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Sample records for mediolateral functional dichotomy

  1. Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The phase of a body in the solar system when exactly half of its sunlit side is visible. The term is used in particular for the half-phases of the inferior planets, Mercury and Venus; in correct usage it is not applied to the Moon, for which the terms first quarter and last quarter are preferred. Other bodies in the solar system can be imaged at dichotomy only by spacecraft....

  2. Basket cell dichotomy in microcircuit function

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Caren; Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    A diversity of GABAergic cell types exist within each brain area, and each cell type is thought to play a unique role in the modulation of principal cell output. Basket cells, whose axon terminals surround principal cell somata and proximal dendrites, have a privileged and influential position for regulating the firing of principal cells. This review explores the dichotomy of the two basket cell classes, cholecystokinin- (CCK) and parvalbumin (PV)-containing basket cells, beginning with differences at the level of the individual cell and subsequently focusing on two ways in which this intrinsic dichotomy is enhanced by extrinsic factors. Neuromodulatory influences, exemplified by the effects of the peptide CCK, dynamically enhance the differential functions of the two cell types. Specifications at the level of the postsynaptic principal cell, including input-specific differences in chloride handling and differences in long-range projection patterns of the principal cell targets, also enhance the distinct network function of basket cells. In this review, new findings will be highlighted concerning the roles of neuromodulatory control and postsynaptic long-range projection pattern in the definition of basket cell function. PMID:22199164

  3. On the use of knee functional calibration to determine the medio-lateral axis of the femur in gait analysis: Comparison with EOS biplanar radiographs as reference.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Christophe; Pillet, Hélène; Skalli, Wafa; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-10-01

    Accurate calibration of the medio-lateral axis of the femur is crucial for clinical decision making based on gait analysis. This study proposes a protocol utilizing biplanar radiographs to provide a reference medio-lateral axis based on the anatomy of the femur. The biplanar radiographs allowed 3D modelling of the bones of the lower limbs and the markers used for motion capture, in the standing posture. A comprehensive analysis was performed and results from biplanar radiographs were reliable for 3D marker localization (±0.35mm) and for 3D localization of the anatomical landmarks (±1mm), leading to a precision of 1° for the orientation of the condylar axis of the femur and a 95% confidence interval of ±3° after registration with motion capture data. The anatomical condylar axis was compared to a conventional, marker-based, axis and three functional calibration techniques (axis transformation, geometric axis fit and DynaKAD). Results for the conventional method show an average difference with the condylar axis of 15° (SD: 6°). Results indicate DynaKAD functional axis was the closest to the anatomical condylar axis, mean: 1° (SD: 5°) when applied to passive knee flexion movement. However, the range of the results exceeded 15° for all methods. Hence, the use of biplanar radiographs, or an alternative imaging technique, may be required to locate the medio-lateral axis of the femur reliably prior to clinical decision making for femur derotational osteotomies.

  4. Neural dichotomy of word concreteness: a view from functional neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Uttam

    2016-02-01

    Our perception about the representation and processing of concrete and abstract concepts is based on the fact that concrete words are highly imagined and remembered faster than abstract words. In order to explain the processing differences between abstract and concrete concepts, various theories have been proposed, yet there is no unanimous consensus about its neural implication. The present study investigated the processing of concrete and abstract words during an orthography judgment task (implicit semantic processing) using functional magnetic resonance imaging to validate the involvement of the neural regions. Relative to non-words, both abstract and concrete words show activation in the regions of bilateral hemisphere previously associated with semantic processing. The common areas (conjunction analyses) observed for abstract and concrete words are bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44/45), left superior parietal (BA 7), left fusiform gyrus and bilateral middle occipital. The additional areas for abstract words were noticed in bilateral superior temporal and bilateral middle temporal region, whereas no distinct region was noticed for concrete words. This suggests that words with abstract concepts recruit additional language regions in the brain.

  5. The dappled nature of causes of psychiatric illness: replacing the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy with empirically based pluralism.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S

    2012-04-01

    Our tendency to see the world of psychiatric illness in dichotomous and opposing terms has three major sources: the philosophy of Descartes, the state of neuropathology in late nineteenth century Europe (when disorders were divided into those with and without demonstrable pathology and labeled, respectively, organic and functional), and the influential concept of computer functionalism wherein the computer is viewed as a model for the human mind-brain system (brain=hardware, mind=software). These mutually re-enforcing dichotomies, which have had a pernicious influence on our field, make a clear prediction about how 'difference-makers' (aka causal risk factors) for psychiatric disorders should be distributed in nature. In particular, are psychiatric disorders like our laptops, which when they dysfunction, can be cleanly divided into those with software versus hardware problems? I propose 11 categories of difference-makers for psychiatric illness from molecular genetics through culture and review their distribution in schizophrenia, major depression and alcohol dependence. In no case do these distributions resemble that predicted by the organic-functional/hardware-software dichotomy. Instead, the causes of psychiatric illness are dappled, distributed widely across multiple categories. We should abandon Cartesian and computer-functionalism-based dichotomies as scientifically inadequate and an impediment to our ability to integrate the diverse information about psychiatric illness our research has produced. Empirically based pluralism provides a rigorous but dappled view of the etiology of psychiatric illness. Critically, it is based not on how we wish the world to be but how the difference-makers for psychiatric illness are in fact distributed.

  6. Equivalences between nonuniform exponential dichotomy and admissibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linfeng; Lu, Kening; Zhang, Weinian

    2017-01-01

    Relationship between exponential dichotomies and admissibility of function classes is a significant problem for hyperbolic dynamical systems. It was proved that a nonuniform exponential dichotomy implies several admissible pairs of function classes and conversely some admissible pairs were found to imply a nonuniform exponential dichotomy. In this paper we find an appropriate admissible pair of classes of Lyapunov bounded functions which is equivalent to the existence of nonuniform exponential dichotomy on half-lines R± separately, on both half-lines R± simultaneously, and on the whole line R. Additionally, the maximal admissibility is proved in the case on both half-lines R± simultaneously.

  7. The functional role of the inferior parietal lobe in the dorsal and ventral stream dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Curry, Victoria; Husain, Masud

    2009-01-01

    Current models of the visual pathways have difficulty incorporating the human inferior parietal lobe (IPL) into dorsal or ventral streams. Some recent proposals have attempted to integrate aspects of IPL function that were not hitherto dealt with well, such as differences between the left and right hemisphere and the role of the right IPL in responding to salient environmental events. However, we argue that these models also fail to capture adequately some important findings regarding the functions of the IPL. Here we critically appraise existing proposals regarding the functional architecture of the visual system, with special emphasis on the role of this region, particularly in the right hemisphere. We review evidence that shows the right IPL plays an important role in two different, but broadly complementary, aspects of attention: maintaining attentive control on current task goals as well as responding to salient new information or alerting stimuli in the environment. In our view, findings from functional imaging, electrophysiological and lesion studies are all consistent with the view that this region is part of a system that allows flexible reconfiguration of behaviour between these two alternative modes of operation. Damage to the right IPL leads to deficits in both maintaining attention and also responding to salient events, impairments that contribute to hemineglect, the classical syndrome that follows lesions of this region. PMID:19138694

  8. Evidence for two distinct stellar initial mass functions: probing for clues to the dichotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Pessev, Peter M.

    2014-12-01

    We present new measurements of the velocity dispersions of 11 Local Group globular clusters using spatially integrated spectra, to expand our sample of clusters with precise integrated-light velocity dispersions to 29, over 4 different host galaxies. This sample allows us to further our investigation of the stellar mass function among clusters, with a particular emphasis on a search for the driver of the apparent bimodal nature of the inferred stellar initial mass function (IMF). We confirm our previous result that clusters fall into two classes. If, as we argue, this behavior reflects a variation in the stellar IMF, the cause of that variation is not clear. The variations do not correlate with formation epoch as quantified by age, metallicity quantified by [Fe/H], host galaxy, or internal structure as quantified by velocity dispersion, physical size, relaxation time, or luminosity. The stellar mass-to-light ratios, Y{sub *}, of the high and low Y{sub *} cluster populations are well-matched to those found in recent studies of early and late type galaxies, respectively.

  9. The Danger of False Dichotomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBoskey, Vicky Kubler

    1998-01-01

    Responds to an article that examined 10 dichotomies in teacher education (SP 527 128), suggesting that too much time and energy are spent debating false dichotomies and addressing two specific dichotomies (preservice versus inservice and campus versus school site). Recommends that professional educators pool their energy and collaborate (rather…

  10. Effects of Changing Body Weight Distribution on Mediolateral Stability Control during Gait Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Caderby, Teddy; Yiou, Eric; Peyrot, Nicolas; de Viviés, Xavier; Bonazzi, Bruno; Dalleau, Georges

    2017-01-01

    During gait initiation, anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) precede the execution of the first step. It is generally acknowledged that these APA contribute to forward progression but also serve to stabilize the whole body in the mediolateral direction during step execution. Although previous studies have shown that changes in the distribution of body weight between both legs influence motor performance during gait initiation, it is not known whether and how such changes affect a person’s postural stability during this task. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of changing initial body weight distribution between legs on mediolateral postural stability during gait initiation. Changes in body weight distribution were induced under experimental conditions by modifying the frontal plane distribution of an external load located at the participants’ waists. Fifteen healthy adults performed a gait initiation series at a similar speed under three conditions: with the overload evenly distributed over both legs; with the overload strictly distributed over the swing-limb side; and with the overload strictly distributed over the stance-leg side. Our results showed that the mediolateral location of center-of-mass (CoM) during the initial upright posture differed between the experimental conditions, indicating modifications in the initial distribution of body weight between the legs according to the load distribution. While the parameters related to the forward progression remained unchanged, the alterations in body weight distribution elicited adaptive changes in the amplitude of APA in the mediolateral direction (i.e., maximal mediolateral shift of the center of pressure (CoP)), without variation in their duration. Specifically, it was observed that the amplitude of APA was modulated in such a way that mediolateral dynamic stability at swing foot-contact, quantified by the margin of stability (i.e., the distance between the base of support boundary and

  11. Exact bounds for exponential dichotomy roughness III. Semistrong dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinograd, Robert E.

    In this part we extend the results of Part I by eliminating the restriction of orthogonality of the unperturbed subspaces or even of a constant angle between them. We shall call this case semistrong dichotomy.

  12. Functional dichotomy and distinct nanoscale assemblies of a cell cycle-controlled bipolar zinc-finger regulator

    PubMed Central

    Mignolet, Johann; Holden, Seamus; Bergé, Matthieu; Panis, Gaël; Eroglu, Ezgi; Théraulaz, Laurence; Manley, Suliana; Viollier, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    Protein polarization underlies differentiation in metazoans and in bacteria. How symmetric polarization can instate functional asymmetry remains elusive. Here, we show by super-resolution photo-activated localization microscopy and edgetic mutations that the bitopic zinc-finger protein ZitP implements specialized developmental functions – pilus biogenesis and multifactorial swarming motility – while shaping distinct nanoscale (bi)polar architectures in the asymmetric model bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. Polar assemblage and accumulation of ZitP and its effector protein CpaM are orchestrated in time and space by conserved components of the cell cycle circuitry that coordinate polar morphogenesis with cell cycle progression, and also act on the master cell cycle regulator CtrA. Thus, this novel class of potentially widespread multifunctional polarity regulators is deeply embedded in the cell cycle circuitry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18647.001 PMID:28008851

  13. Functional Dichotomy between NKG2D and CD28-Mediated Co-Stimulation in Human CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Kamalakannan; Xiong, Va; Fong, Lee; Gorski, Jack; Malarkannan, Subramaniam

    2010-01-01

    Both CD28 and NKG2D can function as co-stimulatory receptors in human CD8+ T cells. However, their independent functional contributions in distinct CD8+ T cell subsets are not well understood. In this study, CD8+ T cells in human peripheral blood- and lung-derived lymphocytes were analyzed for CD28 and NKG2D expression and function. We found a higher level of CD28 expression in PBMC-derived naïve (CD45RA+CD27+) and memory (CD45RA−CD27+) CD8+ T cells (CD28Hi), while its expression was significantly lower in effector (CD45RA+CD27−) CD8+ T cells (CD28Lo). Irrespective of the differences in the CD28 levels, NKG2D expression was comparable in all three CD8+ T cell subsets. CD28 and NKG2D expressions followed similar patterns in human lung-resident GILGFVFTL/HLA-A2-pentamer positive CD8+ T cells. Co-stimulation of CD28Lo effector T cells via NKG2D significantly increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the contrary, irrespective of its comparable levels, NKG2D-mediated co-stimulation failed to augment IFN-γ and TNF-α production in CD28Hi naïve/memory T cells. Additionally, CD28-mediated co-stimulation was obligatory for IL-2 generation and thereby its production was limited only to the CD28Hi naïve/memory subsets. MICA, a ligand for NKG2D was abundantly expressed in the tracheal epithelial cells, validating the use of NKG2D as the major co-stimulatory receptor by tissue-resident CD8+ effector T cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that NKG2D may provide an expanded level of co-stimulation to tissue-residing effector CD8+ T cells. Thus, incorporation of co-stimulation via NKG2D in addition to CD28 is essential to activate tumor or tissue-infiltrating effector CD8+ T cells. However, boosting a recall immune response via memory CD8+ T cells or vaccination to stimulate naïve CD8+ T cells would require CD28-mediated co-stimulation. PMID:20844584

  14. The Angular Momentum Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklu, Adelheid; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus; Burkert, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    In the context of the formation of spiral galaxies the evolution and distribution of the angular momentum of dark matter halos have been discussed for more than 20 years, especially the idea that the specific angular momentum of the halo can be estimated from the specific angular momentum of its disk (e.g. Fall & Efstathiou (1980), Fall (1983) and Mo et al. (1998)). We use a new set of hydrodynamic cosmological simulations called Magneticum Pathfinder which allow us to split the galaxies into spheroidal and disk galaxies via the circularity parameter ɛ, as commonly used (e.g. Scannapieco et al. (2008)). Here, we focus on the dimensionless spin parameter λ = J |E|1/2 / (G M5/2) (Peebles 1969, 1971), which is a measure of the rotation of the total halo and can be fitted by a lognormal distribution, e.g. Mo et al. (1998). The spin parameter allows one to compare the relative angular momentum of halos across different masses and different times. Fig. 1 reveals a dichotomy in the distribution of λ at all redshifts when the galaxies are split into spheroids (dashed) and disk galaxies (dash-dotted). The disk galaxies preferentially live in halos with slightly larger spin parameter compared to spheroidal galaxies. Thus, we see that the λ of the whole halo reflects the morphology of its central galaxy. For more details and a larger study of the angular momentum properties of disk and spheroidal galaxies, see Teklu et al. (in prep.).

  15. Contributions of muscles to mediolateral ground reaction force over a range of walking speeds.

    PubMed

    John, Chand T; Seth, Ajay; Schwartz, Michael H; Delp, Scott L

    2012-09-21

    Impaired control of mediolateral body motion during walking is an important health concern. Developing treatments to improve mediolateral control is challenging, partly because the mechanisms by which muscles modulate mediolateral ground reaction force (and thereby modulate mediolateral acceleration of the body mass center) during unimpaired walking are poorly understood. To investigate this, we examined mediolateral ground reaction forces in eight unimpaired subjects walking at four speeds and determined the contributions of muscles, gravity, and velocity-related forces to the mediolateral ground reaction force by analyzing muscle-driven simulations of these subjects. During early stance (0-6% gait cycle), peak ground reaction force on the leading foot was directed laterally and increased significantly (p<0.05) with walking speed. During early single support (14-30% gait cycle), peak ground reaction force on the stance foot was directed medially and increased significantly (p<0.01) with speed. Muscles accounted for more than 92% of the mediolateral ground reaction force over all walking speeds, whereas gravity and velocity-related forces made relatively small contributions. Muscles coordinate mediolateral acceleration via an interplay between the medial ground reaction force contributed by the abductors and the lateral ground reaction forces contributed by the knee extensors, plantarflexors, and adductors. Our findings show how muscles that contribute to forward progression and body-weight support also modulate mediolateral acceleration of the body mass center while weight is transferred from one leg to another during double support.

  16. Exponential dichotomy for hyperbolic systems with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchnyk, R.; Kmit, I.; Recke, L.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate evolution families generated by general linear first-order hyperbolic systems in one space dimension with periodic boundary conditions. We state explicit conditions on the coefficient functions that are sufficient for the existence of exponential dichotomies on R in the space of continuous periodic functions.

  17. A novel elastic force-field to influence mediolateral foot placement during walking.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Elizabeth; Broadway, Jordan; Finetto, Christian; Dean, Jesse

    2016-12-01

    Bipedal gait can be stabilized through mechanically-appropriate mediolateral foot placement, although this strategy is disrupted in a subset of neurologically injured individuals with balance deficits. The goal of the present work was to develop a device to influence mediolateral foot placement during treadmill walking. We created a novel force-field using a combination of passive elasticity and active control; wires in series with extension springs run parallel to the treadmill belts and can be rapidly repositioned to exert mediolateral forces on the legs of users. This mechanical structure creates a channel-like force landscape that resists displacements of each leg away from its prescribed mediolateral position, producing near-linear effective mediolateral stiffness. The depth of these force-field channels can be predictably controlled by manipulating extension spring initial tension. In human testing, we found that the force-field can effectively "get-out-of-the-way" when desired, closely following the mediolateral leg trajectory with a delay of approximately 110 ms. The force-field can also encourage users to adjust their mediolateral foot placement in order to walk with either narrower or wider steps, without interfering with forward gait progression. Future work will test whether this novel device can help retrain a stable gait pattern in clinical populations.

  18. Hip proprioceptive feedback influences the control of mediolateral stability during human walking.

    PubMed

    Roden-Reynolds, Devin C; Walker, Megan H; Wasserman, Camille R; Dean, Jesse C

    2015-10-01

    Active control of the mediolateral location of the feet is an important component of a stable bipedal walking pattern, although the roles of sensory feedback in this process are unclear. In the present experiments, we tested whether hip abductor proprioception influenced the control of mediolateral gait motion. Participants performed a series of quiet standing and treadmill walking trials. In some trials, 80-Hz vibration was applied intermittently over the right gluteus medius (GM) to evoke artificial proprioceptive feedback. During walking, the GM was vibrated during either right leg stance (to elicit a perception that the pelvis was closer mediolaterally to the stance foot) or swing (to elicit a perception that the swing leg was more adducted). Vibration during quiet standing evoked leftward sway in most participants (13 of 16), as expected from its predicted perceptual effects. Across the 13 participants sensitive to vibration, stance phase vibration caused the contralateral leg to be placed significantly closer to the midline (by ∼2 mm) at the end of the ongoing step. In contrast, swing phase vibration caused the vibrated leg to be placed significantly farther mediolaterally from the midline (by ∼2 mm), whereas the pelvis was held closer to the stance foot (by ∼1 mm). The estimated mediolateral margin of stability was thus decreased by stance phase vibration but increased by swing phase vibration. Although the observed effects of vibration were small, they were consistent with humans monitoring hip proprioceptive feedback while walking to maintain stable mediolateral gait motion.

  19. The reliability and validity of assessing medio-lateral patellar position: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh; Donell, Simon T

    2009-08-01

    Medio-lateral patellar position is regarded as a sign of patellofemoral pain syndrome and patellar instability. Its assessment is important in accurately performing patellofemoral therapeutic taping techniques. The purpose of this paper is to systematically review the literature to determine the reliability and validity of evaluating medio-lateral patellar position. An electronic database search was performed accessing AMED, British Nursing Index, CINAHL, the Cochrane database, EMBASE, Ovid Medline, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), PubMed and Zetoc to July 2008. Conference proceedings and grey literature were also scrutinised for future publications. All human subject, clinical trials, assessing the inter- or intra-tester reliability, or the criterion validity, were included. A CASP tool was employed to evaluate methodological quality. Nine papers including 237 patients (306 knees) were reviewed. The findings of this review suggest that the intra-tester reliability of assessing medio-lateral patellar position is good, but that inter-tester reliability is variable. The criterion validity of this test is at worse moderate. These are based on a limited evidence-base. Further study is recommended to compare the McConnell (1986) [McConnell J. The management of chondromalacia patellae: a long term solution. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy 1986;32(4):215-23] and Herrington (2002) [Herrington LC. The inter-tester reliability of a clinical measurement used to determine the medial/lateral orientation of the patella. Manual Therapy 2002;7(3):163-7] methods of assessing medio-lateral patellar position in patients with well-defined patellofemoral disorders.

  20. The End of a Chemical Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Organic v inorganic dichotomy in chemistry has begun to disappear while a new formal research discipline, bioinorganic chemistry, is emerging. The field has been developed with the realization that a third of all proteins and bioenzymes contain an inorganic element such as a metal critical to their chemical nature. (Author/RE)

  1. Challenging the Traditional/Communicative Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaumont, Mike; Chang, Kyung-Suk

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this paper is to explore a common dichotomy that characterizes debate about what has come to be termed "appropriate methodology". It is that between "traditional" and "communicative" approaches to language teaching, a distinction that persists despite arguments by some that the term…

  2. The influence of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ki-sik; Park, Kyungyeon; Choi, Bo-ram

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of a medio-lateral unstable sole on invertor and evertor activation while descending stairs. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 30 university students with no history of ankle sprain. They descended stairs while wearing the medio-lateral unstable sole or with bare feet. Electromyography was used to record the activity of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscles and paired t-tests were used to assess statistical significance. [Results] The medio-lateral unstable sole group showed increased tibialis anterior and peroneus longus and brevis muscle activation compared to the barefoot group. [Conclusion] Medio-lateral unstable sole can be used with exercises to prevent further ankle damage by activating both the inversion and eversion muscles. PMID:27630412

  3. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings. PMID:27687249

  4. Dichotomy of cellular inhibition by small-molecule inhibitors revealed by single-cell analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Robert M.; Erez, Amir; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2016-09-01

    Despite progress in drug development, a quantitative and physiological understanding of how small-molecule inhibitors act on cells is lacking. Here, we measure the signalling and proliferative response of individual primary T-lymphocytes to a combination of antigen, cytokine and drug. We uncover two distinct modes of signalling inhibition: digital inhibition (the activated fraction of cells diminishes upon drug treatment, but active cells appear unperturbed), versus analogue inhibition (the activated fraction is unperturbed whereas activation response is diminished). We introduce a computational model of the signalling cascade that accounts for such inhibition dichotomy, and test the model predictions for the phenotypic variability of cellular responses. Finally, we demonstrate that the digital/analogue dichotomy of cellular response as revealed on short (signal transduction) timescales, translates into similar dichotomy on longer (proliferation) timescales. Our single-cell analysis of drug action illustrates the strength of quantitative approaches to translate in vitro pharmacology into functionally relevant cellular settings.

  5. Mediolateral angular momentum changes in persons with amputation during perturbed walking.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Riley C; Beltran, Eduardo J; Dingwell, Jonathan B; Wilken, Jason M

    2015-03-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p<0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p<0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability.

  6. Mediolateral Angular Momentum Changes in Persons With Amputation During Perturbed Walking✰

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Riley C.; Beltran, Eduardo J.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Wilken, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50% of individuals with lower limb amputation fall at least once each year. These individuals also exhibit reduced ability to effectively respond to challenges to frontal plane stability. The range of whole body angular momentum has been correlated with stability and fall risk. This study determined how lateral walking surface perturbations affected the regulation of whole body and individual leg angular momentum in able-bodied controls and individuals with unilateral transtibial amputation. Participants walked at fixed speed in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation ENvironment with no perturbations and continuous, pseudo-random, mediolateral platform oscillations. Both the ranges and variability of angular momentum for both the whole body and both legs were significantly greater (p < 0.001) during platform oscillations. There were no significant differences between groups in whole body angular momentum range or variability during unperturbed walking. The range of frontal plane angular momentum was significantly greater for those with amputation than for controls for all segments (p < 0.05). For the whole body and intact leg, angular momentum ranges were greater for patients with amputation. However, for the prosthetic leg, angular momentum ranges were less for patients than controls. Patients with amputation were significantly more affected by the perturbations. Though patients with amputation were able to maintain similar patterns of whole body angular momentum during unperturbed walking, they were more highly destabilized by the walking surface perturbations. Individuals with transtibial amputation appear to predominantly use altered motion of the intact limb to maintain mediolateral stability. PMID:25797789

  7. Frequency domain mediolateral balance assessment using a center of pressure tracking task.

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-11-15

    Since impaired mediolateral balance can increase fall risk, especially in the elderly, its quantification and training might be a powerful preventive tool. We propose a visual tracking task (VTT) with increasing frequencies (.3-2.0Hz) and with center of pressure as visual feedback as an assessment method. This mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) consists of two tasks, tracking a predictable target signal to determine physical capacity and tracking an unpredictable target signal to determine sensorimotor integration limitations. Within and between sessions learning effects and reliability in balance performance descriptors in both tasks were studied in 20 young adults. Balance performance was expressed as the phase-shift (PS) and gain (G) between the target and CoP in the frequency domain and cut-off frequencies at which the performance dropped. Results showed significant differences between the MELBA tasks in PS and G indicating a lower delay and higher accuracy in tracking the predictable target. Significant within and between sessions learning effects for the same measures were found only for the unpredictable task. Reliability of the cut-off frequencies at which PS and G performance declined and the average values within cut-off frequencies was fair to good (ICC .46-.66) for the unpredictable task and fair to excellent for the predictable task (ICC .68-.87). In conclusion, MELBA can reliably quantify balance performance using a predictable VTT. Additionally, the unpredictable tasks can give insight into the visuomotor integration mechanisms controlling balance and highlights MELBA's potential as a training tool.

  8. Interest of active posturography to detect age-related and early Parkinson's disease-related impairments in mediolateral postural control.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Cédrick T; Delval, Arnaud; Defebvre, Luc

    2014-11-15

    Patients with Parkinson's disease display impairments of postural control most particularly in active, challenging conditions. The objective of the present study was to analyze early signs of disease-related and also age-related impairments in mediolateral body extension and postural control. Fifty-five participants (18 Hoehn and Yahr stage 2 patients in the off-drug condition, 18 healthy elderly control subjects, and 19 young adults) were included in the study. The participants performed a quiet stance task and two active tasks that analyzed the performance in mediolateral body motion: a limit of stability and a rhythmic weight shift task. As expected, the patients displayed significantly lower and slower body displacement (head, neck, lower back, center of pressure) than elderly control subjects when performing the two body excursion tasks. However, the behavioral variability in both tasks was similar between the groups. Under these active conditions, the patients showed significantly lower contribution of the hip postural control mechanisms compared with the elderly control subjects. Overall, the patients seemed to lower their performance in order to prevent a mediolateral postural instability. However, these patients, at an early stage of their disease, were not unstable in quiet stance. Complementarily, elderly control subjects displayed slower body performance than young adults, which therefore showed an additional age-related impairment in mediolateral postural control. Overall, the study illustrated markers of age-related and Parkinson's disease impairments in mediolateral postural control that may constrain everyday activities in elderly adults and even more in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  9. The dichotomy (generation of MAbs with functional heterogeneity) in antimalarial immune response in vaccinated/protected mice: a new concept in our understanding of the protective immune mechanisms in malaria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prati Pal; Prakash, Bhanu

    2014-01-01

    Globally, vaccines have emerged as one of the most effective, safe, and cost-effective public health interventions, and are known to save 2-3 million lives, annually. However, despite various commendable efforts, a suitable human malaria vaccine is yet to see the light of the day. The lack of our complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis and immune protection in malaria appears to be responsible for this state. Earlier, our laboratory has reported that Swiss mice vaccinated with Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis-total parasite antigens soluble in culture medium and saponin, following a 100% lethal challenge, showed 60% protection. The monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from the splenocytes of these vaccinated/protected mice, following characterization by in vitro merozoite invasion inhibition assay, ex vivo macrophage phagocytosis assay, and in vivo passive transfer of protection test, belonged to 2 distinct groups-a larger group of MAbs inhibited<58% Mz invasion and transferred 30% passive protection, whereas a smaller group of MAbs inhibited 86% Mz invasion and transferred 60% passive protection. Additionally, the MAbs of the smaller group, as compared with the larger one, mediated nearly 2.4-fold enhanced macrophage phagocytosis of infected-erythrocytes, in vitro. These results thus clearly showed a dichotomy among the generated MAbs. An exploration of the phenomenon of dichotomy in protective immunity in malaria by using various hosts and malaria parasite combinations, especially at the level of antibodies, cells, and cytokines, may add new insights to our understanding of the protective immunity, and help in the identification of biomarkers/biosignatures of immune protection and development of future human malaria vaccines.

  10. The effects of age on stabilization of the mediolateral trajectory of the swing foot.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vennila; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Latash, Mark L; Grabiner, Mark D

    2013-09-01

    To ensure stability during gait, mediolateral placement of the swinging foot must be actively regulated. Logically this occurs through end-point control of the swing limb trajectory, the precision of which is quantified as step-width variability (SWV). Increased SWV with age may reflect reduced precision of this control, but cannot describe if, and how, age-related changes in lower limb kinematic synergies account for reduced precision. We analyzed joint configuration variance across steps within the uncontrolled manifold (UCM) hypothesis, which assumes that redundant sets of elemental variables are organized by the central nervous system to stabilize important performance variables. We tested whether: (1) regardless of age, the swing limb trajectory would be stabilized by a kinematic synergy of the lower limbs, and (2) the strength of the synergy would be weaker in older adults. Ten younger and ten older adults (65+ years) walked on a laboratory walkway at their preferred speed while kinematic data were collected. UCM analysis of segmental configuration variance was performed with respect to the mediolateral trajectory of the swing-limb ankle joint center. Throughout most of swing, the trajectory was stabilized by a kinematic synergy. Despite the greater segmental configuration variance of older adults, the strength of the synergy was not significantly different between groups. Moreover, the synergy index became negative during terminal swing and was not significantly correlated with SWV. Accordingly, co-variation among individual segmental trajectories is more important for stabilization of the swing trajectory during mid-swing, and, throughout swing, aging does not appear to affect this stabilization.

  11. Dichotomies in Music Education--Real or Unreal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espeland, Magne

    2010-01-01

    In this keynote, the author discusses dichotomies having to do with: (1) technology/digital proponents versus non-technology/analogue proponents; (2) a formal/formalist position versus an informal/informalist position; and (3) educator/teacher views versus artist/musician views. The author often wonders what the essence of these dichotomies are,…

  12. Age and Origin of the Crustal Dichotomy in Eastern Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2002-01-01

    The crustal dichotomy in eastern Mars is largely due to the very large impact which produced the Utopia Basin. Buried impact basins on the Utopia Basin constrain the Utopia impact (and therefore the dichotomy) to be very Early Noachian in age. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Nervous system development in cephalopods: How egg yolk-richness modifies the topology of the mediolateral patterning system.

    PubMed

    Buresi, A; Andouche, A; Navet, S; Bassaglia, Y; Bonnaud-Ponticelli, L; Baratte, S

    2016-07-01

    Cephalopods possess the most complex centralized nervous system among molluscs and the molecular determinants of its development have only begun to be explored. To better understand how evolved their brain and body axes, we studied Sepia officinalis embryos and investigated the expression patterns of neural regionalization genes involved in the mediolateral patterning of the neuroectoderm in model species. SoxB1 expression reveals that the embryonic neuroectoderm is made of several distinct territories that constitute a large part of the animal pole disc. Concentric nkx2.1, pax6/gsx, and pax3/7/msx/pax2/5/8 positive domains subdivide this neuroectoderm. Looking from dorsal to ventral sides, the sequence of these expressions is reminiscent of the mediolateral subdivision in model species, which provides good evidence for "mediolateral patterning" conservation in cephalopods. A specific feature of cephalopod development, however, includes an unconventional orientation to this mediolateral sequence: median markers (like nkx2.1) are unexpectedly expressed at the periphery of the cuttlefish embryo and lateral markers (like Pax3/7) are expressed centrally. As the egg is rich with yolk, the lips of the blastopore (that classically organizes the neural midline) remain unclosed at the lateral side of the animal pole until late stages of organogenesis, therefore reversing the whole embryo topology. These findings confirm - by means of molecular tools - the location of both ventral and dorsal poles in cephalopod embryos.

  14. Dynamical Origins of the Kepler Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2016-10-01

    An overabundance of single-transiting planetary systems relative to those with multiple transits within the Kepler dataset, has been interpreted as evidence for mutual inclinations between planetary orbits. The physical origins of this so-called "Kepler Dichotomy," however, remain elusive. Here we show that the observed prevalence of single-planet systems is a direct consequence of the secular evolution of initially co-planar multi-planet systems that orbit stars whose spin-axes are inclined with respect to the protoplanetary disks they host. Such primordial misalignments arise naturally within the disk-hosting stage by way of gravitational torques from stellar companions, and have been previously invoked as explanations for the commonness of spin-orbit misalignments in hot Jupiter systems. Accordingly, our model places the early dynamical evolution of hot super-Earths and hot Jupiters into a unified theoretical framework.

  15. Neither dichotomies nor dualisms; simply genesis.

    PubMed

    Loredo-Narciandi, José C; Sánchez-González, José C

    2012-09-01

    Our starting point is an article by Uchoa Angela Branco published in 2009 in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Sciences (vol. 43, pp. 350-355) and titled "Why Dichotomies can be Misleading while Dualities Fit the Analysis of Complex Phenomena". She criticizes the dualist uses of the distinction between subject and object, or between subjectivist and objectivist perspectives. However we subscribe to the criticism, we argue that some kind of distinction between objectual and subjectual realities is neccesary. Our argument is grounded on the classic constructivist Psychology, especially that of James Mark Baldwin's genetic logic. We assess two theoretical perspectives -the systemic and the structuralist ones- that, in our view, are at risk of falling into objectivism because they tend to reduce subjectual activity to objectivistic or formalistic kinds of explanation. Based on a critical recovery of some ideas of the French philosopher Michel Serres, we propose that subjects and objects must be understood as interpenetrated realities in perpetual construction.

  16. Effects of Filtering the Center of Pressure Feedback Provided in Visually Guided Mediolateral Weight Shifting

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Michael W.; Crowell, Charles R.; Villano, Michael; Schmiedeler, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Thirty healthy adults completed a mediolateral weight-shifting balance task in which they were instructed to shift their weight to visually displayed target regions. A model-based filter and three different moving average filters employing 10, 34, and 58 samples were applied to the center of pressure visual feedback that guided the activity. The effects of filter selection on both the displayed feedback and the shift performance were examined in terms of shift time and non-minimum phase behavior. Shift time relates to feedback delay and shift speed, whereas non-minimum phase behavior relates to the force applied in shift initiation. Results indicated that increasing the number of samples in moving average filters (indicative of stronger filtering) significantly increases shift speed and shift initiation force. These effects indicate that careful selection and documentation of data filtering is warranted in future work and suggest opportunities for strategic filtering of visual feedback in clinical weight-shifting balance activities in order to improve outcomes based on such feedback. PMID:26991996

  17. [Mediolateral gradient of the nucleus accumbens nitrergic activation during exploratory behavior].

    PubMed

    Saul'skaia, N B; Sudorgina, P V

    2012-04-01

    In Sprague-Dawley rats, by means of in vivo microdialysis combined with HPLC analysis it has been shown that an exploratory behavior in a new environment is accompanied by a rise in extracellular levels of citrulline (an NO co-product) in the mediolateral regions of the n. accumbens with the maximum observed in the medial n. accumbens. Infusions of 7-nitroindazole (0.5 mM), a neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, into the medial n. accumbens prevented the exploration-induced rise of extracellular citrulline levels in this area. The second presentation of the same chamber did not produce any significant changes of extracellular citrulline levels in the medial n. accumbens, although there was a tendency of a small increase. The presentation of a familiar chamber did not affect citrulline extracellular levels in this area. The data obtained indicate for the first time that exploratory activity in a new environment is accompanied by the nitrergic activation in the entire n. accumbens with the maximal activation in the medial part of this brain area.

  18. CAN PLANETARY INSTABILITY EXPLAIN THE KEPLER DICHOTOMY?

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, Anders; Davies, Melvyn B.; Church, Ross P.; Holmelin, Viktor

    2012-10-10

    The planet candidates discovered by the Kepler mission provide a rich sample to constrain the architectures and relative inclinations of planetary systems within approximately 0.5 AU of their host stars. We use the triple-transit systems from the Kepler 16 months data as templates for physical triple-planet systems and perform synthetic transit observations, varying the internal inclination variation of the orbits. We find that all the Kepler triple-transit and double-transit systems can be produced from the triple-planet templates, given a low mutual inclination of around 5 Degree-Sign . Our analysis shows that the Kepler data contain a population of planets larger than four Earth radii in single-transit systems that cannot arise from the triple-planet templates. We explore the hypothesis that high-mass counterparts of the triple-transit systems underwent dynamical instability to produce a population of massive double-planet systems of moderately high mutual inclination. We perform N-body simulations of mass-boosted triple-planet systems and observe how the systems heat up and lose planets by planet-planet collisions, and less frequently by ejections or collisions with the star, yielding transits in agreement with the large planets in the Kepler single-transit systems. The resulting population of massive double-planet systems nevertheless cannot explain the additional excess of low-mass planets among the observed single-transit systems and the lack of gas-giant planets in double-transit and triple-transit systems. Planetary instability of systems of triple gas-giant planets can be behind part of the dichotomy between systems hosting one or more small planets and those hosting a single giant planet. The main part of the dichotomy, however, is more likely to have arisen already during planet formation when the formation, migration, or scattering of a massive planet, triggered above a threshold metallicity, suppressed the formation of other planets in sub-AU orbits.

  19. The Biological Implausibility of the Nature-Nurture Dichotomy and What It Means for the Study of Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkowicz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Since the time of the Greeks, philosophers and scientists have wondered about the origins of structure and function. Plato proposed that the origins of structure and function lie in the organism's nature whereas Aristotle proposed that they lie in its nurture. This nature-nurture dichotomy and the emphasis on the origins question has had a…

  20. Conceptual Fallacies in the Rural-Urban Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzzell, Douglas

    1979-01-01

    Describes historical and contemporary social relations in the Oaxaca Valley, Mexico, in order to illustrate fallacies in the folk-urban dichotomy that arise when spatial distribution is treated as a cultural characteristic. (Author/GC)

  1. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  2. Buried mass anomalies along the hemispheric dichotomy in eastern Mars: Implications for the origin and evolution of the dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Walter S.

    2005-11-01

    Gravity observations indicate the presence of buried, high-density material along the hemispheric dichotomy in eastern Mars. This material is unrelated to present-day topography and is probably the result of localized thinning of the crust. This thinning may be the result of an epoch of edge-driven convection that occurred shortly after the dichotomy formed. Initiation of edge-driven convection requires that lateral variations in lithospheric structure be created on a timescale that is shorter than the conductive cooling time for the lithosphere, a few tens of million years at most. This timescale cannot be achieved if the dichotomy boundary is created solely by large-scale convective flow. Formation or modification of the boundary by large impact basins such as Utopia can create the required lithospheric structure in a geologic instant. This suggests that large impacts were important in shaping the dichotomy, at least on a regional scale.

  3. Postural Preparation to Stepping: Coupled Center of Pressure Shifts in the Anterior-Posterior and Medio-Lateral Directions

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Jacques; Do, Manh-Cuong; Latash, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We explored changes in the postural preparation to stepping introduced by modifications of the initial coordinates of the center of pressure (COP). We hypothesized that the postural adjustments in the anterior-posterior direction would persist across all initial COP manipulations while the adjustments in the medio-lateral direction would be highly sensitive to the initial COP coordinate. Healthy subjects stood on a force plate, shifted the body weight to one of the initial conditions that spanned the range of COP coordinates in both directions, and initiated a single step or started to walk. No major changes were observed between the stepping and walking conditions. Changes in the initial COP coordinate in the medio-lateral direction led to scaling of the magnitude of the COP shift in that direction prior to stepping accompanied by a nearly proportional change in the COP shift in the anterior-posterior direction. Changes in the initial COP coordinate in the anterior-posterior direction led to scaling of the magnitude of the COP shift in that direction prior to stepping without consistent changes in the COP shift in the medio-lateral direction. We interpret the results as reflecting a neural organization using a small set of referent body configurations for the postural adjustments. PMID:28031752

  4. Influence of temporal pressure on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Hussein, T; Larue, J

    2012-03-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability along the medio-lateral direction is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APAs). This study aimed to investigate the influence of temporal pressure on this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability. Eight young healthy participants performed series of leg flexions (1) as soon as possible in response to an acoustic signal (reaction-time condition; condition with temporal pressure) and (2) in a self-initiated condition (no temporal pressure). Results showed that APAs duration was shorter in the reaction-time condition as compared to the self-initiated condition; this shortening was compensated by an increase in the medio-lateral center-of-pressure displacement so that the dynamic stability reached at foot-off, as measured by the "extrapolated center-of-mass", remained unchanged. It is concluded that when a complex task is performed under temporal pressure, the central nervous system is able to modulate the spatio-temporal features of APAs in a way to both hasten the initiation of the voluntary movement and maintain optimal conditions of dynamic stability. In other words, it seems that the central nervous system does not "trade off optimal stability for speed of movement initiation under reaction-time condition", as it had been proposed in the literature.

  5. Constraints on Early Mars Evolution and Dichotomy Origin from Relaxation Modeling of Dichotomy Boundary in the Ismenius Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2004-01-01

    The Martian dichotomy is a global feature separating the northern and southern hemispheres. The 3.5 - 4 Gyr old feature is manifested by a topographic difference of 2-6 km and crustal thickness difference of approx. 15 - 30 km between the two hemispheres. In the Ismenius region, sections of the boundary are characterized by a single scarp with a slope of approx. 20 deg. - 23 deg. and are believed to be among the most well preserved parts of the dichotomy boundary. The origin of the dichotomy is unknown. Endogenic hypotheses do not predict the steep slopes (scarps) of the dichotomy boundary. Exogenic models for forming the northern lowlands by impact cratering, associate the scarps along the dichotomy boundary with craters' rims, but are not globally consistent with the topography and gravity. In order to better understand the origin of the Martian dichotomy, it is necessary to know if the steep scarps along the boundary represent the original shape of the dichotomy. Smrekar et al. presented evidence showing that the boundary scarp in Ismenius is a fault along which the highland crust was down faulted. We test whether the relaxation process could produce faulting along the dichotomy boundary and examine the crustal and mantle conditions that would allow for faulting to occur within 1 Gyr and preserve the long wavelength topography over another 3 Gyr. We approach the problem by a combination of numerical and semi-analytical modeling. We test different viscosity profiles and crustal thicknesses by comparing our modeled magnitude, location and timing of plastic strain and displacements to detailed geologic observations in the Ismenius region.

  6. Matching mammographic regions in mediolateral oblique and cranio caudal views: a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samulski, Maurice; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2008-03-01

    Most of the current CAD systems detect suspicious mass regions independently in single views. In this paper we present a method to match corresponding regions in mediolateral oblique (MLO) and craniocaudal (CC) mammographic views of the breast. For every possible combination of mass regions in the MLO view and CC view, a number of features are computed, such as the difference in distance of a region to the nipple, a texture similarity measure, the gray scale correlation and the likelihood of malignancy of both regions computed by single-view analysis. In previous research, Linear Discriminant Analysis was used to discriminate between correct and incorrect links. In this paper we investigate if the performance can be improved by employing a statistical method in which four classes are distinguished. These four classes are defined by the combinations of view (MLO/CC) and pathology (TP/FP) labels. We use distance-weighted k-Nearest Neighbor density estimation to estimate the likelihood of a region combination. Next, a correspondence score is calculated as the likelihood that the region combination is a TP-TP link. The method was tested on 412 cases with a malignant lesion visible in at least one of the views. In 82.4% of the cases a correct link could be established between the TP detections in both views. In future work, we will use the framework presented here to develop a context dependent region matching scheme, which takes the number and likelihood of possible alternatives into account. It is expected that more accurate determination of matching probabilities will lead to improved CAD performance.

  7. Lower-limb amputee recovery response to an imposed error in mediolateral foot placement.

    PubMed

    Segal, Ava D; Klute, Glenn K

    2014-09-22

    Despite walking with a wider step width, amputees remain 20% more likely to fall than non-amputees. Since mediolateral (ML) balance is critical for ambulation and contingent on ML foot placement, we used a ML disturbance to perturb walking balance and explore the influence of prosthetic foot stiffness on balance recovery. Ten transtibial amputees were fit with two commonly prescribed prosthetic feet with differing stiffness characteristics; 12 non-amputees also participated. A perturbation device that released an air burst just before heel strike imposed a repeatable medial or lateral disturbance in foot placement. After a medial disturbance, the first recovery step width was narrowed (p<0.0001) for the prosthetic limb (-103%), the sound limb (-51%) and non-amputees (-41%) and more than twice as variable. The ML inclination angle remained reduced (-109%) for the prosthetic limb, while the sound limb and non-amputees approached undisturbed levels (p<0.0004). Amputees required five steps to return to undisturbed step width after a prosthetic medial disturbance versus two steps for the sound limb and for non-amputees. After a lateral disturbance, the first recovery step was widened for the prosthetic limb (+82%), sound limb (+75%), and wider than non-amputees (+51%; p<0.0001), with all participants requiring three steps to return to undisturbed step width. Amputees also exhibited a similar upper torso response compared to the non-amputees for both disturbances. Prosthetic feet with different stiffness properties did not have a significant effect. In conclusion, amputee balance was particularly challenged by medial disturbances to the prosthetic limb implying a need for improved interventions that address these balance deficits.

