Higher Training in Accident and Emergency. A postal survey was developed from this draft and distributed to all trainees currently registered with the Faculty of Accident and Emergency Medicine. Results: The response rate was 75%. Collective responses to certain aspects of training are demonstrated in order to reflect current practice and opinion among UK specialist registrars and to allow further debate. Conclusion: Development of a structured questionnaire allows issues in relation to training in emergency medicine to be assessed. The findings of the survey allow national data to be presented which will be of interest to trainees and trainers in the UK as well as overseas. PMID:12954958

  18. Training in addiction medicine in Australia.

    PubMed

    Haber, Paul S; Murnion, Bridin P

    2011-04-01

    Barriers to entering addiction medicine (AM) have led to a persisting workforce shortage. To address this problem, the Chapter of Addiction Medicine (AChAM) was formed in 2001 as a subdivision of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Through consultation, AChAM has identified the scope of practice and offered fellowship to suitable established practitioners. The Chapter successfully applied to the Australian Government for recognition of AM as a medical specialty, which was finalized in November 2009. Specialist reimbursement item numbers were incorporated into that decision process and commence operating in November 2010. AChAM has designed and implemented a training scheme using a model similar to that of the RACP internal medicine training program. This comprises 3 years of basic general medical training post internship followed by 3 years of discipline-specific supervised training. The training is broadly based, with experience in both ambulatory care and inpatient care, and including physical health as well as mental health. Assessment is continuous and competency based. There is no exit examination. The overriding clinical approach rests upon the harm minimization framework consistent with long-established national drug policy in Australia and favors evidence-based treatment.

  19. Osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions' 2014 annual report.

    PubMed

    Biszewski, Maura; Ball, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    In 2013, the Board of Trustees of the American Osteopathic Association approved the new mission and vision statements of osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions (OPTIs) to ensure that OPTIs were operating effectively as academic sponsors of osteopathic graduate medical education. Since then, OPTIs have made substantial strides in meeting and exceeding the new mandates. The authors discuss the revised OPTI accreditation standards, the OPTI annual report, and recent activities.

  20. Osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions and academic sponsorship.

    PubMed

    Biszewski, Maura

    2013-04-01

    Since July 2012, all osteopathic graduate medical education programs approved by the American Osteopathic Association are academically sponsored by an Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution (OPTI). The author reviews recent activities related to OPTI operations, including OPTI historical data and academic sponsorship changes, revisions to the OPTI Accreditation Handbook, and the 2012 OPTI Workshop. The author also summarizes the new OPTI Mission and Vision Statements, examines OPTI governance, and cites common commendations and deficiencies for reviews completed from 2008 to 2012.

  1. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... approved as institutional training or on-job training. 21.4265 Section 21.4265 Pensions, Bonuses, and... training or on-job training. (a) Medical-dental internships and residencies. (1) Medical residencies (other... an affiliated hospital, clinic, laboratory, or medical center as a part of a medical or...

  2. [Training in internal medicine and its specialties: universities' proposals].

    PubMed

    Norero, C

    1996-04-01

    Medical School graduates can enter a medicine subspecialty training program upon completion of a 3 year Internal Medicine residency. The Ministry of Health has contributed to postgraduate training by defining the type of physician the country needs, and by financial support of specially (Internal Medicine) training. Before 1995, when applicants began being charged a fee, finding for subspecialty training was provided exclusively by the universities. Currently, 450 training post are available for 550 graduates from all medical schools. Of these, 59 are in Internal Medicine and 58 in its subspecialties. A quantitative analysis of 40 years of training programs in Internal Medicine by the traditional medical schools shows that only the Catholic University of Chile Medical School privileges subspecially training whereas all other schools favor general Internal Medicine training. A high number of Internal Medicine trainees never take final examination. Nevertheless, training through practice, not necessarily in a university setting, accounts for 67% of Autonomous National Corporation for Certification of Medical Specialties. CONACEM accredited subspecialists. About 63% of those who finish an Internal Medicine training program decide to go into subspecialization. It is felt that subspecialization involves technical as well as non-professional aspects, such as a philosophical stance towards the search for truth through research and creativity. An integral education in a subspecialty can only be given by the university. Non-university centers, however, can contribute to subspecialization by allowing trainees to gain access to newer technology or to larger numbers of patients. A critical question is how many subspecialists should exist in relation to the number of generalists and according to the country's health requirements. In my personal view, the proportion of subspecialists is excessive. The decision to subspecialize should not be exclusively a personal choice, but

  3. Nuclear medicine technologist training in European countries.

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-08-01

    This article overviews the training of nuclear medicine technologists in chosen European countries, the United States and Canada. There are basically two types of training: at medical schools following secondary school, without any university degree, usually on a 2- or 3-year basis, or else as a university course, leading to a BSc degree after 3 years, and in some countries to an MSc degree after an additional 2 years. In the United States both systems coexist, while in Europe the picture varies from country to country. The number of hours devoted to nuclear medicine also varies between curricula. Some efforts are being made to unify this system by transition to the university model of education in many European countries.

  4. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    PubMed

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  5. Training in intensive care medicine. A challenge within reach.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Ortega, A; Rothen, H U; Franco, N; Rayo, L A; Martín-Loeches, I; Ramírez, P; Cuñat de la Hoz, J

    2014-01-01

    The medical training model is currently immersed in a process of change. The new paradigm is intended to be more effective, more integrated within the healthcare system, and strongly oriented towards the direct application of knowledge to clinical practice. Compared with the established training system based on certification of the completion of a series or rotations and stays in certain healthcare units, the new model proposes a more structured training process based on the gradual acquisition of specific competences, in which residents must play an active role in designing their own training program. Training based on competences guarantees more transparent, updated and homogeneous learning of objective quality, and which can be homologated internationally. The tutors play a key role as the main directors of the process, and institutional commitment to their work is crucial. In this context, tutors should receive time and specific formation to allow the evaluation of training as the cornerstone of the new model. New forms of objective summative and training evaluation should be introduced to guarantee that the predefined competences and skills are effectively acquired. The free movement of specialists within Europe is very desirable and implies that training quality must be high and amenable to homologation among the different countries. The Competency Based training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe program is our main reference for achieving this goal. Scientific societies in turn must impulse and facilitate all those initiatives destined to improve healthcare quality and therefore specialist training. They have the mission of designing strategies and processes that favor training, accreditation and advisory activities with the government authorities.

  6. 38 CFR 21.4265 - Practical training approved as institutional training or on-job training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Practical training... Administration of Educational Assistance Programs Courses § 21.4265 Practical training approved as institutional... objective of practical nurse, practical trained nurse, or licensed practical nurse will be assessed...

  7. Building institutional capacity for diversity and inclusion in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daryl G

    2012-11-01

    Today, most agree that the health care system in the United States is in need of reform and that existing health disparities have huge implications for both that system and society as a whole. As a result, academic medicine has come to play a central role in addressing health disparities in a pluralistic society. Today, diversity is no longer a projection; it is a reality. Yet, most diversity efforts continue to run parallel to core institutional processes, rather than as part of the mission of the institution. Researchers agree that, to promote a healthy and vital society, leaders in academic medicine must create institutions that can serve diverse populations. To do so, they must first increase their institutional capacity for diversity. This article outlines the next generation of work on diversity and inclusion, drawing on a broad body of research and practice to identify some of the key elements for building the kind of institutional capacity necessary for sustained change in academic medicine, including a deeper engagement of mission, one that considers diversity as core to excellence; an inclusive and differentiated understanding of diversity institutionally; alignment and intentionality with respect to key institutional elements; key metrics associated with success and a serious process to monitor progress; and the identification of diverse talent for leadership at all levels.

  8. Communication skills training for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Orhan; Ak, Mehmet; Sutcigil, Levent; Congologlu, Emel Dovyap; Canbaz, Hayri; Kilic, Erden; Ozmenler, Kamil Nahit

    2012-02-01

    To determine the effects of a communication skills training program on emergency medicine residents and patient satisfaction. Twenty emergency medicine residents attended a 6-week psychoeducation program that was intended to improve their communication skills. The first three sessions of the psychoeducation program consisted of theoretical education on empathy and communication. Other sessions covered awareness, active communication, and empathic skills on a cognitive behavioral basis using discussion, role play, and homework within an interactive group. The effects of the program were assessed using a communication skills scale, empathy scale, and patient satisfaction survey and were reflected by the reduction in the number of undesirable events between doctors and patients in the emergency department. The mean communication skills score increased from 178.7±19 to 189.2±16 after training (P<0.02). Empathy score also increased from 29.5±9 to 30.7±8, but this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.1). The patient satisfaction survey of 576 patients demonstrated increased scores on confidence in the doctor (88.2±14.6-93.6±10.3; P<0.01); the doctor's respect, kindness, and thoughtfulness (90.3±10.8-94.1±16.5; P<0.01); individualized attention (86.7±9.4-93.9±11.1; P<0.01); devotion of adequate time to listening (88.6±12.3-90.8±14.1; P=0.04); and counseling and information delivery (90.1±11.3-92.2±11.7; P=0.02). The number of undesirable events between doctors and patients decreased 75% from 12 to three. Participation in a communication skills training program was associated with improved communication skills of emergency medicine residents, increased patient satisfaction, and decreased complaints.

  9. Simmel's dynamic social medicine: new questions for studying medical institutions?

    PubMed

    Menchik, Daniel A

    2014-04-01

    Over the last half century, changes in the structure of medicine have shifted the relationship between the profession of medicine and social institutions. In this paper, I uncover ideas for retheorizing this relationship by analyzing a review by Georg Simmel that has been previously overlooked. In an analytical overview and critical appraisal of Simmel's text, I argue that he considered preventative medical knowledge more influential when this knowledge is located outside the physician-patient relationship. Simmel suggests we need to identify how such knowledge is injected into medical and non-medical settings by the mixtures of professional-, market-, and state-based institutions governing medicine, and pay attention to how these institutions shift. His goals show continuity with a social medicine movement in Germany previously thought to be stalled, and are unique too in their focus on targeting institutions over individuals. Through a close analysis of Simmel's ideas, we can see the relationship of public health with social structural studies of medicine in theoretically innovative ways.

  10. Training Standards Statements of Family Medicine Postgraduate Training – A Review of Existing Documents Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Sarah; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Marquard, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For the effective and safe management of complex care needs for patients in community settings, high quality family medicine (FM) training programmes are needed. In less primary care oriented countries, training standards statements for FM postgraduate training are less commonly found. The aim of this study was to review international training standards statements in FM postgraduate training and to catalogue these statements to be used as a best practice standard guide for FM training programs in Germany. Materials and Methods A structured three-tiered search was performed: a systematic literature search in MEDLINE®; a search of international indicator databases; and a search in grey literature, consisting of a survey of international experts and a search in “Google (Scholar)”. From all identified documents, training standards statements were extracted, translated and summarized into categories referring to the same quality aspect. Results The search strategy revealed 25 relevant documents (MEDLINE® n = 15, databases n = 2, experts n = 7, “Google” n = 1), containing 337 training standards statements. These were summarized into 80 statements. They covered structure quality (n = 35); process quality (n = 43); and two training standards statements referred to outcome quality (n = 2). Conclusion A broad range of internationally sourced training standards statements for FM postgraduate training could be identified from countries with well-established primary care systems. Only few statements internationally referred to outcome quality, expressing the difficulty in assessing outcome. The resulting inventory of training standards statements for FM postgraduate training can serve as a resource for institutions seeking to formalise and systematise FM training at regional or national levels. PMID:27459714

  11. Development of cell therapy medicinal products by academic institutes.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Sofieke; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Herberts, Carla; Lowdell, Mark; Hildebrandt, Martin; Zandvliet, Maarten; Meij, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    In the rapidly evolving fields of cellular immunotherapy, gene therapy and regenerative medicine, a wide range of promising cell therapy medicinal products are in clinical development. Most products originate from academic research and are explored in early exploratory clinical trials. However, the success rate toward approval for regular patient care is disappointingly low. In this paper, we define strengths and hurdles applying to the development of cell therapy medicinal products in academic institutes, and analyze why only a few promising cell therapies have reached late-stage clinical development. Subsequently, we provide recommendations to stakeholders involved in development of cell therapies to exploit their potential clinical benefit.

  12. [Autopsies for anatomical teaching and training in clinical forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Hammer, U; Blaas, V; Büttner, A; Philipp, M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical forensic medicine does not only entail examination of patients after physical violence but also the option of clinical autopsies, e.g. after non-notifiable complications of medical interventions, after fatalities closely following medical interventions or fatalities as a result of injuries when the public prosecutor decides not to order a medicolegal autopsy. Based on this routine the Institute of Forensic Medicine at the University of Rostock offers a training course in topographical anatomy to physicians for further training in interventional and surgical disciplines. At the beginning of autopsies the participants can explore the approaches of interventional puncture techniques as well as surgical techniques and the basic topographical anatomy in small groups of 2-4 persons under the supervision of forensic examiners. The format is essentially oriented to the early further training period but fulfils the requirements for the exploration of complex operative techniques. The course was adapted for physicians and offered separately to students. The explorations are performed manually or by support with autopsy instruments. The courses offer an ideal room for individual, discipline-specific topics and result in a great benefit for all participants. A statistical assessment can only be achieved with a larger number of participants. Making autopsy rooms available for teaching and further training represents an additional feature to the profile of clinical forensic medicine. Lessons in topographical anatomy provide a great benefit for patient safety. It seems to be important to offer the opportunity to address individual interests in a closed meeting to consolidate skills and abilities in a non-judgemental environment. The post-mortem examiners have to ensure that the autopsy is carried out lege artis. Basic ethical principles and all regulations from an accredited scope have to be adhered to.

  13. Cultural Competency Training in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, Oren J; Dubosh, Nicole M; Rosen, Carlo L; Landry, Alden M

    2017-07-01

    The Emergency Department is widely regarded as the epicenter of medical care for diverse and largely disparate types of patients. Physicians must be aware of the cultural diversity of their patient population to appropriately address their medical needs. A better understanding of residency preparedness in cultural competency can lead to better training opportunities and patient care. The objective of this study was to assess residency and faculty exposure to formal cultural competency programs and assess future needs for diversity education. A short survey was sent to all 168 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education program directors through the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors listserv. The survey included drop-down options in addition to open-ended input. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were used to analyze data. The response rate was 43.5% (73/168). Of the 68.5% (50/73) of residency programs that include cultural competency education, 90% (45/50) utilized structured didactics. Of these programs, 86.0% (43/50) included race and ethnicity education, whereas only 40.0% (20/50) included education on patients with limited English proficiency. Resident comfort with cultural competency was unmeasured by most programs (83.6%: 61/73). Of all respondents, 93.2% (68/73) were interested in a universal open-source cultural competency curriculum. The majority of the programs in our sample have formal resident didactics on cultural competency. Some faculty members also receive cultural competency training. There are gaps, however, in types of cultural competency training, and many programs have expressed interest in a universal open-source tool to improve cultural competency for Emergency Medicine residents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Approaching the evidence basis for aviation-derived teamwork training in medicine.

    PubMed

    Zeltser, Marina V; Nash, David B

    2010-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine has suggested that training in team behavior, leadership, communication, and other human factors could reduce medical errors and improve patient safety. Training on such topics has been adapted from teamwork training programs used in military and commercial aviation, called crew resource management (CRM). The principles behind CRM programs have been deployed in a number of clinical settings over the past 2 decades, and there are now several CRM vendors. Little is known about this nascent industry, and the emerging research supporting CRM programs lacks standardization and conclusive evidence. The objectives of this study were to report on the body of empirical data about CRM training in clinical settings and to provide a conceptual framework for evaluating its effectiveness in medicine. Using the proposed conceptual framework, the authors further examine currently published methods of measuring effectiveness and identify future directions for the use of teamwork training in medicine.

  15. [Guideline 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions'].

    PubMed

    Westra, Michel; de Haan, Hein A; Arends, Marleen T; van Everdingen, Jannes J E; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the policy on care for prisoners who are addicted to opiates is still heterogeneous. The recent guidelines entitled 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions' should contribute towards unambiguous and more evidence-based treatment for this group. In addition, it should improve and bring the care pathways within judicial institutions and mainstream healthcare more into line with one another. Each rational course of medicinal treatment will initially be continued in the penal institution. In penal institutions the help on offer is mainly focused on abstinence from illegal drugs while at the same time limiting the damage caused to the health of the individual user. Methadone is regarded at the first choice for maintenance therapy. For patient safety, this is best given in liquid form in sealed cups of 5 mg/ml once daily in the morning. Recently a combination preparation containing buprenorphine and naloxone - a complete opiate antagonist - has become available. On discontinuation of opiate maintenance treatment intensive follow-up care is necessary. During this period there is considerable risk of a potentially lethal overdose. Detoxification should be coupled with psychosocial or medicinal intervention aimed at preventing relapse. Naltrexone is currently the only available opiate antagonist for preventing relapse. In those addicted to opiates, who also take benzodiazepines without any indication, it is strongly recommended that these be reduced and discontinued. This can be achieved by converting the regular dosage into the equivalent in diazepam and then reducing this dosage by a maximum of 25% a week.

  16. Introducing the Institute of Physics in Engineering and Medicine (IPEM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevil, Stephen F.

    2014-04-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology is one of three journals owned by the UK based Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), along with Physiological Measurement and Medical Engineering and Physics. IPEM is a charity and journal revenues are a vital part of our income stream. By subscribing to our journals, you are helping to support the work of IPEM, so you may be interested to learn more about who we are and what we do. IPEM aims to advance physics and engineering applied to medicine and biology for the public good. Our membership comprises over 4000 physicists, engineers and technologists working in healthcare, academia and industry. Most of our work depends on these members generously volunteering their expert knowledge and extensive experience to work in the following areas. Promoting research and innovation Along with the scientific journals mentioned above, we also regularly produce scientific reports. There are currently 40 IPEM reports in print, as well as reference books such as The Gamma Camera—A Comprehensive Guide and the recently published Physicists and Physicians: A History of Medical Physics from the Renaissance to Röntgen. Publishing is just one way in which we encourage R&D and increase the uptake of new knowledge and innovations. We also support scientific conferences, such as the International Conference on Medical Physics 50th anniversary meeting, which we hosted in 2013 on behalf of the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP). This four-day event explored the contribution that physics and engineering can make to healthcare and showcased the latest developments via 312 international speakers, 212 posters and an exhibition. Our awards, travel bursaries and grants enable us to facilitate, recognize and reward the work of our members. In 2012 we awarded almost #95 000 (around 155 000) this way. Championing the sector IPEM provides a unified voice with which to represent the views of our membership and raise the

  17. Determining Factors of Students' Satisfaction with Malaysian Skills Training Institutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Mohd Zuhdi; Ab Rahman, Mohd Nizam; Yasin, Ruhizan M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine students' perception of quality of service offered in Malaysian skills training institutes and how it influences overall satisfaction. This study employed a questionnaire survey involving seven skills training institutes in Klang Valley, Malaysia. From 600 questionnaires distributed, 419 were returned (69.8…

  18. Breath Examiner Specialist Instructor Training Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap and Associates, Inc., Darien, CT.

    Five regional training institutes were held in the spring of 1972 to develop a cadre to teach the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration curriculum package, "Basic Training Program for Breath Examiner Specialist." Emphasis of the institutes was on the development of teaching skills, rather than breath testing skills. Enrollees…

  19. A transatlantic comparison of training in emergency medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, J P; Weber, J E

    1998-01-01

    The system of training in accident and emergency (A&E) medicine in the United Kingdom is at a critical and much earlier stage of development than in the United States. Transatlantic comparison offers the opportunity to explore possible ways of improving training in the United Kingdom. Comparison revealed deficiencies in the UK training system in the following: prehospital care training, formal theoretical teaching, close supervision in a clinical setting, and in-service training examinations. Implementation of measures designed to address these deficiencies would enhance UK training in A&E medicine. PMID:9639180

  20. Training the next generation of providers in addiction medicine.

    PubMed

    Rasyidi, Ernest; Wilkins, Jeffery N; Danovitch, Itai

    2012-06-01

    Within the United States there exists a profound discrepancy between the significant public health problem of substance abuse and the access to treatment for addicted individuals. Part of the insufficient access to treatment is a function of relatively low levels or professional experts in addiction medicine. Part of the low levels of professional addiction experts is the result of inadequate addiction medicine training of medical students and residents. This article outlines deficits in addiction medicine training among medical students and residents, yet real change in the addiction medicine training process will always be subject to the complexity of producing alterations across multiple credentialing institutions as well as the keen competition between educators for “more time” for their particular subject. Other hurdles include the broad-based issue of stigma regarding alcoholism and other substance abuse that likely impact all systems that regulate physician addiction medicine training. As noted in the discussion of psychiatry residency, even psychiatry residents manifest stigma regarding substance abusing patients. Five currently active processes may allow for fundamental change to the inertia in physician addiction medicine training while also potentially impacting stigma: 1. We appear to be at the beginning of the integration of addiction into traditional medicine through the formation of a legitimized addiction medicine subspecialty. 2. The training of primary care trainees and practitioners in the use of SBIRT is accelerating, thus creating another process of addiction integration into traditional medicine. 3. The PCMH is being established as a model for primary care 4. The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA) became effective for group health care plan years beginning on or after July 1, 2010; thereby, substance abuse benefits and cost are to be the same as general medical or surgical

  1. Evolution of nuclear medicine training: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michael M; Metter, Darlene F

    2007-02-01

    Since the official inception of nuclear medicine in 1971, the practice of nuclear medicine and its training programs have undergone major revisions. Numerous procedures that were common in the 1970s are no longer available, and many new radiotracers and procedures have since been developed. Training programs have evolved from an unstructured experience before 1971 to 2 y of nuclear medicine training after 2 clinical years, to 2 y of nuclear medicine training after 1 clinical year and, most recently, to 3 y of nuclear medicine training after 1 clinical year. The most substantial content changes in the new 2007 training program requirements are an increased emphasis on 6 clinical competencies, an increased emphasis on Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements, and a new CT training requirement that was spawned by the advent of PET/CT. In addition to the new training program requirements, residents will need to become familiar with the concept of maintenance of certification, which will continue to be an important component of their professional careers. Nuclear medicine is gradually evolving into molecular imaging. Hence, it is inevitable that in the near future, training programs will be required to place greater emphasis on molecular imaging in both clinical and research applications. The incorporation of molecular imaging will represent a significant paradigm shift for the specialty but will ensure that nuclear medicine will be a major part of medical practice for the foreseeable future.

  2. Length of training debate in family medicine: idealism versus realism?

    PubMed

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-06-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by "decompressing" the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates.

  3. Length of Training Debate in Family Medicine: Idealism Versus Realism?

    PubMed Central

    Orientale, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    How long a resident must train to achieve competency is an ongoing debate in medicine. For family medicine, there is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)–approved proposal to examine the benefits of lengthening family medicine training from 3 to 4 years. The rationale for adding another year of residency in family medicine has included the following: (1) overcoming the effect of the duty hour limits in further reducing educational opportunities, (2) reversing the growing number of first-time takers of the American Board of Family Medicine primary board who fail to pass the exam, (3) enhancing the family medicine training experience by “decompressing” the ever-growing number of Residency Review Committee requirements to maintain accreditation, and (4) improving the overall quality of family medicine graduates. PMID:24404258

  4. Integrating abortion training into family medicine residency programs.

    PubMed

    Dehlendorf, Christine; Brahmi, Dalia; Engel, David; Grumbach, Kevin; Joffe, Carole; Gold, Marji

    2007-05-01

    Family physicians provide many office-based procedures in primary care settings. While first-trimester abortion is a procedure appropriate for and performed by family physicians, few residency programs offer routine training in this skill. This study explored the experience of residency programs that have initiated or are in the process of initiating required abortion training. Faculty members responsible for abortion training curricula in identified programs completed questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Faculty members from nine programs with required training and seven programs interested in initiating this training were included in the study. Factors that assisted in curriculum development included the support of family medicine and obstetrician-gynecologist faculty. Commonly encountered challenges included the need for dedicated resources, inter-specialty conflict, and limited access to training sites. Family medicine programs can be successful at developing required abortion training. Collaboration with colleagues inside and outside the family medicine department and with receptive training sites will benefit programs interested in such.

  5. International Health Experiences in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Porter, Maribeth; Mims, Lisa; Garven, Chad; Gavin, Jennifer; Carek, Peter; Diaz, Vanessa

    2016-02-01

    International health experiences (IHEs) have been associated with improved clinical skills, altruistic attitudes, cross-cultural sensitivity, and exposure to community medicine for residents and medical students. Although an increasing number of family medicine residencies offer IHEs, there are currently no standardized competencies or guidelines for developing IHEs. The aim of this study was to examine the content of IHEs in order to provide an overview of the current landscape of global health training in family medicine residency programs. Residency programs self-identifying as offering IHEs on the American Medical Association's (AMA) FREIDA Online website were emailed an electronic survey with questions regarding IHE characteristics, resident selection criteria, faculty support, motivations for participation, challenges to implementation, and funding. Of the 153 programs that responded, 84% still offered IHEs. Most IHEs are 3--4 weeks (71.1%) and are funded by the resident (74.2%). Faculty from the resident's department or institution generally provide supervision (76.6%) and have undergone some type of specialized training in global health (65.6%). Being in good academic standing was the most important eligibility criteria for residents participating in an IHE (86.7%), and funding was reported as the most challenging aspect (62.5%) of offering IHEs. IHEs are increasing in number and receiving more funding, but the experiences are variable among residency programs. While most program directors believe residents participate in IHEs to gain exposure with underserved populations, only a small percentage (5.5%) include a commitment to community service as part of a requirement for participation in an IHE.

  6. Extended family medicine training: Measuring training flows at a time of substantial pedagogic change.

    PubMed

    Slade, Steve; Ross, Shelley; Lawrence, Kathrine; Archibald, Douglas; Mackay, Maria Palacios; Oandasan, Ivy F

    2016-12-01

    To examine trends in family medicine training at a time when substantial pedagogic change is under way, focusing on factors that relate to extended family medicine training. Aggregate-level secondary data analysis based on the Canadian Post-MD Education Registry. Canada. All Canadian citizens and permanent residents who were registered in postgraduate family medicine training programs within Canadian faculties of medicine from 1995 to 2013. Number and proportion of family medicine residents exiting 2-year and extended (third-year and above) family medicine training programs, as well as the types and numbers of extended training programs offered in 2015. The proportion of family medicine trainees pursuing extended training almost doubled during the study period, going from 10.9% in 1995 to 21.1% in 2013. Men and Canadian medical graduates were more likely to take extended family medicine training. Among the 5 most recent family medicine exit cohorts (from 2009 to 2013), 25.9% of men completed extended training programs compared with 18.3% of women, and 23.1% of Canadian medical graduates completed extended training compared with 13.6% of international medical graduates. Family medicine programs vary substantially with respect to the proportion of their trainees who undertake extended training, ranging from a low of 12.3% to a high of 35.1% among trainees exiting from 2011 to 2013. New initiatives, such as the Triple C Competency-based Curriculum, CanMEDS-Family Medicine, and Certificates of Added Competence, have emerged as part of family medicine education and credentialing. In acknowledgment of the potential effect of these initiatives, it is important that future research examine how pedagogic change and, in particular, extended training shapes the care family physicians offer their patients. As part of that research it will be important to measure the breadth and uptake of extended family medicine training programs. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians

  7. [Everything is relative...about the Hanoi Institute of Traditional Medicine].

    PubMed

    Boussat, M; Castel-Kirgus, C; Boussat, S; Boussat, M A; Dinh, T H

    1996-01-01

    At the Symposium entitled "Health, Culture, and Quality of Life" held in Hanoi in 1993, the authors of this report met the physicians in charge of the Traditional Medicine Institute of Hanoi which works with the World Health Organization for traditional medicine. After an historical overview of the foundation of this center providing research, care, and training under the auspices of the Hanoi School of Medicine, Professor Hoang Bao Chau described a practice based on revision of ancestral traditions in accordance with scientific methods, the resulting synthesis being up-to-date yet in keeping with heritage. This novel and pragmatic approach, which takes into account the complexity of man, offers an opportunity to reflect on the current status of medical practices in the world and on their adaptation to each population at a time when the experience of the Other seems almost impossible to communicate.

  8. Correctional Staff Training Institutes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Illinois Univ., East St. Louis, Center for the Study of Crime, Delinquency and Corrections.

    Three national institutes for correctional staff trainers incorporated new techniques in an attempt to upgrade corrections programs through improved staff development. There were 78 trainer and 200 middle management staff and correctional officers involved in the program, representing more than 100 correctional institutions in the United States.…

  9. THE TRANSCULTURAL RESEARCH AND TRAINING INSTITUTE (TCI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LOUBERT, J. DANIEL

    MANY AMERICANS EMPLOYED OVERSEAS, ESPECIALLY NAVY AND MARINE PERSONNEL, NEED KNOWLEDGE OF THE CULTURES IN WHICH THEY LIVE. THERE IS CRITICISM OF TRADITIONAL WAYS OF SELECTING PERSONS AND TRAINING THEM. A NUMBER OF NEW TECHNIQUES, BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL TRAINING IN SIMULATION OF FOREIGN SOCIETIES, SEEM TO PROVIDE FOR OVERCOMING INTERNALIZATION…

  10. 75 FR 69686 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... Administration Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry AGENCY: Health Resources and... the cancellation of the Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and...

  11. Institute on Human Values in Medicine. Reports of the Institute Fellows. 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Health and Human Values, Philadelphia, PA.

    This document is a compilation of reports of persons involved in the fellowship program offered by the Institute of Health and Human Values. The fellowship program centers around recognition of a need to support faculty development so that appropriately trained people can be available for emerging programs that teach human values as part of health…

  12. Robotic Surgical Training in an Academic Institution

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph; Nifong, L. Wiley; Chapman, William H. H.; Felger, Jason E.; Bailey, B. Marcus; Ballint, Tara; Mendleson, Kim G.; Kim, Victor B.; Young, James A.; Albrecht, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Summary Background Data Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Methods Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors’ two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Results Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Conclusion Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons

  13. Robotic surgical training in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R; Nifong, L W; Chapman, W H; Felger, J E; Bailey, B M; Ballint, T; Mendleson, K G; Kim, V B; Young, J A; Albrecht, R A

    2001-10-01

    To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors' two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons have applied these methods effectively and safely.

  14. [Mobile learning in nurse training institutes, infinite pedagogical possibilities].

    PubMed

    Martin, Loïc

    Riding on the digital wave, the Rouen nurse training institute is developing mobile learning. Students and trainers are finding benefits in terms of learning methods and pedagogical innovations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic.

  16. Analytic institutes: A guide to training in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanken, Terry G.

    This investigation was inspired by the researcher's desire to pursue psychoanalytic training subsequent to completion of her PhD in clinical psychology and the discovery that no comprehensive resource existed to assist prospective psychoanalytic candidates with identifying or evaluating psychoanalytic training opportunities. This dissertation therefore aspires to provide a comprehensive guide to analytic training in the United States today. The researcher presents the expanding horizons of depth-oriented training leading to certification as an analyst, including training based on those schools of thought that resulted from early splits with Freud (Adlerian and Jungian) as well as training based on thought that has remained within the Freudian theoretical umbrella (e.g., classical, object relations, self psychology, etc.). Employing a heuristic approach and using hermeneutics and systems theory methodologies, the study situates analytic training in its historical context, explores contemporary issues, and considers its future. The study reviews the various analytic schools of thought and traces the history of psychoanalytic theory from its origins with Freud through its many permutations. It then discusses the history of psychoanalytic training and describes political, social, and economic factors influencing the development of training in this country. The centerpiece of the dissertation is a guidebook offering detailed information on each of 107 training institutes in the United States. Tables provide contact data and information which differentiate the institutes in terms of such parameters as size; length of program, theoretical orientation, and accreditation. A narrative of each institute summarizes the unique aspects of the program, including its admissions policy, the requirements for the training analysis and supervised clinical work, and the didactic curriculum, along with lists of courses offered. Child and adolescent psychoanalytic training is also

  17. FCCC Institutional Breast Cancer Training Program (FCCC-IBCTP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-00-1-0249 TITLE: FCCC Institutional Breast Cancer Training Program (FCCC-IBCTP) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jose Russo, M.D...CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Fox Chase Cancer Center Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19111-2497 REPORT DATE: January 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual Summary PREPARED...Institutional Breast Cancer Training Program DAMD17-00-1-0249 (FCCC-IBCTP) 6. AUTHOR(S) Jose Russo, M.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  18. Are the Institute of Medicine's trustworthiness guidelines trustworthy?

    PubMed

    Young, Benjamin K; Greenberg, Paul B

    2013-07-30

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has published a set of eight standards for guideline development groups (GDGs) to derive trustworthy clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). We investigated the adherence of these IOM guidelines to its own standards. The IOM document passed two of its own standards ("GDG-Systematic Review Team Interaction" and "GDG Composition"), only partially passed two others ("Articulation of Recommendation" and "External Review") and failed to pass four ("Establishing Transparency," "Management of Conflict of Interest," "Establishing Evidence Foundations" and "Updating"). The IOM standards for the development of CPGs do not meet their own criteria of trustworthiness. Further study is needed to determine the best methodology to evaluate CPGs.

  19. Reproductive medicine in northwest Argentina: traditional and institutional systems

    PubMed Central

    Hilgert, Norma I; Gil, Guillermo E

    2007-01-01

    are: the family medicine, the midwife, and the formal doctors. Plants have an important role; however there is a lack of total agreement among the families who use them. Reluctance to institutional deliveries may be due to the weak relationship between patients and doctors, and the lack of logistic assistance to delivering mothers coming from far away locations. PMID:17475013

  20. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  1. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  2. Nonsurgical sports medicine training in the United States: a survey of sports medicine fellowship graduates.

    PubMed

    Henehan, Michael; Shiple, Brian; Coppola, Gregory

    2003-09-01

    To survey graduates of nonsurgical sports medicine fellowship training programs about the quality and content of their educational curriculum. Survey. Participants were year 2000 active members of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) and American Osteopathic Academy of Sports Medicine (AOASM) and all other attendees at the 2000 AOASM and AMSSM annual meetings. The survey also was sent to candidates sitting for the 1999 CAQ examination from the American Board of Family Practice, American Board of Internal Medicine, American College of Emergency Physicians, and American Academy of Pediatrics. A total of 1608 surveys were distributed; 612 were returned for a return rate of 43%. Of respondents, 294 were fellowship trained, and 318 considered themselves to be sports medicine physicians but were not fellowship trained. Sections of the survey completed only by fellowship-trained physicians and focusing on training curriculum are reported in this article. Categories of survey questions included clinical experience, curriculum, academic activities, research, teaching experiences, primary care skills, procedures, types of athletes seen during training, supervision, and benefits. General attitudes about fellowship training also were surveyed: 99% of graduates were satisfied with their training and would do a fellowship again, and 98% felt they their training prepared them for a career in sports medicine. Orthopaedic experiences and physical examination skills were rated the highest. Research experience, work with disabled athletes, and selected areas of nonorthopaedic medical training, such as sports ophthalmology and sports psychology, were rated the lowest. Overall, fellowship training in sports medicine seems to be satisfactory to fellowship graduates. Strengths and weaknesses in training programs were identified.

  3. Systemic Change in Vocational Training Institutions in France.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moallem, Abbas; Moallem, Mahnaz

    1998-01-01

    The Specialized Vocational Training Institutions known as Institut Medico-Professionel (IMPro) in France are faced with increasing demands to provide quality services to adolescents with intellectual disabilities. This article describes the process of organizational changes in IMPro including the model, methods, tools, and techniques used in…

  4. Pediatric emergency medicine fellow training in ultrasound: consensus educational guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rebecca L; Hsu, Deborah; Nagler, Joshua; Chen, Lei; Gallagher, Rachel; Levy, Jason A

    2013-03-01

    The importance of point-of-care emergency ultrasound (EUS) to the practice of emergency medicine (EM) is well established, and mounting research continues to demonstrate how EUS can benefit pediatric emergency department (ED) patients. As members of the EM community, pediatric EM (PEM) physicians should understand the potential value of EUS and seek opportunities to incorporate EUS into their daily practice. Currently, EUS education and training is at an early developmental stage for PEM fellows and varies greatly between programs. The goal of this article is to provide consensus education guidelines and to describe a sample curriculum that can be used by PEM fellowship programs when developing or revising their US training curricula. The authors recognize that programs may be at different stages of EUS development and will consequently need to tailor curricula to individual institutional needs and capabilities. This guideline was developed through a collaborative process between EUS educators and members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of EM Fellowship Directors Subcommittee. The guideline includes the following topics: important considerations regarding EUS in PEM, PEM US program framework, PEM US curriculum, PEM US education program, and competency assessment.

  5. The Development of a Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Lynn William; Boerner, Hank

    The manufacture of generic drugs is a growing industry, generally composed of small companies that are more dependent than brand-name companies on hiring entry-level workers. To provide standardized training for employees in the generic drug manufacturing field, the Generic Pharmaceutical Training Institute (GPTI) was established by a partnership…

  6. New developments in education and training in sexual medicine.

    PubMed

    Reisman, Yacov; Eardley, Ian; Porst, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: The past 12 months have been historic ones for the field of Sexual Medicine in that we have seen the creation of the European Board examination in Sexual Medicine with the title of "Fellow of the European Committee on Sexual Medicine" (FECSM) offered to successful candidates. AIM.: The study aims to promote a high standard of care in Sexual Medicine. METHODS.: An important way of promoting high standards of care is by the development of training, regulation, and assessment framework. The background to these developments and the recent educational activities of the European Society for Sexual Medicine (ESSM) are described in this article. RESULTS.: The creation of the Multidisciplinary Joint Committee on Sexual Medicine (MJCSM) under the auspices of the European Union of Medical Specialists, with the primary purpose to develop the highest possible standards of training in Sexual Medicine in Europe, made it possible to create a process for qualification in Sexual Medicine. The ESSM educational activities created opportunities to support trainees in Sexual Medicine and the first MJCSM exam was held in Amsterdam with a high overall success rate. CONCLUSION.: These activities are intended to improve quality. The FECSM examination is the first of its type and provides a real opportunity for Sexual Medicine physicians to demonstrate and document their knowledge. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  7. A "Firm" System for Graduate Training in General Internal Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Waggoner, David M.

    1979-01-01

    The Department of Medicine at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital fosters general internal medicine in a graduate training program with a "medical firm" system of medical care. The firm system consists of four medical teams that care for distinct patient populations, closely integrating outpatient and inpatient care. (Author/JMD)

  8. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  9. Hands-On Sports Medicine Training for Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a hands-on sports medicine training program for residents at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center. Education strategies include clinical teaching, on-the-field education, experiential learning, and didactic instruction. Programs focusing exclusively on sports medicine are needed because the number of…

  10. Training the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janoski, Tom

    1977-01-01

    This article gives the history and purpose of the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician (PMT) School, overviews the program's goals, and summarizes the program of study. PMT students receive 26 weeks of intensive didactic and practical instruction in preventive medicine and environmental health. Graduates receive 421/2 semester hours of college…

  11. Training in Addiction Medicine in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Paul S.; Murnion, Bridin P.

    2011-01-01

    Barriers to entering addiction medicine (AM) have led to a persisting workforce shortage. To address this problem, the Chapter of Addiction Medicine (AChAM) was formed in 2001 as a subdivision of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Through consultation, AChAM has identified the scope of practice and offered fellowship to suitable…

  12. Training in Addiction Medicine in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Paul S.; Murnion, Bridin P.

    2011-01-01

    Barriers to entering addiction medicine (AM) have led to a persisting workforce shortage. To address this problem, the Chapter of Addiction Medicine (AChAM) was formed in 2001 as a subdivision of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (RACP). Through consultation, AChAM has identified the scope of practice and offered fellowship to suitable…

  13. Training the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janoski, Tom

    1977-01-01

    This article gives the history and purpose of the Navy Preventive Medicine Technician (PMT) School, overviews the program's goals, and summarizes the program of study. PMT students receive 26 weeks of intensive didactic and practical instruction in preventive medicine and environmental health. Graduates receive 421/2 semester hours of college…

  14. The Italian American Parent Training Institutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Maria

    To help parents of Italian descent take an active part in their children's education, a 2-year program was implemented in New York City and Boston. The project attempted to examine the impact of training upon (1) parents' active participation in the schools and the bilingual programs; (2) parents' home activities with their children; and (3) the…

  15. Computer-Based Training: An Institutional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Philip; Manji, Karim

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of issues related to computer-assisted learning (CAL) and computer-based training (CBT) describes approaches to electronic learning; principles underlying courseware development to support these approaches; and a plan for creation of a CAL/CBT development center, including its functional role, campus services, staffing, and equipment…

  16. Marijuana and medicine: assessing the science base: a summary of the 1999 Institute of Medicine report.

    PubMed

    Watson, S J; Benson, J A; Joy, J E

    2000-06-01

    In response to public pressure to allow the medical use of marijuana, the Office of National Drug Control Policy, Washington, DC, funded a study by the Institute of Medicine evaluating the scientific evidence for benefits and risks of using marijuana as a medicine. The report used scientific reviews, public hearings, and reports from other agencies, and was evaluated by knowledgeable advisors and reviewers. It called for heavier investment in research on the biology of cannabinoid systems, careful clinical studies of cannabinoids in clinical syndromes, analysis of cannabinoids' psychological effects on symptoms, and evaluations of the health consequences of heavy marijuana use; recommends against the use of smoked marijuana in medicine and for the development of a medical cannabinoid inhaler; and recommends that compassionate use of marijuana be considered under carefully reviewed protocols. Finally, the report evaluates the abuse potential, tolerance, withdrawal, and gateway risks of medical use of cannabinoid drugs.