  8. Effect of running speed and leg prostheses on mediolateral foot placement and its variability.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Christopher J; McDermott, William J; Kram, Rodger; Grabowski, Alena M

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of speed and leg prostheses on mediolateral (ML) foot placement and its variability in sprinters with and without transtibial amputations. We hypothesized that ML foot placement variability would: 1. increase with running speed up to maximum speed and 2. be symmetrical between the legs of non-amputee sprinters but asymmetrically greater for the affected leg of sprinters with a unilateral transtibial amputation. We measured the midline of the body (kinematic data) and center of pressure (kinetic data) in the ML direction while 12 non-amputee sprinters and 7 Paralympic sprinters with transtibial amputations (6 unilateral, 1 bilateral) ran across a range of speeds up to maximum speed on a high-speed force measuring treadmill. We quantified ML foot placement relative to the body's midline and its variability. We interpret our results with respect to a hypothesized relation between ML foot placement variability and lateral balance. We infer that greater ML foot placement variability indicates greater challenges with maintaining lateral balance. In non-amputee sprinters, ML foot placement variability for each leg increased substantially and symmetrically across speed. In sprinters with a unilateral amputation, ML foot placement variability for the affected and unaffected leg also increased substantially, but was asymmetric across speeds. In general, ML foot placement variability for sprinters with a unilateral amputation was within the range observed in non-amputee sprinters. For the sprinter with bilateral amputations, both affected legs exhibited the greatest increase in ML foot placement variability with speed. Overall, we find that maintaining lateral balance becomes increasingly challenging at faster speeds up to maximum speed but was equally challenging for sprinters with and without a unilateral transtibial amputation. Finally, when compared to all other sprinters in our subject pool, maintaining lateral balance appears to be the

  9. Medio-lateral Knee Fluency in Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Injured Athletes During Dynamic Movement Trials

    PubMed Central

    Panos, Joseph A.; Hoffman, Joshua T.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Correction of neuromuscular impairments after anterior cruciate ligament injury is vital to successful return to sport. Frontal plane knee control during landing is a common measure of lower-extremity neuromuscular control and asymmetries in neuromuscular control of the knee can predispose injured athletes to additional injury and associated morbidities. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of anterior cruciate ligament injury on knee biomechanics during landing. Methods Two-dimensional frontal plane video of single leg drop, cross over drop, and drop vertical jump dynamic movement trials was analyzed for twenty injured and reconstructed athletes. The position of the knee joint center was tracked in ImageJ software for 500 milliseconds after landing to calculate medio-lateral knee motion velocities and determine normal fluency, the number of times per second knee velocity changed direction. The inverse of this calculation, analytical fluency, was used to associate larger numerical values with fluent movement. Findings Analytical fluency was decreased in involved limbs for single leg drop trials (P=0.0018). Importantly, analytical fluency for single leg drop differed compared to cross over drop trials for involved (P<0.001), but not uninvolved limbs (P=0.5029). For involved limbs, analytical fluency values exhibited a stepwise trend in relative magnitudes. Interpretation Decreased analytical fluency in involved limbs is consistent with previous studies. Fluency asymmetries observed during single leg drop tasks may be indicative of abhorrent landing strategies in the involved limb. Analytical fluency differences in unilateral tasks for injured limbs may represent neuromuscular impairment as a result of injury. PMID:26895446

  10. Axial elongation in mouse embryos involves mediolateral cell intercalation behavior in the paraxial mesoderm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, WeiWei; Burdsal, Carol; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sutherland, Ann E.

    2006-02-01

    The cell mechanical and signaling pathways involved in gastrulation have been studied extensively in invertebrates and amphibians, such as Xenopus, and more recently in non-mammalian vertebrates such as zebrafish and chick. However, because culturing mouse embryos extra-utero is very difficult, this fundamental process has been least characterized in the mouse. As the primary mammalian model for genetics, biochemistry, and the study of human disease and birth defects, it is important to investigate how gastrulation proceeds in murine embryos. We have developed a method of using 4D multiphoton excitation microscopy and extra-utero culture to visualize and characterize the morphogenetic movements in mouse embryos dissected at 8.5 days of gestation. Cells are labeled by expression of an X chromosome-linked enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) transgene. This method has provided a unique approach, where, for the first time, patterns of cell behavior in the notochord and surrounding paraxial mesoderm can be visualized and traced quantitatively. Our observations of mouse embryos reveal both distinct differences as well as striking similarities in patterned cell motility relative to other vertebrate models such as Xenopus, where axial extension is driven primarily by mediolateral oriented cell behaviors in the notochord and paraxial somitic mesoderm. Unlike Xenopus, the width of the mouse notochord remains the same between 4-somite stage and 8-somite stage embryos. This implies the mouse notochord plays a lesser role in driving axial extension compared to Xenopus, although intercalation may occur where the anterior region of the node becomes notochordal plate. In contrast, the width of mouse paraxial mesoderm narrows significantly during this period and cells within the paraxial mesoderm are both elongated and aligned perpendicular to the midline. In addition, these cells are observed to intercalate, consistent with a role for paraxial mesoderm in driving convergence

  11. Topographic Change of the Dichotomy Boundary Suggested by Crustal Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neumann, G. A.

    2004-01-01

    Linear negative gravity anomalies in Acidalia Planitia along the eastern edge of Tempe Terra and along the northern edge of Arabia Terra have been noted in Mars Global Surveyor gravity fields. Once proposed to represent buried fluvial channels, it is now believed that these gravity troughs mainly arise from partial compensation of the hemispheric dichotomy topographic scarp. A recent inversion for crustal structure finds that mantle compensation of the scarp is offset from the present-day topographic expression of the dichotomy boundary. The offset suggests that erosion or other forms of mass wasting occurred after lithosphere thickened and no longer accomodated topographic change through viscous relaxation.

  12. Direct Instruction vs. Arts Integration: A False Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aprill, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author takes on what he considers to be the false dichotomy between direct instruction and arts integration. He contends that at a time when national issues of sustainability and conservation of energy and resources become ever more urgent, it is time that those committed to quality arts education stop squandering time, money,…

  13. STEM and the Arts and Humanities: Debunking a False Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartzell, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The false dichotomy that suggests schools must choose between STEM (or STEAM) and the humanities would not merit the time it takes to write an article if not for a dangerous crescendo of backlash clouding the senses of boards and administrations around the independent school world. In this article, the author, an upper school principal of Taipei…

  14. MOLA Topography of the Crustal Dichotomy Boundary Zone, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.; E. H., Susan; H., James

    1998-01-01

    Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) profiles frequently cross the crustal dichotomy boundary where the transition zone (TZ) between cratered highland terrain (CT) and lowland smooth plains (SP) is marked by mesas and knobby terrain. The detailed topographic character of the boundary zone is longitudinally variable, as is the geomorphology of the TZ. Some portions of the boundary are associated with an outer ring of the Utopia impact basin; MOLA topography is consistent with this. The regional character of the boundary topography is a 2-4 km step function from nearly flat SP to almost as flat CT. This rise has a regional slope of 1-2 degrees, 50-100 times that of the Cr and SP away from TZ, which suggests a significant change in crustal properties (thickness, composition or both) across the TZ. The overall topography is very similar to that at some passive continent-oceanic crustal margins on the Earth, with the seafloor allowed to adjust upward after removal of the overlying water. A possible temporal constraint on the CT/SP elevation difference comes from two MOLA profiles which pass through two large (150 km diameter) craters located at the boundary in Aeolis. The N and S rims of the more degraded crater are at the same elevation; north of the N rim the topography drops by greater than 2 km to the floor of the TZ. This crater predates the elevation offset between CT and TZ floor. The better preserved crater (Gale) has a N rim 2 km lower than its S rim, and appears to have been emplaced on a pre-existing regional slope of about I degree. Gale probably post- dates the elevation difference between CT and TZ floor. Based on the stratigraphy of the units in which these craters are found, the elevation difference appears to have been in place in the Mid to Late Noachian.

  15. Pressure plate analysis of toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance at the walk and trot in sound sport horses.

    PubMed

    Oosterlinck, M; Hardeman, L C; van der Meij, B R; Veraa, S; van der Kolk, J H; Wijnberg, I D; Pille, F; Back, W

    2013-12-01

    Empirically, equine distal limb lameness is often linked to hoof imbalance. To objectively quantify dynamic toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance of the vertical ground reaction force in sound sport horses, seven Royal Dutch Sport Horses were led at the walk and trot over a dynamically calibrated pressure plate. Forelimb hoof prints were divided into a toe and heel region and a medial and lateral zone. Toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance of the vertical ground reaction force were calculated throughout the stance. Toe-heel balance was highly symmetrical between contralateral limbs at both gaits. At the walk, medio-lateral balance of both forelimbs presented higher loading in the lateral part of the hoof throughout the stance. However, at the trot, left medio-lateral balance presented higher loading of the medial part of the hoof at impact, whereas the right limb showed higher loading of the lateral part of the hoof in all horses, and both limbs presented increased lateral loading at the end of the stance. This study provides objective data for toe-heel and medio-lateral hoof balance in sound sport horses.

  16. The Biological Implausibility of the Nature-Nurture Dichotomy & What It Means for the Study of Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Lewkowicz, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Since the time of the Greeks, philosophers and scientists have wondered about the origins of structure and function. Plato proposed that the origins of structure and function lie in the organism's nature whereas Aristotle proposed that they lie in its nurture. This nature/nurture dichotomy and the emphasis on the origins question has had a powerful effect on our thinking about development right into modern times. Despite this, empirical findings from various branches of developmental science have made a compelling case that the nature/nurture dichotomy is biologically implausible and, thus, that a search for developmental origins must be replaced by research into developmental processes. This change in focus recognizes that development is an immensely complex, dynamic, embedded, interdependent, and probabilistic process and, therefore, renders simplistic questions such as whether a particular behavioral capacity is innate or acquired scientifically uninteresting. PMID:21709807

  17. The Biological Implausibility of the Nature-Nurture Dichotomy & What It Means for the Study of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Lewkowicz, David J

    2011-01-01

    Since the time of the Greeks, philosophers and scientists have wondered about the origins of structure and function. Plato proposed that the origins of structure and function lie in the organism's nature whereas Aristotle proposed that they lie in its nurture. This nature/nurture dichotomy and the emphasis on the origins question has had a powerful effect on our thinking about development right into modern times. Despite this, empirical findings from various branches of developmental science have made a compelling case that the nature/nurture dichotomy is biologically implausible and, thus, that a search for developmental origins must be replaced by research into developmental processes. This change in focus recognizes that development is an immensely complex, dynamic, embedded, interdependent, and probabilistic process and, therefore, renders simplistic questions such as whether a particular behavioral capacity is innate or acquired scientifically uninteresting.

  18. Rapid video shot detective based on the dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xing-Hui; Guo, Zong-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Video shot boundary detection is a fundamental step for the organization of large video data. The classical VSB detection is basically a sequential frame to compute frame-by-frame, however this approach is computationally very expensive for large databases .In this work we propose a dichotomy approach for video shot boundary detection. The proposed technique can improve the performance of the algorithm and reduce the calculation. Our experimental results show that the proposed algorithm produces faster detection rapid.

  19. Dichotomy in the definition of prescriptive information suggests both prescribed data and prescribed algorithms: biosemiotics applications in genomic systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The fields of molecular biology and computer science have cooperated over recent years to create a synergy between the cybernetic and biosemiotic relationship found in cellular genomics to that of information and language found in computational systems. Biological information frequently manifests its "meaning" through instruction or actual production of formal bio-function. Such information is called Prescriptive Information (PI). PI programs organize and execute a prescribed set of choices. Closer examination of this term in cellular systems has led to a dichotomy in its definition suggesting both prescribed data and prescribed algorithms are constituents of PI. This paper looks at this dichotomy as expressed in both the genetic code and in the central dogma of protein synthesis. An example of a genetic algorithm is modeled after the ribosome, and an examination of the protein synthesis process is used to differentiate PI data from PI algorithms. PMID:22413926

  20. Generation and vulnerability of deep cerebellar nuclei neurons in the weaver condition along the anteroposterior and mediolateral axes.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Santa-Cruz, M C; Hervás, José P

    2016-04-01

    Production and death of deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN) neurons were investigated in the weaver condition at appropriate anatomical levels throughout the mediolateral (medial, intermediate and lateral) and rostrocaudal (rostral, middle and caudal) axes of three DCN-cell groups: the fastigial, the interposed and the dentate nuclei. Current results have denoted that the deficit of DCN neurons is always more important in the homozygous weaver than in the heterozygous weaver mice. No loss of neurons was found in the dentate nucleus. In the mediolateral axis, an intranuclear gradient of depletion was observed in the mutant mice; in a given deep nucleus, neurodegeneration was more prominent in the medial pars than in lateral ones. In the rostrocaudal axis, on the other hand, when each deep nucleus was studied and compared as a whole, neuron loss was higher in the fastigial nucleus than in the interposed nucleus, which, in turn, was more important than in the dentate nucleus. These data suggest that, in the weaver condition, an internuclear gradient of neurodegeneration exists. Moreover, neurons located in rostral parts of a given nucleus appear to be more vulnerable than those settled in middle parts and these, in turn, are more than the caudal ones. These results seem to indicate the presence of an intranuclear gradient of depletion. Current autoradiographic results have revealed that, in the rostrocaudal axis, deep neurons are settled in the weaver cerebellum following three neurogenetic gradients. The first of these is internuclear; if each deep nucleus is analyzed and compared as a whole, the fastigial nucleus has more late-generated neurons than the interposed nucleus, and this, in turn, has more than the dentate nucleus. The second gradient is also internuclear; if the proportion of late-born neurons is compared throughout the rostral levels from each deep nucleus, it is observed that proportions increase from the fastigial to the dentate nucleus. A similar picture

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  3. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  4. Beyond the dichotomy: six religious views of homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dawne

    2014-01-01

    Using published theological and scholarly evidence, this article disrupts the stereotypical "born gay"/"sinful choice" dichotomy widely assumed to characterize religious views of homosexuality in the United States. It argues that we need to keep moral questions separate from questions about the fixity or fluidity of sexual orientation. Rather than two, American Christian and Jewish views of homosexuality can been seen on a range from the "God Hates Fags" view through "Love the Sinner, Hate the Sin," "We Don't Talk About That," "They Can't Help It," "God's Good Gift," and a queer-theological view of the "Godly Calling."

  5. Dichotomy of some satellites of the outer Solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2011-10-01

    Recently acquired by the Cas as ini' CIR a temperature map (11 -16 microns radiation) of small satellite Mimas caused a perplexity among the Cassini scientists (an interpretation of PIA12867). They expected to have a regular temperature map characteristic of a homogeneous spherical body heated by Sun. Instead, the bizarre map with two sharply divided temperature fields was produced (Fig. 1). The temperature difference between two fields is about 15 Kelvin that is rather remarkable. The warm part has typical temperature near 92 Kelvin, the cold part -about 77 Kelvin. Obviously there are two icy substances with different conductivity of heat composing two planetary segments (hemispheres). But in this result there is nothing new for explorers insisting for many years that all celestial bodies are tectonically dichotomous [1, 2, 3]. However, this new beautiful confirmat ion of the wave planetology theorem 1 (" Celes tial bodies are dichotomous ") is not s uperfluous , as many s cientis ts , es pecially in the USA, are not acquainted with the wave p lanetology. The fundamental wave 1 long 2πR warping any body aris es in them becaus e they move in elliptica l keple rian orbits with periodically changing acceleration. Having in rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) a stationary character and four interfering directions (ortho- and diagonal) these waves inevitably produce uplifting (+), subsiding (-), and neutral (0) tectonic blocks (Fig. 7). The uplifts and subsidences are in an opposition (the best examples are the terrestrial Eastern (+) and Western ( -) segments-hemispheres and mart ian Northern (-) and Southern (+) ones) [3]. The small icy Mimas (396 km in diameter) is no exclusion (Fig. 1). Its dichotomy is well pronounced in two temperature fields obviously reflect ing slightly different in composition icy materials composing two segments. Presence of two kinds of surface materials is also revealed by spectrometry under combination of the UV, green and IR

  6. Influence of fear of falling on anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral stability during rapid leg flexion.

    PubMed

    Yiou, E; Deroche, T; Do, M C; Woodman, T

    2011-04-01

    During leg flexion from erect posture, postural stability is organized in advance during "anticipatory postural adjustments" (APA). During these APA, inertial forces are generated that propel the centre of gravity (CoG) laterally towards stance leg side. This study examined how fear of falling (FoF) may influence this anticipatory postural control of medio-lateral (ML) stability. Ten young healthy participants performed a series of leg flexions at maximal velocity from low and high surface heights (6 and 66 cm above ground, respectively). In this latter condition with increased FoF, stance foot was placed at the lateral edge of the support surface to induce maximal postural threat. Results showed that the amplitude of ML inertial forces generated during APA decreased with FoF; this decrease was compensated by an increase in APA duration so that the CoG position at time of swing foot-off was located further towards stance leg side. With these changes in ML APA, the CoG was propelled in the same final (unipodal) position above stance foot as in condition with low FoF. These results contrast with those obtained in the literature during quiet standing which showed that FoF did not have any influence on the ML component of postural control. It is proposed that ML APA are modified with increased FoF, in such a way that the risk of a sideway fall induced by the large CoG motion is attenuated.

  7. The Prokaryote-Eukaryote Dichotomy: Meanings and Mythology

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on documents both published and archival, this paper explains how the prokaryote-eukaryote dichotomy of the 1960s was constructed, the purposes it served, and what it implied in terms of classification and phylogeny. In doing so, I first show how the concept was attributed to Edouard Chatton and the context in which he introduced the terms. Following, I examine the context in which the terms were reintroduced into biology in 1962 by Roger Stanier and C. B. van Niel. I study the discourse over the subsequent decade to understand how the organizational dichotomy took on the form of a natural classification as the kingdom Monera or superkingdom Procaryotae. Stanier and van Niel admitted that, in regard to constructing a natural classification of bacteria, structural characteristics were no more useful than physiological properties. They repeatedly denied that bacterial phylogenetics was possible. I thus examine the great historical irony that the “prokaryote,” in both its organizational and phylogenetic senses, was defined (negatively) on the basis of structure. Finally, we see how phylogenetic research based on 16S rRNA led by Carl Woese and his collaborators confronted the prokaryote concept while moving microbiology to the center of evolutionary biology. PMID:15944457

  8. Knowledge of Being v. Practice of Becoming in Higher Education: Overcoming the Dichotomy in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquez, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    This essay suggests ways to overcome what I take to be a widespread problem of a dichotomy between the knowledge of being and the practice of becoming and an emphasis on the former at the expense of the latter within contemporary Humanities at the university. First, I trace the genealogy of this dichotomy and its effects on contemporary…

  9. Delivering Effective Blended Learning: Managing the Dichotomy of Humility and Hubris in Executive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockhart, James; McKee, Dorothy; Donnelly, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    The dichotomy of humility and hubris among participants in Executive Education courses presents faculty with a source of heterogeneity not disclosed through the common descriptive statistics of sex, age, education and employment. This article discusses the impact of this dichotomy on the design and delivery of effective executive education. In…

  10. Coordination of pelvis-HAT (head, arms and trunk) in anterior-posterior and medio-lateral directions during treadmill gait in preadolescents with/without Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Masayoshi; Ulrich, Beverly

    2006-06-01

    In human biped gait, movements in the frontal plane such as side-to-side rocking, are as essential as the alternating movement of the legs in the sagittal plane. In addition, the top-heavy structure of human body necessitates control of the trunk during walking. In this study, we evaluated the pelvis and HAT (head, arms and trunk) movements and their coordination during treadmill walking in the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral directions in children with typical development (TD) and those with Down syndrome (DS). Participants were 12 children with DS aged 8-10 years and 10 age-matched children with TD. They walked on a treadmill at 40%, 75% and 110% of their preferred overground walking speeds. Kinematic data were collected using a 3D-motion-capture system; movements of the mid-point of hip joints (OPELVIS) and the center of mass of HAT (COMHAT) were reduced. Children with DS showed larger and speed dependent amplitude responses compared to their TD peers. Coordination patterns for children with DS were less stable, especially in medio-lateral direction at slow speed. Differences in amplitude response may be the result of poorer trunk control in children with DS or, alternatively, part of a necessary and sufficient propulsion/stabilization mechanism for this population with reduced tone and muscle strength. Response differences observed between the anterior-posterior and medio-lateral directions for both groups may reflect relative differences in the involvement of active neuromuscular control.

  11. Placental dichotomy: a hint in twin anemia polycythemia sequence.

    PubMed

    Stritzke, Amelie; Thomas, Sumesh; Somerset, David

    2014-12-01

    Contexte : Les grossesses monochorioniques représentent une partie significative de la charge de travail en imagerie diagnostique et doivent fréquemment faire l’objet d’une évaluation aux fins de la détection du syndrome transfuseur-transfusé. Il est important de reconnaître la présence d’une dichotomie placentaire au cours de la tenue d’une étude Doppler régulière de l’artère cérébrale fœtale, et ce, de façon à pouvoir alerter le clinicien quant à la présence possible d’une séquence anémie polyglobulie gémellaire (un sous-ensemble important du syndrome transfuseur-transfusé). Cas : Une multigravide de 36 ans connaissant une grossesse gémellaire a accouché à 33 semaines de gestation, à la suite de l’identification d’une détresse fœtale. Une séquence anémie polyglobulie gémellaire a été diagnostiquée à la suite de l’accouchement. Les échographies prénatales régulières n’avaient pas détecté la présence d’un oligohydramnios ou d’un polyhydramnios. L’analyse rétrospective des images échographiques du placenta a mis au jour la présence d’une dichotomie marquée, la partie relevant du jumeau anémique y apparaissant comme étant hyperéchogène. Conclusion : L’identification de la dichotomie placentaire (s’ajoutant au dépistage au moyen d’études Doppler cérébrales) pourrait mener à l’identification précoce de la séquence anémie polyglobulie gémellaire et à l’amélioration des issues.

  12. The false dichotomy: a refutation of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Thomas; Overmann, Karenleigh; Coolidge, Frederick

    2016-06-20

    In the debate about the demise of the Neandertal, several scholars have claimed that humanity's nearest relatives were indistinguishable archaeologically, and thus behaviorally and cognitively, from contemporaneous Homo sapiens. They suggest that to hold otherwise is to characterize Neandertals as inferior to H. sapiens, a false dichotomy that excludes the possibility that the two human types simply differed in ways visible to natural selection, including their cognition. Support of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim requires ignoring the cranial differences between the two human types, which have implications for cognition and behavior. Further, support of the claim requires minimizing asymmetries in the quantity and degree of behavioral differences as attested by the archaeological record. The present paper reviews the evidence for cognitive and archaeological differences between the two human types in support of the excluded middle position.

  13. Beyond dichotomies: Gender and intersecting inequalities in climate change studies.

    PubMed

    Djoudi, Houria; Locatelli, Bruno; Vaast, Chloe; Asher, Kiran; Brockhaus, Maria; Basnett Sijapati, Bimbika

    2016-12-01

    Climate change and related adaptation strategies have gender-differentiated impacts. This paper reviews how gender is framed in 41 papers on climate change adaptation through an intersectionality lens. The main findings show that while intersectional analysis has demonstrated many advantages for a comprehensive study of gender, it has not yet entered the field of climate change and gender. In climate change studies, gender is mostly handled in a men-versus-women dichotomy and little or no attention has been paid to power and social and political relations. These gaps which are echoed in other domains of development and gender research depict a 'feminization of vulnerability' and reinforce a 'victimization' discourse within climate change studies. We argue that a critical intersectional assessment would contribute to unveil agency and emancipatory pathways in the adaptation process by providing a better understanding of how the differential impacts of climate change shape, and are shaped by, the complex power dynamics of existing social and political relations.

  14. The Albedo Dichotomy of Iapetus Measured at UV Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Hansen, Candice J.

    2007-01-01

    The dramatic hemispheric dichotomy in albedo displayed by Saturn's moon Iapetus has intrigued astronomers for centuries. Here we report on far-ultraviolet observations of Iapetus' bright and dark terrains from Cassini. We compare the reflectance spectra of Iapetus's dark terrain, Hyperion and Phoebe and find that both Phoebe and Hyperion are richer in water ice than Iapetus' dark terrain. Spectra of the lowest latitudes of the dark terrain display the diagnostic water ice absorption feature; water ice amounts increase within the dark material away from the apex (at 90 deg W longitude, the center of the dark leading hemisphere), consistent with thermal segregation of water ice. The water ice in the darkest, warmest low latitude regions is not expected to be stable and may be a sign of ongoing or recent emplacement of the dark material from an exogenic source.

  15. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  16. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation.

    PubMed

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  17. Workshop on Hemispheres Apart: The Origin and Modification of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Hemispheres Apart: The Origin and Modification of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy, September 30-October 1, 2004, Houston, Texas.

  18. The problems of liminal states, line drawing, and false dichotomies

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    This commentary focuses on the tenuous line between health and disease and the conflicting characterizations of genetic predisposition that sometimes place it on one side of that line, and sometimes on the other. For example, GINA uses the line between health and disease to distinguish between, respectively, the healthy (including, those with genetic predispositions), who are shielded from discrimination, and those with ‘manifested illness,’ who are not. At the same time, some have argued that the Americans with Disabilities Act protects individuals with genetic predispositions, relying on a label akin to disability, as opposed to health, to characterize this group. Similarly, courts have described genetic predisposition as a disease of sorts to justify insurance payment for medical intervention. Attempts to fit genetic predisposition neatly into the binary world of health or illness can be problematic because this dichotomy doesn't capture the complex continuum between those states. Some individuals reside in yet another ‘liminal’ state when they develop mild symptoms or biomarkers, placing them somewhere between genetic predisposition and actual disease manifestation. As a result, they may be unprotected under existing frameworks. Liminal states are therefore problematic not only with respect to insurance reimbursement, but in other areas as well. PMID:27774225

  19. Magnetometer Data Tests Models for the Origin of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy; Dichotomy Models Constrain Timing of Martian Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements recently supplied by the MGS Magnetometer/Electron Reflectometer (MAG/ER) on MGS can be applied to test theories of the origin of the martian crustal dichotomy. Strong (+/- 1500 nT) magnetic anomalies are observed in the Martian crust. The observations can be summarized as follows: 1) strong crustal magnetic sources are generally confined to the southern highlands, although weaker (approx. 40 nT) anomalies were observed during close periapsis; 2) strong magnetic anomalies are absent in the vicinity of Hellas and Argyre; 3) the anomalies in the region 0 deg to 90 deg S, 120 deg to 240 deg west have a linear geometry, strike generally east west for 1000s km, and show several reversals. This latter point has led to the suggestion that some form of lateral plate tectonics may have been operative in the southern highlands of Mars. These observations have led previous workers to hypothesize that the magnetic anomalies were present prior to and were destroyed by the formation of Hellas and Argyre. As such large impacts are confined to the era of heavy bombardment, this places the time of formation of large magnetic anomalies prior to approx. 3.9 Ga. One obvious extension of this is that the northern lowlands lack significant anomalies because they were erased by impacts and/or the northern lowlands represent crust completely reheated above the Curie temperature. Preliminary observations of the distributions of the large crustal magnetic anomalies show that many of them extend continuously over the highland lowland boundary. This occurs particularly north of the boundary between 30 deg W and 270 deg W, corresponding to northern Arabia, but also occurs in southern Elysium (approx. 10 deg S, 200 deg) and the SW portion of Tharsis (approx. 15 deg S, 140 deg). This suggests that, in these areas, Noachian crust containing the greater than 3.9 Ga magnetic signature, lies beneath the northern highlands. This geometry can be used to test models for the formation of

  20. On the Radio Dichotomy of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinwu

    2016-12-01

    It is still a mystery why only a small fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) contain relativistic jets. A strong magnetic field is a necessary ingredient for jet formation, however, the advection of the external field in a geometrically thin disk is inefficient. Gas with a small angular velocity may fall from the Bondi radius {R}{{B}} nearly freely to the circularization radius {R}{{c}}, and a thin accretion disk is formed within {R}{{c}}. We suggest that the external magnetic field is substantially enhanced in this region, and the magnetic field at {R}{{c}} can be sufficiently strong to drive outflows from the disk if the angular velocity of the gas is low at {R}{{B}}. The magnetic field is efficiently dragged in the disk, because most angular momentum of the disk is removed by the outflows that lead to a significantly high radial velocity. The strong magnetic field formed in this way may accelerate jets in the region near the black hole, either by the Blandford-Payne or/and Blandford-Znajek mechanisms. We suggest that the radio dichotomy of AGNs predominantly originates from the angular velocity of the circumnuclear gas. An AGN will appear as a radio-loud (RL) one if the angular velocity of the circumnuclear gas is lower than a critical value at the Bondi radius, otherwise, it will appear as a radio-quiet (RQ) AGN. This is supported by the observations that RL nuclei are invariably hosted by core galaxies. Our model suggests that the mass growth of the black holes in RL quasars is much faster than that in RQ quasars with the same luminosity, which is consistent with the fact that the massive black holes in RL quasars are systematically a few times heavier than those in their RQ counterparts.

  1. Self-consistent Model of Martian Dichotomy Formation and Tharsis Evolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, O.; Zhong, S.

    2010-12-01

    The hemispheric crustal dichotomy and the Tharsis volcanic province are major global physiographic features on Mars, whose origin has not yet been satisfactorily explained. Hypotheses for the dichotomy origin invoke both external causes (i.e., a giant impact) and mechanisms of internal dynamics (e.g., long-wavelength mantle convection, or a large-scale overturn of unstable post-magma ocean cumulates). Recently, Zhong (2009) proposed a link between the preexisting dichotomy, and the formation and early evolution of Tharsis. He considered lithospheric thickness with a strong hemispheric asymmetry, where thicker lithosphere below the thicker crust in the southern highlands represents devolatilized residue after more extensive partial melting assumed to be responsible for the dichotomy formation. The thermal upwellings of long-wavelength convection then first form below the thickest lithosphere. Subsequently, the strong lateral viscosity variations result in a relative motion between the one-plate lithosphere and the upwelling, such that the upwelling migrates toward regions of smaller lithospheric thickness. This model is capable of explaining the apparent early migration of the Tharsis volcanic centers and their stabilization near the dichotomy boundary (Sramek & Zhong, 2010). However, our previous models did not consider melting, which prevented us from addressing the question of how the large lithospheric thickness variation is produced. Recent modeling results of Keller & Tackley (2009) suggest that dichotomy may have been formed by partial melting of the mantle showing a spherical harmonic degree 1 convection pattern. However, they did not consider devolatilization effects of partial melting and the modulation of the flow by the stiff melt residue. We present a series of numerical experiments of long-wavelength convection in Martial mantle, where we consider the effect of partial melt residue stiffening on the plume-lithosphere dynamics, in order to asses the

  2. Altered biomechanical strategies and medio-lateral control of the knee represent incomplete recovery of individuals with injury during single leg hop.

    PubMed

    Roos, Paulien E; Button, Kate; Sparkes, Valerie; van Deursen, Robert W M

    2014-02-07

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can result in failure to return to pre-injury activity levels and future osteoarthritis predisposition. Single leg hop is used in late rehabilitation to evaluate recovery and inform treatment but biomechanical understanding of this activity is insufficient. This study investigated single leg hop for distance aiming to evaluate if ACL patients had recovered: (1) landing strategies and (2) medio-lateral knee control. We hypothesized that patients with reconstructive surgery (ACLR) would have more similar landing strategies and knee control to healthy controls than patients treated conservatively (ACLD). 16 ACLD and 23 ACLR subjects were compared to 20 healthy controls (CONT). Kinematic and ground reaction force data were collected while subjects hopped their maximum distance. The main output parameters were hop distance, peak knee flexor angles and extensor moments and Fluency (a measure introduced to represent medio-lateral knee control). Statistical differences between ACL and control groups were analyzed using a general linear model univariate analysis, with COM velocity prior to landing as covariate. Hop distance was the smallest for ACLD and largest for CONT (p<0.001; ACLD 57.1±14.1; ACLR 75.1±17.8; CONT 77.7±14.07% height). ACLR used a similar kinematic strategy to CONT, but had a reduced peak knee extensor moment (p<0.001; ACLD 0.32±0.14; ACLR 0.31±0.16; CONT 0.42±0.13 BW.height). Fluency was reduced in both ACLD and ACLR (p=0.006; ACLD 0.13±0.34; ACLR 0.14±0.34; CONT 0.17±0.41s). Clinical practice uses hopping distance to evaluate ACL patients' recovery. This study demonstrated that aspects such as movement strategies and knee control need to be evaluated.

  3. Constraints on Thermal Evolution of Mars from Relaxation Models of Crustal and Topographic Dichotomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2005-01-01

    The early thermal evolution of Mars is largely unconstrained. Models such as degree one convection [1,2,3], plate tectonics [4], and a transition to stagnant lid [5] have been proposed to explain formation of the dichotomy, the Tharsis rise, crustal production, and dynamo evolution. Here we model both the early deformation of the dichotomy and the long-term preservation as a means of examining the plausibility of a range of early thermal evolution models. Constraints include the preservation of crustal thickness and topographic differences between the northern and southern hemispheres and the geologic history of the dichotomy [6]). Our previous modeling indicates that the lower crust must have been weak enough to allow for relaxation early on, but the Martian interior had to cool fast enough to preserve the crustal difference and the associated topographic difference (5 km) over approx. 3-3.5 Gyr [7].

  4. Geologic Evolution of the Martian Dichotomy and Plains Magnetization in the Ismenius Area of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; McGill, G. E.; Raymond, C. A.; Dimitriou, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    The global dichotomy divides the northern lowlands from the southern highlands, except where interrupted by relatively young volcanic provinces and impact basins. An elevation change of 2-4 km is typical across the dichotomy, and more than 6 km locally, over distances of several 100s km to as much as 1300 km [1,2]. A variety of exogenic and endogenic formation models have been proposed. Distinguishing between these models would help constrain the overall thermal evolution of the planet, possibly timing of core formation, and the associated mantle heat flux over time. A first step is to determine whether or not gravitational relaxation plays a role in modifying the boundary. Nimmo and Stevenson [3] examined 10 profiles across the dichotomy and used models of gravitational relaxation to conclude the relaxation has not occurred. In this study we begin by considering the geologic history in detail as inputs for modeling [4].

  5. Relaxation of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy Boundary in the Ismenius Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of the Martian crustal dichotomy remains a puzzle that when solved can provide an insight to the geological and geophysical evolution of Mars. In this study we model crustal relaxation in order to better constrain the original topographic shape, rheology, and temperature of the Martian crust. Our approach is to model the detailed geologic history of the Ismenius region of Mars, including slope, strain, and timing of faulting [1]. This region may contain the best preserved section of the dichotomy boundary as it is relatively unaffected by large impacts and erosion. So far the only study Martian crustal relaxation [2] suggests that the original topographic shape of the dichotomy is preserved. However, in this area strain from faulting implies at least some relaxation [1].

  6. Constraints on the Evolution of the Dichotomy Boundary at 50-90E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Raymond, C. A.; Dimitriou, A.; McGill, G. E.

    2003-01-01

    The global dichotomy is a fundamental feature of Mars. It marks the boundary between the highly cratered, older southern highlands, and the northern plains. Recent analysis of buried craters in the northern lowlands confirms the long held suspicion that they are comparable in age to the southern highlands, but with surficial deposits of younger material. A variety of exogenic and endogenic models have been proposed for the origin of the dichotomy, including multiple impacts, plate tectonics, and degree one convection produced by core formation, a plume under the lowlands, or a plume under the highlands. New gravity and topography data from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mission favor endogenic processes. In this study we examine MGS topography, gravity and magnetic field data to constrain the tectonic history the dichotomy in the region 30-60N and 50-90E, which encompasses portions of the Ismenius Lacus quadrangle. The dichotomy formed very early the history of Mars and has undergone extensive modification by impact cratering, erosion, and faulting. This history must be carefully interpreted in order to reconstruct the original nature of the dichotomy boundary and ultimately discriminate between models of origin. In the study area boundary-parallel faults are well preserved, and may be the result of gravitational relaxation. The geologic history has been examined in detail, including estimates of volumes of material eroded. Further, it is one of the few regions where there is a correlation between the free air gravity, magnetic anomalies, and the geology. This allows to constrain subsurface faulting beneath the lowlands fill material. In addition to being an excellent location to unravel the complex history of the dichotomy, this area preserves the transition from a highly magnetized highlands crust to an unmagnetized or slightly magnetized lowlands crust.

  7. Continuous Time Random Walk and Migration-Proliferation Dichotomy of Brain Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iomin, A.

    A theory of fractional kinetics of glial cancer cells is presented. A role of the migration-proliferation dichotomy in the fractional cancer cell dynamics in the outer-invasive zone is discussed and explained in the framework of a continuous time random walk. The main suggested model is based on a construction of a 3D comb model, where the migration-proliferation dichotomy becomes naturally apparent and the outer-invasive zone of glioma cancer is considered as a fractal composite with a fractal dimension Dfr < 3.

  8. Continuous Time Random Walk and Migration-Proliferation Dichotomy of Brain Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iomin, A.

    2015-10-01

    A theory of fractional kinetics of glial cancer cells is presented. A role of the migration-proliferation dichotomy in the fractional cancer cell dynamics in the outer-invasive zone is discussed and explained in the framework of a continuous time random walk. The main suggested model is based on a construction of a 3D comb model, where the migration-proliferation dichotomy becomes naturally apparent and the outer-invasive zone of glioma cancer is considered as a fractal composite with a fractal dimension Dfr < 3.

  9. Radiowaves and Tectonic Dichotomy: Two Sides of One Coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    The first theorem of the wave planetology states that "Celestial bodies are di- chotomic"[1]. This notion is best demonstrated by modulation of the high frequency orbiting in the Solar system (SS) by the low frequency orbiting the SS in Galaxy. Or- biting frequencies of all bodies in the SS -from 1/8 hours for Phobos to 1/248 years for Pluto - are high comparative to the SS orbiting in Galaxy -about 1/200 000 000 years. Modulation of a high frequency by a low frequency brings about side frequencies at both sides of a high frequency. Earlier we considered only one side of the modula- tion stressing that the lower side frequency in any celestial body can achieve only the fundamental wave and produce related to it inevitable tectonic dichotomy [2]. Now we consider the higher side frequencies and find that they are in the limits of the ra- dio frequencies. Dividing all possible orbiting frequencies of bodies in the SS by the SS orbiting frequency in Galaxy one comes to a range of side frequencies from mi- crowaves to kilometer waves. This finding is rather important as it is well known that all bodies of the SS emit often enigmatic radiowaves. Figuratively, the SS is wrapped by a cloud of crossing radiowaves of various frequencies. Some calculations below show modulation of tectonic granula sizes of some celestial bodies. A granula size is a half of a wavelength which is tied to an orbiting frequency. A scale is the Earth's orbiting period 1 year and the granula size pR/4. The tectonic granula sizes of bodies are proportional to their orbital periods (Theorem 3 [1[). The modulating frequency is 1/200 000 000 years. Jupiter (12 y : 200 000 000 y) pR= (12 : 200 000 000) 3.14°u 71400 km=13.4 m tectonic granula or 26.8 m wavelength. Varying orbital periods and bodies'radia one comes to the following wavelengths. Jupiter-26.8 m, Saturn-56.4 m, Uranus-67 m, Neptune-124 m, Pluto-10.9 m, Sun-1.46 m, Triton-11.4 m (for the cir- cumsolar frequency), 1.84 mm (circumneptunian fr

  10. The Dichotomy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haomming; Zhu, Jianjun; Yue, Shi; Lu, Ling; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). As ER stress triggers an adaptive cellular response, the question of what determines its functional outcome in liver IRI remains to be defined. In a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, we studied how transient (30 minutes) or prolonged (90 minutes) liver ischemia regulated local ER stress response and autophagy activities and their relationship with liver IRI. Effects of chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were evaluated. Our results showed that although the activating transcription factor 6 branch of ER stress response was induced in livers by both types of ischemia, liver autophagy was activated by transient, but inhibited by prolonged, ischemia. Although 3-MA had no effects on liver IRI after prolonged ischemia, it significantly increased liver IRI after transient ischemia. The 4-PBA treatment protected livers from IRI after prolonged ischemia by restoring autophagy flux, and the adjunctive 3-MA treatment abrogated its liver protective effect. The same 4-PBA treatment, however, increased liver IRI and disrupted autophagy flux after transient ischemia. Although both types of ischemia activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and inactivated protein kinase B (Akt), prolonged ischemia also resulted in downregulations of autophagy-related gene 3 and autophagy-related gene 5 in ischemic livers. These results indicate a functional dichotomy of ER stress response in liver IRI via its regulation of autophagy. Transient ischemia activates autophagy to protect livers from IRI, whereas prolonged ischemia inhibits autophagy to promote the development of liver IRI.

  11. Geomorphology of the Martian Crustal Dichotomy Boundary: Implications for Age and Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, R. P.; Watters, T. R.

    2005-12-01

    The fairly abrupt decline in surface age, elevation, and crustal thickness from the southern highlands to the northern lowlands of Mars is termed the crustal dichotomy. The cause of northern crustal thinning remains among the major unresolved issues in Mars research. Most geophysical models have invoked degree-1 mantle convection, whereas others suggest plate tectonism or one or more giant impacts in the northern hemisphere. Other studies have focused on modifications to the highland/lowland dichotomy boundary, which may or may not be relevant to the issue of origin. These hypotheses include erosion, extensional faulting, lateral crustal flow, and flexure of an elastic lithosphere by loading of the lowlands. The geomorphology of the highland/lowland boundary region provides important controls for these geophysical models of early crustal development. Geologic observations suggest that the thin lowland crust and dichotomy boundary originated in the Early Noachian Epoch (>4 Ga). The slope within ancient cratered terrain along the boundary influenced post-Noachian fresh crater morphology, Late Noachian valley network planform, and the degradation of Middle to Late Noachian (~3.95-3.7 Ga) impact craters. For fresh (post-Noachian) craters emplaced on the dichotomy slope, the plane of the rim crest inclines subparallel to the exterior slope, although the interior cavity and central peak are oriented vertically, consistent with impacts on a precursor slope. Valleys converge down modern slopes, so the cratered dichotomy slope predates Late Noachian valley development. Degraded craters within the north-sloping cratered and dissected units have floors that are flat or slightly concave, so tilting did not occur after the crater floors were emplaced in Middle Noachian to Early Hesperian time. Most crater floors along the dichotomy boundary are not dissected, as one would expect from an erosional response to Late Noachian tilting, and the few craters with dissected floors have

  12. Dysfunctional Dichotomies? Deflating Bipolar Constructions of Curriculum and Pedagogy through Case Studies from Music and History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim; Chapman, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Recent public discussions of curriculum and pedagogy that have accompanied the English National Curriculum review have been structured around clichéd dichotomies that generate more heat than light and that, as Robin Alexander has argued, reduce complex educational debates to oppositional and incompatible slogans. This paper begins by exploring the…

  13. Dichotomy, Dialectic and Dialogic: How Do Sociology Terms Assist Career Development Theory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edgar A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Three concepts from sociology--dichotomy and two extensions, dialectic and dialogic--are considered here as social-psychological tools for career practitioners who analyse and investigate career patterns, career motivations and career pathways, whether at career start or at further points of transition. These terms have macro-social applications…

  14. Minority Parents as Researchers: Beyond a Dichotomy in Parent Involvement in Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ippolito, John

    2010-01-01

    This article documents the work of parent-driven research teams in two school boards in the Greater Toronto Area. Motivated by a desire to move beyond a school-centred/family-centred dichotomy, this parent-lead project explores a middle space for collective learning among multiple stakeholders in publicly-funded schooling. Drawing on participatory…

  15. Models of Sensory Deprivation: The Nature/nurture Dichotomy and Spatial Representation in the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Susanna

    1988-01-01

    Examines the fallacies about the nature of abilities and learning and about the interaction between sense modalities which follow from the dichotomy in relation to explanations of spatial development in the blind. Suggests that interactions between cognitive and perceptual factors need to be considered to explain more adequately effects of sensory…

  16. MEVTV study: Early tectonic evolution of Mars: Crustal dichotomy to Valles Marineris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.; Schultz, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Several fundamental problems were addressed in the early impact, tectonic, and volcanic evolution of the martian lithosphere: (1) origin and evolution of the fundamental crustal dichotomy, including development of the highland/lowland transition zone; (2) growth and evolution of the Valles Marineris; and (3) nature and role of major resurfacing events in early martian history. The results in these areas are briefly summarized.

  17. Modification of the dichotomy boundary on Mars by Amazonian mid-latitude regional glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, James W.; Nahm, Amanda L.; Marchant, David R.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2006-03-01

    Restoration of the dichotomy boundary to its original position to assess its origin requires a thorough knowledge of processes responsible for its degradation and retreat. The unique fretted terrain, located along the Deuteronilus-Protonilus Mensae northern mid-latitude portion of the boundary, has been long held to provide clues to dichotomy degradation processes. We use new spacecraft data to show that fretted valleys display a multitude of characteristics typical of integrated valley glacial systems on Earth (multiple theater-headed, alcove-like accumulation areas; sharp arete-like ridges typical of glacial erosion; converging patterns of downslope valley flow; valley lineation patterns typical of folding and shear; wrap-around features indicative of flow around obstacles; and broad piedmont-like lobes as the valley fill extends out into the northern lowlands). The single integrated system containing these features covers about 30,000 km2, and is one of dozens of fretted valleys along the dichotomy boundary in this region. These relationships suggest that the boundary area was subjected to very large-scale regional glaciation during the Amazonian. Recognition and documentation of this important late-stage process provides information critical to reconstructing the original dichotomy boundary.