  17. Pain medicine: The case for an independent medical specialty and training programs.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Michel Y; Follett, Kenneth A

    2014-06-01

    Over the last 30 years, pain has become one of the most dynamic areas of medicine and a public health issue. According to a recent Institute of Medicine report, pain affects approximately 100 million Americans at an estimated annual economic cost of $560 to $635 billion and is poorly treated overall. The American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) recognizes a pain subspecialty, but pain care delivery has struggled with increasing demand and developed in an inconsistent and uncoordinated fashion. Pain education is insufficient and highly variable. Multiple pain professional organizations have led to fragmentation of the field and lack of interdisciplinary agreement, resulting in confusion regarding who speaks for pain medicine. In this Perspective, the authors argue that ABMS recognition of pain medicine as an independent medical specialty would provide much needed structure and oversight for the field and would generate credibility for the specialty and its providers among medical peers, payers, regulatory and legislative agencies, and the public at large. The existing system, managed by three ABMS boards, largely excludes other specialties that contribute to pain care, fails to provide leadership from a single professional organization, provides suboptimal training exposure to pain medicine, and lengthens training, which results in inefficient use of time and educational resources. The creation of a primary ABMS conjoint board in pain medicine with its own residency programs and departments would provide better coordinated training, ensure the highest degree of competence of pain medicine specialists, and improve the quality of pain care and patient safety.

  18. [The Sino-French emergency and disaster medicine training center].

    PubMed

    Pourriat, Jean-Louis; Dahan, Benjamin; Lapandry, Claude

    2012-01-01

    French (AP-HP) and Chinese (Beijing Health Office) hospitals, with support from the French company Total, collaborated in order to improve Chinese doctors' knowledge of emergency and disaster medicine prior to the Beijing Olympic Games. A Sino-French emergency and disaster medicine training center was subsequently opened in Beijing in 2008, with the aim of providing high-level continuous medical training for Chinese specialists in emergency medicine. Teaching in the management of critical situations was based on the use of a latest-generation simulator (Sim 3G; Laerdal). This collaboration has had both pedagogical and diplomatic benefits.

  19. Nuclear medicine/radiology training and certification requirements recent changes.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay; Graham, Michael M; Maurer, Alan; Guiberteau, Milton J; Miller, Tom R; Vydareny, Kay

    2006-11-01

    There have been many recent changes in governmental regulations affecting nuclear medicine/nuclear radiology practice and training requirements. This article summarizes the background for these changes, and summarizes the new requirements for residency training, board certification, and authorized user status.

  20. Evaluation of a Medicine Information Training Program for Older People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quine, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Australian older adults were trained to act as advocates and role models to inform peers on effective use of medicines. Trainees reported difficulties experienced by older learners when training is too concentrated. Many noted increased self-esteem and personal growth as a result of their involvement. (SK)

  1. Culture Competence in the Training of Geriatric Medicine Fellows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanabe, Marianne K. G.

    2007-01-01

    With the aging and diversifying of the elder population in the United States, there is a pressing need for an organized and effective curriculum in cultural competence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that the curriculum for Geriatric Medicine Fellowship training include cultural competency training.…

  2. Simulation in Canadian postgraduate emergency medicine training - a national survey.

    PubMed

    Russell, Evan; Hall, Andrew Koch; Hagel, Carly; Petrosoniak, Andrew; Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; Howes, Daniel

    2017-05-17

    Simulation-based education (SBE) is an important training strategy in emergency medicine (EM) postgraduate programs. This study sought to characterize the use of simulation in FRCPC-EM residency programs across Canada. A national survey was administered to residents and knowledgeable program representatives (PRs) at all Canadian FRCPC-EM programs. Survey question themes included simulation program characteristics, the frequency of resident participation, the location and administration of SBE, institutional barriers, interprofessional involvement, content, assessment strategies, and attitudes about SBE. Resident and PR response rates were 63% (203/321) and 100% (16/16), respectively. Residents reported a median of 20 (range 0-150) hours of annual simulation training, with 52% of residents indicating that the time dedicated to simulation training met their needs. PRs reported the frequency of SBE sessions ranging from weekly to every 6 months, with 15 (94%) programs having an established simulation curriculum. Two (13%) of the programs used simulation for resident assessment, although 15 (94%) of PRs indicated that they would be comfortable with simulation-based assessment. The most common PR-identified barriers to administering simulation were a lack of protected faculty time (75%) and a lack of faculty experience with simulation (56%). Interprofessional involvement in simulation was strongly valued by both residents and PRs. SBE is frequently used by Canadian FRCPC-EM residency programs. However, there exists considerable variability in the structure, frequency, and timing of simulation-based activities. As programs transition to competency-based medical education, national organizations and collaborations should consider the variability in how SBE is administered.

  3. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Zehra; Bozkurt, M Fani; Erbas, Belkıs; Durak, Hatice

    2017-01-31

    Nuclear medicine applications in Turkey started in the early 1950s, grew as an independent medical discipline and finally were recognized by the Ministry of Health in 1973. Later on, the professional organization of nuclear medicine physicians and other related professionals including radiopharmacists and technologists under the Turkish Society of Nuclear Medicine were established in 1975. Recently after completing more than a half century in Turkey, nuclear medicine has proved to be a strong and evolving medical field with more than 600 physicians serving for the changing needs of clinical practice throughout these years. This article describes past and present facts in this field and attempts to provide insights into the future which hopefully will be brighter than before.

  4. [Specialist training of emergency medicine in a secondary care hospital].

    PubMed

    Palomäki, Ari; Naskali, Jarno; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Alaspää, Ari; Innamaa, Tapio; Rautava, Veli-Pekka

    2014-01-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) was established as a speciality in Finland in the beginning of 2013. The training period of six years conforms to the principles of the European Curriculum for EM. We present here the first-year training in Kanta-Häme Central Hospital, located in Southern Finland. Training is not only based on "learning by doing". Lunchtime lectures covering a wide variety of topics in EM are an essential part of our weekly education day. This day also offers to the residents small group sessions with abstracts, case reports, focused lectures and ultrasound training. A successful training program of EM is achievable by good collaboration with other specialities.

  5. Neurosciences intensive care medicine in initial neurosurgical training.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E A C; Madder, H; Millo, J; Kearns, C F

    2009-04-01

    The authors describe a novel 4-month clinical placement in neurosciences intensive care medicine (NICM) undertaken in the first specialty registrar (ST1) year of neurosurgical training as part of a clinical neurosciences themed training year. Neurosurgery is unique among British surgical specialties in having pioneered themed early years in run-through training to replace basic surgical training in general surgical specialties as part of Modernising Medical Careers. After describing events leading to the new neurosurgical training, the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired in NICM are highlighted alongside discussion of logistic aspects and future directions from an inaugural experience.

  6. [Dynamic VRML for training in medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqun; Zhao, Jiaao

    2006-02-01

    Experimenting in medicine can be accomplished by virtual reality system. VRML is a tool to build virtual object and scenes which can realize static and animated applications in medicine. However, to creat a real environment, the demanded level of interactivity and dynamics is difficult to achieve. In this paper we describe some approaches and techniques which can realize dynamic 3D. Our demonstration is based on the implementation of a virtual baby model, whose character can be accomplished by external JAVA applications.

  7. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2013-2014), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2014-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in them. We present the 2014 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  8. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2012-2013), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Baren, Jill M; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C

    2013-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2013 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  9. Report on residency training information (2011-2012), American Board of Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Carius, Michael L; Collier, Robert E; Counselman, Francis L; Kowalenko, Terry; Marco, Catherine A; Muelleman, Robert L; Korte, Robert C

    2012-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency training programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2012 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  10. American Board of Emergency Medicine Report on Residency Training Information (2015-2016).

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Goyal, Deepi G; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Wahl, Robert P; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2016-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents training in those programs. We present the 2016 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  11. Psychosomatic medicine in primary care: influence of training.

    PubMed

    Fazekas, Christian; Matzer, Franziska; Greimel, Elfriede R; Moser, Gabriele; Stelzig, Manfred; Langewitz, Wolf; Loewe, Bernd; Pieringer, Walter; Jandl-Jager, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are often confronted with patients presenting somatic symptoms presumed to be decisively modulated by psychosocial factors. We aimed to explore GPs' reported clinical routine in dealing with these patients according to the GPs' level of training in psychosomatic medicine. A structured postal questionnaire survey was conducted among all Austrian GPs with a standardized training background in psychosomatic medicine (three levels of training; duration between one and six years) as well as in a random national sample of Austrian GPs without such training, resulting in four study subgroups. Respondents estimated that between 20% and 40% of their patients presenting somatic symptoms need psychosocial factors to be addressed. Study subgroups differed significantly concerning their reported diagnostic and therapeutic routine behavior patterns. Some diagnostic approaches such as clarification of lay etiology increased linearly with the level of training. The proportion of patients receiving corresponding treatment in the GP's own practice was also reported to increase with the level of training (no training: 35%, levels one and two: 46%, level three: 54%), although all subgroups estimated that over 20% of patients do not receive any corresponding treatment. Results point at the clinical relevance of a general training in psychosomatic medicine in primary care. They also suggest specific training effects that need to be substantiated in observational studies.

  12. Fellowship or Further Training for Family Medicine Residents?

    PubMed

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Dai, Mingliang; Eden, Aimee R; Peterson, Lars E; Mainous, Arch G

    2017-09-01

    The breadth of family medicine (FM) generates debate about the length of residency training. One argument used by proponents for lengthening training is that residents feel unprepared for practice. The objectives of our study were to (1) identify the proportion of FM residency graduates intending to pursue fellowship training and those who would have done an additional year of core residency training had it been available, and (2) determine whether an association exists between these two variables. We used data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) as part of resident certification examination application in 2014 and 2015. Data included fellowship intention, and interest in pursuing another year of residency training if it were available. We used descriptive and bivariate statistics. The questionnaire was completed by 6,235 residents, of which 17.0% (n=1,063) intended to enroll in a fellowship. Overall 54.2% of residents were "not at all likely" to extend residency training, with 19.9% "extremely/moderately likely". Forty-six percent of those intending a fellowship were "not at all likely" to extend training and only 29% of those "extremely/moderately likely" to extend residency training intended to enroll in a fellowship. We found a disconnect between fellowship intention and desire for another year of residency training. Desire for fellowship may be more about obtaining specific skills and expertise or additional certifications, and less about being prepared for general practice in family medicine.

  13. Reflections on the Institute of Medicine's systemic exertion intolerance disease.

    PubMed

    Jason, Leonard A; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; McManimen, Stephanie; Furst, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) in the United States has recently proposed that the term systemic exertion intolerance disease (SEID) replace chronic fatigue syndrome. In addition, the IOM proposed a new case definition for SEID, which includes substantial reductions or impairments in the ability to engage in pre‑illness activities, unrefreshing sleep, postexertional malaise, and either cognitive impairment or orthostatic intolerance. Unfortunately, these recommendations for a name change were not vetted with patient and professional audiences, and the new criteria were not evaluated with data sets of patients and controls. A recent poll suggests that the majority of patients reject this new name. In addition, studies have found that prevalence rates will dramatically increase with the new criteria, particularly due to the ambiguity revolving around exclusionary illnesses. Findings suggest that the new criteria select more patients who have less impairment and fewer symptoms than several other criteria. The implications of these findings are discussed in the current review.

  14. Defining Tailored Training Approaches for Army Institutional Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    teaching. In A.C. Ornstein (Ed.), Teaching: Theory into practice (pp. 98-115). Boston: Allyn and Bacon . Corno, L. (2008). On teaching...Learning, training, and development in organizations (pp. 3-64). New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group. Hailikari, T., Nevgi, A., & Komulainen

  15. [Family medicine and practice in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    PubMed

    Casas Patiño, Donovan; Jarillo Soto, Edgar; Rodríguez Torres, Alejandra

    2014-06-26

    The central ideas of this research paper are related to the practice of family medicine as a specialty. It focuses in its origins, problems, unique characteristics, limitations, scope, management, and processes within the context of primary care of the Mexican Social Security System. This approach was based on a qualitative, hermeneutical study closely related to the Structural Functionalism Theory. Within this framework, medical practice is seen as an equation: Meaning = action + function/structure. This offers an approach to the understanding of reality through surveys and observations in five categories: identity, activity, purpose, values/norms, and power/relationship. The practice of family medicine is defined as a medical act in the Mexican Social Security Institute. This act is limited to a brief encounter and a prescription, which makes it a short, fleeting, medicalized interaction. The result is a negative social imaginary of the physician, the patient and the whole of society. Thus, individuals and society host a negative social imaginary bestowed on doctors and users of the health system.

  16. Institute of Medicine recommends a continuing professional development institute for U.S. health professions.

    PubMed

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    A workforce of knowledgeable professionals is critical to the discovery and application of best health care practices; yet, today in the United States, the professional health workforce is not consistently prepared to provide safe, high-quality health care, even as the nation spends more per capita on health care than any other country. The Institute of Medicine recently recommended creation of a continuing professional development institute (CPDI) supported as a public-private initiative. The CPDI would coordinate and guide efforts that align: (a) content and knowledge among health professions; (b) regulation across states and national continuing professional development (CPD) providers; and (c) the financing of CPD, not only for improving professional performance and patient outcomes, but also for strengthening the scientific basis for the practice of CPD. With a strong scientific foundation, the community of health professions educators and regulators may advance the development of health care practitioners, enhance the discipline of CPD, and improve health outcomes for patients.

  17. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  18. Interdisciplinary team training identifies discrepancies in institutional policies and practices.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Pamela; Frankel, Jennifer; Boblick Smith, Sara; Bullough, Alexandra; Marzano, David

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of an interdisciplinary team-training program in obstetric emergencies on identifying unsupportive institutional policies and systems-based practices. We implemented a qualitative study design with a purposive sample of interdisciplinary physicians, nurses, and ancillary allied health professionals from 4 specialties (n = 79) to conduct a 6-month, weekly simulation-based intervention for managing obstetric emergencies. Debriefing focused on identifying discrepancies between clinical practice and institutional policies. Our data yielded 5 categories of discrepancies between institutional or departmental policy and actual clinical practice. Specific institutional policies and system-based practices were recommended to health system administration for reevaluation. Simulation-based interdisciplinary team training can inform system-wide quality improvement objectives that could lead to increased patient safety.

  19. No Denying It: Medicinal Chemistry Training Is in Big Trouble.

    PubMed

    Rafferty, Michael F

    2016-12-22

    There has been little consensus between the pharmaceutical industry and academic communities concerning the best approach to train medicinal chemists for drug discovery. For decades the pharmaceutical industry has shown preference for synthetic organic graduates over candidates with degrees from medicinal chemistry programs on the assumption that medicinal chemistry expertise will be acquired on the job. However, ongoing changes to pharmaceutical drug discovery organizations and practices threaten to undermine this training model. There is a compelling argument to be made for establishment of a strong industry-academic partnership to train new candidates with sophisticated knowledge of contemporary drug design concepts and techniques to ensure that the future needs of both industry and academic drug discovery research can be served.

  20. Training requirements for chemists in radiotracer development for nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, R.; Fowler, J.

    1988-01-01

    This panel was organized to address the current and anticipated future shortage of chemists with advanced training to fill positions in the nuclear medicine field. Although hard data and statistics are difficult to acquire, we will attempt to highlight the impact of chemistry on nuclear medicine and to describe the growth of the field which has led to an increasing need for chemists resulting in the current manpower shortage. We also will make recommendations for attracting Ph.D. chemists to careers in nuclear medicine research and possible mechanisms for postgraduate training. Solving this problem and establishing a long term committment and mechanism for advanced training is critically important to meet the current needs of the profession and to assure future growth and innovation. 3 tabs.

  1. Differences between family and emergency medicine training before sports medicine fellowship.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Mark; Christensen, Heidi K

    2015-01-01

    Residency training clearly impacts physicians' approach toward fellowship in Primary Care Sports Medicine. Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sets strict standards for all programs, family medicine and emergency medicine training differ a great deal in general and provide physicians from both backgrounds varied perspectives and skill sets. The family physician acquires a substantial amount of experience in continuity of care and integration of health care into a patient's everyday life. On the other hand, the emergency physician receives exceptional training in the management of acutely ill and injured patients and leadership of a large health care team. Furthermore, while the emergency physician may be skilled in procedures such as fracture reduction and diagnostic ultrasound, the family physician is proficient in developing patient rapport and compliance with a treatment plan. Although physicians from different backgrounds may start with many differences, fellowship training is essential in bridging those gaps.

  2. Hospitalist involvement in family medicine residency training: A CERA study.

    PubMed

    Baldor, Robert; Savageau, Judith A; Shokar, Navkiran; Potts, Stacy; Gravel, Joseph; Eisenstock, Kimberly; Ledwith, James

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of hospitalists on family medicine residencies. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess attitudes about hospitalists and their involvement in residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2012 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of hospitalists. Bivariate statistics were used to examine relationships between the use of hospitalists to teach and program characteristics. Forty-one percent (n=175) of residency directors completed the hospitalist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-six percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated. The majority of directors who have, or are planning to develop, a hospitalist service currently use an internal medicine service (92.5%), followed by family medicine (39.1%), pediatrics (35.4%), OB/laborists (18.0%), and combined services (8.7%). The majority of programs with a hospitalist training track (or plans to develop one) indicated that this was for a family medicine service. Sixty percent of programs that have a hospitalist service involve hospitalists in teaching. Twenty percent of directors reported that hospitalists serve as family medicine faculty, and 63% viewed them as "good educators." However, 85% reported no reduction in inpatient teaching by family medicine faculty despite using hospitalist teaching services. Hospitalists have a significant educational role in family medicine resident training. Further research is needed to explore how hospitalists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  3. Key informants’ perspectives on development of family medicine training programs in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gossa, Weyinshet; Wondimagegn, Dawit; Mekonnen, Demeke; Eshetu, Wondwossen; Abebe, Zerihun; Fetters, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    As a very low-income country, Ethiopia faces significant development challenges, though there is great aspiration to dramatically improve health care in the country. Family medicine has recently been recognized through national policy as one potential contributor in addressing Ethiopia’s health care challenges. Family medicine is a new specialty in Ethiopia emerging in the context of family medicine development in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Addis Ababa University family medicine residency program started in 2013 and is the first and the only family medicine program in the country as of March 2016. Stakeholders on the ground feel that family medicine is off to a good start and have great enthusiasm and optimism for its success. While the Ministry of Health has a vision for the development of family medicine and a plan for rapid upscaling of family medicine across the country, significant challenges remain. Continuing discussion about the potential roles of family medicine specialists in Ethiopia and policy-level strategic planning to place family medicine at the core of primary health care delivery in the country is needed. In addition, the health care-tier system needs to be restructured to include the family medicine specialists along with appropriately equipped health care facilities for training and practice. Key stakeholders are optimistic that family medicine expansion can be successful in Ethiopia through a coordinated effort by the Ministry of Health and collaboration between institutions within the country, other Sub-Saharan African countries, and international partners supportive of establishing family medicine in Ethiopia. PMID:27175100

  4. Family Orientation in Family Medicine Training

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Yves R.; Tannenbaum, David

    1990-01-01

    Teaching about the family has become an important part of the family medicine curriculum. The family orientation index, a 39-item questionnaire, was designed to evaluate the family orientation of services and care provided as well as the teaching and research. The questionnaire was distributed to 55 program directors at 16 Canadian universities. The response rate was 84%. The results indicate that the family orientation of services is less than optimal. PMID:21233938

  5. Training experts in family medicine teaching.

    PubMed

    Švab, Igor; Allen, Justin; Žebiene, Egle; Petek Šter, Marija; Windak, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine teachers require specific educational skills. A framework for their professional development is essential for future development of the discipline in Europe. EURACT developed a framework on educational expertise, and subsequently applied it in a curriculum of teaching-skills courses of various levels. The aim of this article is to describe the development of the teaching framework, and of an international three-level course programme for 'teaching-the-teachers'. Furthermore, we describe our experiences and lessons learned, in particular with regard to the level-three programme for proficient teachers, which was new. We conclude that it is possible to develop a theoretical framework of family medicine teaching expertise and to apply it in an international high-level educational programme for future experts in family medicine education. Research evidence of the usefulness of this approach is needed, and the threats for its further development into a sustainable activity are its high teacher/student ratio associated with relatively high costs and difficulties in recruiting suitable participants.

  6. Resistance training is medicine: effects of strength training on health.

    PubMed

    Westcott, Wayne L

    2012-01-01

    Inactive adults experience a 3% to 8% loss of muscle mass per decade, accompanied by resting metabolic rate reduction and fat accumulation. Ten weeks of resistance training may increase lean weight by 1.4 kg, increase resting metabolic rate by 7%, and reduce fat weight by 1.8 kg. Benefits of resistance training include improved physical performance, movement control, walking speed, functional independence, cognitive abilities, and self-esteem. Resistance training may assist prevention and management of type 2 diabetes by decreasing visceral fat, reducing HbA1c, increasing the density of glucose transporter type 4, and improving insulin sensitivity. Resistance training may enhance cardiovascular health, by reducing resting blood pressure, decreasing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Resistance training may promote bone development, with studies showing 1% to 3% increase in bone mineral density. Resistance training may be effective for reducing low back pain and easing discomfort associated with arthritis and fibromyalgia and has been shown to reverse specific aging factors in skeletal muscle.

  7. Foreign Trained Physicians and American Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Rosemary; Vermeulen, Joan

    The purpose of the study was to bring together available materials on the location, activity, and function of more than 63,000 foreign trained physicians in the United States; to review the political, economic, and organizational factors which have led to the current manpower situation; and to analyze these data in terms of physician manpower,…

  8. Improving the Quality of Postgraduate Education in Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine for Junior Residents: An Exploratory Survey Conducted in Five Institutions in the Tohoku Area.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Shin; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Kaneko, Soichiro; Tabata, Masao; Sato, Shinya; Ishikawa, Keiichi; Suzuki, Saya; Arita, Ryutaro; Saito, Natsumi; Kamiya, Tetsuharu; Nishikawa, Hitoshi; Ikeno, Yuka; Tanaka, Junichi; Ohsawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Akiko; Numata, Takehiro; Kuroda, Hitoshi; Abe, Michiaki; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Ishii, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    Traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine has been widely applied in general medicine in Japan. In 2001, the model core curriculum for Japanese medical education was revised to include Kampo medicine. Since 2007, all 80 Japanese medical schools have incorporated it within their programs. However, postgraduate training or instruction of Kampo medicine has not been recognized as a goal for the clinical training of junior residents by Japan's Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare; little is known about postgraduate Kampo medicine education. This exploratory study investigated attitudes about Kampo medicine among junior residents in Japanese postgraduate training programs. A questionnaire survey was administered to junior residents at five institutions in the Tohoku area of Japan. Questions evaluated residents' experiences of prescribing Kampo medicines and their expectations for postgraduate Kampo education and training. As a result, 121 residents responded (response rate = 74%). About 96% of participants had previously received Kampo medicine education at their pre-graduate medical schools and 64% had prescribed Kampo medications. Specifically, daikenchuto was prescribed to prevent ileus and constipation after abdominal surgery and yokukansan was prescribed to treat delirium in the elderly. Residents received on-the-job instruction by attending doctors. Over 70% of participants indicated that there was a need for postgraduate Kampo medicine education opportunities and expected lectures and instruction on how to use it to treat common diseases. In conclusion, we have revealed that junior residents require Kampo medicine education in Japanese postgraduate training programs. The programs for comprehensive pre-graduate and postgraduate Kampo education are expected.

  9. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  10. Reflections of a ZERO TO THREE National Training Institute Neophyte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Tanika

    2013-01-01

    In this article Tanika Simpson reflects on her experience at the 2012 three-day ZERO TO THREE National Training Institute (NTI) held in Los Angeles, California. The week began with a two-day pre-NTI retreat convening a national league of state Infant Mental Health Associations that are intensely committed to the work of implementing Michigan's…

  11. Reflections of a ZERO TO THREE National Training Institute Neophyte

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Tanika

    2013-01-01

    In this article Tanika Simpson reflects on her experience at the 2012 three-day ZERO TO THREE National Training Institute (NTI) held in Los Angeles, California. The week began with a two-day pre-NTI retreat convening a national league of state Infant Mental Health Associations that are intensely committed to the work of implementing Michigan's…

  12. A TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Cobleskill. Agricultural and Technical Coll.

    A TRAINING INSTITUTE WAS HELD FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE IN WHICH SPEAKERS AND DISCUSSION GROUPS EXPLORED AND EXPLAINED (1) THE NEED FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE, (2) FACILITIES NECESSARY FOR SUCH INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS, (3) FACULTY REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING COURSES IN THE TECHNICAL FIELDS OF AGRICULTURE, (4)…

  13. Summer Inservice Institutes: A Cooperative Training Model for School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carswell, Jim; Mateer, Anne

    This training model outlines methods school systems can use to implement Summer Inservice Institutes for elementary and secondary teachers of regular and exceptional education students. Procedural information is included that explains the philosophy and assists in the initiation, supervision, evaluation and continuation of the Summer Institute…

  14. Training and Continuing Education; A Handbook for Health Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    This basic handbook for personnel development through training and continuing education within health care institutions describes the techniques involved in developing programs, from needs determination to evaluation. It covers how to make a skill inventory and a survey of learning needs; how to state learning objectives; how to design a specific…

  15. Supervisory Curriculum: General Management Training Institute. FY 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Chicago, IL. Regional Training Center.

    The document describes the supervisory course offerings of the General Management Training Institute. It contains a general information sheet, a curriculum calendar for 1976, and course descriptions for the following courses: basic management functions, basic management methods and skills, communicating and counseling, increasing (improving)…

  16. Leadership Training Institute in Learning Disabilties. Volume I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, N. Dale; And Others

    Presented is the final report of the Leadership Training Institute (LTI) in Learning Disabilities at the University of Arizona. Purposes of the LTI are reported to have been to give technical assistance to the Child Service Demonstration Centers which were alloted funds by the Bureau for the Education of Handicapped Children in eight states…

  17. Report to the Career Development Training Institute Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Juliette N.

    This report, annually prepared by the Executive Director of National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC) for the NOICC Career Development Training Institute, provides current information on its performance. It identifies issues that require attention, and informs the Board of any NOICC management or policy decisions that may…

  18. Librarians and Community Computer Networks: A Training Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerkey, A. Neil

    1997-01-01

    Describes an institute designed to train librarians to use the Buffalo Free-Net, an open-access community computer system. The objectives were to help librarians become comfortable with networked information and to teach them how to exploit the potential of the network to serve the information needs of their communities. (Author/LRW)

  19. School Bus Driver Instructor Training Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleven, Arlene M.; Fucigna, Joseph T.

    The National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA) has supported the development of a training program for school bus drivers in the form of a curriculum package (instructor's, course, and trainee study guides). To assist the States in making the program operational, NHTSA in 1974 supported the conduct of five five-day institutes to explain…

  20. Emergency Medical Technician Instructor Training Institute--Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleven, Arlene

    The instructor training institutes were conducted to familiarize State and local emergency medical instructional personnel with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) curriculum materials and to enhance their instructional capabilities with this material. Thirty-hour courses, correlated with the content of the Emergency Medical…

  1. Police Traffic Services Supervisor Instructor Training Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleven, Arlene M.

    The purpose of the study was to expose key individuals to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) developed curriculum materials for police traffic services supervisors and to teach them how to teach. The objective was accomplished through the conduct of five 30-hour instructor training institutes conducted in various areas of…

  2. Responsiveness of Training Institutions to Changing Labor Market Demands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Robert E., Ed.; And Others

    These 19 papers from the second annual Policy Forum on Employability Development explore the responsiveness of various educational and training institutions to changing labor market demands. The first three papers provide an overview of the forum. They summarize the proceedings and policy considerations and address how vocational education and…

  3. Effectiveness of Training Institute for Women Administrators: A Preliminary Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Dorothy J.

    The effectiveness of a four-week residential summer institute, developed by the Higher Education Resource Services (HERS, Mid-Atlantic), the University of Pennsylvania, and Bryn Mawr College, to train women for administrative positions in higher education was assessed in a 1978 study and will be evaluated in a longitudinal analysis. The institute…

  4. Special Curriculum: General Management Training Institute. FY 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Chicago, IL. Regional Training Center.

    The document describes the special curriculum course offerings for the General Management Training Institute. It contains a general information sheet, a curriculum calendar for 1976, and course descriptions for the following courses: administrative officer seminar, analyzing managerial key results areas and formulating objectives, creative problem…

  5. Special Training Institute on Problems of School Desegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hontz, Glenn

    A six-week summer training institute designed to provide participants with the skills and understanding needed to help student teachers and beginning teachers to perform successfully in racially mixed schools and classrooms was attended by 119 elementary and secondary school teachers and administrators (approximately half Negro and half white)…

  6. CAEP 2016 Academic Symposium on Education Scholarship: Training our Future Clinician Educators in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Woods, Robert A; Artz, Jennifer D; Carrière, Benoit; Field, Simon; Huffman, James; Dong, Sandy L; Bhanji, Farhan; Yiu, Stella; Smith, Sheila; Mengual, Rose; Hicks, Chris; Frank, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To develop consensus recommendations for training future clinician educators (CEs) in emergency medicine (EM). A panel of EM education leaders was assembled from across Canada and met regularly by teleconference over the course of 1 year. Recommendations for CE training were drafted based on the panel's experience, a literature review, and a survey of current and past EM education leaders in Canada. Feedback was sought from attendees at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) annual academic symposium. Recommendations were distributed to the society's Academic Section for further feedback and updated by a consensus of the expert panel. Recommendations were categorized for one of three audiences: 1) Future CEs; 2) Academic departments and divisions (AD&D) that support training to fulfill their education leadership goals; and 3) The CAEP Academic Section. Advanced medical education training is recommended for any emergency physician or resident who pursues an education leadership role. Individuals should seek out mentorship in making decisions about career opportunities and training options. AD&D should regularly perform a needs assessment of their future CE needs and identify and encourage potential individuals who fulfill education leadership roles. AD&D should develop training opportunities at their institution, provide support to complete this training, and advocate for the recognition of education scholarship in their institutional promotions process. The CAEP Academic Section should support mentorship of future CEs on a national scale. These recommendations serve as a framework for training and supporting the next generation of Canadian EM medical educators.

  7. The Residency Training Experience in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David; Chuang, Taijung; Argade, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The podiatric medicine and surgery residency is currently characterized by 3 years of comprehensive training. Contemporary issues have recently influenced the direction of training in the profession of podiatric medicine. Formal investigation into the residency training experience has, nonetheless, been limited. The purpose of the present study was to conduct a learning needs assessment of podiatric residency training. An electronic survey was developed, with comparable versions for program directors and residents. The specific topics investigated included the use of minimum activity volume numbers, learning resources, duty hours, strengths and weaknesses of residents, motivation of hosting student externship positions, noncognitive residency traits, meetings between residents and directors, resident satisfaction, and director satisfaction. A total of 197 program directors nationwide were sent the survey electronically, and 109 (53%) responded. Of 230 residents receiving the survey, 159 (78%) responded. Several statistically significant differences, and notable similarities, were observed between the 2 groups encompassing many aspects of the survey. A majority opinion, among both directors and residents, was found that the use of procedural assessment tools might improve resident evaluation. The responding directors and residents agreed that the following 3 topics were weaknesses in podiatric training: practice management, biomechanics, and performing podiatric research. Direct feedback immediately after surgery was the most valuable learning resource reported by the residents. The results of our study reflect the current status of the podiatric medicine and surgery residency and could facilitate improvement in the residency training experience. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  9. The Infant Parent Training Institute: A Developmental Model for Training Infant Mental Health Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arons, Judith; Epstein, Ann; Sklan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The Infant Parent Training Institute (IPTI) at Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Boston offers integrated clinical and theoretical infant mental health training. The curriculum reflects the belief that nurturing and reflective relationships promote optimal learning and growth. A specialty in infant mental health requires knowledge…

  10. Human Factors in Training - Space Medicine Proficiency Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Erin; Arsintescu, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The early Constellation space missions are expected to have medical capabilities very similar to those currently on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). For Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) missions to ISS, medical equipment will be located on ISS, and carried into CEV in the event of an emergency. Flight Surgeons (FS) on the ground in Mission Control will be expected to direct the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) during medical situations. If there is a loss of signal and the crew is unable to communicate with the ground, a CMO would be expected to carry out medical procedures without the aid of a FS. In these situations, performance support tools can be used to reduce errors and time to perform emergency medical tasks. Work on medical training has been conducted in collaboration with the Medical Training Group at the Space Life Sciences Directorate and with Wyle Lab which provides medical training to crew members, Biomedical Engineers (BMEs), and to flight surgeons under the JSC Space Life Sciences Directorate s Bioastronautics contract. The space medical training work is part of the Human Factors in Training Directed Research Project (DRP) of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project under the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Human factors researchers at Johnson Space Center have recently investigated medical performance support tools for CMOs on-orbit, and FSs on the ground, and researchers at the Ames Research Center performed a literature review on medical errors. The work proposed for FY10 continues to build on this strong collaboration with the Space Medical Training Group and previous research. This abstract focuses on two areas of work involving Performance Support Tools for Space Medical Operations. One area of research building on activities from FY08, involved the feasibility of just-in-time (JIT) training techniques and concepts for real-time medical procedures. In Phase 1

  11. Human Factors in Training - Space Medicine Proficiency Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Erin; Arsintescu, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The early Constellation space missions are expected to have medical capabilities very similar to those currently on the Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS). For Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) missions to ISS, medical equipment will be located on ISS, and carried into CEV in the event of an emergency. Flight Surgeons (FS) on the ground in Mission Control will be expected to direct the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) during medical situations. If there is a loss of signal and the crew is unable to communicate with the ground, a CMO would be expected to carry out medical procedures without the aid of a FS. In these situations, performance support tools can be used to reduce errors and time to perform emergency medical tasks. Work on medical training has been conducted in collaboration with the Medical Training Group at the Space Life Sciences Directorate and with Wyle Lab which provides medical training to crew members, Biomedical Engineers (BMEs), and to flight surgeons under the JSC Space Life Sciences Directorate s Bioastronautics contract. The space medical training work is part of the Human Factors in Training Directed Research Project (DRP) of the Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Project under the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element of the Human Research Program (HRP). Human factors researchers at Johnson Space Center have recently investigated medical performance support tools for CMOs on-orbit, and FSs on the ground, and researchers at the Ames Research Center performed a literature review on medical errors. The work proposed for FY10 continues to build on this strong collaboration with the Space Medical Training Group and previous research. This abstract focuses on two areas of work involving Performance Support Tools for Space Medical Operations. One area of research building on activities from FY08, involved the feasibility of just-in-time (JIT) training techniques and concepts for real-time medical procedures. In Phase 1

  12. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  13. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  14. Effect of location on family medicine residents' training.

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, D.; Hogg, W.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of family medicine residents trained at community-based or hospital-based centres suggested differences in experience and in career plans. Community-based residents saw more patients in the same family, believed they knew the community better, made more housecalls, expected to use allied health professionals more frequently, and were more likely to choose a small community practice. PMID:8499787

  15. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  16. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  17. Interdisciplinary training to build an informatics workforce for precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Marc S.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Payne, Philip R.O.

    2015-01-01

    The proposed Precision Medicine Initiative has the potential to transform medical care in the future through a shift from interventions based on evidence from population studies and empiric response to ones that account for a range of individual factors that more reliably predict response and outcomes for the patient. Many things are needed to realize this vision, but one of the most critical is an informatics workforce that has broad interdisciplinary training in basic science, applied research and clinical implementation. Current approaches to informatics training do not support this requirement. We present a collaborative model of training that has the potential to produce a workforce prepared for the challenges of implementing precision medicine. PMID:27054076

  18. Developing obstetric medicine training in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Suarez, José; Suarez, Niza; Ateka-Barrutia, Oier

    2017-03-01

    Maternal mortality is an important indicator of health in populations around the world. The distribution of maternal mortality ratio globally shows that middle- and low-income countries have ∼99% of the mortality burden. Most countries of Latin America are considered to be middle- or low-income countries, as well as areas of major inequities among the different social classes. Medical problems in pregnancy remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this region. Previous data indicate the need for a call to action for adequate diagnosis and care of medical diseases in obstetric care. The impact of nonobstetric and medical pathologies on maternal mortality in Latin America is largely unknown. In Latin America, two educational initiatives have been proposed to improve skills in maternity care. The Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics (ALSO®) was first started to address obstetric emergencies, and subsequently adapted for low-middle-income country settings as the Global ALSO®. In parallel, the Latin American obstetric anesthesia community has progressively focused on improvement of several intrapartum/intraoperative issues, which has secondarily taken them to embrace the obstetric medicine area on interest and join the former initiatives. In the present review, we summarize the available data regarding medical morbidity and mortality in pregnancy in Latin America, as well as the challenges, achievements, issues, initiatives, and future directions encouraging maternal health educators, health care trainers, and physicians in middle- and low-income countries, such as many Latin American ones, to improve and/or change attitudes, if needed, on current clinical practice.

  19. Personalized Cancer Genetics Training for Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, Kathleen R.; MacDonald, Deborah J.; Culver, Julie O.; Huizenga, Carin R.; Morgan, Robert J.; Uman, Gwen C.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of a multi-modal interdisciplinary course in genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) and research collaboration for community-based clinicians. Clinicians are increasingly requested to conduct GCRA, but many are inadequately prepared to provide these services. Methods A prospective analysis of 131 participants (48 physicians, 41 advanced-practice nurses and 42 genetic counselors) from community settings across the U.S. The course was delivered in three phases: distance didactic learning, face-to-face training and 12 months of Web-based professional development activities to support integration of skills into practice. Cancer genetics knowledge, skills, professional self-efficacy and practice changes were measured at baseline, immediate- and 14-months-post course. Results Knowledge, skills and self-efficacy scores were significantly different between practice disciplines; however, post scores increased significantly overall and for each discipline (p<.001). Fourteen-month practice outcomes reflect significant increases in provision of GCRA services (p=.018), dissemination of cancer prevention information (p=.005) and high-risk screening recommendations (p=.004) to patients, patient enrollment in research (p=.013), and educational outreach about GCRA (p=.003). Conclusions Results support the efficacy of the multi-modal course as a tool to develop a genetically literate workforce. Sustained alumni participation in Web-based professional development activities has evolved into a distance-mediated Community of Practice in clinical cancer genetics, modeling the lifelong learning goals envisioned by leading CME stakeholders. PMID:21629123

  20. Training Experiences of Family Medicine Residents on Behavioral Health Rotations.

    PubMed

    Zubatsky, Max; Brieler, Jay; Jacobs, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Although accreditation guidelines for residency in family medicine include behavioral health curriculum, little is known about resident learning activities in real world training. Our study explored residents' perceptions about and exposure to specific activities during their behavioral health rotations. Family medicine residents (N=84) recruited via faculty list serves completed a survey about their experiences during behavioral health rotations. The survey included quantitative Likert scale questions, along with open-ended questions on which a qualitative content analysis was performed. Open-ended responses indicated that many residents receive constructive observation and collaboration opportunities during their training month. However, residents wanted more time to practice behavioral health skills beyond the rotation, more practice in psychotherapy skills, and additional education on medication management. Most residents (62%) received either limited or no training in couples or family therapy during their behavioral health rotation. Residents who reported more behavioral health knowledge gain during the rotation also reported higher self-perceived competency using Motivational Interviewing (M=3.82, P<.01). While family medicine as a discipline is based on the biopsychosocial model of care, residents reported deficits in education about family systems. Residents desire additional opportunities to learn psychotherapy techniques and practice counseling skills. Family medicine residency programs and faculty may consider supplementing their core behavioral curriculum to include these content areas.

  1. Team Training and Institutional Protocols to Prevent Shoulder Dystocia Complications.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Shoulder dystocia is an obstetrical emergency that may result in significant neonatal complications. It requires rapid recognition and a coordinated response. Standardization of care, teamwork and communication, and clinical simulation are the key components of patient safety programs in obstetrics. Simulation-based team training and institutional protocols for the management of shoulder dystocia are emerging as integral components of many labor and delivery safety initiatives because of their impact on technical skills and team performance.

  2. Experiences of family medicine residents in primary care obstetrics training.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Sudha; Brown, Judith Belle; Jordan, John M

    2012-03-01

    Obstetrical practice by family physicians has been declining rapidly for many reasons over the past number of decades. One reason for this trend is family medicine residents not considering intrapartum care as part of their future careers. Decisions such as this may be related to experiences during obstetrical training. This study explored the experiences of family medicine residents in core primary care obstetrics training. Using qualitative approaches, focus groups of family medicine residents were conducted. The resulting data were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Independent and team analysis was both iterative and interpretive. Data obtained from the focus groups revealed findings relating to the following categories: (1) perceived facilitators to practicing primary care obstetrics, (2) perceived barriers to practicing primary care obstetrics, and (3) learner experiences at the fulcrum of career decision making. Family medicine residents were encouraged by favorable learning experiences and group shared-call arrangements by their primary care obstetrics preceptors. Some concerns about a career including obstetrics persisted; however, positive experiences, including influential fulcrum points, may inspire family medicine residents to pursue a career involving primary care obstetrics.

  3. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  4. Musculoskeletal exam and joint injection training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Tracie; Oyler, Julie; Harada, Caroline; Utset, Tammy

    2006-05-01

    We developed a musculoskeletal education intervention for internal medicine residents consisting of lectures, anatomic models, and a joint injection clinic. Written tests, observed musculoskeletal exams, and self-confidence scales were administered to 27 internal medicine residents before and after the intervention. Improvement was found in observed physical exam and self-reported confidence levels in performing knee injections. Confidence in shoulder injection skills improved, but remained low. Improved scores on written examination, though statistically significant, were not educationally significant. This single-institution pilot study demonstrates that a simple educational program results in improved knee and shoulder examination skills and confidence in performing knee injections.

  5. DoD-Supported Overseas Training Rotations in Tropical Medicine and Global Health, 2000-2015.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, James D; Hickey, Patrick W; Coldren, Rodney L; Korman, Amy K; Keep, Lisa W; DeFraites, Robert F; Smith, Maria; Mancuso, Luke J; Sanchez, Jose L

    2017-03-01

    In 1999, the Department of Defense developed a tropical medicine training program (TMTP) to train military physicians, medical students, and scientists in performing surveillance activities in an overseas environment. This review describes the competencies, educational approach, program participants, institutional collaborations, and process outcomes of the TMTP from 2000 to 2015. TMTP-sponsored rotations addressed a wide variety of interdisciplinary competencies, many of which have military-unique applications. Rotations consisted of both didactic and experiential (overseas) components. The program provided 282 rotations for 260 trainees between 2006 and 2015, the years for which data were available. The Department of Defense accrues benefits from this training program in three main ways: (1) building a cadre of health care professionals who will go on to work at the overseas research laboratories, (2) supporting force health protection and readiness through experiential tropical medicine training, and (3) engaging in global health collaborations and partnerships. The primary challenges include funding, health and security, trainee and site heterogeneity, supervision, trainee engagement, and burden on the host institution. The program will continue to focus on improvement in these areas, with special attention to trainee preparation, communication with both trainees and host sites, and increasing reciprocity with host sites and their faculty. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  6. American Board of Emergency Medicine report on residency training information (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Marco, Catherine A; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Counselman, Francis L; Heller, Barry N; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Nelson, Lewis S; Wahl, Robert P; Korte, Robert C; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2015-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents in those programs. We present the 2015 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs.

  7. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    PubMed

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine's report, entitled "Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety", published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation's teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release, discussion of the

  8. A Learning-Curve Approach to the Self-Assessment of Internal Medicine Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Susan C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    In response to the perceived need for primary care physicians, two major changes in internal medicine training have occurred: (1) a third year of general training was required for internal medicine board certification and (2) many hospitals developed primary care internal medicine residencies with an increased emphasis on ambulatory training.…

  9. National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM): advancing the field of translational medicine and mental health.

    PubMed

    Hallak, Jaime E C; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Quevedo, João; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2010-03-01

    Translational medicine has been described as the integrated application of innovative pharmacology tools, biomarkers, clinical methods, clinical technologies and study designs to improve the understanding of medical disorders. In medicine, translational research offers an opportunity for applying the findings obtained from basic research to every-day clinical applications. The National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is comprised of six member institutions (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade de São Paulo-Ribeirão Preto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade Estadual de Santa Catarina and a core facility that serves all centers). The objectives of the project are divided into four areas: Institutional, Research, Human Resources and Technology for the Community and Productive Sector. In this manuscript, we describe some of the approaches used to attain the main objectives of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine, which include the development of 1) animal models for bipolar disorder; 2) strategies to investigate neurobehavioral function and cognitive dysfunction associated with brain disorders; 3) experimental models of brain function and behavior, neuropsychiatric disorders, cell proliferation, and cancer; 4) Simulated Public Speaking and 5) Virtual reality simulation for inducing panic disorder and agoraphobia. The main focus of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is the development of more useful methods that allow for a better application of basic research-based knowledge to the medical field.

  10. Evaluating Hospice and Palliative Medicine Education in Pediatric Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arun L; Klick, Jeffrey C; McCracken, Courtney E; Hebbar, Kiran B

    2017-08-01

    Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) competencies are of growing importance in training general pediatricians and pediatric sub-specialists. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) emphasized pediatric trainees should understand the "impact of chronic disease, terminal conditions and death on patients and their families." Currently, very little is known regarding pediatric trainee education in HPM. We surveyed all 486 ACGME-accredited pediatric training program directors (PDs) - 200 in general pediatrics (GP), 57 in cardiology (CARD), 64 in critical care medicine (CCM), 69 in hematology-oncology (ONC) and 96 in neonatology (NICU). We collected training program's demographics, PD's attitudes and educational practices regarding HPM. The complete response rate was 30% (148/486). Overall, 45% offer formal HPM curriculum and 39% offer a rotation in HPM for trainees. HPM teaching modalities commonly reported included conferences, consultations and bedside teaching. Eighty-one percent of all respondents felt that HPM curriculum would improve trainees' ability to care for patients. While most groups felt that a HPM rotation would enhance trainees' education [GP (96%), CARD (77%), CCM (82%) and ONC (95%)], NICU PDs were more divided (55%; p < 0.05 for all comparisons vs. NICU). While most programs report perceived benefit from HPM training, there remains a paucity of opportunities for pediatric trainees. Passive teaching methods are frequently utilized in HPM curricula with minimal diversity in methods utilized to teach HPM. Opportunities to further emphasize HPM in general pediatric and pediatric sub-specialty training remains.

  11. Sports medicine training and practice opportunities for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Henehan, Michael J; Cappellari, Ann M; Stromwall, Amy E; Donaldson, Nathan G

    2013-10-01

    There is growing interest among emergency physicians to seek additional training in Sports Medicine (SM) and to add it to their clinical practice. This presents unique training and practice management issues. The majority of Primary Care SM fellowship programs list that they will accept emergency physicians, and approximately one-third have already had an emergency physician as an SM fellow. The objective of this article is to provide an overview of the key elements for emergency physicians to consider as they pursue SM career goals. Training needs such as continuity of care as it pertains to the athlete, SM skills development, and practice management are reviewed. Practice challenges such as malpractice insurance and billing issues are discussed. Examples of several practice models are presented. Evolving trends in SM practice and training opportunities for emergency physicians are discussed as well. Sports Medicine is a viable career option for emergency physicians and may complement their skills set in the management of acute injuries. Practice and training opportunities will continue to evolve as this pathway into the practice of SM gains further recognition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychiatry Training in Canadian Family Medicine Residency Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kates, Nick; Toews, John; Leichner, Pierre

    1985-01-01

    Family physicians may spend up to 50% of their time diagnosing and managing mental disorders and emotional problems, but this is not always reflected in the training they receive. This study of the teaching of psychiatry in the 16 family medicine residency programs in Canada showed that although the majority of program directors are reasonably satisfied with the current training, they see room for improvement—particularly in finding psychiatrists with a better understanding of family practice, in integrating the teaching to a greater degree with clinical work, thereby increasing its relevance, and in utilizing more suitable clinical settings. PMID:21279156

  13. Core content for training in venous and lymphatic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Min, Robert J; Comerota, Anthony J; Meissner, Mark H; Carman, Teresa L; Rathbun, Suman W; Jaff, Michael R; Wakefield, Thomas W; Feied, Craig F

    2014-01-01

    The major venous societies in the United States share a common mission to improve the standards of medical practitioners, the educational goals for teaching and training programs in venous disease, and the quality of patient care related to the treatment of venous disorders. With these important goals in mind, a task force made up of experts from the specialties of dermatology, interventional radiology, phlebology, vascular medicine, and vascular surgery was formed to develop a consensus document describing the Core Content for venous and lymphatic medicine and to develop a core educational content outline for training. This outline describes the areas of knowledge considered essential for practice in the field, which encompasses the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with acute and chronic venous and lymphatic disorders. The American Venous Forum and the American College of Phlebology have endorsed the Core Content. PMID:25059735

  14. Occupational safety training and practices in selected vocational training institutions and workplaces in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kintu, Denis; Kyakula, Michael; Kikomeko, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Several industrial accidents, some of them fatal, have been reported in Uganda. Causes could include training gaps in vocational training institutions (VTIs) and workplaces. This study investigated how occupational safety training in VTIs and workplaces is implemented. The study was carried out in five selected VTIs and workplaces in Kampala. Data were collected from instructors, workshop technicians, students, workshop managers, production supervisors, machine operators and new technicians in the workplaces. A total of 35 respondents participated in the study. The results revealed that all curricula in VTIs include a component of safety but little is practiced in VTI workshops; in workplaces no specific training content was followed and there were no regular consultations between VTIs and industry on safety skills requirements, resulting in a mismatch in safety skills training. The major constraints to safety training include inadequate funds to purchase safety equipment and inadequate literature on safety.

  15. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    PubMed

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; O’Neill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges faced by geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques prior to the course. Geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n=18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on 5-point scale). Compared to before the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, p<0.01). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, tailored to the specific needs of geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows’ self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  17. Dilation and evacuation training in maternal-fetal medicine fellowships.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, Melissa G; Turk, Jema K; Caughey, Aaron B; Steinauer, Jody E; Kerns, Jennifer L

    2014-06-01

    Many maternal-fetal medicine (MFM) specialists provide dilation and evacuation (D&E) procedures for their patients with fetal or obstetric complications. Our study describes the D&E training opportunities that are available to MFM trainees during their fellowship. National surveys of MFM fellows and fellowship program directors assessed the availability of D&E training in fellowship. Univariate and multivariate comparisons of correlates of D&E training and provision were performed. Of the 270 MFM fellows and 79 fellowship directors who were contacted, 92 (34%) and 44 (56%) responded, respectively. More than one-half of fellows (60/92) and almost one-half of fellowship programs (20/44) report organized training opportunities for D&E. Three-quarters of fellows who were surveyed believe that D&E training should be part of MFM fellowship, and one-third of fellows who have not yet been trained would like training opportunities. Being at a fellowship that offers D&E training is associated with 7.5 times higher odds of intending to provide D&E after graduation (P = .005; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-30). MFM physicians are in a unique position to provide termination services for their patients with pregnancy complications. Many MFM subspecialists provide D&E services during fellowship and plan to continue after graduation. MFM fellows express a strong interest in D&E training; therefore, D&E training opportunities should be offered as a part of MFM fellowship. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Training family medicine residents to care for children

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Curran, Vernon; Hollett, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Problem addressed There is a lack of consensus around the optimal way to train family medicine residents to care for children. Objective of program Evaluation of an ambulatory versus an inpatient pediatrics rotation for family medicine residents. Program description A 4-week pediatrics rotation for second-year family medicine residents was introduced involving half-day ambulatory pediatric clinics. A nonequivalent control group evaluation study design was followed. Patient logbook entries, as well as residents’ satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported confidence outcomes were compared between family medicine residents completing the new ambulatory rotation and those completing a traditional inpatient-ambulatory pediatrics rotation. Conclusion An ambulatory rotation in pediatrics is a feasible option for facilitating family medicine resident learning in child health care. Residents report exposure to more patient cases that reflect a family practice office setting and the same level of knowledge and confidence as residents completing an inpatient-ambulatory rotation. Intraprofessional collaboration, flexibility in scheduling, and the support of pediatric preceptors are key factors in the organization and implementation of an ambulatory rotation. PMID:21321160

  19. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  20. 78 FR 47419 - Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Occupational Safety and Health Administration Requirements for the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach Training Program; Requesting the Office of Management and Budget's (OMB... contained in the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers Program and the OSHA Outreach Training Program...

  1. Assessment of empathy in different years of internal medicine training.

    PubMed

    Mangione, Salvatore; Kane, Gregory C; Caruso, John W; Gonnella, Joseph S; Nasca, Thomas J; Hojat, Mohammadreza

    2002-07-01

    The operational measurement of physician empathy, as well as the question of whether empathy could change at different levels of medical education, is of interest to medical educators. To address this issue, 98 internal medicine residents from all 3 years of training were studied. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy was administered, and residents' empathy scores correlated with ratings on humanistic attributes made by postgraduate program directors. No statistically significant differences in scores were found among residents of different training levels. Empathy scores remained also stable during internship (test-retest reliability = 0.72). Correlation between empathy and ratings on humanism was 0.17. Thus, the findings suggest that empathy is a relatively stable trait that is not easily amenable to change in residency training programs. The issue of whether targeted educational activities for the purpose of cultivating empathy can improve empathy scores awaits empirical scrutiny.

  2. Enhancing motivational interviewing training in a family medicine clerkship.

    PubMed

    Kaltman, Stacey; WinklerPrins, Vincent; Serrano, Adriana; Talisman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among patients in the healthcare system, traditional medical training involves little or no exposure to effective behavior change techniques such as Motivational Interviewing. An online learning community for enhanced training in Motivational Interviewing was developed for 3rd-year medical students. The website included educational materials about Motivational Interviewing as well as problematic health behaviors, a repository of exemplar videos and student videos with feedback, and a discussion board. Student participants were given the opportunity to record an encounter with a patient and to receive feedback on their use of Motivational Interviewing from a faculty member. Student volunteers in the Family Medicine Clerkship at Georgetown University School of Medicine were randomized to enhanced training, which included the online learning community, or training as usual. All student volunteers completed a questionnaire assessing self-efficacy initially and at the end of the clerkship. Students also participated in an Observed Structured Clinical Exam, which was subsequently coded by a blinded rater for behavioral counts of Motivational Interviewing techniques, key steps in Motivational Interviewing, and overall Motivational Interviewing style. Students in the enhanced training arm were rated as having significantly higher scores in Motivational Interviewing style in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam than training as usual students. A significant increase in self-efficacy from pre- to posttest in the overall sample was observed but between-group differences were not significant. Student feedback was particularly positive regarding video recorded practice sessions with patients and individualized feedback. The results of this study as well as student feedback suggest that future work should include patient practice sessions and individualized feedback in developing Motivational Interviewing curricula.

  3. [Training of institutional research networks as a strategy of improvement].

    PubMed

    Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel

    2017-01-01

    The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) through the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud (Health Research Council) has promoted a strong link between the generation of scientific knowledge and the clinical care through the program Redes Institucionales de Investigación (Institutional Research Network Program), whose main aim is to promote and generate collaborative research between clinical, basic, epidemiologic, educational, economic and health services researchers, seeking direct benefits for patients, as well as to generate a positive impact on institutional processes. All of these research lines have focused on high-priority health issues in Mexico. The IMSS internal structure, as well as the sufficient health services coverage, allows the integration of researchers at the three levels of health care into these networks. A few years after their creation, these networks have already generated significant results, and these are currently applied in the institutional regulations in diseases that represent a high burden to health care. Two examples are the National Health Care Program for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction "Código Infarto", and the Early Detection Program on Chronic Kidney Disease; another result is the generation of multiple scientific publications, and the promotion of training of human resources in research from the same members of our Research Networks. There is no doubt that the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud advances steadily implementing the translational research, which will keep being fruitful to the benefit of our patients, and of our own institution.

  4. Development and implementation of an emergency medicine graduate training program at Addis Ababa University School of Medicine: challenges and successes.

    PubMed

    Teklu, Sisay; Azazh, Aklilu; Seyoum, Nebyou; Woldetsadik, Assefu; Tupesis, Janis P; Wubben, Ryan; Hunchak, Cheryl; Meshkat, Nazanin; Tefera, Girma; Maskalyk, James

    2014-07-01

    Ethiopians experience high rates of acute illness and injury that have been sub-optimally addressed by the existing health care system. High rates of patient morbidity and mortality prompted the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine (AAU-SM) to prioritize the establishment of emergency medicine (EM) as a medical specialty in Ethiopia to meet this acute health system need. To review the EM residency training program developed and implemented at AAU-SM in partnership with the University of Wisconsin (UW), the University of Toronto (UT) and University of Cape Town (UCT) and to evaluate the progress and challenges to date. An EM Task Force (EMTF) at AAU-SM developed a context-specific three-year graduate EM curriculum with UW input. This curriculum has been co-implemented by faculty teachers from AAU-SM, UT and UW. The curriculum together with all documents (written, audio, video) are reviewed and used as a resource for this article. Seventeen residents are currently in full-time training. Five residents research projects are finalized and 100% of residents passed their year-end exams. A novel graduate EM training program has been successfully developed and implemented at AAU-SM. Interim results suggest that this curriculum and tri-institutional collaboration has been successful in addressing the emergency health needs of Ethiopians and bolstering the expertise of Ethiopian physicians. This program, at the forefront of EM education in Africa, may serve as an effective model for future EM training development throughout Africa.

  5. Institute on Human Values in Medicine. Proceedings of the First Session, April 12-14, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Health and Human Values, Philadelphia, PA.

    The document relates the proceedings of the Institute on Human Values in Medicine, which explored issues involving human values (humanities) and medicine. The purpose of the first conference is to investigate some of the questions involving this relationship and to see if there is a need for better interpolation of the knowledge of the humanities…

  6. Emergency Medicine Resources Within the Clinical Translational Science Institutes: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Meurer, William J; Quinn, James; Lindsell, Christopher; Schneider, Sandra; Newgard, Craig D

    2016-06-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program aims to strengthen and support translational research by accelerating the process of translating laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, training a new generation of clinical and translational researchers, and engaging communities in clinical research efforts. Yet, little is known about how emergency care researchers have interacted with and utilized the resources of academic institutions with CTSAs. The purpose of this survey was to describe how emergency care researchers use local CTSA resources, to ascertain what proportion of CTSA consortium members have active emergency care research (ECR) programs, and to solicit participation in a national CTSA-associated emergency care translational research network. This study was a survey of all emergency departments affiliated with a CTSA. Of the 65 CTSA consortium members, three had no ECR program and we obtained responses from 46 of the remaining 62 (74% response rate). The interactions with and resources used by emergency care researchers varied widely. Methodology and biostatistics support was most frequently accessed (77%), followed closely by education and training programs (60%). Several ECR programs (76%) had submitted for funding through CTSAs, with 71% receiving awards. Most CTSA consortium members had an active ECR infrastructure: 21 (46%) had 24/7 availability to recruit and screen for research, and 21 (46%) had less than 24/7 research recruitment. A number of emergency care research programs participated in National Institutes of Health research networks with the Neurological Emergencies Treatment Trials network most highly represented with 23 (59%) sites. Most ECR programs (96%) were interested in participating in a CTSA-based emergency care translational research network. Despite little initial involvement in development of the CTSA program, there has been moderate interaction between CTSAs and emergency care. There is considerable

  7. Effects of residency training in family medicine v. internship training on professional attitudes and practice patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Maheux, B; Beaudoin, C; Jacques, A; Lambert, J; Lévesque, A

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the professional attitudes and practice patterns of physicians with residency training in family medicine differ from those of generalists with internship training. DESIGN: Mail survey conducted in 1985-86. SETTING: Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS: A stratified random sample of French-speaking family and general practitioners who graduated after 1972 (325 physicians with residency training and 304 with internship training) (response rate 82%). MAIN RESULTS: Physicians with residency training were 3 years younger on average than those with internship training, were more likely to be female (38% v. 18%, p less than 0.001) and were more likely to work on a salaried basis in CLSCs (public community health centres) (36% v. 14%, p less than 0.001). Even after these confounding factors were controlled for, physicians with residency training seemed to be more sensitive to the psychosocial aspects of patient care and tended to attach more importance to informing patients about useful materials and resources concerning their health problems. They were not, however, more likely to value health counselling or integrate it in medical practice. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide some evidence that the new requirement that physicians complete a residency in family medicine to obtain medical licensure in general practice in Quebec may foster a more patient-centred approach to health care. PMID:1544077

  8. Assessing research methodology training needs in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Supino, P G; Richardson, L D

    1999-04-01

    To determine the perceptions of emergency medicine (EM) academic faculty leaders and other academic emergency physicians regarding importance and knowledge of specific research methodology content areas and training priorities. The authors conducted a confidential mail survey of 52 EM academic chairs, 112 residency directors, 116 research directors, and 400 randomly selected other members of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM). Respondents rated the importance of knowledge about each of 12 content areas for enhancing research productivity, rated their own knowledge of these areas, and identified training priorities. Standard descriptive statistics were used to characterize the study population; subgroup differences were examined by nonparametric statistics. 551 (81%) of those sampled returned surveys. Most (90%) respondents thought that knowledge about all selected content areas was important for enhancing research productivity; however, 7-37% (depending on the topic) reported little knowledge or experience in specific areas. Research directors reported highest overall knowledge levels (p < 0.001), followed by chairs, residency directors, and other SAEM members. Top training priorities (identified by all subgroups) included study planning (70%), problem identification/hypothesis construction (41%), and proposal writing (38%). These data support the continued need to offer broad training in research methodology, but suggest that greater emphasis be given to concepts involved in initiating and planning a study and to strengthening research proposal writing skills. These results should be of interest to academic departments who must address their own training needs, and help support the development of research methodology curricula on regional and national levels to advance the state of research in the specialty of EM.

  9. [Quality assurance, certification and the new Institute for Quality in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Hakenberg, O W; Schroeder, A

    2014-08-01

    The political partners of the new coalition federal government in Germany have agreed on the founding of a new Institute for Quality in Medicine based on a law regulating more transparency in the quality assessment of hospitals. How can such an institute find its place in the already existing diverse landscape of quality control and quality management in the German health care system?

  10. Director of Duke Institute Wants To Make Medicine More of a Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (North Carolina) is committed to making better use of patient information for medical research, and is building a database from the institute's clinical trials. His approach is to provide biomedical researchers with daily involvement in medicine rather than management. (MSE)

  11. Director of Duke Institute Wants To Make Medicine More of a Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, David L.

    1998-01-01

    The director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (North Carolina) is committed to making better use of patient information for medical research, and is building a database from the institute's clinical trials. His approach is to provide biomedical researchers with daily involvement in medicine rather than management. (MSE)

  12. Training Physician Investigators in Medicine and Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Melanie R.; Goldfrank, Lewis R.; Mendelsohn, Alan L.; Dreyer, Benard P.; Foltin, George L.; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. Methods. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows’ mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Results. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health–related research or practice (9/12). Conclusions. A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health. PMID:22594745

  13. Training physician investigators in medicine and public health research.

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Marc N; Jay, Melanie R; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Mendelsohn, Alan L; Dreyer, Benard P; Foltin, George L; Lipkin, Mack; Schwartz, Mark D

    2012-07-01

    We have described and evaluated the impact of a unique fellowship program designed to train postdoctoral, physician fellows in research at the interface of medicine and public health. We developed a rigorous curriculum in public health content and research methods and fostered linkages with research mentors and local public health agencies. Didactic training provided the foundation for fellows' mentored research initiatives, which addressed real-world challenges in advancing the health status of vulnerable urban populations. Two multidisciplinary cohorts (6 per cohort) completed this 2-year degree-granting program and engaged in diverse public health research initiatives on topics such as improving pediatric care outcomes through health literacy interventions, reducing hospital readmission rates among urban poor with multiple comorbidities, increasing cancer screening uptake, and broadening the reach of addiction screening and intervention. The majority of fellows (10/12) published their fellowship work and currently have a career focused in public health-related research or practice (9/12). A fellowship training program can prepare physician investigators for research careers that bridge the divide between medicine and public health.

  14. Institutional Profile: Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P

    2012-03-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international nonprofit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several national/ethnic genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine on society in various countries. Educational activities also include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia(®), which are high-profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts.

  15. 76 FR 64952 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry . Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.... Purpose: The Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (``Advisory...

  16. Correlation of United States Medical Licensing Examination and Internal Medicine In-Training Examination Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Jose A., Jr.; Greer, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    The Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (ITE) is administered during residency training in the United States as a self-assessment and program assessment tool. Performance on this exam correlates with outcome on the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying examination. Internal Medicine Program Directors use the United States Medical…

  17. American Board of Emergency Medicine Report on Residency and Fellowship Training Information (2016-2017).

    PubMed

    Marco, Catherine A; Nelson, Lewis S; Baren, Jill M; Beeson, Michael S; Carius, Michael L; Chudnofsky, Carl R; Gausche-Hill, Marianne; Goyal, Deepi G; Keim, Samuel M; Kowalenko, Terry; Muelleman, Robert L; Joldersma, Kevin B

    2017-05-01

    The American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) gathers extensive background information on emergency medicine residency programs and the residents training in those programs. We present the 2017 annual report on the status of US emergency medicine training programs. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P < .001). Two months after the course, fellows reported a high level of sustained skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care subspecialty training.

    PubMed

    Lorin, Scott; Heffner, John; Carson, Shannon

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of internal medicine residents regarding pulmonary and critical care medicine (PCCM) training. Prospective study. Three university hospitals. An eight-page survey was distributed and collected between March 1, 2002, and June 30, 2002. All internal medicine or internal medicine/pediatric residents training at the three institutions were eligible for the study. One hundred seventy-eight residents in internal medicine from an eligible pool of 297 residents returned the survey (61% response rate). PCCM accounted for only 3.4% of the career choices. Forty-one percent of the residents seriously considered a pulmonary and/or critical care fellowship during their residency. Of these residents, 23.5% found the combination of programs the more attractive option, while 2.8% found pulmonary alone and 14.5% found critical care alone more attractive. Key factors associated with a higher resident interest in PCCM subspecialty training included more weeks in the ICU (p = 0.008), more role models in PCCM (3.02 +/- 0.78 vs 3.45 +/- 0.78, p = 0.0004), and resident observations of a greater sense of satisfaction among PCCM faculty (3.07 +/- 0.82 vs 3.33 +/- 0.82, p = 0.04) and fellows (3.05 +/- 0.69 vs 3.31 +/- 0.86, p = 0.03) [mean +/- SD]. The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM fellowship that would attract residents to the field included intellectual stimulation (69%), opportunities to manage critically ill patients (51%), application of complex physiologic principles (45%), number of procedures performed (31%), and academically challenging rounds (29%). The five most commonly cited attributes of PCCM that would dissuade residents from the field included overly demanding responsibilities with lack of leisure time (54%), stress among faculty and fellows (45%), management responsibilities for chronically ill patients (30%), poor match of career with resident personality (24%), and treatment of pulmonary diseases (16%). Internal

  20. Solar installer training: Home Builders Institute Job Corps

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, K.; Mann, R.

    1996-10-01

    The instructors describe the solar installation training program operated since 1979 by the Home Builders Institute, the Educational Arm of the National Association of Home Builders for the US Department of Labor, Job Corps in San Diego, CA. The authors are the original instructors and have developed the program since its inception by a co-operative effort between the Solar Energy Industries Association, NAHB and US DOL. Case studies of a few of the 605 students who have gone to work over the years after the training are included. It is one of the most successful programs under the elaborate Student Performance Monitoring Information System used by all Job Corps programs. Job Corps is a federally funded residential job training program for low income persons 16--24 years of age. Discussion details the curriculum and methods used in the program including classroom, shop and community service projects. Solar technologies including all types of hot water heating, swimming pool and spa as well as photovoltaics are included.

  1. The U.S. training institute for dissemination and implementation research in health

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The science of dissemination and implementation (D&I) is advancing the knowledge base for how best to integrate evidence-based interventions within clinical and community settings and how to recast the nature or conduct of the research itself to make it more relevant and actionable in those settings. While the field is growing, there are only a few training programs for D&I research; this is an important avenue to help build the field’s capacity. To improve the United States’ capacity for D&I research, the National Institutes of Health and Veterans Health Administration collaborated to develop a five-day training institute for postdoctoral level applicants aspiring to advance this science. Methods We describe the background, goals, structure, curriculum, application process, trainee evaluation, and future plans for the Training in Dissemination and Implementation Research in Health (TIDIRH). Results The TIDIRH used a five-day residential immersion to maximize opportunities for trainees and faculty to interact. The train-the-trainer-like approach was intended to equip participants with materials that they could readily take back to their home institutions to increase interest and further investment in D&I. The TIDIRH curriculum included a balance of structured large group discussions and interactive small group sessions. Thirty-five of 266 applicants for the first annual training institute were accepted from a variety of disciplines, including psychology (12 trainees); medicine (6 trainees); epidemiology (5 trainees); health behavior/health education (4 trainees); and 1 trainee each from education & human development, health policy and management, health services research, public health studies, public policy and social work, with a maximum of two individuals from any one institution. The institute was rated as very helpful by attendees, and by six months after the institute, a follow-up survey (97% return rate) revealed that 72% had initiated a new

  2. Otolaryngology education in family medicine and communication sciences training.

    PubMed

    Baig, Samir; Cunningham, Michael J

    2011-10-01

    To characterize the extent and format of otolaryngology instruction during family medicine and communication disorders training and to determine the comfort level of graduate trainees to assess specific hearing disorders. Online surveys were sent to program directors in the fields of family medicine, audiology, and speech pathology. Directors were asked to delineate methods of teaching otolaryngology-related material and to define how often otolaryngologists were involved in their curricula. They were also asked to rate their graduate trainees' ability to manage 3 clinical scenarios involving pediatric hearing impairment. A total of 682 surveys were sent using e-mail addresses from the American Medical Association and the Council of Academic Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Response rates were 20% for family medicine programs and 30% for each of the communication science disciplines. Virtually all respondent family medicine programs have dedicated instruction in otolaryngology, typically in the form of a clinical rotation (98%). Ninety-five percent of audiology programs involve an otolaryngologist in teaching compared with 55% of speech pathology programs. Otolaryngology-related diagnostic examination skills are taught by most programs in all 3 disciplines; confirmation of skills acquisition, however, is lacking. Directors rated the competence of their trainees to manage hearing disorders at an average of 3.4 for audiology, 2.7 for speech pathology, and 2.6 for family medicine graduates on a 4-point scale. Respondent directors from all 3 disciplines make a concerted effort to teach otolaryngology-related topics. A greater emphasis on those otolaryngology disorders requiring multidisciplinary care appears necessary, as does more formal instruction in and competency evaluation of diagnostic examination skills.

  3. New paradigm in training of undergraduate clinical skills: the NEPTUNE-CS project at the Split University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Simunovic, Vladimir J; Hozo, Izet; Rakic, Mladen; Jukic, Marko; Tomic, Snjezana; Kokic, Slaven; Ljutic, Dragan; Druzijanic, Nikica; Grkovic, Ivica; Simunovic, Filip; Marasovic, Dujomir

    2010-10-01

    Clinical skills' training is arguably the weakest point in medical schools' curriculum. This study briefly describes how we at the Split University School of Medicine cope with this problem. We consider that, over the last decades, a considerable advancement in teaching methodologies, tools, and assessment of students has been made. However, there are many unresolved issues, most notably: (i) the institutional value system, impeding the motivation of the teaching staff; (ii) lack of a strong mentoring system; (iii) organization, timing, and placement of training in the curriculum; (iv) lack of publications pertinent to training; and (v) unwillingness of patients to participate in student training. To improve the existing training models we suggest increased institutional awareness of obstacles, as well as willingness to develop mechanisms for increasing the motivation of faculty. It is necessary to introduce changes in the structure and timing of training and to complement it with a catalog, practicum, and portfolio of clinical skills. At Split University School of Medicine, we developed a new paradigm aimed to improve the teaching of clinical skills called "Neptune-CSS," which stands for New Paradigm in Training of Undergraduate Clinical Skills in Split.

  4. Providing competency-based family medicine residency training in substance abuse in the new millennium: a model curriculum

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This article, developed for the Betty Ford Institute Consensus Conference on Graduate Medical Education (December, 2008), presents a model curriculum for Family Medicine residency training in substance abuse. Methods The authors reviewed reports of past Family Medicine curriculum development efforts, previously-identified barriers to education in high risk substance use, approaches to overcoming these barriers, and current training guidelines of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and their Family Medicine Residency Review Committee. A proposed eight-module curriculum was developed, based on substance abuse competencies defined by Project MAINSTREAM and linked to core competencies defined by the ACGME. The curriculum provides basic training in high risk substance use to all residents, while also addressing current training challenges presented by U.S. work hour regulations, increasing international diversity of Family Medicine resident trainees, and emerging new primary care practice models. Results This paper offers a core curriculum, focused on screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment, which can be adapted by residency programs to meet their individual needs. The curriculum encourages direct observation of residents to ensure that core skills are learned and trains residents with several "new skills" that will expand the basket of substance abuse services they will be equipped to provide as they enter practice. Conclusions Broad-based implementation of a comprehensive Family Medicine residency curriculum should increase the ability of family physicians to provide basic substance abuse services in a primary care context. Such efforts should be coupled with faculty development initiatives which ensure that sufficient trained faculty are available to teach these concepts and with efforts by major Family Medicine organizations to implement and enforce residency requirements for substance abuse training. PMID

  5. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training in Mental Health for Staff in Residential Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    The annotated bibliography of periodical literature through August of 1967 is the third in the series of four pertaining to inservice mental health training for personnel in residential institutions. It includes materials on training in mental hospitals, institutions for the mentally retarded, child care residential institutions, and nursing…

  6. Report on the Leadership Training Institute (LTI) and Leadership in Library Education (LLE).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. School of Library Science.

    A report on the Leadership Training Institute (LTI) and its successor, the Leadership in Library Education Institute (LLEI), reviews 1974-75 new and continuing activities and provides an assessment of program-activity patterns for the last three years. Activities reported include site visits to training institutes; special meetings of…

  7. Osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions: a decentralized model for facilitating accreditation and program quality.

    PubMed

    Peska, Don N; Opipari, Michael I; Watson, D Keith

    2009-06-01

    Osteopathic medicine has experienced significant growth in the number of accredited colleges and graduates over the past decade. Anticipating that growth and recognizing a responsibility to provide sufficient opportunities for quality postdoctoral training, the American Osteopathic Association created a national network of educational consortia to meet the needs of those graduates. These osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions (OPTIs) were to provide enhanced capability for the development and accreditation of new programs, quality oversight, and access to academic resources for their members. The plan reached full implementation in 1999 when all graduate training programs were required to become members of one of these consortia. Although several contributing factors can be considered, an increase in the rate at which training programs have obtained approval by the American Osteopathic Association has occurred under the OPTI model. Quality indicators are more elusive. Each OPTI provides peer-driven oversight to curriculum and faculty development and closely monitors outcomes such as in-service examination scores, certification board passage rates, and resident evaluations of programs.The strategy has enabled a much-sought-after transformation in osteopathic graduate medical education that has provided both strength and accountability to the preexisting infrastructure. As a decentralized accreditation model, OPTI is still evolving and warrants continued application and study.

  8. [The department of occupational medicine of the State School of Occupational Medicine at the National Institute of Occupational Medicine in Warsaw in 1926-1939].

    PubMed

    Braczkowska, B; Jabłoński, L

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Occupational Hygiene, State School of Hygiene at the National Institute of Hygiene was established in 1926/27. Prof. Brunon Nowakowski was its founder and the first Director. Teaching and providing of highly qualified personnel for occupational medicine institutions was the main area of the Department's activity. The Department also carried out scientific research focusing on organisation of labour hygiene in Poland, and occupational diseases, lead poisoning in particular. The results of studies carried out by the Department provided the basis for the elaboration of numerous legal regulations in the area of occupational medicine.

  9. Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health: TRIUMPH.

    PubMed

    Haq, Cynthia; Stearns, Marjorie; Brill, John; Crouse, Byron; Foertsch, Julie; Knox, Kjersti; Stearns, Jeffrey; Skochelak, Susan; Golden, Robert N

    2013-03-01

    The number of U.S. medical school graduates who choose to practice in health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) has not kept pace with the needs of society. The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health has created a new program that prepares medical students to reduce health disparities for urban medically underserved populations in Milwaukee. The authors describe the Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health (TRIUMPH) program and provide early, short-term outcomes. TRIUMPH integrates urban clinical training, community and public health curricula, longitudinal community and public health projects, mentoring, and peer support for select third- and fourth-year medical students. The authors tracked and held focus groups with program participants to assess their knowledge, skills, satisfaction, confidence, and residency matches. The authors surveyed community partners to assess their satisfaction with students and the program. From 2009 to 2012, 53 students enrolled in the program, and 45 have conducted projects with community organizations. Participants increased their knowledge, skills, confidence, and commitment to work with urban medically underserved populations. Compared with local peers, TRIUMPH graduates were more likely to select primary care specialties and residency programs serving urban underserved populations. Community leaders have reported high levels of satisfaction and benefits; their interest in hosting students exceeds program capacity. Early, short-term outcomes confirm that TRIUMPH is achieving its desired goals: attracting and preparing medical students to work with urban underserved communities. The program serves as a model to prepare physicians to meet the needs of urban HPSAs.

  10. Trends and different educational pathways for training physicians in nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A; Smith, Gary T; Baker, Stephen R

    2008-12-01

    The introduction of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT), single photon-emission CT/CT, and software packages for multimodality imaging has accelerated the need for nuclear medicine physicians to obtain more training in cross-sectional imaging, especially in CT. In recent years, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the American Board of Radiology, and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine have promulgated new rules and regulations. In addition, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the American College of Radiology, and the American College of Cardiology Foundation have crafted new guidelines and training requirements. All these changes have consequences for the education of physicians in nuclear medicine. Self-referral and concerns about radiation exposure from nuclear medicine examinations and CT are also affecting the education of physicians practicing nuclear medicine. The authors examine the impact of these developments on training and certification in nuclear medicine and suggest another pathway to train some nuclear medicine physicians.

  11. 78 FR 48440 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: August 29, 2013, 9:00...

  12. Benchmarks of support in internal medicine residency training programs.

    PubMed

    Wolfsthal, Susan D; Beasley, Brent W; Kopelman, Richard; Stickley, William; Gabryel, Timothy; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    To identify benchmarks of financial and staff support in internal medicine residency training programs and their correlation with indicators of quality. A survey instrument to determine characteristics of support of residency training programs was mailed to each member program of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine. Results were correlated with the three-year running average of the pass rates on the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of 394 surveys, 287 (73%) were completed: 74% of respondents were program directors and 20% were both chair and program director. The mean duration as program director was 7.5 years (median = 5), but it was significantly lower for women than for men (4.9 versus 8.1; p =.001). Respondents spent 62% of their time in educational and administrative duties, 30% in clinical activities, 5% in research, and 2% in other activities. Most chief residents were PGY4s, with 72% receiving compensation additional to base salary. On average, there was one associate program director for every 33 residents, one chief resident for every 27 residents, and one staff person for every 21 residents. Most programs provided trainees with incremental educational stipends, meals while oncall, travel and meeting expenses, and parking. Support from pharmaceutical companies was used for meals, books, and meeting expenses. Almost all programs provided meals for applicants, with 15% providing travel allowances and 37% providing lodging. The programs' board pass rates significantly correlated with the numbers of faculty fulltime equivalents (FTEs), the numbers of resident FTEs per office staff FTEs, and the numbers of categorical and preliminary applications received and ranked by the programs in 1998 and 1999. Regression analyses demonstrated three independent predictors of the programs' board pass rates: number of faculty (a positive predictor), percentage of clinical work

  13. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  14. Training veterinary students in shelter medicine: a service-learning community-classroom technique.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Brenda J; Gruen, Margaret E

    2014-01-01

    Shelter medicine is a rapidly developing field of great importance, and shelters themselves provide abundant training opportunities for veterinary medical students. Students trained in shelter medicine have opportunities to practice zoonotic and species-specific infectious disease control, behavioral evaluation and management, primary care, animal welfare, ethics, and public policy issues. A range of sheltering systems now exists, from brick-and-mortar facilities to networks of foster homes with no centralized facility. Exposure to a single shelter setting may not allow students to understand the full range of sheltering systems that exist; a community-classroom approach introduces students to a diverse array of sheltering systems while providing practical experience. This article presents the details and results of a series of 2-week elective clinical rotations with a focus on field and service learning in animal shelters. The overall aim was to provide opportunities that familiarized students with sheltering systems and delivered primary-care training. Other priorities included increasing awareness of public health concerns and equipping students to evaluate shelters on design, operating protocols, infectious disease control, animal enrichment, and community outreach. Students were required to participate in rounds and complete a project that addressed a need recognized by them during the rotation. This article includes costs associated with the rotation, a blueprint for how the rotation was carried out at our institution, and details of shelters visited and animals treated, including a breakdown of treatments provided. Also discussed are the student projects and student feedback on this valuable clinical experience.