  18. Moving beyond the Deep and Surface Dichotomy; Using Q Methodology to Explore Students' Approaches to Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godor, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Student learning approaches research has been built upon the notions of deep and surface learning. Despite its status as part of the educational research canon, the dichotomy of deep/surface has been critiqued as constraining the debate surrounding student learning. Additionally, issues of content validity have been expressed concerning…

  19. Familiarity for Associations? A Test of the Domain Dichotomy Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Iain M.; Mackenzie, Graham; Donaldson, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Episodic recognition memory is mediated by functionally separable retrieval processes, notably familiarity (a general sense of prior exposure) and recollection (the retrieval of contextual details), whose relative engagement depends partly on the nature of the information being retrieved. Currently, the specific contribution of familiarity to…

  20. The great dichotomy of the Solar System: Small terrestrial embryos and massive giant planet cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Lambrechts, M.; Jacobson, S.; Bitsch, B.

    2015-09-01

    The basic structure of the Solar System is set by the presence of low-mass terrestrial planets in its inner part and giant planets in its outer part. This is the result of the formation of a system of multiple embryos with approximately the mass of Mars in the inner disk and of a few multi-Earth-mass cores in the outer disk, within the lifetime of the gaseous component of the protoplanetary disk. What was the origin of this dichotomy in the mass distribution of embryos/cores? We show in this paper that the classic processes of runaway and oligarchic growth from a disk of planetesimals cannot explain this dichotomy, even if the original surface density of solids increased at the snowline. Instead, the accretion of drifting pebbles by embryos and cores can explain the dichotomy, provided that some assumptions hold true. We propose that the mass-flow of pebbles is two-times lower and the characteristic size of the pebbles is approximately ten times smaller within the snowline than beyond the snowline (respectively at heliocentric distance r rice , where rice is the snowline heliocentric distance), due to ice sublimation and the splitting of icy pebbles into a collection of chondrule-size silicate grains. In this case, objects of original sub-lunar mass would grow at drastically different rates in the two regions of the disk. Within the snowline these bodies would reach approximately the mass of Mars while beyond the snowline they would grow to ∼ 20 Earth masses. The results may change quantitatively with changes to the assumed parameters, but the establishment of a clear dichotomy in the mass distribution of protoplanets appears robust provided that there is enough turbulence in the disk to prevent the sedimentation of the silicate grains into a very thin layer.

  1. Geologic Mapping along the Arabia Terra Dichotomy Boundary: Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleamaster, Leslie F., III; Crown, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Geologic mapping studies at the 1:1M-scale are being used to assess geologic materials and processes that shape the highlands along the Arabia Terra dichotomy boundary. In particular, this mapping will evaluate the distribution, stratigraphic position, and lateral continuity of compositionally distinct outcrops in Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae as identified by spectral instruments currently in orbit. Placing these landscapes, their material units, structural features, and unique compositional outcrops into spatial and temporal context with the remainder of the Arabia Terra dichotomy boundary may provide constraints on: 1) origin of the dichotomy boundary, 2) paleo-environments and climate conditions, and 3) various fluvial-nival modification processes related to past and present volatile distribution and their putative reservoirs (aquifers, lakes and oceans, surface and ground ice) and the influences of nearby volcanic and tectonic features on hydrologic processes in these regions. The results of this work will include two 1:1M scale geologic maps of twelve MTM quadrangles (Mawrth Vallis - 20022, 20017, 20012, 25022, 25017, and 25012; and Nili Fossae - 20287, 20282, 25287, 25282, 30287, 30282).

  2. Geologic Mapping along the Arabia Terra Dichotomy Boundary: Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae, Mars: Introductory Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bleamaster, Leslie F., III; Crown, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Geologic mapping studies at the 1:1M-scale will be used to characterize geologic processes that have shaped the highlands along the Arabia Terra dichotomy boundary. In particular, this mapping will evaluate the distribution, stratigraphic position, and lateral continuity of compositionally distinct outcrops in Mawrth Vallis and Nili Fossae as identified by spectral instruments currently in orbit. Placing these landscapes, their material units, structural features, and unique compositional outcrops into spatial and temporal context with the remainder of the Arabia Terra dichotomy boundary will provide the ability to: 1) further test original dichotomy formation hypotheses, 2) constrain ancient paleoenvironments and climate conditions, and 3) evaluate various fluvial-nival modification processes related to past and present volatile distribution and their putative reservoirs (aquifers, lakes and oceans, surface and ground ice) and the influences of nearby volcanic and tectonic features on hydrologic processes in these regions. The result will be two 1:1M scale geologic maps of twelve MTM quadrangles (Mawrth Vallis - 20022, 20017, 20012, 25022, 25017, and 25012; and Nili Fossae - 20287, 20282, 25287, 25282, 30287, 30282).

  3. Maximum Power Point Tracking with Dichotomy and Gradient Method for Automobile Exhaust Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, W.; Quan, S. H.; Xie, C. J.; Tang, X. F.; Wang, L. L.; Huang, L.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a direct-current/direct-current (DC/DC) converter with maximum power point tracking (MPPT) is developed to down-convert the high voltage DC output from a thermoelectric generator to the lower voltage required to charge batteries. To improve the tracking accuracy and speed of the converter, a novel MPPT control scheme characterized by an aggregated dichotomy and gradient (ADG) method is proposed. In the first stage, the dichotomy algorithm is used as a fast search method to find the approximate region of the maximum power point. The gradient method is then applied for rapid and accurate tracking of the maximum power point. To validate the proposed MPPT method, a test bench composed of an automobile exhaust thermoelectric generator was constructed for harvesting the automotive exhaust heat energy. Steady-state and transient tracking experiments under five different load conditions were carried out using a DC/DC converter with the proposed ADG and with three traditional methods. The experimental results show that the ADG method can track the maximum power within 140 ms with a 1.1% error rate when the engine operates at 3300 rpm@71 NM, which is superior to the performance of the single dichotomy method, the single gradient method and the perturbation and observation method from the viewpoint of improved tracking accuracy and speed.

  4. The sense of smell, its signalling pathways, and the dichotomy of cilia and microvilli in olfactory sensory cells

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Smell is often regarded as an ancillary perception in primates, who seem so dominated by their sense of vision. In this paper, we will portray some aspects of the significance of olfaction to human life and speculate on what evolutionary factors contribute to keeping it alive. We then outline the functional architecture of olfactory sensory neurons and their signal transduction pathways, which are the primary detectors that render olfactory perception possible. Throughout the phylogenetic tree, olfactory neurons, at their apical tip, are either decorated with cilia or with microvilli. The significance of this dichotomy is unknown. It is generally assumed that mammalian olfactory neurons are of the ciliary type only. The existance of so-called olfactory microvillar cells in mammals, however, is well documented, but their nature remains unclear and their function orphaned. This paper discusses the possibility, that in the main olfactory epithelium of mammals ciliated and microvillar sensory cells exist concurrently. We review evidence related to this hypothesis and ask, what function olfactory microvillar cells might have and what signalling mechanisms they use. PMID:17903277

  5. The effects of blurring vision on medio-lateral balance during stepping up or down to a new level in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Buckley, John G; Heasley, Karen; Scally, Andy; Elliott, David B

    2005-10-01

    Visual impairment is an important risk factor for falls, but relatively little is known about how it affects stair negotiation. The present study determined how medio-lateral (ML) dynamics of stepping and single limb support stability when stepping up or down to a new level were affected by blurring the vision of healthy elderly subjects. Twelve elderly subjects (72.3 +/- 4.2 years) were analysed performing single steps up and single steps down to a new level (7.2, 14.4 and 21.6 cm). Stepping dynamics were assessed by determining the ML ground reaction force (GRF) impulse, lateral position of the centre of mass (CM) relative to the supporting foot (average horizontal ML distance between CM and CP during single support) and movement time. Stability was determined as the rms fluctuation in ML position of the centre of pressure (CP) during single support. Differences between optimal and blurred visual conditions were analysed using a random effects model. Duration of double and single support, and the ML GRF impulse were significantly greater when vision was blurred, while the average CM-CP ML distance and ML stability was reduced. ML stability decreased with increasing step height and was further decreased when stepping down than when stepping up. These findings indicate that ML balance during stepping up and down was significantly affected by blurring vision. In particular, single limb support stability was considerably reduced, especially so during stepping down. The findings highlight the importance of accurate visual feedback in the precise control of stepping dynamics when stepping up or down to a new level, and suggest that correcting common visual problems, such as uncorrected refractive errors and cataract may be an important intervention strategy in improving how the elderly negotiate stairs.

  6. Universal Dichotomy for Dynamical Systems with Variable Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, Andreas; Müller, David; Radons, Günter

    2017-01-01

    We show that the dynamics of systems with a time-dependent delay is fundamentally affected by the functional form of the retarded argument. Associating with the latter an iterated map, the access map, and a corresponding Koopman operator, we identify two universality classes. Members in the first are equivalent to systems with a constant delay. The new, second class is characterized by the mode-locking behavior of their access maps and by an asymptotically linear, instead of a logarithmic, scaling of the Lyapunov spectrum. The membership depends in a fractal manner only on the parameters of the delay.

  7. Developmental modularity and the marsupial-placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Goswami, A; Weisbecker, V; Sánchez-Villagra, M R

    2009-05-15

    The contrasting evolutionary histories of marsupial and placental mammals have often been attributed to their different reproductive strategies. The speciose placentals develop mainly in utero and have radiated into diverse niches, whereas marsupials are born in a highly altricial state with immediate functional requirements and are limited in taxonomic, ecological, and morphological diversity. These differences have been tied to heterochrony, and it has been hypothesized that coordinated shifts in developmental timing occur among functionally- or developmentally related structures, such as forelimbs in marsupials. We use new ossification sequence data for 11 marsupial and 14 placental species to assess the integration of first ossification timing among skeletal elements. Although cranial elements fail to demonstrate significant coordination, marsupials and placentals differ markedly in postcranial integration. Marsupials display independent anterior and posterior developmental modules, whereas placentals show significant integration of the entire appendicular skeleton. This developmental integration of the placental postcranium is consistent with a recent study of phenotypic modularity in limbs of placental mammals, showing a potential correspondence between integration of developmental timing and of shape. The observed differences in postcranial integration between marsupials and placentals may reflect the disparate evolutionary histories of these two mammalian clades.

  8. Neither metaphysical dichotomy nor pure identity: clarifying the emergentist creed.

    PubMed

    Sartenaer, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Emergentism is often misleadingly described as a monolithic "third way" between radical monism and pluralism. In the particular case of biology, for example, emergentism is perceived as a middle course between mechanicism and vitalism. In the present paper I propose to show that the conceptual landscape between monism and pluralism is more complex than this classical picture suggests. On the basis of two successive analyses-distinguishing three forms of tension between monism and pluralism and a distinction between derivational and functional reduction-I define three different versions of emergentism that can be considered as consistent middle courses between monism and pluralism (respectively theoretical, explanatory and causal emergence). I then emphasise the advantage of this taxonomy of the concepts of emergence by applying the results of my analysis to the historical controversy that pertains to the relationship between life and matter.

  9. Hybrid rhinoplasty: beyond the dichotomy of rhinoplasty techniques.

    PubMed

    Palma, P; Khodaei, I; Bertossi, D; Vasilenko, I; Alqahtani, A; Alaa Shawkat, S; Wills Villarraga, D

    2013-06-01

    Although rhinoplasty and the development of facial aesthetic criteria can be traced to several millennia, contemporary techniques have passed through a rapid evolutionary process in the past century (1) (2). Although understanding human anatomy and the consequences of surgical excision occupied the minds of the founders of rhinoplasty, the process moved towards preservation of supporting structures, and maintaining the physiological functions of the nose. Initially, this endonasal approach created its own series of problems due to excessive tissue removal. External rhinoplasty provided a new impetus for growth in this field, and since its inception, has swung the pendulum of reconstruction firmly into its own sphere of influence. However, as no rhinoplasty technique holds all the answers, hybrid rhinoplasty seeks to combine the best achievements of 20(th) century rhinoplasty, from all schools of thought, in order to provide a safe, sensible and planned approach to the most demanding operation for the facial plastic surgeon.

  10. Friends and Foes of Theory Construction in Psychological Science: Vague Dichotomies, Unified Theories of Cognition, and the New Experimentalism.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marques, Leonel; Ferreira, Mário B

    2011-03-01

    Newell (1973) criticized the use of vague theoretical dichotomies to account for narrowly defined empirical phenomena. Many of the problems raised by Newell persist today. We argue that these problems derive not from any peculiarity of psychological science but from the hindrances inherent to empirical theory testing. To show the contemporary relevance of these problems, we present two modern illustrations of the encumbrances faced by dichotomy-based research, we review some attempts to rely on nonempirical criteria to overcome the empirical impediments in theory testing, and we bring the question of theoretical mimicry to bear on these problems. Next, we discuss an alternative to theoretical dichotomies: the Unified Theories of Cognition (Newell, 1990). Finally, we introduce the "new experimentalism" approach in philosophy of science (Mayo, 1996), which provides a new perspective on theory construction in psychological science. We conclude with suggestions on how this new perspective can be implemented.

  11. Lineated valley fill at the Martian dichotomy boundary: Nature and history of degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gasselt, S.; Hauber, E.; Neukum, G.

    2010-08-01

    The fretted terrain of the Martian dichotomy boundary is a key region for investigating landforms related to creep of ice and debris as it exhibits landforms comparable to morphologies of periglacial environments. Although features known as lobate debris aprons, lineated valley fills and concentric crater fills have been studied in great detail, basic questions concerned with the composition and the style of emplacement and degradation still remain unanswered. This study focuses on morphologies which are located in a near-circular depression located at the dichotomy escarpment in Deuteronilus Mensae. Analysis of high-resolution image data suggests an early formation of these features as the result of backward thermokarstic degradation of highland terrain. Geologically younger processes caused deposition and degradation of an ice-rich mantling deposit, which ultimately led to formation of creep morphologies that might have even been active in the geologically recent past. Intermixing of both degradational landform units form complex patterns that cannot be explained by a late stage (glacial) process alone. Morphological comparisons of lineated valley fill units with concentric crater fill landforms in Utopia Planitia strongly suggest comparable emplacement and degradation styles of these features. The sequential development consisting of an initial probably widespread thermokarstic degradation followed by later cyclic deposition of volatile material and continual thermokarstic degradation suggests that the development of parts of the Martian fretted terrain is directly related to climatic variations in the planet's history.

  12. The HMA-LMA dichotomy revisited: an electron microscopical survey of 56 sponge species.

    PubMed

    Gloeckner, Volker; Wehrl, Markus; Moitinho-Silva, Lucas; Gernert, Christine; Schupp, Peter; Pawlik, Joseph R; Lindquist, Niels L; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Wörheide, Gert; Hentschel, Ute

    2014-08-01

    The dichotomy between high microbial abundance (HMA) and low microbial abundance (LMA) sponges has been long recognized. In the present study, 56 sponge species from three geographic regions (greater Caribbean, Mediterranean, Red Sea) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy for the presence of microorganisms in the mesohyl matrix. Additionally, bacterial enumeration by DAPI-counting was performed on a subset of samples. Of the 56 species investigated, 28 were identified as belonging to the HMA and 28 to the LMA category. The sponge orders Agelasida and Verongida consisted exclusively of HMA species, and the Poecilosclerida were composed only of LMA sponges. Other taxa contained both types of microbial associations (e.g., marine Haplosclerida, Homoscleromorpha, Dictyoceratida), and a clear phylogenetic pattern could not be identified. For a few sponge species, an intermediate microbial load was determined, and the microscopy data did not suffice to reliably determine HMA or LMA status. To experimentally determine the HMA or LMA status of a sponge species, we therefore recommend a combination of transmission electron microscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequence data. This study significantly expands previous reports on microbial abundances in sponge tissues and contributes to a better understanding of the HMA-LMA dichotomy in sponge-microbe symbioses.

  13. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF THE MILKY WAY HALO TRACED BY THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY AMONG GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sohee; Lee, Young-Wook

    2015-06-22

    In our recent investigation of the Oosterhoff dichotomy in the multiple population paradigm, we have suggested that the RR Lyrae variables in the globular clusters (GCs) of Oosterhoff groups I, II, and III are produced mostly by first, second, and third generation stars (G1, G2, and G3), respectively. Here we show, for the first time, that the observed dichotomies in the inner and outer halo GCs can be naturally reproduced when these models are extended to all metallicity regimes, while maintaining reasonable agreements in the horizontal-branch type versus [Fe/H] correlations. In order to achieve this, however, specific star formation histories are required for the inner and outer halos. In the inner halo GCs, the star formation commenced and ceased earlier with a relatively short formation timescale between the subpopulations (∼0.5 Gyr), while in the outer halo, the formation of G1 was delayed by ∼0.8 Gyr with a more extended timescale between G1 and G2 (∼1.4 Gyr). This is consistent with the dual origin of the Milky Way halo. Despite the difference in detail, our models show that the Oosterhoff period groups observed in both outer and inner halo GCs are all manifestations of the “population-shift” effect within the instability strip, for which the origin can be traced back to the two or three discrete episodes of star formation in GCs.

  14. Spin-Orbit Misalignment as a Driver of the Kepler Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Christopher; Batygin, Konstantin

    2016-10-01

    During its five-year mission, the Kepler spacecraft has uncovered a diverse population of planetary systems with orbital configurations ranging from single-transiting planets to systems of multiple planets co-transiting the parent star. By comparing the relative occurrences of multiple to single-transiting systems, recent analyses have revealed a significant over-abundance of singles. Dubbed the “Kepler Dichotomy,” this feature has been interpreted as evidence for two separate populations of planetary systems: one where all orbits are confined to a single plane, and a second where the constituent planetary orbits possess significant mutual inclinations, allowing only a single member to be observed in transit at a given epoch. In this work, we demonstrate that stellar obliquity, excited within the disk-hosting stage, can explain this dichotomy. Young stars rotate rapidly, generating a significant quadrupole moment, which torques the planetary orbits, with inner planets influenced more strongly. Given nominal parameters, this torque is sufficiently strong to excite significant mutual inclinations between planets, enhancing the number of single-transiting planets, sometimes through a dynamical instability. Furthermore, as hot stars appear to possess systematically higher obliquities, we predict that single-transiting systems should be relatively more prevalent around more massive stars. We analyze the Kepler data and confirm this signal to be present.

  15. Impact Constraints on the Age and Origin of the Crustal Dichotomy on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA data have revealed a large population of "Quasi-Circular Depressions" (QCDs) with little or no visible expression in image data. These likely buried impact basins have important implications for the age of the lowland crust, how that compares with original highland crust, and when and how the crustal dichotomy may have formed. The buried lowlands are of Early Noachian age, likely slightly younger than the buried highlands but older than the exposed (visible) highland surface. A depopulation of large visible basins at diameters 800 to 1300 km suggests some global scale event early in martian history, maybe related to the formation of the lowlands andor the development of Tharsis. A suggested early disappearance of the global magnetic field can be placed within a temporal sequence of formation of the very largest impact basins. The global field appears to have disappeared at about the time the lowlands formed. It seems likely the topographic crustal dichotomy was produced very early in martian history by processes which operated very quickly. This and the preservation of large relic impact basins in the north- em hemisphere, which themselves can account for the lowland topography, suggest that large impacts played the major role in the origin Mars fundamental crustal feature.

  16. Impact Constraints on the Age and Origin of the Crustal Dichotomy on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Herbert V.

    2004-01-01

    MOLA data have revealed a large population of 'Quasi-Circular Depressions' (QCDs) with little or no visible expression in image data. These likely buried impact basins have important implications for the age of the lowland crust, how that compares with original highland crust, and when and how the crustal dichotomy may have formed. The buried lowlands are of Early Noachian age, likely slightly younger than the buried highlands but older than the exposed (visible) highland surface. A depopulation of large visible basins at diameters 800 to 1300 km suggests some global scale event early in martian history, maybe related to the formation of the lowlands and/or the development of Tharsis. A suggested early disappearance of the global magnetic field can be placed within a temporal sequence of formation of the very largest impact basins. The global field appears to have disappeared at about the time the lowlands formed. It seems likely the topographic crustal dichotomy was produced very early in martian history by processes which operated very quickly. This and the preservation of large relic impact basins in the northern hemisphere, which themselves can account for the lowland topography, suggest that large impacts played the major role in the origin Mars fundamental crustal feature.

  17. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Bridge between Functional Organic Dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Shukla, Ratnakar; Ghoshal, Ujjala

    2017-03-15

    The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), once thought to be largely psychogenic in origin, is now understood to be multifactorial. One of the reasons for this paradigm shift is the realization that gut dysbiosis, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), causes IBS symptoms. Between 4% and 78% of patients with IBS and 1% and 40% of controls have SIBO; such wide variations in prevalence might result from population differences, IBS diagnostic criteria, and, most importantly, methods to diagnose SIBO. Although quantitative jejunal aspirate culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, noninvasive hydrogen breath tests have been popular. Although the glucose hydrogen breath test is highly specific, its sensitivity is low; in contrast, the early-peak criteria in the lactulose hydrogen breath test are highly nonspecific. Female gender, older age, diarrhea-predominant IBS, bloating and flatulence, proton pump inhibitor and narcotic intake, and low hemoglobin are associated with SIBO among IBS patients. Several therapeutic trials targeting gut microbes using antibiotics and probiotics have further demonstrated that not all symptoms in patients with IBS originate in the brain but rather in the gut, providing support for the micro-organic basis of IBS. A recent proof-of-concept study showing the high frequency of symptom improvement in patients with IBS with SIBO further supports this hypothesis.

  18. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Bridge between Functional Organic Dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Uday C.; Shukla, Ratnakar; Ghoshal, Ujjala

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), once thought to be largely psychogenic in origin, is now understood to be multifactorial. One of the reasons for this paradigm shift is the realization that gut dysbiosis, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), causes IBS symptoms. Between 4% and 78% of patients with IBS and 1% and 40% of controls have SIBO; such wide variations in prevalence might result from population differences, IBS diagnostic criteria, and, most importantly, methods to diagnose SIBO. Although quantitative jejunal aspirate culture is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of SIBO, noninvasive hydrogen breath tests have been popular. Although the glucose hydrogen breath test is highly specific, its sensitivity is low; in contrast, the early-peak criteria in the lactulose hydrogen breath test are highly nonspecific. Female gender, older age, diarrhea-predominant IBS, bloating and flatulence, proton pump inhibitor and narcotic intake, and low hemoglobin are associated with SIBO among IBS patients. Several therapeutic trials targeting gut microbes using antibiotics and probiotics have further demonstrated that not all symptoms in patients with IBS originate in the brain but rather in the gut, providing support for the micro-organic basis of IBS. A recent proof-of-concept study showing the high frequency of symptom improvement in patients with IBS with SIBO further supports this hypothesis. PMID:28274108

  19. Channel slope reversal near the Martian dichotomy boundary: Testing tectonic hypotheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, Alexandra; Burr, Devon M.; Nimmo, Francis; Jacobsen, Robert E.

    2015-07-01

    Faults along the Martian dichotomy boundary are evidence of tectonic activity, which by analogy with terrestrial tectonism may cause changes in or even reversal of fluvial longitudinal profiles. In the eastern hemisphere between 30° E and 150° E, this tectonic activity has been hypothesized to result from lower crustal flow or from lithospheric flexure, for which loading (e.g., by material deposition) of the northern lowlands is a possible cause (Watters, 2003a; Nimmo, 2005). The topographic (slope) changes resulting from these two different mechanisms are distinct and can provide a means for distinguishing between them, although other processes may complicate interpretations of reversed longitudinal profiles. Two fan-shaped networks of inverted channels are located near 150° E in the Aeolis Dorsa region just north of the dichotomy boundary. Their original flow directions, inferred from planform morphology, suggest flow to the northeast in contrast to their current longitudinal profiles sloping down to the southwest. This contrast indicates slope reversal. We investigate the lower crustal flow and flexure mechanisms for slope reversal by testing three different hypotheses: 1) lower crustal flow, 2) flexure caused by material erosion from the highlands and deposition in the lowlands, and 3) flexure caused by highland erosion and deposition in the lowlands plus deposition of the Medusae Fossae Formation in the lowlands. We test these three hypotheses by comparing the inferred magnitudes of the slope reversals with predicted slope changes from geophysical models for these processes. Taking the possibility of non-tectonic (i.e., collapse) processes into account, our results suggest that, among these three models, the slope reversal is most consistent with the predicted tectonic response to erosion and deposition of highland material in conjunction with deposition of the Medusae Fossae Formation. Contrary to previous findings, our results do not support the mechanism

  20. Indigenous Knowledge and Education from the Quechua Community to School: Beyond the Formal/Non-Formal Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumida Huaman, Elizabeth; Valdiviezo, Laura Alicia

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose to approach Indigenous education beyond the formal/non-formal dichotomy. We argue that there is a critical need to conscientiously include Indigenous knowledge in education processes from the school to the community; particularly, when formal systems exclude Indigenous cultures and languages. Based on ethnographic…

  1. How Can We Overcome the Dichotomy That Western Culture Has Created between the Concepts of Independence and Dependence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Zehavit

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article, inspired by the works of Martin Buber, is to propose an alternative to the inherent dichotomy of Western culture. It may allow Western culture to transcend its fixed nature towards new directions and to suggest challenging solutions for reshaping the questions--what is the role of man in the world, and what is the…

  2. Stress-stones-stress-recurrent stones: a self-propagating cycle? Difficulties in solving this dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Arzoz-Fabregas, Montserrat; Roca-Antonio, Josep; Ibarz-Servio, Luis; Jappie-Mahomed, Dalielah; Rodgers, Allen

    2017-03-21

    Numerous studies have reported an association between stress and urolithiasis. Although urinary risk factors have been measured in several of these, compelling evidence of a causal relationship has not been established. A shortcoming is that alterations in single urinary parameters rather than ratios and quotients, which provide a more synergistic risk evaluation, have been measured. Recently, we speculated about a possible association between chronic stress and stone recurrence. This presents an intriguing dichotomy of whether stress causes stones or vice versa, or whether they are linked in a self-propagating stress-stones-stress-recurrence cycle. We investigated the latter hypothesis in a retrospective case-control designed study in which we calculated urinary ratios and quotients which are regarded as diagnostic indicators of stone risk. These included Ca/Cr, Ox/Cr, Mg/Cr, Cit/Cr, urate/Cr and citrate-magnesium-calcium ratios, activity product quotient for calcium oxalate (CaOx) and relative supersaturation of CaOx, brushite and uric acid. Overnight urinary data from 128 participants comprising 31 first time (FS), 33 recurrent (RS) CaOx stone formers and 64 controls were used. All subjects had been previously assessed for chronic stress dimensions, as well as for stress caused by their stone episodes per se. Conditional and unconditional logistic regression (with a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests) and simple linear regression were used to analyse various components of the data. Although RS had more stressful life events, with greater intensity of perception than FS, there were no significant differences between the groups regarding any of the urinary risk factors. No significant association between stressful life events and any of the urinary ratios or quotients was observed. A direct causal link between stress and stone recurrence was not indicated. We believe that future studies should shift their focus from traditional urinary risk factors to other

  3. Photochemical and thermal spiropyran (SP)-merocyanine (MC) interconversion: a dichotomy in dependence on viscosity.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jamie; Abdallah, Dalia; Piskorz, Konrad; Wojtyk, James T C; Dust, Julian M; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Hoz, Shmaryahu; Buncel, Erwin

    2012-10-21

    The current study extends our work with spiropyran-merocyanines (SP-MC) as molecular photoswitches by delving into the effects of viscosity. This has led to the interesting finding of a dichotomy in viscosity dependence. Solutions of SP [6'-nitro-1,3,3-trimethylspiro(indolino-2,2'-benzopyran)] in a wide range of ethylene glycol-methanol (EG-MeOH) media (3.59 to 17.9 M in EG) were irradiated 90 s (365 nm). The absorbance at 90 s of MC (532 nm) formed photolytically varied with solvent. The least viscous medium yielded the highest concentration of MC and yields declined with increasing viscosity. Once irradiation ceased each system achieved thermal equilibrium. Molecular dynamics studies of typical thermal reactions governed by electronic and steric factors show that the transition state is achieved primarily after solvent reorganization has occurred to accommodate the new structure. It follows that in such thermal reactions viscosity may not cause any hindrance to the motion of atoms in molecules because solvent has already rearranged. In contrast, photochemical excitations occur at much higher rates (10(-15) s) than solvent reorganization, i.e. dielectric relaxation (10(-10) to 10(-12) s). The viscosity dependence of photochemical MC formation suggests that a major geometrical change is required for excited SP to be converted to MC. The dichotomy in dependence on viscosity is confirmed by the thermal equilibration of SP and MC. The equilibrium constant for the process increases three-fold (from 0.0535 to 0.158) as the EG content of the medium increases. However, the forward rate constant (SP → MC) is almost invariant with EG content or viscosity. The process is viscosity independent. The increase in the equilibrium constant with EG concentration is a result of a decline in the reverse rate constant for MC cyclisation to SP. This is attributed to special stabilisation of the MC that increases with increasing EG concentration. The present study, to our knowledge

  4. The Crustal Dichotomy Boundary West of Tempe Terra: Speculation on Where it Lies Beneath Alba Patera Based on Mola Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H.; Roark, J.; Sakimoto, S.; McGovern, P.

    1999-01-01

    MOLA gridded data based on profiles collected during the Aerobraking Hiatus and Science Phasing Operations suggest the crustal dichotomy boundary west of Tempe continues beneath Alba volcanics, at least to 105 W at about 50 N. A broad shelf-like region in the Alba units is continuous with a similar region of Tempe in which Hesperian volcanics overlie Noachian cratered terrain. Perspective views show significant changes in the sloping character of the flanks of Alba east and west of 105W, with much more continuous steep topography to the west. We suggest that Alba sits astride the ancient crustal dichotomy boundary, not adjacent to it, and that its eastern half lies on old cratered terrain. If true, this would significantly affect the estimate of Alba volcanics volumes, and might also explain some of the observed asymmetries in the structure and the distribution of faults associated with this immense feature.

  5. EMBRYO IMPACTS AND GAS GIANT MERGERS. I. DICHOTOMY OF JUPITER AND SATURN's CORE MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Shulin; Agnor, C.B.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2010-09-10

    Interior to the gaseous envelopes of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, there are high-density cores with masses larger than 10 Earth masses. According to the conventional sequential accretion hypothesis, such massive cores are needed for the onset of efficient accretion of their gaseous envelopes. However, Jupiter's gaseous envelope is more massive and its core may be less massive than those of Saturn. In order to account for this structural diversity and the super-solar metallicity in the envelope of Jupiter and Saturn, we investigate the possibility that they may have either merged with other gas giants or consumed several Earth-mass protoplanetary embryos during or after the rapid accretion of their envelope. In general, impinging sub-Earth-mass planetesimals disintegrate in gas giants' envelopes, deposit heavy elements well outside the cores, and locally suppress the convection. Consequently, their fragments sediment to promote the growth of cores. Through a series of numerical simulations, we show that it is possible for colliding super-Earth-mass embryos to reach the cores of gas giants. Direct parabolic collisions also lead to the coalescence of gas giants and merging of their cores. In these cases, the energy released from the impact leads to vigorous convective motion throughout the envelope and the erosion of the cores. This dichotomy contributes to the observed dispersion in the internal structure and atmospheric composition between Jupiter and Saturn and other gas giant planets and elsewhere.

  6. The martian hemispheric dichotomy may be due to a giant impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilhelms, D.E.; Squyres, S. W.

    1984-01-01

    Mars is divided into two fundamentally different geological provinces of approximately hemispherical extent1-3. The more southerly province is heavily cratered, contains relatively old geological units, and superficially resembles the lunar and mercurian highlands. The northern province is relatively lightly cratered and contains younger geological units, including extensive plains, volcanic edifices, and volcanic calderas. Except for the Tharsis and Elysium regions and other large volcanoes, most of the younger, northern province consists of lowlands, which lie an average of 3 km below the highlands. Lowlands occupy about one-third of Mars. They are separated from the highlands by a distinct scarp or by a sloping transitional zone as much as 700km wide in which highland materials have been disrupted and partly replaced by lowland deposits (Fig. 1). The transition is characterized by a variety of landforms unknown on other planets. The highlands and lowlands are in isostatic equilibrium across the transitional zone4. No generally accepted explanation for the cause of the highland-lowland dichotomy has been proposed although thinning of the lithosph.

  7. Universal tectonic dichotomy of small celestial bodies expressed in their common convexo-concave shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The wave planetology [1, 2, 3 & others] declares in its first theorem that all celestial bodies are dichotomous. This is a result of a warping action of the fundamental wave (wave 1 long 2πR where R is a body radius) that appears in any body due to its movement in non-round (elliptical, parabolic) keplerian orbits with periodically changing accelerations. Having a standing character and four crossing directions in rotating bodies (but all bodies rotate!) these waves inevitably press in one hemisphere and bulge out the opposite one tending to impose on a body convexo-concave shape. This shape is leveled out in larger bodies due to enhanced gravity but is clearly observed in smaller ones with diminished gravity. Still, in the larger bodies as, for an example, in Earth the tectonic dichotomy is expressed as an opposition of the subsided western Pacific hemisphere and the uplifted eastern continental hemisphere. At Mars even sharper dichotomy is in the north-south direction. Small bodies (normally less than 400-500 km across) notwithstanding their type (asteroids, comets, satellites), size and composition (stones, metals, ices) are flattened and bended by the fundamental wave. That is why all asteroids in the main asteroid belt have an oblong shape what was established rather long ago but never was properly explained. Now a number of small satellites is observed by Cassini spacecraft in the saturnian system that makes together with jovian and martian small satellites a representative group for comparisons. In the figures below are shown asteroids, satellites and a comet arranged in a row of increasing sizes. They all are flattened except the largest in the row Enceladus (505 km) and bended tending to acquire a convexo-concave shape. Asteroids: Itokawa (0.5 km long), Eros (33 km, PIA03111). Satellites: Calypso (22 km, PIA07633), Atlas (32 km, PIA08233), Prometheus (102 km, PIA08192), Hyperion (350 km, PIA06645), Enceladus (505 km, PIA08258, comet-like behaviour). Comet

  8. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch

  9. Mutational dichotomy in desmoplastic malignant melanoma corroborated by multigene panel analysis.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Stephan W; Kashofer, Karl; Halbwedl, Iris; Winter, Gerlinde; El-Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila; Mentzel, Thomas; Hoefler, Gerald; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette

    2015-07-01

    Desmoplastic malignant melanoma is a distinct melanoma entity histologically subtyped into mixed and pure forms due to significantly reduced lymph node metastases in the pure form. Recent reports investigating common actionable driver mutations have demonstrated a lack of BRAF, NRAS, and KIT mutation in pure desmoplastic melanoma. In search for alternative driver mutations next generation amplicon sequencing for hotspot mutations in 50 genes cardinal to tumorigenesis was performed and in addition the RET G691S polymorphism was investigated. Data from 21 desmoplastic melanomas (12 pure and 9 mixed) were retrieved. Pure desmoplastic melanomas were either devoid of mutations (50%) or displayed mutations in tumor suppressor genes (TP53, CDKN2A, and SMAD4) singularly or in combination with the exception of a PIK3CA double-mutation lacking established biological relevance. Mixed desmoplastic melanomas on the contrary were frequently mutated (89%), and 67% exhibited activating mutations similar to common-type cutaneous malignant melanomas (BRAF, NRAS, FGFR2, and ERBB2). Separate analysis of morphologically heterogeneous tumor areas in four mixed desmoplastic malignant melanomas displayed no difference in mutation status and RET G691 status. GNAQ and GNA11, two oncogenes in BRAF and NRAS wild-type uveal melanomas, were not mutated in our cohort. The RET G691S polymorphism was found in 25% of pure and 38% of mixed desmoplastic melanomas. Apart from RET G691S our findings demonstrate absence of activating driver mutations in pure desmoplastic melanoma beyond previously investigated oncogenes (BRAF, NRAS, and KIT). The findings underline the therapeutic dichotomy of mixed versus pure desmoplastic melanoma with regard to activating mutations primarily of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

  10. Stabilization of fluorescent silver clusters by RNA homopolymers and their DNA analogs: C,G vs A,T(U) Dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Danielle; Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2011-03-01

    We show that single-stranded RNA stabilizes fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag:RNAs) in aqueous solution, analogous to previously studied Ag:DNAs. To determine whether the different canonical nucleosides play similar roles in stabilizing fluorescent silver species in RNA and DNA hosts, we compare RNA homopolymers of rA,rC,rG and rU to their DNA counterparts, and observe the same base-dependent dichotomy: visible- to IR-emitting silver complexes are stabilized by C and G homopolymers, but not by A or T(U) homopolymers at neutral pH. Shifts in emission wavelengths between Ag:RNA and Ag:DNA analogs show that both base and sugar influence populations of fluorescent species. The data indicate a minimum binding-pocket size of roughly five C or G bases for fluorescent species. These findings open the scope of silver cluster fluorophores to the diversely structured and functional arena of RNA and have implications for rational designs of nucleic acid hosts. Supported by NSF CHE-0848375.

  11. J.A. Schumpeter and T.B. Veblen on economic evolution: the dichotomy between statics and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Marlies; Rainer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At present, the discussion on the dichotomy between statics and dynamics is resolved by concentrating on its mathematical meaning. Yet, a simple formalisation masks the underlying methodological discussion. Overcoming this limitation, the paper discusses Schumpeter's and Veblen's viewpoint on dynamic economic systems as systems generating change from within. It contributes to an understanding on their ideas of how economics could become an evolutionary science and on their contributions to elaborate an evolutionary economics. It confronts Schumpeter's with Veblen's perspective on evolutionary economics and provides insight into their evolutionary economic theorising by discussing their ideas on the evolution of capitalism. PMID:28057981

  12. Comet 67P's morphological dichotomy and surface evolution from the Rosetta/OSIRIS camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramy El-Maarry, M.; Thomas, Nicolas; Gracia-Berná, Antonio; Pajola, Maurizio; Groussin, Olivier; ROSETTA/OSIRIS

    2016-10-01

    The Rosetta mission orbited comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from Aug, 2014 to Sep, 2016. During this time, it obtained the most comprehensive image dataset for a comet's nucleus in terms of resolution, as well as spatial and temporal coverage, using the OSIRIS camera. These images have shown the surface of the comet to be very diverse in its texture and geology. In particular, the 2-year duration of the mission permitted imaging of both hemispheres and the possibility to assess the morphology and surface evolution of comet's 67P's northern hemisphere before and after perihelion passage (in Aug, 2015). The northern hemisphere (NH) is morphologically diverse including regions of consolidated, often fractured materials, smooth terrains showing aeolian-like landforms and seasonal variations, dust-covered areas suggestive of an air-fall-like mechanism, and irregular large-scale depressions suggestive of massive outburst activities. On the other hand, the southern hemisphere (SH) shows a clear dichotomy with the North showing regionally rougher terrains with little or no smooth deposits. Similarly, dusty coatings that were observed in the northern hemisphere are generally lacking in addition to the absence of large depressions. Overall, the SH shows significantly less topographical variation in comparison to the NH. The difference in relief between the NH and SH may be explained by the differences in erosional extent between both hemispheres. The SH has a shorter yet more intensive summer (close to perihelion), which could result in levels of erosion in the SH that are up to a factor of 3 higher than that of the NH. Another notable difference between both hemispheres is the absence of smooth deposits and dust coatings in the SH. The absence of similar deposits in the south may suggest that activity in the SH occurs with much higher intensity leading to ejection of dust particles at velocities exceeding comet's escape velocity. During the meeting, we plan to summarize the

  13. Functional Education for Careers That Count.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veliotis, P. Takis

    1981-01-01

    The author proposes that the academic/vocational dichotomy in American schools be replaced with the concept of "functional education," in which business, secondary schools, and colleges cooperate to provide more flexible and realistic training that will benefit young people and will provide business with the educated workers it needs. (SJL)

  14. DISCLOSING THE RADIO LOUDNESS DISTRIBUTION DICHOTOMY IN QUASARS: AN UNBIASED MONTE CARLO APPROACH APPLIED TO THE SDSS-FIRST QUASAR SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Balokovic, M.; Smolcic, V.; Ivezic, Z.; Zamorani, G.; Schinnerer, E.; Kelly, B. C.

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 {+-} 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  15. Individuality beyond the Dichotomy of "Small Self and Big Self" in Contemporary Chinese Education: Lessons from Hu Shi and Liang Shuming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Huajun

    2013-01-01

    This article identifies the problem that an instrumentalist mode of thinking dominates China's contemporary education practice and suggests that the dichotomy between the "small self and big self," a notion that has been present throughout modern Chinese history, exacerbates this instrumentalism. It parallels the loss of China's…

  16. Sinks with relatively large immediate basins and a refinement of Mañé’s C 1 generic dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shuhei

    2016-12-01

    A C 1 perturbation theorem creating sinks with relatively large immediate basins of attraction under the existence of a non-atomic ergodic measure admitting at most small positive Lyapunov exponents is provided. As an application, we prove a refinement of Mañé’s C 1 generic dichotomy for surface diffeomorphisms, that is, C 1 generically they have either (I) hyperbolicity; or (II) (by taking the inverse if necessary) infinitely many attracting periodic orbits each of which has either (a) relatively large immediate basins of attraction or (b) a pathological feature (i.e. the maximal and minimum norms of the derivatives along the periodic orbits increase and decrease exponentially, respectively, at the periods by a uniform rate). Moreover, the property (a) of (II) is considered from numerical viewpoints in the context of ‘observability’.

  17. The "enduring mission" of Zing-Yang Kuo to eliminate the nature-nurture dichotomy in psychology.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Hunter

    2011-05-01

    This paper reviews the arguments against the instinct concept and the nature-nurture dichotomy put forward by Zing-Yang Kuo (1898-1970) during the 1920s. Kuo insisted that nativism represented a kind of finished psychology, and that the labels of nature and nurture reflected and promoted one's ignorance of the development of a trait. Also discussed are his lesser known lines of research on the origins of the so-called rat-killing instinct in cats and his analysis on the determinants of animal fighting. His research illustrated the shortcomings of a nature-nurture framework and highlighted the necessity of his developmentally grounded alternative to studying behavior. Reasons for why Kuo's work has been marginalized in modern histories of psychology are also discussed.

  18. Toward Understanding the Fanaroff-Riley Dichotomy in Radio Source Morphology and Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Stefi A.; Zirbel, Esther L.; O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1995-09-01

    of the total energy output from the AGNs into jet kinetic energy versus radiant energy than do FR 2 sources. If this interpretation is correct, then this suggests that there is a fundamental difference in the central engine and/or in the immediate "accretion region" around the engine in FR 1 and FR 2 radio galaxies. We note also the absence of FR 1 sources with nuclear broad line regions and suggest that the absence of the BLR is tied to the absence of the "isotropic" nuclear UV continuum source in FR 1 sources. We put forth the possibility that the FR 1/FR 2 dichotomy (i.e., the observed differences in the properties of low- and high-power radio sources) is due to qualitative differences in the structural properties of the central engines in these two types of sources. Following early work by Rees et al. (1982), we suggest the possibility that FR 1 sources are produced when the central engine is fed at a lower accretion rate, leading to the creation of a source in which the ratio of radiant to jet bulk kinetic energy is low, while FR 2 sources are produced when the central engine is fed at a higher accretion rate, causing the central engine to deposit a higher fraction of its energy in radiant energy. We further suggest the possibility that associated differences in the spin properties of the central black hole between FR 1 (lower spin) and FR 2 (higher spin) sources may be responsible for the different collimation properties and Mach numbers of the jets produced by these two types of radio-loud galaxies. This scenario, although currently clearly speculative, is nicely consistent with our current picture of the triggering, feeding, environments, and evolution of powerful radio galaxies. This model allows for evolution of these properties with time for example, the mass accretion rate and BH spin may decline with time causing an FR 2 radio source or quasar to evolve into a FR 1 radio source.

  19. The cool component and the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of solar X-ray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.; Robe, Dominic

    2013-06-01

    We present results from a study of 54 polar X-ray jets that were observed in coronal X-ray movies from the X-ray Telescope on Hinode and had simultaneous coverage in movies of the cooler transition region (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) taken in the He II 304 Å band of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on Solar Dynamics Observatory. These dual observations verify the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of polar X-ray jets previously found primarily from XRT movies alone. In accord with models of blowout jets and standard jets, the AIA 304 Å movies show a cool (T ∼ 10{sup 5} K) component in nearly all blowout X-ray jets and in a small minority of standard X-ray jets, obvious lateral expansion in blowout X-ray jets but none in standard X-ray jets, and obvious axial rotation in both blowout X-ray jets and standard X-ray jets. In our sample, the number of turns of axial rotation in the cool-component standard X-ray jets is typical of that in the blowout X-ray jets, suggesting that the closed bipolar magnetic field in the jet base has substantial twist not only in all blowout X-ray jets but also in many standard X-ray jets. We point out that our results for the dichotomy, lateral expansion, and axial rotation of X-ray jets add credence to published speculation that type-II spicules are miniature analogs of X-ray jets, are generated by granule-size emerging bipoles, and thereby carry enough energy to power the corona and solar wind.