  15. Gaps in Radiation Therapy Awareness: Results From an Educational Multi-institutional Survey of US Internal Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Shaverdian, Narek; Yoo, Sun Mi; Cook, Ryan; Chang, Eric M; Jiang, Naomi; Yuan, Ye; Sandler, Kiri; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy

    2017-08-01

    Internists and primary care providers play a growing role in cancer care. We therefore evaluated the awareness of radiation therapy in general and specifically the clinical utility of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among current US internal medicine residents. A web-based institutional review board-approved multi-institutional survey was distributed to US internal medicine residency programs. The survey evaluated trainee demographic characteristics, baseline radiation oncology awareness, knowledge of the role of SBRT for early-stage NSCLC, and whether the survey successfully improved awareness. Thirty US internal medicine programs participated, with an overall participant response rate of 46% (1177 of 2551). Of the trainees, 93% (n=1076) reported no radiation oncology education in their residency, 39% (n=452) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in an oncologic emergency, and 26% (n=293) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in the setting of a newly diagnosed cancer. Of the participants, 76% (n=850) correctly identified that surgical resection is the standard treatment in operable early-stage NSCLC, but only 50% (n=559) of participants would recommend SBRT to a medically inoperable patient, followed by 31% of participants (n=347) who were unsure of the most appropriate treatment, and 10% (n=117) who recommended waiting to offer palliative therapy. Ninety percent of participants (n=1029) agreed that they would benefit from further training on when to consult radiation oncology. Overall, 96% (n=1072) indicated that the survey increased their knowledge and awareness of the role of SBRT. The majority of participating trainees received no education in radiation oncology in their residency, reported a lack of confidence regarding when to consult radiation oncology, and overwhelmingly agreed that they would benefit from further training. These findings

  16. Institution-Specific Factors Associated With Family Medicine Residency Match Rates.

    PubMed

    Wimsatt, Leslie A; Cooke, James M; Biggs, Wendy S; Heidelbaugh, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    Phenomenon: Existing research provides little specific evidence regarding the association between public and private medical school curricular settings and the proportion of medical students matching into family medicine careers. Institutional differences have been inadequately investigated, as students who match into family medicine are often consolidated into the umbrella of primary care along with those matching in internal medicine and pediatrics. However, understanding medical school contexts in relation to career choice is critical toward designing targeted strategies to address the projected shortage of family physicians. This study examines factors associated with family medicine residency match rates and the extent to which such factors differ across medical school settings. We combined data from a survey of 123 departments of family medicine with graduate placement rates reported to the American Academy of Family Physicians over a 2-year period. Chi-square/Fisher's Exact texts, t tests, and linear regression analyses were used to identify factors significantly associated with average match rate percentages. The resulting data set included 85% of the U.S. medical schools with Departments of Family Medicine that reported 2011 and 2012 residency match rates in family medicine. Match rates in family medicine were higher among graduates of public than private medical schools-11% versus 7%, respectively, t(92) = 4.00, p < .001. Using a linear regression model and controlling for institutional type, the results indicated 2% higher match rates among schools with smaller annual clerkship enrollments (p  = .03), 3% higher match rates among schools with clerkships lasting more than 3 to 4 weeks (p  = .003), 3% higher match rates at schools with at least 1 family medicine faculty member in a senior leadership role (p  = .04), and 8% lower match rates at private medical schools offering community medicine electives (p < .001, R(2) = .48), F(6, 64) = 9.95, p

  17. Institutional profile: University of Florida Health Personalized Medicine Program.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Larisa H; Weitzel, Kristin W; Elsey, Amanda R; Liu, Xinyue; Mosley, Scott A; Smith, Donald M; Staley, Benjamin J; Winterstein, Almut G; Mathews, Carol A; Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Starostik, Petr; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nelson, David R; Johnson, Julie A

    2017-04-01

    The University of Florida (UF) Health Personalized Medicine Program launched in 2012 with CYP2C19 genotyping for clopidogrel response at UF Health Shands Hospital. We have since expanded CYP2C19 genotyping to UF Health Jacksonville and established the infrastructure at UF Health to support clinical implementation for five additional gene-drug pairs: TPMT-thiopurines, IFNL3 (IL28B)-PEG IFN-α-based regimens, CYP2D6-opioids, CYP2D6/CYP2C19-antidepressants and CYP2C19-proton pump inhibitors. We are contributing to the evidence based on outcomes with genotype-guided therapy through pragmatic studies of our clinical implementations. In addition, we have developed a broad array of educational programs for providers, trainees and students that incorporate personal genotype evaluation to enhance participant learning.

  18. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter research focusing on the past 25 years.

    PubMed

    Pandolf, Kent B; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W; Young, Andrew J; Zambraski, Edward J

    2011-12-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of pocket guides providing guidance for sustaining Warfighter health and performance in Southwest Asia, Somalia, the former Republic of Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Haiti. Issues identified during Operation Desert Storm elicited research that improved nutritional guidelines for protracted desert operations; safer use of nuclear, chemical, and biological protective clothing; equipment, development, and fielding of efficient microclimate cooling systems; and effective evaluation of pharmaceuticals to protect soldiers from chemical and biological threats. During the first decade of the 21st century, USARIEM and the Department of the Army published official medical/performance doctrines for operations in the heat and cold and at high altitude. The current Global War on Terrorism focused research to improve doctrines for hot, cold, and high-altitude operations, reduce musculoskeletal training injuries, provide improved field nutrition, more efficient planning for operational water requirements, and improve both military clothing and materiel. This article also describes the critically important interactions and communications between USARIEM and deployed units and the benefits to Warfighters from this association. This report presents USARIEM's unique and world-class facilities, organizational changes, scientific and support personnel, and major research accomplishments, including the publication of 2,200 scientific papers over the past 25 yr.

  19. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now

    PubMed Central

    Sabath, Bruce F.; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution – a community hospital – in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available. PMID:27802866

  20. Point-of-care ultrasonography as a training milestone for internal medicine residents: the time is now.

    PubMed

    Sabath, Bruce F; Singh, Gurkeerat

    2016-01-01

    Point-of-care (POC) ultrasonography is considered fundamental in emergency medicine training and recently has become a milestone in critical care fellowship programs as well. Currently, there is no such standard requirement for internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We present a new case and briefly review another case at our institution - a community hospital - in which internal medicine house staff trained in ultrasonography were able to uncover unexpected and critical diagnoses that significantly changed patient care and outcomes. We also review the growing evidence of the application of ultrasound in the diagnosis of a myriad of conditions encountered in general internal medicine as well as the mounting data on the ability of internal medicine residents to apply this technology accurately at the bedside. We advocate that the literature has sufficiently established the role of POC ultrasonography in general internal medicine that there should no longer be any delay in giving this an official place in the development of internal medicine trainees. This may be particularly useful in the community hospital setting where 24-h echocardiography or other sonography may not be readily available.

  1. Survey of Internal Medicine Physicians Trained in Three Different Eras: Reflections on Duty-Hour Reform

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Carolyn M.; Issa, Meltiady; Croghan, Ivana T.; Buechler, Tamara E.; Burton, M. Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To survey internal medicine physicians and residents who have completed residency in three different eras of medical training regarding their experiences during their intern year and their perceptions of duty-hour reform. Methods An online survey was administered to 268 residents, fellows, and staff physicians who had completed or were completing residency during one of three eras of training: before the 80-hour work week, after the 80-hour work week (instituted in 2003), and after the 16-hour limit on continuous shifts for interns (instituted in 2011). The survey assessed experiences during their intern year of residency and perceptions regarding resident duty-hour reform. Results The majority of respondents (n = 32; 54%) indicated that duty-hour restrictions would result in residents being less prepared for their future careers. In addition, 36% (n = 21) of respondents anticipated a decrease in the quality of patient care under the restricted duty hours. A total of 41% (n = 24) were undecided regarding the impact of duty-hour reform on patient care. Respondents reported time spent on independent study, research, and conference attendance did not increase following the institution of duty-hour restrictions. Conclusions Survey responses indicated that after 18 months of experience with the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour restrictions, physician opinions were mixed and a substantial number remain undecided regarding the impact of duty-hour restrictions on resident career preparedness and the quality of patient care. PMID:24945179

  2. [Social medicine service of undergraduate medicine students in the Hospitalary Donation Coordination area of the Mexican Institute of Social Security].

    PubMed

    Maya-Álvarez, Jorge Arturo; Lechuga-García, Rafael; Querevalú-Murillo, Walter

    2012-01-01

    The cadaveric or donor-related transplant is a worldwide priority program. In Mexico, the human hospitalary resources primarily assigned to issues about donation and transplant are scarce. In our country, recent legal changes permit that undergraduate medicine students under University linking programs can be integrated in activities that guarantee a social profit, for example, the hospitalary donation coordination of the Mexican Institute of Social Security. This is a proposal with a legal framework, based in experiences of the Barcelona Provincial Hospital Clínic, that integrate undergraduate medicine students as monitors in the Hospitalary Donation Coordination area of the Mexican Institute of Social Security who are available 24 hours. During this social service stage, undergraduate medical students can benefit their community by optimizing potential for transplants via hospital organ donations.

  3. FCPS training in the specialty of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation for physicians in Pakistan: The option less known.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Ahmad Zaheer

    2016-01-01

    There has been a growing demand for rehabilitation services in Pakistan in recent years, likely due to increasing prevalence of disability. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) is a branch of medicine which deals with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of functional impairments resulting from neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. Physiatrists are physicians who specialize in the specialty of PM&R. College of Physicians and Surgeons of Pakistan started FCPS training in PM&R in the late 1990s. There are various training institutes within and outside Pakistan which are accredited for FCPS training in PM&R. There is a huge vacuum in this specialty in the country likely due to lack of awareness among health care providers. It is considered to be the specialty of the future due to its rapid growth potential, opportunities for sub specializations and unique skills.

  4. Emergency medicine residents’ attitudes and opinions of in-training exam preparation

    PubMed Central

    Eastin, Travis R; Bernard, Aaron W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Emergency Medicine (EM) residents take the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM) in-training exam, and performance on this exam has been shown to correlate to performance on the ABEM qualifying exam. Though many residencies have in-training exam preparation activities, there is little data on the effectiveness of these efforts. This study aimed to elicit resident perspectives about the exam and exam preparation in order to generate hypotheses and better inform future preparation efforts. Methods Second- and third-year EM residents at a single institution were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative methodology was used to analyze the data. Results Thirteen EM residents participated in the study. Eight major themes and 18 sub-themes were identified. These were further characterized as relating to the exam itself or to exam preparation. Residents generally value the in-training exam. Sixty-nine percent noted that it provided an assessment of their current knowledge and deficiencies. Thirty-eight percent noted that it improved familiarity with the qualifying exam. Regarding exam preparation, residents stated that a question format was preferred, especially when accompanying explanations were of high quality. Additionally, practical considerations, such as portability, impacted resident selection of study tools. Conclusion Residents value the in-training exam as a marker of their academic progress and for their ability to gain familiarity with the qualifying exam. They prefer question-based preparation over text-based learning, as long as there is a detailed explanation of each answer. Educators creating structured in-training review may want to focus on question-based material with detailed explanations. PMID:24062620

  5. Police department personnel stress resilience training: an institutional case study.

    PubMed

    Weltman, Gershon; Lamon, Jonathan; Freedy, Elan; Chartrand, Donald

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this case study was to test the impact in law enforcement personnel of an innovative self-regulation and resilience building program delivered via an iPad (Apple Inc, Cupertino, California) app and personal mentoring. The Stress Resilience Training System (SRTS) app includes training on stress and its effects, HRV coherence biofeedback, a series of HeartMath self-regulation techniques (The Institute of HeartMath, Boulder Creek, California), and HRV-controlled games. The stressful nature of law enforcement work is well established, and the need for meaningful and effective stress resilience training programs is becoming better understood, as it has been in the military. Law enforcement and military service share many stress-related features including psychological stressors connected with the mission, extended duty cycles, and exposure to horrific scenes of death and injury. San Diego (California) Police Department personnel who participated in the study were 12 sworn officers and 2 dispatchers, 10 men and 4 women. The SRTS intervention comprised an introductory 2-hour training session, 6 weeks of individualized learning and practice with the SRTS app, and four 1-hour telephone mentoring sessions by experienced HeartMath mentors spread over a four week period. Outcome measures were the Personal and Organizational Quality Assessment (POQA) survey, the mentors' reports of their observations, and records of participants' comments from the mentoring sessions. The POQA results were overwhelmingly positive: All four main scales showed improvement; Emotional Vitality improved by 25% (P=.05) and Physical Stress improved by 24% (P=.01). Eight of the nine subscales showed improvement, with the Stress subscale, perhaps the key measure of the study, improving by approximately 40% (P=.06). Participant responses were also uniformly positive and enthusiastic. Individual participants praised the program and related improvements in both on-the-job performance and

  6. [Tropical medicine/tropical dermatology training in Tanzania and Ghana: Personal experience and selected case reports].

    PubMed

    Völker, K

    2015-05-01

    As a consultant for dermatology with special interested in tropical diseases, I accepted my employers offer (German Armed Forces) to start my training in tropical medicine and tropical dermatology in Africa. The dermatological part of the training was completed at the Regional Dermatology Training Centre (RDTC) in Moshi, Tanzania. This was followed by tropical medicine training at the Presbyterian Hospital in Agogo, Ghana. In this article, I report on my experiences in Africa and present selected case reports.

  7. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Long working hours and sleep deprivation have been a facet of physician training in the US since the advent of the modern residency system. However, the scientific evidence linking fatigue with deficits in human performance, accidents and errors in industries from aeronautics to medicine, nuclear power, and transportation has mounted over the last 40 years. This evidence has also spawned regulations to help ensure public safety across safety-sensitive industries, with the notable exception of medicine. In late 2007, at the behest of the US Congress, the Institute of Medicine embarked on a year-long examination of the scientific evidence linking resident physician sleep deprivation with clinical performance deficits and medical errors. The Institute of Medicine’s report, entitled “Resident duty hours: Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety”, published in January 2009, recommended new limits on resident physician work hours and workload, increased supervision, a heightened focus on resident physician safety, training in structured handovers and quality improvement, more rigorous external oversight of work hours and other aspects of residency training, and the identification of expanded funding sources necessary to implement the recommended reforms successfully and protect the public and resident physicians themselves from preventable harm. Given that resident physicians comprise almost a quarter of all physicians who work in hospitals, and that taxpayers, through Medicare and Medicaid, fund graduate medical education, the public has a deep investment in physician training. Patients expect to receive safe, high-quality care in the nation’s teaching hospitals. Because it is their safety that is at issue, their voices should be central in policy decisions affecting patient safety. It is likewise important to integrate the perspectives of resident physicians, policy makers, and other constituencies in designing new policies. However, since its release

  8. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  9. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    PubMed

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training. Copyright © 2011 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Postgraduate Emergency Medicine Training in India: An Educational Partnership with the Private Sector.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Katherine; Pousson, Amelia; Gidwani, Shweta; Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) is a recently recognized specialty in India, still in its infancy. Local training programs are developing, but remain very limited. Private, for-profit hospitals are an important provider of graduate medical education (GME) in India, and are partnering with United States (US) universities in EM to expand training opportunities. Our aim was to describe current private-sector programs affiliated with a US university providing postgraduate EM training in India, the evolution and structure of these programs, and successes and challenges of program implementation. Programs have been established in seven cities in India in partnership with a US academic institution. Full-time trainees have required didactics, clinical rotations, research, and annual examinations. Faculty members affiliated with the US institution visit each program monthly. Regular evaluations have informed program modifications, and a local faculty development program has been implemented. Currently, 240 trainees are enrolled in the EM postgraduate program, and 141 physicians have graduated. A pilot survey conducted in 2012 revealed that 93% of graduates are currently practicing EM, 82% of those in India; 71% are involved in teaching, and 32% in research. Further investigation into programmatic impacts is necessary. Challenges include issues of formal program recognition both in India and abroad. This unique partnership is playing a major early role in EM GME in India. Future steps include official program recognition, expanded numbers of training sites, and a gradual transition of training and education to local faculty. Similar partnership programs may be effective in other settings outside of India. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 17140 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health, HHS)...

  12. 75 FR 6039 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special.... 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes...

  13. Training and education to increase the effectiveness of technology introduction in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagne, Albert H.

    1994-12-01

    Training and education can increase the effectiveness with which new technology can be introduced in medicine. However, the use of technology in the education and training itself can be the vehicle for that increased effectiveness. The most effective way that education and training can be improved by technology is through the use of simulation. Examples are given from, first, the historical perspective in aircrew and spacecrew flight training; an anesthesiology training simulator; and a laparoscopic surgery training simulator.

  14. Radiological preparedness-awareness and attitudes: a cross-sectional survey of emergency medicine residents and physicians at three academic institutions in the United States.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Sophia; McCormick, Lisa C; Pevear, Jesse; Adoff, Spencer; Walter, Frank G; Kazzi, Ziad N

    2012-01-01

    Emergency preparedness has been increasingly recognized as important. Research shows many medical personnel feel unprepared to respond to radiation incidents. Knowledge and attitudes of emergency medicine residents and faculty are largely unstudied, regarding their abilities to provide care for radiation disaster victims. It is unknown whether receiving training in radiological emergency preparedness improves knowledge and attitudes. (1) Assess the attitudes of emergency medicine residents and faculty toward a radiological disaster; (2) Assess knowledge gaps of emergency medicine residents and faculty regarding radiological emergency preparedness; (3) Assess the attitudes of emergency medicine residents and faculty toward different educational strategies. An electronic survey was sent to 309 emergency medicine residents and faculty at three U.S. academic institutions. Analyses were performed using SAS 9.0 software. The survey response rate was 36.6%. Only 37% and 28% of respondents had attended radiological preparedness training in the preceding 5 years or any training in radiation detection, respectively. Higher proportions of trained physicians were: (1) more familiar with DTPA and Prussian blue; (2) more comfortable assessing, decontaminating, and managing victims of radiation incidents; and (3) more comfortable using radiation detectors than their untrained counterparts. Many respondents were unable to differentiate between contamination with and exposure to radiological material. Classroom teaching at the workplace and prepackaged educational materials were most frequently rated as the preferred educational method for radiation preparedness training. Our results suggest a need for additional radiological-nuclear preparedness training for emergency medicine residents and faculty. Training should include radiation detection, decontamination, explaining differences between radiation exposure and contamination, and teaching patient management, including DTPA and

  15. Sports medicine training room clinic model for the military.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Stephen; Fairbanks, Keith; Nguyen, William; Blivin, Steve; Frantz, Earl

    2012-02-01

    A transition from traditional problem-based clinics to the Sports Medicine and Reconditioning Team (SMART) clinic model was completed by January 2009 at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. The SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and enhances coordinated care between providers. The objective of this research is to show the advantages of implementing a training room team approach for the care of musculoskeletal injuries in active duty members by comparing the number of patients seen, the number of limited duty (LIMDU) periods, the number of physical evaluation boards (PEBs), and the percentage of orthopedic referrals. Electronic medical records for patients seen at sports medicine clinics between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 were reviewed. Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune provided a database of patients placed on LIMDU and PEB from 2007 through 2010. Fifty-eight and twenty-four percent more encounters occurred in 2009 and 2010, respectively, than that in 2007. The percentage of LIMDU referred for PEB in 2010 was reduced to 9% compared to that in 2007. In conclusion, the SMART clinic model allows for more patients to be seen and a reduction in the percentage of patients recommended for PEB from LIMDU.

  16. Design Concepts for an Integrated Environmental Medicine Workstation for Prediction, Simulation and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    officers and health care planners with the systematic evaluation of the environmental threats to health and performance. Analysis of the environmental ...unified environmental preventive medicine decision aid for military health care planners and staff officers. It exploits USARIEM’s institutional... health and performance in Somalia: guidance for small unit leaders. Natick, MA: U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Technical Note

  17. Institute on Human Values in Medicine. Third Proceedings, Southwest Regional Institute, October 17-19, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society for Health and Human Values, Philadelphia, PA.

    To further supplement the larger conference proceedings held by the Society for Health and Human Values, a smaller Southwest Regional Institute was held in October of 1973. Conference participants examined the rationale for including human values as an area of study in health professional education, the process by which this kind of teaching can…

  18. Library Aide Training Institute for American Indians. Narrative Evaluation Report on the Institute for Training in Librarianship. August 23, 1974 to August 23, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lotsee

    An institute was designed to train 14 American Indians in basic library and audiovisual skills so that they could function as paraprofessional librarians in the pueblos and reservations of western New Mexico. The institute, funded under the 1965 Higher Education Act Title II-B, was based at the University of New Mexico, although most of the…

  19. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N.; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W.; Young, Andrew J.; Zambraski, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of…

  20. United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine: Warfighter Research Focusing on the Past 25 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandolf, Kent B.; Francesconi, Ralph; Sawka, Michael N.; Cymerman, Allen; Hoyt, Reed W.; Young, Andrew J.; Zambraski, Edward J.

    2011-01-01

    The United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM) celebrated its 50th anniversary on July 1, 2011. This article reviews its history, evolution, and transition of its research programs as well as its scientific and military accomplishments, emphasizing the past 25 yr. During the 1990s, USARIEM published a series of…

  1. Symposium on the Future of Dental Education, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences. Preface.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Marilyn J.

    1996-01-01

    This brief article introduces several papers originally presented at a symposium responding to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report on the current status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It notes the range of reactions to the original report ranging from mostly positive support to caution and disagreement on some…

  2. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  3. Building family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica: overcoming challenges in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Standard-Goldson, A; Williams-Green, P; Smith, K; Segree, W; James, K; Eldemire-Shearer, D

    2015-01-01

    This paper recounts the development of family medicine postgraduate training in Jamaica, the challenges faced and lessons learned. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by past trainees exploring the perceived usefulness, strengths and weaknesses of the programme. The results of this study helped guide the strengthening of family medicine training in a resource-limited setting.

  4. Two birds with one stone: experiences of combining clinical and research training in addiction medicine.

    PubMed

    Klimas, J; McNeil, R; Ahamad, K; Mead, A; Rieb, L; Cullen, W; Wood, E; Small, W

    2017-01-23

    Despite a large evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not combined the training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine and research. As such, addiction care is often lacking, or not based on evidence or best practices. We undertook a qualitative study to assess the experiences of physicians who completed a clinician-scientist training programme in addiction medicine within a hospital setting. We interviewed physicians from the St. Paul's Hospital Goldcorp Addiction Medicine Fellowship and learners from the hospital's academic Addiction Medicine Consult Team in Vancouver, Canada (N = 26). They included psychiatrists, internal medicine and family medicine physicians, faculty, mentors, medical students and residents. All received both addiction medicine and research training. Drawing on Kirkpatrick's model of evaluating training programmes, we analysed the interviews thematically using qualitative data analysis software (Nvivo 10). We identified five themes relating to learning experience that were influential: (i) attitude, (ii) knowledge, (iii) skill, (iv) behaviour and (v) patient outcome. The presence of a supportive learning environment, flexibility in time lines, highly structured rotations, and clear guidance regarding development of research products facilitated clinician-scientist training. Competing priorities, including clinical and family responsibilities, hindered training. Combined training in addiction medicine and research is feasible and acceptable for current doctors and physicians in training. However, there are important barriers to overcome and improved understanding of the experience of addiction physicians in the clinician-scientist track is required to improve curricula and research productivity.

  5. Effects of Medicine Ball Training on Fitness Performance of High-School Physical Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Mediate, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of medicine ball training on the fitness performance of high-school physical education students. Sixty-nine high-school students participated in a 6-week medicine training program during the first 10 to 15 minutes of each physical education class. A group of 49 students who participated in…

  6. UCSD's Institute of Engineering in Medicine: fostering collaboration through research and education.

    PubMed

    Chien, Shu

    2012-07-01

    The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) was established in 1961 as a new research university that emphasizes innovation, excellence, and interdisciplinary research and education. It has a School of Medicine (SOM) and the Jacobs School of Engineering (JSOE) in close proximity, and both schools have national rankings among the top 15. In 1991, with the support of the Whitaker Foundation, the Whitaker Institute of Biomedical Engineering was formed to foster collaborations in research and education. In 2008, the university extended the collaboration further by establishing the Institute of Engineering in Medicine (IEM), with the mission of accelerating the discoveries of novel science and technology to enhance health care through teamwork between engineering and medicine, and facilitating the translation of innovative technologies for delivery to the public through clinical application and commercialization.

  7. Preventive medicine and public health residency training: federal policy and advocacy opportunities.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Sara; Siu, Kimberly

    2009-11-01

    Preventive medicine physicians are uniquely trained in both clinical medicine and public health to understand and reduce the risks of disease, disability, and death in individuals and populations. The nation is facing a severe shortage of preventive medicine-trained physicians, which is largely due to unstable and inadequate residency program funding. Several policy options have been explored and evaluated to fund preventive medicine residency training programs as part of a multipronged approach to engage physicians in the policy-making process. The most adequate, sustainable, distributable, and politically feasible policy option was pursued, and a bill called the "Preventive Medicine and Public Health Training Act" was introduced into the House and the Senate. Opportunities to participate in the policy-making process and interact with key legislators and stakeholders exist in a variety of ways. Leadership at the federal level helps preventive medicine and public health physicians recognize their vital role in shaping public policy.

  8. [Survey and analysis of radiation safety management systems at medical institutions--initial report: radiation protection supervisor, radiation safety organization, and education and training].

    PubMed

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Aburano, Tamio

    2005-11-20

    In this study, a questionnaire survey was carried out to determine the actual situation of radiation safety management systems in Japanese medical institutions with nuclear medicine facilities. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning the Radiation Protection Supervisor license, safety management organizations, and problems related to education and training in safety management. Analysis was conducted according to region, type of establishment, and number of beds. The overall response rate was 60%, and no significant difference in response rate was found among regions. Medical institutions that performed nuclear medicine practices without a radiologist participating accounted for 10% of the total. Medical institutions where nurses gave patients intravenous injections of radiopharmaceuticals as part of the nuclear medicine practices accounted for 28% of the total. Of these medical institutions, 59% provided education and training in safety management for nurses. The rate of acquisition of Radiation Protection Supervisor licenses was approximately 70% for radiological technologists and approximately 20% for physicians (regional difference, p=0.02). The rate of medical institutions with safety management organizations was 71% of the total. Among the medical institutions (n=208) without safety management organizations, approximately 56% had 300 beds or fewer. In addition, it became clear that 35% of quasi-public organizations and 44% of private organizations did not provide education and training in safety management (p<0.001, according to establishment).

  9. 76 FR 30951 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: June 13, 2011, 1 p.m... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  10. 75 FR 14446 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary CareMedicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: April 22, 2010, 8 a.m... of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In the plenary session, the...

  11. 75 FR 64318 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 15, 2010, 8... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  12. 77 FR 36550 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: July 19, 2012, 8..., 2012, will begin with an update on the Division of Medicine and Dentistry's development of...

  13. 77 FR 64116 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-18

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 1, 2012, 10... Jerilyn K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health...

  14. Adequacy of Training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health: A National Survey of Residency Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David H.; Salive, Marcel E.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 797 preventive medicine residency graduates found that improvements are needed in the curricula for health administration, environmental health, health education, and occupational medicine. Women found their training less adequate than men did in all areas except clinical preventive medicine. Graduates tended to practice ultimately in…

  15. Adequacy of Training in Preventive Medicine and Public Health: A National Survey of Residency Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David H.; Salive, Marcel E.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 797 preventive medicine residency graduates found that improvements are needed in the curricula for health administration, environmental health, health education, and occupational medicine. Women found their training less adequate than men did in all areas except clinical preventive medicine. Graduates tended to practice ultimately in…

  16. 77 FR 22349 - OSHA Training Institute Education Center; Notice of Competition and Request for Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ..., emails, Web site urls and screen shots, postcards, use of social media, and any other associated relevant... Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA Training Institute Education Center; Notice of Competition.... ACTION: Notice of competition and request for applications for the OSHA Training Institute...

  17. 78 FR 35935 - National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH)-Certified B Readers; Training and Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... (NIOSH)--Certified B Readers; Training and Testing AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and... address in training and testing of National Institute for Occupational Health (NIOSH)--certified B Readers... Pneumoconioses provides a standardized system for classification of chest radiographs that has been widely used...

  18. The foundations of interdisciplinary fellowship training in adolescent medicine in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bravender, Terrill

    2016-08-01

    The field of adolescent medicine, having developed from the specialty of Pediatrics, encompasses a holistic and developmental approach from its very origin. While its foundations were in medicine, early leaders in the field emphasized the importance of mental health care as well as nutrition, public health, and social justice. As the specialty became further established in the US with the creation of an academic society, board certification and training program accreditation, the interdisciplinary nature of adolescent medicine practice and training became formalized. This formal recognition brought with it strict guidelines with regards training and board certification. Despite the often Byzantinian training requirements, an interdisciplinary approach forms the core of adolescent medicine practice, and the incorporation of interdisciplinary training is a necessity for graduate medical education programs in the field of adolescent medicine.

  19. Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: Interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H.; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international non-profit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several National/Ethnic Genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine to society in various countries. Also, educational activities include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia®, which are high profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine, and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts. PMID:22379996

  20. [50 years anniversary of Research Institute for Occupational Medicine and Human Ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc].

    PubMed

    Rukavishnikov, V S; Shaiakhmetov, S F; Gus'kova, T M

    2010-01-01

    The article covers main steps of establishment and development of Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology with Siberian Division of RAMSc over 50 years of activities, major results of research, contribution of the Institute personnel into development of hygienic science and practical medicine in Siberia.

  1. Obstetric training in Emergency Medicine: a needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Janicki, Adam James; MacKuen, Courteney; Hauspurg, Alisse; Cohn, Jamieson

    2016-01-01

    Identification and management of obstetric emergencies is essential in emergency medicine (EM), but exposure to pregnant patients during EM residency training is frequently limited. To date, there is little data describing effective ways to teach residents this material. Current guidelines require completion of 2 weeks of obstetrics or 10 vaginal deliveries, but it is unclear whether this instills competency. We created a 15-item survey evaluating resident confidence and knowledge related to obstetric emergencies. To assess confidence, we asked residents about their exposure and comfort level regarding obstetric emergencies and eight common presentations and procedures. We assessed knowledge via multiple-choice questions addressing common obstetric presentations, pelvic ultrasound image, and cardiotocography interpretation. The survey was distributed to residency programs utilizing the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) listserv. The survey was completed by 212 residents, representing 55 of 204 (27%) programs belonging to CORD and 11.2% of 1,896 eligible residents. Fifty-six percent felt they had adequate exposure to obstetric emergencies. The overall comfort level was 2.99 (1-5 scale) and comfort levels of specific presentations and procedures ranged from 2.58 to 3.97; all increased moderately with postgraduate year (PGY) level. Mean overall percentage of items answered correctly on the multiple-choice questions was 58% with no statistical difference by PGY level. Performance on individual questions did not differ by PGY level. The identification and management of obstetric emergencies is the cornerstone of EM. We found preliminary evidence of a concerning lack of resident comfort regarding obstetric conditions and knowledge deficits on core obstetrics topics. EM residents may benefit from educational interventions to increase exposure to these topics.

  2. [The role of health education in preventive medicine strategy of the Mexican Institute of Social Security].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Véliz, A M

    1982-01-01

    This article presents the Mexican Institute for Social Security (IMSS) created in 1943 and describes its main features, its programmes and the role played by health education inside the programmes. It ends by explaining the present situation concerning health education and the changes which are presently envisaged. During its first twenty years, the IMSS promoted preventive medicine and trained health personnel. Since 1979 it has concerned itself mainly with some 10 million peasants and marginal groups. In the frame of a national development programme, a vaccination and detection campaign were implemented and the distribution system of potable water was extended. Mexico with a population of 73 million has the dual characteristics of a developed and a developing country (70 per cent of its population is urban, 30 per cent rural). The overcrowded cities contrast with the isolated rural areas where sanitary conditions are poor and life difficult. The main causes of mortality, in 1978, were: -in the towns: car accidents, cardiovascular diseases and suicide; -in rural areas, acute respiratory infections and intestinal infections. The 1978 Alma Ata international conference on primary health care and the meeting of Ministers of health convened in 1980 by the Pan American Health Organization endorsed the IMSS programmes which emphasize prevention, promote health education and community participation. The cost of preventive measures being cheaper than treatment, 203 million pesos were saved and allocated to the expansion of programmes. Systematic immunization has resulted in a sharp decline of diphteria, polio, rabies, typhoid, pertussis and measles. Early detection of tumours of cervix uteri has saved many lives.

  3. Library Programs: National Education Goals and Information Technology Are Focus of FY93 Training Institutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    The U.S. Department of Education has awarded just over one million dollars to support institutes or training workshops primarily for school and public librarians. Under the Library Education and Human Resource Development Program, 15 institutions of higher education or library organizations nationwide have received funding for institutes that…

  4. Characteristics of project management at institutions sponsoring National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Go Local.

    PubMed

    Olney, Cynthia A; Backus, Joyce E B; Klein, Lori J

    2010-01-01

    Through interviews with the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus Go Local collaborators, an evaluation team sought to identify process characteristics that are critical for long-term sustainability of Go Local projects and to describe the impact that Go Local projects have on sponsoring institutions. Go Local project coordinators (n = 44) at 31 sponsor institutions participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences developing and maintaining Go Local sites. Interviews were summarized, checked for accuracy by the participating librarians, and analyzed using a general inductive methodology. Institutional factors that support Go Local projects were identified through the interviews, as well as strategies for staffing and partnerships with external organizations. Positive outcomes for sponsoring institutions also were identified. The findings may influence the National Library of Medicine team's decisions about improvements to its Go Local system and the support it provides to sponsoring institutions. The findings may benefit current sponsoring institutions as well as those considering or planning a Go Local project.

  5. Characteristics of project management at institutions sponsoring National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Go Local*

    PubMed Central

    Olney, Cynthia A.; Backus, Joyce E. B.; Klein, Lori J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Through interviews with the National Library of Medicine's MedlinePlus Go Local collaborators, an evaluation team sought to identify process characteristics that are critical for long-term sustainability of Go Local projects and to describe the impact that Go Local projects have on sponsoring institutions. Methods: Go Local project coordinators (n = 44) at 31 sponsor institutions participated in semi-structured interviews about their experiences developing and maintaining Go Local sites. Interviews were summarized, checked for accuracy by the participating librarians, and analyzed using a general inductive methodology. Results: Institutional factors that support Go Local projects were identified through the interviews, as well as strategies for staffing and partnerships with external organizations. Positive outcomes for sponsoring institutions also were identified. Conclusions: The findings may influence the National Library of Medicine team's decisions about improvements to its Go Local system and the support it provides to sponsoring institutions. The findings may benefit current sponsoring institutions as well as those considering or planning a Go Local project. PMID:20098657

  6. Training in Occupational Medicine: Jurisprudential Malfunctions in the Italian System and European Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cegolon, L; Heymann, W C; Xodo, C; Lange, J H

    2017-01-01

    To practice occupational health in Europe, a medical doctor must qualify in occupational medicine. This requires a period of postgraduate specialist medical training lasting a minimum of four years, in conformity with European regulations, to obtain a certificate of completion of training which is then mutually recognized within the entire European Union. In 2002 an Italian law allowed doctors specialized in public health medicine and legal/forensic medicine to also practice as consultants in occupational medicine in the country. However a subsequent law in 2008 determined that only physicians specialized in occupational medicine could freely practice as consultants in this discipline. The other two categories (consultants in public health medicine and consultants in legal/forensic medicine) were required to undertake additional training (a Master course) to qualify as consultants in occupational medicine. Doctors who entered postgraduate training in public health or legal/forensic medicine before 2008, with the option to practice also as consultants in occupational medicine upon completion of their training, suffered an unprecedented and legally questionable retroactive application of this new law which stripped them of previously acquired rights. Moreover, even after qualifying by undertaking this extra training in occupational medicine, the latter two categories of doctors do not have their training recognized in other member states of the European Union. To disallow the rights of doctors qualified in occupational medicine to work as consultants in the latter medical discipline elsewhere within the European Union seems a clear violation of professional rights and, as such, legal action could be taken to submit this issue to European attention.

  7. Narrative Evaluation Report on the Leadership Training Institute. July 1, 1972 (through) June 30, 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. School of Library Science.

    During the 1972-1973 year the Leadership Training Institute (LTI) implemented a variety of program activities to improve training skills, to assess needs, and to package certain products for dissemination to the profession in general. Specific activities included training sessions, on-site visits, development of instructional materials, and…

  8. [Survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in 14 Japanese institutes].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Kensuke; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Koizumi, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Under the auspices of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Nuclear Medicine, an annual aggregate from a 5-year period, 2007 to 2011, of a survey questionnaire of pediatric nuclear medicine examinations performed at 14 institutes in the Kanto region was conducted. The subjects were pediatric patients 15 years old or younger. The survey questions included the determination method for administered dose of radiopharmaceuticals, the items examined and number of examinations. Of 14 institutes, 11 determined administered doses using the formula: adult dose X (age +1) / (age+7), while the remaining 3 used the adult dose as the maximum dose and used a conversion formula based on age and physical condition. In 2011, in a total of 3,884 pediatric patients, renoscintigraphy accounted for 41.5%, brain 14.4%, pulmonary scintigraphy 12.9%, oncology 9.0%, hepatobiliary scintigraphy 6.3%, gastrointestinal scintigraphy 4.8%, musculoskeletal scintigraphy 4.3%, cardiology 2.5%, and other 4.9% of all nuclear medicine examinations. Pediatric nuclear medicine examinations in general hospitals accounted for only 3.4% of all examinations. A similar trend was observed in previous years. Since pediatric patients have a longer reproductive term and higher sensitivity to radiation exposure, pediatric nuclear medicine requires a strict selection of appropriate studies and administered dose. These results show the current practice and would warrant further consideration.

  9. One program, multiple training sites: does site of family medicine training influence professional practice location?

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Jean L; Kernahan, Jill; Calam, Betty; Sivertz, Kristin S

    2013-01-01

    Numerous strategies have been suggested to increase recruitment of family physicians to rural communities and smaller regional centers. One approach has been to implement distributed postgraduate education programs where trainees spend substantial time in such communities. The purpose of the current study was to compare the eventual practice location of family physicians who undertook their postgraduate training through a single university but who were based in either metropolitan or distributed, non-metropolitan communities. Since 1998, the Department of Family Practice at the University of British Columbia in Canada has conducted an annual survey of its residents at 2, 5, and 10 years after completion of training. The authors received Ethics Board approval to use this anonymized data to identify personal and educational factors that predict future practice location. The overall response rate was 45%. At 2 years (N=222), residents trained in distributed sites were 15 times more likely to enter practice in rural communities, small towns and regional centers than those who trained in metropolitan teaching centers. This was even more predictive for retention in non-urban practice sites. Among the subgroup of physicians who remained in a single practice location for more than a year preceding the survey, those who trained in smaller sites were 36 times more likely to choose a rural or regional practice setting. While the vast majority of those trained in metropolitan sites chose an urban practice location, a subgroup of those with some rural upbringing were more likely to practice in rural or regional settings. Trainees from distributed sites considered themselves more prepared for practice regardless of ultimate practice location. Participation in a distributed postgraduate family medicine training site is an important predictor of a non-urban practice location. This effect persists for 10 years after completion of training and is independent of other predictors of

  10. Regionalization and emergency care: the institute of medicine reports and a federal government update.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brendan G; Asplin, Brent R

    2010-12-01

    The 2010 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on regionalization in emergency care began with an update on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) reports on the Future of Emergency Care. This was followed by two presentations from federal officials, focusing on regionalization from the perspective of the White House National Security Staff and the Emergency Care Coordination Center. This article summarizes the content of these presentations. It should be noted that this summary is the perspective of the authors and does not represent the official policy of the U.S. government.

  11. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  12. Psychosocial Training in U.S. Internal Medicine and Family Practice Residency Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaufberg, Elizabeth H.; Joseph, Robert C.; Pels, Richard J.; Wyshak, Grace; Wieman, Dow; Nadelson, Carol C.

    2001-01-01

    Surveyed directors of internal medicine (IM) and family practice (FP) residency programs regarding the format, content, and quantity of psychosocial training in their programs, their opinions on topics related to such training, and program demographics. Found considerable variation in content and time devoted to psychosocial training within and…

  13. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline’s education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape. PMID:24664375

  14. Education and training in family medicine: progress and a proposed national vision for 2030.

    PubMed

    Goh, Lee Gan; Ong, Chooi Peng

    2014-03-01

    This review provides an update of education and training in family medicine in Singapore and worldwide. Family medicine has progressed much since 1969 when it was recognised as the 20th medical discipline in the United States. Three salient changes in the local healthcare landscape have been noted over time, which are of defining relevance to family medicine in Singapore, namely the rise of noncommunicable chronic diseases, the care needs of an expanding elderly population, and the care of a larger projected population in 2030. The change in the vision of family medicine into the future refers to a new paradigm of one discipline in many settings, and not limited to the community. Family medicine needs to provide a patient-centred medical home, and the discipline's education and training need to be realigned. The near-term training objectives are to address the service, training and research needs of a changing and challenging healthcare landscape.

  15. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzutiello, Robert J

    2015-09-08

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear  medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics  Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to:• Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years,• Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and• Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists.As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission.

  16. AAPM/SNMMI Joint Task Force: report on the current state of nuclear medicine physics training.

    PubMed

    Harkness, Beth A; Allison, Jerry D; Clements, Jessica B; Coffey, Charles W; Fahey, Frederic H; Gress, Dustin A; Kinahan, Paul E; Nickoloff, Edward L; Mawlawi, Osama R; MacDougall, Robert D; Pizzuitello, Robert J

    2015-09-01

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) recognized the need for a review of the current state of nuclear medicine physics training and the need to explore pathways for improving nuclear medicine physics training opportunities. For these reasons, the two organizations formed a joint AAPM/SNMMI Ad Hoc Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Physics Training. The mission of this task force was to assemble a representative group of stakeholders to: Estimate the demand for board-certified nuclear medicine physicists in the next 5-10 years, Identify the critical issues related to supplying an adequate number of physicists who have received the appropriate level of training in nuclear medicine physics, and Identify approaches that may be considered to facilitate the training of nuclear medicine physicists. As a result, a task force was appointed and chaired by an active member of both organizations that included representation from the AAPM, SNMMI, the American Board of Radiology (ABR), the American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine (ABSNM), and the Commission for the Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP). The Task Force first met at the AAPM Annual Meeting in Charlotte in July 2012 and has met regularly face-to-face, online, and by conference calls. This manuscript reports the findings of the Task Force, as well as recommendations to achieve the stated mission. PACS number: 01.40.G.

  17. Training Veterinary Students in Shelter-Medicine: A Service-Learning Community Classroom Based Technique

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Brenda J.; Gruen, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Shelter medicine is a rapidly developing field of great importance, and shelters themselves provide abundant training opportunities for veterinary medical students. Students trained in shelter medicine have opportunities to practice zoonotic and species-specific infectious disease control, behavioral evaluation and management, primary care, as well as animal welfare, ethics, and public policy issues. Ranges of sheltering systems now exist, from brick-and-mortar facilities to networks of foster homes with no centralized facility. Exposure to a single shelter setting may not allow students to understand the full range of sheltering systems that exist; a community classroom approach balances the opportunity to introduce students to a diverse array of sheltering systems, while gaining practical experience. This article presents the details and results of a series of two-week, elective clinical rotations with a focus on field and service-learning in animal shelters. The overall aim was to provide opportunities that familiarized students with sheltering systems and provided primary care training. Other priorities included increasing awareness of public health concerns, and equipping students to evaluate shelters on design, operating protocols, infectious disease control, enrichment and community outreach. Students were required to participate in rounds, and complete a project that addressed a need recognized by them during the rotation. This article includes costs associated with the rotation, a blueprint for how the rotation was carried out at our institution, and details of shelters visited and animals treated, including a breakdown of treatments provided. Also discussed are the student projects and student feedback on this valuable clinical experience. PMID:24407109

  18. The Effects of Abortion Training on Family Medicine Residents' Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Summit, Aleza K; Gold, Marji

    2017-01-01

    RHEDI, Reproductive Health Education in Family Medicine, offers technical assistance and funding to family medicine residency programs to support integrated opt-out abortion and reproductive health training for residents. This study assessed the impact of this enhanced training on residents' reproductive health experience. Investigator-developed pre- and post-surveys were administered online to 214 residents at 12 family medicine residency programs before and after their RHEDI training experience. Surveys addressed experience in contraception and abortion, attitudes around abortion provision, and post-residency intentions. Descriptive statistics were generated, and statistical tests were performed to assess changes after training. Surveys had a 90% response rate. After the RHEDI enhanced reproductive health rotation, residents reported increased experience in contraception provision, early pregnancy ultrasound, aspiration and medication abortion, and miscarriage management. After training, residents with experience in IUD insertion increased from 85% to 99%, and contraceptive implant insertion experience rose from 60% to 85%. Residents who had performed any abortions increased from 15% to 79%, and self-rated competency in abortion increased. Finally, almost all residents agreed that early abortion was within the scope of family medicine, and training confirmed residents' intentions to provide reproductive health services after residency. Integrated training in reproductive health, with an emphasis on abortion, increases residents' experience and underscores their understanding of the role of these services in family medicine. Increasing the number of family medicine residency programs that offer this training could help prepare family physicians to meet their patients' needs for reproductive health services.

  19. Core content for wilderness medicine fellowship training of emergency medicine graduates.

    PubMed

    Lipman, Grant S; Weichenthal, Lori; Stuart Harris, N; McIntosh, Scott E; Cushing, Tracy; Caudell, Michael J; Macias, Darryl J; Weiss, Eric A; Lemery, Jay; Ellis, Mark A; Spano, Susanne; McDevitt, Marion; Tedeschi, Christopher; Dow, Jennifer; Mazzorana, Vicki; McGinnis, Henderson; Gardner, Angela F; Auerbach, Paul S

    2014-02-01

    Wilderness medicine is the practice of resource-limited medicine under austere conditions. In 2003, the first wilderness medicine fellowship was established, and as of March 2013, a total of 12 wilderness medicine fellowships exist. In 2009 the American College of Emergency Physicians Wilderness Medicine Section created a Fellowship Subcommittee and Taskforce to bring together fellowship directors, associate directors, and other interested stakeholders to research and develop a standardized curriculum and core content for emergency medicine (EM)-based wilderness medicine fellowships. This paper describes the process and results of what became a 4-year project to articulate a standardized curriculum for wilderness medicine fellowships. The final product specifies the minimum core content that should be covered during a 1-year wilderness medicine fellowship. It also describes the structure, length, site, and program requirements for a wilderness medicine fellowship.

  20. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  1. A Social Network System Based on an Ontology in the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Kyun; Han, Jeong-Min; Song, Mi-Young

    We in this paper propose a social network based on ontology in Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM). By using the social network, researchers can find collaborators and share research results with others so that studies in Korean Medicine fields can be activated. For this purpose, first, personal profiles, scholarships, careers, licenses, academic activities, research results, and personal connections for all of researchers in KIOM are collected. After relationship and hierarchy among ontology classes and attributes of classes are defined through analyzing the collected information, a social network ontology are constructed using FOAF and OWL. This ontology can be easily interconnected with other social network by FOAF and provide the reasoning based on OWL ontology. In future, we construct the search and reasoning system using the ontology. Moreover, if the social network is activated, we will open it to whole Korean Medicine fields.

  2. [Impact of the Core Training Law on preventive medicine and public health training and other common medical specialties].

    PubMed

    Latasa, Pello; Gil-Borrelli, Christian; Aguilera, José Antonio; Reques, Laura; Barreales, Saúl; Ojeda, Elena; Alemán, Guadalupe; Iniesta, Carlos; Gullón, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Core Training Law (CTL) is to amend specialised medical training to include 24 months of common training. The aim of this study is to assess its potential impact on the Preventive Medicine and Public Health (PM&PH) training programme and other medical specialties. The programmes of the 21 common medical specialties were analysed and the recommended training periods for each specialty collected, before the information was agreed upon by three observers. The training impact was calculated as the percentage of months that should be amended per specialty to adapt to the common training schedule. The Preventive Medicine and Public Health training programme is the specialty most affected by the Core Training Law (100%, 24 months). Intensive medicine (0%, 0 months) and medical oncology (17%, 4 months) is the least affected. The CTL affects the common medical specialties in different ways and requires a complete reorganisation of the activities and competencies of PM&PH professionals. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Training Australian Defence Force Medical Officers to civilian general practice training standards--reflections on military medicine and its links to general practice education and training.

    PubMed

    Kitchener, Scott J; Rushbrook, Elizabeth; Brennan, Leonard; Davis, Stephen

    2011-06-06

    This article examines military medicine and its links to civilian general practice education and training, drawing attention to the variations and difficulties in, and successful approaches for, training Australian Defence Force (ADF) Medical Officers. Military medicine has been an area of change over the 10 years of the Australian General Practice Training (AGPT) program. Crisis situations like those in Timor Leste and Afghanistan have focused attention and recognition on the importance of primary health care in the work of the ADF. To train doctors in military medicine, there are several different models at different locations around Australia, as well as large variations in military course and experience recognition and approvals between AGPT regional training providers. At times, the lack of standardisation in training delays the progress of ADF registrars moving through the AGPT program and becoming independently deployable Medical Officers.

  4. National Institutes of Health Center for Regenerative Medicine: putting science into practice.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mahendra

    2013-12-01

    The field of regenerative medicine has been revolutionized by breakthroughs in stem cell biology, gene engineering, and whole-genome sequencing. These advances are not only scientific or medical but have also advanced how we conceptualize regenerative medicine. The progenitive research that proceeded as well as a substantial part of the funding that supported these discoveries were provided by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Now, perhaps more than ever, the NIH has a vital role to play in the translation of science into clinical practice. The NIH is uniquely positioned to coordinate interactions between the different institutes and other arms of the government, as well as international organizations. Efforts of researchers in the United States both within and without the NIH are supported by a number of mechanisms, including specialized workshops, and the support of developing small-scale industry. Additionally, the NIH has stepped up to provide necessary infrastructure in areas of regenerative medicine where the medical need might be apparent but might be currently infeasible or unattractive to private-sector investment. This article will discuss these perhaps lesser-known activities of the NIH, which I believe have continued and will continue to contribute to the role of stem cell research in translating science into regenerative medicine.

  5. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-09-15

    While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  6. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Mitsuya; Kitamura, Kazuya; Fetters, Michael D

    2005-01-01

    Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments). Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1) circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2) approach to starting the program; 3) how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4) future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1) few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2) developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3) start with undergraduates; 4) emphasize clinical skills; and 5) train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training. PMID:16162298

  7. The East African Training Initiative. A Model Training Program in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine for Low-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Charles B; Carter, E Jane; Braendli, Otto; Getaneh, Asqual; Schluger, Neil W

    2016-04-01

    Despite an extensive burden of lung disease in East Africa, there are remarkably few pulmonary physicians in the region and no pulmonary subspecialty training programs. We developed a unique training program for pulmonary medicine in Ethiopia. The East African Training Initiative (EATI) is a 2-year fellowship program at Tikur Anbessa (Black Lion) Specialized Teaching Hospital, the largest public hospital in Ethiopia and the teaching hospital for the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The first year is devoted to clinical care and procedural skills. Lectures, conferences, daily inpatient and outpatient rounds, and procedure supervision by visiting faculty provide the clinical knowledge foundation. In the second year, training in clinical research is added to ongoing clinical training. Before graduation, fellows must pass rigorous written and oral examinations and achieve high marks on faculty evaluations. Funding derives from several sources. Ethiopian trainees are paid by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and the Addis Ababa University School of Medicine. The World Lung Foundation and the Swiss Lung Foundation supply travel and housing costs for visiting faculty, who receive no other stipend. The first two trainees graduated in January 2015, and a second class of three fellows completed training in January 2016. All five presented research abstracts at the annual meetings of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in 2014 and 2015. The EATI has successfully provided pulmonary medicine training in Ethiopia and has capacity for local leadership. We believe that EATI could be a model for other resource-limited countries.

  8. West German Biotech Institute Trains Third World Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a six-week program designed to give scientists from developing countries advanced training in biotechnology methods. Stresses the need to provide the participants with "hands-on" experiences to enhance their ability to contribute to biotechnology programs in their home countries and to train others locally. (TW)

  9. Southeastern Institute for Teacher Training in Adult Basic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Dept. of Adult Education.

    The overall objective of the project was to train a group of highly selected teacher-trainers and master teachers in the theory and principles of ABE, who would, in turn, provide for the pre-service and inservice training of classroom teachers and teacher-aides through state and local community clinics and workshops. More than 70 participants took…

  10. West German Biotech Institute Trains Third World Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Dermot A.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a six-week program designed to give scientists from developing countries advanced training in biotechnology methods. Stresses the need to provide the participants with "hands-on" experiences to enhance their ability to contribute to biotechnology programs in their home countries and to train others locally. (TW)

  11. The state of chronic pain education in geriatric medicine fellowship training programs: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Debra K; Turner, Gregory H; Hennon, John G; Perera, Subashan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2005-10-01

    A survey of U.S. geriatric medicine fellowship training programs was performed to assess the status of teaching about chronic pain evaluation and management and identify opportunities for improvement. After an initial e-mail query, 43 of 96 programs agreed to participate. A self-administered questionnaire, with items adapted from a 2002 consensus panel statement, was mailed to their 171 fellows-in-training and 43 fellowship directors. Thirty-two programs (33% of nationwide sample) including 79 fellows (30% of nationwide sample) and 25 directors (26% of nationwide sample) returned surveys; 21 institutions returned both faculty and fellow surveys. Overall, directors endorsed the 19 items identified by the consensus panel as essential components of fellowship training, but fellows identified deficiencies, both before and during fellowship training. Specific areas of undereducation included comprehensive musculoskeletal assessment, neuropathic pain evaluation, indications for low back pain imaging, the role of multidisciplinary pain clinics and nonpharmacological modalities, the effect of physical and psychosocial comorbidities in formulating treatment goals, and the effect of aging on analgesic metabolism and prescription. Both groups were generally positive about fellows' abilities to implement pain-related clinical skills. Discrepancies existed between fellowship directors' ratings of importance of teaching individual items and the degree to which teaching was actually done, as well as faculty versus fellow assessments of whether some of the 19 items were taught. Primary care training programs (e.g., internal medicine, family medicine, geriatric medicine) should pay more systematic attention to educating trainees about chronic pain to optimize patient care, decrease suffering, and diminish healthcare expenditures.

  12. [Postgraduates' training as laboratory physicians/clinical pathologists in Japan--board certification of JSLM as a mandatory requirement for chairpersons of laboratory medicine].

    PubMed

    Kumasaka, Kazunari

    2002-04-01

    The educational committee of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine(JSLM) proposed a revised laboratory medicine residency curriculum in 1999 and again in 2001. The committee believes that present undergraduate clinical training is insufficient and that Japanese medical graduates need clinical training for two years after graduation. This two years training should be a precondition for further postgraduate training in laboratory medicine and should include fundamental clinical skills(communication skills, physical examination and common laboratory procedures such as Gram's stain, Wright-Giemsa stain and urinalysis). After the two years training, the minimal training period of laboratory medicine should be three years, and should include: 1) Principles, instrumentation and techniques of each discipline including clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical immunology, blood banking and other specific areas. 2) The use of laboratory information in a medical setting. 3) Interaction of the laboratory physician with laboratory staff, physicians and patients. With good on-the-job training and 24 hours on-call duties, laboratory physicians are expected to perform their tasks, including laboratory management, effectively. They should have appropriate educational background and should be well motivated. The background and duties of the laboratory physicians often reflect the institutional needs and personal philosophy of the chairperson of their department. At the moment, few senior physicians in Japan have qualifications in laboratory medicine and are unable, therefore, to provide the necessary guidance to help the laboratory physicians in their work. I therefore believe that the board certification of JSLM should be regarded as mandatory for chairpersons of laboratory medicine. Our on-call service system can enhance the training in laboratory medicine, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but patients' care as well.

  13. Development of training for medicines-oriented policymakers to apply evidence.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, H L; Helis, E; Lowe, D; Belanger, D; Hill, S; Mayhew, A; Taylor, M; Grimshaw, J M

    2016-07-29

    Health systems globally promote appropriate prescribing by healthcare providers and safe and effective medicine use by consumers. Rx for Change, a publicly available database, provides access to systematic reviews regarding best practices for prescribing and using medicines. Despite the value of the database for improving prescribing and medicine use, its use remains suboptimal. This study aimed to develop a training program for five medicine-focused organisations in Canada and Australia to facilitate the use and understanding of the Rx for Change database. Four steps were undertaken: 1) key informant interviews were completed across all organisations to understand the knowledge user perspective; 2) a directed content analysis was completed of the interview transcripts and proposed training was developed; 3) a second round of feedback on the proposed training by knowledge users was gathered; and 4) feedback was integrated to develop the final training. Sixteen key informant interviews with knowledge users were conducted. Themes for training content included the scope of, navigation and strategies for using Rx for Change (generic content) and practical examples on incorporating evidence within their workplace context (tailored content). The final training consisted of an informational video, a 60-minute face-to-face workshop and two post-training reminders. A method of engaging knowledge users in the development of a training program to improve the use of an on-line database of systematic reviews was established and used to design training. Next steps include the delivery and evaluation of the training.

  14. [Estimation of the functional parameters of the organ of vision in Military Training Institute entrants].

    PubMed

    Makogon, S I; Kuziakin, G V

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to estimate the functional parameters of the organ of vision in Military Training Institute entrants. Eight hundred and twenty school-leavers--Military Training Institute entrants (2006-2007) aged 17 to 19 years were examined. The integral procedure of their examination could characterize the state of refraction and accommodation: decreased visual acuity, refraction shift towards myopia, worse accommodation function. Prerequisites for the development and progression of myopia were found in higher law educational establishment entrants.

  15. Filling the gaps between theory and daily clinical procedural skills training in family medicine.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Performance of procedures is an integral part of any family physician/general practitioner's practice. Unfortunately, discrepancy occurs between the existing theoretical methods of procedural teaching and the training imparted during real daily practice, which creates gaps that need to be overcome. This article identifies and reviews teaching gaps in family medicine training and presents suggestions to overcome them with a view to forming holistic psychomotor skills based on the learner's characteristics within the patient-centred philosophy of family medicine.

  16. Aviation medicine graduate training at Ohio State University, 1955-1977.

    PubMed

    Billings, Charles E

    2010-05-01

    Between 1955 and 1977, The Ohio State University sponsored what is believed to be the first residency training program in aviation medicine. The training program was instigated by Richard Meiling, M.D., the associate dean of the College of Medicine, who had been a U.S. Army flight surgeon during World War II. Dr. Meiling was active after the war in a committee of physicians that advocated establishment of a residency training program and certification of aviation medicine as an approved specialty. From 1955 to 1977, 51 physicians were trained at Ohio State in aviation (later aerospace) and occupational medicine. The programs were located in the Department of Preventive Medicine and directed by William F. Ashe, M.D., chairman. It was a 3-yr residency: the first was an academic year that included full-time coursework and research, and a second year was also devoted to advanced coursework and field experience, during which the resident finished conducting research and submitted a thesis. The third year was a practicum in which the residents were located at any of a number of academic, aeronautical, or industrial sites under supervision of faculty members. They were then qualified to take the examinations of the American Board of Preventive Medicine in either aviation or occupational medicine. A number of graduates took both examinations during the first years of practice following their training; several continued to practice in both specialties throughout their careers.

  17. Principles to Consider in Defining New Directions in Internal Medicine Training and Certification

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Barbara J; Centor, Robert M; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2006-01-01

    SGIM endoreses seven principles related to current thinking about internal medicine training: 1) internal medicine requires a full three years of residency training before subspecialization; 2) internal medicine residency programs must dramatically increase support for training in the ambulatory setting and offer equivalent opportunities for training in both inpatient and outpatient medicine; 3) in settings where adequate support and time are devoted to ambulatory training, the third year of residency could offer an opportunity to develop further expertise or mastery in a specific type or setting of care; 4) further certification in specific specialties within internal medicine requires the completion of an approved fellowship program; 5) areas of mastery in internal medicine can be demonstrated through modified board certification and recertification examinations; 6) certification processes throughout internal medicine should focus increasingly on demonstration of clinical competence through adherence to validated standards of care within and across practice settings; and 7) regardless of the setting in which General Internists practice, we should unite to promote the critical role that this specialty serves in patient care. PMID:16637826

  18. Principles to consider in defining new directions in internal medicine training and certification.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Centor, Robert M; Rosenthal, Gary E

    2006-03-01

    SGIM endorses seven principles related to current thinking about internal medicine training: 1) internal medicine requires a full three years of residency training before subspecialization; 2) internal medicine residency programs must dramatically increase support for training in the ambulatory setting and offer equivalent opportunities for training in both inpatient and outpatient medicine; 3) in settings where adequate support and time are devoted to ambulatory training, the third year of residency could offer an opportunity to develop further expertise or mastery in a specific type or setting of care; 4) further certification in specific specialties within internal medicine requires the completion of an approved fellowship program; 5) areas of mastery in internal medicine can be demonstrated through modified board certification and recertification examinations; 6) certification processes throughout internal medicine should focus increasingly on demonstration of clinical competence through adherence to validated standards of care within and across practice settings; and 7) regardless of the setting in which General Internists practice, we should unite to promote the critical role that this specialty serves in patient care.

  19. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  20. Epidemiology and Herd Health Training in the School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archbald, L. F.; Hagstad, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    At Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, training in preventive medicine is incorporated into all four years of the curriculum. The curriculum is described with focus on the fourth year practical course that involves problem solving, using various herds in the area. (JMD)

  1. Undergraduate Training in Companion Animal Preventive Medicine at Louisiana State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bech-Nielsen, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The veterinary curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine has developed an undergraduate professional training program in companion animal preventive medicine--a new area of specialization--as a field of clinical practice. Curricula for years three and four are described. (Author/MLW)

  2. Faculty Development for Medical School Community-Based Faculty: A Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance Study Exploring Institutional Requirements and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Drowos, Joanna; Baker, Suzanne; Harrison, Suzanne Leonard; Minor, Suzanne; Chessman, Alexander W; Baker, Dennis

    2017-08-01

    Community-based faculty play a large role in training medical students nationwide and require faculty development. The authors hypothesized that positive relationships exist between clerkships paying preceptors and requiring faculty development, and between protected clerkship directors' time and delivering face-to-face preceptor training, as well as with the number or length of community-based preceptor visits. Through under standing the quantity, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support for faculty development provided to community-based preceptors teaching in family medicine clerkships, best practices can be developed. Data from the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine's Educational Research Alliance survey of Family Medicine Clerkship Directors were analyzed. The cross-sectional survey of clerkship directors is distributed annually to institutional representatives of U.S. and Canadian accredited medical schools. Survey questions focused on the requirements, delivery methods, barriers, and institutional support available for providing faculty development to community-based preceptors. Paying community-based preceptors was positively correlated with requiring faculty development in family medicine clerkships. The greatest barrier to providing faculty development was community-based preceptor time availability; however, face-to-face methods remain the most common delivery strategy. Many family medicine clerkship directors perform informal or no needs assessment in developing faculty development topics for community-based faculty. Providing payment to community preceptors may allow schools to enhance faculty development program activities and effectiveness. Medical schools could benefit from constructing a formal curriculum for faculty development, including formal preceptor needs assessment and program evaluation. Clerkship directors may consider recruiting and retaining community-based faculty by employing innovative faculty development delivery

  3. Addiction Medicine: Current Status of Certification, Maintenance of Certification, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Kevin; Wiegand, Timothy

    2016-03-01

    Addiction medicine (ADM) is an emerging medical field. It will soon be recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties as a multispecialty subspecialty, sponsored by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Certification and maintenance of certification in ADM are available currently through the American Board of Addiction Medicine (ABAM). There is an urgent need for trained and certified ADM physicians to serve the needs of patients and society. Thirty-seven addiction medicine fellowships of 12 months duration are now available, and their number is increasing. Physicians specializing in medical toxicology have educational, training, and practice overlap with addiction medicine. Medical toxicology physicians usually meet ADM examination eligibility requirements, based on clinical practice experience and continuing medical education activities. Those with fellowship training or in a fellowship bring training experience which has commonalities to ADM fellowship training, and therefore are particularly prepared for examination and practice in ADM. There are opportunities for partnerships in training, practice, and leadership between addiction medicine and medical toxicology.

  4. Family medicine residency training in community health centers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Morris, Carl G; Lesko, Sarah E; Andrilla, Holly A; Chen, Frederick M

    2010-10-01

    For more than 25 years, family medicine residencies (FMRs) have worked with community health centers (CHCs) to train family physicians. In light of the long history and current policy focus on this training model, the authors sought to evaluate comprehensively the scope and extent of family physician training occurring in CHCs. The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of 439 U.S. FMR directors in 2007. FMR directors were asked to provide information regarding the number, type, location, and length of any CHC training affiliations and to rate their satisfaction with such affiliations. Of 354 respondents (80% response rate), 83 FMRs (23.4%) provided some type of CHC training experience; 32 (9%) had their main residency continuity training site in a CHC. Respondents reported that 10.5% (788) of family medicine residents were trained in a CHC continuity clinic. The average length of affiliation was 10.2 years. Residency directors reported high satisfaction with CHC training affiliations. Almost one-quarter of FMRs in 2007 provided some training in CHCs. However, the proportion of residencies providing continuity training in CHCs--the type of training associated with enhanced recruitment and retention of family medicine graduates in underserved areas--was limited and relatively unchanged since 1992.

  5. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  6. The Teaching of Liberal Arts in Internal Medicine Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Povar, Gail J.; Keith, Karla J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey on the teaching of liberal arts in internal medicine residency programs and the importance of liberal arts to the practice of medicine is discussed. Law and organization of the health care system as well as economics and bioethics were rated as essential to medical practice. (Author/MLW)

  7. Institute for Training in Library Management and Communication Skills. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Henry C.; And Others

    An institute held December 10-16, 1978, in the United States Virgin Islands, trained 25 middle-level library administrators in the use of communications as a management tool. The institute was part of an on-going program of staff development in a multi-cultural, disadvantaged area. The program was based on these objectives: (1) to introduce basic…

  8. Effective Teacher Training at the Autism Institute in the People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This article presents research that was conducted at the Autism Institute, an organization serving children with autism and their families in the People's Republic of China. The article examines and highlights aspects of the teacher training model at the Autism Institute that have led to the preparation of highly qualified, enthusiastic, and…

  9. The Teaching of the Social Studies in Primary Teacher Training Institutions in Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Edward A.

    This comparative study was undertaken to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the social studies programs in the training of primary school teachers in the Asian countries. A detailed questionnaire was sent to selected associated institutions of the Asian Institute for Teacher Educators in each of the member states of UNESCO, except Mongolia;…

  10. Southwest Park and Recreation Training Institute (27th, Kingston, OK, January 31-February 3, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Dept. of Park Administration and Landscape Architecture.

    The professional responsibilities of administrators of parks and recreational facilities were emphasized in the keynote address to the twenty-seventh annual conference of the Southwest Park and Recreation Training Institute. The institute was founded with the objectives of fostering the gathering and dissemination of information with reference to…

  11. Development of a Performance Appraisal Training Program for the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Deborah Kilgore

    2004-01-01

    "Nobody wants to get one. Nobody wants to give one." The problem was that the supervisors and managers of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) did not know how to use the Institute's new performance management system and had not been trained on how to prepare and deliver effective performance appraisals. The problem further…

  12. Non-Formal Library Training Institutes, Final Report, 1973-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eyster, George W.

    The Appalachian Adult Education Center (AAEC) provided non-formal library training institutes in ten southeastern states over a three-year period, 1973-1976. With the cooperation of the state libraries, AAEC conducted institutes at 77 individual libraries and involved whole library staffs, as well as useful and interested community and agency…

  13. [Simulation in health care, a partnership between a training institute and a health care facility].

    PubMed

    Appelshaeuser, Michèle; Sengel, Danièle

    2017-03-01

    A system of collaboration around simulation, between a health care facility and a training institute, has been put in place. It has enabled the challenges for both institutions to be identified, thereby confirming the need to continue this project. In this context, interprofessionalality and intergenerationality are key elements.

  14. Effective Teacher Training at the Autism Institute in the People's Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Helen

    2008-01-01

    This article presents research that was conducted at the Autism Institute, an organization serving children with autism and their families in the People's Republic of China. The article examines and highlights aspects of the teacher training model at the Autism Institute that have led to the preparation of highly qualified, enthusiastic, and…

  15. Development of a Performance Appraisal Training Program for the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Deborah Kilgore

    2004-01-01

    "Nobody wants to get one. Nobody wants to give one." The problem was that the supervisors and managers of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) did not know how to use the Institute's new performance management system and had not been trained on how to prepare and deliver effective performance appraisals. The problem further…

  16. Report on the Information Management Training Institute Summer 1973: Volume 1-Proceedings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, James A., Ed.; Jackson, Linda M., Ed.

    This report is a consolidation of the knowledge and skills imparted during the 1973-74 Information Management Training Institute sponsored by Tennessee State University, Meharry Medical College, and the Institute for Services to Education, Inc. Section one of the report includes the proceedings from the sessions conducted on data collection,…

  17. Class of 1994, Annual Report: NH Technical Colleges and Institute and NH Police Standards and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Hampshire State Dept. of Postsecondary Technical Education, Concord.

    This 1994 annual report for the New Hampshire Technical Colleges and Institute System (NHTC&IS) includes information on enrollments, outcomes, job placement, average salaries, transfer institutions, work force training, the Police Academy, finances, future directions, and governance. Introductory material highlights the following…

  18. Revisiting the challenges of training Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows in chorionic villus sampling.

    PubMed

    Suskin, Barrie G; Sciscione, Anthony M; Teigen, Nickolas; Jenkins, Thomas C; Wapner, Ronald J; Gregg, Anthony R; Gross, Susan J; Bajaj, Komal

    2016-12-01

    More than a decade ago, researchers described a survey of Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows that showed that chorionic villus sampling training was limited for Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows in the United States. Prenatal screening and diagnosis have rapidly evolved since then and include the introduction of noninvasive aneuploidy screening that uses cell-free fetal DNA. Yet, chorionic villus sampling remains the only method available for first-trimester genetic diagnosis. This study evaluated the chorionic villus sampling training of Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows with respect to availability, competency standards, and education methods. In November 2015, an electronic survey was sent to Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows and fellowship directors of accredited Maternal Fetal Medicine fellowship programs in the United States. Fifty-eight percent of fellows (179/310) and 46% of program directors (35/76) responded. Ninety-five percent of Maternal Fetal Medicine fellows think that invasive diagnostic testing is essential to their training; 100% of fellows have amniocentesis training; and 65% have chorionic villus sampling training. The median number of chorionic villus sampling procedures that are expected during a fellowship in those who trained was 10. Eighty-eight percent of fellows and 89% of program directors state that chorionic villus sampling training could be better; 89% of fellows and 97% of directors would like access to simulated models. Barriers to training included lack of patients (71%) and lack of proficient attending supervisors (43%). Since the last survey, >10 years ago, chorionic villus sampling training has declined further. A decrease in the number of procedures that are performed is the leading barrier to this training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The high throughput biomedicine unit at the institute for molecular medicine Finland: high throughput screening meets precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Pietiainen, Vilja; Saarela, Jani; von Schantz, Carina; Turunen, Laura; Ostling, Paivi; Wennerberg, Krister

    2014-05-01

    The High Throughput Biomedicine (HTB) unit at the Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM was established in 2010 to serve as a national and international academic screening unit providing access to state of the art instrumentation for chemical and RNAi-based high throughput screening. The initial focus of the unit was multiwell plate based chemical screening and high content microarray-based siRNA screening. However, over the first four years of operation, the unit has moved to a more flexible service platform where both chemical and siRNA screening is performed at different scales primarily in multiwell plate-based assays with a wide range of readout possibilities with a focus on ultraminiaturization to allow for affordable screening for the academic users. In addition to high throughput screening, the equipment of the unit is also used to support miniaturized, multiplexed and high throughput applications for other types of research such as genomics, sequencing and biobanking operations. Importantly, with the translational research goals at FIMM, an increasing part of the operations at the HTB unit is being focused on high throughput systems biological platforms for functional profiling of patient cells in personalized and precision medicine projects.

  20. The effect of health care reform on academic medicine in Canada. Editorial Committee of the Canadian Institute for Academic Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, C H

    1996-01-01

    Although Canadian health care reform has constrained costs and improved efficiency, it has had a profound and mixed effect on Canadian academic medicine. Teaching hospitals have been reduced in number and size, and in patient programs have shifted to ambulatory and community settings. Specialized care programs are now multi-institutional and multidisciplinary. Furthermore, the influence of regional planning bodies has grown markedly. Although these changes have likely improved clinical service, their impact on the quality of clinical education is uncertain. Within the academic clinical department, recruitment of young faculty has been greatly complicated by constraints on licensing, billing numbers, fee-for-service income and research funding. The departmental practice plan based on university funds and fee-for-service income is being replaced by less favourable funding arrangements. However, emphasis on multidisciplinary programs has rendered these departments more flexible in structure. The future of Canadian academic medicine depends on an effective alliance with government. Academia and government must agree, particularly on human-resource requirements, research objectives and the delivery of clinical and academic programs in regional and community settings. The establishment of focal points for academic health sciences planning within academic health sciences centres and within governments would assist in these developments. Finally, government and the academic health sciences sector must work together to remove the current impediments to the recruitment of highly qualified young faculty. PMID:8624998

  1. [Expedition medicine].

    PubMed

    Donlagić, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Expedition and wildeness medicine is a term that combines rescue medicine, sport medicine as well as more specific branches as polar or high altitude medicine. It is being intensively studied both at the reaserch institutes and on expeditions. Ophtalmologists are concentrated on the reaserch of HARH (High Altitude Retinal Hemorrhage), neurologists on HACE reaserch (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), psychologists are developing tests to decsribe cognitive functions and many physicians are being trained to work in extreme enviroment. The result of all this effort are numerous new findings in pathophysiology and therapy of altitude illness, increased security on expedition and further development of expeditionism.

  2. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  3. In-Service Training of Professional and Para-Professional Staff in Institutions for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ron, Pnina; Lowenstein, Ariela

    2002-01-01

    Paraprofessional staff in six Israeli institutions for the elderly received training in psychological and social aspects of aging, loneliness and loss, communication, multiprofessional staff work, and elders with disabilities. They expressed a need for additional training in following up on physiotherapy. (Contains 18 references.) (SK)

  4. The Influence of Functional Fitness and Cognitive Training of Physical Disabilities of Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Ko-Chia; Hong, Wei-Chin; Lu, Yu-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    According to an investigation done by Taiwan Ministry of the Interior in 2013, there was more than 90% of the disability care institutions mainly based on life care. Previous studies have shown that individuals can effectively improve physical and cognitive training, improved in independent living and everyday competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate influence of the intervention program applying functional fitness and cognitive training to disabled residents in the institution. The subjects were disabled persons of a care institution in southern Taiwan and were randomly divided into training and control groups, both having 17 subjects. The age of the subjects was between 56 and 98 years with a mean age of 79.08 ± 10.04 years; the subjects of training group implemented 12 weeks of training on physical and cognitive training, while the control group subjects did not have any training program. The results revealed that subjects of the training group have significantly improved their functional shoulder rotation flexibility of left and right anterior hip muscle group flexibility of right, sitting functional balance of left and right, naming, attention, delayed recall, orientation, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA). The study suggested developing physical fitness programs and physical and cognitive prescriptions for the disabled people of the institutions. PMID:25756064

  5. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  6. The influence of functional fitness and cognitive training of physical disabilities of institutions.

    PubMed

    Yeh, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Ko-Chia; Hong, Wei-Chin; Lu, Yu-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    According to an investigation done by Taiwan Ministry of the Interior in 2013, there was more than 90% of the disability care institutions mainly based on life care. Previous studies have shown that individuals can effectively improve physical and cognitive training, improved in independent living and everyday competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate influence of the intervention program applying functional fitness and cognitive training to disabled residents in the institution. The subjects were disabled persons of a care institution in southern Taiwan and were randomly divided into training and control groups, both having 17 subjects. The age of the subjects was between 56 and 98 years with a mean age of 79.08 ± 10.04 years; the subjects of training group implemented 12 weeks of training on physical and cognitive training, while the control group subjects did not have any training program. The results revealed that subjects of the training group have significantly improved their functional shoulder rotation flexibility of left and right anterior hip muscle group flexibility of right, sitting functional balance of left and right, naming, attention, delayed recall, orientation, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA). The study suggested developing physical fitness programs and physical and cognitive prescriptions for the disabled people of the institutions.

  7. India: Implications of Communication Infrastructure on the Production of Media in State Training Institutes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.

    1989-01-01

    Description of training institutes developed by the government of India to improve the irrigation system focuses on the communication system infrastructure for the production and use of audiovisual materials for training. Highlights include local production of media; equipment and communication networks; cost effectiveness; and recommendations for…

  8. The Institute of Medicine report on emergency medical services for children: thoughts for emergency medical technicians, paramedics, and emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Cook, R T

    1995-07-01

    The emergency medical technician, the paramedic, and the emergency physician, as well as emergency physicians who have additional expertise in emergency medical service (EMS) prehospital care or pediatric emergency medicine (through experience or formal fellowship training), will all find the Institute of Medicine's report, Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMS-C), to be an invaluable background resource as well as a guide for EMS system and EMS-C-related planning. With both breadth and depth, it reviews many of the issues in EMS-C today from many perspectives and provides practical information to enable these care givers to understand better the "big picture" of EMS-C as well as to assist them in continuing to make a difference in the day-to-day emergency care for children. It is well referenced, engenders respect for all members of the team within the broad continuum of EMS-C, and provides encouragement to them to work together to identify and address issues and solve problems to improve the quality of care for our nation's children.

  9. The Institute on Human Values in Medicine: its role and influence in the conception and evolution of bioethics.

    PubMed

    McElhinney, T K; Pellegrino, E D

    2001-08-01

    For ten years, 1971-1981, the Institute on Human Values in Medicine (IHVM) played a key role in the development of Bioethics as a field. We have written this history and analysis to bring to new generations of Bioethicists information about the development of their field within both the humanities disciplines and the health professions. The pioneers in medical humanities and ethics came together with medical professionals in the decade of the 1960s. By the 1980s Bioethics was a fully recognized discipline. We show the role that IHVM programs played in defining the field, training faculty and helping schools to develop programs. We review, the beginnings of the IHVM in the crucible of social and technological change that led to the establishment of the IHVM's parent organization, the Society for Health and Human Values. We then turn to the IHVM programs through which Faculty members received fellowships to explore new crossovers between the humanities and the health professions. We have not only described the Fellows Program as it existed in 1973-1980, but have completed a survey of the fellows a quarter of a century after they held their fellowships. We describe other IHVM programs designed to facilitate the initiation and development of new humanities programs, to explore conceptual issues between medicine and five humanities fields, to conduct issue driven or educational method conferences and to advance humanities programs into graduate education through the Directors of Medical Education.

  10. A survey of the role of the UK physicist in nuclear medicine: a report of a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tindale, W B; Thorley, P J; Nunan, T O; Lewington, V; Shields, R A; Williams, N R

    2003-01-01

    Guidelines for the provision of physics support to nuclear medicine were published in 1999 by a joint working group of the British Institute of Radiology, the British Nuclear Medicine Society, and the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine. Following publication of the guidelines, a survey was conducted by the working group to gather data on the actual level of physicist support in UK hospitals of different types and on the activities undertaken by physicists. The data were collected in the 12 months following the publication of guidelines and cover different hospital models and seven UK regions. The results provide evidence that many of the smaller units - small teaching hospitals and, particularly, small district general hospitals - have insufficient physics support. Although, on average, there is good agreement between the guidelines and the survey data for medium and large district general hospitals, there is wide variation in the level of physics provision between hospitals delivering apparently similar services. This emphasizes the need for national guidelines, against which institutions may be bench-marked and which may be used as a recommendation for the staffing levels necessary to ensure services are delivered safely and standards are not compromised. The complexity and variety of workload is an important factor in determining the level of physics support. As services develop, it is vital that this aspect is recognized to ensure that appropriate resources are available for the required physics input, even if any new service represents only a modest clinical throughput in terms of patient numbers.