  20. Understanding the Dorsal and Ventral Systems of the Human Cerebral Cortex: Beyond Dichotomies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borst, Gregoire; Thompson, William L.; Kosslyn, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, characterizations of the macrolevel functional organization of the human cerebral cortex have focused on the left and right cerebral hemispheres. However, the idea of left brain versus right brain functions has been shown to be an oversimplification. We argue here that a top-bottom divide, rather than a left-right divide, is a more…

  1. The Smoking Gun: Remanent Magnetic Anomalies on Mars and the Formation of the Crustal Dichotomy via Giant Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombard, A. J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of large-scale crustal magnetic anomalies in the Southern Highlands of Mars is equivocal. Though some are indeed elongated primarily in the east-west direction, initial map projections exacerbated their linear nature, leading to the hypothesis that the anomalies are equivalent to magnetic stripes due to spreading of Earth's sea floor and hence to the proposal of plate tectonics on Mars. This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with Martian geology. For instance, a plate-tectonics model predicts the anomalies should be formed in thin, oceanic crust at low elevation, but instead they are found in the thick crust of the Highlands, not in the thin crust of the Northern Lowlands. Indeed, the formation of this Crustal Dichotomy is also equivocal, with models ranging from a giant impact (or multiple smaller impacts) near either the current north or south poles, to plate tectonics-like processes, to mantle convection, either eroding the crust in the northern hemisphere or thickening the crust in the south. Recently, the idea of a giant impact in the north has been resurrected, with the proposal that the Dichotomy results from the formation of an elliptical basin by a giant impact very early in Martian history. While it may be tempting to suggest that the current, generally demagnetized state of the Northern Lowlands may be related to this impact, this linkage makes implicit assumptions about the timing of dynamo shut-off on Mars, and it neglects other demagnetization mechanisms possibly operating in the Lowlands after such an impact (e.g., later hydrothermal processing). More direct magnetic evidence for the giant impact hypothesis would come if the remanent magnetism in Southern Highlands were relatable in a unique way to the putative impact. Here, we show that the positions of many of the dominant elongated magnetic anomalies on Mars are consistent with the first ring of a multi-ring basin. The best match comes from an ellipse ~2200 km wider than the

  2. [Functional imaging of pain: from the somatic response to emotions].

    PubMed

    Laurent, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Functional brain imaging in subjects experiencing pain (real, observed or imagined) has led to considerable progress in our understanding of the role of the brain andpsyche in pain integration and control, as well as some forms of somatoform pain with no anatomical basis. This research is challenging not only the dichotomy between the soma and psyche, but also the concept of psychosomatic pain.

  3. A dichotomy between the hard state spectral properties of black hole and neutron star X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. J.; Gilfanov, M.; Sunyaev, R.

    2017-04-01

    We analyse the spectra of black hole (BH) and neutron star (NS) X-ray binaries (XBs) in the hard state using archival RXTE observations. We find that there is a clear dichotomy in the strength of Comptonization between NS and BH sources, as measured by both the Compton y-parameter and the amplification factor A, with distinct groups of BH and NS XBs separated at y ∼ 0.9 and A ∼ 3. The electron temperature kTe can occupy a broad range in BH systems, from kTe ∼ 30 to 200 keV, whereas for NSs kTe is peaked at ∼15-25 keV, but can extend to higher values. The difference between BHs and NSs in y implies that kTe is higher at a given optical depth for BH XBs. Our results also imply that for NS systems the accreting material loses ∼1/2-2/3 of its energy through Comptonization in the corona. The remaining energy is released on the surface of the NS, making it a powerful source of soft radiation, which alters the properties of the Comptonizing corona. Finally, we find evidence at the ∼2.4σ confidence level that Comptonization parameters may be correlated with the NS spin, whereas no correlation with the BH spin is found. Our results highlight a further observational distinction between BH and NS XBs, which is a consequence of NSs possessing a physical surface.

  4. A Dichotomy of Information-Seeking and Information-Trusting: Stem Cell Interventions and Children with Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Kimberly; Di Pietro, Nina; Jacob, Karen J; Illes, Judy

    2016-08-01

    Parents and primary caregivers of children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are faced with difficult treatment choices and management options for their children. The potential of stem cell technologies as an interventional strategy for CP and ASD has gained attention in the last decade. Information about these interventions varies in quality, resulting in a complex landscape for parent decision making for a child's care. Further complicating this landscape are clinics that advertise these interventions as a legitimate treatment for a fee. In this study, we surveyed individuals who considered taking their child with ASD or CP abroad for stem cell interventions on their use of different sources of stem cell related health information and their level of trust in these sources. Participants reported that while the Internet was their most frequent source of information, it was not well-trusted. Rather, information sources trusted most were researchers and the science journals in which they publish, other parents of children with CP and ASD, and healthcare providers. These findings highlight a dichotomy between information-seeking preferences and information-trusted sources. We discuss the challenges of health science communication and present innovative opportunities to increase communication with trusted and reliable sources as part of an integrated multi-pronged approach.

  5. The Dichotomy of Tumor Exosomes (TEX) in Cancer Immunity: Is It All in the ConTEXt?

    PubMed Central

    Kunigelis, Katherine E.; Graner, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are virus-sized nanoparticles (30–130 nm) formed intracellularly as intravesicular bodies/intralumenal vesicles within maturing endosomes (“multivesicular bodies”, MVBs). If MVBs fuse with the cell’s plasma membrane, the interior vesicles may be released extracellularly, and are termed “exosomes”. The protein cargo of exosomes consists of cytosolic, membrane, and extracellular proteins, along with membrane-derived lipids, and an extraordinary variety of nucleic acids. As such, exosomes reflect the status and identity of the parent cell, and are considered as tiny cellular surrogates. Because of this closely entwined relationship between exosome content and the source/status of the parental cell, conceivably exosomes could be used as vaccines against various pathologies, as they contain antigens associated with a given disease, e.g., cancer. Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) have been shown to be potent anticancer vaccines in animal models, driving antigen-specific T and B cell responses, but much recent literature concerning TEX strongly places the vesicles as powerfully immunosuppressive. This dichotomy suggests that the context in which the immune system encounters TEX is critical in determining immune stimulation versus immunosuppression. Here, we review literature on both sides of this immune coin, and suggest that it may be time to revisit the concept of TEX as anticancer vaccines in clinical settings. PMID:26694473

  6. Safety Profile of Finasteride: Distribution of Adverse Effects According to Structural and Informational Dichotomies of the Mind/Brain.

    PubMed

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L; Manea, Mirela; Georgescu, Simona R; Păunică, Ioana; Sinescu, Ioanel

    2017-02-04

    Finasteride is currently used extensively for male androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia; however, some adverse effects are severe and even persistent after treatment cessation, the so-called 'post-finasteride syndrome'. The following most severe adverse effects-sexual dysfunction and depression-often occur together and may potentiate one other, a fact that could explain (at least in part) the magnitude and persistence of finasteride adverse effects. This paper presents the pharmacological action of finasteride and the corresponding adverse effects, the biological base explaining the occurrence, persistence and distribution of these adverse effects, and a possible therapeutic solution for post-finasteride syndrome. The distribution of finasteride adverse effects is presented within a comprehensive and modern neuro-endocrine perspective related to structural and informational dichotomies of the brain. Understanding the variation of finasteride side effects among different populations would be necessary not only to delineate the safety profile of finasteride for different subgroups of men (a subject may or may not be affected by a certain anti-hormonal compound dependent on the individual neuro-endocrine profile), but also as a possible premise for a therapeutic approach of finasteride adverse effects. Such therapeutic approach should include administration of exogenous hormones, which are deficient in men with post-finasteride syndrome, namely dihydrotestosterone (in right-handed men) or progesterone/dihydroprogesterone (in left-handed subjects).

  7. The Kepler Dichotomy in Planetary Disks: Linking Kepler Observables to Simulations of Late-stage Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, John; Ballard, Sarah

    2016-11-01

    NASA’s Kepler Mission uncovered a wealth of planetary systems, many with planets on short-period orbits. These short-period systems reside around 50% of Sun-like stars and are similarly prevalent around M dwarfs. Their formation and subsequent evolution is the subject of active debate. In this paper, we simulate late-stage, in situ planet formation across a grid of planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles and total mass. We compare simulation results with observable characteristics of the Kepler sample. We identify mixture models with different primordial planetesimal disk properties that self-consistently recover the multiplicity, radius, period and period ratio, and duration ratio distributions of the Kepler planets. We draw three main conclusions. (1) We favor a “frozen-in” narrative for systems of short-period planets, in which they are stable over long timescales, as opposed to metastable. (2) The “Kepler dichotomy,” an observed phenomenon of the Kepler sample wherein the architectures of planetary systems appear to either vary significantly or have multiple modes, can naturally be explained by formation within planetesimal disks with varying surface density profiles. Finally, (3) we quantify the nature of the “Kepler dichotomy” for both GK stars and M dwarfs, and find that it varies with stellar type. While the mode of planet formation that accounts for high multiplicity systems occurs in 24% ± 7% of planetary systems orbiting GK stars, it occurs in 63% ± 16% of planetary systems orbiting M dwarfs.

  8. Dichotomy in the NRT Gene Families of Dicots and Grass Species

    PubMed Central

    Plett, Darren; Toubia, John; Garnett, Trevor; Tester, Mark; Kaiser, Brent N.; Baumann, Ute

    2010-01-01

    A large proportion of the nitrate (NO3−) acquired by plants from soil is actively transported via members of the NRT families of NO3− transporters. In Arabidopsis, the NRT1 family has eight functionally characterised members and predominantly comprises low-affinity transporters; the NRT2 family contains seven members which appear to be high-affinity transporters; and there are two NRT3 (NAR2) family members which are known to participate in high-affinity transport. A modified reciprocal best hit (RBH) approach was used to identify putative orthologues of the Arabidopsis NRT genes in the four fully sequenced grass genomes (maize, rice, sorghum, Brachypodium). We also included the poplar genome in our analysis to establish whether differences between Arabidopsis and the grasses may be generally applicable to monocots and dicots. Our analysis reveals fundamental differences between Arabidopsis and the grass species in the gene number and family structure of all three families of NRT transporters. All grass species possessed additional NRT1.1 orthologues and appear to lack NRT1.6/NRT1.7 orthologues. There is significant separation in the NRT2 phylogenetic tree between NRT2 genes from dicots and grass species. This indicates that determination of function of NRT2 genes in grass species will not be possible in cereals based simply on sequence homology to functionally characterised Arabidopsis NRT2 genes and that proper functional analysis will be required. Arabidopsis has a unique NRT3.2 gene which may be a fusion of the NRT3.1 and NRT3.2 genes present in all other species examined here. This work provides a framework for future analysis of NO3− transporters and NO3− transport in grass crop species. PMID:21151904

  9. EVERY BCG WITH A STRONG RADIO AGN HAS AN X-RAY COOL CORE: IS THE COOL CORE-NONCOOL CORE DICHOTOMY TOO SIMPLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, M.

    2009-10-20

    The radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in X-ray cool cores has been proposed as a crucial ingredient in the evolution of baryonic structures. However, it has long been known that strong radio AGNs also exist in 'noncool core' clusters, which brings up the question whether an X-ray cool core is always required for the radio feedback. In this work, we present a systematic analysis of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and strong radio AGNs in 152 groups and clusters from the Chandra archive. All 69 BCGs with radio AGN more luminous than 2 x 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} at 1.4 GHz are found to have X-ray cool cores. BCG cool cores can be divided into two classes: the large cool core (LCC) class and the corona class. Small coronae, easily overlooked at z > 0.1, can trigger strong heating episodes in groups and clusters, long before LCCs are formed. Strong radio outbursts triggered by coronae may destroy embryonic LCCs and thus provide another mechanism to prevent the formation of LCCs. However, it is unclear whether coronae are decoupled from the radio feedback cycles as they have to be largely immune to strong radio outbursts. Our sample study also shows the absence of groups with a luminous cool core while hosting a strong radio AGN, which is not observed in clusters. This points to a greater impact of radio heating on low-mass systems than clusters. Few L {sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1} radio AGNs (approx16%) host an L {sub 0.5-10keV} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} X-ray AGN, while above these thresholds, all X-ray AGNs in BCGs are also radio AGNs. As examples of the corona class, we also present detailed analyses of a BCG corona associated with a strong radio AGN (ESO 137-006 in A3627) and one of the faintest coronae known (NGC 4709 in the Centaurus cluster). Our results suggest that the traditional cool core/noncool core dichotomy is too simple. A better alternative is the cool core distribution function, with the enclosed X-ray luminosity or gas mass.

  10. Volume-limited SDSS/First quasars and the radio dichotomy

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Jester; R.G. Kron

    2004-03-12

    Much evidence has been presented in favor of and against the existence of two distinct populations of quasars, radio-loud and radio-quiet. The SDSS differs from earlier optically selected quasar surveys in the large number of quasars and the targeting of FIRST radio source counterparts as quasar candidates. This allows a qualitatively different approach of constructing a series of samples at different redshifts which are volume-limited with respect to both radio and optical luminosity. This technique avoids any biases from the strong evolution of quasar counts with redshift and potential redshift-dependent selection effects. We find that optical and radio luminosities of quasars detected in both SDSS and FIRST are not well correlated within each redshift shell, although the fraction of radio detections among optically selected quasars remains roughly constant at 10% for z {le} 3.2. The distribution in the luminosity-luminosity plane does not appear to be strongly bimodal. The optical luminosity function is marginally flatter at higher radio luminosities.

  11. Differences in the timing of prechondrogenic limb development in mammals: the marsupial-placental dichotomy resolved.

    PubMed

    Sears, Karen E

    2009-08-01

    In contrast to placentals, marsupials are born with forelimbs that are greatly developmentally advanced relative to their hind limbs. Despite significant interest, we still do not know why this is the case, or how this difference is achieved developmentally. Studies of prechondrogenic and chondrogenic limbs have supported the traditional hypothesis that marsupial forelimb development is accelerated in response to the functional requirements of the newborn's crawl to the teat. However, limb ossification studies have concluded that, rather than the forelimb being accelerated, hind limb development is delayed. By increasing the taxonomic coverage and number of prechondrogenic events relative to previous studies, and combining traditional phylogenetic analyses of event sequences with novel analyses of relative developmental rates, this study demonstrates that the timing of limb development in marsupials is more complex than commonly thought. The marsupial phenotype was derived through two independent evolutionary changes in developmental rate: (1) an acceleration of the forelimb's first appearance and (2) a delay of hind limb development from the bud stage onward. Surprisingly, this study also provides some support for an evolutionary acceleration of the marsupial hind limb's first appearance. Further study is needed on the developmental and genetic mechanisms driving these major evolutionary transitions.

  12. 3C 57 as an atypical radio-loud quasar: implications for the radio-loud/radio-quiet dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Martínez-Carballo, M. A.; Marziani, P.; del Olmo, A.; Stirpe, G. M.; Zamfir, S.; Plauchu-Frayn, I.

    2015-06-01

    Lobe-dominated radio-loud (LD RL) quasars occupy a restricted domain in the 4D Eigenvector 1 (4DE1) parameter space which implies restricted geometry/physics/kinematics for this subclass compared to the radio-quiet (RQ) majority of quasars. We discuss how this restricted domain for the LD RL parent population supports the notion for a RQ-RL dichotomy among type 1 sources. 3C 57 is an atypical RL quasar that shows both uncertain radio morphology and falls in a region of 4DE1 space where RL quasars are rare. We present new radio flux and optical spectroscopic measures designed to verify its atypical optical/UV spectroscopic behaviour and clarify its radio structure. The former data confirms that 3C 57 falls off the 4DE1 quasar `main sequence' with both extreme optical Fe II emission (R_{Fe II} ˜ 1) and a large C IV λ1549 profile blueshift (˜-1500 km s-1). These parameter values are typical of extreme Population A sources which are almost always RQ. New radio measures show no evidence for flux change over a 50+ year time-scale consistent with compact steep-spectrum (or young LD) over core-dominated morphology. In the 4DE1 context where LD RL are usually low L/LEdd quasars, we suggest that 3C 57 is an evolved RL quasar (i.e. large blackhole mass) undergoing a major accretion event leading to a rejuvenation reflected by strong Fe II emission, perhaps indicating significant heavy metal enrichment, high bolometric luminosity for a low-redshift source and resultant unusually high Eddington ratio giving rise to the atypical C IV λ1549.

  13. A quasi-universal medium to break the aerobic/anaerobic bacterial culture dichotomy in clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Dione, N; Khelaifia, S; La Scola, B; Lagier, J C; Raoult, D

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-19th century, the dichotomy between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria was introduced. Nevertheless, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacterial species such as Ruminococcus gnavus and Fusobacterium necrophorum, in a culture medium containing antioxidants, was recently demonstrated. We tested aerobically the culture of 623 bacterial strains from 276 bacterial species including 82 strictly anaerobic, 154 facultative anaerobic, 31 aerobic and nine microaerophilic bacterial species as well as ten fungi. The basic culture medium was based on Schaedler agar supplemented with 1 g/L ascorbic acid and 0.1 g/L glutathione (R-medium). We successively optimized this media, adding 0.4 g/L uric acid, using separate autoclaving of the component, or adding haemin 0.1 g/L or α-ketoglutarate 2 g/L. In the basic medium, 237 bacterial species and ten fungal species grew but with no growth of 36 bacterial species, including 22 strict anaerobes. Adding uric acid allowed the growth of 14 further species including eight strict anaerobes, while separate autoclaving allowed the growth of all tested bacterial strains. To extend its potential use for fastidious bacteria, we added haemin for Haemophilus influenzae, Haemophilus parainfluenzae and Eikenella corrodens and α-ketoglutarate for Legionella pneumophila. This medium allowed the growth of all tested strains with the exception of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis. Testing primoculture and more fastidious species will constitute the main work to be done, but R-medium coupled with a rapid identification method (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) will facilitate the anaerobic culture in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  14. DichotomY IdentitY: Euler-Bernoulli Numbers, Sets-Multisets, FD-BE Quantum-Statistics, 1 /f0 - 1 /f1 Power-Spectra, Ellipse-Hyperbola Conic-Sections, Local-Global Extent: ``Category-Semantics''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, G.-C.; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Seminal Apostol[Math.Mag.81,3,178(08);Am.Math.Month.115,9,795(08)]-Rota[Intro.Prob. Thy.(95)-p.50-55] DichotomY equivalence-class: set-theory: sets V multisets; closed V open; to Abromowitz-Stegun[Hdbk.Math.Fns.(64)]-ch.23,p.803!]: numbers/polynomials generating-functions: Euler V Bernoulli; to Siegel[Schrodinger Cent.Symp.(87); Symp.Fractals, MRS Fall Mtg.,(1989)-5-papers!] power-spectrum: 1/ f {0}-White V 1/ f {1}-Zipf/Pink (Archimedes) HYPERBOLICITY INEVITABILITY; to analytic-geometry Conic-Sections: Ellipse V (via Parabola) V Hyperbola; to Extent/Scale/Radius: Locality V Globality, Root-Causes/Ultimate-Origins: Dimensionality: odd-Z V (via fractal) V even-Z, to Symmetries/(Noether's-theorem connected)/Conservation-Laws Dichotomy: restored/conservation/convergence=0- V broken/non-conservation/divergence=/=0: with asymptotic-limit antipodes morphisms/ crossovers: Eureka!!!; "FUZZYICS"=''CATEGORYICS''!!! Connection to Kummer(1850) Bernoulli-numbers proof of FLT is via Siegel(CCNY;1964) < (1994)[AMS Joint Mtg. (2002)-Abs.973-60-124] short succinct physics proof: FLT = Least-Action Principle!!!

  15. Neuroanatomical dichotomy of sexual behaviors in rodents: a special emphasis on brain serotonin

    PubMed Central

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Much of the social behavior in which rodents engage is related to reproduction, such as maintaining a breeding territory, seeking mates, mating, and caring for young. Rodents belong to the internally fertilizing species that require sexual behavior for reproduction. The dyadic, heterosexual patterns of most mammalian species are sexually dimorphic, but they also share mutual components in both sexes: sexual attraction is reciprocal, sexual initiative is assumed, appetitive behavior is engaged in and mating involves consummatory and postconsummatory phases in females as well as in males. Serotonin, a phylogenetically ancient molecule, is the most widely distributed neurotransmitter in the brain and its signaling pathways are essential for numerous functions including sexual behavior. Since the late 1960’s, brain serotonergic neurotransmission has been considered to exert an inhibitory influence on the neural mechanisms mediating sexual behavior. This contention was based mainly on the observations that a decrease in central serotonergic activity facilitated the elicitation of sexual behavior while an increase in central serotonergic activity attenuated it. However, the discovery of over 14 types of serotonin receptors has added numerous layers of complexity to the study of serotonin and sexual behavior. Evidence shows that upon activation, certain receptor subtypes facilitate while some others suppress sexual behavior as well as sexual arousal and motivation. Furthermore, the role of these receptors has been shown to be differential in males versus females. The use of serotonergic pharmacological interventions, mouse strains with genetic polymorphisms causing alterations in the levels of brain serotonin as well as animal models with genetic manipulations of various serotonin effectors has helped delineate the fundamental role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of sexual behavior. This review aims to examine the basics of the components of female and male

  16. Kraepelin's dichotomy is true: contrasting brain dysfunction at the extremes of human growth and maturation. Excitability, the fundamental property of nervous tissue, is affected.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of Kraepelin's ubiquitous dichotomy varies with standard of living and pubertal age: when one rises, the other declines. The universal similar clinical picture--mortality risk, manic depressive psychosis, episodic dysfunction of brainstem control systems (sleep-wake cycle, food, mood control mechanism)--is caused by abridged pubertal pruning of excitatory synapses, which is treated with anti-epileptics, as opposed to convulsant neuroleptics in dementia praecox, where the clinical variation reflects varying degrees of excessive pruning and deficit in excitability. Localization of cortical breakdown of circuitry, silent spots and persistent dysfunction due to insufficient fill-in mechanisms, determine the clinical picture. This ranges from dementia praecox in late puberty and poor living standards, to cognitive dysfunction (mainly with higher standards of living) with earlier puberty. This variation is the most likely explanation why the acceptance of dementia praecox as a disease entity was complicated. Kraepelin's dichotomy, episodic dysfunction against a clinical deterioration, is at the extremes of brain maturation; the fundamental property of nervous tissue, excitability, is affected. To reduce the risk of psychotic episodes, omega-3 might also be given, as it normalizes excitation at all levels. The neo-Kraepelinian atheoretical quantitative scoring systems have eliminated disease entities and neglected endogeneity in psychiatry. We are back to a pre-Kraepelinian state, without his systematic observations. What is psychiatry without Kraepelin's dichotomy? Mood stability is a fundamental personality trait with a normal distribution; what is considered within or outside normal variation is arbitrary. Given the mood-stabilizing effect of anti-epileptics and omega-3, these will increasingly dominate psychiatric treatment.

  17. Madonna: Like a Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary; Kizer, Elizabeth

    Students in communication classes find it useful to study Madonna because she is a fascinating and prolific cultural figure whose merit and intentions are matters of great controversy. As the quintessential music-video star, she is also perhaps the medium's most significant auteur. In the areas of women's roles, motherhood, sexuality, race and…

  18. Relative Ages of the Highlands, Lowlands, and Transition Zone Along a Portion of the Mars Crustal Dichotomy from Densities of Visible and Buried Impact Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSoto, G. E.; Frey, H. V.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental age relationships of the different parts of the Mars Crustal Dichotomy is essential to fully understanding the events that shaped the early history and formation of the surface of Mars. A dominant question is what are the true relative ages of the Northern Lowlands and the Southern Highlands? Using MOLA data from the Mars Global Surveyor and Viking visual images, a dataset of both buried and visible crater diameters was created over a nine million sq km study area of a section of the dichotomy boundary stretching from Arabia Terra to Utopia Planitia. Cumulative frequency plots on a log-log scale were used to determine the relative ages for the Highlands, the Lowlands, and the Transition Zone, separately for the visible, the buried and the combined total (visible+ buried) populations. We find the overall Highland crater population in this area is slightly older than the Lowlands, consistent with previous global studies, but the Lowlands and Transition Zone are also very old and formed at roughly the same time. It appears that the formation of the Lowlands in this region formed contemporaneously with a large-scale resurfacing event in the Highlands, perhaps caused by the process responsible for the Lowland formation.

  19. Amazonian Mid-Latitude Regional Glaciation on Mars: Lineated Valley Fill, Lobate Debris Aprons and Plateau Deposits at the Dichotomy Boundary and Implications for Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Marchant, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    The dichotomy boundary on Mars represents a distinct geologic, topographic, morphologic and crustal thickness boundary that is characterized by a wide range of modificational processes. The Deuteronilus-Protonilus region represents the area where the boundary reaches its highest latitude. The fretted terrain, located in the vicinity of the dichotomy boundary at these mid-northern latitudes on Mars, displays two enigmatic terrain types: lobate debris aprons (LDA) and lineated valley fill (LVF). The prevailing hypotheses for their origin has been mass wasting from mesa margins and valley walls, with movement periodically assisted by groundwater seepage or atmospheric vapor diffusion into the debris aprons, causing ice-assisted creep. Creep from opposite valley walls and convergence in valley centers has been called on to explain the parallel, along-valley lineations, and little evidence has been found for down-valley movement. New higher-resolution THEMIS and MOC data, however, show compelling evidence for a more integrated picture of LVF formation, suggesting a significant role for regional glaciation. We find evidence for: 1) localized alcoves, sources of hundreds of narrow, lobate concentric-ridged debris flows; 2) bulbous-headed tributary valley systems, which contain converging LVF that feeds into larger valley systems; 3) rounded-sharp-paired intersections of the corners of tributary entrances into main valleys, with sharp corners pointing down-flow; 4) narrow arete-like linear plateau ridge remnants, commonly parallel to LVF; 5) horseshoe-shaped ridges up-valley of topographic obstacles, with deformed and folded upslope LVF; 6) convergence and merging of LVF in the down-valley directions; 7) deformation, distortion and folding of LVF in the vicinity of convergence; 8) distinctive lobe-shaped termini where LVF emerges into the northern lowlands. We interpret these LVF features to have formed as parts of integrated valley glacial systems extending hundreds of km

  20. Photometric properties of Titan's surface from Cassini VIMS: Relevance to titan's hemispherical albedo dichotomy and surface stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, R.M.; Brown, R.H.; Hapke, B.W.; Smythe, W.D.; Kamp, L.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.; Baines, K.H.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Combes, M.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Formisano, V.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.

    2006-01-01

    The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument on the Cassini Saturn Orbiter returned spectral imaging data as the spacecraft undertook six close encounters with Titan beginning 7 July, 2004. Three of these flybys each produced overlapping coverage of two distinct regions of Titan's surface. Twenty-four points were selected on approximately opposite hemispheres to serve as photometric controls. Six points were selected in each of four reflectance classes. On one hemisphere each control point was observed at three distinct phase angles. From the derived phase coefficients, preliminary normal reflectances were derived for each reflectance class. The normal reflectance of Titan's surface units at 2.0178 ??m ranged from 0.079 to 0.185 for the most absorbing to the most reflective units assuming no contribution from absorbing haze. When a modest haze contribution of ??=0.1 is considered these numbers increase to 0.089-0.215. We find that the lowest three reflectance classes have comparable normal reflectance on either hemisphere. However, for the highest brightness class the normal reflectance is higher on the hemisphere encompassing longitude 14-65?? compared to the same high brightness class for the hemisphere encompassing 122-156?? longitude. We conclude that an albedo dichotomy observed in continental sized units on Titan is due not only to one unit having more areal coverage of reflective material than the other but the material on the brighter unit is intrinsically more reflective than the most reflective material on the other unit. This suggests that surface renewal processes are more widespread on Titan's more reflective units than on its less reflective units. We note that one of our photometric control points has increased in reflectance by 12% relative to the surrounding terrain from July of 2004 to April and May of 2005. Possible causes of this effect include atmospheric processes such as ground fog or orographic clouds; the suggestion of

  1. Molecular mechanism for opioid dichotomy: bidirectional effect of μ-opioid receptors on P2X₃ receptor currents in rat sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Chizhmakov, Igor; Kulyk, Vyacheslav; Khasabova, Iryna; Khasabov, Sergey; Simone, Donald; Bakalkin, Georgy; Gordienko, Dmitri; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Krishtal, Oleg

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe a molecular switch associated with opioid receptors-linked signalling cascades that provides a dual opioid control over P2X3 purinoceptor in sensory neurones. Leu-enkephalin inhibited P2X3-mediated currents with IC50 ~10 nM in ~25% of small nociceptive rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones. In contrast, in neurones pretreated with pertussis toxin leu-enkephalin produced stable and significant increase of P2X3 currents. All effects of opioid were abolished by selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), nonselective inhibitor naloxone, and by PLC inhibitor U73122. Thus, we discovered a dual link between purinoceptors and μ-opioid receptors: the latter exert both inhibitory (pertussis toxin-sensitive) and stimulatory (pertussis toxin-insensitive) actions on P2X3 receptors through phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent pathways. This dual opioid control of P2X3 receptors may provide a molecular explanation for dichotomy of opioid therapy. Pharmacological control of this newly identified facilitation/inhibition switch may open new perspectives for the adequate medical use of opioids, the most powerful pain-killing agents known today.

  2. Stable symbionts across the HMA-LMA dichotomy: low seasonal and interannual variation in sponge-associated bacteria from taxonomically diverse hosts.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Patrick M; Coma, Rafel; López-Sendino, Paula; Serrano, Eduard; Ribes, Marta

    2015-10-01

    Marine sponges host bacterial communities with important ecological and economic roles in nature and society, yet these benefits depend largely on the stability of host-symbiont interactions and their susceptibility to changing environmental conditions. Here, we investigated the temporal stability of complex host-microbe symbioses in a temperate, seasonal environment over three years, targeting sponges across a range of symbiont density (high and low microbial abundance, HMA and LMA) and host taxonomy (six orders). Symbiont profiling by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that bacterial communities in all sponges exhibited a high degree of host specificity, low seasonal dynamics and low interannual variability: results that represent an emerging trend in the field of sponge microbiology and contrast sharply with the seasonal dynamics of free-living bacterioplankton. Further, HMA sponges hosted more diverse, even and similar symbiont communities than LMA sponges and these differences in community structure extended to core members of the microbiome. Together, these findings show clear distinctions in symbiont structure between HMA and LMA sponges while resolving notable similarities in their stability over seasonal and inter-annual scales, thus providing insight into the ecological consequences of the HMA-LMA dichotomy and the temporal stability of complex host-microbe symbioses.

  3. Venomic Analysis of the Poorly Studied Desert Coral Snake, Micrurus tschudii tschudii, Supports the 3FTx/PLA2 Dichotomy across Micrurus Venoms

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Libia; Pla, Davinia; Pérez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Yania; Zavaleta, Alfonso; Salas, Maria; Lomonte, Bruno; Calvete, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    The venom proteome of the poorly studied desert coral snake Micrurus tschudii tschudii was unveiled using a venomic approach, which identified ≥38 proteins belonging to only four snake venom protein families. The three-finger toxins (3FTxs) constitute, both in number of isoforms (~30) and total abundance (93.6% of the venom proteome), the major protein family of the desert coral snake venom. Phospholipases A2 (PLA2s; seven isoforms, 4.1% of the venom proteome), 1–3 Kunitz-type proteins (1.6%), and 1–2 l-amino acid oxidases (LAO, 0.7%) complete the toxin arsenal of M. t. tschudii. Our results add to the growing evidence that the occurrence of two divergent venom phenotypes, i.e., 3FTx- and PLA2-predominant venom proteomes, may constitute a general trend across the cladogenesis of Micrurus. The occurrence of a similar pattern of venom phenotypic variability among true sea snake (Hydrophiinae) venoms suggests that the 3FTx/PLA2 dichotomy may be widely distributed among Elapidae venoms. PMID:27338473

  4. A potential role of reward and punishment in the facilitation of the emotion-cognition dichotomy in the Iowa Gambling Task.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varsha

    2013-01-01

    The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) is based on the assumption that a decision maker is equally motivated to seek reward and avoid punishment, and that decision making is governed solely by the intertemporal attribute (i.e., preference for an option that produces an immediate outcome instead of one that yields a delayed outcome is believed to reflect risky decision making and is considered a deficit). It was assumed in the present study that the emotion- and cognition-based processing dichotomy manifests in the IGT as reward and punishment frequency and the intertemporal attribute. It was further proposed that the delineation of emotion- and cognition-based processing is contingent upon reward and punishment as manifested in the frame of the task (variant type) and task motivation (instruction type). The effects of IGT variant type (reward vs. punishment) and instruction type (task motivation induced by instruction types: reward, punishment, reward and punishment, or no hint) on the intertemporal and frequency attributes of IGT decision-making were analyzed. Decision making in the reward variant was equally governed by both attributes, and significantly affected by instruction type, while decision making in the punishment variant was differentially affected by the two attributes and not significantly impacted by instruction type. These results suggest that reward and punishment manifested via task frame as well as the task motivation may facilitate the differentiation of emotion- and cognition-based processing in the IGT.

  5. The era of comparable life expectancy between thalassaemia major and intermedia: Is it time to revisit the major-intermedia dichotomy?

    PubMed

    Vitrano, Angela; Calvaruso, Giuseppina; Lai, Eliana; Colletta, Grazia; Quota, Alessandra; Gerardi, Calogera; Concetta Rigoli, Luciana; Pitrolo, Lorella; Cuccia, Liana; Gagliardotto, Francesco; Filosa, Aldo; Caruso, Vincenzo; Argento, Crocetta; Campisi, Saveria; Rizzo, Michele; Prossomariti, Luciano; Fidone, Carmelo; Fustaneo, Maria; Di Maggio, Rosario; Maggio, Aurelio

    2017-01-01

    In the last few decades, the life expectancy of regularly transfused β-thalassaemia major (TM) patients has dramatically improved following the introduction of safe transfusion practices, iron chelation therapy, aggressive treatment of infections and improved management of cardiac complications. How such changes, especially those attributed to the introduction of iron chelation therapy, improved the survival of TM patients to approach those with β-thalassaemia intermedia (TI) remains unknown. Three hundred and seventy-nine patients with TM (n = 284, dead 40) and TI (n = 95, dead 13) were followed retrospectively since birth until 30 June 2015 or death. Kaplan-Meir curves showed statistically significant differences in TM and TI survival (P < 0·0001) before the introduction of iron chelation in 1965, which were no longer apparent after that date (P = 0·086), reducing the Hazard Ratio of death in TM compared to TI from 6·8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 2·6-17·5] before 1965 to 2·8 (95% CI 0·8-9·2). These findings suggest that, in the era of iron chelation therapy and improved survival for TM, the major-intermedia dichotomy needs to be revisited alongside future directions in general management and prevention for both conditions.

  6. Venomic Analysis of the Poorly Studied Desert Coral Snake, Micrurus tschudii tschudii, Supports the 3FTx/PLA₂ Dichotomy across Micrurus Venoms.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Libia; Pla, Davinia; Pérez, Alicia; Rodríguez, Yania; Zavaleta, Alfonso; Salas, Maria; Lomonte, Bruno; Calvete, Juan J

    2016-06-07

    The venom proteome of the poorly studied desert coral snake Micrurus tschudii tschudii was unveiled using a venomic approach, which identified ≥38 proteins belonging to only four snake venom protein families. The three-finger toxins (3FTxs) constitute, both in number of isoforms (~30) and total abundance (93.6% of the venom proteome), the major protein family of the desert coral snake venom. Phospholipases A₂ (PLA₂s; seven isoforms, 4.1% of the venom proteome), 1-3 Kunitz-type proteins (1.6%), and 1-2 l-amino acid oxidases (LAO, 0.7%) complete the toxin arsenal of M. t. tschudii. Our results add to the growing evidence that the occurrence of two divergent venom phenotypes, i.e., 3FTx- and PLA₂-predominant venom proteomes, may constitute a general trend across the cladogenesis of Micrurus. The occurrence of a similar pattern of venom phenotypic variability among true sea snake (Hydrophiinae) venoms suggests that the 3FTx/PLA₂ dichotomy may be widely distributed among Elapidae venoms.

  7. Effect of postural insoles on static and functional balance in children with cerebral palsy: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Christovão, Thaluanna C. L.; Pasini, Hugo; Grecco, Luanda A. C.; Ferreira, Luiz A. B.; Duarte, Natália A. C.; Oliveira, Cláudia S.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Improved gait efficiency is one of the goals of therapy for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Postural insoles can allow more efficient gait by improving biomechanical alignment. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of the combination of postural insoles and ankle-foot orthoses on static and functional balance in children with CP. METHOD: A randomized, controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. After meeting legal requirements and the eligibility criteria, 20 children between four and 12 years of age were randomly allocated either to the control group (CG) (n=10) or the experimental group (EG) (n=10). The CG used placebo insoles and the EG used postural insoles. The Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up-and-Go Test, Six-Minute Walk Test, and Gross Motor Function Measure-88 were used to assess balance as well as the determination of oscillations from the center of pressure in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions with eyes open and closed. Three evaluations were carried out: 1) immediately following placement of the insoles; 2) after three months of insole use; and 3) one month after suspending insole use. RESULTS: The EG achieved significantly better results in comparison to the CG on the Timed Up-and-Go Test as well as body sway in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. CONCLUSION: Postural insoles led to an improvement in static balance among children with cerebral palsy, as demonstrated by the reduction in body sway in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions. Postural insole use also led to a better performance on the Timed Up-and-Go Test. PMID:25651134

  8. Dichotomy of short and long thymic stromal lymphopoietin isoforms in inflammatory disorders of the bowel and skin

    PubMed Central

    Fornasa, Giulia; Tsilingiri, Katerina; Caprioli, Flavio; Botti, Fiorenzo; Mapelli, Marina; Meller, Stephan; Kislat, Andreas; Homey, Bernhard; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Sonzogni, Angelica; Viale, Giuseppe; Diaferia, Giuseppe; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Penna, Giuseppe; Rescigno, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in the immune system. It has been associated with allergic reactions in the skin and lungs but also homeostatic tolerogenic responses in the thymus and gut. Objective In human subjects TSLP is present in 2 isoforms, short and long. Here we wanted to investigate the differential expression of the TSLP isoforms and discern their biological implications under homeostatic or inflammatory conditions. Methods We evaluated the expression of TSLPs in tissues from healthy subjects, patients with ulcerative colitis, patients with celiac disease, and patients with atopic dermatitis and on epithelial cells and keratinocytes under steady-state conditions or after stimulation. We then tested the immune activity of TSLP isoforms both in vitro and in vivo. Results We showed that TSLP isoforms are responsible for 2 opposite immune functions. The short isoform is expressed under steady-state conditions and exerts anti-inflammatory activities by affecting the capacity of PBMCs and dendritic cells to produce inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, the short isoform TSLP ameliorates experimental colitis in mice and prevents endotoxin shock. The long isoform of TSLP is proinflammatory and is only expressed during inflammation. The isoforms are differentially regulated by pathogenic bacteria, such as Salmonella species and adhesive-invasive Escherichia coli. Conclusions We have solved the dilemma of TSLP being both homeostatic and inflammatory. The TSLP isoform ratio is altered during several inflammatory disorders, with strong implications in disease treatment and prevention. Indeed, targeting of the long isoform of TSLP at the C-terminal portion, which is common to both isoforms, might lead to unwanted side effects caused by neutralization of the homeostatic short isoform. PMID:26014813

  9. Dichotomies of collectivism and individualism in bioethics: Selective abortion debates and issues of self-determination in Japan and 'the West'.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masae; Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2011-08-01

    This article examines the dichotomies of collectivism and individualism in the debates on the selective abortion of disabled fetuses, which have occurred over the last four decades in Japan. Disagreements in debates on abortion in Japan have often revolved around the concept of self-determination (jiko-kettei). These debates usually focus on whether this 'foreign' concept is appropriate in a Japanese context, as the dominant Japanese discourse stereotypes the Japanese as making decisions in a harmonious manner. Both in public debates and in academic writing on abortion, the idea that the West is devoid of harmonious collectivism is often presented in an uncritical manner. In this article, we argue that the notion of 'self-determination' is borrowed from 'reverse Orientalist' and Occidentalist discourses that portray Westerners as individualistic or ego-centric and the Japanese as collectivist. The concept of 'self-determination' was remolded and projected onto Japanese public and academic debates on abortion. The relevance of this concept lies in the ways in which dichotomous views of 'Japan as harmonious' versus 'the West as individualistic' influence guidelines concerning prenatal testing and its daily practice. By critically analyzing the narratives of policy-makers and academic studies on self-determination and prenatal testing, this study traces these polarizing views back to the processes of national identity formation. These processes underlie political debates and academic work associated with the search for 'Japanese-ness'. This article further demonstrates that policy-makers' criticism of self-determination in prenatal testing derives from gender bias, which is also related to issues of Japanese identity. This article is based on both archival and field research materials collected between 1997 and 2008. We also refer to interviews with medical doctors, policy-makers, journalists, counselors, nurses, participants in various social movements and

  10. Hot versus cold: The dichotomy in spherical accretion of cooling flows onto supermassive black holes in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2014-01-10

    Feedback heating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has been commonly invoked to suppress cooling flows predicted in hot gas in elliptical galaxies, galaxy groups, and clusters. Previous studies have focused on if and how AGN feedback heats the gas but have little paid attention to its triggering mechanism. Using spherically symmetric simulations, we investigate how large-scale cooling flows are accreted by central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) in eight well-observed systems and find an interesting dichotomy. In massive clusters, the gas develops a central cooling catastrophe within about the cooling time (typically ∼100-300 Myr), resulting in cold-mode accretion onto SMBHs. However, in our four simulated systems on group and galaxy scales at a low metallicity Z = 0.3 Z {sub ☉}, the gas quickly settles into a long-term state that has a cuspy central temperature profile extending to several tens to about 100 pc. At the more realistic solar metallicity, two groups (with R {sub e} ∼ 4 kpc) still host the long-term, hot-mode accretion. Both accretion modes naturally appear in our idealized calculations where only cooling, gas inflow, and compressional heating are considered. The long-term, hot-mode accretion is maintained by the quickly established closeness between the timescales of these processes, preferably in systems with low gas densities, low gas metallicities, and importantly, compact central galaxies, which result in strong gravitational acceleration and compressional heating at the intermediate radii. Our calculations predict that central cuspy temperature profiles appear more often in smaller systems than galaxy clusters, which instead often host significant cold gas and star formation.

  11. THE ROLE OF CORE MASS IN CONTROLLING EVAPORATION: THE KEPLER RADIUS DISTRIBUTION AND THE KEPLER-36 DENSITY DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2013-10-10

    We use models of coupled thermal evolution and photo-evaporative mass loss to understand the formation and evolution of the Kepler-36 system. We show that the large contrast in mean planetary density observed by Carter et al. can be explained as a natural consequence of photo-evaporation from planets that formed with similar initial compositions. However, rather than being due to differences in XUV irradiation between the planets, we find that this contrast is due to the difference in the masses of the planets' rock/iron cores and the impact that this has on mass-loss evolution. We explore in detail how our coupled models depend on irradiation, mass, age, composition, and the efficiency of mass loss. Based on fits to large numbers of coupled evolution and mass-loss runs, we provide analytic fits to understand threshold XUV fluxes for significant atmospheric loss, as a function of core mass and mass-loss efficiency. Finally we discuss these results in the context of recent studies of the radius distribution of Kepler candidates. Using our parameter study, we make testable predictions for the frequency of sub-Neptune-sized planets. We show that 1.8-4.0 R{sub ⊕} planets should become significantly less common on orbits within 10 days and discuss the possibility of a narrow 'occurrence valley' in the radius-flux distribution. Moreover, we describe how photo-evaporation provides a natural explanation for the recent observations of Ciardi et al. that inner planets are preferentially smaller within the systems.

  12. Relationships of Balance, Gait Performance, and Functional Outcome in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Comparison of Left and Right Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Priscila Garcia; Lopes, José Augusto Fernandes; Brito, Christina Moran; Alfieri, Fábio Marcon; Rizzo Battistella, Linamara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study compared the balance by center of pressure (COP) and its relationship with gait parameters and functional independence in left (LH) and right (RH) chronic stroke patients. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, twenty-one hemiparetic stroke patients were assessed for Functional Independence Measure (FIM), balance with a force platform, and gait in the Motion Analysis Laboratory. Results. The amplitudes of the COP in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions were similar in both groups. The anteroposterior direction was greater than the mediolateral direction. Only the temporal parameters showed any statistically significant differences. The LH showed a significant correlation between stride length, step length, and gait velocity with COP velocity sway for the healthy and paretic lower limbs. In both groups, the area of COP was significantly correlated with stride length. Motor FIM was significantly correlated with the COP in the LH group. Conclusion. There was no difference in the performance of balance, gait, and functional independence between groups. The correlation of the COP sway area with stride length in both groups can serve as a guideline in the rehabilitation of these patients where training the static balance may reflect the improvement of the stride length. PMID:26583129

  13. Jargonial-Obfuscation(J-O) DISambiguation Elimination via Siegel-Baez Cognition Category-Semantics(C-S) in Siegel FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (Son of TRIZ)/(F=C) Tabular List-Format Dichotomy Truth-Table Matrix Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Carl Ludwig; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    NOT "philosophy" per se but raising serious salient Arnol'd [Huygens and Barrow, Newton and Hooke(96)] questions begged is Rota empiricism Husserl VS. Frege maths-objects Dichotomy controversy: Hill-Haddock[Husserl or Frege?(00)]as manifestly-demonstrated by Hintikka[B.U.]-Critchey[Derrida Deconstruction Ethics(78)] deconstruction; Altshuler TRIZ; Siegel F=C/C-S; Siegel-Baez(UCR) Cognition C-S = "Category-theory ``+'' Cognitive-Semantics[Wierzbica-Langacker-Lakoff-Nunez[Where Maths Comes From(00)]-Fauconnier-Turner[Blending(98)]-Coulson[Semantic-Leaps (00)

  14. The Land Use and Land Cover Dichotomy: A Comparison of Two Land Classification Systems in Support of Urban Earth Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, William K.