  11. Challenges in Measuring Benefit of Clinical Research Training Programs--the ASH Clinical Research Training Institute Example.

    PubMed

    Sung, Lillian; Crowther, Mark; Byrd, John; Gitlin, Scott D; Basso, Joe; Burns, Linda

    2015-12-01

    The American Society of Hematology developed the Clinical Research Training Institute (CRTI) to address the lack of training in patient-oriented research among hematologists. As the program continues, we need to consider metrics for measuring the benefits of such a training program. This article addresses the benefits of clinical research training programs. The fundamental and key components are education and mentorship. However, there are several other benefits including promotion of collaboration, job and advancement opportunities, and promotion of work-life balance. The benefits of clinical research training programs need to be measured so that funders and society can judge if they are worth the investment in time and resources. Identification of elements that are important to program benefit is essential to measuring the benefit of the program as well as program planning. Future work should focus on the constructs which contribute to benefits of clinical research training programs such as CRTI.

  12. [International collaboration of the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine: assistance for public health in the Republic of Guinea].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, O K

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of international collaboration, the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine (IMPTM), I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, assisted the Public Health System of the Republic of Guinea in detecting, diagnosing, studying, and preventing tropical infections of viral, bacterial, and parasitic etiologies, and in training national scientific manpower. The work was under way in the Soviet-Guinea Research Microbiology and Virology Laboratory, USSR Ministry of Health, in the Republic of Guinea (now the Pasteur Institute in Guinea (PIG)) in 1978-1991. The circulation of pathogens of a number of tropical infections, the fauna of vectors and carriers of transmissible infections, and their involvement of the circulation of pathogens of these diseases were found in this period. Consultative-and-methodological and medical assistance was given; national higher- and middle-level brainpower trained. It is expedient to restore scientific ties between the IMPTM and the PIG.

  13. Residents' Expectation of Family Medicine-Specific Training Program and Its Current State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Jun; Cheong, Yoo Seock; Choi, Eun Young; Baek, Kuk Hyun; Sung, Hwa Yoen; Lee, Hong-Yeon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Background The family medicine residency program consists mainly of clinical rotations in other specialties and the family medicine-specific training. We conducted this study to investigate how family medicine residents evaluated their training program that include family-oriented medicine, clinical preventive medicine, behavioral science and research in primary care. Methods In 2009, third-year residents of 129 training hospitals in Korea were surveyed to investigate the current state and their expectation of the residency program. The contents of questionnaires included training periods, conferences, procedures, interview techniques, outpatient and inpatient consultations, and written thesis. Results Total 133 out of 142 residents (93.7%) responded that 3 years of training is ideal or pertinent. Residents responded that the types of conference that they need most are journal review (81%), staff lecture (73.2%), and clinical topic review (73.2%), in that order. Procedures and interview techniques that the residents want to learn most were gastroscopy (72.5%), abdominal ultrasonography (65.2%), and pain management (46.4%). Hospitals where family medicine residents do not see hospitalized patients or patients in the outpatient clinic were 7.9% and 6.5%, respectively, whereas hospitals that maintain continuous family medicine outpatient clinics were only 40.8%. Education in outpatient clinic and articlewriting seminars was done less frequently in the secondary hospitals than in the tertiary hospitals. Conclusion Evaluation and quality improvement of family medicine training program as well as specialty rotations should be considered in order to foster better family physicians. The efforts have to be made to minimize the difference in quality of each family medicine residency program. PMID:22745877

  14. Design Institutional and Unit Sustainment Training Programs for XM1 Armor Crewmen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    f Research Product 81-12 DESIGN INSTITUTIONAL AND UNIT SUSTAINMENT TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR Xlii ARMOR CREWMAN ARI FIELD UNIT AT FORT KNOX, KENTUCKY... Armor Crewmen 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER RP-MTRD-(KY) -81-7 7. AUTHOR(a) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Charlotte H. Campbell MDA 903-80-C-0223...are presented: 1. Capabilities analyses for XMl armor crewman training devices. ’k2. Recommended training program for XMIi armor crewman

  15. Developing a competence-based addiction medicine curriculum in Indonesia: the training needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Pinxten, W J L; De Jong, C; Hidayat, T; Istiqomah, A N; Achmad, Y M; Raya, R P; Norviatin, D; Siregar, I M P

    2011-04-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet established. Urgent development and scaling-up of professional capacity in comprehensive, evidence-based addiction medicine is needed. In this article the results of the first step is presented, being the training needs assessment (TNA) and the process of further developing a national evidence- and competence-based addiction medicine curriculum in Indonesia.

  16. Post-Doctoral Research Training of Full-Time Faculty in Departments of Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Nancy O.; And Others

    As the second phase of a larger investigation, this study sought detailed information about the post-doctoral research training experiences of the faculty in departments of internal medicine and about the relationships between their research training experience and subsequent research activity. A six-page survey form was sent to 7,947 full-time…

  17. Accident Investigation Technician Instructor Training Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    To assist States in implementing Highway Safety Program Standard 18, "Accident Investigation and Reporting", the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funded an instructor training program for a new occupational field in highway safety, accident investigation technician. The Center for Vocational and Technical Education executed this…

  18. Crash Injury Management Instructor Training Institute: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleven, Arlene M.

    The purpose of this study was to expose key individuals to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)-developed curriculum materials for crash injury management and to teach them how to teach. The scope of the training effort is described using a detailed discussion and separate conclusions for the following tasks: planning,…

  19. Workplace and Institute Accredited Training. Costs and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symmonds, Helen; Burke, Gerald; Harvey-Beavis, Adrian; Malley, Jeff

    A case study approach was used to examine various models of technical and further education (TAFE) accredited training, with particular focus on comparative costs and student satisfaction. Literature on costing and satisfaction was reviewed. Case studies were drawn from the retail, hospitality, and automotive industries. Two comparable courses…

  20. Instructor Training Institutes for NHTSA Curriculum Package: Traffic Court Judges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgener, V. E.; Reese, Dorothy

    A series of five national instructor training workshops were planned for traffic court judges and administrators. A curriculum package which had been previously prepared was used to orient selected key personnel toward highway safety. Technical Education Research Centers (Midwest Center) conducted the conferences from October 23 to December 12,…

  1. High School Harvest: Combining Food Service Training and Institutional Procurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, David; Estrin, Hans; Becot, Florence

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses High School Harvest (HSH), an Extension educator-led project in five Vermont schools to provide students with job training and food system education and to provide lightly processed produce to school lunch programs. One hundred and twenty-one students participated, logging 8,752 hours growing, harvesting, and processing…

  2. High School Harvest: Combining Food Service Training and Institutional Procurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, David; Estrin, Hans; Becot, Florence

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses High School Harvest (HSH), an Extension educator-led project in five Vermont schools to provide students with job training and food system education and to provide lightly processed produce to school lunch programs. One hundred and twenty-one students participated, logging 8,752 hours growing, harvesting, and processing…

  3. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    PubMed

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so.

  4. Principles of ethics review on traditional medicine and the practice of institute review board in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-yun; Liang, Zhao-hui; Huang, Hui-ling; Liang, Wei-xiong

    2011-08-01

    As one of the significant parts of medical science research in China, the research on Chinese medicine (CM) reflects the essence of healthcare tradition in the country both theoretically and clinically, and embodies the values of Chinese culture. Therefore, in the practice of ethics review on CM research protocols, besides abiding by the contemporary prevalent international principles and guidelines on bioethics, which emphasizes the scientific and bioethical value of the study, we should also stress the CM theoretical background and relevant clinical experience in the framework of Chinese culture and values. In this paper, we went over the traits of CM clinical research and the experience from the practice of ethics review by the institution review board for bioethics, and then attempted to summarize the key points for the bioethics review to CM researches in China, so as to serve as reference for the bioethics review to traditional and alternative medicine researches.

  5. Perceptions of interprofessional education and practice within a complementary and alternative medicine institution.

    PubMed

    Kadar, Gena E; Vosko, Andrew; Sackett, Michael; Thompson, H Garrett Rush

    2015-01-01

    A survey of the constituents of a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institution was conducted to identify perceptions of interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP). A 22 question survey was developed and administered to: chiropractic students, acupuncture and oriental medicine students, faculty and alumni of both professions, staff and administrators. The majority of the 321 respondents demonstrated positive perceptions of IPE and IPP, however many reported a lack of understanding of the distinct roles of select healthcare professions. The study also suggested that the campus community is not homogenous in its understanding of CAM or allopathic professions, or is it homogenous in its understanding of IPE and IPP. While the overall positive attitudes toward IPE and IPP imply a willingness to improve collaboration between these groups, the lack of understanding of profession-specific roles must be addressed to support effective implementation of IPE.

  6. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    PubMed

    Campion, MaryAnn W; Bhasin, Robina M; Beaudette, Donald J; Shann, Mary H; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2016-09-01

    Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty.

  7. Challenges and Opportunities for Genomics Education: Insights from an Institute of Medicine Roundtable Activity.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Michael J; Wicklund, Catherine; Johansen Taber, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing availability of genomic tools for clinical care, many health care providers experience gaps in genomics knowledge and skills that serve as impediments to widespread and appropriate integration of genomics into routine care. A workshop recently held by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Roundtable on Translating Genomics-Based Research for Health explored 1) the barriers that result in a perception among health care providers that the need for genomics education is not urgent and 2) the drivers that may spur a change in that attitude. This commentary promotes continuing and graduate education-informed by an awareness of barriers, drivers, and best practices-as the most effective approaches for preparing the workforce for genomic medicine and ultimately improving patient care, and argues that the time for education is now.

  8. Best educational practices in pediatric emergency medicine during emergency medicine residency training: guiding principles and expert recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Robert L; Walthall, Jennifer D H; Mull, Colette C; Nypaver, Michele M; Baren, Jill M

    2010-10-01

    The state of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) education within emergency medicine (EM) residency programs is reviewed and discussed in the context of shifting practice environments and new demands for a greater focus on the availability and quality of PEM services. The rapid growth of PEM within pediatrics has altered the EM practice landscape with regard to PEM. The authors evaluate the composition, quantity, and quality of PEM training in EM residency programs, with close attention paid to the challenges facing programs. A set of best practices is presented as a framework for discussion of future PEM training that would increase the yield and relevance of knowledge and experiences within the constraints of 3- and 4-year residencies. Innovative educational modalities are discussed, as well as the role of simulation and pediatric-specific patient safety education. Finally, barriers to PEM fellowship training among EM residency graduates are discussed in light of the shortage of practitioners from this training pathway and in recognition of the ongoing importance of the EM voice in PEM. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. Variability of ethics education in laboratory medicine training programs: results of an international survey.

    PubMed

    Bruns, David E; Burtis, Carl A; Gronowski, Ann M; McQueen, Matthew J; Newman, Anthony; Jonsson, Jon J

    2015-03-10

    Ethical considerations are increasingly important in medicine. We aimed to determine the mode and extent of teaching of ethics in training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine. We developed an on-line survey of teaching in areas of ethics relevant to laboratory medicine. Reponses were invited from directors of training programs who were recruited via email to leaders of national organizations. The survey was completed by 80 directors from 24 countries who directed 113 programs. The largest numbers of respondents directed postdoctoral training of scientists (42%) or physicians (33%), post-masters degree programs (33%), and PhD programs (29%). Most programs (82%) were 2years or longer in duration. Formal training was offered in research ethics by 39%, medical ethics by 31%, professional ethics by 24% and business ethics by 9%. The number of reported hours of formal training varied widely, e.g., from 0 to >15h/year for research ethics and from 0 to >15h for medical ethics. Ethics training was required and/or tested in 75% of programs that offered training. A majority (54%) of respondents reported plans to add or enhance training in ethics; many indicated a desire for online resources related to ethics, especially resources with self-assessment tools. Formal teaching of ethics is absent from many training programs in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, with heterogeneity in the extent and methods of ethics training among the programs that provide the training. A perceived need exists for online training tools, especially tools with self-assessment components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep learning for segmentation of brain tumors: can we train with images from different institutions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, David; Saha, Ashirbani; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2017-03-01

    Deep learning and convolutional neural networks (CNNs) in particular are increasingly popular tools for segmentation and classification of medical images. CNNs were shown to be successful for segmentation of brain tumors into multiple regions or labels. However, in the environment which fosters data-sharing and collection of multi-institutional datasets, a question arises: does training with data from another institution with potentially different imaging equipment, contrast protocol, and patient population impact the segmentation performance of the CNN? Our study presents preliminary data towards answering this question. Specifically, we used MRI data of glioblastoma (GBM) patients for two institutions present in The Cancer Imaging Archive. We performed a process of training and testing CNN multiple times such that half of the time the CNN was tested on data from the same institution that was used for training and half of the time it was tested on another institution, keeping the training and testing set size constant. We observed a decrease in performance as measured by Dice coefficient when the CNN was trained with data from a different institution as compared to training with data from the same institution. The changes in performance for the entire tumor and for four different labels within the tumor were: 0.72 to 0.65 (p=0.06), 0.61 to 0.58 (p=0.49), 0.54 to 0.51 (p=0.82), 0.31 to 0.24 (p<0.03), and 0.43 to 0.31(p<0.003) respectively. In summary, we found that while data across institutions can be used for development of CNNs, this might be associated with a decrease in performance.

  11. Army Institutional Training: Current Status and Future Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    possibility that cultural differences in the Soldier population could interact with institutional instruction (cf. Hofstede , 1986), the Army seeks to...effectiveness have been found to improve trainee retention and generalization of learned skills for higher level cognitive functions such as concept formation... workplace and about barriers and enablers of transfer. However, it does not measure transfer directly, which limits the types of inferences that can

  12. A national survey of terrorism preparedness training among pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine programs.

    PubMed

    Martin, Shelly D; Bush, Anneke C; Lynch, Julia A

    2006-09-01

    Domestic terrorism is a real threat focusing on a need to engage in effective emergency preparedness planning and training. Front-line physicians are an important component of any emergency preparedness plan. Potential victims of an attack include children who have unique physiologic and psychological vulnerabilities in disasters. Front-line providers need to have adequate training to effectively participate in local planning initiatives and to recognize and treat casualties including children. The goal of the survey was to assess the current state of terrorism preparedness training, including child victims, by emergency medicine, family practice, and pediatric residency programs in the United States and to assess methods of training and barriers to establishing effective training. A survey was e-mailed to a comprehensive list of all US pediatric, family practice, and emergency medicine residency programs 3 times between September 2003 and January 2004. The survey measured the perceived risk of terrorist attack, level of training by type of attack, level of training regarding children, method of training, and barriers to training. Overall, 21% of programs responded (46 of 182 pediatric, 75 of 400 family practice, and 29 of 125 emergency medicine programs). Across all of the event types, emergency medicine programs were more likely to report adequate/comprehensive training. However, < 50% of emergency medicine programs report adequate training for children. Didactic classroom-based lectures were the most commonly used method of training. Emergency medicine programs were more likely to use scenario-based exercises. Among programs that use scenario exercises, 93% report that they never (40%) or only sometimes (53%) incorporate child victims into the scenarios. Time, funding, access to subject matter experts, and availability of training material are the most important barriers to effective training. Children are a precious national resource and a vulnerable population

  13. [V. V. Strel'tsov: founder of the Institute and father of our country's aerospace medicine].

    PubMed

    Agadzhanian, N A

    1996-01-01

    The paper gives an account of the scientific-and-practical activity of the prominent Soviet physiologist V. V. Streltsov, Head of the Fourth Sector, Research Sanitary Institute, and the initiator of the Aviation Medicine Institute. He was a brilliant experimenter, innovator, organizer of unique researches who developed the physiological aspects of high altitude, speedy, night and instrumental blind flights, the problems of stratospheric aviation. He made the first experimental ascent in the altitude chamber. He was one of the first aviation physicians who made a parachute jump. He was the first inflight medical investigator who tested the on-board oxygen equipment in group cross-country flight on the closed route Moscow-Kharkov-Moscow.

  14. Institute of Medicine core competencies as a foundation for nursing program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Morris, Tama L; Hancock, Dawson R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore one institution's experience integrating the Institute of Medicine (IOM) competencies into a pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing curriculum. In response to a growing number of errors in the health care system and efforts to increase patient safety and quality of care, the IOM proposed that students in health care professions learn to implement five core competencies. The program evaluation encompassed a mixed-method, stakeholder-focused methodology using a curriculum matrix triangulated with Student and Faculty Core Competency surveys. Results of the study indicate that all competencies were evident in the curriculum. Students often cited barriers to implementation of the competencies while faculty cited opportunities. Findings suggest that faculty need to raise student awareness of performing the competencies and be deliberate in the design of experiences to facilitate competency implementation.

  15. Developing a high-performance team training framework for internal medicine residents: the ABC'S of teamwork.

    PubMed

    Carbo, Alexander R; Tess, Anjala V; Roy, Christopher; Weingart, Saul N

    2011-06-01

    Effective teamwork and communication can prevent error and mitigate harm. High-performance team training was developed in the aviation industry for flight crews and is being incorporated in health care settings, such as emergency departments, operating rooms, and labor and delivery suites. We translated and adapted high-performance teamwork and communication principles from other industries and other disciplines to an inpatient internal medicine environment. We selected key principles from aviation and anesthesia crew training programs in 2004 and organized them into the ABC'S of teamwork. These included appropriate Assertiveness, effective Briefings, Callback and verification, Situational awareness, and Shared mental models. Based on this content, we developed a training session for internal medicine residents and faculty, and evaluated learners' patient safety attitudes and knowledge before and after training with a written survey. More than 50 residents participated in the module. The percentage of correct answers on a question related to key teamwork principles increased from 35% before training to 67% after training (P = 0.03). Before training, 65% of the residents reported that they "would feel comfortable telling a senior clinician his/her plan was unsafe"; this increased to 94% after training (P = 0.005). After the training session, residents were able to provide examples from their clinical practice that emphasized all of the ABC'S of teamwork. Teamwork principles can be adapted from other disciplines and applied to internal medicine. After a single session, residents displayed greater knowledge of teamwork principles and reported changed attitudes toward key teamwork behaviors.

  16. Voice Range Profiles of Singing Students: The Effects of Training Duration and Institution.

    PubMed

    Lycke, Hugo; Siupsinskiene, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess differences in voice parameters measured by the physiological voice range profile (VRP) in groups of vocally healthy subjects differentiated by the duration of vocal training and the training institution. Six basic frequency- and intensity-related VRP parameters and the frequency dip of the register transition zone were determined from VRP recordings of 162 females studying in individual singing lessons (1st-5th level) in Dutch, Belgian, English, and French public or private training facilities. Sixty-seven nonsinging female students served as controls. Singing students in more advanced singing classes demonstrated a significantly greater frequency range, particularly at high frequencies, than did first-year students. Students with private training showed a significantly increased mean intensity range in comparison to those in group classes, while students with musical theater training exhibited significantly increased frequency- and intensity-related VRP parameters in comparison to the students with classical training. When compared to nonsingers, all singing student subgroups showed significant increases in all basic VRP parameters. However, the register transition parameter was not influenced by training duration or institution. Our study suggests that the extension of physiological vocal limits might depend on training duration and institution. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Specialization training in Malawi: a qualitative study on the perspectives of medical students graduating from the University of Malawi College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a critical shortage of healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa, and Malawi has one of the lowest physician densities in the region. One of the reasons for this shortage is inadequate retention of medical school graduates, partly due to the desire for specialization training. The University of Malawi College of Medicine has developed specialty training programs, but medical school graduates continue to report a desire to leave the country for specialization training. To understand this desire, we studied medical students’ perspectives on specialization training in Malawi. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews of medical students in the final year of their degree program. We developed an interview guide through an iterative process, and recorded and transcribed all interviews for analysis. Two independent coders coded the manuscripts and assessed inter-coder reliability, and the authors used an “editing approach” to qualitative analysis to identify and categorize themes relating to the research aim. The University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board and the University of Malawi College of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee approved this study and authors obtained written informed consent from all participants. Results We interviewed 21 medical students. All students reported a desire for specialization training, with 12 (57%) students interested in specialties not currently offered in Malawi. Students discussed reasons for pursuing specialization training, impressions of specialization training in Malawi, reasons for staying or leaving Malawi to pursue specialization training and recommendations to improve training. Conclusions Graduating medical students in Malawi have mixed views of specialization training in their own country and still desire to leave Malawi to pursue further training. Training institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to understand the needs of the country’s healthcare workforce and the needs of their

  18. Report on Federal Predoctoral Student Support Part II--Students Supported Under Training Grants of the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Mental Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Interagency Committee on Education, Washington, DC. Student Support Study Group.

    This report presents data concerning predoctoral students supported under training grants of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). The report offers a discussion of the training grant and a comparison of it to other forms of support, a discussion of the students and the fields of study…

  19. Post-School Vocational Training Initiatives for Young Adults in Greece: The Case of IEKs (Vocational Training Institutes)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarifis, George K.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews developments in vocational education in Greece, especially the 1993 establishment of vocational training institutes as a response to the need for competitiveness and economic development. Identifies problems and concerns about whether they are fulfilling their role after 10 years. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  20. Factors that influence medical student selection of an emergency medicine residency program: implications for training programs.

    PubMed

    Love, Jeffrey N; Howell, John M; Hegarty, Cullen B; McLaughlin, Steven A; Coates, Wendy C; Hopson, Laura R; Hern, Gene H; Rosen, Carlo L; Fisher, Jonathan; Santen, Sally A

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of student decision-making when selecting an emergency medicine (EM) training program is essential for program directors as they enter interview season. To build upon preexisting knowledge, a survey was created to identify and prioritize the factors influencing candidate decision-making of U.S. medical graduates. This was a cross-sectional, multi-institutional study that anonymously surveyed U.S. allopathic applicants to EM training programs. It took place in the 3-week period between the 2011 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rank list submission deadline and the announcement of match results. Of 1,525 invitations to participate, 870 candidates (57%) completed the survey. Overall, 96% of respondents stated that both geographic location and individual program characteristics were important to decision-making, with approximately equal numbers favoring location when compared to those who favored program characteristics. The most important factors in this regard were preference for a particular geographic location (74.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 72% to 78%) and to be close to spouse, significant other, or family (59.7%, 95% CI = 56% to 63%). Factors pertaining to geographic location tend to be out of the control of the program leadership. The most important program factors include the interview experience (48.9%, 95% CI = 46% to 52%), personal experience with the residents (48.5%, 95% CI = 45% to 52%), and academic reputation (44.9%, 95% CI = 42% to 48%). Unlike location, individual program factors are often either directly or somewhat under the control of the program leadership. Several other factors were ranked as the most important factor a disproportionate number of times, including a rotation in that emergency department (ED), orientation (academic vs. community), and duration of training (3-year vs. 4-year programs). For a subset of applicants, these factors had particular importance in overall decision-making. The vast majority

  1. Guiding the development of family medicine training in Africa through collaboration with the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mash, Robert J; de Villiers, Marietjie R; Moodley, Kalay; Nachega, Jean B

    2014-08-01

    Africa's health care challenges include a high burden of disease, low life expectancy, health workforce shortages, and varying degrees of commitment to primary health care on the part of policy makers and government officials. One overarching goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to develop models of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. To do this, MEPI has created a network of universities and other institutions that, among other things, recognizes the importance of supporting training programs in family medicine. This article provides a framework for assessing the stage of the development of family medicine training in Africa, including the challenges that were encountered and how educational organizations can help to address them. A modified "stages of change" model (precontemplation, contemplation, action, maintenance, and relapse) was used as a conceptual framework to understand the various phases that countries go through in developing family medicine in the public sector and to determine the type of assistance that is useful at each phase.

  2. [50 years' of the Institute of Sports Medicine at the Charles University Medical School on the 650th anniversary of its founding].

    PubMed

    Novotný, V

    1999-01-01

    In an agreeable shadow of the great 650th anniversary of Charles University foundation (1348-1998), arising of the first Institute of Sports Medicine round the world on Medical Faculty in Prague (1948-1998) was commemorated by scientific session. Since J. E. Purkynĕ (1850) have gone idea of favourable effect of body training for human health by representatives of Prague Medical Faculty, till Doctor J. Král, who started lectures for medical students in this discipline in 1933. Rise of Institute of Sports Medicine was approved in 1934, but its realization thanks to Professor Král, was performed after 2nd World War in 1948. From the beginning, students have lectures within the framework of daily study of whole wide of the branche, including practical exercises and closing examine. First text book of sports medicine and first book about clinic in sports medicine was written (J. Král). Members of Institute lectured on many foreign universities and scientific congresses and published more than 2,500 scientific works, some of them have world priority. For example first wireless transmission of heart frequency (V. Seliger, V. Kruta), cardiologic observations during big sports load (J. Král, Z. Hornof), discoveries at biochemical laboratory (J. Král, A. Zenísek), at medical functional anthropologic laboratory (V. Novotný), introducing of remedial exercises in clinical practice (L. Schmid, M. Zintlová, J. Chrástek) etc. In the set out choice of literary citation it is put on only fragment of publications which document scientific activity of jubileeing Institute. For period of duration of Institute more than hundred thousand patients were examined--both sportives and non-sportives, young and old. Contemporary trend goes from classic care about sportsmen towards preventive medicine. Attention is focused first of all to testing of middle aged and older patients in sense of prevention of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases and indication for specific movement load

  3. Evidence-Based Medicine: What Is It and How Does It Apply to Athletic Training?

    PubMed

    Steves, Russell; Hootman, Jennifer M.

    2004-03-01

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce the concept of evidence-based medicine (EBM) to athletic trainers. This overview provides information on how EBM can affect the clinical practice of athletic training and enhance the care given to patients. DATA SOURCES: We searched the MEDLINE and CINHAL bibliographic databases using the terms evidence-based medicine and best practice and the online Index to Abstracts of Cochrane Reviews by group (injury, musculoskeletal injuries, and musculoskeletal) to identify reviews on topics pertinent to athletic training. DATA SYNTHESIS: Evidence-based medical practice has 5 components: defining a clinically relevant question, searching for the best evidence, appraising the quality of the evidence, applying the evidence to clinical practice, and evaluating the process. Evidence-based medicine integrates the research evidence, clinician's expertise, and patient's preferences to guide clinical decision making. Critical to this effort is the availability of quality research on the effectiveness of sports medicine techniques. Athletic training outcomes research is lagging behind that of other health care professions. RECOMMENDATIONS: Athletic trainers need to embrace the critical-thinking skills to assess the medical literature and incorporate it into their clinical practice. The profession should encourage more clinically related research and enhance the scientific foundation of athletic training. Evidence-based medicine provides an important next step in the growth of the athletic training profession.

  4. The National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center Global Health Scholars and Fellows Program: Collaborating Across Five Consortia to Strengthen Research Training.

    PubMed

    Zunt, Joseph R; Chi, Benjamin H; Heimburger, Douglas C; Cohen, Craig R; Strathdee, Steffanie; Hobbs, Nicole; Thomas, Yolanda; Bale, Kimberly; Salisbury, Kathryn; Hernandez, Maria T; Riley, Lee W; Vermund, Sten H; van der Horst, Charles

    2016-09-07

    As demand for global health research training continues to grow, many universities are striving to meet the needs of trainees in a manner complementary to research priorities of the institutions hosting trainees, while also increasing capacity for conducting research. We provide an overview of the first 4 years of the Global Health Program for Fellows and Scholars, a collaboration of 20 U.S. universities and institutions spread across 36 low- and middle-income countries funded through the National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center. We highlight many aspects of our program development that may be of interest to other multinational consortia developing global health research training programs. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Physician training in aerospace medicine--an historical review in the United States.

    PubMed

    Doarn, Charles R; Mohler, Stanley R

    2013-02-01

    The training of U.S. physicians in aviation medicine closely followed the development of reliable airplanes. This training has matured as aviation and space travel have become more routine over the past several decades. In the U.S., this training began in support of military pilots who were flying increasingly complex aircraft in the early part of the 20th century. As individuals reached into the stratosphere, low Earth orbit, and eventually to the Moon, physicians were trained not only through military efforts but in academic settings as well. This paper provides an historical summary of how physician training in aerospace medicine developed in the U.S., citing both the development of the military activities and, more importantly, the perspectives of the academic programs. This history is important as we move forward in the development of commercial space travel and the needs that such a business model will be required to meet.

  6. Behind Scenes in Medicine: Training the Pharmaceutical Detail Man

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltz, Judith S.

    1974-01-01

    The pharmaceutical detail man, in bringing information about new drugs to physicians, hospitals and pharmacists, performs a complex and sensitive task. Does his training fit him to meet the challenge? (Author)

  7. Faculty prediction of in-training examination scores of emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Amer Z; Salzman, David H; Gisondi, Michael A; Courtney, D Mark

    2014-03-01

    The Emergency Medicine In-Training Examination (EMITE) is one of the only valid tools for medical knowledge assessment in current use by emergency medicine (EM) residencies. However, EMITE results return late in the academic year, providing little time to institute potential remediation. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of EM faculty to accurately predict resident EMITE scores prior to results return. We asked EM faculty at the study site to predict the 2012 EMITE scores of the 50 EM residents 2 weeks prior to results being available. The primary outcome was prediction accuracy, defined as the proportion of predictions within 6% of the actual score. The secondary outcome was prediction precision, defined as the mean deviation of predictions from the actual scores. We assessed several faculty background variables, including years of experience, educational leadership status, and clinical hours worked, for correlation with the two outcomes. Thirty-two of the 38 faculty (84.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 69.6-92.6) participated in the study, rendering a total of 1600 predictions for 50 residents. Mean resident EMITE score was 81.1% (95% CI 79.5-82.8%). Mean prediction accuracy for all faculty participants was 69% (95% CI 65.9-72.1%). Mean prediction precision was 5.2% (95% CI 4.9-5.5%). Education leadership status was the only background variable correlated with the primary and secondary outcomes (Spearman's ρ = 0.51 and -0.53, respectively). Faculty possess only moderate accuracy at predicting resident EMITE scores. We recommend a multicenter study to evaluate the generalizability of the present results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Faculty Prediction of In-Training Examination Scores of Emergency Medicine Residents: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Aldeen, Amer Z; Quattromani, Erin N; Williamson, Kelly; Hartman, Nicholas D; Wheaton, Natasha B; Branzetti, Jeremy B

    2015-07-01

    The Emergency Medicine In-Training Examination (EMITE) is one of the few validated instruments for medical knowledge assessment of emergency medicine (EM) residents. The EMITE is administered only once annually, with results available just 2 months before the end of the academic year. An earlier predictor of EMITE scores would be helpful for educators to institute timely remediation plans. A previous single-site study found that only 69% of faculty predictions of EMITE scores were accurate. The goal of this article was to measure the accuracy with which EM faculty at five residency programs could predict EMITE scores for resident physicians. We asked EM faculty at five different residency programs to predict the 2014 EMITE scores for all their respective resident physicians. The primary outcome was prediction accuracy, defined as the proportion of predictions within 6% of the actual scores. The secondary outcome was prediction precision, defined as the mean deviation of predictions from the actual scores. We assessed faculty background variables for correlation with the two outcomes. One hundred and eleven faculty participated in the study (response rate 68.9%). Mean prediction accuracy for all faculty was 60.0%. Mean prediction precision was 6.3%. Participants were slightly more accurate at predicting scores of noninterns compared to interns. No faculty background variable correlated with the primary or secondary outcomes. Eight participants predicted scores with high accuracy (>80%). In this multicenter study, EM faculty possessed only moderate accuracy at predicting resident EMITE scores. A very small subset of faculty members is highly accurate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Do They Stay or Do They Go? Residents Who Become Faculty at Their Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathright, Molly Marie; Krain, Lewis P.; Sparks, Shane E.; Thrush, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Few data exist on the topic of internal hiring of trainees in academic medicine. This study examines nationally representative data to determine the frequency of faculty psychiatrists who are employed in the same department in which they completed their residency training. Method: Estimates of internal faculty hiring were obtained by…

  10. Do They Stay or Do They Go? Residents Who Become Faculty at Their Training Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathright, Molly Marie; Krain, Lewis P.; Sparks, Shane E.; Thrush, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Few data exist on the topic of internal hiring of trainees in academic medicine. This study examines nationally representative data to determine the frequency of faculty psychiatrists who are employed in the same department in which they completed their residency training. Method: Estimates of internal faculty hiring were obtained by…

  11. Development of Family Medicine training in Botswana: Views of key stakeholders in Ngamiland

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background Family Medicine training commenced in Botswana in 2011, and Maun was one of the two sites chosen as a training complex. If it is to be successful there has to be investment in the training programme by all stakeholders in healthcare delivery in the district. Aim The aim of the study was to explore the attitudes of stakeholders to initiation of Family Medicine training and their perspectives on the future roles of family physicians in Ngami district, Botswana. Setting Maun and the surrounding Ngami subdistrict of Botswana. Methods Thirteen in-depth interviews were conducted with purposively selected key stakeholders in the district health services. Data were recorded, transcribed and analysed using the framework method. Results Participants welcomed the development of Family Medicine training in Maun and expect that this will result in improved quality of primary care. Participants expect the registrars and family physicians to provide holistic health care that is of higher quality and expertise than currently experienced, relevant research into the health needs of the community, and reduced need for referrals. Inadequate personal welfare facilities, erratic ancillary support services and an inadequate complement of mentors and supervisors for the programme were some of the gaps and challenges highlighted by participants. Conclusion Family Medicine training is welcomed by stakeholders in Ngamiland. With proper planning introduction of the family physician in the district is expected to result in improvement of primary care. PMID:28235328

  12. Anesthesiologists and Disaster Medicine: A Needs Assessment for Education and Training and Reported Willingness to Respond.

    PubMed

    Hayanga, Heather K; Barnett, Daniel J; Shallow, Natasha R; Roberts, Michael; Thompson, Carol B; Bentov, Itay; Demiralp, Gozde; Winters, Bradford D; Schwengel, Deborah A

    2017-05-01

    Anesthesiologists provide comprehensive health care across the emergency department, operating room, and intensive care unit. To date, anesthesiologists' perspectives regarding disaster medicine and public health preparedness have not been described. Anesthesiologists' thoughts and attitudes were assessed via a Web-based survey at 3 major academic institutions. Frequencies, percentages, and odds ratios (ORs) were used to assess self-reported perceptions of knowledge and skills, as well as attitudes and beliefs regarding education and training, employee development, professional obligation, safety, psychological readiness, efficacy, personal preparedness, and willingness to respond (WTR). Three representative disaster scenarios (natural disaster [ND], radiological event [RE], and pandemic influenza [PI]) were investigated. Results are reported as percent or OR (95% confidence interval). Participants included 175 anesthesiology attendings (attendings) and 95 anesthesiology residents (residents) representing a 47% and 51% response rate, respectively. A minority of attendings indicated that their hospital provides adequate pre-event preparation and training (31% [23-38] ND, 14% [9-21] RE, and 40% [31-49] PI). Few residents felt that their residency program provided them with adequate preparation and training (22% [14-33] ND, 16% [8-27] RE, and 17% [9-29] PI). Greater than 85% of attendings (89% [84-94] ND, 88% [81-92] RE, and 87% [80-92] PI) and 70% of residents (81% [71-89] ND, 71% [58-81] RE, and 82% [70-90] PI) believe that their hospital or residency program, respectively, should provide them with preparation and training. Approximately one-half of attendings and residents are confident that they would be safe at work during response to a ND or PI (55% [47-64] and 58% [49-67] of attendings; 59% [48-70] and 48% [35-61] of residents, respectively), whereas approximately one-third responded the same regarding a RE (31% [24-40] of attendings and 28% [18-41] of

  13. Communication skills training in postgraduate medicine: the development of a new course.

    PubMed

    Dacre, J; Richardson, J; Noble, L; Stephens, K; Parker, N

    2004-12-01

    It has long been accepted that communication is of central importance in healthcare, and a core aspect of clinical competence. Many educational institutions and Royal Colleges now reflect this and consider communication skills a priority in postgraduate examination. The new examination "Practical Assessment of Clinical and Examination Skills" has replaced the Royal College of Physicians MRCP part 2 clinical and oral examination. This examination now consists of five clinical stations, two of which focus on communication skills. A short course for postgraduate trainees has been designed to address the communication skills requirements of the part 2 clinical examination. The aims, development, and content of the course are described. Emphasis is placed on candidates practising skills with patients and receiving feedback during the course. Evidence suggests that practice with feedback is an essential ingredient of communication skills courses, and is more effective than other methods such as observing experts or video examples, or simply discussing issues in communication. Results of a preliminary evaluation indicate that the course was perceived as valuable by candidates and that the aims, format, and content were appropriate. Although the preliminary evaluation was largely positive, it could be argued that the acid test of the effectiveness of a course is an objective evaluation of skills, observed before and after the course, a development that is being considered for future evaluation of the course. Recommendations for applying this type of training to postgraduate trainees in any branch of medicine are given.

  14. Training Pathology Residents to Practice 21st Century Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Morrow, Jon S.; Steinberg, Jacob J.

    2016-01-01

    Scientific advances, open information access, and evolving health-care economics are disrupting extant models of health-care delivery. Physicians increasingly practice as team members, accountable to payers and patients, with improved efficiency, value, and quality. This change along with a greater focus on population health affects how systems of care are structured and delivered. Pathologists are not immune to these disruptors and, in fact, may be one of the most affected medical specialties. In the coming decades, it is likely that the number of practicing pathologists will decline, requiring each pathologist to serve more and often sicker patients. The demand for increasingly sophisticated yet broader diagnostic skills will continue to grow. This will require pathologists to acquire appropriate professional training and interpersonal skills. Today’s pathology training programs are ill designed to prepare such practitioners. The time to practice for most pathology trainees is typically 5 to 6 years. Yet, trainees often lack sufficient experience to practice independently and effectively. Many studies have recognized these challenges suggesting that more effective training for this new century can be implemented. Building on the strengths of existing programs, we propose a redesign of pathology residency training that will meet (and encourage) a continuing evolution of American Board of Pathology and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requirements, reduce the time to readiness for practice, and produce more effective, interactive, and adaptable pathologists. The essence of this new model is clear definition and acquisition of core knowledge and practice skills that span the anatomic and clinical pathology continuum during the first 2 years, assessed by competency-based metrics with emphasis on critical thinking and skill acquisition, followed by individualized modular training with intensively progressive responsibility during the final years

  15. 76 FR 12744 - National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary & Alternative Medicine... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Special... Assistance Program Nos. 93.213, Research and Training in Complementary and Alternative Medicine,...

  16. Integrating Sonography Training Into Undergraduate Medical Education: A Study of the Previous Exposure of One Institution's Incoming Residents.

    PubMed

    Day, James; Davis, Joshua; Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Heil, Daniel; Berg, Katherine; Davis, Robyn; Berg, Dale

    2015-07-01

    Sonography is a crucial and versatile tool within the field of medicine. Recent advancements in technology have led to increased use of point-of-care sonography. We designed a survey to assess prior point-of-care sonography training among incoming interns at an academic teaching hospital. In 2012 and 2013, we surveyed incoming interns (n = 154 and 145, respectively) regarding point-of-care sonography training received during medical school. The survey questions included formal didactic sessions, bedside instruction, and the use of simulation technology. One-fourth (26.3% in 2012 and 23.4% in 2013) of responding interns reported having never done an ultrasound scan at the bedside. In 2012 and 2013, 55.0% and 55.6% of respondents reported never having done an ultrasound scan in a simulation center, respectively. Interns agreed that sonography education should be provided during medical school. On average, interns disagreed with the statement that sonography should be taught in residency only. There was no significant difference in the sex or general previous experience with sonography across both intern classes. Point-of-care sonography is inconsistently taught in medical school. The interns in our study also thought that sonography education should begin in medical school, and sonography should be taught by using simulation and at the bedside. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Becoming a holistic thinker: training effect of oriental medicine on reasoning.

    PubMed

    Koo, Minkyung; Choi, Incheol

    2005-09-01

    The authors hypothesized that training in Oriental medicine would make students think in a more holistic way. Study 1 found that students of Oriental medicine exhibited a cyclic expectation of future change, a key characteristic of holistic thinking, more than did students in other majors, such that the former, not the latter, believed that if something was going up or going down, it would reverse its direction in the future. Study 2 found that students in Oriental medicine also possessed a more complex causal belief and hence considered a greater amount of information in causal attribution than did students in other majors. More important, such a complex causal belief increased with the length of training in Oriental medicine. Implications and future research are discussed.

  18. Missed Opportunities for Improving Nutrition Through Institutional Food: The Case for Food Worker Training

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Jonathan; Patinella, Stefania; Freudenberg, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The institutional food sector—including food served in schools, child care settings, hospitals, and senior centers—is a largely untapped resource for public health that may help to arrest increasing rates of obesity and diet-related health problems. To make this case, we estimated the reach of a diverse institutional food sector in 1 large municipality, New York City, in 2012, and explored the potential for improving institutional food by building the skills and nutritional knowledge of foodservice workers through training. Drawing on the research literature and preliminary data collected in New York City, we discuss the dynamics of nutritional decision-making in these settings. Finally, we identify opportunities and challenges associated with training the institutional food workforce to enhance nutrition and health. PMID:23865653

  19. Integrated residency training pathways of the future: diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging.

    PubMed

    Oates, M Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    Following up on the recommendations of the ACR/SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training, the respective leaderships convened Task Force II. Its charge is to develop realistic residency training pathways integrating diagnostic radiology, nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging. The diagnostic radiology participants offer these "pathways of the future" that are built on a foundation of training in diagnostic radiology. It is hoped that these pathways will ensure that the traditional and emerging clinical, educational, and research domains of nuclear radiology, nuclear medicine, and molecular imaging will be sustained and will indeed flourish in the decades to come. Copyright © 2012 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A National Cancer Clinical Trials Network: Recommendations from the Institute of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nass, Sharyl J.; Balogh, Erin; Mendelsohn, John

    2010-01-01

    Oncology has become one of the most active areas of drug discovery, with more than 800 cancer therapeutics in development. This presents an unprecedented opportunity to improve the outcome for patients with cancer, but also requires an effective and efficient clinical trials network to generate the evidence necessary for regulatory approval and optimal integration of new treatments into clinical care. The Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program supported by the National Cancer Institute has been instrumental in establishing standards of care in oncology over the last 50 years, but it currently faces numerous challenges that threaten its ability to undertake the large-scale, multi-institutional trials that advance patient care. The Institute of Medicine recently appointed a consensus study committee to assess the organization and operation of the Cooperative Group Program and recommend ways to improve the quality of cancer clinical trials conducted by the Groups and others. The committee developed a set of recommendations, summarized here, that aim to improve the speed and efficiency of trials; incorporate innovative science and trial design; improve prioritization, selection, and support of trials; and increase participation by patients and physicians. PMID:21326081

  1. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country

    PubMed Central

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that. PMID:27303587

  2. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country.

    PubMed

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that.

  3. New family medicine residency training programme: Residents’ perspectives from the University of Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Tshitenge, Stephane; Setlhare, Vincent; Tsima, Billy; Adewale, Ganiyu; Parsons, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Background Family Medicine (FM) training is new in Botswana. No previous evaluation of the experiences and opinions of residents of the University of Botswana (UB) Family Medicine training programme has been reported. Aims This study explored and assessed residents’ experiences and satisfaction with the FM training programme at the UB and solicited potential strategies for improvement from the residents. Methods A descriptive survey using a self-administered questionnaire based on a Likert-type scale and open-ended questions was used to collect data from FM residents at the UB. Results Eight out the 14 eligible residents participated to this study. Generally, residents were not satisfied with the FM training programme. Staff shortage, inadequate supervision and poor programme organisation by the faculty were the main reasons for this. However, the residents were satisfied with weekly training schedules and the diversity of patients in the current training sites. Residents’ potential solutions included an increase in staff, the acquisition of equipment at teaching sites and emphasis on FM core topics teachings. They had different views regarding how certain future career paths will be. Conclusions Despite the general dissatisfaction among residents because of challenges faced by the training programme, we have learnt that residents are capable of valuable inputs for improvement of their programme when engaged. There is need for the Department of Family Medicine to work with the Ministry of Health to set a clear career pathway for future graduates and to reflect on residents’ input for possible implementation. PMID:27796117

  4. [Inventory of training of internal medicine in France: Results of a national survey].

    PubMed

    Samson, M; Terrier, B; Mangin, O; Mouthon, L

    2017-05-01

    To make an inventory of training of Internal Medicine in France. This study was conducted between May and September 2015 with coordinators (interviews of 45minutes) of local Internal Medicine training and fellows (online questionnaire). All coordinators (n=28) responded to the interviews. Local training of Internal Medicine exists in 86% of regions (3.1±3.1hours/month) and an interregional training in all interregions (34.7±13.9hours/year). When excluding Île-de-France, no correlation between the number of teachers and the amount of lessons was noted (P=0.61). Of the 550 fellows in Internal Medicine in 2014-2015, 223 (41%) responded to the online questionnaire. Mean level was 5.5±2.7 semesters. The rate of satisfaction (1=very dissatisfied and 5=very satisfied) was 3.0±1.0 and 3.8±0.8 for regional and interregional teaching, respectively (P<0.0001). Regional teaching satisfaction was correlated with the perceived expanse of diseases covered into the program (P<0.0001). In addition, 89% of fellows wish to evaluate themselves online, 66% wish to have a practical evaluation at the bedside and 70% in simulation centers. Finally, 91% of fellows support the establishment of a national program for the training of Internal Medicine. This survey states for the first time an inventory of training of Internal Medicine dedicated to fellows in France. This report highlights that fellows wish to have a national program, be further evaluated and have access to more interactive approach of teaching. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Medicinal chemistry teaching and training: a continuous adaptation.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Henk; de Souza, Noel J

    2009-07-01

    Bridging the gap: The differences between medicinal chemistry at the industrial and academic levels raises the question: Is there a significant gap between the two spheres that requires attention, or should such differences be deemed natural, without the need to close the gap? Herein we provide perspectives on this issue, based in part on opinions expressed at a forum discussion held at ISMC 2008 in Vienna.

  6. Integrated residency training leading to radiology and nuclear medicine board certification: the Arkansas experience.

    PubMed

    McDonald, James E; Deloney, Linda A; Jambhekar, Kedar

    2014-08-01

    The pool of qualified nuclear medicine (NM) physicians is declining as fewer choose to enter the specialty. In June 2012, we began developing an integrated categorical residency training position satisfying the requirements of both the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM). Termed "NuRad," this was listed and filled in the 2013 NRMP match. We found it to be more attractive to qualified applicants than our traditional, three year NM residency. This approach may play a significant role in the future in ensuring the training of physicians expert in NM and molecular imaging.

  7. Annotated Bibliography on Inservice Training in Mental Health for Staff in Residential Institutions. Public Health Service Publication No. 1902.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 86 entries classified into the following sections: (1) Regional Conferences, (National Institute of Mental Health planning conferences on inservice training held in 1963), (2) Multidiscipline, Multilevel Training, (3) Professionals (administrators, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurses), (4) Child…

  8. The State of Sleep Medicine Education in North American Psychiatry Residency Training Programs in 2013: Chief Resident's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Imran S; Dickmann, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Thomas D; Thuras, Paul D; Feinstein, Robert E; Douglass, Alan B; Lee, Elliott Kyung

    2017-08-31

    To assess the current state of sleep medicine educational resources and training offered by North American psychiatry residency programs. In June 2013, a 9-item peer-reviewed Sleep Medicine Training Survey was administered to 39 chief residents of psychiatry residency training programs during a meeting in New York. Thirty-four percent of the participating programs offered an elective rotation in sleep medicine. A variety of innovative approaches for teaching sleep medicine were noted. The majority of the chief residents felt comfortable screening patients for obstructive sleep apnea (72%), half felt comfortable screening for restless legs syndrome (53%), and fewer than half were comfortable screening for other sleep disorders (47%). This is the first report in the last decade to provide any analysis of current sleep medicine training in North American psychiatry residency training programs. These data indicate that sleep medicine education in psychiatry residency programs is possibly in decline.

  9. AN EIGHT WEEK SUMMER INSTITUTE TRAINING PROGRAM TO TRAIN INSTRUCTORS OF INSTRUMENTATION TECHNOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCKEE, DELBERT A.

    A SUMMER INSTITUTE IN INSTRUMENTATION TECHNOLOGY WAS HELD TO PROVIDE TEACHERS WITH CURRENT KNOWLEDGE ON AUTOMATIC, PROCESS-CONTROL INSTRUMENTATION. A PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED GUIDE FOR A 2-YEAR, POST-HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM PROVIDED THE BASIS FOR INSTRUCTION AND DISCUSSION DURING THE INSTITUTE. THREE COURSES IN MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENT SHOP…

  10. Faculty staff-guided versus self-guided ultrasound training for internal medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Alba, George A; Kelmenson, Daniel A; Noble, Vicki E; Murray, Alice F; Currier, Paul F

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasonography is of growing importance within internal medicine (IM), but the optimal method of training doctors to use it is uncertain. In this study, the authors provide the first objective comparison of two approaches to training IM residents in ultrasonography. In this randomised trial, a simulation-based ultrasound training curriculum was implemented during IM intern orientation at a tertiary care teaching hospital. All 72 incoming interns attended a lecture and were given access to online modules. Interns were then randomly assigned to a 4-hour faculty-guided (FG) or self-guided (SG) ultrasound training session in a simulation laboratory with both human and manikin models. Interns were asked to self-assess their competence in ultrasonography and underwent an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to assess their competence in basic and procedurally oriented ultrasound tasks. The primary outcome was the score on the OSCE. Faculty-guided training was superior to self-guided training based on the OSCE scores. Subjects in the FG training group achieved significantly higher OSCE scores on the two subsets of task completion (0.9-point difference, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.54; p = 0.008) and ultrasound image quality (2.43-point difference, 95% CI 1.5-3.36; p < 0.001). Both training groups demonstrated an increase in self-assessed competence after their respective training sessions and there was little difference between the groups. Subjects rated the FG training group much more favourably than the SG training group. Both FG and SG ultrasound training curricula can improve the self-reported competence of IM interns in ultrasonography. However, FG training was superior to SG training in both skills acquisition and intern preference. Incorporating mandatory ultrasound training into IM residencies can address the perceived need for ultrasound training, improve confidence and procedural skills, and may enhance patient safety. However, the optimal

  11. Residency training programs in veterinary clinical pathology: a comparison of experiences at two institutions.

    PubMed

    Raskin, Rose E

    2007-01-01

    Two institutions with different residency training formats in clinical pathology are compared with respect to application procedures, learning and teaching opportunities, learning resources, research training, publication requirements, and assessment methods of the program and trainees. The University of Florida and Purdue University programs are both based on an emphasis in morphologic recognition and interpretation of disease processes as well as training in basic science and applied research principles. The progress of trainees through each program is carefully monitored to meet individual needs as well as to meet the training requirements to allow candidates to sit for the certifying examination in clinical pathology. Periodic mock board exams are a critical tool to assess trainee progress and learning. The differences in format focus on coursework and publication requirements as well as on program assessment tools. While one program provides training in the form of 75% clinical diagnostic service, the other uses a mixture of 50% coursework and 50% clinical diagnostic training. Despite the contrast between a pure residency training program and one combining residency training with an MS degree, both institutions provide a solid program structure, ample learning resources, and adequate faculty mentorship to produce a high pass rate of board-certified specialists, the major focus for both programs. Numbers of post-training employment positions for both institutions are similar for those selecting faculty positions at veterinary schools. During the period studied, however, the combined residency and MS graduate program at Purdue University produced more graduates employed in pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, while the residency program at the University of Florida produced more graduates employed by diagnostic laboratories.

  12. Knowledge of Pharmacogenetics among Healthcare Professionals and Faculty Members of Health Training Institutions in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Kudzi, W; Addy, B S; Dzudzor, B

    2015-03-01

    Pharmacogenetics has a potential for optimizing drug response and identifying risk of toxicity for patients. Pharmacogenetics knowledge of healthcare professionals and the unmet need for pharmacogenetics education in health training institutions are some of the challenges of integrating pharmacogenetics into routine medical practice. To assess pharmacogenetics knowledge among healthcare professionals and faculty members of health training institutions in Ghana. Semi-structured questionnaires were used to interview healthcare professionals from selected public and private hospitals. Faculty members from health training institutions were also interviewed. The respondents were Medical doctors 42 (46.7%), Pharmacists 29 (32.2%) and Nurses 19 (21.1%). Healthcare professionals rated their knowledge of Pharmacogenetics as Excellent 5 (5.6%), Very Good 10 (11.2%), Good 53 (60%) and Poor 19 (21.4%). Thirty-two faculty members from health training institutions were also interviewed. Faculty members rated their knowledge of pharmacogenetics as Excellent 2 (6.3%), Very Good 3 (9.4%), Good 9 (28.1%), Fair 12 (37.5%) and Poor 6 (18.8%). Thirty seven percent (12) of these faculty members said pharmacogenetics was not part of their institutions' curriculum, 7 (22%) did not know if pharmacogenetics was part of their curriculum and only 13 (40.6%) said it was part of their curriculum. Few healthcare professionals and faculty members of training institutions are aware of the discipline of pharmacogenetics. There is the need for continuous professional education on pharmacogenetics and development of competency standards for all healthcare professionals in Ghana.

  13. The effect of simulation training on PALS skills among family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Gerard, James M; Thomas, Scott M; Germino, Kevin W; Street, Megan H; Burch, Wesley; Scalzo, Anthony J

    2011-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires that family medicine residents receive structured skills training on pediatric advanced life support (PALS) and should learn procedures for medical emergencies in patients of all ages. Traditional methods of training family medicine residents in PALS is challenging given their limited clinical exposure to critically ill patients. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effect of a 2-hour PALS training session utilizing high-fidelity mannequins on residents' psychomotor skills performances. Between February and June 2009, residents from two urban family medicine residency programs received training on four PALS procedures (bag-mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, intraosseous line placement, and cardiac rhythm assessment/defibrillation) at a university simulation center. Residents completed questionnaires to provide data on previous resuscitation training and experience. We collected self-confidence data and video recordings of residents performing the procedures before and after training. To assess retention at 6 months, we collected self-confidence data and video recordings of PGY-1 and PGY-2 residents performing the procedures. A blinded reviewer scored the video recordings. Forty-seven residents completed the study. The majority of residents (53.2%) had never performed any of the procedures on a real patient. Immediately following skills training, mean overall performance improved from 39.5% (± 11.5%) to 76.5% (± 10.4%), difference 37.0% (95% CI, 33.5%--40.6%). Bag-mask ventilation and intraosseous insertion skills remained above baseline at 6-month follow-up. Simulation training is beneficial for teaching PALS procedures to family medicine residents.

  14. Pain management practices by internal medicine residents--a comparison before and after educational and institutional interventions.

    PubMed

    Scott, Emma; Borate, Uma; Heitner, Stephen; Chaitowitz, Mark; Tester, William; Eiger, Glenn

    We aimed to improve internal medicine residents' deficiencies in pain management and evaluate the effectiveness of our intervention, which included an interactive conference series, e-mail vignettes, and didactic sessions. An anonymous survey was administered at the beginning and at the end of an academic year, before and after the intervention, respectively. We analyzed 65 preintervention and 63 postintervention surveys. Self-perception of competency in pain management increased from 40% to 60% (P = .02). Perception of adequacy of training increased from 38.5% to 55.6% (P = .05). Opioid conversion skills improved by 25% (P = .02). Overall, knowledge did not change significantly, except in the subgroup of residents who had completed the oncology rotation from 0.60 to 0.72 (P = .003). "Opiophobia'' improved by 20% (P = .05). Documentation of pain improved (rank correlation = 21; P = .02). We concluded that educational and institutional interventions administered over an academic year improved pain management skills and documentation and reduced "opiophobia'' among residents.

  15. A Valid Approach in Refractory Glossodynia: A Single-Institution 5-Year Experience Treating with Japanese Traditional Herbal (Kampo) Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Chino, Atsushi; Hirasaki, Yoshiro; Ueda, Keigo; Raimura, Masaki; Namiki, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Glossodynia is often refractory to conventional medicine, and there is only limited evidence to guide clinicians in its management. Patients with refractory glossodynia are often introduced to Japanese traditional herbal (Kampo) medicine experts under such circumstances because Kampo medicine has become known in Japan to be effective in treating a wide variety of symptoms refractory to conventional medicine. Herein, we report our single-institution 5-year experience treating patients with Kampo medicine for primary glossodynia that was refractory to conventional medicine. We found that 69.2% of patients reported a beneficial effect of Kampo medicine on glossodynia, and the average onset of improvement was 8.0 ± 7.7 weeks after starting Kampo treatment. The top two frequently used Kampo medicines for glossodynia were seinetsuhokito and mibakuekkito among high responders who showed a decrease of severity by 50% or more. The top four most overlapped herbs among effective Kampo medicines for glossodynia were Glycyrrhiza Root, Ginseng Root, Hoelen, and Atractylodes (lancea) Rhizome, which compose an essential Kampo prescription called shikunshito. Although more research is required to further clarify the effectiveness of Kampo medicine, it has valid efficacy even in cases of glossodynia that remain incurable by conventional treatments. PMID:24223055

  16. Review of institute of medicine and national research council recommendations for one health initiative.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Carol; Myers, Tanya; Stokes, William; Dunham, Bernadette; Harris, Stic; Lautner, Beth; Annelli, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Human health is inextricably linked to the health of animals and the viability of ecosystems; this is a concept commonly known as One Health. Over the last 2 decades, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) have published consensus reports and workshop summaries addressing a variety of threats to animal, human, and ecosystem health. We reviewed a selection of these publications and identified recommendations from NRC and IOM/NRC consensus reports and from opinions expressed in workshop summaries that are relevant to implementation of the One Health paradigm shift. We grouped these recommendations and opinions into thematic categories to determine if sufficient attention has been given to various aspects of One Health. We conclude that although One Health themes have been included throughout numerous IOM and NRC publications, identified gaps remain that may warrant targeted studies related to the One Health approach.

  17. Review of Institute of Medicine and National Research Council Recommendations for One Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya; Stokes, William; Dunham, Bernadette; Harris, Stic; Lautner, Beth; Annelli, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Human health is inextricably linked to the health of animals and the viability of ecosystems; this is a concept commonly known as One Health. Over the last 2 decades, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) have published consensus reports and workshop summaries addressing a variety of threats to animal, human, and ecosystem health. We reviewed a selection of these publications and identified recommendations from NRC and IOM/NRC consensus reports and from opinions expressed in workshop summaries that are relevant to implementation of the One Health paradigm shift. We grouped these recommendations and opinions into thematic categories to determine if sufficient attention has been given to various aspects of One Health. We conclude that although One Health themes have been included throughout numerous IOM and NRC publications, identified gaps remain that may warrant targeted studies related to the One Health approach. PMID:24274461

  18. Assessing the American Association of Neuroscience Nurses' Progress on the Institute of Medicine Report.

    PubMed

    Madden, Lori Kennedy; Hundley, Lynn; Summers, Debbie; Villanueva, Nancy; Walter, Suzy Mascaro

    2017-06-01

    The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) has worked toward meeting the challenges and addressing the key messages from the 2010 Institute of Medicine report on the future of nursing. In 2012, AANN developed an article summarizing how the association has addressed key issues. Since that time, new recommendations have been made to advance nursing, and AANN has updated its strategic plan. The AANN has assessed organizational progress in these initiatives in a 2017 white paper. This process included review of plans since the initial report and proposal of further efforts the organization can make in shaping the future of neuroscience nursing. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview of the AANN white paper.

  19. The Effects of Training Institution Practice Costs, Quality, and Other Characteristics on Future Practice

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert L.; Petterson, Stephen M.; Bazemore, Andrew W.; Wingrove, Peter; Puffer, James C.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE Medicare beneficiary spending patterns reflect those of the 306 Hospital Referral Regions where physicians train, but whether this holds true for smaller areas or for quality is uncertain. This study assesses whether cost and quality imprinting can be detected within the 3,436 Hospital Service Areas (HSAs), 82.4 percent of which have only 1 teaching hospital, and whether sponsoring institution characteristics are associated. METHODS We conducted a secondary, multi-level, multivariable analysis of 2011 Medicare claims and American Medical Association Masterfile data for a random, nationally representative sample of family physicians and general internists who completed residency between 1992 and 2010 and had more than 40 Medicare patients (3,075 physicians providing care to 503,109 beneficiaries). Practice and training locations were matched with Dartmouth Atlas HSAs and categorized into low-, average-, and high-cost spending groups. Practice and training HSAs were assessed for differences in 4 diabetes quality measures. Institutional characteristics included training volume and percentage of graduates in rural practice and primary care. RESULTS The unadjusted, annual, per-beneficiary spending difference between physicians trained in high- and low-cost HSAs was $1,644 (95% CI, $1,253–$2,034), and the difference remained significant after controlling for patient and physician characteristics. No significant relationship was found for diabetes quality measures. General internists were significantly more likely than family physicians to train in high-cost HSAs. Institutions with more graduates in rural practice and primary care produced lower-spending physicians. CONCLUSIONS The “imprint” of training spending patterns on physicians is strong and enduring, without discernible quality effects, and, along with identified institutional features, supports measures and policy options for improved graduate medical education outcomes. PMID:28289113

  20. A comparison of surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of cross-cultural care training.

    PubMed

    Chun, Maria B J; Jackson, David S; Lin, Susan Y; Park, Elyse R

    2010-12-01

    The need for physicians formally trained to deliver care to diverse patient populations has been widely advocated. Utilizing a validated tool, Weissman and Betancourt's Cross-Cultural Care Survey, the aim of this current study was to compare surgery and family medicine residents' perceptions of their preparedness and skillfulness to provide high quality cross-cultural care. Past research has documented differences between the two groups' reported impressions of importance and level of instruction received in cross-cultural care. Twenty surgery and 15 family medicine residents participated in the study. Significant differences were found between surgery and family medicine residents on most ratings of the amount of training they received in cross-cultural skills. Specifically, family medicine residents reported having received more training on: 1) determining how patients want to be addressed, 2) taking a social history, 3) assessing their understanding of the cause of illness, 4) negotiating their treatment plan, 5) assessing whether they are mistrustful of the health care system and÷or doctor, 6) identifying cultural customs, 7) identifying how patients make decisions within the family, and 8) delivering services through a medical interpreter. One unexpected finding was that surgery residents, who reported not receiving much formal cultural training, reported higher mean scores on perceived skillfulness (i.e. ability) than family medicine residents. The disconnect may be linked to the family medicine residents' training in cultural humility - more knowledge and understanding of cross-cultural care can paradoxically lead to perceptions of being less prepared or skillful in this area.

  1. Gestational weight gain in adolescents: a comparison to the new Institute of Medicine recommendations.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, I D; Hoffmire, C A; Olson, C M

    2011-12-01

    To examine the gestational weight gain distributions of healthy adolescents with optimal birth outcomes and compare them to the current 2009 Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Secondary data analysis to conduct a population-based, cross-sectional study. The Central and Finger Lakes regions of New York state (Perinatal Database System). 6995 adolescents with healthy singleton pregnancies (1996 to 2002). Percentiles of the gestational weight gain distributions were compared within body mass index (BMI) groups categorized using 2 different classification schemes: adolescent BMI percentiles and adult BMI cut-points. We compared these distributions overall and within racial and age groups. The gestational weight gain distribution does not differ considerably when BMI is classified using adolescent or adult cutoffs. Adolescents have good birth outcomes across a wider gestational weight gain range than recommended by the Institute of Medicine regardless of how pre-pregnancy weight status is categorized. For example, overweight adolescents by adult cutoffs have a range of gestational weight gain from 5.0 kg to 30.0 kg, and overweight adolescents by percentile cutoffs have a range from 5.4 kg to 29.5 kg, whereas the IOM range is 7.5-11.5 kg. Black and young adolescents have a similar distribution to their white and older counterparts. Practitioners can safely use the new IOM gestational weight gain ranges to monitor weight gain in pregnant adolescent patients using adult BMI classifications. Future research should examine the range of gestational weight gain in adolescents considering a broader scope of birth and maternal outcomes. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. United States Chiropractic Practice Acts and Institute of Medicine defined primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    Duenas, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective This review was conducted to analyze the law for the practice of chiropractic throughout the United States, including the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, to determine the legal ability of the Doctor of Chiropractic in each jurisdiction to provide primary care service as described by the 1996 Institute of Medicine Definition of Primary Care. Method The practice acts for each State, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands were reviewed for language that would permit the chiropractic doctor to meet the 9 criteria of primary care practice described by the Institute of Medicine. Forty-four practice acts were cross referenced with the results of a scope of practice survey of State Boards of Chiropractic in 1999. Results The review of the practice acts and the survey on chiropractic scope of practice revealed a varied degree of chiropractic scope of practice with 23 of 53 of the jurisdictions limiting the ability of the chiropractic doctor to fully provide IOM defined primary care. Conclusion The varied practice act definitions for chiropractic practice throughout the United States the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands reveal an inability of the chiropractic profession to respond to a call for a standard nationally-based primary-care policy that could be readily achieved by all chiropractic practitioners throughout the Union. This void of primary-care qualification in many State and Commonwealth practice acts will need to be addressed by the leaders of the profession if government entities and national third party organizations are to utilize chiropractic health care services to the standard of chiropractic education and clinical experience. The need for a broad range chiropractic scope of practice model practice act is suggested. PMID:19674578

  3. Influence of residency training on procedures performed by South Carolina family medicine graduates.

    PubMed

    Tucker, William; Diaz, Vanessa; Carek, Peter J; Geesey, Mark E

    2007-01-01

    Guidelines regarding procedure training in family medicine residencies are nonspecific. This study describes procedure practices of South Carolina family medicine residency graduates. Of 1,416 surveys mailed to graduates of South Carolina Area Health Education Consortium (SC AHEC) family medicine residency programs, 144 were undeliverable. A total of 717 respondents (response rate 56.4%) were stratified by community size and year of graduation. Percentage performing 18 procedures (from a list developed by SC AHEC program directors) and stating lack of training affected their procedural practice was compared using chi square tests. Logistic regressions evaluating procedure performance included year of graduation, community size, region of country, and gender as independent variables. Joint aspiration/injection (81%), skin biopsy (81%), and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) care (48%) were the most common procedures. Physicians in smaller communities were more likely to perform joint aspiration/injection, skin biopsy, ICU care, and respirator management while recent graduates were more likely to perform exercise stress testing, ICU care, and respirator management. Lack of training was a common reason not to perform esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, nasopharyngoscopy, and vasectomy. Increasing performance of exercise stress testing and ICU care by recent graduates and reported lack of training for several outpatient procedures may reflect evolving roles for family physicians. New residency training modalities may improve training for these roles.

  4. Computer-based Training in Medicine and Learning Theories.

    PubMed

    Haag, Martin; Bauch, Matthias; Garde, Sebastian; Heid, Jörn; Weires, Thorsten; Leven, Franz-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of the case-based CBT system CAMPUS that current learning theories and design principles (Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value.

  5. Breaking bad news: structured training for family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Ungar, Lea; Alperin, Mordechai; Amiel, Gilad E; Beharier, Zvi; Reis, Shmuel

    2002-09-01

    Previous research has shown that physicians experience incompetence and difficulty in dealing with patients' feelings after they have broken bad news to them. During the past 10 years, we have implemented a longitudinal training program targeting these issues. The present article describes this training and discusses its contribution to doctors' skills at approaching distressed patients. In order to cope with breaking bad news to patients and their families, physicians should be skilled at crisis intervention and communication techniques. They should also be aware of their personal attitudes and emotional reactions when breaking bad news. Each session encompassed these areas, as well as the most prominent issues arising when breaking bad news. In a 1-5 Likert scale, the course received an overall score of 4.47 (S.D. 0.51). Participants noted that they had gained relevant communication skills for future patient encounters.

  6. Public health training in internal medicine residency programs: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Jillian S; Popiel, David K; Duwell, Monique M; Price, Jessica Hallerman; Miles, Jacqueline Cole

    2014-11-01

    The IOM recommends public health training for all physicians. Data characterizing such training of internal medicine (IM) residents are lacking. To describe the current state of public health education at IM residency programs, characterize programs offering public health education, and quantify interest in expanding training opportunities. IM residency program directors from the 380 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency programs in the U.S were invited to participate in a cross-sectional survey. Responses were received from 127 programs (33%). Data were collected July-December 2012 and analyzed in January 2013. Participants were queried on domestic public health training offered, perceived resident interest in and satisfaction with this training, and interest in expanding training. Eighty-four respondents (66%) provide some form of public health training, but structure and content vary widely. In many programs offering public health training, few residents (<10%) receive it. Although 93 programs (73%) integrate public health into core curricula, only three topics were common to a majority of these programs. Sixty-six respondents (52%) offer clinical training at community-based health centers. Most residency program directors (90%) are very or somewhat interested in expanding their public health training. This study characterizes the structures and content of public health training across IM residency programs. The wide range highlights the diverse definition of "public health training" used by IM residency program directors and lack of universal public health competencies required for IM physicians. Opportunities exist for collaboration among residency programs and between IM and public health educators to share best practices. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Training the Translational Research Teams of the Future: UC Davis - HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science Program

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Anne A.; Rainwater, Julie A.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C.; Robbins, John A.; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This article outlines the HHMI-IMBS program’s logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of pre-doctoral students. PMID:24127920

  8. Training the translational research teams of the future: UC Davis-HHMI Integrating Medicine into Basic Science program.

    PubMed

    Knowlton, Anne A; Rainwater, Julie A; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Bonham, Ann C; Robbins, John A; Henderson, Stuart; Meyers, Frederick J

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for successful models of how to recruit, train, and retain bench scientists at the earliest stages of their careers into translational research. One recent, promising model is the University of California Davis Howard Hughes Medical Institute Integrating Medicine into Basic Science (HHMI-IMBS) program, part of the HHMI Med into Grad initiative. This paper outlines the HHMI-IMBS program's logic, design, and curriculum that guide the goal of research that moves from bedside to bench. That is, a curriculum that provides graduate students with guided translational training, clinical exposure, team science competencies, and mentors from diverse disciplines that will advance the students careers in clinical translational research and re-focusing of research to answer clinical dilemmas. The authors have collected data on 55 HHMI-IMBS students to date. Many of these students are still completing their graduate work. In the current study the authors compare the initial two cohorts (15 students) with a group of 29 control students to examine the program success and outcomes. The data indicate that this training program provides an effective, adaptable model for training future translational researchers. HHMI-IMBS students showed improved confidence in conducting translational research, greater interest in a future translational career, and higher levels of research productivity and collaborations than a comparable group of predoctoral students.

  9. Challenges to the practice of evidence-based medicine during residents' surgical training: a qualitative study using grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Mohit; Montori, Victor; Devereaux, P J; Dosanjh, Sonia; Sprague, Sheila; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2003-11-01

    To examine surgical trainees' barriers to implementing and adopting evidence-based medicine (EBM) in the day-to-day care of surgical patients. In 2000, 28 surgical residents from various subspecialties at a hospital affiliated with McMaster University Faculty of Health Sciences in Ontario, Canada, participated in a focus group (n = 8) and semistructured interviews (n = 20) to explore their perceptions of barriers to the practice of EBM during their training. Additional themes were explored, such as definitions of EBM and potential strategies to implement EBM during training. The canons and procedures of the grounded theory approach to qualitative research guided the coding and content analysis of the data derived from the focus group and semistructured interviews. Residents identified personal barriers, staff-surgeon barriers, and institutional barriers that limited their ability to apply EBM in their daily activities. Residents perceived their lack of education in EBM, time constraints, lack of priority, and fear of staff disapproval as major challenges to practicing EBM. Moreover, the lack of ready access to surgical EBM resource materials proved to be an important additional factor limiting EBM surgical practice. Residents identified several strategies to overcome these barriers to EBM, including hiring staff surgeons with EBM training, offering coursework in critical appraisal for all staff, improving interdepartmental communication, and providing greater flexibility for EBM training. Surgical residents identified a general lack of education, time constraints, lack of priority, and staff disapproval as important factors limiting incorporation of EBM. Curriculum reform and surgeon education may help overcome these barriers.

  10. Milton C. Winternitz and the Yale Institute of Human Relations: a brief chapter in the history of social medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Viseltear, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the antecedent events that led to the development of Yale's Institute of Human Relations, the program of interdisciplinary research and teaching established, and the principal protagonists, James Rowland Angell, President of Yale University, and Milton C. Winternitz, Dean of the School of Medicine, both of whom were committed to the concept that medicine is a social science. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:6399650

  11. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    PubMed Central

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. Methods A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. Results At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Conclusion Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty. PMID:27942418

  12. Turkey’s contribution to medicine: Main institutions, fields and publications

    PubMed Central

    Onat, Altan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify and disclose publications from Turkey with the greatest “genuine” contributons to medicine in the past 50 years. Material and Methods: Based on the data of Web of Science, publications originating from Turkey’s institutions that were received by May, 2013, ≥72 citations were identified, after excluding papers having more than a minor share by international authors. Results: Primary authors numbering 223 generated 271 medical papers, each receiving ≥72 (95% CI 72; 263) citations. The articles cited herein were of a level of top global 8–10% papers. Half of the articles were published in 1997–2004. Compared with about 25–28 papers annually 10 years previously, it is estimated that currently only 20 papers are generated in Turkey annually, representing a global share of only 1.5 per thousand. The rate of rise registered in the period 1995–2004 may be anticipated to attenuate. Internal medicine, led by rheumatology, cardiology and hematology, and neurosciences were represented at 1.8-fold odds higher than the overall average. Led by Behçet’s disease, health issues encountered more widely than in other populations, formed frequent topics of contribution. Led by the Medical Faculties of Istanbul, Hacettepe, Ankara Universities and the Military Medical Academy, only 33 medical faculties and 14 public and private hospitals constituted sources. Conclusion: Since the elicited results are unsatisfactory, compared with Turkey’s potential, much more concerted efforts should be directed to rebuild a milieu favorable to promote research likely to contribute to medicine. PMID:25931859

  13. Institute for Health Care Libraries: Training of Personnel (February 26, 1975 to May 14, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaillancourt, Pauline M.

    An institute was set up to train 20 current employees to provide information retrieval and document delivery in libraries of health facilities in the northeastern United States and to promote familiarity with existing networks and regional systems. Participants included secretaries, medical record managers, volunteers, and others, with education…

  14. Post-Secondary Vocational Education and Training: Pathways and Partnerships. Institutional Management in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth of tertiary education is partly due to the expansion of post-secondary vocational education and training (PSV). A well developed post-secondary PSV system and links between universities and VET institutions improve skills and employment opportunities. What is post-secondary PSV and how does it relate to other components of the…

  15. Southwest Park & Recreation Training Institute 1987 Proceedings (32nd, Kingston, Oklahoma, February 1-4, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Dept. of Park Administration and Landscape Architecture.

    In the first section of this report, summaries are presented of the papers delivered at the General Session of the meeting of the Southwest Park and Recreation Training Institute. The topics were: (1) Risk Aspect of Parks and Recreation; (2) All You Need To Know about Boards and Commissions, but Were Afraid To Ask; (3) Leadership and…

  16. Modernizing Research Training-Education and Science Policy between Profession, Discipline and Academic Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiklie, Ivar; Hostaker, Roar

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that the way in which research training is affected by national policies aiming at modernizing graduate education is shaped by the way in which national characteristics of state policies, academic institutions and disciplines interact. The argument is applied in an analysis of the consequences of policy changes and higher…

  17. Ucebnoe posobie dlja studentov pedagogiceskih institutov (Manual for Students of Teacher Training Institutes).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogorodnikov, I. T.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a book recommended for publication by the jury of the open competition for educational manuals to be used in teacher training institutes; it is designed for the Soviet educational theory course for general secondary school teachers. The five chapters deal with the subject…

  18. Online Training of TPACK Skills of Higher Education Scholars: A Cross-Institutional Impact Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienties, Bart; Brouwer, Natasa; Bohle Carbonell, Katerina; Townsend, Danielle; Rozendal, Anne-Petra; van der Loo, Janneke; Dekker, Peter; Lygo-Baker, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Higher education institutions should provide adequate training for teachers in order to increase their awareness of the complex interplay between technology, pedagogy and the cognitive knowledge in their disciplines. However, research has shown that providing effective staff development from teacher educators to support these teachers' skills is…

  19. NDEA Institute for In-Service Training of Educational Planners for State Departments of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for State Educational Planners, Mankato, Minn.

    This document includes the papers presented at an inservice training institute for planners from State education agencies. Guidelines concerning information analysis techniques and basic pupil, personnel, and fiscal information needs are covered in papers by Stanley Hecker, John J. Stiglmeier, Paul Bethke, Robert L. Hopper, and Burton D. Friedman.…

  20. Paramedical Training in Minnesota; Requiring Two Years or Less Education at Non-Profit Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latchaw, Truly Trousdale, Comp.; Miller, G. Dean, Comp.

    The directory of Minnesota institutions providing paramedical training is organized by categories of paramedical occupations: child care specialist, dental assistant and hygienist, dietetic assistant, electro medical technician, hospital service coordinator or hospital station secretary, inhalation therapist, laboratory assistant and technician,…

  1. MarylandOnline's Inter-Institutional Project to Train Higher Education Adjunct Faculty to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shattuck, Julie; Dubins, Bobbi; Zilberman, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an inter-institutional project to design, develop, pilot, and evaluate a state-wide online training course for higher education adjunct faculty who are preparing to teach their first online course. We begin with a brief literature review to contextualize the stated problem the project sought to address: the need for…

  2. Shaping Flexibility in Vocational Education and Training: Institutional, Curricular and Professional Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Wim J., Ed.; Heikkinen, Anja, Ed.; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M., Ed.

    This collection of essays, which is arranged in four sections, concerns flexibility in the Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems of Europe. The first section, "Introduction," includes the following chapter: "Shaping Conditions for a Flexible VET" (Nieuwenhuis et al.). The second section, "Institutional and…

  3. A Survey of Nurse Training Needs in Oklahoma Health Care Institutions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, William D.

    A study was conducted to identify staffing patterns for nursing personnel in the health care institutions of Oklahoma in order to predict future needs for nursing education and training. Structured interviews with administrators and directors of nursing from eighteen hospitals and eighteen nursing homes were used to elicit demographic data…

  4. Research Administration Training and Compliance at the Department Level for a Predominantly Undergraduate Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temples, Beryline; Simons, Paula; Atkinson, Timothy N.

    2012-01-01

    By providing training from the Central Sponsored Programs Office (SPO), departments, and colleges at Predominantly Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) can increase compliance with grant requirements. PUIs usually do not focus on department- or college-level grants administration and lack monetary resources to support this function. However, at the…

  5. Shaping Flexibility in Vocational Education and Training: Institutional, Curricular and Professional Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Wim J., Ed.; Heikkinen, Anja, Ed.; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M., Ed.

    This collection of essays, which is arranged in four sections, concerns flexibility in the Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems of Europe. The first section, "Introduction," includes the following chapter: "Shaping Conditions for a Flexible VET" (Nieuwenhuis et al.). The second section, "Institutional and…

  6. Training Programs of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, 1971-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The study predicts future requirements for biological scientists by specialty area, future supply within area, and the effects of National Institutes of Health program alternatives on requirements and supply measures. At present and for the forseeable future, approved training grants for critical shortage areas are funded as rapidly as centers of…

  7. Communication Satellite Technology as a Potential Comprehensive Delivery System for Correctional Institution Education and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polcyn, Kenneth A.

    1977-01-01

    By pooling resources and using communication satellites to access quality regional or national programs and personnel, institutions may be able to determine inmate aptitudes and career options, receive career counselling for inmates based on job trends, access educational and vocational training programs that match the inmates' capabilities and…

  8. Training Programs of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, 1971-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of General Medical Sciences (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The study predicts future requirements for biological scientists by specialty area, future supply within area, and the effects of National Institutes of Health program alternatives on requirements and supply measures. At present and for the forseeable future, approved training grants for critical shortage areas are funded as rapidly as centers of…

  9. Sweden's International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development Enables Students to Change Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Jim; Neeser, Marie

    2012-01-01

    The Swedish International Training Programme in Education for Sustainable Development, which has been run annually for the past 10 years, is a five-phase program that supports participants to develop and implement a change project in their work places. It requires a team of students from an institution and provides extensive follow up. The course…

  10. Training Consortium of Institutions Preparing Teaching Personnel for Handicapped Populations. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Marvin C.; Ingram, Cregg F.