    2003-01-01

    One is likely to read the terms 'land use' and 'land cover' in the same sentence, yet these concepts have different origins and different applications. Land cover is typically analyzed by earth scientists working with remotely sensed images. Land use is typically studied by urban planners who must prescribe solutions that could prevent future problems. This apparent dichotomy has led to different classification systems for land-based data. The works of earth scientists and urban planning practitioners are beginning to come together in the field of spatial analysis and in their common use of new spatial analysis technology. In this context, the technology can stimulate a common 'language' that allows a broader sharing of ideas. The increasing amount of land use and land cover change challenges the various efforts to classify in ways that are efficient, effective, and agreeable to all groups of users. If land cover and land uses can be identified by remote methods using aerial photography and satellites, then these ways are more efficient than field surveys of the same area. New technology, such as high-resolution satellite sensors, and new methods, such as more refined algorithms for image interpretation, are providing refined data to better identify the actual cover and apparent use of land, thus effectiveness is improved. However, the closer together and the more vertical the land uses are, the more difficult the task of identification is, and the greater is the need to supplement remotely sensed data with field study (in situ). Thus, a number of land classification methods were developed in order to organize the greatly expanding volume of data on land characteristics in ways useful to different groups. This paper distinguishes two land based classification systems, one developed primarily for remotely sensed data, and the other, a more comprehensive system requiring in situ collection methods. The intent is to look at how the two systems developed and how they

  15. Clinical evaluation of conversational speech fluency in the acute phase of acquired childhood aphasia: does a fluency/nonfluency dichotomy exist?

    PubMed

    van Dongen, H R; Paquier, P F; Creten, W L; van Borsel, J; Catsman-Berrevoets, C E

    2001-05-01

    demonstrate a fluent/nonfluent dichotomy in a childhood aphasic population as well. This study shows that the traditional views on the uniformity of the clinical picture of acquired childhood aphasia are obsolete. Our findings corroborate data issued from several case reports of fluent acquired childhood aphasia and from the few studies focusing on speech fluency in acquired childhood aphasia, which all point to the existence of an adultlike heterogeneity of childhood aphasic syndromes. Current clinical evidence no longer supports the hypotheses of equipotentiality and progressive lateralization but favors the notion that the anatomic substrate for language representation in the child is similar to that in adults, even in young subjects.

  16. The Illusory Dichotomy of Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhmcke, Anita; Booth, Tracey; Wangmann, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Plagiarism has been characterised as a "major problem" for universities. While tensions between students and universities are inevitable, the problem with the existing system of plagiarism management and prevention is that it operates to problematise the relationship between the university and the student, rather than address the core…

  17. Functional (dissociative) retrograde amnesia.

    PubMed

    Markowitsch, H J; Staniloiu, A

    2017-01-01

    Retrograde amnesia is described as condition which can occur after direct brain damage, but which occurs more frequently as a result of a psychiatric illness. In order to understand the amnesic condition, content-based divisions of memory are defined. The measurement of retrograde memory is discussed and the dichotomy between "organic" and "psychogenic" retrograde amnesia is questioned. Briefly, brain damage-related etiologies of retrograde amnesia are mentioned. The major portion of the review is devoted to dissociative amnesia (also named psychogenic or functional amnesia) and to the discussion of an overlap between psychogenic and "brain organic" forms of amnesia. The "inability of access hypothesis" is proposed to account for most of both the organic and psychogenic (dissociative) patients with primarily retrograde amnesia. Questions such as why recovery from retrograde amnesia can occur in retrograde (dissociative) amnesia, and why long-term new learning of episodic-autobiographic episodes is possible, are addressed. It is concluded that research on retrograde amnesia research is still in its infancy, as the neural correlates of memory storage are still unknown. It is argued that the recollection of episodic-autobiographic episodes most likely involves frontotemporal regions of the right hemisphere, a region which appears to be hypometabolic in patients with dissociative amnesia.

  18. Evidence of stratabound liquefaction in the formation of fractured topographic margins, cone chains and pit catenas along the Martian Dichotomy Boundary and in Isidis Planitia, Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, C.; Balme, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    On the low-lying plains along much of the Martian Dichotomy Boundary (MDB) and in the Isidis impact basin, cones and curving chains of cones, referred to as thumbprint terrain (TPT), are common. In the same settings, pit chains (catenas) occur in orthogonal to curving and conchoidal fracture sets between mesa-like crustal blocks, generally at or near topographic margins. Many of the fractures consist of linked pits rather than simple propagated cracks. These assemblages are often associated with the more disaggregated populations of blocks comprising chaos terrain. We show that the local planimetric arrangement of the cone chains, fractures and pit catenas is strikingly similar in both shape and scale, including lateral separation, length, longitudinal slope and radius of curvature. The summits of cones tend to be closely accordant along individual cone chains. Neighbouring cone chains tend to be mutually accordant on low gradient basin surfaces but generally stepped en echelon closer to the fractured basin margins. Similarly, the crustal blocks (including very isolated block sets) are often mutually stepped, and fractures between these en echelon blocks tend to be very close to horizontal. Hence, many cone chains, fractures and pit catenas in fractures share the property of being arranged along strike. They diverge morphologically by the cone chains being positive forms separated by narrow gulfs but the pit catenas being negative forms separated by planar blocks. All of these characteristics point to the possibility that the arcuate cone chains and the arcuate pit catenas have a common origin. In particular, we hypothesise that the cone chains characteristic of TPT along the MDB and in Isidis are filled, indurated and then exhumed pit catenas revealed by the stripping-away of intervening blocks [cf. 1]. Many other surfaces on Mars are pervaded by pits and pit catenas, with evidence of former water flow through the catenas suggesting that ground-ice thaw played a

  19. PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 Is a Novel Maize Gene Required for Leaf Pattern Formation That Functions Downstream of the Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Pathway1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Douglas, Ryan N.; Strable, Josh; Lee, Michelle; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C.P.; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) gene RAGGED SEEDLING2-R (RGD2-R) encodes an ARGONAUTE7-like protein required for the biogenesis of trans-acting small interfering RNA, which regulates the accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3A transcripts in shoots. Although dorsiventral polarity is established in the narrow and cylindrical leaves of rgd2-R mutant plants, swapping of adaxial/abaxial epidermal identity occurs and suggests a model wherein RGD2 is required to coordinate dorsiventral and mediolateral patterning in maize leaves. Laser microdissection-microarray analyses of the rgd2-R mutant shoot apical meristem identified a novel gene, PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 (PVE1), that is down-regulated in rgd2-R mutant apices. Transcripts of PVE1 provide an early molecular marker for vascular morphogenesis. Reverse genetic analyses suggest that PVE1 functions during vascular development and in mediolateral and dorsiventral patterning of maize leaves. Molecular genetic analyses of PVE1 and of rgd2-R;pve1-M2 double mutants suggest a model wherein PVE1 functions downstream of RGD2 in a pathway that intersects and interacts with the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway. PMID:22669891

  20. Studies on a Novel Neuro-dynamic Model for Prediction Learning of Fluctuated Data Streams: Beyond Dichotomy between Probabilistic and Deterministic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-04

    learning by robots as well as video image understanding by accumulated learning of the exemplars are discussed. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cognitive ...learning to predict perceptual streams or encountering events by acquiring internal models is indispensable for intelligent or cognitive systems because...various cognitive functions are based on this compentency including goal-directed planning, mental simulation and recognition of the current situation

  1. Physics Proofs of Four Millennium-Problems(MP) via CATEGORY-SEMANTICS(C-S)/F=C Aristotle SQUARE-of-OPPOSITION(SoO) DEduction-LOGIC DichotomY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, London; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    Siegel-Baez Cognitive-Category-Semantics"(C-C-S) tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics SoO jargonial-obfuscation elimination query WHAT? yields four "pure"-maths MP "Feet of Clay!!!" proofs: (1) Siegel [AMS Natl.Mtg.(02)-Abs.973-03-126: (CCNY;64)(94;Wiles)] Fermat's: Last-Thm. = Least-Action Ppl.; (2) P=/=NP TRIVIAL simple Euclid geometry/dimensions: NO computer anything"Feet of Clay!!!"; (3) Birch-Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture; (4) Riemann-hypotheses via COMBO.: Siegel[AMS Natl.Mtg.(02)-Abs.973-60-124] digits log-law inversion to ONLY BEQS with ONLY zero-digit BEC, AND Rayleigh[1870;graph-thy."short-CUT method"[Doyle-Snell, Random-Walks & Electric-Nets,MAA(81)]-"Anderson"[(58)] critical-strip C-localization!!! SoO DichotomY ("V") IdentitY: #s:(Euler v Bernoulli) = (Sets v Multisets) = Quantum-Statistics(FD v BE) = Power-Spectra(1/f(0) v 1/f(1)) = Conic-Sections(Ellipse v Hyperbola) = Extent(Locality v Globality);Siegel[(89)] (so MIScalled) "complexity" as UTTER-SIMPLICITY(!!!) v COMPLICATEDNESS MEASURE(S) definition.

  2. Physics Proofs of Four Millennium-Problems(MP) via CATEGORY-SEMANTICS(C-S)/F=C Aristotle SQUARE-of-OPPOSITION(SoO) DEduction-LOGIC DichotomY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, L.; Siegel, E.

    2010-03-01

    Siegel-Baez C-S/F=C tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics SoO jargonial-obfuscation elimination query WHAT? yields four ``pure''-maths MP ``Feet of Clay!!!'' proofs:(1)Siegel [AMS Natl.Mtg.(2002)-Abs.#:973-03-126:(@CCNY;1964!!!)<<<(1994; Wiles)]Fermat's: Last-Theorem = Least-Action Principle; (2) P=/=NP TRIVIAL simple Euclid geometry/dimensions: NO computer anything;``Feet of Clay!!!''; (3)Birch-Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture; (4)Riemann-hypotheses via combination of: Siegel [AMS Natl.Mtg. (2002)-Abs.#:973-60-124 digits logarithmic-law simple algebraic- inversion to ONLY BEQS with ONLY zero-digit BEC, AND Rayleigh [(1870);graph-theory ``short-CUT method''[Doyle- Snell,Random- Walks & Electric-Networks,MAA(1981)]-``Anderson'' [PRL(1958)] critical-strip 1/2 complex-plane localization!!! SoO DichotomY (``v'') IdentitY: numbers(Euler v Bernoulli) = (Sets v Multisets) = Quantum-Statistics(F.-D. v B.-E.) = Power- Spectra(1/f^(0) v 1/f^(1.000...) = Conic-Sections(Ellipse v (Parabola) v Hyperbola) = Extent(Locality v Globality); Siegel [MRS Fractals Symp.(1989)](so MIScalled)``complexity'' as UTTER- SIMPLICITY (!!!) v COMPLICATEDNESS MEASURE(S) definition.

  3. Mitral annulus morphologic and functional analysis using real time tridimensional echocardiography in patients submitted to unsupported mitral valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Marco Antônio Vieira; Pomerantzeff, Pablo Maria Alberto; Brandão, Carlos Manuel de Almeida; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos; Tarasoutchi, Flávio; Spinola, Pablo da Cunha; Jatene, Fábio Biscegli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mitral valve repair is the treatment of choice to correct mitral insufficiency, although the literature related to mitral valve annulus behavior after mitral repair without use of prosthetic rings is scarce. Objective To analyze mitral annulus morphology and function using real time tridimensional echocardiography in individuals submitted to mitral valve repair with Double Teflon technique. Methods Fourteen patients with mitral valve insufficiency secondary to mixomatous degeneration that were submitted to mitral valve repair with the Double Teflon technique were included. Thirteen patients were in FC III/IV. Patients were evaluated in preoperative period, immediate postoperative period, 6 months and 1 year after mitral repair. Statistical analysis was made by repeated measures ANOVA test and was considered statistically significant P<0.05. Results There were no deaths, reoperation due to valve dysfunction, thromboembolism or endocarditis during the study. Posterior mitral annulus demonstrated a significant reduction in immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), remaining stable during the study, and presents a mean of reduction of 25.8% comparing with preoperative period. There was a significant reduction in anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters in the immediate postoperative period (P<0.001), although there was a significant increase in mediolateral diameter between immediate postoperative period and 1 year. There was no difference in mitral internal area variation over the cardiac cycle during the study. Conclusion Segmentar annuloplasty reduced the posterior component of mitral annulus, which remained stable in a 1-year-period. The variation in mitral annulus area during cardiac cycle remained stable during the study. PMID:26313723

  4. Cellular Dichotomy Between Anchorage-Independent Growth Responses to bFGF and TA Reflects Molecular Switch in Commitment to Carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Tan, Ruimin; Opresko, Lee K.; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Bandyopadhyay, Somnath; Chrisler, William B.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated gene expression patterns underlying reversible and irreversible anchorage-independent growth (AIG) phenotypes to identify more sensitive markers of cell transformation for studies directed at interrogating carcinogenesis responses. In JB6 mouse epidermal cells, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) induces an unusually efficient and reversible AIG response, relative to 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced AIG which is irreversible. The reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes are characterized by largely non-overlapping global gene expression profiles. However, a subset of differentially expressed genes were identified as common to reversible and irreversible AIG phenotypes, including genes regulated in a reciprocal fashion. Hepatic leukemia factor (HLF) and D-site albumin promoter-binding protein (DBP) were increased in both bFGF and TPA soft agar colonies and selected for functional validation. Ectopic expression of human HLF and DBP in JB6 cells resulted in a marked increase in TPA- and bFGF-regulated AIG responses. HLF and DBP expression were increased in soft agar colonies arising from JB6 cells exposed to gamma radiation and in a human basal cell carcinoma tumor tissue, relative to paired non-tumor tissue. Subsequent biological network analysis suggests that many of the differentially expressed genes that are common to bFGF- and TPA-dependent AIG are regulated by c-Myc, SP-1 and HNF-4 transcription factors. Collectively, we have identified a potential molecular switch that mediates the transition from reversible to irreversible AIG.

  5. Water balance and renal function in two species of African lungfish Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Monika; Iftikar, Fathima I; Smith, Richard W; Ip, Yuen K; Wood, Chris M

    2009-02-01

    The basic physiology of water balance and kidney function was characterized in two species of African lungfish, Protopterus dolloi and Protopterus annectens. Diffusive water efflux rate constants were low (0.13 h(-1)-0.38 h(-1) in various series) relative to values in freshwater teleost fish. Efflux rate constants increased approximately 3-fold after feeding in both species, and were greatly decreased after 8 months terrestrialization (P. dolloi only tested). Urine flow rates (UFR, 3.9-5.2 mL kg(-1) h(-1)) and glomerular filtration rates (GFR, 6.6-9.3 mL kg(-1) h(-1)) were quite high relative to values in most freshwater teleosts. However urinary ion excretion rates were low, with net re-absorption of >99% Na(+), >98% Cl(-), and >78% Ca(2+) from the primary filtrate, comparable to teleosts. Net water re-absorption was significantly greater in P. dolloi (56%) than in P. annectens (23%). We conclude that renal function in lungfish is similar to that in other primitive freshwater fish, but there is an interesting dichotomy between diffusive and osmotic permeabilities. Aquatic lungfish have low diffusive water permeability, an important pre-adaptation to life on land, and in accord with greatly reduced gill areas and low metabolic rates. However osmotic permeability is high, 4-12 times greater than diffusive permeability. A role for aquaporins in this dichotomy is speculated.

  6. The effects of hippotherapy on postural balance and functional ability in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Andréa Gomes; Copetti, Fernando; Angelo, Vera Regina; Chiavoloni, Luana Leonardo; David, Ana Cristina

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of hippotherapy on seated postural balance, dynamic balance, and functional performance in children with cerebral palsy and compared the effects of 12 and 24 sessions on seated postural balance. [Subjects and Methods] This study included 15 children with cerebral palsy aged between 5 and 10 years. Interventions: A hippotherapy protocol was performed for 30 minutes, twice a week, for 12 weeks. Postural balance in a sitting position was measured using an AMTI AccuSway Plus force platform 1 week before initiating the hippotherapy program and after 12 and 24 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) were used before and after 24 sessions. [Results] Significant differences were observed for center of pressure (COP) variables, including medio-lateral (COPml), anteroposterior displacement (COPap), and velocity of displacement (VelCOP), particularly after 24 sessions. There were also significant differences in BBS scores and PEDI score increases associated with functional skills (self-care, social function, and mobility), caregiver assistance (self-care), social function, and mobility. [Conclusion] Hippotherapy resulted in improvement in postural balance in the sitting position, dynamic balance, and functionality in children with cerebral palsy, an effect particularly significant after 24 hippotherapy sessions. PMID:27630401

  7. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  8. Phenotypic Dichotomy Following Developmental Exposure to ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The synthetic surfactant, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a proven developmental toxicant in mice, causing prenatal pregnancy loss, increased neonatal mortality, delayed eye opening, and abnormal mammary gland growth in animals exposed during fetal life. PFOA is found in the sera of wildlife and humans throughout the world, but is especially high in the sera of children. These studies in CD-1 mice aim to determine the latent health effects of PFOA following an in utero exposure, a developmental exposure followed by ovariectomy (ovx), or exposure as an adult. Mice were exposed to 0, 0.01, 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, or 5 mg PFOA/kg BW for 17 days of pregnancy or as an adult. Body weight was reduced in the highest doses on postnatal day (PND) 1 and at weaning. However, the lowest exposures (0.01-0.3 mg/kg) induced excessive weight gain between 20-40 weeks, as well as a significant increase in serum leptin (0.01-0.1 mg/kg). Although body weight was significantly increased due to ovx, there was no longer a body weight effect of PFOA in ovx animals. Further, there was no effect of adult exposure to PFOA on body weight gain. At 18 months of age, the effects of PFOA on body weight were no longer detected. The white adipose tissue and spleen weights were decreased at high doses of PFOA in intact developmentally exposed mice, and spleen weight was reduced in ovx mice. But, brown adipose tissue weight was significantly increased in both ovx and intact mice at high doses. Liver weigh

  9. Dichotomies in Teaching, Application, and Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heames, Joyce T.; Service, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a move from the old control model of teaching, managing, and leading based on stability and power to a new enterprise model based on speed and constant self-innovation. They hope to promote the practice of a rapid incremental innovation strategy that produces practitioners and educators dedicated to continuous…

  10. An Energy Dichotomy for the 80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Tom

    1980-01-01

    Discusses past exploitation of Indians by energy development efforts on tribal lands and forecasts a changing climate in the coming decade in which tribes may negotiate vastly improved economic agreements for development of their resources or may reject energy development altogether. (DS)

  11. Returners and explorers dichotomy in human mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Luca; Simini, Filippo; Rinzivillo, Salvatore; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-09-01

    The availability of massive digital traces of human whereabouts has offered a series of novel insights on the quantitative patterns characterizing human mobility. In particular, numerous recent studies have lead to an unexpected consensus: the considerable variability in the characteristic travelled distance of individuals coexists with a high degree of predictability of their future locations. Here we shed light on this surprising coexistence by systematically investigating the impact of recurrent mobility on the characteristic distance travelled by individuals. Using both mobile phone and GPS data, we discover the existence of two distinct classes of individuals: returners and explorers. As existing models of human mobility cannot explain the existence of these two classes, we develop more realistic models able to capture the empirical findings. Finally, we show that returners and explorers play a distinct quantifiable role in spreading phenomena and that a correlation exists between their mobility patterns and social interactions.

  12. Returners and explorers dichotomy in human mobility.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Luca; Simini, Filippo; Rinzivillo, Salvatore; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-09-08

    The availability of massive digital traces of human whereabouts has offered a series of novel insights on the quantitative patterns characterizing human mobility. In particular, numerous recent studies have lead to an unexpected consensus: the considerable variability in the characteristic travelled distance of individuals coexists with a high degree of predictability of their future locations. Here we shed light on this surprising coexistence by systematically investigating the impact of recurrent mobility on the characteristic distance travelled by individuals. Using both mobile phone and GPS data, we discover the existence of two distinct classes of individuals: returners and explorers. As existing models of human mobility cannot explain the existence of these two classes, we develop more realistic models able to capture the empirical findings. Finally, we show that returners and explorers play a distinct quantifiable role in spreading phenomena and that a correlation exists between their mobility patterns and social interactions.

  13. Returners and explorers dichotomy in human mobility

    PubMed Central

    Pappalardo, Luca; Simini, Filippo; Rinzivillo, Salvatore; Pedreschi, Dino; Giannotti, Fosca; Barabási, Albert-László

    2015-01-01

    The availability of massive digital traces of human whereabouts has offered a series of novel insights on the quantitative patterns characterizing human mobility. In particular, numerous recent studies have lead to an unexpected consensus: the considerable variability in the characteristic travelled distance of individuals coexists with a high degree of predictability of their future locations. Here we shed light on this surprising coexistence by systematically investigating the impact of recurrent mobility on the characteristic distance travelled by individuals. Using both mobile phone and GPS data, we discover the existence of two distinct classes of individuals: returners and explorers. As existing models of human mobility cannot explain the existence of these two classes, we develop more realistic models able to capture the empirical findings. Finally, we show that returners and explorers play a distinct quantifiable role in spreading phenomena and that a correlation exists between their mobility patterns and social interactions. PMID:26349016

  14. Dynamic morphological changes in the skulls of mice mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from gain-of-function mutation of FGFR2 (P253R).

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaolan; Weng, Tujun; Sun, Qidi; Su, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Qi, Huabing; Jin, Ming; Yin, Liangjun; He, Qifen; Chen, Lin

    2010-08-01

    Apert syndrome is caused mainly by gain-of-function mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. We have generated a mouse model (Fgfr2(+/P253R)) mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Pro253Arg mutation using the knock-in approach. This mouse model in general has the characteristic skull morphology similar to that in humans with Apert syndrome. To characterize the detailed changes of form in the overall skull and its major anatomic structures, euclidean distance matrix analysis was used to quantitatively compare the form and growth difference between the skulls of mutants and their wild-type controls. There were substantial morphological differences between the skulls of mutants and their controls at 4 and 8 weeks of age (P < 0.01). The mutants showed shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, especially in their face. The width of the frontal bone and the distance between the two orbits were broadened mediolaterally. The neurocrania were significantly increased along the dorsoventral axis and slightly increased along the mediolateral axis, and also had anteriorly displayed opisthion along the rostrocaudal axis. Compared with wild-type, the mutant mandible had an anteriorly displaced coronoid process and mandibular condyle along the rostrocaudal axis. We further found that there was catch-up growth in the nasal bone, maxilla, zygomatic bone and some regions of the mandible of the mutant skulls during the 4-8-week interval. The above-mentioned findings further validate the Fgfr2(+/P253R) mouse strain as a good model for human Apert syndrome. The changes in form characterized in this study will help to elucidate the mechanisms through which the Pro253Arg mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 affects craniofacial development and causes Apert syndrome.

  15. Lateral wedges alter mediolateral load distributions at the knee joint in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Russell, Elizabeth M; Miller, Ross H; Umberger, Brian R; Hamill, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is the primary risk factor for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Greater external knee adduction moments, surrogate measures for medial compartment loading, are present in Obese individuals and may predispose them to knee OA. Laterally wedged insoles decrease the magnitude of the external adduction moment in Obese individuals but it is unknown how they alter the center of pressure on the tibial plateau. A gait analysis was performed on 14 Obese (avg. 29.3 years; BMI range: 30.3-51.6 kg/m(2) ) and 14 lean women (avg. 26.1 years; BMI range: 20.9-24.6 kg/m(2) ) with and without a full-length, wedged insole. Computed joint angles, joint moments, and knee extensor strength values were input into a musculoskeletal model to estimate center of pressure of the contact force on the tibial plateau. Statistical significance was assessed using a two-way ANOVA to compare the main effects of group and insole condition (α = 0.05). The insole resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) lateral shift in the center of pressure location in both the Obese and Control groups (mean: 2.9 ± 0.7 and 1.5 ± 0.7 mm, respectively). The insole also significantly reduced the peak external knee adduction moment 1.88 ± 1.82 N m in the Control group (p < 0.01) and 3.62 ± 3.90 N m in the Obese group (p < 0.01). The results of this study indicate the effects of a prophylactic wedged insole for reducing the magnitude of the load on the knee's medial compartment in Obese women who are at risk for knee OA development.

  16. Effects of virtual reality programs on balance in functional ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Heo, Myoung

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to identify the impact that recent virtual reality training programs used in a variety of fields have had on the ankle's static and dynamic senses of balance among subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly divided research subjects into two groups, a strengthening exercise group (Group I) and a balance exercise group (Group II), with each group consisting of 10 people. A virtual reality program was performed three times a week for four weeks. Exercises from the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus program were applied to each group for twenty minutes along with ten minutes of warming up and wrap-up exercises. [Results] Group II showed a significant decrease of post-intervention static and dynamic balance overall in the anterior-posterior, and mediolateral directions, compared with the pre-intervention test results. In comparison of post-intervention static and dynamic balance between Group I and Group II, a significant decrease was observed overall. [Conclusion] Virtual reality programs improved the static balance and dynamic balance of subjects with functional ankle instability. Virtual reality programs can be used more safely and efficiently if they are implemented under appropriate monitoring by a physiotherapist.

  17. Evaluation of functional deficits and falls risk in the elderly--methods for preventing falls.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Michael R; Scalzi, Maria Elena; Redmond, Stephen J; Lord, Steven R; Celler, Branko G; Lovell, Nigel H

    2009-01-01

    Falls in the elderly have a profound impact on their quality of life through injury, increased fear of falling, reduced confidence to perform daily tasks and loss of independence. Falls come at a substantial economic cost. Tools to quantify falls risk and evaluate functional deficits allow interventions to be targeted to those at increased risk of falling and tailored to correct deficits with the aim of reducing falls rate and reducing ones risk of falling. We describe a system to evaluate falls risk and functional deficits in the elderly. The system is based on the evaluation of performance in a simple set of controlled movements known as the directed routine (DR). We present preliminary results of the DR in a cohort of 68 subjects using features extracted from the DR. Linear least-squares models were trained to estimate falls risk, knee-extension strength, proprioception, mediolateral body sway, anteroposterior body sway and contrast sensitivity. The model estimates provided good to fair correlations with (r=0.76 p<0.001), (r=0.65 p<0.001), (r=0.35 p<0.01), (r=0.53 p<0.001), (r=0.48 p<0.001) and (r=0.37 p<0.01) respectively.

  18. Importance of the functional examination in lower extremities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wareńczak, Agnieszka; Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with evaluation of the lower extremity efficiency and balance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The authors' own test (LLFT-lower extremities functional test) and balance tests during normal standing and tandem positions with eyes opened or closed were used. Twelve patients with RA and fifteen controls for comparison were examined. Center feet of pressure dislocation on platform in normal standing with eyes open, normal standing with eyes closed, tandem left foot in front and tandem right foot in front positions and further dynamic balance tests on three different boards were analyzed. Visual Analogue Scale monitored the level of pain after each LLFT task. There was found a relation between the intensity of pain and overloading of joints in particular tasks, resulting in lower extremities dysfunction. A significant disbalance in medio-lateral direction during normal standing with eyes closed and tandem right foot in front positions and also in anterior-posterior direction in tandem right foot in front position during static balance tests was found. Correlations showed that patient's age, disease duration and Steinbrocker Functional Classes have an influence on parameters of balance tests. Results indicate that complex dysfunction of lower extremities causes disbalance of posture in static conditions.

  19. Effects of virtual reality programs on balance in functional ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Jong; Heo, Myoung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to identify the impact that recent virtual reality training programs used in a variety of fields have had on the ankle’s static and dynamic senses of balance among subjects with functional ankle instability. [Subjects and Methods] This study randomly divided research subjects into two groups, a strengthening exercise group (Group I) and a balance exercise group (Group II), with each group consisting of 10 people. A virtual reality program was performed three times a week for four weeks. Exercises from the Nintendo Wii Fit Plus program were applied to each group for twenty minutes along with ten minutes of warming up and wrap-up exercises. [Results] Group II showed a significant decrease of post-intervention static and dynamic balance overall in the anterior-posterior, and mediolateral directions, compared with the pre-intervention test results. In comparison of post-intervention static and dynamic balance between Group I and Group II, a significant decrease was observed overall. [Conclusion] Virtual reality programs improved the static balance and dynamic balance of subjects with functional ankle instability. Virtual reality programs can be used more safely and efficiently if they are implemented under appropriate monitoring by a physiotherapist. PMID:26644652

  20. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  1. Relationship between static postural control and the level of functional abilities in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Pavão, Sílvia L.; Nunes, Gabriela S.; Santos, Adriana N.; Rocha, Nelci A. C. F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Postural control deficits can impair functional performance in children with cerebral palsy (CP) in daily living activities. Objective: To verify the relationship between standing static postural control and the functional ability level in children with CP. Method: The postural control of 10 children with CP (gross motor function levels I and II) was evaluated during static standing on a force platform for 30 seconds. The analyzed variables were the anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) displacement of the center of pressure (CoP) and the area and velocity of the CoP oscillation. The functional abilities were evaluated using the mean Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) scores, which evaluated self-care, mobility and social function in the domains of functional abilities and caregiver assistance. Results: Spearman's correlation test found a relationship between postural control and functional abilities. The results showed a strong negative correlation between the variables of ML displacement of CoP, the area and velocity of the CoP oscillation and the PEDI scores in the self-care and caregiver assistance domains. Additionally, a moderate negative correlation was found between the area of the CoP oscillation and the mobility scores in the caregiver assistance domain. We used a significance level of 5% (p <0.05). Conclusions: We observed that children with cerebral palsy with high CoP oscillation values had lower caregiver assistance scores for activities of daily living (ADL) and consequently higher levels of caregiver dependence. These results demonstrate the repercussions of impairments to the body structure and function in terms of the activity levels of children with CP such that postural control impairments in these children lead to higher requirements for caregiver assistance. PMID:25054383

  2. Morphology and behaviour: functional links in development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bertossa, Rinaldo C.

    2011-01-01

    Development and evolution of animal behaviour and morphology are frequently addressed independently, as reflected in the dichotomy of disciplines dedicated to their study distinguishing object of study (morphology versus behaviour) and perspective (ultimate versus proximate). Although traits are known to develop and evolve semi-independently, they are matched together in development and evolution to produce a unique functional phenotype. Here I highlight similarities shared by both traits, such as the decisive role played by the environment for their ontogeny. Considering the widespread developmental and functional entanglement between both traits, many cases of adaptive evolution are better understood when proximate and ultimate explanations are integrated. A field integrating these perspectives is evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo), which studies the developmental basis of phenotypic diversity. Ultimate aspects in evo-devo studies—which have mostly focused on morphological traits—could become more apparent when behaviour, ‘the integrator of form and function’, is integrated into the same framework of analysis. Integrating a trait such as behaviour at a different level in the biological hierarchy will help to better understand not only how behavioural diversity is produced, but also how levels are connected to produce functional phenotypes and how these evolve. A possible framework to accommodate and compare form and function at different levels of the biological hierarchy is outlined. At the end, some methodological issues are discussed. PMID:21690124

  3. Morphological and functional changes in the vertebral column with increasing aquatic adaptation in crocodylomorphs

    PubMed Central

    Molnar, Julia L.; Pierce, Stephanie E.; Bhullar, Bhart-Anjan S.; Turner, Alan H.; Hutchinson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage leading to modern Crocodylia has undergone dramatic evolutionary changes in morphology, ecology and locomotion over the past 200+ Myr. These functional innovations may be explained in part by morphological changes in the axial skeleton, which is an integral part of the vertebrate locomotor system. Our objective was to estimate changes in osteological range of motion (RoM) and intervertebral joint stiffness of thoracic and lumbar vertebrae with increasing aquatic adaptation in crocodylomorphs. Using three-dimensional virtual models and morphometrics, we compared the modern crocodile Crocodylus to five extinct crocodylomorphs: Terrestrisuchus, Protosuchus, Pelagosaurus, Steneosaurus and Metriorhynchus, which span the spectrum from terrestrial to fully aquatic. In Crocodylus, we also experimentally measured changes in trunk flexibility with sequential removal of osteoderms and soft tissues. Our results for the more aquatic species matched our predictions fairly well, but those for the more terrestrial early crocodylomorphs did not. A likely explanation for this lack of correspondence is the influence of other axial structures, particularly the rigid series of dorsal osteoderms in early crocodylomorphs. The most important structures for determining RoM and stiffness of the trunk in Crocodylus were different in dorsoventral versus mediolateral bending, suggesting that changes in osteoderm and rib morphology over crocodylomorph evolution would have affected movements in some directions more than others. PMID:26716001

  4. Social dichotomy versus gender dichotomy: a case report of gender identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kuldip; Gupta, Manushree

    2012-04-01

    Gender identity disorder is one of the most controversial diagnoses of DSM-IV and almost incomparable in the complexity of its social, ethical and political considerations to any other diagnosis. We present a case of 30 year-old male who presented with complaints of suggestive of depressive disorder with a recent suicidal attempt. Careful history taking reveals underlying conflicts with prominent gender dysphoria and social complexities. The patient is managed primarily by pharmacotherapy and harm reduction model. Our case reflects a unique coping strategy against the present sociocultural values and ambiguity of law in this part of the world.

  5. Wave-function functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Xiaoyin; Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2010-04-15

    We extend our prior work on the construction of variational wave functions {psi} that are functionals of functions {chi}:{psi}={psi}[{chi}] rather than simply being functions. In this manner, the space of variations is expanded over those of traditional variational wave functions. In this article we perform the constrained search over the functions {chi} chosen such that the functional {psi}[{chi}] satisfies simultaneously the constraints of normalization and the exact expectation value of an arbitrary single- or two-particle Hermitian operator, while also leading to a rigorous upper bound to the energy. As such the wave function functional is accurate not only in the region of space in which the principal contributions to the energy arise but also in the other region of the space represented by the Hermitian operator. To demonstrate the efficacy of these ideas, we apply such a constrained search to the ground state of the negative ion of atomic hydrogen H{sup -}, the helium atom He, and its positive ions Li{sup +} and Be{sup 2+}. The operators W whose expectations are obtained exactly are the sum of the single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i{delta}}(r{sub i}), W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i{nabla}i}{sup 2}, and the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n},n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|. Comparisons with the method of Lagrangian multipliers and of other constructions of wave-function functionals are made. Finally, we present further insights into the construction of wave-function functionals by studying a previously proposed construction of functionals {psi}[{chi}] that lead to the exact expectation of arbitrary Hermitian operators. We discover that analogous to the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, there exist {psi}[{chi}] that are unphysical in that they lead to singular values for the expectations. We also explain the origin of the singularity.

  6. Diagnosis and management of functional symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease in remission

    PubMed Central

    Teruel, Carlos; Garrido, Elena; Mesonero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients in remission may suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms that resemble irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Knowledge on this issue has increased considerably in the last decade, and it is our intention to review and summarize it in the present work. We describe a problematic that comprises physiopathological uncertainties, diagnostic difficulties, as IBS-like symptoms are very similar to those produced by an inflammatory flare, and the necessity of appropriate management of these patients, who, although in remission, have impaired quality of life. Ultimately, from almost a philosophical point of view, the presence of IBS-like symptoms in IBD patients in remission supposes a challenge to the traditional functional-organic dichotomy, suggesting the need for a change of paradigm. PMID:26855814

  7. Diverse functions of ceramide in cancer cell death and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Saddoughi, Sahar A; Ogretmen, Besim

    2013-01-01

    Ceramide, a bioactive sphingolipid, is now at the forefront of cancer research. Classically, ceramide is thought to induce death, growth inhibition, and senescence in cancer cells. However, it is now clear that this simple picture of ceramide no longer holds true. Recent studies suggest that there are diverse functions of endogenously generated ceramides, which seem to be context dependent, regulated by subcellular/membrane localization and presence/absence of direct targets of these lipid molecules. For example, different fatty-acid chain lengths of ceramide, such as C(16)-ceramide that can be generated by ceramide synthase 6 (CerS6), have been implicated in cancer cell proliferation, whereas CerS1-generated C(18)-ceramide mediates cell death. The dichotomy of ceramides' function in cancer cells makes some of the metabolic enzymes of ceramide synthesis potential drug targets (such as Cers6) to prevent cancer growth in breast and head and neck cancers. Conversely, activation of CerS1 could be a new therapeutic option for the development of novel strategies against lung and head and neck cancers. This chapter focuses on recent discoveries about the mechanistic details of mainly de novo-generated ceramides and their signaling functions in cancer pathogenesis, and about how these mechanistic information can be translated into clinically relevant therapeutic options for the treatment of cancer.

  8. A Sharp Cadherin-6 Gene Expression Boundary in the Developing Mouse Cortical Plate Demarcates the Future Functional Areal Border

    PubMed Central

    Terakawa, Youhei W.; Inoue, Yukiko U.; Asami, Junko; Hoshino, Mikio; Inoue, Takayoshi

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex can be tangentially subdivided into tens of functional areas with distinct cyto-architectures and neural circuitries; however, it remains elusive how these areal borders are genetically elaborated during development. Here we establish original bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mouse lines that specifically recapitulate cadherin-6 (Cdh6) mRNA expression profiles in the layer IV of the somatosensory cortex and by detailing their cortical development, we show that a sharp Cdh6 gene expression boundary is formed at a mediolateral coordinate along the cortical layer IV as early as the postnatal day 5 (P5). By further applying mouse genetics that allows rigid cell fate tracing with CreERT2 expression, it is demonstrated that the Cdh6 gene expression boundary set at around P4 eventually demarcates the areal border between the somatosensory barrel and limb field at P20. In the P6 cortical cell pellet culture system, neurons with Cdh6 expression preferentially form aggregates in a manner dependent on Ca2+ and electroporation-based Cdh6 overexpression limited to the postnatal stages perturbs area-specific cell organization in the barrel field. These results suggest that Cdh6 expression in the nascent cortical plate may serve solidification of the protomap for cortical functional areas. PMID:22875867

  9. Measurement of plantar pressure distribution during gait for diagnosis of functional lateral ankle instability.

    PubMed

    Becker, HP; Rosenbaum, D; Claes, L; Gerngro, H

    1997-04-01

    INTRODUCTION:: Chronic functional instability of the lateral ankle may be difficult to distinguish from mechanical instability when radiological stress tests reveal only small ligamentous defects. For decision making whether to surgically reconstruct the ligaments or not, it can be helpful to use additional information on joint and foot function. Therefore, the aim of a prospective study of patients with longstanding chronic ankle instability was to demonstrate that the dynamic measurement of plantar pressure distribution can identify patients with functional ankle instability. [Table: see text] MATERIALS AND METHODS:: Sixty five patients (mean age 24 (4.6 years)) were included. After clinical examination and radiological stress views, plantar pressure patterns were measured during gait using a capacitive platform, the EMED-SF 2-system. Five trials of each foot were documented and the maximum impulses in eight points of the foot (central heel, lateral and medial heel, midfoot, 1st, 2nd, 5th metatarsal head and hallux) were calculated intraindividually and compared with a group of 100 healthy subjects. The medio-lateral loading factor (MLF) as the quotient of the medial and lateral relative impulses indicated the tendency to walk on the lateral edge of the foot. RESULTS:: Based on clinical criteria alone, two comparable groups of patients were separated, 35 with functional instability and 30 with mechanical instability. After collective analyses of the results, the patients with functional instability showed a significantly increased lateral loading of the unstable foot (p=0 0 1), whereas the mechanically unstable group tended to walk more on the medial side of the unstable foot (Table 1). DISCUSSION:: Dynamic measurement of plantar pressure can identify a group of patients walking on the lateral side of the unstable foot when compared with the stable foot. This finding is explained by a deficit of peroneal strength during stance phase based on a proprioceptive

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the rat cerebellum during electrical stimulation of the fore- and hindpaw at 7 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, Ronald; Verhoye, Marleen; Vos, Bart; De Schutter, Erik; Van der Linden, Anne-Marie

    1999-05-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent contrast (BOLD) functional MRI responses at 7T were observed in the cerebellum of alpha- chloralose anesthetized rats in response to innocuous electrical stimulation of a forepaw or hindpaw. The responses were imaged in both coronal and sagittal slices which allowed for a clear delineation and localization of the observed activations. We demonstrate the validity of our fMRI protocol by imaging the responses in somatosensory cortex to the same stimuli and by showing a high level of reproducibility of the cerebellar responses. Widespread bilateral activations were found with mainly a patchy and medio-lateral band organization, more pronounced ipsilaterally. There was no overlap between the cerebellar activations caused by forepaw or hindpaw stimulation. Most remarkable was the overall horizontal organization of these responses: for both stimulation paradigms the patches and bands of activation were roughly positioned in either a cranial or caudal plane running antero-posteriorly through the whole cerebellum. This is the first fMRI study in the cerebellum of the rat. We relate our findings to the known projection patterns found with other techniques and to human fMRI studies. The horizontal organization found wasn't observed before in other studies using other techniques.

  11. Using Low Levels of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rahul; Kofman, Igor; Jeevarajan, Jerome; De Dios, Yiri; Cohen, Helen S.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.

    2015-01-01

    Low-level stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) has been associated with improved postural responses in the medio-lateral (ML) direction, but its effect in improving balance function in both the ML and anterior-posterior (AP) directions has not been studied. In this series of studies, the efficacy of applying low amplitude SVS in 0–30 Hz range between the mastoids in the ML direction on improving cross-planar balance function was investigated. Forty-five (45) subjects stood on a compliant surface with their eyes closed and were instructed to maintain a stable upright stance. Measures of stability of the head, trunk, and whole body were quantified in ML, AP and combined APML directions. Results show that binaural bipolar SVS given in the ML direction significantly improved balance performance with the peak of optimal stimulus amplitude predominantly in the range of 100–500 μA for all the three directions, exhibiting stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon. Objective perceptual and body motion thresholds as estimates of internal noise while subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and were given 1 Hz bipolar binaural sinusoidal electrical stimuli were also measured. In general, there was no significant difference between estimates of perceptual and body motion thresholds. The average optimal SVS amplitude that improved balance performance (peak SVS amplitude normalized to perceptual threshold) was estimated to be 46% in ML, 53% in AP, and 50% in APML directions. A miniature patch-type SVS device may be useful to improve balance function in people with disabilities due to aging, Parkinson’s disease or in astronauts returning from long-duration space flight. PMID:26295807

  12. Steady-state probability density function of the phase error for a DPLL with an integrate-and-dump device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Mileant, A.

    1986-01-01

    The steady-state behavior of a particular type of digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) with an integrate-and-dump circuit following the phase detector is characterized in terms of the probability density function (pdf) of the phase error in the loop. Although the loop is entirely digital from an implementation standpoint, it operates at two extremely different sampling rates. In particular, the combination of a phase detector and an integrate-and-dump circuit operates at a very high rate whereas the loop update rate is very slow by comparison. Because of this dichotomy, the loop can be analyzed by hybrid analog/digital (s/z domain) techniques. The loop is modeled in such a general fashion that previous analyses of the Real-Time Combiner (RTC), Subcarrier Demodulator Assembly (SDA), and Symbol Synchronization Assembly (SSA) fall out as special cases.

  13. Functional aspects of metatarsal head shape in humans, apes, and Old World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Peter J; Almécija, Sergio; Patel, Biren A; Orr, Caley M; Tocheri, Matthew W; Jungers, William L

    2015-09-01

    Modern human metatarsal heads are typically described as "dorsally domed," mediolaterally wide, and dorsally flat. Despite the apparent functional importance of these features in forefoot stability during bipedalism, the distinctiveness of this morphology has not been quantitatively evaluated within a broad comparative framework. In order to use these features to reconstruct fossil hominin locomotor behaviors with any confidence, their connection to human bipedalism should be validated through a comparative analysis of other primates with different locomotor behaviors and foot postures, including species with biomechanical demands potentially similar to those of bipedalism (e.g., terrestrial digitigrady). This study explores shape variation in the distal metatarsus among humans and other extant catarrhines using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics (3 DGM). Shape differences among species in metatarsal head morphology are well captured by the first two principal components of Procrustes shape coordinates, and these two components summarize most of the variance related to "dorsal doming" and "dorsal expansion." Multivariate statistical tests reveal significant differences among clades in overall shape, and humans are reliably distinguishable from other species by aspects of shape related to a greater degree of dorsal doming. Within quadrupeds, terrestrial species also trend toward more domed metatarsal heads, but not to the extent seen in humans. Certain aspects of distal metatarsus shape are likely related to habitual dorsiflexion of the metatarsophalangeal joints, but the total morphological pattern seen in humans is distinct. These comparative results indicate that this geometric morphometric approach is useful to characterize the complexity of metatarsal head morphology and will help clarify its relationship with function in fossil primates, including early hominins.

  14. Approximating Functions with Exponential Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2005-01-01

    The possibility of approximating a function with a linear combination of exponential functions of the form e[superscript x], e[superscript 2x], ... is considered as a parallel development to the notion of Taylor polynomials which approximate a function with a linear combination of power function terms. The sinusoidal functions sin "x" and cos "x"…

  15. Highly specific role of hypocretin (orexin) neurons: differential activation as a function of diurnal phase, operant reinforcement versus operant avoidance and light level.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Ronald; Wu, Ming-Fung; Barber, Grace; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2011-10-26

    Hypocretin (Hcrt) cell loss is responsible for narcolepsy, but Hcrt's role in normal behavior is unclear. We found that Hcrt knock-out mice were unable to work for food or water reward during the light phase. However, they were unimpaired relative to wild-type (WT) mice when working for reward during the dark phase or when working to avoid shock in the light or dark phase. In WT mice, expression of Fos in Hcrt neurons occurs only in the light phase when working for positive reinforcement. Expression was seen throughout the mediolateral extent of the Hcrt field. Fos was not expressed when expected or unexpected unearned rewards were presented, when working to avoid negative reinforcement, or when given or expecting shock, even though these conditions elicit maximal electroencephalogram (EEG) arousal. Fos was not expressed in the light phase when light was removed. This may explain the lack of light-induced arousal in narcoleptics and its presence in normal individuals. This is the first demonstration of such specificity of arousal system function and has implications for understanding the motivational and circadian consequences of arousal system dysfunction. The current results also indicate that comparable and complementary specificities must exist in other arousal systems.

  16. Does extending the dual-task functional exercises workout improve postural balance in individuals with ID?

    PubMed

    Mikolajczyk, Edyta; Jankowicz-Szymanska, Agnieszka

    2015-03-01

    Maintaining postural balance, overcoming visual and motor coordination disorders and experiencing problems with low general fitness - typical of intellectually disabled individuals - adversely affect the performance quality of their activities of daily living (ADLs). Physical fitness and postural balance can be improved by taking part in special intervention programs. Our study was designed to test whether extending the dual-task intervention program (combining ADLs with balance exercises on unstable surfaces) from 12 to 24 weeks additionally improved postural balance in individuals with intellectual disability (ID). We also attempted to assess whether the effects of the above intervention program were still noticeable after 8 weeks of holidays, in which participants did not take any rehabilitation exercises. A total of 34 adolescents, aged 14-16 years (15.06±0.9), with moderate ID took part in our study. The experimental group (E) consisted of 17 individuals, who continued the intervention program originated 3 months earlier, and the control group (C) comprised the same number of participants. Postural balance was assessed on a stabilometric platform Alfa. Having extended the workout period by another 12 weeks, we noticed that the path length of the center of pressure (COP) covered by participants on tests with their eyes open and closed significantly shortened. After a lapse of 8 weeks from the completion of the program, the experimental group revealed a statistically significant decrease in the velocity along the medio-lateral (M/L) and anterior-posterior (A/P) axes. The remaining variables stayed at the same level and the control group did not demonstrate any statistically significant changes. Dual-task exercises, in which enhancing functional tasks of daily living is combined with a parallel stimulation of balance reactions, may improve static balance in persons with ID.

  17. Functional anatomy of the equine temporomandibular joint: Collagen fiber texture of the articular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adams, K; Schulz-Kornas, E; Arzi, B; Failing, K; Vogelsberg, J; Staszyk, C

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the equine masticatory apparatus has received much attention. Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the functional process of mastication. However, ultrastructural and histological data providing a basis for biomechanical and histopathological considerations are not available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the architecture of the collagen fiber apparatus in the articular surfaces of the equine TMJ to reveal typical morphological features indicating biomechanical adaptions. Therefore, the collagen fiber alignment was visualized using the split-line technique in 16 adult warmblood horses without any history of TMJ disorders. Within the central two-thirds of the articular surfaces of the articular tubercle, the articular disc and the mandibular head, split-lines ran in a correspondent rostrocaudal direction. In the lateral and medial aspects of these articular surfaces, the split-line pattern varied, displaying curved arrangements in the articular disc and punctual split-lines in the bony components. Mediolateral orientated split-lines were found in the rostral and caudal border of the articular disc and in the mandibular fossa. The complex movements during the equine chewing cycle are likely assigned to different areas of the TMJ. The split-line pattern of the equine TMJ is indicative of a relative movement of the joint components in a preferential rostrocaudal direction which is consigned to the central aspects of the TMJ. The lateral and medial aspects of the articular surfaces provide split-line patterns that indicate movements particularly around a dorsoventral axis.

  18. Riemann-Hypothesis Millennium-Problem(MP) Physics Proof via CATEGORY-SEMANTICS(C-S)/F =C Aristotle SQUARE-of-OPPOSITION(SoO) DEduction-LOGIC DichotomY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baez, Joao-Joan; Lapidaryus, Michelle; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2013-03-01

    Riemann-hypothesis physics-proof combines: Siegel-Antono®-Smith[AMS Joint Mtg.(2002)- Abs.973-03-126] digits on-average statistics HIll[Am. J. Math 123, 3, 887(1996)] logarithm-function's (1,0)- xed-point base =units =scale-invariance proven Newcomb [Am. J. Math. 4, 39(1881)]-Weyl[Goett. Nachr.(1914); Math. Ann.7, 313(1916)]-Benford[Proc. Am. Phil. Soc. 78, 4, 51(1938)]-law [Kac,Math. of Stat.-Reasoning(1955); Raimi, Sci. Am. 221, 109(1969)] algebraic-inversion to ONLY Bose-Einstein quantum-statistics(BEQS) with digit d = 0 gapFUL Bose-Einstein Condensation(BEC) insight that digits are quanta are bosons because bosons are and always were quanta are and always were digits, via Siegel-Baez category-semantics tabular list-format matrix truth-table analytics in Plato-Aristotle classic ''square-of-opposition'' : FUZZYICS =CATEGORYICS/Category-Semantics, with Goodkind Bose-Einstein Condensation (BEC) ABOVE ground-state with/and Rayleigh(cut-limit of ''short-cut method''1870)-Polya(1922)-''Anderson''(1958) localization [Doyle and Snell,Random-Walks and Electrical-Networks, MAA(1981)-p.99-100!!!] in Brillouin[Wave-Propagation in Periodic-Structures(1946) Dover(1922)]-Hubbard-Beeby[J.Phys.C(1967)] Siegel[J.Nonxline-Sol.40,453(1980)] generalized-disorder collective-boson negative-dispersion mode-softening universality-principle(G...P) first use of the ``square-of-opposition'' in physics since Plato and Aristote!!!

  19. In Vivo 3D Analysis of Thoracic Kinematics: Changes in Size and Shape During Breathing and Their Implications for Respiratory Function in Recent Humans and Fossil Hominins.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; García-Martínez, Daniel; Torres-Tamayo, Nicole; Sanchis-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; O'Higgins, Paul; Utrilla, Cristina; Torres Sánchez, Isabel; García Río, Francisco

    2017-02-01

    The human ribcage expands and contracts during respiration as a result of the interaction between the morphology of the ribs, the costo-vertebral articulations and respiratory muscles. Variations in these factors are said to produce differences in the kinematics of the upper thorax and the lower thorax, but the extent and nature of any such differences and their functional implications have not yet been quantified. Applying geometric morphometrics we measured 402 three-dimensional (3D) landmarks and semilandmarks of 3D models built from computed tomographic scans of thoraces of 20 healthy adult subjects in maximal forced inspiration (FI) and expiration (FE). We addressed the hypothesis that upper and lower parts of the ribcage differ in kinematics and compared different models of functional compartmentalization. During inspiration the thorax superior to the level of the sixth ribs undergoes antero-posterior expansion that differs significantly from the medio-lateral expansion characteristic of the thorax below this level. This supports previous suggestions for dividing the thorax into a pulmonary and diaphragmatic part. While both compartments differed significantly in mean size and shape during FE and FI the size changes in the lower compartment were significantly larger. Additionally, for the same degree of kinematic shape change, the pulmonary thorax changes less in size than the diaphragmatic thorax. Therefore, variations in the form and function of the diaphragmatic thorax will have a strong impact on respiratory function. This has important implications for interpreting differences in thorax shape in terms of respiratory functional differences within and among recent humans and fossil hominins. Anat Rec, 300:255-264, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Lower-limb amputee ankle and hip kinetic response to an imposed error in mediolateral foot placement.

    PubMed

    Segal, Ava D; Shofer, Jane B; Klute, Glenn K

    2015-11-26

    Maintaining balance while walking is challenging for lower limb amputees. The effect of prosthetic foot stiffness on recovery kinetics from an error in foot placement may inform prescription practice and lead to new interventions designed to improve balance. Ten unilateral transtibial amputees were fit with two prosthetic feet with different stiffness properties in random order. After a 3-week acclimation period, they returned to the lab for testing before switching feet. Twelve non-amputees also participated in a single data collection. While walking on an instrumented treadmill, we imposed a repeatable, unexpected medial or lateral disturbance in foot placement by releasing a burst of air at the ankle just before heel strike. Three-dimensional motion capture, ground reaction force and center of pressure (COP) data were collected for two steps prior, the disturbed step and three steps after the disturbance. During undisturbed walking, coronal ankle impulse was lower by 42% for amputees wearing a stiff compared to a compliant foot (p=0.017); however, across steps, both prosthetic recovery patterns were similar compared to the sound limb and non-amputees. Peak coronal hip moment was 15-20% lower for both foot types during undisturbed walking (p<0.001), with less change in response to the medial disturbance (p<0.001) compared to the sound limb and non-amputees. Amputee prosthetic COP excursion was unaffected by the disturbance (2.4% change) compared to the sound limb (59% change; p<0.001) and non-amputees (55% change; p<0.001). These findings imply that a prosthetic foot-ankle system able to contribute to ankle kinetics may improve walking balance among amputees.

  1. Executive functions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen J

    2005-04-01

    Executive functions are higher-order cognitive processes that continue to develop well into adulthood. They are critically important to behavioral self-control and task performance, and deficits can have serious effects on a student's functioning in many areas. Primary care pediatricians can play an important role by being aware of this evolving field of research, current assessment strategies, and by encouraging families, schools, and students to adopt a positive and problem-solving approach to improve executive functions.

  2. Differential macrophage function in Brown Swiss and Holstein Friesian cattle.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Amanda Jane; Woodman, Sally; Pennelegion, Christopher; Patterson, Robert; Stuart, Emma; Hosker, Naomi; Siviter, Peter; Douglas, Chloe; Whitehouse, Jessica; Wilkinson, Will; Pegg, Sherri-Anne; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Werling, Dirk

    2016-11-15

    There is strong evidence that high yielding dairy cows are extremely susceptible to infectious diseases, and that this has severe economic consequences for the dairy industry and welfare implications. Here we present preliminary functional evidence showing that the innate immune response differs between cow breeds. The ability of macrophages (MØ) to kill pathogens depends in part on oxygen-dependent and independent mechanisms. The oxygen-dependent mechanisms rely on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, respectively). ROS production has been shown to activate the inflammasome complex in MØ leading to increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Conversely RNS inhibits inflammasome mediated IL-1β activation, indicating a division between inflammasome activation and RNS production. In the present study MØ from Brown Swiss (BS) cattle produce significantly more RNS and less IL-1β when compared to cells from Holstein Friesian (HF) cattle in response to bacterial or fungal stimuli. Furthermore, BS MØ killed ingested Salmonella typhimurium more efficiently, supporting anecdotal evidence of increased disease resistance of the breed. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) stimulated IL-1β secretion in cells from both breeds, but was more pronounced in HF MØ. Blocking RNS production by l-arginase completely abolished RNS production but increased IL-1β secretion in BS MØ. Collectively these preliminary data suggest that the dichotomy of inflammasome activation and RNS production exists in cattle and differs between these two breeds. As pattern recognition receptors and signaling pathways are involved in the assessed functional differences presented herein, our data potentially aid the identification of in vitro predictors of appropriate innate immune response. Finally, these predictors may assist in the discovery of candidate genes conferring increased disease resistance for future use in

  3. Turning semicircular canal function on its head: dinosaurs and a novel vestibular analysis.

    PubMed

    Georgi, Justin A; Sipla, Justin S; Forster, Catherine A

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have correlated vestibular function to locomotion in vertebrates by scaling semicircular duct radius of curvature to body mass. However, this method fails to discriminate bipedal from quadrupedal non-avian dinosaurs. Because they exhibit a broad range of relative head sizes, we use dinosaurs to test the hypothesis that semicircular ducts scale more closely with head size. Comparing the area enclosed by each semicircular canal to estimated body mass and to two different measures of head size, skull length and estimated head mass, reveals significant patterns that corroborate a connection between physical parameters of the head and semicircular canal morphology. Head mass more strongly correlates with anterior semicircular canal size than does body mass and statistically separates bipedal from quadrupedal taxa, with bipeds exhibiting relatively larger canals. This morphologic dichotomy likely reflects adaptations of the vestibular system to stability demands associated with terrestrial locomotion on two, versus four, feet. This new method has implications for reinterpreting previous studies and informing future studies on the connection between locomotion type and vestibular function.

  4. Turning Semicircular Canal Function on Its Head: Dinosaurs and a Novel Vestibular Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Justin A.; Sipla, Justin S.; Forster, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have correlated vestibular function to locomotion in vertebrates by scaling semicircular duct radius of curvature to body mass. However, this method fails to discriminate bipedal from quadrupedal non-avian dinosaurs. Because they exhibit a broad range of relative head sizes, we use dinosaurs to test the hypothesis that semicircular ducts scale more closely with head size. Comparing the area enclosed by each semicircular canal to estimated body mass and to two different measures of head size, skull length and estimated head mass, reveals significant patterns that corroborate a connection between physical parameters of the head and semicircular canal morphology. Head mass more strongly correlates with anterior semicircular canal size than does body mass and statistically separates bipedal from quadrupedal taxa, with bipeds exhibiting relatively larger canals. This morphologic dichotomy likely reflects adaptations of the vestibular system to stability demands associated with terrestrial locomotion on two, versus four, feet. This new method has implications for reinterpreting previous studies and informing future studies on the connection between locomotion type and vestibular function. PMID:23516495

  5. Glycosphingolipid Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, Clifford A.

    2011-01-01

    The combination of carbohydrate and lipid generates unusual molecules in which the two distinctive halves of the glycoconjugate influence the function of each other. Membrane glycolipids can act as primary receptors for carbohydrate binding proteins to mediate transmembrane signaling despite restriction to the outer bilayer leaflet. The extensive heterogeneity of the lipid moiety plays a significant, but still largely unknown, role in glycosphingolipid function. Potential interplay between glycolipids and their fatty acid isoforms, together with their preferential interaction with cholesterol, generates a complex mechanism for the regulation of their function in cellular physiology. PMID:21555406

  6. Breaking Down a False Dichotomy: Feature Films and Public Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, James E.; Stromgren, Richard

    1970-01-01

    A look (is) taken at the background of feature films in both commercial and public television; arguments (are) presented for and against feature film usage in public broadcasting; findings of a recent survey on feature films and public broadcasting (are) reported; and formats for usage of feature films in local stations (are) explored."…

  7. Transcending the Mind-Body Dichotomy: Schizophrenia Reexamined.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Epp, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how the genetic aspects of schizophrenia must be described within the interactive context of psychosocial stress. Suggests that the mental health profession must consider the environmental and social components of this condition, including the clients' relationships, families, and communities. States that psychotherapeutic interventions…

  8. The aging-disease false dichotomy: understanding senescence as pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gems, David

    2015-01-01

    From a biological perspective aging (senescence) appears to be a form of complex disease syndrome, though this is not the traditional view. This essay aims to foster a realistic understanding of aging by scrutinizing ideas old and new. The conceptual division between aging-related diseases and an underlying, non-pathological aging process underpins various erroneous traditional ideas about aging. Among biogerontologists, another likely error involves the aspiration to treat the entire aging process, which recent advances suggest is somewhat utopian. It also risks neglecting a more modest but realizable goal: to develop preventative treatments that partially protect against aging. PMID:26136770

  9. The dichotomy of pathogens and allergens in vaccination approaches

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Fiona J.; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional prophylactic vaccination to prevent illness is the primary objective of many research activities worldwide. The golden age of vaccination began with an approach called variolation in ancient China and the evolution of vaccines still continues today with modern developments such as the production of GardasilTM against HPV and cervical cancer. The historical aspect of how different forms of vaccination have changed the face of medicine and communities is important as it dictates our future approaches on both a local and global scale. From the eradication of smallpox to the use of an experimental vaccine to save a species, this review will explore these successes in infectious disease vaccination and also discuss a few significant failures which have hampered our efforts to eradicate certain diseases. The second part of the review will explore designing a prophylactic vaccine for the growing global health concern that is allergy. Allergies are an emerging global health burden. Of particular concern is the rise of food allergies in developed countries where 1 in 10 children is currently affected. The formation of an allergic response results from the recognition of a foreign component by our immune system that is usually encountered on a regular basis. This may be a dust-mite or a prawn but this inappropriate immune response can result in a life-time of food avoidance and lifestyle restrictions. These foreign components are very similar to antigens derived from infectious pathogens. The question arises: should the allergy community be focussing on protective measures rather than ongoing therapeutic interventions to deal with these chronic inflammatory conditions? We will explore the difficulties and benefits of prophylactic vaccination against various allergens by means of genetic technology that will dictate how vaccination against allergens could be utilized in the near future. PMID:25076945

  10. Dichotomy and perceptual distortions in absolute pitch ability

    PubMed Central

    Athos, E. Alexandra; Levinson, Barbara; Kistler, Amy; Zemansky, Jason; Bostrom, Alan; Freimer, Nelson; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-01-01

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. Understanding both the nature and genesis of AP can provide insights into neuroplasticity in the auditory system. We explored factors that may influence the accuracy of pitch perception in AP subjects both during the development of the trait and in later age. We used a Web-based survey and a pitch-labeling test to collect perceptual data from 2,213 individuals, 981 (44%) of whom proved to have extraordinary pitch-naming ability. The bimodal distribution in pitch-naming ability signifies AP as a distinct perceptual trait, with possible implications for its genetic basis. The wealth of these data has allowed us to uncover unsuspected note-naming irregularities suggestive of a “perceptual magnet” centered at the note “A.” In addition, we document a gradual decline in pitch-naming accuracy with age, characterized by a perceptual shift in the “sharp” direction. These findings speak both to the process of acquisition of AP and to its stability. PMID:17724340

  11. Dichotomy and perceptual distortions in absolute pitch ability.

    PubMed

    Athos, E Alexandra; Levinson, Barbara; Kistler, Amy; Zemansky, Jason; Bostrom, Alan; Freimer, Nelson; Gitschier, Jane

    2007-09-11

    Absolute pitch (AP) is the rare ability to identify the pitch of a tone without the aid of a reference tone. Understanding both the nature and genesis of AP can provide insights into neuroplasticity in the auditory system. We explored factors that may influence the accuracy of pitch perception in AP subjects both during the development of the trait and in later age. We used a Web-based survey and a pitch-labeling test to collect perceptual data from 2,213 individuals, 981 (44%) of whom proved to have extraordinary pitch-naming ability. The bimodal distribution in pitch-naming ability signifies AP as a distinct perceptual trait, with possible implications for its genetic basis. The wealth of these data has allowed us to uncover unsuspected note-naming irregularities suggestive of a "perceptual magnet" centered at the note "A." In addition, we document a gradual decline in pitch-naming accuracy with age, characterized by a perceptual shift in the "sharp" direction. These findings speak both to the process of acquisition of AP and to its stability.

  12. The Multilingual/Bilingual Dichotomy: An Exploration of Individual Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy S.

    2009-01-01

    Bilingualism (Sanz, 2000), motivation (Pintrich, 1989), and language aptitude (Grigorenko, Sternberg, and Ehrman, 2000) are crucial individual differences that contribute to successful adult language learning. Since Gardner's (1985) seminal work on motivation, many studies have shown that motivation is dynamic and that it affects language…

  13. Disciplinary versus Academic Sanctions in Higher Education: A Doomed Dichotomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutile, Fernand N.

    2003-01-01

    Explains that courts have generally subjected disciplinary action to procedural due process under the Fourteenth Amendment, while academic sanctions have garnered greater deference. Examines the judicial history of this dual track, establishes the difficulty of characterizing as either disciplinary or academic the countless situations reflecting…

  14. Solving the Dichotomy of Excitonic Challenges in Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambem, Soniya Devi

    The focus of this research is to design a novel architecture for organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, a "wrapped OPV", which is tailored to the requirements of short exciton diffusion length and low charge carrier mobility of organic semiconductors. A wrapped OPV is a vertically oriented device, in contrast to typical flat panel OPV devices, in order to capture, manage, guide, and use all incident photons and therefore generate a higher current. Resonant light, on being transmitted into a wrapped OPV, makes multiple passes through the active layer, resulting in increased optical path length and consequently absorption of all incident resonant light. The wrapped OPV is constructed from a flexible "flat" OPV, fabricated using a bulk heterojunction photoactive layer of poly-(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). A flexible OPV is achieved by fabricating OPV devices on highly flexible semitransparent thin metal films. The outcome of the unique trapping of all resonant photons in a wrapped OPV is a two-fold increase in the current density which was obtained when light is incident at an angle of ˜ 30° at the face of the wrapped OPV. The angular dependence of current density is a complex relation that combines factors including transmittances across the different layers, area of illumination at the face of the OPV, optical path length, and geometry of the wrapped OPV. A mathematical model constructed, incorporating all these factors, shows a very close agreement with the experimental result obtained. The findings reported uncover a new direction for photovoltaic research which has the potential to increase performance of OPVs significantly.

  15. [The development of gender identity beyond rigid dichotomy].

    PubMed

    Quindeau, Ilka

    2014-01-01

    The conflicts individuals with ambiguous sexual characteristics suffer from are not the result of genetic features but of the rigid and dichotomous gender order, which is currently undergoing a renaissance. This also applies to individuals with an uncertain gender identity. In the best interests of the child a concept of gender seems necessary, that goes beyond a binary separation and allows gender-specific intermediary stages in the personal development of identity. Such a gender concept can be developed following psychoanalytic theories. The present discourse contains a scale of connecting factors for a differentiated and less normative conceptualization of gender development. Starting from Freud's concept of constitutional bisexuality, Robert Stoller's theory, which has been firmly rooted in the mainstream of psychoanalysis for more than 40 years, will be critically reviewed. By involving Reimut Reiche's and Jean Laplanche's arguments, a continuative psychological gender theory will be drafted, which does not normatively and reductively claim the demarcation of gender, but rather opens up a space for gender diversity.

  16. Content vs. Learning: An Old Dichotomy in Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergtrom, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    The principles of course redesign that were applied to a gateway Cell Biology course at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee are applicable to courses large and small, and to institutions of any size. The challenge was to design a content-rich science course that kept pace with present and future content and at the same time use principles of…

  17. Capstone Dichotomies: A Proposed Framework for Characterizing Capstone Design Experiences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    discipline has freedom in how they achieve these outcomes, so long as it is a deliberate and traceable approach back to the desired outcomes. This freedom...allows each discipline to tailor their capstone design experience tot hose appropriate to their domains. When students are developed fully within a...single discipline program that also offers their capstone, the structure promotes alignment of the student, instructor, and advisor expectations. However

  18. A false dichotomy? Mental illness and lone-actor terrorism.

    PubMed

    Corner, Emily; Gill, Paul

    2015-02-01

    We test whether significant differences in mental illness exist in a matched sample of lone- and group-based terrorists. We then test whether there are distinct behavioral differences between lone-actor terrorists with and without mental illness. We then stratify our sample across a range of diagnoses and again test whether significant differences exist. We conduct a series of bivariate, multivariate, and multinomial statistical tests using a unique dataset of 119 lone-actor terrorists and a matched sample of group-based terrorists. The odds of a lone-actor terrorist having a mental illness is 13.49 times higher than the odds of a group actor having a mental illness. Lone actors who were mentally ill were 18.07 times more likely to have a spouse or partner who was involved in a wider movement than those without a history of mental illness. Those with a mental illness were more likely to have a proximate upcoming life change, more likely to have been a recent victim of prejudice, and experienced proximate and chronic stress. The results identify behaviors and traits that security agencies can utilize to monitor and prevent lone-actor terrorism events. The correlated behaviors provide an image of how risk can crystalize within the individual offender and that our understanding of lone-actor terrorism should be multivariate in nature.

  19. Managerial Intuition across Cultures: Beyond a "West-East Dichotomy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wozniak, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Studies investigating intuition from a cultural and cross-cultural perspective have a long tradition in various disciplines but, due to the increased internationalization of business, an understanding of the mental lives of other cultures became one of the priorities of management practitioners and theoreticians. Cultures of…

  20. Localising News: Translation and the "Global-National" Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orengo, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    Due to the peculiar nature of news texts, the adoption of a theory of "localisation" rather than conventional translation theories accounts more easily for both the commercial nature and the global scale of news distribution. News texts are global products which are distributed through a localisation process involving not only reception…

  1. Kalela, Beni, Asafo, Ingoma and the rural-urban dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Argyle, J

    1991-01-01

    The author provides a critical examination of the arguments and support for conclusions in "copperbelt writings" about the urban Kalela dance and the relationship to urban and rural differences. There is a critical discussion of relationships between the dance forms: the kalela, asafo, beni, and ingoma. The origins of the dance are traced to the rural Beni in the writings of Mitchel, however Ranger's treatise on the Beni in east Africa indicates a locally quite distinct tradition associated with Swahili dance associations in towns. The author finds strong parallels between the Beni and Swahili dance associations and derivation from the Akan asafo companies. It is suggested that both east and west African dances reflected a European impact and the fundamental values of African people as well as a form of entertainment. It was a public display of progress and skill. The spread of the Swahili Beni between the 2 World Wars was complex and varied, but the form conformed well to rural villages which traditionally competed against each other. The Mitchel assertion that the costumes which imitated the uniforms of colonial civil and military hierarchy allowed vicarious participation in social relationships which they were excluded from is refuted. It is suggested by the author and Ranger that African dancers were asserting as traditional their individual and collective status and prestige in their own society and the costumes were the new fashion. The change to modern dress is though by Mitchell to reflect similarly a fictitious upward mobility and urban influence, and is considered to be unsubstantiated by the lower class population assuming the behavior. The author views the behavior as directed to unskilled, uneducated migrant workers groups which included them and provided a strong link to their rural homes and children. In dispute is also the Mitchell interpretation of lyrics to the songs which the author finds reflect rural themes and influences as well. It is recognized that there were new urban references. The Kalela dance is considered by the author to be an example of the encapsulation of rural migrants within an urban environment. This view is reflected in Mayer's Townsmen and Tribemen and the writings of H.J. Thomas on the ingoma dance groups of Durban, which also reflected lyrics pertained to rural life. The songs are a traditional, spontaneous, unsolicited testimony to rural life.

  2. "Murrayesque" Expressivism: A Deweyan Reconsideration of Contemporary Composition's Dangerous Dichotomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Don

    Like the narrator of Robert Frost's poem "Mending Wall," instructors need to ask what is being walled in and walled out of their composition programs when categories such as process vs. product, expressive, epistemic, current traditionalism, and social constructionism are constructed. When divisive categories prevent theorists from…

  3. Paradigms, Perspectives and Dichotomies amongst Teacher Educators in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katyal, Kokila Roy; Fai, Pang Ming

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that the concepts, beliefs and understandings of local and non-local teacher educators in a Hong Kong university are grounded in their own cultural cognition and antecedents. It presents the viewpoint that contemporary notions of good practice were compromised when applied to a context that is strongly influenced by the tenets of…

  4. Beyond Remedial Dichotomies: Are "Underprepared" College Students a Marginalized Majority?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deil-Amen, Regina

    2011-01-01

    This article questions the dichotomous labeling and conceptualization of remedial and nonremedial students, particularly the added distinctions emphasized between four-year and two-year colleges, and it calls for a focus on the common challenges among all underprepared college students. The content of this article has attempted to broaden the…

  5. Dichotomy of protective cellular immune responses to human visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Khalil, E A G; Ayed, N B; Musa, A M; Ibrahim, M E; Mukhtar, M M; Zijlstra, E E; Elhassan, I M; Smith, P G; Kieny, P M; Ghalib, H W; Zicker, F; Modabber, F; Elhassan, A M

    2005-05-01

    Healing/protective responses in human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are associated with stimulation/production of Th1 cytokines, such as interferon IFN-gamma, and conversion in the leishmanin skin test (LST). Such responses were studied for 90 days in 44 adult healthy volunteers from VL non-endemic areas, with no past history of VL/cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and LST non-reactivity following injection with one of four doses of Alum-precipitated autoclaved Leishmania major (Alum/ALM) +/- bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), a VL candidate vaccine. The vaccine was well tolerated with minimal localized side-effects and without an increase in antileishmanial antibodies or interleukin (IL)-5. Five volunteers (5/44; 11.4%) had significant IFN-gamma production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to Leishmania antigens in their prevaccination samples (P = 0.001) but were LST non-reactive. On day 45, more than half the volunteers (26/44; 59.0%) had significantly high LST indurations (mean 9.2 +/- 2.7 mm) and high IFN-gamma levels (mean 1008 +/- 395; median 1247 pg/ml). Five volunteers had significant L. donovani antigen-induced IFN-gamma production (mean 873 +/- 290; median 902; P = 0.001), but were non-reactive in LST. An additional five volunteers (5/44; 11.4%) had low IFN-gamma levels (mean 110 +/- 124 pg/ml; median 80) and were non-reactive in LST (induration = 00 mm). The remaining eight volunteers had low IFN-gamma levels, but significant LST induration (mean 10 +/- 2.9 mm; median 11). By day 90 the majority of volunteers (27/44; 61.4%) had significant LST induration (mean 10.8 +/- 9.9 mm; P < 0.001), but low levels of L. donovani antigen-induced IFN-gamma (mean 66.0 +/- 62 pg/ml; P > 0.05). Eleven volunteers (11/44; 25%) had significantly high levels of IFN-gamma and LST induration, while five volunteers had low levels of IFN-gamma (<100 pg/ml) and no LST reactivity (00 mm). One volunteer was lost to follow-up. In conclusion, it is hypothesized that cellular immune responses to human VL are dichotomatous, and that IFN-gamma production and the LST response are not in a causal relationship. Following vaccination and probably cure of VL infection, the IFN-gamma response declines with time while the LST response persists. LST is a simple test that can be used to assess candidate vaccine efficacy.

  6. Tolerance to Alliance: Deconstructing Dichotomies to Advocate for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that teachers in the twenty-first century need to incorporate queer theory into their teaching practice and their discussions about individual differences in order to advocate for those students most likely to be bullied in schools. It provides a brief background on queer theory, gives an introduction to central ideas of the…

  7. Negative aging stereotypes and the agentic-communal dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Hale, N M; Hewitt, J

    1998-12-01

    Prior research has documented negative aging stereotypes. Our hypothesis is that these only apply when a certain dimension of traits is employed and when older persons occupy certain roles. 42 college students were asked to rate the extent to which each of several "agentic" traits, e.g., active, aggressive, independent, and "communal" traits, e.g., understanding, warm, helpful, characterized a roommate and college professor, both of whom were stated to be either 23 or 65 years of age. For the roommate (but not the professor), the young person was seen as more agentic than the older person. No differences were found on the dimension of communality. It was concluded that young college students may attribute negative behaviors to older persons but this is more likely when the negative behaviors are agentic in nature and the older person occupies certain roles such as "retired person."

  8. Educating Moral Emotions or Moral Selves: A False Dichotomy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Kristjan

    2010-01-01

    In the post-Kohlbergian era of moral education, a "moral gap" has been identified between moral cognition and moral action. Contemporary moral psychologists lock horns over how this gap might be bridged. The two main contenders for such bridge-building are moral emotions and moral selves. I explore these two options from an Aristotelian…

  9. Dichotomy, Consubstantiality, Technical Writing, Literary Theory: The Double Orthodox Curse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Jasper

    1992-01-01

    Articulates two different conceptions of writing that come from ancient Greece (classical and sophistic) and uses them as a field in which to compare two writing scenes involving reader response and software documentation. Explores whether these scenes are the same, similar, or absolutely different and whether they imply similar, different, or…

  10. Albedo dichotomy of Rhea - Hapke analysis of Voyager photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Veverka, Joseph

    1989-01-01

    The Hapke (1986) model has been well fitted to both full-disk and disk-resolved Voyager observations. The low phase angle data indicate a substantial opposition effect, and the Hapke analysis results show that while the regolith compaction parameter for Rhea is definitely larger than for Titania, it is comparable to that of the moon. Photometric differences other than albedo are noted between the leading and trailing hemispheres of the satellite. The albedo map of Rhea presented reproduces the observed lightcurve and demonstrates that no terrain or feature in the trailing hemisphere is as bright as any in the leading hemisphere. A quasi-circular low albedo region near the antiapex of motion is discovered.

  11. The Dialectics of Gender: A Move beyond Dichotomies Constraining Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranieri, Paul W.

    The conceptual starting point for almost all recent gender related theory and research is to identify the characteristics of current educational practice as rooted in a type of thought that is linear, analytical, stage dependent, discursive, and "objective," and that separates thought and language--this is the mode that is typically associated…

  12. Dialectics Instead of Dichotomy: Perspectives on the Twin Ambitions Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksson, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the mobilizing work of a disability organization, at the local chapter level. I have spent about a year following the work of a chapter, mainly through contacts, conversations and interviews with the persons who are active on its board. The analysis of the chapter's work takes as its starting point two traditions that…

  13. Cognitive Function

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because chemicals can adversely affect cognitive function in humans, considerable effort has been made to characterize their effects using animal models. Information from such models will be necessary to: evaluate whether chemicals identified as potentially neurotoxic by screenin...

  14. Functional diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Tack, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Chronic diarrhea is a frequent and challenging problem in clinical medicine. In a considerable subgroup of these, no underlying cause is identified and this is referred to as functional diarrhea. A consensus definition for functional diarrhea is based on loose stool consistency and chronicity and absence of coexisting irritable bowel syndrome. Underlying pathophysiology includes rapid intestinal transit, which may be worsened by stress or be triggered by a preceding infectious gastroenteritis. Diagnostic work-up aims at exclusion of underlying organic disease. Treatment starts with dietary adjustments, aiming at decreasing nutrients that enhance transit and stool and at identifying precipitating food items.

  15. The neutron star and black hole initial mass function

    SciTech Connect

    Timmes, F.X. |

    1996-02-01

    Using recently calculated models for massive stellar evolution and supernovae coupled to a model for Galactic chemical evolution, neutron star and black hole birth functions (number of neutron stars and black holes as a function of their mass) are determined for the Milky Way galaxy. For these stars that explode as Type II supernovae, the models give birth functions that are bimodal with peaks at 1.27 and 1.76 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}} and average masses within those peaks of 1.28 and 1.73 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}. For these stars that explode as Type Ib there is a narrower spread of remnant masses, the average being 1.32 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}, and less evidence for bimodality. These values will be increased, especially in the more massive Type II supernovae, if significant accretion continues during the initial launching of the shock, and the number of heavier neutron stars could be depleted by black hole formation. The principal reason for the dichotomy in remnant masses for Type II is the difference in the presupernova structure of stars above and below 19 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}, the mass separating stars that burn carbon convectively from those that produce less carbon and burn radiatively. The Type Ib{close_quote}s and the lower mass group of the Type II{close_quote}s compare favorably with measured neutron star masses, and in particular to the Thorsett {ital et} {ital al}. (1993) determination of the average neutron star mass in 17 systems; 1.35{plus_minus}0.27 {ital M}{sub {circle_dot}}. Variations in the exponent of a Salpeter initial mass function are shown not to affect the locations of the two peaks in the distribution function, but do affect their relative amplitudes. Sources of uncertainty, in particular placement of the mass cut and sensitivity to the explosion energy, are discussed, and estimates of the total number of neutron stars and black holes in the Galaxy are given. (Abstract Truncated)

  16. Comprehensive functional annotation of 18 missense mutations found in suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Joubrel, Rozenn; Pissard, Serge; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Gérolami, Victoria; Ged, Cécile; Cadet, Estelle; Cartault, François; Ka, Chandran; Gourlaouen, Isabelle; Gourhant, Lénaick; Oudin, Claire; Goossens, Michel; Grandchamp, Bernard; De Verneuil, Hubert; Rochette, Jacques; Férec, Claude; Le Gac, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Hemochromatosis type 4 is a rare form of primary iron overload transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait caused by mutations in the gene encoding the iron transport protein ferroportin 1 (SLC40A1). SLC40A1 mutations fall into two functional categories (loss- versus gain-of-function) underlying two distinct clinical entities (hemochromatosis type 4A versus type 4B). However, the vast majority of SLC40A1 mutations are rare missense variations, with only a few showing strong evidence of causality. The present study reports the results of an integrated approach collecting genetic and phenotypic data from 44 suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients, with comprehensive structural and functional annotations. Causality was demonstrated for 10 missense variants, showing a clear dichotomy between the two hemochromatosis type 4 subtypes. Two subgroups of loss-of-function mutations were distinguished: one impairing cell-surface expression and one altering only iron egress. Additionally, a new gain-of-function mutation was identified, and the degradation of ferroportin on hepcidin binding was shown to probably depend on the integrity of a large extracellular loop outside of the hepcidin-binding domain. Eight further missense variations, on the other hand, were shown to have no discernible effects at either protein or RNA level; these were found in apparently isolated patients and were associated with a less severe phenotype. The present findings illustrate the importance of combining in silico and biochemical approaches to fully distinguish pathogenic SLC40A1 mutations from benign variants. This has profound implications for patient management.

  17. Functional conservation between members of an ancient duplicated transcription factor family, LSF/Grainyhead.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Kavitha; McManus, Heather R; Mello, Craig C; Smith, Temple F; Hansen, Ulla

    2003-08-01

    The LSF/Grainyhead transcription factor family is involved in many important biological processes, including cell cycle, cell growth and development. In order to investigate the evolutionary conservation of these biological roles, we have characterized two new family members in Caenorhabditis elegans and Xenopus laevis. The C.elegans member, Ce-GRH-1, groups with the Grainyhead subfamily, while the X.laevis member, Xl-LSF, groups with the LSF subfamily. Ce-GRH-1 binds DNA in a sequence-specific manner identical to that of Drosophila melanogaster Grainyhead. In addition, Ce-GRH-1 binds to sequences upstream of the C.elegans gene encoding aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase and genes involved in post-embryonic development, mab-5 and dbl-1. All three C.elegans genes are homologs of D.melanogaster Grainyhead-regulated genes. RNA-mediated interference of Ce-grh-1 results in embryonic lethality in worms, accompanied by soft, defective cuticles. These phenotypes are strikingly similar to those observed previously in D.melanogaster grainyhead mutants, suggesting conservation of the developmental role of these family members over the course of evolution. Our phylogenetic analysis of the expanded LSF/GRH family (including other previously unrecognized proteins/ESTs) suggests that the structural and functional dichotomy of this family dates back more than 700 million years, i.e. to the time when the first multicellular organisms are thought to have arisen.

  18. Effect of Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation Combined with Treadmill Training on Balance and Functional Performance in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Natália de Almeida Carvalho; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Galli, Manuela; Fregni, Felipe; Oliveira, Cláudia Santos

    2014-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy refers to permanent, mutable motor development disorders stemming from a primary brain lesion, causing secondary musculoskeletal problems and limitations in activities of daily living. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of gait training combined with transcranial direct-current stimulation over the primary motor cortex on balance and functional performance in children with cerebral palsy. Methods A double-blind randomized controlled study was carried out with 24 children aged five to 12 years with cerebral palsy randomly allocated to two intervention groups (blocks of six and stratified based on GMFCS level (levels I-II or level III).The experimental group (12 children) was submitted to treadmill training and anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex. The control group (12 children) was submitted to treadmill training and placebo transcranial direct-current stimulation. Training was performed in five weekly sessions for 2 weeks. Evaluations consisted of stabilometric analysis as well as the administration of the Pediatric Balance Scale and Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory one week before the intervention, one week after the completion of the intervention and one month after the completion of the intervention. All patients and two examiners were blinded to the allocation of the children to the different groups. Results The experimental group exhibited better results in comparison to the control group with regard to anteroposterior sway (eyes open and closed; p<0.05), mediolateral sway (eyes closed; p<0.05) and the Pediatric Balance Scale both one week and one month after the completion of the protocol. Conclusion Gait training on a treadmill combined with anodal stimulation of the primary motor cortex led to improvements in static balance and functional performance in children with cerebral palsy. Trial Registration Ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/RBR-9B5DH7 PMID:25171216

  19. A rehabilitation tool for functional balance using altered gravity and virtual reality

    PubMed Central

    Oddsson, Lars IE; Karlsson, Robin; Konrad, Janusz; Ince, Serdar; Williams, Steve R; Zemkova, Erika

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a need for effective and early functional rehabilitation of patients with gait and balance problems including those with spinal cord injury, neurological diseases and recovering from hip fractures, a common consequence of falls especially in the elderly population. Gait training in these patients using partial body weight support (BWS) on a treadmill, a technique that involves unloading the subject through a harness, improves walking better than training with full weight bearing. One problem with this technique not commonly acknowledged is that the harness provides external support that essentially eliminates associated postural adjustments (APAs) required for independent gait. We have developed a device to address this issue and conducted a training study for proof of concept of efficacy. Methods We present a tool that can enhance the concept of BWS training by allowing natural APAs to occur mediolaterally. While in a supine position in a 90 deg tilted environment built around a modified hospital bed, subjects wear a backpack frame that is freely moving on air-bearings (cf. puck on an air hockey table) and attached through a cable to a pneumatic cylinder that provides a load that can be set to emulate various G-like loads. Veridical visual input is provided through two 3-D automultiscopic displays that allow glasses free 3-D vision representing a virtual surrounding environment that may be acquired from sites chosen by the patient. Two groups of 12 healthy subjects were exposed to either strength training alone or a combination of strength and balance training in such a tilted environment over a period of four weeks. Results Isokinetic strength measured during upright squat extension improved similarly in both groups. Measures of balance assessed in upright showed statistically significant improvements only when balance was part of the training in the tilted environment. Postural measures indicated less reliance on visual and/or increased use

  20. Determine Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J.J.; Mulavara, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface [1]. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training applications customized to each crewmember. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds [2]. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s long sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. Comparison of threshold of motion detection obtained from joystick data versus body sway suggests that perceptual thresholds were significantly lower. In the balance task, subjects stood on an unstable surface and had to maintain balance

  1. Executive Functions

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Adele

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) make possible mentally playing with ideas; taking the time to think before acting; meeting novel, unanticipated challenges; resisting temptations; and staying focused. Core EFs are inhibition [response inhibition (self-control—resisting temptations and resisting acting impulsively) and interference control (selective attention and cognitive inhibition)], working memory, and cognitive flexibility (including creatively thinking “outside the box,” seeing anything from different perspectives, and quickly and flexibly adapting to changed circumstances). The developmental progression and representative measures of each are discussed. Controversies are addressed (e.g., the relation between EFs and fluid intelligence, self-regulation, executive attention, and effortful control, and the relation between working memory and inhibition and attention). The importance of social, emotional, and physical health for cognitive health is discussed because stress, lack of sleep, loneliness, or lack of exercise each impair EFs. That EFs are trainable and can be improved with practice is addressed, including diverse methods tried thus far. PMID:23020641

  2. Modulation of mitochondrial function by the microbiome metabolite propionic acid in autism and control cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Frye, R E; Rose, S; Chacko, J; Wynne, R; Bennuri, S C; Slattery, J C; Tippett, M; Delhey, L; Melnyk, S; Kahler, S G; MacFabe, D F

    2016-01-01

    Propionic acid (PPA) is a ubiquitous short-chain fatty acid, which is a major fermentation product of the enteric microbiome. PPA is a normal intermediate of metabolism and is found in foods, either naturally or as a preservative. PPA and its derivatives have been implicated in both health and disease. Whereas PPA is an energy substrate and has many proposed beneficial effects, it is also associated with human disorders involving mitochondrial dysfunction, including propionic acidemia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We aimed to investigate the dichotomy between the health and disease effects of PPA by measuring mitochondrial function in ASD and age- and gender-matched control lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) following incubation with PPA at several concentrations and durations both with and without an in vitro increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial function was optimally increased at particular exposure durations and concentrations of PPA with ASD LCLs, demonstrating a greater enhancement. In contrast, increasing ROS negated the positive PPA effect with the ASD LCLs, showing a greater detriment. These data demonstrate that enteric microbiome metabolites such as PPA can have both beneficial and toxic effects on mitochondrial function, depending on concentration, exposure duration and microenvironment redox state with these effects amplified in LCLs derived from individuals with ASD. As PPA, as well as enteric bacteria, which produce PPA, have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases, including ASD, diabetes, obesity and inflammatory diseases, insight into this metabolic modulator from the host microbiome may have wide applications for both health and disease. PMID:27779624

  3. Cellular mechanisms of mutations in Kv7.1: auditory functions in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome vs. Romano–Ward syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mousavi Nik, Atefeh; Gharaie, Somayeh; Jeong Kim, Hyo

    2015-01-01

    As a result of cell-specific functions of voltage-activated K+ channels, such as Kv7.1, mutations in this channel produce profound cardiac and auditory defects. At the same time, the massive diversity of K+ channels allows for compensatory substitution of mutant channels by other functional channels of their type to minimize defective phenotypes. Kv7.1 represents a clear example of such functional dichotomy. While several point mutations in the channel result in a cardio-auditory syndrome called Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS), about 100-fold mutations result in long QT syndrome (LQTS) denoted as Romano–Ward syndrome (RWS), which has an intact auditory phenotype. To determine whether the cellular mechanisms for the diverse phenotypic outcome of Kv7.1 mutations, are dependent on the tissue-specific function of the channel and/or specialized functions of the channel, we made series of point mutations in hKv7.1 ascribed to JLNS and RWS. For JLNS mutations, all except W248F yielded non-functional channels when expressed alone. Although W248F at the end of the S4 domain yielded a functional current, it underwent marked inactivation at positive voltages, rendering the channel non-functional. We demonstrate that by definition, none of the JLNS mutants operated in a dominant negative (DN) fashion. Instead, the JLNS mutants have impaired membrane trafficking, trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Cis-Golgi. The RWS mutants exhibited varied functional phenotypes. However, they can be summed up as exhibiting DN effects. Phenotypic differences between JLNS and RWS may stem from tissue-specific functional requirements of cardiac vs. inner ear non-sensory cells. PMID:25705178

  4. Statistical parametric network analysis of functional connectivity dynamics during a working memory task.

    PubMed

    Ginestet, Cedric E; Simmons, Andrew

    2011-03-15

    performances on the N-back task (Wald F=13.39,df(1)=1,df(2)=83,p<0.001), and therefore conferred predictive validity to functional connectivity strength, as measured by weighted cost. The results were found to be highly sensitive to the frequency band used for the computation of the between-region correlations, with the relationship between weighted cost and behavioral performance being most salient at very low frequencies (0.01-0.03 Hz). These findings are discussed in relation to the integration/specialization functional dichotomy. The pruning of functional networks under increasing cognitive load may permit greater modular specialization, thereby enhancing performance.