    Presented is the final report of a project to develop a consortium of Kentucky training institutions prepared to teach educational personnel for handicapped populations. Brief sections cover the following topics: purposes of the project (such as the establishment of a comprehensive statewide data base for student populations); the procedures and…

  11. [Competence in and uses for information technology at the Training Institute in Nursing].

    PubMed

    Avilez, Antoine

    2012-03-01

    After the presentation of three references to Information and communication technology (ICT) skills, the capacity of trainers training institute in nursing are explored through a survey of opinion. The use in the professional practice of these skills is captured by a dichotomous terms question.

  12. Communication Satellite Technology as a Potential Comprehensive Delivery System for Correctional Institution Education and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polcyn, Kenneth A.

    1977-01-01

    By pooling resources and using communication satellites to access quality regional or national programs and personnel, institutions may be able to determine inmate aptitudes and career options, receive career counselling for inmates based on job trends, access educational and vocational training programs that match the inmates' capabilities and…

  13. Post-Secondary Vocational Education and Training: Pathways and Partnerships. Institutional Management in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth of tertiary education is partly due to the expansion of post-secondary vocational education and training (PSV). A well developed post-secondary PSV system and links between universities and VET institutions improve skills and employment opportunities. What is post-secondary PSV and how does it relate to other components of the…

  14. A National CERA Study of the Use of Laborists in Family Medicine Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Baldor, Robert A; Pecci, Christine Chang; Moreno, Gerardo; Van Duyne, Virginia; Potts, Stacy E

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the impact of laborists (which we defined as "clinicians dedicated to providing L&D care services in the hospital environment for pregnant patients, regardless of who provided the prenatal care" for this survey) on family medicine residency training. We surveyed family medicine residency directors to assess characteristics about laborist services and their involvement in family medicine residency teaching. Questions were included in the 2015 Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) survey of family medicine residency directors. Univariate statistics were used to describe programs, directors, and our questions on the use of laborists. Chi-square tests and Student's t tests were used to evaluate bivariate relationships using a P<.05 to denote statistical significance. A total of 250/473 (52.9%) of residency directors completed the laborist section of the CERA survey. Sixty-four percent of residency programs were community based/university affiliated, representing the expected range, size, and location of family medicine programs. Almost half of programs (44.4%) reported a laborist service in their main teaching hospital for L&D training. Of directors, 64.1 % viewed laborists as good/excellent educators; 54.3% reported little or no reduction in L&D teaching required of their faculty despite the presence of a laborist service. Fifteen percent reported that >30% of their graduates included L&D care in their first practice.. Laborists have an important role in family medicine resident obstetrics training and education. More research is needed to explore how laborists and family medicine faculty can collaborate to promote enhanced efficiency and effectiveness as residency teachers.

  15. Stories from early-career women physicians who have left academic medicine: a qualitative study at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Levine, Rachel B; Lin, Fenny; Kern, David E; Wright, Scott M; Carrese, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The number of women in academic medicine has steadily increased, although gender parity still does not exist and women leave academics at somewhat higher rates than men. The authors investigated the reasons why women leave careers in academic medicine. Semistructured, one-on-one interviews were conducted in 2007-2008 with 20 women physicians who had left a single academic institution to explore their reasons for opting out of academic careers. Data analysis was iterative, and an editing analysis style was used to derive themes. A lack of role models for combining career and family responsibilities, frustrations with research (funding difficulties, poor mentorship, competition), work-life balance, and the institutional environment (described as noncollaborative and biased in favor of male faculty) emerged as key factors associated with a decision to leave academic medicine for respondents. Faced with these challenges, respondents reevaluated their priorities and concluded that a discrepancy existed between their own and institutional priorities. Many respondents expressed divergent views with the institutional norms on how to measure success and, as a consequence, felt that they were undervalued at work. Participants report a disconnection between their own priorities and those of the dominant culture in academic medicine. Efforts to retain women faculty in academic medicine may include exploring the aspects of an academic career that they value most and providing support and recognition accordingly.

  16. Procedural Headache Medicine in Neurology Residency Training: A Survey of US Program Directors.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S; Robertson, Carrie E; Ailani, Jessica; Levin, Morris; Friedman, Deborah I; Dodick, David W

    2016-01-01

    To survey neurology residency program directors (PDs) on trainee exposure, supervision, and credentialing in procedures widely utilized in headache medicine. Clinic-based procedures have assumed a prominent role in headache therapy. Headache fellows obtain procedural competence, but reliance on fellowship-trained neurologists cannot match the population eligible for treatments. The inclusion of educational modules and mechanisms for credentialing trainees pursuing procedural competence in residency curricula at individual programs is not known. A web-based survey of US neurology residency PDs was designed by the American Headache Society (AHS) procedural special interest section in collaboration with AHS and American Academy of Neurology's Headache and Facial Pain section leadership. The survey addressed exposure, training, and credentialing in: (1) onabotulinumtoxinA (onabotA) injections, (2) extracranial peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs), and (3) trigger point injections (TPIs). Fifty-five PDs (42.6%) completed the survey. Compared to noncompleters, survey completers were more likely to feature headache fellowships at their institutions (38.2% vs 10.8%, P=0.0002). High exposure (onabotA=90.9%, PNBs=80.0%, TPIs=70.9%) usually featured hands-on patient instruction (66.2%) and lectures (55.7%). Supervised performance rates were high (onabotA=65.5%, PNBs=60.0%, TPIs=52.7%), usually in continuity clinic (60.0%) or headache elective (50.9%). Headache specialists (69.1%) or general neurology (32.7%) faculty most commonly trained residents. Formal credentialing was uncommon (16.4-18.2%), mostly by documenting supervised procedures (25.5%). Only 27.3% of programs permitted trainees to perform procedures independently. Most PDs felt procedural exposure (80.0-90.9%) and competence (50.9-56.4%) by all trainees was important. Resident exposure to procedures for headache is high, but credentialing mechanisms, while desired by most PDs, are not generally in place. Implementation

  17. [A french-speaking institute for tropical medicine in Asia: the IFMT in Vientiane, Lao PDR].

    PubMed

    Strobel, M

    2006-02-01

    Since the year-2000, a French-speaking Institute for Tropical Medicine (French acronym, IFMT) has been operating in Lao PDR through funding provided by the Agence Universitaire de la Francophonie. The IFMT is a postgraduate teaching centre dedicated to improving skills of health care professionals in clinical sciences, epidemiology, public health and management as well as to research and health care intervention. These activities are conducted in the capital as well as provinces and districts throughout Laos with special focus on priority health issues facing developing countries in tropical regions. The IFMT organizes a 4-semester international course taught in French to medical doctors from Southeast Asia, mainly Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and Southern China, but also from other countries. To date, a total of 72 students have graduated from the IFMT. In 2005 the Institute delivers a master degree. This article describes the course objectives and some features of the curriculum. It also presents a general overview of health, teaching, and research facilities in Southeast Asia as well as of the major challenges now confronting the region.

  18. Ground-facilities at the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine for preparation of flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmersbach, Ruth; Hendrik Anken, Ralf; Hauslage, Jens; von der Wiesche, Melanie; Baerwalde, Sven; Schuber, Marianne

    In order to investigate the influence of altered gravity on biological systems and to identify gravisensitive processes, various experimental platforms have been developed, which are useful to simulate weightlessness or are able to produce hypergravity. At the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, DLR Cologne, a broad spectrum of applications is offered to scientists: clinostats with one rotation axis and variable rotation speeds for cultivation of small objects (including aquatic organisms) in simulated weightlessness conditions, for online microscopic observations and for online kinetic measurements. Own research concentrates on comparative studies with other kinds of methods to simulate weightlessness, also available at the institute: Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) for aquatic studies, Random Positioning Machine (RPM; manufactured by Dutch Space, Leiden, The Netherlands). Correspondingly, various centrifuge devices are available to study different test objects under hypergravity conditions -such as NIZEMI, a slow rotating centrifuge microscope, and MUSIC, a multi-sample centrifuge. Mainly for experiments with human test subjects (artificial gravity), but also for biological systems or for testing various kinds of (flight-) hardware, the SAHC, a short arm human centrifuge -loaned by ESA -was installed in Cologne and completes our experimental scenario. Furthermore, due to our specific tasks such as providing laboratories during the German Parabolic Flight Experiments starting from Cologne and being the Facility Responsible Center for BIOLAB, a science rack in the Columbus module aboard the ISS, scientists have the possibility for an optimal preparation of their flight experiments.

  19. [Investigations on leishmaniases at the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine].

    PubMed

    Kellina, O I; Strelkova, M V

    2010-01-01

    The paper assesses the investigations on leishmaniases at the E.I. Martsinovsky Institute of Medical Parasitology and Tropical Medicine in 1920 to 2009. The analysis includes papers on biology, ecology, taxonomy, and experimental transmission of the agents of leishmaniases via the bites of sand flies, the principle in the control of zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis (ZCL) during the agricultural development of extensive territories in the Karshin steppe, on quantitative approaches in the epidemiology of ZCL, a search for Russian effective medicaments to treat patients with this disease and the development of criteria for selecting L. major strains for individual and mass vaccinations against ZCL, the revision of Leishmania circulating in great gerbil populations, and the description of the new species L. turanica, an important parasite for L. major persistence from one transmission season to the next. The first investigations on leishmaniasis were made by Prof. E.I. Martsinovsky, the founder and the first director of the Institute in the early 20th century.

  20. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less-than-baccalaureate degree)

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, L.

    1982-01-01

    Current projections indicate that in addition to the 10,100 technician positions and 6100 existing operator positions in the nuclear power industry, another 9100 technicians and 9700 operators will be required over the next decade. With 56 nuclear plants currently in operation and an additional 35 plants under construction, it is essential that trained technical personnel be available for employment in the nuclear utilities. Because of the growing demand for technicians in the nuclear utility industry, this report has been prepared to identify the nuclear-related, less-than-baccalaureate, technical educational programs provided by academic institutions and to ascertain both the current number of students and the maximum number that could be trained, given present staff and facilities. The data serve as a gauge for the proportion of technician training required by the nuclear industry that can be provided by academic institutions.

  1. Lessons Learned From a Training Collaboration Between an Ivy League Institution and a Historically Black University

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nanetta; Simmons, Emma; Hyde, Jennifer; Sly, Kaye; Zlotnick, Caron

    2009-01-01

    The Miriam Hospital, Brown Medical School, and Jackson State University developed a joint training program for predoctoral, Black psychology students under the auspices of a training grant funded by the National Institutes of Health. The students in the program at Jackson State University had unlimited access to the clinical research resources and mentoring expertise at Brown Medical School. This innovative program began in 2001 and addresses the need for Black leaders in clinical research and academia who will focus on HIV and other infections that disproportionately affect the Black community. This collaboration has served as a bridge between an Ivy League institution and a historically Black university for training in clinical research to develop successful minority academicians. PMID:19246675

  2. Salvaging a geriatric medicine academic program in disaster mode-the LSU training program post-Katrina.

    PubMed Central

    Cefalu, Charles A.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Formal training in geriatric medicine in Louisiana is in its infancy. This article portrays the struggle of the sole functioning geriatric medicine training program and its trials and tribulations in a survival mode, opportunities that come with disaster as well as lessons learned post-Katrina. PMID:17534025

  3. Community-Oriented Training in Family Medicine: Integration in an urban residency program.

    PubMed

    Ouchterlony, D P

    1991-07-01

    Family medicine educators are challenged by the need to introduce community experiences into residency training programs. This paper describes one inner-city program's preliminary efforts to join with community-oriented health service agencies in the development of meaningful educational experiences and discusses problems and possible solutions.

  4. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  5. Developing a Competence-Based Addiction Medicine Curriculum in Indonesia: The Training Needs Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinxten, W. J. L.; De Jong, C.; Hidayat, T.; Istiqomah, A. N.; Achmad, Y. M.; Raya, R. P.; Norviatin, D.; Siregar, I. M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Indonesia has one of the fastest growing, injecting drugs user-driven, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics in Asia. Coverage of needle and syringe programs (NSPs), opioid substitution therapy (OST), and antiretroviral treatment (ART) is increasing, but is still low, whereas professional training in addiction medicine is not yet…

  6. Tablet computer enhanced training improves internal medicine exam performance

    PubMed Central

    Wende, Ilja; Grittner, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Background Traditional teaching concepts in medical education do not take full advantage of current information technology. We aimed to objectively determine the impact of Tablet PC enhanced training on learning experience and MKSAP® (medical knowledge self-assessment program) exam performance. Methods In this single center, prospective, controlled study final year medical students and medical residents doing an inpatient service rotation were alternatingly assigned to either the active test (Tablet PC with custom multimedia education software package) or traditional education (control) group, respectively. All completed an extensive questionnaire to collect their socio-demographic data, evaluate educational status, computer affinity and skills, problem solving, eLearning knowledge and self-rated medical knowledge. Both groups were MKSAP® tested at the beginning and the end of their rotation. The MKSAP® score at the final exam was the primary endpoint. Results Data of 55 (tablet n = 24, controls n = 31) male 36.4%, median age 28 years, 65.5% students, were evaluable. The mean MKSAP® score improved in the tablet PC (score Δ + 8 SD: 11), but not the control group (score Δ- 7, SD: 11), respectively. After adjustment for baseline score and confounders the Tablet PC group showed on average 11% better MKSAP® test results compared to the control group (p<0.001). The most commonly used resources for medical problem solving were journal articles looked up on PubMed or Google®, and books. Conclusions Our study provides evidence, that tablet computer based integrated training and clinical practice enhances medical education and exam performance. Larger, multicenter trials are required to independently validate our data. Residency and fellowship directors are encouraged to consider adding portable computer devices, multimedia content and introduce blended learning to their respective training programs. PMID:28369063

  7. [The importance of teamwork in emergency medicine training].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, B; Carron, P-N

    2007-08-15

    The study of dynamics in relation to performing in small groups has increased pedagogic knowledge about teamwork. The successful management of patients with life-threatening pathologies depends highly from a succession of teams with a specific mission as: the call centre 144, Paramedics, the ED, the Operating Theatre and the Intensive care. To enable each team to operate successfully, it is essential to coordinate their qualifications and synergism. This can be efficiently attained by simulating real situations and by following protocols dedicated to teamwork. Emergency Medicine, which is on the brink of acquiring its proper curriculum, must adopt this concept to integrate knowledge and know-how, and the art of being and doing. At this stage, the Emergency Physician will have the competence which will enable him to be a real "team leader".

  8. Academic Medicine Education Institute (AM·EI): Transforming the Educational Culture of Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Goh, Sok Hong; Tan, Kok Hian; Kamei, Robert K; Koo, Wen Hsin; Cook, Sandy

    2015-05-01

    The Academic Medicine Education Institute (AM∙EI), jointly established by Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Duke-NUS) and Singapore Healthcare Services (SingHealth), is a newly formed health professions education academy designed to cultivate best education practices and create a community of health professions educators. To achieve the aims of AM∙EI, the needs of SingHealth educators have to be understood. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess educators' perceptions towards the current education climate and their academic needs. A 28-item questionnaire consisting of free-response, Likert-type and ranking questions was developed. The questionnaire was electronically distributed to 200 medical and nursing educators, and made available to attendees of the 2012 Singhealth Duke-NUS Scientific Congress through hardcopies. A total of 150 completed questionnaires were received (94 from electronic survey and 56 from Congress). Five themes emerged from the analysis of responses to free-response questions: 1) faculty development, 2) development of a community of educators, 3) recognition for educational efforts, 4) institutional support, and 5) better communication about SingHealth educational activities. Respondents were in highest agreement with the statements (rating of 3.7 out of 5): "The SingHealth education programmes are high quality", "New learning or teaching methods are welcomed in this institution/hospital", and "An academic appointment is important to me". The competencies that respondents felt to be the most important were facilitating discussions, presentation skills, and providing feedback (respective means = 5.1, 5, 5 of 7). This needs assessment provided us with important insights regarding SingHealth medical educators' perceptions of their education environment and established key priorities for the AM∙EI's programming efforts.

  9. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices.

    PubMed

    Bell, Paul F; Semelka, Michael W; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-03-01

    Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training.

  10. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Paul F.; Semelka, Michael W.; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. Objective We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. Methods The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. Results A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Conclusions Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training. PMID:26217424

  11. Assessing the integration of genomic medicine in genetic counseling training programs.

    PubMed

    Profato, Jessica; Gordon, Erynn S; Dixon, Shannan; Kwan, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Medical genetics has entered a period of transition from genetics to genomics. Genetic counselors (GCs) may take on roles in the clinical implementation of genomics. This study explores the perspectives of program directors (PDs) on including genomic medicine in GC training programs, as well as the status of this integration. Study methods included an online survey, an optional one-on-one telephone interview, and an optional curricula content analysis. The majority of respondents (15/16) reported that it is important to include genomic medicine in program curricula. Most topics of genomic medicine are either "currently taught" or "under development" in all participating programs. Interview data from five PDs and one faculty member supported the survey data. Integrating genomics in training programs is challenging, and it is essential to develop genomics resources for curricula.

  12. Training Family Medicine Residents to Perform Home Visits: A CERA Survey.

    PubMed

    Sairenji, Tomoko; Wilson, Stephen A; D'Amico, Frank; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-02-01

    Home visits have been shown to improve quality of care, save money, and improve outcomes. Primary care physicians are in an ideal position to provide these visits; of note, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education no longer requires home visits as a component of family medicine residency training. To investigate changes in home visit numbers and expectations, attitudes, and approaches to training among family medicine residency program directors. This research used the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance (CERA) national survey of family medicine program directors in 2015. Questions addressed home visit practices, teaching and evaluation methods, common types of patient and visit categories, and barriers. There were 252 responses from 455 possible respondents, representing a response rate of 55%. At most programs, residents performed 2 to 5 home visits by graduation in both 2014 (69% of programs, 174 of 252) and 2015 (68%, 172 of 252). The vast majority (68%, 172 of 252) of program directors expect less than one-third of their graduates to provide home visits after graduation. Scheduling difficulties, lack of faculty time, and lack of resident time were the top 3 barriers to residents performing home visits. There appeared to be no decline in resident-performed home visits in family medicine residencies 1 year after they were no longer required. Family medicine program directors may recognize the value of home visits despite a lack of few formal curricula.

  13. [Further training for medical specialists in respiratory medicine: how can we improve it?].

    PubMed

    Karg, O

    2015-09-01

    Young physicians in Germany often criticize the advanced training programme, especially the lack of structure and the insufficient rotations. The Medical Association in each Bundesland/federal state require to include a proposal for advanced training and rotation in a trainer's aplication for an educational license. However, there is no systematic scrutiny of these concepts and therefore the criteria stated outcomes are often only incompletely met. Trainers engage too little in training methods and medical didactics. They rarely evaluate learning outcomes, and structured assessments based on workplace are exceptions. The reasons are deeply rooted in Germany's education system: Resources for specialist training are not provided, and there is no funding for a commitment in continued medical education. In addition, teaching is not assigned a quantifiable value. However, during the last decade awareness has arisen that good training programmes are an important part of quality assurance and the validation of a hospital. Better planning, structuring and evaluation of training programmes is necessary. New learning methods should be incorporated in training programmes. The German Respiratory Society (DGP) wishes to contribute to the improvement of advanced training: for example with "train the trainer" seminars for teachers, with a structured educational course programme for the trainees, with assessments such as the HERMES (Harmonized Education in Respiratory Medicine for European Specialists) exam and with support for the accreditation as a Respiratory Training Centre of the ERS (European Respiratory Society) and EBAP (European Board for Accreditation in Pneumology).

  14. Computer-based simulation training in emergency medicine designed in the light of malpractice cases.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Akan; Duran, Latif; Yavuz, Yücel; Altintop, Levent; Calişkan, Fatih

    2014-07-27

    Using computer-based simulation systems in medical education is becoming more and more common. Although the benefits of practicing with these systems in medical education have been demonstrated, advantages of using computer-based simulation in emergency medicine education are less validated. The aim of the present study was to assess the success rates of final year medical students in doing emergency medical treatment and evaluating the effectiveness of computer-based simulation training in improving final year medical students' knowledge. Twenty four Students trained with computer-based simulation and completed at least 4 hours of simulation-based education between the dates Feb 1, 2010 - May 1, 2010. Also a control group (traditionally trained, n =24) was chosen. After the end of training, students completed an examination about 5 randomized medical simulation cases. In 5 cases, an average of 3.9 correct medical approaches carried out by computer-based simulation trained students, an average of 2.8 correct medical approaches carried out by traditionally trained group (t = 3.90, p < 0.005). We found that the success of students trained with simulation training in cases which required complicated medical approach, was statistically higher than the ones who didn't take simulation training (p ≤ 0.05). Computer-based simulation training would be significantly effective in learning of medical treatment algorithms. We thought that these programs can improve the success rate of students especially in doing adequate medical approach to complex emergency cases.

  15. Impact of fellowship training on clinical practice of orthopaedic sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Bob; Gandhi, Jaipal; Limpisvasti, Orr; Mohr, Karen; ElAttrache, Neal S

    2015-03-04

    Approximately 90% of current orthopaedic graduates are engaging in fellowship training, with sports medicine being the most commonly chosen specialty. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of fellowship training on clinical decision-making by fellowship-trained sports medicine surgeons. A survey was designed to assess the importance of fellowship on common clinical decisions made in the nonoperative and surgical treatment of knee, shoulder, and elbow disorders. The survey also included questions for the respondents on their comfort level with a variety of routine and complex surgical procedures. The survey was sent to alumni of 113 orthopaedic sports medicine programs across the United States. Completed surveys were returned by 310 surgeons who had been in practice for an average of 9.0 years. They represented alumni of twenty-nine orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs across sixteen states. Fellowship was considered very important for surgical decision-making in the knee and shoulder. For nonoperative treatment, fellowship had a greater impact on shoulder disorders than on knee or elbow disorders. Fellowship was significantly more important than residency (p < 0.001) for determining preferred surgical equipment, implants, and braces. Among the surgical procedures assessed, respondents were least comfortable with the treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries, and shoulder instability with bone loss. Fellowship has a significantly higher impact than residency on industry-related decision-making. Fellowship-trained sports surgeons should consider seeking additional training in the treatment of multi-ligamentous knee injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries, shoulder instability with bone loss, and elbow disorders. The current findings were limited by the relatively small respondent pool, which represented only 26% of sports medicine fellowship programs in the United States. Copyright © 2015 by

  16. The effect of a simple educational intervention on interest in early abortion training among family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Wu, Justine P; Bennett, Ian; Levine, Jeffrey P; Aguirre, Abigail Calkins; Bellamy, Scarlett; Fleischman, Joan

    2006-06-01

    We aimed to assess the effect of an educational intervention on the interest in and support for abortion training among family medicine residents. We conducted a cross-sectional survey before and after an educational lecture on medical and surgical abortion in primary care among 89 residents in 10 New Jersey family medicine programs. Before the lecture, there was more interest in medical abortion training than surgical abortion. Resident interest in surgical abortion and overall support for abortion training increased after the educational intervention (p<.01). Efforts to develop educational programs on early abortion care may facilitate the integration of abortion training in family medicine.

  17. Potential role for psychological skills training in emergency medicine: Part 1 - Introduction and background.

    PubMed

    Lauria, Michael J; Rush, Stephen; Weingart, Scott D; Brooks, Jason; Gallo, Isabelle A

    2016-10-01

    Psychological skills training (PST) is the systematic acquisition and practice of different psychological techniques to improve cognitive and technical performance. This training consists of three phases: education, skills acquisition and practice. Some of the psychological skills developed in this training include relaxation techniques, focusing and concentration skills, positive 'self-suggestion' and visualisation exercises. Since the middle of the 20th century, PST has been successfully applied by athletes, performing artists, business executives, military personnel and other professionals in high-risk occupations. Research in these areas has demonstrated the breadth and depth of the training's effectiveness. Despite the benefits realised in other professions, medicine has only recently begun to explore certain elements of PST. The present paper reviews the history and evidence behind the concept of PST. In addition, it presents some aspects of PST that have already been incorporated into medical training as well as implications for developing more comprehensive programmes to improve delivery of emergency medical care.

  18. A laboratory medicine residency training program that includes clinical consultation and research.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, E D; Pierce, G F; McDonald, J M

    1990-04-01

    We describe a laboratory medicine residency training program that includes ongoing interaction with both clinical laboratories and clinical services as well as significant research experience. Laboratory medicine residents serve as on-call consultants in the interpretation of test results, design of testing strategies, and assurance of test quality. The consultative on-call beeper system was evaluated and is presented as an effective method of clinical pathology training that is well accepted by the clinical staff. The research component of the residency program is also described. Together, these components provide training in real-time clinical problem solving and prepare residents for the changing technological environment of the clinical laboratory. At the completion of the residency, the majority of the residents are qualified laboratory subspecialists and are also capable of running an independent research program.

  19. Identifying and training non-technical skills for teams in acute medicine

    PubMed Central

    Flin, R; Maran, N

    2004-01-01

    The aviation domain provides a better analogy for the "temporary" teams that are found in acute medical specialities than industrial or military teamwork research based on established teams. Crew resource management (CRM) training, which emphasises portable skills (for whatever crew a pilot is rostered to on a given flight), has been recognised to have potential application in medicine, especially for teams in the operating theatre, intensive care unit, and emergency room. Drawing on research from aviation psychology that produced the behavioural marker system NOTECHS for rating European pilots' non-technical skills for teamwork on the flightdeck, this paper outlines the Anaesthetists Non-Technical Skills behavioural rating system for anaesthetists working in operating theatre teams. This taxonomy was used as the design basis for a training course, Crisis Avoidance Resource Management for Anaesthetists used to develop these skills, based in an operating theatre simulator. Further developments of this training programme for teams in emergency medicine are outlined. PMID:15465960

  20. Identifying and training non-technical skills for teams in acute medicine.

    PubMed

    Flin, R; Maran, N

    2004-10-01

    The aviation domain provides a better analogy for the "temporary" teams that are found in acute medical specialities than industrial or military teamwork research based on established teams. Crew resource management (CRM) training, which emphasises portable skills (for whatever crew a pilot is rostered to on a given flight), has been recognised to have potential application in medicine, especially for teams in the operating theatre, intensive care unit, and emergency room. Drawing on research from aviation psychology that produced the behavioural marker system NOTECHS for rating European pilots' non-technical skills for teamwork on the flightdeck, this paper outlines the Anaesthetists Non-Technical Skills behavioural rating system for anaesthetists working in operating theatre teams. This taxonomy was used as the design basis for a training course, Crisis Avoidance Resource Management for Anaesthetists used to develop these skills, based in an operating theatre simulator. Further developments of this training programme for teams in emergency medicine are outlined.

  1. Advanced rural skills training - the value of an addiction medicine rotation.

    PubMed

    Allan, Julaine

    2011-11-01

    General practitioners are ideally placed to address drug and alcohol problems in the Australian population. Lack of adequate undergraduate and postgraduate training has been suggested as a key barrier limiting their involvement in addiction medicine. This article describes the establishment and operations of an advanced rural skills training program at the Lyndon Community - a rural drug and alcohol treatment organisation in New South Wales. An addiction medicine rotation offers general practice registrars the opportunity to develop skills and experience in psychosocial interventions as well as physical and mental health issues common in the treatment population. Registrars participating in the Lyndon Community program perceived that the training period had influenced and enhanced their future practice.

  2. State-of-The-Art Technologies Used in Training Delivery and Administration at the Institute of Public Administration: Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewain, Saleh A. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Public Administration (IPA), in Saudi Arabia, is a well renowned training institution designated for training civil servants in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This paper mainly discusses the uses of technologies in the administrative aspects of the IPA. The author also points out the obstacles faced and lessons learned from the…

  3. Proceedings of the Annual Southwest Park & Recreation Training Institute (26th, Kingston, Oklahoma, February 1-4, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Dept. of Park Administration and Landscape Architecture.

    Summaries of papers given at a regional training institute on parks and recreation facilities, programs, amd objectives are presented. The purposes of the institute were to encourage professionalism among those who work in parks and recreation, to foster interagency cooperation, and to support colleges that train parks and recreation…

  4. Can evidence-based medicine change toilet-training practice?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsi-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess the evidence showing that a specific method of toilet training (TT) is more effective than others, as any method of TT recommended by a physician faces obstacles because parents rarely request advice on TT from physicians, and TT practices vary tremendously across cultures and socioeconomic levels. Methods Reports on the natural course of urinary incontinence in children and different methods of TT, published in English between 1946 and 2012, were reviewed. Specifically investigated were historical recommendations on TT, the prevalence of urinary incontinence during childhood, the outcome of TT methods, and the effect of culture and socioeconomic status on the choice of TT method and timing. Results TT now occurs at later ages than it did previously. This progression reflects changing ideas about normal childhood physiology and psychology. The prevalence of urinary incontinence in European countries progressively decreased in children aged between 6–7 years and 16–17 years old. TT methods change with increasing socioeconomic levels to ‘child-centred’ techniques applied at older ages, but the prevalence of urinary incontinence after ‘parent-centred’ techniques of TT at younger ages has not been studied. There is currently no evidence that a specific timing or method of TT is more effective or prevents voiding dysfunction. Conclusions Follow-up studies of urinary continence in children toilet trained at 6–12 months of age might provide evidence for whether a given method or timing of TT is beneficial to prevent voiding dysfunction. The recommendations of physicians might be more readily adopted if they fit culturally accepted ideas of good parenting techniques. PMID:26579239

  5. Development of a training needs assessment for an education scholarship fellowship in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michelle; Santen, Sally A; Yarris, Lalena M; Mullan, Patricia; Searle, Nancy; Rougas, Steven; Coates, Wendy C

    2012-12-01

    At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Education Research in Emergency Medicine: Opportunities, Challenges, and Strategies for Success," a breakout session convened to discuss postgraduate fellowship training in emergency medicine (EM), which would focus on education research. Graduates will form a growing cadre of education scholars who conduct and publish quality education research. This proceedings article reports the consensus findings of a breakout session subgroup whose goal was to construct a needs assessment for the proposed 2-year education scholarship fellowship. The authors describe, based on expert and participant consensus, a framework for a large-scale, mixed-methods needs assessment for such a fellowship. © 2012 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    PubMed

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development.

  7. Internal medicine residency training for unhealthy alcohol and other drug use: recommendations for curriculum design

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Unhealthy substance use is the spectrum from use that risks harm, to use associated with problems, to the diagnosable conditions of substance abuse and dependence, often referred to as substance abuse disorders. Despite the prevalence and impact of unhealthy substance use, medical education in this area remains lacking, not providing physicians with the necessary expertise to effectively address one of the most common and costly health conditions. Medical educators have begun to address the need for physician training in unhealthy substance use, and formal curricula have been developed and evaluated, though broad integration into busy residency curricula remains a challenge. Discussion We review the development of unhealthy substance use related competencies, and describe a curriculum in unhealthy substance use that integrates these competencies into internal medicine resident physician training. We outline strategies to facilitate adoption of such curricula by the residency programs. This paper provides an outline for the actual implementation of the curriculum within the structure of a training program, with examples using common teaching venues. We describe and link the content to the core competencies mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the formal accrediting body for residency training programs in the United States. Specific topics are recommended, with suggestions on how to integrate such teaching into existing internal medicine residency training program curricula. Summary Given the burden of disease and effective interventions available that can be delivered by internal medicine physicians, teaching about unhealthy substance use must be incorporated into internal medicine residency training, and can be done within existing teaching venues. PMID:20230607

  8. AN EIGHT WEEK SUMMER INSTITUTE TRAINING PROGRAM TO TRAIN INSTRUCTORS OF INSTRUMENTATION TECHNOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZIOL, FRANK J.

    AN INSTITUTE WAS CONDUCTED TO ASSIST IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF KNOWLEDGES AND SKILLS ESSENTIAL FOR TEACHING SPECIALIZED TECHNICAL COURSES. THE PARTICIPANTS WERE 16 TEACHERS IN THE TECHNICAL-VOCATIONAL AREA OF INSTRUMENTATION. THE ACTIVITY INCLUDED LECTURE AND DISCUSSION, DEMONSTRATION, LABORATORY WORK, AND FIELD TRIPS. THE SCOPE OF THE PROGRAM…

  9. Institutional training programs for research personnel conducted by laboratory-animal veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Melissa C; Rush, Howard G

    2012-01-01

    Research institutions are required by federal law and national standards to ensure that individuals involved in animal research are appropriately trained in techniques and procedures used on animals. Meeting these requirements necessitates the support of institutional authorities; policies for the documentation and enforcement of training; resources to support and provide training programs; and high-quality, effective educational material. Because of their expertise, laboratory-animal veterinarians play an essential role in the design, implementation, and provision of educational programs for faculty, staff, and students in biomedical research. At large research institutions, provision of a training program for animal care and use personnel can be challenging because of the animal-research enterprise's size and scope. At the University of Michigan (UM), approximately 3,500 individuals have direct contact with animals used in research. We describe a comprehensive educational program for animal care and use personnel designed and provided by laboratory-animal veterinarians at UM and discuss the challenges associated with its implementation.

  10. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    PubMed

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  11. Health and Behavior: The Interplay of Biological, Behavioral, and Social Influences: Summary of an Institute of Medicine Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellmar, Terry C.; Brandt, Edward N., Jr.; Baird, Macaran A.

    2002-01-01

    An Institute of Medicine committee examined the links between biological, psychosocial, and behavioral factors and health; reviewed effective applications of behavioral interventions (individual behavior, families, organizations, communities, and society); and discussed the production and maintenance of behavior change. The paper presents a…

  12. Middle-school students' school lunch consumption does not meet the new Institute of Medicine's National School Lunch Program recommendations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the school lunch consumption of Texas middle-school students with the 2009 Institute of Medicine's (IOM) school meal report recommendations. These new lunch menu patterns increase fruit to one serving and vegetables to two servings, with 50 percent wholegra...

  13. Children in school cafeterias select foods containing more saturated fat and energy than the Institute of Medicine recommendations.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we examined if children’s food selection met the School Meals Initiative (SMI) standards, and the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Mean food selection, plate waste, and food intake were also examined. Food intake of 2,049 4th-6th grade students were measu...

  14. Children in school cafeterias select foods containing more saturated fat and energy than the institute of medicine recommends.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In this study, we examined if children’s food selections met the School Meals Initiative (SMI) standards, and the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Mean food selection, plate waste, and food intake were also examined. Food intake of 2,049 4th-6th grade students were meas...

  15. A Perspective of the future of nuclear medicine training and certification

    PubMed Central

    Arevalo-Perez, Julio; Paris, Manuel; Graham, Michael M.; Osborne, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine has evolved from a medical subspecialty using quite basic tests to one using elaborate methods to image organ physiology and has truly become “Molecular Imaging”. Concurrently, there has also been a timely debate about who has to be responsible for keeping pace with all of the components of the developmental cycle; imaging, radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation. Since the foundation of the ABNM, the practice of Nuclear Medicine and the process toward certification have undergone major revisions. At present, the debate is focused on the inevitable future convergence of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. The potential for further cooperation or fusion of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) and the American Board of Nuclear Medicine (ABNM) is likely to bring about a new path for Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging training. If the merger is done carefully, respecting the strengths of both partners equally, there is an excellent potential to create a hybrid Nuclear Medicine – Radiology specialty that combines Physiology and Molecular Biology with detailed anatomic imaging that will sustain the innovation that has been central to nuclear medicine residency and practice. Herein, we also introduce a few basic trends in imaging utilization in the United States. These trends do not predict future utilization, but highlight the need for an appropriately credentialed practitioner to interpret these examinations and provide value to the healthcare system. PMID:26687859

  16. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1997-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the Institute include the following: (1) To conduct basic and applied research; (2) to promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community; (3) to provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute; (4) to provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute; and (5) to disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  17. The Research and Training Activities for the Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requests continued support for the program of activities to be undertaken by the Ames-Stanford Joint Institute for Aeronautics and Acoustics during the one-year period October 1, 1996 to September 30, 1997. The emphasis in this program is on training and research in experimental and computational methods with application to aerodynamics, acoustics and the important interactions between them. The program comprises activities in active flow control, Large Eddy Simulation of jet noise, flap aerodynamics and acoustics, high lift modeling studies and luminescent paint applications. During the proposed period there will be a continued emphasis on the interaction between NASA Ames, Stanford University and Industry, particularly in connection with the noise and high lift activities. The program will be conducted within the general framework of the Memorandum of Understanding (1976) establishing the Institute, as updated in 1993. As outlined in the agreement, the purposes of the institute include the following: To conduct basic and applied research. To promote joint endeavors between Center scientists and those in the academic community To provide training to graduate students in specialized areas of aeronautics and acoustics through participation in the research programs of the Institute. To provide opportunities for Post-Doctoral Fellows to collaborate in research programs of the Institute. To disseminate information about important aeronautical topics and to enable scientists and engineers of the Center to stay abreast of new advances through symposia, seminars and publications.

  18. Postgraduate family medicine training in Singapore--a new way forward.

    PubMed

    Wong, Teck Yee; Chong, Phui Nah; Chng, Shih Kiat; Tay, Ee Guan

    2012-05-01

    Postgraduate Family Medicine (FM) training is important to train future primary care doctors to provide accessible and cost effective healthcare. In Singapore, a structured postgraduate FM training programme has been available for 20 years. This programme is characterised by involvement of both FM and non-FM doctors, well written modules and a rigorous assessment process. However, challenges faced by both the current healthcare system and training structure underlie the need to review the training structure to ensure its relevancy for future Family Physicians (FPs) to manage the needs of their patients. A workgroup was formed to review the current FM postgraduate programme and to explore the possibility of using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) framework to enhance our current system. The workgroup felt that broad-based training and comprehensive coverage of topics are areas that are important to retain in any new FM residency programme. Weaknesses identified included a lack of early FM exposure and the need to strengthen formative assessments. New organisational structures such as Family Medicine Centres (FMC) need to be established and the involvement of the private sector in any FM residency progammes could be enhanced. The implementation of the FM Residency Programme in 2011 presented a unique opportunity to realign FM postgraduate education in line with the national objectives and to equip FPs with the necessary knowledge and skills for managing the future healthcare needs of Singaporeans.

  19. Establishment of a General Medicine Residency Training Program in Rural West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Drislane, Frank W.; Akpalu, Albert; Wegdam, Harry H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Ghana, a developing country in West Africa, has major medical burdens in taking care of a large population with limited resources. Its three medical schools produce more than 200 graduates per year, but most emigrate to developed lands after training. Ghana is working to educate and retain locally trained physicians, but it is difficult to get them to work in rural settings where the need is greatest. This article details the establishment of a General Medicine residency at a 150-bed hospital in rural Ghana. Early training comprises 6 months each in Medicine, Surgery, OB/GYN, and Pediatrics; the hospital in Techiman also has a Surgery residency. House officers choose the program for more hands-on experience than they can get in larger centers. They perform many tasks, including surgery, sooner and more independently than do residents in developed countries. The training program includes a morning report, clinical teaching rounds, and rotations on in-patient wards and in the Emergency Department and clinics. Teaching focuses on history, physical examination, good communication, and proper follow-up, with rigorous training in the OR and some clinical research projects pertinent to Ghana. Trainees work hard and learn from one another, from a dedicated faculty, and by evaluating and treating very sick patients. Ghana’s rural residencies offer rigorous and attractive training, but it is too soon to tell whether this will help stem the “brain drain” of young physicians out of West Africa. PMID:25191148

  20. NIR tracking assists sports medicine in junior basketball training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeglis, Roberts; Bluss, Kristaps; Rudzitis, Andris; Spunde, Andris; Brice, Tamara; Nitiss, Edgars

    2011-07-01

    We recorded eye movements of eight elite junior basketball players. We hypothesized that a more stable gaze is correlated to a better shot rate. Upon preliminary testing we invited male juniors whose eyes could be reliably tracked in a game situation. To these ends, we used a head-mounted video-based eye tracker. The participants had no record of ocular or other health issues. No significant differences were found between shots made with and without the tracker cap, Paired samples t-test yielded p= .130 for the far and p=..900 > .050 for the middle range shots. The players made 40 shots from common far and middle range locations, 5 and 4 meters respectively for aged 14 years As expected, a statistical correlation was found between gaze fixation (in milliseconds) for the far and middle range shot rates, r=.782, p=.03. Notably, juniors who fixated longer before a shot had a more stable fixation or a lower gaze dispersion (in tracker's screen pixels), r=-.786, p=.02. This finding was augmented by the observation that the gaze dispersion while aiming at the basket was less (i.e., gaze more stable) in those who were more likely to score. We derived a regression equation linking fixation duration to shot success. We advocate infra-red eye tracking as a means to monitor player selection and training success.