  5. Sleep and bodily functions: the physiological interplay between body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Amici, R; Bastianini, S; Berteotti, C; Cerri, M; Del Vecchio, F; Lo Martire, V; Luppi, M; Perez, E; Silvani, A; Zamboni, G; Zoccoli, G

    2014-01-01

    Body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis may both rely on the complex integrative activity carried out by the hypothalamus. Thus, the three main wake-sleep (WS) states (i.e. wakefulness, NREM sleep, and REM sleep) may be better understood if the different cardio-respiratory and metabolic parameters, which are under the integrated control of the autonomic and the endocrine systems, are studied during sleep monitoring. According to this view, many physiological events can be considered as an expression of the activity that physiological regulations should perform in order to cope with the need to fulfill body and sleep homeostasis. This review is aimed at making an assessment of data showing the existence of a physiological interplay between body homeostasis and sleep homeostasis, starting from the spontaneous changes observed in the somatic and autonomic activity during sleep, through evidence showing the deep changes occurring in the central integration of bodily functions during the different WS states, to the changes in the WS states observed when body homeostasis is challenged by the external environment and when the return to normal ambient conditions allows sleep homeo- stasis to run without apparent physiological restrictions. The data summarized in this review suggest that an approach to the dichotomy between NREM and REM sleep based on physiological regulations may offer a framework within which observations that a traditional behavioral approach may overlook can be interpreted. The study of the interplay between body and sleep homeostasis appears, therefore, to be a way to understand the function of complex organisms beyond that of the specific regulations.

  6. Second-order structure function scaling derivation from the Euler and magnetohydrodynamic equations.

    PubMed

    Beronov, Kamen N

    2002-06-01

    An anomalous scaling paradigm that has recently come to be canonical has two features limiting its range of applicability: The driving and driven fields are separated dyamically and the driving field statistics is prescribed, in terms of the (inertial subrange) scaling of its second-order structure functions and of white-noise statistics in time. Then the spectrum of scaling exponents for the driven field, scalar or vector, depends parametrically on the driving. Here, the coupling of turbulent vorticity to the driving velocity field is considered. Using simple approximations and no white-noise statistics assumption, equations are derived for the evolution of two-point second-order correlations. The turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) case is treated in an analogous fashion. In the neutral case, the kinematic coupling between vorticity and velocity leads to a unique prediction for the scaling exponent of the second-order structure functions of the two turbulent fields. The velocity scaling exponent estimate is zeta(2)=3(1/2)-1 approximately equal to 0.732, i.e., close to experimental data. Unlike Kolmogorov scaling, this result is systematically derived from the Euler equations. The analogous scaling of MHD fields is now treated beyond the dynamo theory approximation. In contrast to the uniqueness found in the neutral case, predicted MHD scalings depend on one parameter, similar to the "plasma beta" parameter beta(T) relating kinetic to magnetic energy. The nature of predicted dependence of inertial-range scaling exponents on beta(T) agrees with an observed dichotomy between high-beta(T) and low-beta(T) turbulence regimes.

  7. Altered Kinematics and Time to Stabilization During Drop-Jump Landings in Individuals With or Without Functional Ankle Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cynthia J.; Arnold, Brent L.; Ross, Scott E.

    2016-01-01

    Context It has been proposed that altered dynamic-control strategies during functional activity such as jump landings may partially explain recurrent instability in individuals with functional ankle instability (FAI). Objective To capture jump-landing time to stabilization (TTS) and ankle motion using a multisegment foot model among FAI, coper, and healthy control individuals. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Participants were 23 individuals with a history of at least 1 ankle sprain and at least 2 episodes of giving way in the past year (FAI), 23 individuals with a history of a single ankle sprain and no subsequent episodes of instability (copers), and 23 individuals with no history of ankle sprain or instability in their lifetime (controls). Participants were matched for age, height, and weight (age = 23.3 ± 3.8 years, height = 1.71 ± 0.09 m, weight = 69.0 ± 13.7 kg). Intervention(s) Ten single-legged drop jumps were recorded using a 12-camera Vicon MX motion-capture system and a strain-gauge force plate. Main Outcome Measures Mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) TTS in seconds, as well as forefoot and hindfoot sagittal- and frontal-plane angles at jump-landing initial contact and at the point of maximum vertical ground reaction force were calculated. Results For the forefoot and hindfoot in the sagittal plane, group differences were present at initial contact (forefoot: P = .043, hindfoot: P = .004). At the hindfoot, individuals with FAI displayed more dorsiflexion than the control and coper groups. Time to stabilization differed among groups (AP TTS: P < .001; ML TTS: P = .040). Anteroposterior TTS was longer in the coper group than in the FAI or control groups, and ML TTS was longer in the FAI group than in the control group. Conclusions During jump landings, copers showed differences in sagittal-plane control, including less plantar flexion at initial contact and increased AP sway during stabilization

  8. Bayesian function-on-function regression for multilevel functional data.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Mark J; Coull, Brent A; Versace, Francesco; Cinciripini, Paul; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Medical and public health research increasingly involves the collection of complex and high dimensional data. In particular, functional data-where the unit of observation is a curve or set of curves that are finely sampled over a grid-is frequently obtained. Moreover, researchers often sample multiple curves per person resulting in repeated functional measures. A common question is how to analyze the relationship between two functional variables. We propose a general function-on-function regression model for repeatedly sampled functional data on a fine grid, presenting a simple model as well as a more extensive mixed model framework, and introducing various functional Bayesian inferential procedures that account for multiple testing. We examine these models via simulation and a data analysis with data from a study that used event-related potentials to examine how the brain processes various types of images.

  9. Ocular-Motor Function and Information Processing: Implications for the Reading Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leisman, Gerald; Schwartz, Joddy

    This paper discusses the dichotomy between continually moving eyes and the lack of blurred visual experience. A discontinuous model of visual perception is proposed, with the discontinuities being phase and temporally related to saccadic eye movements. It is further proposed that deviant duration and angular velocity characteristics of saccades in…

  10. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  11. Defining Function in the Functional Medicine Model.

    PubMed

    Bland, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    In the functional medicine model, the word function is aligned with the evolving understanding that disease is an endpoint and function is a process. Function can move both forward and backward. The vector of change in function through time is, in part, determined by the unique interaction of an individual's genome with their environment, diet, and lifestyle. The functional medicine model for health care is concerned less with what we call the dysfunction or disease, and more about the dynamic processes that resulted in the person's dysfunction. The previous concept of functional somatic syndromes as psychosomatic in origin has now been replaced with a new concept of function that is rooted in the emerging 21st-century understanding of systems network-enabled biology.

  12. Divergence of allosteric effects of rapacuronium on binding and function of muscarinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Many neuromuscular blockers act as negative allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors by decreasing affinity and potency of acetylcholine. The neuromuscular blocker rapacuronium has been shown to have facilitatory effects at muscarinic receptors leading to bronchospasm. We examined the influence of rapacuronium on acetylcholine (ACh) binding to and activation of individual subtypes of muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells to determine its receptor selectivity. Results At equilibrium rapacuronium bound to all subtypes of muscarinic receptors with micromolar affinity (2.7-17 μM) and displayed negative cooperativity with both high- and low-affinity ACh binding states. Rapacuronium accelerated [3H]ACh association with and dissociation from odd-numbered receptor subtypes. With respect to [35S]GTPγS binding rapacuronium alone behaved as an inverse agonist at all subtypes. Rapacuronium concentration-dependently decreased the potency of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding at M2 and M4 receptors. In contrast, 0.1 μM rapacuronium significantly increased ACh potency at M1, M3, and M5 receptors. Kinetic measurements at M3 receptors showed acceleration of the rate of ACh-induced [35S]GTPγS binding by rapacuronium. Conclusions Our data demonstrate a novel dichotomy in rapacuronium effects at odd-numbered muscarinic receptors. Rapacuronium accelerates the rate of ACh binding but decreases its affinity under equilibrium conditions. This results in potentiation of receptor activation at low concentrations of rapacuronium (1 μM) but not at high concentrations (10 μM). These observations highlight the relevance and necessity of performing physiological tests under non-equilibrium conditions in evaluating the functional effects of allosteric modulators at muscarinic receptors. They also provide molecular basis for potentiating M3 receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction. PMID:20038295

  13. The development of vestibular system and related functions in mammals: impact of gravity

    PubMed Central

    Jamon, Marc

    2013-01-01

    This chapter reviews the knowledge about the adaptation to Earth gravity during the development of mammals. The impact of early exposure to altered gravity is evaluated at the level of the functions related to the vestibular system, including postural control, homeostatic regulation, and spatial memory. The hypothesis of critical periods in the adaptation to gravity is discussed. Demonstrating a critical period requires removing the gravity stimulus during delimited time windows, what is impossible to do on Earth surface. The surgical destruction of the vestibular apparatus, and the use of mice strains with defective graviceptors have provided useful information on the consequences of missing gravity perception, and the possible compensatory mechanisms, but transitory suppression of the stimulus can only be operated during spatial flight. The rare studies on rat pups housed on board of space shuttle significantly contributed to this problem, but the use of hypergravity environment, produced by means of chronic centrifugation, is the only available tool when repeated experiments must be carried out on Earth. Even though hypergravity is sometimes considered as a mirror situation to microgravity, the two situations cannot be confused because a gravitational force is still present. The theoretical considerations that validate the paradigm of hypergravity to evaluate critical periods are discussed. The question of adaption of graviceptor is questioned from an evolutionary point of view. It is possible that graviception is hardwired, because life on Earth has evolved under the constant pressure of gravity. The rapid acquisition of motor programming by precocial mammals in minutes after birth is consistent with this hypothesis, but the slow development of motor skills in altricial species and the plasticity of vestibular perception in adults suggest that gravity experience is required for the tuning of graviceptors. The possible reasons for this dichotomy are discussed

  14. Functional eye movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, D; Bronstein, A M

    2017-01-01

    Functional (psychogenic) eye movement disorders are perhaps less established in the medical literature than other types of functional movement disorders. Patients may present with ocular symptoms (e.g., blurred vision or oscillopsia) or functional eye movements may be identified during the formal examination of the eyes in patients with other functional disorders. Convergence spasm is the most common functional eye movement disorder, but functional gaze limitation, functional eye oscillations (also termed "voluntary nystagmus"), and functional convergence paralysis may be underreported. This chapter reviews the different types of functional eye movement abnormalities and provides a practical framework for their diagnosis and management.

  15. Functional realism: a defense of narrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Vannatta, Seth; Vannatta, Jerry

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we (1) define and describe the practice of narrative medicine, (2) reveal the need for narrative medicine by exposing the presuppositions that give rise to its discounting, including a reductive empiricism and a strict dichotomy between scientific fact and narrative value, (3) show evidence of the effects of education in narrative competence in the medical clinic, and (4) present Peircean realism as the proper conceptual model for our argument that the medical school curriculum committees should give space to the employment of the scientific and literary knowledge in medical practice. On account of our argument, we contend that the medical community should tend to latitude and openness with regard to the tools we use to resolve medical problems. These tools include both biomedical and narrative knowledge.

  16. Wave-function functionals for the density

    SciTech Connect

    Slamet, Marlina; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-11-15

    We extend the idea of the constrained-search variational method for the construction of wave-function functionals {psi}[{chi}] of functions {chi}. The search is constrained to those functions {chi} such that {psi}[{chi}] reproduces the density {rho}(r) while simultaneously leading to an upper bound to the energy. The functionals are thereby normalized and automatically satisfy the electron-nucleus coalescence condition. The functionals {psi}[{chi}] are also constructed to satisfy the electron-electron coalescence condition. The method is applied to the ground state of the helium atom to construct functionals {psi}[{chi}] that reproduce the density as given by the Kinoshita correlated wave function. The expectation of single-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub i}r{sub i}{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, W={Sigma}{sub i}{delta}(r{sub i}) are exact, as must be the case. The expectations of the kinetic energy operator W=-(1/2){Sigma}{sub i}{nabla}{sub i}{sup 2}, the two-particle operators W={Sigma}{sub n}u{sup n}, n=-2,-1,1,2, where u=|r{sub i}-r{sub j}|, and the energy are accurate. We note that the construction of such functionals {psi}[{chi}] is an application of the Levy-Lieb constrained-search definition of density functional theory. It is thereby possible to rigorously determine which functional {psi}[{chi}] is closer to the true wave function.

  17. Functional microorganisms for functional food quality.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, M; Cagno, R Di; De Angelis, M

    2010-09-01

    Functional microorganisms and health benefits represent a binomial with great potential for fermented functional foods. The health benefits of fermented functional foods are expressed either directly through the interactions of ingested live microorganisms with the host (probiotic effect) or indirectly as the result of the ingestion of microbial metabolites synthesized during fermentation (biogenic effect). Since the importance of high viability for probiotic effect, two major options are currently pursued for improving it--to enhance bacterial stress response and to use alternative products for incorporating probiotics (e.g., ice cream, cheeses, cereals, fruit juices, vegetables, and soy beans). Further, it seems that quorum sensing signal molecules released by probiotics may interact with human epithelial cells from intestine thus modulating several physiological functions. Under optimal processing conditions, functional microorganisms contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. Overproduction of free amino acids and vitamins are two classical examples. Besides, bioactive compounds (e.g., peptides, γ-amino butyric acid, and conjugated linoleic acid) may be released during food processing above the physiological threshold and they may exert various in vivo health benefits. Functional microorganisms are even more used in novel strategies for decreasing phenomenon of food intolerance (e.g., gluten intolerance) and allergy. By a critical approach, this review will aim at showing the potential of functional microorganisms for the quality of functional foods.

  18. Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Sensorimotor Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Cohen, H.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). Our previous work has shown the advantageous effects of VSR in a balance task of standing on an unstable surface. This technique to improve detection of vestibular signals uses a stimulus delivery system that is wearable or portable and provides imperceptibly low levels of white noise-based binaural bipolar electrical stimulation of the vestibular system. The goal of this project is to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection. A series of experiments were carried out to determine a robust paradigm to identify a vestibular threshold that can then be used to recommend optimal stimulation levels for SR training applications customized to each crewmember. Customizing stimulus intensity can maximize treatment effects. The amplitude of stimulation to be used in the VSR application has varied across studies in the literature such as 60% of nociceptive stimulus thresholds. We compared subjects' perceptual threshold with that obtained from two measures of body sway. Each test session was 463s long and consisted of several 15s sinusoidal stimuli, at different current amplitudes (0-2 mA), interspersed with 20-20.5s periods of no stimulation. Subjects sat on a chair with their eyes closed and had to report their perception of motion through a joystick. A force plate underneath the chair recorded medio-lateral shear forces and roll moments. First we determined the percent time during stimulation periods for which perception of motion (activity above a pre-defined threshold) was reported using the joystick, and body sway (two

  19. Reduction of frontal-plane hip joint reaction force via medio-lateral foot center of pressure manipulation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Solomonow-Avnon, Deborah; Wolf, Alon; Herman, Amir; Rozen, Nimrod; Haim, Amir

    2015-02-01

    Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulation of lower-limb joints has been shown to influence lower-limb biomechanics. Numerous studies report the influence of such interventions on the knee, however little is known about the influence of these interventions on the hip. The present study analyzed kinetic and kinematic changes about the hip of 12 healthy young males who underwent biomechanical manipulation utilizing the APOS biomechanical device (APOS-Medical and Sports Technologies Ltd., Herzliya, Israel) allowing controlled foot center of pressure manipulation. Subjects underwent gait testing in four para-sagittal device configurations: Medial, lateral, neutral, and regular shoes. In the medial configuration, subjects demonstrated no change in step width (i.e., distance between right and left foot center of pressure), however inter-malleolar distance significantly increased. Likewise with the medial setting, greater hip abduction was recorded, while hip adduction moment and joint reaction force decreased significantly. We speculate that subjects adopt a modified gait pattern aimed to maintain constant base of support. As a result, hip abductor muscle moment arm increases and adduction moment and joint reaction force decreases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to show this relationship. These results contribute to the understanding of lower-limb biomechanics and warrant further investigation.

  20. Diastolic function in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R A; Diamond, J A

    2001-11-01

    Diastolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension may present as asymptomatic findings on noninvasive testing, or as fulminant pulmonary edema, despite normal left ventricular systolic function. Up to 40% of hypertensive patients presenting with clinical signs of congestive heart failure have normal systolic left ventricular function. In this article we review the pathophysiologic factors affecting diastolic function in individuals with diastolic function, current and emerging tools for measuring diastolic function, and current concepts regarding the treatment of patients with diastolic congestive heart failure.

  1. Sampling functions for geophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  2. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  3. Scaled density functional theory correlation functionals.

    PubMed

    Ghouri, Mohammed M; Singh, Saurabh; Ramachandran, B

    2007-10-18

    We show that a simple one-parameter scaling of the dynamical correlation energy estimated by the density functional theory (DFT) correlation functionals helps increase the overall accuracy for several local and nonlocal functionals. The approach taken here has been described as the "scaled dynamical correlation" (SDC) method [Ramachandran, J. Phys. Chem. A 2006, 110, 396], and its justification is the same as that of the scaled external correlation (SEC) method of Brown and Truhlar. We examine five local and five nonlocal (hybrid) DFT functionals, the latter group including three functionals developed specifically for kinetics by the Truhlar group. The optimum scale factors are obtained by use of a set of 98 data values consisting of molecules, ions, and transition states. The optimum scale factors, found with a linear regression relationship, are found to differ from unity with a high degree of correlation in nearly every case, indicating that the deviation of calculated results from the experimental values are systematic and proportional to the dynamic correlation energy. As a consequence, the SDC scaling of dynamical correlation decreases the mean errors (signed and unsigned) by significant amounts in an overwhelming majority of cases. These results indicate that there are gains to be realized from further parametrization of several popular exchange-correlation functionals.

  4. Photon structure function - theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references.

  5. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  6. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your Liver > Liver Disease Information > Liver Function Tests Liver Function Tests Explore this section to learn more ... including a description and diagnosis. Why is the liver important? The liver is the second largest organ ...

  7. Ego Functioning During Latency

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Milton S.

    1979-01-01

    The latency period is an extremely important transition between the preschool years and adolescence. Normal ego functioning is described, especially cognition, socialization, motor development, and defensive functions. PMID:529320

  8. Liver function tests

    MedlinePlus

    Liver function tests are common tests that are used to see how well the liver is working. Tests include: ... M, Bowne WB, Bluth MH. Evaluation of liver function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  9. Parton fragmentation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, A.; Vossen, A.

    2016-11-01

    The field of fragmentation functions of light quarks and gluons is reviewed. In addition to integrated fragmentation functions, attention is paid to the dependence of fragmentation functions on transverse momenta and on polarization degrees of freedom. Higher-twist and di-hadron fragmentation functions are considered as well. Moreover, the review covers both theoretical and experimental developments in hadron production in electron-positron annihilation, deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and proton-proton collisions.

  10. Functional Task Test (FTT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Peters, Brian T.; Rescheke, Millard F.; Wood, Scott; Lawrence, Emily; Koffman, Igor; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Spiering, Barry A.; Feeback, Daniel L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Lee, Stuart M.C.; Arzeno, Natalia; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ryder, Jeffrey; Garcia, Yamil; Guilliams, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Functional Task Test (FTT), an interdisciplinary testing regimen that has been developed to evaluate astronaut postflight functional performance and related physiological changes. The objectives of the project are: (1) to develop a set of functional tasks that represent critical mission tasks for the Constellation Program, (2) determine the ability to perform these tasks after space flight, (3) Identify the key physiological factors that contribute to functional decrements and (4) Use this information to develop targeted countermeasures.

  11. What Is Functionalism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth; MacWhinney, Brian

    A defense of functionalism in linguistics, and more specifically the competition model of linguistic performance, examines six misconceptions about the functionalist approach. Functionalism is defined as the belief that the forms of natural languages are created, governed, constrained, acquired, and used for communicative functions. Functionalism…

  12. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  13. An Exceptional Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curgus, Branko

    2006-01-01

    We show that there is a link between a standard calculus problem of finding the best view of a painting and special tangent lines to the graphs of exponential functions. Surprisingly, the exponential function with the "best view" is not the one with the base "e." A similar link is established for families of functions obtained by composing…

  14. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Jordan, Michael I.; Repo, Susanna T.; Brenner, Steven E.

    2009-07-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called "phylogenomics") is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods.

  15. Two Functions of Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Carol Fleisher

    1977-01-01

    Author advocates the view that meaning is necessarily dependent upon the communicative function of language and examines the objections, particularly those of Noam Chomsky, to this view. Argues that while Chomsky disagrees with the idea that communication is the essential function of language, he implicitly agrees that it has a function.…

  16. Functioning Mathematically: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, David

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the first part of the closing address given by the author to the 2007 Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) Easter conference at Loughborough. In his closing address, the author focuses on functioning mathematically as opposed to functional mathematics. His view of functional mathematics is that the focus is on someone…

  17. Phylogenetic molecular function annotation

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Barbara E; Jordan, Michael I; Repo, Susanna T; Brenner, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    It is now easier to discover thousands of protein sequences in a new microbial genome than it is to biochemically characterize the specific activity of a single protein of unknown function. The molecular functions of protein sequences have typically been predicted using homology-based computational methods, which rely on the principle that homologous proteins share a similar function. However, some protein families include groups of proteins with different molecular functions. A phylogenetic approach for predicting molecular function (sometimes called “phylogenomics”) is an effective means to predict protein molecular function. These methods incorporate functional evidence from all members of a family that have functional characterizations using the evolutionary history of the protein family to make robust predictions for the uncharacterized proteins. However, they are often difficult to apply on a genome-wide scale because of the time-consuming step of reconstructing the phylogenies of each protein to be annotated. Our automated approach for function annotation using phylogeny, the SIFTER (Statistical Inference of Function Through Evolutionary Relationships) methodology, uses a statistical graphical model to compute the probabilities of molecular functions for unannotated proteins. Our benchmark tests showed that SIFTER provides accurate functional predictions on various protein families, outperforming other available methods. PMID:20664722

  18. Functional Cantor equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabat, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the class of entire functions of exponential type in relation to the scattering theory for the Schrödinger equation with a finite potential that is a finite Borel measure. These functions have a special self-similarity and satisfy q-difference functional equations. We study their asymptotic behavior and the distribution of zeros.

  19. Functional determinants from Wronski Green functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, H.; Chervyakov, A.

    1999-11-01

    A general technique is developed for calculating functional determinants of second-order differential operators with Dirichlet, periodic, and antiperiodic boundary conditions, without the knowledge of spectral properties. As an example, we give explicit formulas for a harmonic oscillator with an arbitrary time-dependent frequency, where our result is a generalization of the Gel'fand-Yaglom famous formula for Dirichlet boundary conditions. Our technique is based on the Wronski's construction of Green functions, which does not require spectral knowledge. Our final formula expresses the ratios of functional determinants in terms of an ordinary 2×2 determinant of a constant matrix constructed from two linearly independent solutions of the homogeneous differential equations associated with second-order differential operators. For ratios of determinants encountered in semiclassical fluctuations around a classical solution, the result can further be expressed in terms of the classical solution. Special properties of operators with a zero mode are exhibited.

  20. Cross-functional systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Many companies, including Xerox and Texas Instruments, are using cross functional systems to deal with the increasingly complex and competitive business environment. However, few firms within the aerospace industry appear to be aware of the significant benefits that cross functional systems can provide. Those benefits are examined and a flexible methodology is discussed that companies can use to identify and develop cross functional systems that will help improve organizational performance. In addition, some of the managerial issues are addressed that cross functional systems may raise and specific examples are used to explore networking's contributions to cross functional systems.

  1. On genetic map functions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Hongyu; Speed, T.P.

    1996-04-01

    Various genetic map functions have been proposed to infer the unobservable genetic distance between two loci from the observable recombination fraction between them. Some map functions were found to fit data better than others. When there are more than three markers, multilocus recombination probabilities cannot be uniquely determined by the defining property of map functions, and different methods have been proposed to permit the use of map functions to analyze multilocus data. If for a given map function, there is a probability model for recombination that can give rise to it, then joint recombination probabilities can be deduced from this model. This provides another way to use map functions in multilocus analysis. In this paper we show that stationary renewal processes give rise to most of the map functions in the literature. Furthermore, we show that the interevent distributions of these renewal processes can all be approximated quite well by gamma distributions. 43 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rasquin-Weber, A; Hyman, P; Cucchiara, S; Fleisher, D; Hyams, J; Milla, P; Staiano, A

    1999-01-01

    This is the first attempt at defining criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The decision-making process was as for adults and consisted of arriving at consensus, based on clinical experience. This paper is intended to be a quick reference. The classification system selected differs from the one used in the adult population in that it is organized according to main complaints instead of being organ-targeted. Because the child is still developing, some disorders such as toddler's diarrhea (or functional diarrhea) are linked to certain physiologic stages; others may result from behavioral responses to sphincter function acquisition such as fecal retention; others will only be recognizable after the child is cognitively mature enough to report the symptoms (e.g., dyspepsia). Infant regurgitation, rumination, and cyclic vomiting constitute the vomiting disorders. Abdominal pain disorders are classified as: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional abdominal pain, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia. Disorders of defecation include: infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. Some disorders, such as IBS and dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain, are exact replications of the adult criteria because there are enough data to confirm that they represent specific and similar disorders in pediatrics. Other disorders not included in the pediatric classification, such as functional biliary disorders, do occur in children; however, existing data are insufficient to warrant including them at the present time. For these disorders, it is suggested that, for the time being, clinicians refer to the criteria established for the adult population.


Keywords: infant vomiting; cyclic vomiting syndrome; functional dyspepsia in children; irritable bowel syndrome in children; functional abdominal pain in children; functional

  3. Functional Explanation and the Function of Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania; Carey, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Teleological explanations (TEs) account for the existence or properties of an entity in terms of a function: we have hearts because they pump blood, and telephones for communication. While many teleological explanations seem appropriate, others are clearly not warranted--for example, that rain exists for plants to grow. Five experiments explore…

  4. Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    The challenge of approximating the exchange-correlation functional in Density Functional Theory (DFT) has led to the development of numerous different approximations of varying accuracy on different calculated properties. There is therefore a need for reliable estimation of prediction errors within the different approximation schemes to DFT. The Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals (BEEF) have been developed with this in mind. The functionals are constructed by fitting to experimental and high-quality computational databases for molecules and solids including chemisorption and van der Waals systems. This leads to reasonably accurate general-purpose functionals with particual focus on surface science. The fitting procedure involves considerations on how to combine different types of data, and applies Tikhonov regularization and bootstrap cross validation. The methodology has been applied to construct GGA and metaGGA functionals with and without inclusion of long-ranged van der Waals contributions. The error estimation is made possible by the generation of not only a single functional but through the construction of a probability distribution of functionals represented by a functional ensemble. The use of the functional ensemble is illustrated on compound heat of formation and by investigations of the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates.

  5. Functional Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Beau B; Newman, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Neurologists frequently evaluate patients complaining of vision loss, especially when the patient has been examined by an ophthalmologist who has found no ocular disease. A significant proportion of patients presenting to the neurologist with visual complaints will have non-organic or functional visual loss. While there are examination techniques which can aid in the detection and diagnosis of functional visual loss, the frequency with which functional visual loss occurs concomitantly with organic disease warrants substantial caution on the part of the clinician. Furthermore, purely functional visual loss is never a diagnosis of exclusion, and must be supported by positive findings on examination that demonstrate normal visual function. The relationship of true psychological disease and functional visual loss is unclear and most patients respond well to simple reassurance. PMID:20638000

  6. Operator Lipschitz functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A. B.; Peller, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of this survey is a comprehensive study of operator Lipschitz functions. A continuous function f on the real line {R} is said to be operator Lipschitz if \\Vert f(A)-f(B)\\Vert≤slant{const}\\Vert A-B\\Vert for arbitrary self-adjoint operators A and B. Sufficient conditions and necessary conditions are given for operator Lipschitzness. The class of operator differentiable functions on {R} is also studied. Further, operator Lipschitz functions on closed subsets of the plane are considered, and the class of commutator Lipschitz functions on such subsets is introduced. An important role for the study of such classes of functions is played by double operator integrals and Schur multipliers. Bibliography: 77 titles.

  7. Balance Function Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the Balance Function Laboratory and Clinic at the Minneapolis (MN) Neuroscience Institute on the Abbot Northwestern Hospital Campus are using a rotational chair (technically a "sinusoidal harmonic acceleration system") originally developed by NASA to investigate vestibular (inner ear) function in weightlessness to diagnose and treat patients with balance function disorders. Manufactured by ICS Medical Corporation, Schaumberg, IL, the chair system turns a patient and monitors his or her responses to rotational stimulation.

  8. CONMIN- CONSTRAINED FUNCTION MINIMIZATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.

    1994-01-01

    In many mathematical problems, it is necessary to determine the minimum and maximum of a function of several variables, limited by various linear and nonlinear inequality constraints. It is seldom possible, in practical applications, to solve these problems directly. In most cases, an iterative method must be used to numerically obtain a solution. The CONMIN program was developed to numerically perform the minimization of a multi-variable function subject to a set of inequality constraints. The function need not be a simple analytical equation; it may be any function which can be numerically evaluated. The basic analytic technique used by CONMIN is to minimize the function until one or more of the constraints become active. The minimization process then continues by following the constraint boundaries in a direction such that the value of the function continues to decrease. When a point is reached where no further decrease in the function can be obtained, the process is terminated. Function maximization may be achieved by minimizing the negative of the function. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on a CDC 6000 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 43K (octal) of 60 bit words. The CONMIN program was originally developed in 1973 and last updated in 1978.

  9. Emotions: form follows function.

    PubMed

    Farb, Norman A S; Chapman, Hanah A; Anderson, Adam K

    2013-06-01

    Emotion research has been divided by debate as to whether emotions are universal in form or cognitively constructed. We review an emerging approach that focuses on function rather than form. Functional affective science suggests that the particular origin of an emotion is relatively unimportant; instead, emotions can be understood in terms of a rapidly deployed set of mechanisms that structure perception, cognition and behavior to facilitate goal fulfillment. Evidence from this approach suggests at least three major functions of emotion: sensory gating, embodying affect, and integrating knowledge toward goal resolution. These functions appear to be universal and automatically activated, yet also moderated by conscious representation and regulatory efforts.

  10. Functional foods in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, M; Veereman-Wauters, G

    2002-01-01

    The philosophy that food can be health promoting beyond its nutritional value is gaining acceptance. Known disease preventive aspects of nutrition have led to a new science, the 'functional food science'. Functional foods, first introduced in Japan, have no universally accepted definition but can be described as foods or food ingredients that may provide health benefits and prevent diseases. Currently, there is a growing interest in these products. However, not all regulatory issues have been settled yet. Five categories of foods can be classified as functional foods: dietary fibers, vitamins and minerals, bioactive substances, fatty acids and pro-, pre- and symbiotics. The latter are currently the main focus of research. Functional foods can be applied in pediatrics: during pregnancy, nutrition is 'functional' since it has prenatal influences on the intra-uterine development of the baby, after birth, 'functional' human milk supports adequate growth of infants and pro- and prebiotics can modulate the flora composition and as such confer certain health advantages. Functional foods have also been studied in pediatric diseases. The severity of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, intestinal allergy and lactose intolerance may be reduced by using functional foods. Functional foods have proven to be valuable contributors to the improvement of health and the prevention of diseases in pediatric populations.

  11. Mapping Cognitive Function

    PubMed Central

    Stufflebeam, Steven M.; Rosen, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. A unifying theme of this chapter is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies. PMID:17983964

  12. LITHIUM AND RENAL FUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, N.; Trivedi, J.K.; Sethi, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty patients of affective disorder who were on lithium for a year and thirty patients on antidepressant were studied in detail for renal functions. Our observation is that lithium therapy does not lead to any deterioration in kidney functions. The results are discussed. PMID:21927211

  13. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  14. Can sequence determine function?

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2000-01-01

    The functional annotation of proteins identified in genome sequencing projects is based on similarities to homologs in the databases. As a result of the possible strategies for divergent evolution, homologous enzymes frequently do not catalyze the same reaction, and we conclude that assignment of function from sequence information alone should be viewed with some skepticism. PMID:11178260

  15. Program Computes Thermodynamic Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, Bonnie J.; Gordon, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    PAC91 is latest in PAC (Properties and Coefficients) series. Two principal features are to provide means of (1) generating theoretical thermodynamic functions from molecular constants and (2) least-squares fitting of these functions to empirical equations. PAC91 written in FORTRAN 77 to be machine-independent.

  16. Pulmonary Function Tests

    PubMed Central

    Ranu, Harpreet; Wilde, Michael; Madden, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications. PMID:22347750

  17. Functional performance of pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a Government/Industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to provide information on functional performance of pyrovalves to allow users the opportunity to improve procurement requirements. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the seating; these gases/particles entered the fluid path of measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center on several units for each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. Two of the five designs had inadequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  18. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  19. Differential Objective Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kino, Mary M.; And Others

    Item response theory (IRT) has been used extensively to study differential item functioning (dif) and to identify potentially biased items. The use of IRT for diagnostic purposes is less prevalent and has received comparatively less attention. This study addressed differential objective function (dof) to identify potentially biased content units.…

  20. High Functioning Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Vicki

    This paper reviews the characteristics and needs of students with high functioning autism. First, it lists 18 common characteristics of autism, then it stresses that autism is defined by the general pattern of characteristics. Next, it discusses how people with high functioning autism differ from those with autism. These differences include higher…

  1. Antigravitational Functional System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorogovtsev, V. N.

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is the description of the main components and basic functioning principles of the antigravitational functional system (AFS). Methods: literary review and theoretical analysis of the neurogenic regulation functional system. The concept of a functional system was formulated in the beginning of the 20th century. Functional system was described as dynamic, self-organizing, central-peripheral functional integration structures of the nervous system whose activity was aiming at achieving adaptive useful results. The main difference between functional system and proposed regulating principles is the physiological mechanism presence of the prospective result prediction (action result acceptor). Action is programmed for defined result receiving. This is anticipatory regulation principle. Using this principle AFS provides timely cardiovascular system preparing for its impending functional conditions changes. It seems that gravity intolerance in the beginning and after space flight is related with AFS regulation peculiarities. There is a necessity for the AFS advanced study. It is very important to create safe and comfort conditions for astronauts adaptation during gravitational loading changes as well as for certain diseases prophylaxis on the Earth.

  2. Surface Functionalized Polyethylene Film.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    functionality into this oxidized surface layer. 2) Explored new techniques for analyzing the surfaces of organic polymeric solids. Contact angle titration...the study of the contact angle of water on organic solids as a function of pH--has proved particularly useful and extremely surface sensitive. 3

  3. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  4. Impact of 'functional food'.

    PubMed

    Guesry, Pierre René

    2005-01-01

    'Functional Food' is not a new concept but it became more important recently due to the collapse of most social health system because 'Functional Foods' allow low cost prevention of numerous diseases. 'Functional Foods' are different from 'Neutraceuticals' which remain drug based with poor taste whereas 'Functional Foods' remain good food which could be consumed for years, but in addition have a disease prophylactic function. They are becoming particularly important for the prevention of food allergy in 'at risk' population, obesity, osteoporosis, cardiovascular diseases and particularly high blood pressure and atherosclerosis, but also for cancer prevention. The newest trend is that governments and health authorities allow food manufacturers to make health prevention related claims on mass media.

  5. The Function of Introns

    PubMed Central

    Chorev, Michal; Carmel, Liran

    2012-01-01

    The intron–exon architecture of many eukaryotic genes raises the intriguing question of whether this unique organization serves any function, or is it simply a result of the spread of functionless introns in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we show that introns in contemporary species fulfill a broad spectrum of functions, and are involved in virtually every step of mRNA processing. We propose that this great diversity of intronic functions supports the notion that introns were indeed selfish elements in early eukaryotes, but then independently gained numerous functions in different eukaryotic lineages. We suggest a novel criterion of evolutionary conservation, dubbed intron positional conservation, which can identify functional introns. PMID:22518112

  6. Plant functional genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtorf, Hauke; Guitton, Marie-Christine; Reski, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    Functional genome analysis of plants has entered the high-throughput stage. The complete genome information from key species such as Arabidopsis thaliana and rice is now available and will further boost the application of a range of new technologies to functional plant gene analysis. To broadly assign functions to unknown genes, different fast and multiparallel approaches are currently used and developed. These new technologies are based on known methods but are adapted and improved to accommodate for comprehensive, large-scale gene analysis, i.e. such techniques are novel in the sense that their design allows researchers to analyse many genes at the same time and at an unprecedented pace. Such methods allow analysis of the different constituents of the cell that help to deduce gene function, namely the transcripts, proteins and metabolites. Similarly the phenotypic variations of entire mutant collections can now be analysed in a much faster and more efficient way than before. The different methodologies have developed to form their own fields within the functional genomics technological platform and are termed transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics. Gene function, however, cannot solely be inferred by using only one such approach. Rather, it is only by bringing together all the information collected by different functional genomic tools that one will be able to unequivocally assign functions to unknown plant genes. This review focuses on current technical developments and their impact on the field of plant functional genomics. The lower plant Physcomitrella is introduced as a new model system for gene function analysis, owing to its high rate of homologous recombination.

  7. Functional Performance of Pyrovalves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    Following several flight and ground test failures of spacecraft systems using single-shot, 'normally closed' pyrotechnically actuated valves (pyrovalves), a government/industry cooperative program was initiated to assess the functional performance of five qualified designs. The goal of the program was to improve performance-based requirements for the procurement of pyrovalves. Specific objectives included the demonstration of performance test methods, the measurement of 'blowby' (the passage of gases from the pyrotechnic energy source around the activating piston into the valve's fluid path), and the quantification of functional margins for each design. Experiments were conducted in-house at NASA on several units each of the five valve designs. The test methods used for this program measured the forces and energies required to actuate the valves, as well as the energies and the pressures (where possible) delivered by the pyrotechnic sources. Functional performance ranged widely among the designs. Blowby cannot be prevented by o-ring seals; metal-to-metal seals were effective. Functional margin was determined by dividing the energy delivered by the pyrotechnic sources in excess to that required to accomplish the function by the energy required for that function. All but two designs had adequate functional margins with the pyrotechnic cartridges evaluated.

  8. Hantush Well Function revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veling, E. J. M.; Maas, C.

    2010-11-01

    SummaryIn this paper, we comment on some recent numerical and analytical work to evaluate the Hantush Well Function. We correct an expression found in a Comment by Nadarajah [Nadarajah, S., 2007. A comment on numerical evaluation of Theis and Hantush-Jacob well functions. Journal of Hydrology 338, 152-153] to a paper by Prodanoff et al. [Prodanoff, J.A., Mansur, W.J., Mascarenhas, F.C.B., 2006. Numerical evaluation of Theis and Hantush-Jacob well functions. Journal of Hydrology 318, 173-183]. We subsequently derived another analytic representation based on a generalized hypergeometric function in two variables and from the hydrological literature we cite an analytic representation by Hunt [Hunt, B., 1977. Calculation of the leaky aquifer function. Journal of Hydrology 33, 179-183]. We have implemented both representations and compared the results. Using a convergence accelerator Hunt's representation of Hantush Well Function is efficient and accurate. While checking our implementations we found that Bear's table of the Hantush Well Function [Bear, J., 1979. Hydraulics of Groundwater. McGraw-Hill, New York, Tables 8-6] contains a number of typographical errors that are not present in the original table published by Hantush [Hantush, M.S., 1956. Analysis of data from pumping tests in leaky aquifers. Transactions, American Geophysical Union 37, 702-714]. Finally, we offer a very fast approximation with a maximum relative error of 0.0033 for the parameter range in the table given by Bear.

  9. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Voorhees, Andrew P.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-01-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  10. The Enzyme Function Initiative†

    PubMed Central

    Gerlt, John A.; Allen, Karen N.; Almo, Steven C.; Armstrong, Richard N.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Cronan, John E.; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C. Dale; Raushel, Frank M.; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily-specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include: 1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation); 2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia; 3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy; 4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization; and 5) dissemination of data via the EFI’s website, enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal and pharmaceutical efforts. PMID

  11. Mapping cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Stufflebeam, Steven M; Rosen, Bruce R

    2007-11-01

    Cognitive functions are fundamental to being human. Although tremendous progress has been made in the science of cognition using neuroimaging, the clinical applications of neuroimaging are just beginning to be realized. This article focuses on selected technologies, analysis techniques, and applications that have, or will soon have, direct clinical impact. The authors discuss how cognition can be imaged using MR imaging, functional MR imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography, and MR imaging diffusion tensor imaging. A unifying theme of this article is the concept that a more complete understanding of cognition only comes through integration of multimodal structural and functional imaging technologies.

  12. Longitudinal Functional Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, So Young; Staicu, Ana-Maria

    We consider dependent functional data that are correlated because of a longitudinal-based design: each subject is observed at repeated times and at each time a functional observation (curve) is recorded. We propose a novel parsimonious modeling framework for repeatedly observed functional observations that allows to extract low dimensional features. The proposed methodology accounts for the longitudinal design, is designed to study the dynamic behavior of the underlying process, allows prediction of full future trajectory, and is computationally fast. Theoretical properties of this framework are studied and numerical investigations confirm excellent behavior in finite samples. The proposed method is motivated by and applied to a diffusion tensor imaging study of multiple sclerosis.

  13. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  14. A universal functional object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A scheme is presented for realizing any function, combinational or sequential, in a single universal function scheme, termed the universal function object UF. This scheme is addressed to the problem of the proliferation of the number of parts (cards, chips) necessary for conventional implementation in an LSI technology of a computer system. The UF implementation will use about ten times more circuits than a conventional implementation regardless of the size of the design. The UF approach also includes general-purpose spares for failing circuits. The procedure could be used both at manufacture to increase yields, as well as to achieve automatic repair.

  15. ON COMMUTING FUNCTIONS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The methods used seem to be new, and the author feels that further work in this direction may eventually yield a proof of the conjecture in the case when one of the functions is of bounded variation . (Author)

  16. Reasoning about Function Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordio, Martin; Calcagno, Cristiano; Meyer, Bertrand; Müller, Peter; Tschannen, Julian

    Modern object-oriented languages support higher-order implementations through function objects such as delegates in C#, agents in Eiffel, or closures in Scala. Function objects bring a new level of abstraction to the object-oriented programming model, and require a comparable extension to specification and verification techniques. We introduce a verification methodology that extends function objects with auxiliary side-effect free (pure) methods to model logical artifacts: preconditions, postconditions and modifies clauses. These pure methods can be used to specify client code abstractly, that is, independently from specific instantiations of the function objects. To demonstrate the feasibility of our approach, we have implemented an automatic prover, which verifies several non-trivial examples.

  17. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  18. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... related side effects. The hepatic function panel evaluates: Alanine aminotransferase (ALT). This enzyme, found in the liver, ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Mononucleosis Hepatitis Blood Test: Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT, or SGPT) Blood Test: Aspartate Aminotransferase ( ...

  19. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  20. The Neutron Structure Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Roy

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron structure function is important for testing models of the nucleon, for a complete understanding of deep inelastic scattering (DIS) from nuclei, and for high energy experiments. As there exist no free neutron targets, neutron structure functions have been determined from deep inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Unfortunately, the short-range part of the deuteron wave function becomes important in extracting the neutron structure function at very high Bjorken x. New methods have been devised for Jefferson Lab experiments to mitigate this problem. The BONUS experiment involves tagging spectator neutrons in the deuteron, while the MARATHON experiment minimizes nuclear structure effects by a comparison of DIS from 3H and 3He. A summary of the status and future plans will be presented. This work supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Normal Functioning Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Normal Functioning Family Page Content Article Body Is there any way ...

  2. Functional Task Test: Data Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cromwell, Ronita

    2014-01-01

    After space flight there are changes in multiple physiological systems including: Cardiovascular function; Sensorimotor function; and Muscle function. How do changes in these physiological system impact astronaut functional performance?

  3. Disentangling different functional roles of evoked K-complex components: Mapping the sleeping brain while quenching sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Marco; Menicucci, Danilo; Piarulli, Andrea; Mastorci, Francesca; Bedini, Remo; Allegrini, Paolo; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-02-01

    physiological dichotomy: P200 acts as a traveling cortical excitation whose function is to induce the bistable cortical response (N550/P900), which in turn is crucial for maintaining sleep and unconsciousness.

  4. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    BNL

    2008-08-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  5. Structure function monitor

    DOEpatents

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  6. Functional neuroimaging in psychiatry.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, C H; McGuire, P K

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging is one of the most powerful means available for investigating the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we shall focus on the different ways that it can be employed to this end, describing the major findings in the field in the context of different methodological approaches. We will also discuss practical issues that are particular to studying psychiatric disorders and the potential contribution of functional neuroimaging to future psychiatric research. PMID:10466156

  7. Neural Network Function Classifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-02-07

    neural network sets. Each of the neural networks in a particular set is trained to recognize a particular data set type. The best function representation of the data set is determined from the neural network output. The system comprises sets of trained neural networks having neural networks trained to identify different types of data. The number of neural networks within each neural network set will depend on the number of function types that are represented. The system further comprises

  8. Sexual Function Across Aging.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Harsh, Veronica

    2016-03-01

    Women experience multiple changes in social and reproductive statuses across the life span which can affect sexual functioning. Various phases of the sexual response cycle may be impacted and can lead to sexual dysfunction. Screening for sexual problems and consideration of contributing factors such as neurobiology, reproductive life events, medical problems, medication use, and depression can help guide appropriate treatment and thereby improve the sexual functioning and quality of life of affected women. Treatment options include psychotropic medications, hormone therapy, and psychotherapy.

  9. Functional Polymer Matrix Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the carbon nanofibers led to the deterioration of the polymeric cellulose structure. Extensive research on the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers...1 November 2003 - 14-Mar-05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-03-1-3042 Functional Polymer Matrix Fibres 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...MARYLABONE RD LONDON NWl 5TH PERFORMANCE REPORT Project title: Functional polymer matrix fibers Period of performance: 1 November 2003 - 31 October 2004

  10. Function, anticipation, representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bickhard, Mark. H.

    2001-06-01

    Function emerges in certain kinds of far-from-equilibrium systems. One important kind of function is that of interactive anticipation, an adaptedness to temporal complexity. Interactive anticipation is the locus of the emergence of normative representational content, and, thus, of representation in general: interactive anticipation is the naturalistic core of the evolution of cognition. Higher forms of such anticipation are involved in the subsequent macro-evolutionary sequence of learning, emotions, and reflexive consciousness.

  11. [Binocular function clarified].

    PubMed

    Pigassou-Albouy, R

    1996-01-01

    Normal binocular function is defined as the bifoveal connection of the central and peripheral structures of the visual system. Binocular function in strabismus is defined as connections, more or less strong and more or less labile, of the fovea of the fixating eye with the "pseudo-fovea" of the deviating eye including all central and peripheral structures, and this connection represents, in fact, a progress of adaptation of all parameters to the new conditions of vision.

  12. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    ScienceCinema

    BNL

    2016-07-12

    Staff from Brookhaven's new Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) describe how this advanced facility will focus on the development and understanding of nanoscale materials. The CFN provides state-of-the-art capabilities for the fabrication and study of nanoscale materials, with an emphasis on atomic-level tailoring to achieve desired properties and functions. The overarching scientific theme of the CFN is the development and understanding of nanoscale materials that address the Nation's challenges in energy security.

  13. Imaging basal ganglia function

    PubMed Central

    BROOKS, DAVID J.

    2000-01-01

    In this review, the value of functional imaging for providing insight into the role of the basal ganglia in motor control is reviewed. Brain activation findings in normal subjects and Parkinson's disease patients are examined and evidence supporting the existence for functionally independent distributed basal ganglia-frontal loops is presented. It is argued that the basal ganglia probably act to focus and filter cortical output, optimising the running of motor programs. PMID:10923986

  14. Functional Molecular Ecological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jizhong; Deng, Ye; Luo, Feng; He, Zhili; Tu, Qichao; Zhi, Xiaoyang

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity and its responses to environmental changes are central issues in ecology and for society. Almost all microbial biodiversity research focuses on “species” richness and abundance but not on their interactions. Although a network approach is powerful in describing ecological interactions among species, defining the network structure in a microbial community is a great challenge. Also, although the stimulating effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on plant growth and primary productivity are well established, its influences on belowground microbial communities, especially microbial interactions, are poorly understood. Here, a random matrix theory (RMT)-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks was developed with the high-throughput functional gene array hybridization data of soil microbial communities in a long-term grassland FACE (free air, CO2 enrichment) experiment. Our results indicate that RMT is powerful in identifying functional molecular ecological networks in microbial communities. Both functional molecular ecological networks under eCO2 and ambient CO2 (aCO2) possessed the general characteristics of complex systems such as scale free, small world, modular, and hierarchical. However, the topological structures of the functional molecular ecological networks are distinctly different between eCO2 and aCO2, at the levels of the entire communities, individual functional gene categories/groups, and functional genes/sequences, suggesting that eCO2 dramatically altered the network interactions among different microbial functional genes/populations. Such a shift in network structure is also significantly correlated with soil geochemical variables. In short, elucidating network interactions in microbial communities and their responses to environmental changes is fundamentally important for research in microbial ecology, systems microbiology, and global change. PMID:20941329

  15. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  16. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  17. Marrying Form and Function: A Place for Grammar and Total Target Language in the Secondary Modern Foreign Languages Classroom. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogg, Ivy

    This paper examines the possible role of grammar throughout Key Stages 3 and 4 in the modern language curriculum where communication is the central tenet. It also discusses how total or virtually total use of target language (German) in the classroom can help deal with the dichotomy of grammar versus communication and bring about an integrated…

  18. High-throughput sequence analysis of Ciona intestinalis SL trans-spliced mRNAs: alternative expression modes and gene function correlates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Jun; Dewar, Ken; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Wiley, Graham B; Macmil, Simone L; Roe, Bruce A; Zeller, Robert W; Satou, Yutaka; Hastings, Kenneth E M

    2010-05-01

    Pre-mRNA 5' spliced-leader (SL) trans-splicing occurs in some metazoan groups but not in others. Genome-wide characterization of the trans-spliced mRNA subpopulation has not yet been reported for any metazoan. We carried out a high-throughput analysis of the SL trans-spliced mRNA population of the ascidian tunicate Ciona intestinalis by 454 Life Sciences (Roche) pyrosequencing of SL-PCR-amplified random-primed reverse transcripts of tailbud embryo RNA. We obtained approximately 250,000 high-quality reads corresponding to 8790 genes, approximately 58% of the Ciona total gene number. The great depth of this data revealed new aspects of trans-splicing, including the existence of a significant class of "infrequently trans-spliced" genes, accounting for approximately 28% of represented genes, that generate largely non-trans-spliced mRNAs, but also produce trans-spliced mRNAs, in part through alternative promoter use. Thus, the conventional qualitative dichotomy of trans-spliced versus non-trans-spliced genes should be supplanted by a more accurate quantitative view recognizing frequently and infrequently trans-spliced gene categories. Our data include reads representing approximately 80% of Ciona frequently trans-spliced genes. Our analysis also revealed significant use of closely spaced alternative trans-splice acceptor sites which further underscores the mechanistic similarity of cis- and trans-splicing and indicates that the prevalence of +/-3-nt alternative splicing events at tandem acceptor sites, NAGNAG, is driven by spliceosomal mechanisms, and not nonsense-mediated decay, or selection at the protein level. The breadth of gene representation data enabled us to find new correlations between trans-splicing status and gene function, namely the overrepresentation in the frequently trans-spliced gene class of genes associated with plasma/endomembrane system, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and actin cytoskeleton.

  19. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  20. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  1. Educating executive function.

    PubMed

    Blair, Clancy

    2017-01-01

    Executive functions are thinking skills that assist with reasoning, planning, problem solving, and managing one's life. The brain areas that underlie these skills are interconnected with and influenced by activity in many different brain areas, some of which are associated with emotion and stress. One consequence of the stress-specific connections is that executive functions, which help us to organize our thinking, tend to be disrupted when stimulation is too high and we are stressed out, or too low when we are bored and lethargic. Given their central role in reasoning and also in managing stress and emotion, scientists have conducted studies, primarily with adults, to determine whether executive functions can be improved by training. By and large, results have shown that they can be, in part through computer-based videogame-like activities. Evidence of wider, more general benefits from such computer-based training, however, is mixed. Accordingly, scientists have reasoned that training will have wider benefits if it is implemented early, with very young children as the neural circuitry of executive functions is developing, and that it will be most effective if embedded in children's everyday activities. Evidence produced by this research, however, is also mixed. In sum, much remains to be learned about executive function training. Without question, however, continued research on this important topic will yield valuable information about cognitive development. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1403. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1403 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Space race functional responses.

    PubMed

    Sjödin, Henrik; Brännström, Åke; Englund, Göran

    2015-02-22

    We derive functional responses under the assumption that predators and prey are engaged in a space race in which prey avoid patches with many predators and predators avoid patches with few or no prey. The resulting functional response models have a simple structure and include functions describing how the emigration of prey and predators depend on interspecific densities. As such, they provide a link between dispersal behaviours and community dynamics. The derived functional response is general but is here modelled in accordance with empirically documented emigration responses. We find that the prey emigration response to predators has stabilizing effects similar to that of the DeAngelis-Beddington functional response, and that the predator emigration response to prey has destabilizing effects similar to that of the Holling type II response. A stability criterion describing the net effect of the two emigration responses on a Lotka-Volterra predator-prey system is presented. The winner of the space race (i.e. whether predators or prey are favoured) is determined by the relationship between the slopes of the species' emigration responses. It is predicted that predators win the space race in poor habitats, where predator and prey densities are low, and that prey are more successful in richer habitats.

  3. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Tonneau, François; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects. PMID:16776058

  4. Function transformation without reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Tonneau, Franćois; Arreola, Fara; Martínez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-05-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the presence of X. In a final test, A often displays behavioral functions that differ from those of B, and can be predicted from the nature of the relation associated with X in the initial training phase. Here we report function-transformation effects in the absence of selection responses and of their reinforcers. In three experiments with college students, exposure to relations of difference or identity modified the responses given to later stimuli. In Experiment 1, responses to a test stimulus A varied depending on preexposure to pairs of colors that were distinct from A but exemplified relations of difference or identity. In Experiment 2, a stimulus A acquired distinct functions, depending on its previous pairing with a contextual cue X that had itself been paired with identity or difference among colors. Experiment 3 confirmed the results of Experiment 2 with a modified design. Our data are consistent with the notion that relations of identity or difference can serve as stimuli for Pavlovian processes, and, in compound with other cues, produce apparent function-transformation effects.

  5. Column continuous transition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangrong

    2007-04-01

    A column continuous transition function is by definition a standard transition function P(t) whose every column is continuous for t[greater-or-equal, slanted]0 in the norm topology of bounded sequence space l[infinity]. We will prove that it has a stable q-matrix and that there exists a one-to-one relationship between column continuous transition functions and increasing integrated semigroups on l[infinity]. Using the theory of integrated semigroups, we give some necessary and sufficient conditions under which the minimal q-function is column continuous, in terms of its generator (of the Markov semigroup) as well as its q-matrix. Furthermore, we will construct all column continuous Q-functions for a conservative, single-exit and column bounded q-matrix Q. As applications, we find that many interesting continuous-time Markov chains (CTMCs), say Feller-Reuter-Riley processes, monotone processes, birth-death processes and branching processes, etc., have column continuity.

  6. On immediate function

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, Michael D.

    1992-01-01

    Behavior is a property of living organisms, not of inanimate matter. The problems of physical science are to understand how a phenomenon works; biological science adds the questions of what a phenomenon does and how something that does such things came to be. Exclusive dedication to cause–effect explanations ignores how behavior helps creatures cope with their internal and external environments. Laws of causation describe the precursors to behavior; laws of function describe the effects of behavior. The numerous instances of learning reflect the many ways that selective pressure for altering behavior on the basis of experience has been manifested. Little basis exists for assuming that the various forms of learning reflect either common functions or common processes. Instead, it seems that evolutionary processes have resulted in domain-specific learning. The rules of learning must be understood in terms of the function that the particular manifestation of learning serves for the organism. Evolutionary theory provides the framework for understanding function as well as relations between function and causal mechanisms. PMID:16812660

  7. Functional BES equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan; Serban, Didina; Volin, Dmytro

    2008-08-01

    We give a realization of the Beisert, Eden and Staudacher equation for the planar Script N = 4 supersymetric gauge theory which seems to be particularly useful to study the strong coupling limit. We are using a linearized version of the BES equation as two coupled equations involving an auxiliary density function. We write these equations in terms of the resolvents and we transform them into a system of functional, instead of integral, equations. We solve the functional equations perturbatively in the strong coupling limit and reproduce the recursive solution obtained by Basso, Korchemsky and Kotański. The coefficients of the strong coupling expansion are fixed by the analyticity properties obeyed by the resolvents.

  8. Pain and functional imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvar, M

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has fundamentally changed our knowledge about the cerebral representation of pain. For the first time it has been possible to delineate the functional anatomy of different aspects of pain in the medial and lateral pain systems in the brain. The rapid developments in imaging methods over the past years have led to a consensus in the description of the central pain responses between different studies and also to a definition of a central pain matrix with specialized subfunctions in man. In the near future we will see studies where a systems perspective allows for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the higher-order frontal and parietal cortices. Also, pending the development of experimental paradigms, the functional anatomy of the emotional aspects of pain will become better known. PMID:10466155

  9. Composing decoherence functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boës, Paul; Navascués, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    Quantum measure theory (QMT) is a generalization of quantum theory where physical predictions are computed from a matrix known as the decoherence functional (DF). Previous works have noted that, in its original formulation, QMT exhibits a problem with composability, since the composition of two decoherence functionals is, in general, not a valid decoherence functional. This does not occur when the DFs in question happen to be positive semidefinite (a condition known as strong positivity). In this paper, we study the concept of composability of DFs and its consequences for QMT. Firstly, we show that the problem of composability is much deeper than originally envisaged, since, for any n , there exists a DF that can coexist with n -1 copies of itself, but not with n . Secondly, we prove that the set of strongly positive DFs cannot be enlarged while remaining closed under composition. Furthermore, any closed set of DFs containing all quantum DFs can only contain strongly positive DFs.

  10. Microfacet distribution function for physically based bidirectional reflectance distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanyuk, O. N.; Pavlov, S. V.; Dovhaliuk, R. Yu.; Babyuk, N. P.; Obidnyk, M. D.; Kisala, P.; Suleimenov, B.

    2013-01-01

    A microfacet distribution function is presented. This function can be used to calculate the microfacet distribution term in BRDF models. The function differs from other well-known microfacet distribution functions like Blinn or Beckmann distributions in that it doesn`t use special functions like acos, tan, exp, pow and thus has lower computational complexity.

  11. Adaptive multiconfigurational wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2014-03-28

    A method is suggested to build simple multiconfigurational wave functions specified uniquely by an energy cutoff Λ. These are constructed from a model space containing determinants with energy relative to that of the most stable determinant no greater than Λ. The resulting Λ-CI wave function is adaptive, being able to represent both single-reference and multireference electronic states. We also consider a more compact wave function parameterization (Λ+SD-CI), which is based on a small Λ-CI reference and adds a selection of all the singly and doubly excited determinants generated from it. We report two heuristic algorithms to build Λ-CI wave functions. The first is based on an approximate prescreening of the full configuration interaction space, while the second performs a breadth-first search coupled with pruning. The Λ-CI and Λ+SD-CI approaches are used to compute the dissociation curve of N{sub 2} and the potential energy curves for the first three singlet states of C{sub 2}. Special attention is paid to the issue of energy discontinuities caused by changes in the size of the Λ-CI wave function along the potential energy curve. This problem is shown to be solvable by smoothing the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian. Our last example, involving the Cu{sub 2}O{sub 2}{sup 2+} core, illustrates an alternative use of the Λ-CI method: as a tool to both estimate the multireference character of a wave function and to create a compact model space to be used in subsequent high-level multireference coupled cluster computations.

  12. Carbohydrates: functionality in foods.

    PubMed

    Chinachoti, P

    1995-04-01

    Many functional requirements are met by the use of simple and complex carbohydrates in food. Carbohydrates offer a wide range of rheological and other properties, including solubility, cryoprotection, sweetening effect, hygroscopicity, crystallization inhibition, flavor encapsulation, and coating ability. These properties are based on chemical structure and interactions with other molecules through hydrogen bonding, ionic effect, and the formation of complexes with lipids and proteins. The ability to understand these properties directly affects the development of food products and processes. Thus, the functionality of carbohydrates in foods integrates precise knowledge of chemical structure and behavior with practical applications in the development and preparation of foods.

  13. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  14. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  15. Peroxisome Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Reumann, Sigrun; Hu, Jianping

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are small and single membrane-delimited organelles that execute numerous metabolic reactions and have pivotal roles in plant growth and development. In recent years, forward and reverse genetic studies along with biochemical and cell biological analyses in Arabidopsis have enabled researchers to identify many peroxisome proteins and elucidate their functions. This review focuses on the advances in our understanding of peroxisome biogenesis and metabolism, and further explores the contribution of large-scale analysis, such as in sillco predictions and proteomics, in augmenting our knowledge of peroxisome function In Arabidopsis. PMID:22303249

  16. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  17. Algal functional annotation tool

    SciTech Connect

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG

  18. GADRAS Detector Response Function.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J.; Harding, Lee; Thoreson, Gregory G; Horne, Steven M.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) applies a Detector Response Function (DRF) to compute the output of gamma-ray and neutron detectors when they are exposed to radiation sources. The DRF is fundamental to the ability to perform forward calculations (i.e., computation of the response of a detector to a known source), as well as the ability to analyze spectra to deduce the types and quantities of radioactive material to which the detectors are exposed. This document describes how gamma-ray spectra are computed and the significance of response function parameters that define characteristics of particular detectors.

  19. DNA Functionalization of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are hybrid nanoscale objects that integrate different types of DNA molecules and inorganic nanoparticles with a typical architecture of a DNA shell around an inorganic core. Such incorporation provides particles with unique properties of DNA, addressability and recognition, but, at the same time, allows exploiting the properties of the particle's inorganic core. Thus, these hybrid nano-objects are advantageous for rational fabrication of functional materials and for biomedical applications. Here, we describe several established DNA functionalization procedures for different types of surface ligands and nanoparticle core materials.

  20. Challenging the Dichotomy between "Urban" and "Suburban" in Educational Discourse and Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey-Maddox, Linn

    2016-01-01

    This article builds a case for nuanced conceptualizations of "urban" and "-suburban" educational contexts and issues. The author analyzes data across two studies--one of upper-middle-class White parents with children in Chicago public schools, and the other of Black low-income and working-class parents who moved from Chicago to…

  1. Probing the radio loud/quiet AGN dichotomy with quasar clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retana-Montenegro, E.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the clustering properties of 45 441 radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) and 3493 radio-loud quasars (RLQs) drawn from a joint use of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at 20 cm (FIRST) surveys in the range 0.3 < z < 2.3. This large spectroscopic quasar sample allow us to investigate the clustering signal dependence on radio-loudness and black hole (BH) virial mass. We find that RLQs are clustered more strongly than RQQs in all the redshift bins considered. We find a real-space correlation length of and for RQQs and RLQs, respectively, for the full redshift range. This implies that RLQs are found in more massive host haloes than RQQs in our samples, with mean host halo masses of 4.9 × 1013h-1M⊙ and 1.9 × 1012h-1M⊙, respectively. Comparison with clustering studies of different radio source samples indicates that this mass scale of ≳ 1 × 1013h-1M⊙ is characteristic for the bright radio-population, which corresponds to the typical mass of galaxy groups and galaxy clusters. The similarity we find in correlation lengths and host halo masses for RLQs, radio galaxies and flat-spectrum radio quasars agrees with orientation-driven unification models. Additionally, the clustering signal shows a dependence on BH mass, with the quasars powered by the most massive BHs clustering more strongly than quasars having less massive BHs. We suggest that the current virial BH mass estimates may be a valid BH proxies for studying quasar clustering. We compare our results to a previous theoretical model that assumes that quasar activity is driven by cold accretion via mergers of gas-rich galaxies. While the model can explain the bias and halo masses for RQQs, it cannot reproduce the higher bias and host halo masses for RLQs. We argue that other BH properties such as BH spin, environment, magnetic field configuration, and accretion physics must be considered to fully understand the origin of radio-emission in quasars and its relation to the higher clustering.

  2. Academic Staff Performance and Workload in Higher Education in the UK: The Conceptual Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Higher education in the UK is under increasing pressure to manage the workload of its academic staff in a way that maximises the outputs from teaching and research. The emergence of this trend can be traced back to 1989 and the government legislation that introduced neo-liberal managerialism into the sector mirroring the laissez-faire approach to…

  3. Diet dichotomy between two migrant seabirds breeding near a high Arctic polynya

    PubMed Central

    Boadway, Kelly A.; Davis, Shanti E.; Maftei, Mark; Mallory, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    High Arctic polynyas are predictable areas of open water, which offer long-distance migrant seabirds a reliable source of food during a period when they have to replenish and accumulate energy for reproduction. Investigating the interaction between species nesting sympatrically in the vicinity of polynyas should provide insights into the role that such oceanographic features play for pre-breeding seabirds. We used stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) to compare the diet of two ground-nesting seabirds, Sabine's gull (Xema sabini) and Arctic tern (Sterna paradisaea), nesting on an island adjacent to a recurring polynya in the Canadian high Arctic in 2008 and 2009. We show that, unlike Arctic terns, the diet of Sabine's gulls appears to include a non-negligible amount of terrestrially derived prey during early incubation, and that overall both species segregate their dietary niche during pre-laying and early incubation.

  4. Gender Neutralities, Dichotomies and Hidden Inequalities: Analysis of Vocational Teachers' Reflections on Gender in the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappalainen, Sirpa; Lahelma, Elina; Pehkonen, Leila; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses how Finnish vocational teachers make sense of the meanings of gender in their work. The context of the study consists of the two most gender segregated environments of vocational education: the female-dominated Sector of Health and Social Services and the male-dominated Sector of Technology and Transport. Our analysis draws…

  5. Dichotomy Between Black Hole and Neutron Star Accretion: Effect of Hard Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhang, Prasun; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Sharma, Prateek

    2016-07-01

    Estimates of accretion rate on to compact objects have been explored based on the well-known, spherically symmetric, inviscid, steady-state solution given by Bondi. This solution assumes that there is a sink of mass at the center -- which in case of a black hole (BH) corresponds to the advection of matter across the event horizon. Other stars, such as a neutron star (NS), have surfaces and hence the infalling matter has to come to rest at the surface. We study the initial value problem in which the matter distribution is uniform and at rest at time t=0 with different inner radial boundary conditions for BHs and NSs: inflow boundary condition valid for BHs; and reflective or settling boundary condition for NSs. We obtain a similarity solution for the flow with inner inflow and reflective boundary conditions (assuming a cold ambient medium) and compare with numerical simulations of the Euler equations. One-dimensional simulations show the formation of an outward propagating and a standing shock in NS system for reflective and settling boundary conditions respectively. Two-dimensional simulations show that both these flows are unstable (locally to convection and globally to a standing shock instability). Numerical simulations show that in steady state, spherical accretion rate on to a NS for reflective boundary condition is suppressed by orders of magnitude compared to that on to a BH.

  6. Educational Leadership and Culture in China: Dichotomies between Chinese and Anglo-American Leadership Traditions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Law, Wing-Wah

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the extent to which Chinese school leaders espouse dichotomous or integrated Chinese and Anglo-American leadership and management preferences. Data are drawn from questionnaires completed by school leaders and from semi-structured interviews with individual school leaders from different parts of China. The exploratory study…

  7. THE DIRECTIVE LESS-DIRECTIVE DICHOTOMY AS VIEWED FROM THE CONCEPT OF LINGUISTIC RELATIVITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCARTHY, JOHN W.

    DIRECTIVE AND LESS-DIRECTIVE COUNSELING ARE EXAMINED ON A THEORETICAL BASIS THROUGH THE CONCEPT OF LINGUISTIC RELATIVITY (LR). THE FOLLOWING ARE ASSUMED--(1) THE GOAL OF COUNSELING IN OUR SOCIETY IS INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM AND EMERGENCE, (2) DIRECTIVE COUNSELING, AN END IN ITSELF, GUIDES THE CLIENT TO PREDETERMINED ADJUSTMENT, AND (3) LESS-DIRECTIVE…

  8. Questioning the dichotomy between vegetative state and minimally conscious state: a review of the statistical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Giulia; Hünefeldt, Thomas; Olivetti Belardinelli, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Given the enormous consequences that the diagnosis of vegetative state (VS) vs. minimally conscious state (MCS) may have for the treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness, it is particularly important to empirically legitimate the distinction between these two discrete levels of consciousness. Therefore, the aim of this contribution is to review all the articles reporting statistical evidence concerning the performance of patients in VS vs. patients in MCS, on behavioral or neurophysiological measures. Twenty-three articles matched these inclusion criteria, and comprised behavioral, electroencephalographic (EEG), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures. The analysis of these articles yielded 47 different statistical findings. More than half of these findings (n = 24) did not reveal any statistically significant difference between VS and MCS. Overall, there was no combination of variables that allowed reliably discriminating between VS and MCS. This pattern of results casts doubt on the empirical validity of the distinction between VS and MCS. PMID:25404905

  9. Military/Media Dichotomy and Its Impact on Military Operations in West Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-08

    electrical , electronic, architectural and geodetic engineers, quantity surveyors, and technicians of all types. Other manpower resources include lawyers...Northern Region and the upper fringes of the Volta Region of Ghana in the wake of the violent ethnic clashes between the Dagombas, Gonjas, and Konkombas...news. Almost everyone has access to a radio. Television is limited to areas where there is electricity . More than TV, radio is opinion forming and

  10. Muslim American University Students' Perceptions of Islam and Democracy: Deconstructing the Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Sarah; Collet, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    The aftermath of 9/11 and the current surge of revolutions in North Africa and the Middle East have caused Muslim Americans to be either demonized or forgotten altogether, despite the significance of their everyday navigation of both Islamic and democratic values and unique efforts toward identity construction. The neglect of the Muslim American…

  11. Overcoming the dichotomy between open and isolated populations using genomic data from a large European dataset

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Dominici, Valentina; Battaggia, Cinzia; Pagani, Luca; Vilar, Miguel; Wells, R. Spencer; Pettener, Davide; Sarno, Stefania; Boattini, Alessio; Francalacci, Paolo; Colonna, Vincenza; Vona, Giuseppe; Calò, Carla; Destro Bisol, Giovanni; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Human populations are often dichotomized into “isolated” and “open” categories using cultural and/or geographical barriers to gene flow as differential criteria. Although widespread, the use of these alternative categories could obscure further heterogeneity due to inter-population differences in effective size, growth rate, and timing or amount of gene flow. We compared intra and inter-population variation measures combining novel and literature data relative to 87,818 autosomal SNPs in 14 open populations and 10 geographic and/or linguistic European isolates. Patterns of intra-population diversity were found to vary considerably more among isolates, probably due to differential levels of drift and inbreeding. The relatively large effective size estimated for some population isolates challenges the generalized view that they originate from small founding groups. Principal component scores based on measures of intra-population variation of isolated and open populations were found to be distributed along a continuum, with an area of intersection between the two groups. Patterns of inter-population diversity were even closer, as we were able to detect some differences between population groups only for a few multidimensional scaling dimensions. Therefore, different lines of evidence suggest that dichotomizing human populations into open and isolated groups fails to capture the actual relations among their genomic features. PMID:28145502

  12. Culture Consciousness among Hmong Immigrant Leaders: Beyond the Dichotomy of Cultural Essentialism and Cultural Hybridity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Bic

    2013-01-01

    This article illustrates the culture consciousness of Hmong immigrant community leaders as they made sense of the educational experiences of Hmong American children and families. It draws on the work of scholars who have theorized "critical" essentialism to suggest that Hmong leaders are critically aware of the role and import of…

  13. Dichotomy in mode propagation of coseismic ionospheric disturbance: Observations from 11 April 2012 Indian Ocean earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, J. K.; Vijayan, M. S. M.; Syeda Rabiya, U. B.; Shimna, K.; Gahalaut, Vineet K.; Ramesh, D. S.

    2015-05-01

    The ionosphere response to the great intraplate Indian Ocean earthquake of 11 April 2012 (Mw 8.6) and its largest aftershock (Mw 8.2) is analyzed using GPS-aided total electron content (TEC) measurements. Data from the dense GPS networks, SuGAr (Sumatran GPS Array) and the permanent Andaman-Nicobar array, formed the near-field observations at distances 250-1200 km from the epicenter. Stations such as IISC, DGAR, and few others provided measurements over 2000 km from the epicenter. The coseismic ionospheric disturbances (CIDs) with a propagation velocity of 930-1262 m/s, equals the speeds of the shock acoustic waves, arrive within 10-18 min after the earthquake occurrence. The observed phenomenon of CID splitting into two modes, north and south of the epicenter, is akin to the well-documented effects of anisotropy on wave propagation. Closer to the epicenter, to its south, the propagation velocity of CID is ~1 km/s, and farther southeast of the network the velocity reduces to 500-600 m/s. In contrast, toward Andaman in the north, the CID propagation velocity increases to 2-3.5 km/s. The zenith angle of the line of sight between the GPS receiver and satellite appears to influence the amplitude of the TEC fluctuations. The anomalous azimuthal variation of the Rayleigh wave radiation pattern best explains the observed N-S asymmetry of CID.

  14. An artificial Kepler dichotomy? Implications for the coplanarity of planetary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovaird, Timothy; Lineweaver, Charles H.

    2016-10-01

    We challenge the assumptions present in previous efforts to model the ensemble of detected Kepler systems, which require a dichotomous stellar population of `fertile' and `sterile' planet producing stars. We remove the assumption of Rayleigh distributed mutual inclinations between planets and show that the need for two distinct stellar populations disappears when the inner part of planetary disks are assumed to be flat, rather than flared.

  15. "Formative Good, Summative Bad?"--A Review of the Dichotomy in Assessment Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Alice Man Sze

    2016-01-01

    The debate between summative and formative assessment is creating a situation that increasingly calls to mind the famous slogan in George Orwell's (1945) "Animal Farm"--"Four legs good, two legs bad". Formative assessment is increasingly being portrayed in the literature as "good" assessment, which tutors should…

  16. Human T helper type 1 dichotomy: origin, phenotype and biological activities

    PubMed Central

    Annunziato, Francesco; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The great variety of pathogens present in the environment has obliged the immune system to evolve different mechanisms for tailored and maximally protective responses. Initially, two major types of CD4+ T helper (Th) effector cells were identified, and named as type 1 (Th1) and type 2 (Th2) cells because of the different cytokines they produce. More recently, a third type of CD4+ Th effectors has been identified and named as Th17 cells. Th17 cells, however, have been found to exhibit high plasticity because they rapidly shift into the Th1 phenotype in the inflammatory sites. Therefore, in these sites there is usually a dichotomous mixture of classic and non-classic (Th17-derived) Th1 cells. In humans, non-classic Th1 cells express CD161, as well as the retinoic acid orphan receptor C, interleukin-17 receptor E (IL-17RE), IL-1RI, CCR6, and IL-4-induced gene 1 and Tob-1, which are all virtually absent from classic Th1 cells. The possibility to distinguish between these two cell subsets may allow the opportunity to better establish their respective pathogenic role in different chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we discuss the different origin, the distinctive phenotypic features and the major biological activities of classic and non-classic Th1 cells. PMID:25284714

  17. Dichotomy of The Messada Pluton, Serbo-Macedonian Massif, Greece: From Rifting to Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilatos, Charalampos

    2016-10-01

    The Messada pluton is a mafic intrusion that is located about 12 km SW of Serres town, (Macedonia Greece) that intrudes the two mica, biotite and the augen gneisses of the Vertiskos formation (Serbo-Macedonian massif). The aim of this study is to investigate, define and evaluate the geochemical characteristics of the pluton in order to determine the geotectonic environment in which the parental magma has been formed. The Mesada pluton is a mid to coarse grained intrusion presenting petrographic variety from diorite and quartz diorite to tonalite and granodiorite. The variety in petrography reflects its chemical inhomogeneity in major and trace elements. It is suggested that parts of pluton have been formed by distinctly different types of magmas originated in diverse geotectonic settings. Those parts of quartz diorite and tonalite composition, present similar geochemical characteristics, LILE/HFSE ratios and negative Nb, but no Ti anomalies in their primitive mantle normalized trace elements spider grams. They exhibit higher HFS values than those of granodioritic composition. Moreover, their ORG normalized spider grams not only suggest that they have been evolved by a common parental magma, but also present the typical characteristics of a “crust dominated” within plate pluton that may have been formed in an early stage during rifting, prior to a subsequent subduction episode. This interpretation may be in accordance with the suggestion for the Gondwanian origin of the more silicic Triassic rift related meta-granites (e.g. Arnea plutonic complex) of the Serbo-Macedonian massif. In contrary; the parts of Mesada pluton of granodioritic composition, exhibit a calc-alkaline to high K calc-alkaline magmatic suite and present higher LILE/HFSE and LREE/HREE ratios, related to a higher crustal component contribution for the magma genesis. Furthermore, their primitive mantle normalized spider grams’ present negative anomalies at Nb and Ti. These characteristics indicate that those granodioritic parts have been formed by the crystallization of a calk-alkaline magma, produced by the partial melting of lower crust, lithospheric mantle and asthenospheric mantle components, in a volcanic arc geo-tectonic setting. Their geochemical characteristics have close similarities to those of the collision related granitoids that have intruded the Serbo- Macedonian during Tertiary.

  18. Overcoming Modern-Postmodern Dichotomies: Some Possible Benefits for the Counselling Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekerman, Zvi; Tatar, Moshe

    2005-01-01

    The rhetorical/discursive turn, in its multiple disciplinary masks, is here to stay. Even psychology is giving in to its charm. The Sophists can smile again, the agora is back, and the solipsistic self is in retreat. Dialogical, narrative, and cultural psychologies, as well as the counselling profession, triumph the return of the social, the…

  19. Teaching Comparative Law in the 21st Century: Beyond the Civil/Common Law Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waxman, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that the inexorable shift to transnational and global legal practice demands a comparable shift in methods of teaching comparative law to move it beyond its current American common law/European civil law myopia. Proposes an introductory course, Law in Comparative Cultures, which exposes students to a panoply of international legal systems.…

  20. False Dichotomies and Health Policy Research Designs: Randomized Trials Are Not Always the Answer.

    PubMed

    Soumerai, Stephen B; Ceccarelli, Rachel; Koppel, Ross

    2017-02-01

    Some medical scientists argue that only data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are trustworthy. They claim data from natural experiments and administrative data sets are always spurious and cannot be used to evaluate health policies and other population-wide phenomena in the real world. While many acknowledge biases caused by poor study designs, in this article we argue that several valid designs using administrative data can produce strong findings, particularly the interrupted time series (ITS) design. Many policy studies neither permit nor require an RCT for cause-and-effect inference. Framing our arguments using Campbell and Stanley's classic research design monograph, we show that several "quasi-experimental" designs, especially interrupted time series (ITS), can estimate valid effects (or non-effects) of health interventions and policies as diverse as public insurance coverage, speed limits, hospital safety programs, drug abuse regulation and withdrawal of drugs from the market. We further note the recent rapid uptake of ITS and argue for expanded training in quasi-experimental designs in medical and graduate schools and in post-doctoral curricula.

  1. Language Policy and Instructional Practice Dichotomy: The Case of Primary Schools in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Ernest; Agbenyega, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    "Clear grounding in a location gives us the confidence to engage with knowledge from other locations as we deconstruct and reconstruct them with our purposes" (Canagarajah, 2005, p. 15). This quote serves the basis of what this paper presents on language policy and pedagogical practices in Ghana. Language plays an important role in…

  2. Programming cell death in the 1960s: developmental biology beyond dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyung Wook

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been one of the most significant topics in modern biomedical research. Its broad importance in many biological and pathological phenomena, including morphogenesis, autoimmune disease, and cancer, demonstrates that its origin deserves a historical examination. By analyzing the role of developmental biology of the 1960s in shaping the notion of a program, this paper explains the emergence of a close correlation between not only life and death, but also the normal and the pathological in the postwar study of cell death.

  3. A Convenient Dichotomy: Critical Eyes on the Limits to Biological Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milne, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In "The Secret Identity of a Biology Textbook: straight and naturally sexed," Jesse Bazzul and Heather Sykes conduct a case study of a biology textbook as an oppressive instructional material. Using queer theory they explore how the text of the biology textbook produces "truths" about sex, gender, and sexuality. Their analysis is complemented by…

  4. A convenient dichotomy: critical eyes on the limits to biological knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Catherine

    2011-06-01

    In The Secret Identity of a Biology Textbook: straight and naturally sexed, Jesse Bazzul and Heather Sykes conduct a case study of a biology textbook as an oppressive instructional material. Using queer theory they explore how the text of the biology textbook produces "truths" about sex, gender, and sexuality. Their analysis is complemented by the Forum papers by Jay Lemke and Francis Broadway who broaden the analysis examining the way that what counts as knowledge in science is a political decision while also encouraging authors, including Bazzul and Sykes, to also look critically at their own theoretical lenses. In this paper I pull together their ideas while exploring cultural contexts for a more nuanced representation of biological knowledge and the politics of what it means to know science.

  5. "Glocalization": Going beyond the Dichotomy of Global versus Local through Additive Multilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Michael; Ramani, Esther

    2012-01-01

    This article interrogates the notion of "glocalization" (Moja, 2004, based on Castells, 2001) as a concept that seeks to integrate the local and the global to address both the need for social justice and the need to participate in a global market economy. The article argues that the relation between the global and the local cannot be…

  6. From Rigid Dichotomy to Measured Contingency. Hong Kong Preservice Teachers' Discursive Construction of Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trent, John

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study into the discursive construction of teacher identities amongst six preservice English language teachers in Hong Kong. While teacher identity construction has been conceptualized as an evolving process of becoming a teacher, some preservice teachers regard their professional identities as rigid, resulting…

  7. MAGNETARS VERSUS HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS: A THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE APPARENT DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Perna, Rosalba

    2011-11-10

    Highly magnetized neutron stars (NSs) are characterized by a bewildering range of astrophysical manifestations. Here, building on our simulations of the evolution of magnetic stresses in the NS crust and its ensuing fractures, we explore in detail, for the middle-aged and old NSs, the dependence of starquake frequency and energetics on the relative strength of the poloidal (B{sub p}) and toroidal (B{sub tor}) components. We find that, for B{sub p} {approx}> 10{sup 14} G, since a strong crustal toroidal field B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub p} is quickly formed on a Hall timescale, the initial toroidal field needs to be B{sub tor} >> B{sub p} to have a clear influence on the outbursting behavior. For initial fields B{sub p} {approx}< 10{sup 14} G, it is very unlikely that a middle-aged (t {approx} 10{sup 5} years) NS shows any bursting activity. This study allows us to solve the apparent puzzle of how NSs with similar dipolar magnetic fields can behave in a remarkably different way: an outbursting 'magnetar' with a high X-ray luminosity, or a quiet, low-luminosity, 'high-B' radio pulsar. As an example, we consider the specific cases of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 and the radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744, which at present have a similar dipolar field {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G. We determine for each object an initial magnetic field configuration that reproduces the observed timing parameters at their current age. The same two configurations also account for the differences in quiescent X-ray luminosity and for the 'magnetar/outbursting' behavior of 1E 2259+586 but not of PSR J1814-1744. We further use the theoretically predicted surface temperature distribution to compute the light curve for these objects. In the case of 1E 2259+586, for which data are available, our predicted temperature distribution gives rise to a pulse profile whose double-peaked nature and modulation level are consistent with the observations.

  8. Beyond the 'east-west' dichotomy: Global variation in cultural models of selfhood.

    PubMed

    Vignoles, Vivian L; Owe, Ellinor; Becker, Maja; Smith, Peter B; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Cadena, Maria Paz; Lay, Siugmin; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Villamar, Juan A; Gavreliuc, Alin; Zinkeng, Martina; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Baguma, Peter; Martin, Mariana; Tatarko, Alexander; Herman, Ginette; de Sauvage, Isabelle; Courtois, Marie; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Harb, Charles; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Nizharadze, George; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Jalal, Baland; Bourguignon, David; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chybicka, Aneta; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Xiao; Espinosa, Agustín; Valk, Aune; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Amponsah, Benjamin; Özgen, Emre; Güner, E Ülkü; Yamakoğlu, Nil; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Vargas Trujillo, Elvia; Balanta, Paola; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Koller, Silvia H; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Gausel, Nicolay; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Kusdil, Ersin; Çağlar, Selinay; Aldhafri, Said; Ferreira, M Cristina; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Wang, Qian; Fülöp, Márta; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Lemos, Flávia Cristina Silveira; Fritsche, Immo; Möller, Bettina; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Bond, Michael Harris

    2016-08-01

    Markus and Kitayama's (1991) theory of independent and interdependent self-construals had a major influence on social, personality, and developmental psychology by highlighting the role of culture in psychological processes. However, research has relied excessively on contrasts between North American and East Asian samples, and commonly used self-report measures of independence and interdependence frequently fail to show predicted cultural differences. We revisited the conceptualization and measurement of independent and interdependent self-construals in 2 large-scale multinational surveys, using improved methods for cross-cultural research. We developed (Study 1: N = 2924 students in 16 nations) and validated across cultures (Study 2: N = 7279 adults from 55 cultural groups in 33 nations) a new 7-dimensional model of self-reported ways of being independent or interdependent. Patterns of global variation support some of Markus and Kitayama's predictions, but a simple contrast between independence and interdependence does not adequately capture the diverse models of selfhood that prevail in different world regions. Cultural groups emphasize different ways of being both independent and interdependent, depending on individualism-collectivism, national socioeconomic development, and religious heritage. Our 7-dimensional model will allow future researchers to test more accurately the implications of cultural models of selfhood for psychological processes in diverse ecocultural contexts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Straw Men and False Dichotomies: Overcoming Philosophical Confusion in Chemical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.

    2010-01-01

    Constructivism has been widely considered the most influential perspective in science education research for some decades, and has been the basis of widespread pedagogic advice in many educational contexts. Yet it has been claimed in this "Journal" that the philosophical basis of constructivist thought in chemical education is confused, and…

  10. Dichotomies or Binoculars: Reflections on the Papers by Steffe and Thompson and by Lerman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieren, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    Mathematics education in schools can be viewed either as primarily a sociocultural phenomenon or as a nurturing of the individual's mathematical development. Argues that instead of taking the dichotomous view, contrasting the Vygotskian and the Piagetian perspectives, the two may be seen as separate "truths" providing different lenses…

  11. Gender as Contradiction: From Dichotomies to Diversity in Natural Resource Extraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Sara; Krogman, Naomi T.

    2011-01-01

    Given the varied nature of resource dependent communities, the gendered experiences of women and men may vary in unexpected and contradictory ways. Building on a review and critique of existing theoretical approaches and studies of US and Canadian extractive resource communities in both the feminist and rural social science literature, we provide…

  12. Mutinous Colonialism: Navigating Self-Other Dichotomy in Octavia Butler's "Survivor"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JubouriAl-Ogaili, Thamer Amer; Babaee, Ruzbeh

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the self-other relationship in Octavia Butler's novel "Survivor" (1978). This relationship incarnates the colonial powers brought about the missionaries in their early advent in the fictional place known as "Earth". This place is the foundational setting where the main events take place. The study focuses…

  13. Activity as Object-Related: Resolving the Dichotomy of Individual and Collective Planes of Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetsenko, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This article suggests that the principle of object-relatedness, introduced by Vygotsky and expanded by A. N. Leontiev, can be used to conceptualize human subjectivity within a profoundly social view of human development. This is achieved by reformulating the premises of cultural-historical activity theory to include the notion that material…

  14. Caught in a "West/China Dichotomy": Doing Critical Sociolinguistic Ethnography in Zhejiang Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Milans, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on how issues of power and identity were negotiated when doing a critical sociolinguistic ethnography as a Spanish researcher in the Chinese educational context. Data come from fieldwork conducted in 3 different primary and secondary schools together in Zhejiang province, where inside- and outside-classroom…

  15. Collegiality and Managerialism: A False Dichotomy? Evidence from the Higher Education Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    Collegiality and managerialism are often portrayed as opposed ideas or practices, with the latter, in particular, either held up as a necessary response to the massification of higher education or portrayed as a betrayal of long-held academic ideals (as supposedly reflected in collegiality). This article explores how collegiality and managerialism…

  16. From Dichotomy to Divergence: Number/Gender Marking on Hebrew Nouns and Adjectives across School Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ravid, Dorit; Schiff, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the development of plural adjective agreement in Hebrew, focusing on the consolidation of Hebrew number/gender morphology in children and adolescents across the school years in comparison with adults. A total of 240 Hebrew-speaking participants in seven consecutive grade levels (kindergarten to sixth grade) plus a group of…

  17. Dichotomy in the T-linear resistivity in hole-doped cuprates.

    PubMed

    Hussey, N E; Cooper, R A; Xu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Y; Mouzopoulou, I; Vignolle, B; Proust, C

    2011-04-28

    From analysis of the in-plane resistivity ρ(ab)(T) of La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4), we show that normal state transport in overdoped cuprates can be delineated into two regimes in which the electrical resistivity varies approximately linearly with temperature. In the low-temperature limit, the T-linear resistivity extends over a very wide doping range, in marked contrast to expectations from conventional quantum critical scenarios. The coefficient of this T-linear resistivity scales with the superconducting transition temperature T(c), implying that the interaction causing this anomalous scattering is also associated with the superconducting pairing mechanism. At high temperatures, the coefficient of the T-linear resistivity is essentially doping independent beyond a critical doping p(crit)=0.19 at which the ratio of the two coefficients is maximal. Taking our cue from earlier thermodynamic and photoemission measurements, we conclude that the opening of the normal-state pseudogap at p(crit) is driven by the loss of coherence of anti-nodal quasi-particles at low temperatures.

  18. Institutional Academic Freedom vs. Faculty Academic Freedom in Public Colleges and Universities: A Dubious Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiers, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the origins of recent federal appellate decisions' divergence from the Supreme Court's identification of teachers' or faculty's academic freedom as "a special concern of the First Amendment." Suggests ways in which academic freedom might better be accorded its rightful importance within the framework of current Supreme Court…

  19. Overcoming the dichotomy between open and isolated populations using genomic data from a large European dataset.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Paolo; Dominici, Valentina; Battaggia, Cinzia; Pagani, Luca; Vilar, Miguel; Wells, R Spencer; Pettener, Davide; Sarno, Stefania; Boattini, Alessio; Francalacci, Paolo; Colonna, Vincenza; Vona, Giuseppe; Calò, Carla; Destro Bisol, Giovanni; Tofanelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Human populations are often dichotomized into "isolated" and "open" categories using cultural and/or geographical barriers to gene flow as differential criteria. Although widespread, the use of these alternative categories could obscure further heterogeneity due to inter-population differences in effective size, growth rate, and timing or amount of gene flow. We compared intra and inter-population variation measures combining novel and literature data relative to 87,818 autosomal SNPs in 14 open populations and 10 geographic and/or linguistic European isolates. Patterns of intra-population diversity were found to vary considerably more among isolates, probably due to differential levels of drift and inbreeding. The relatively large effective size estimated for some population isolates challenges the generalized view that they originate from small founding groups. Principal component scores based on measures of intra-population variation of isolated and open populations were found to be distributed along a continuum, with an area of intersection between the two groups. Patterns of inter-population diversity were even closer, as we were able to detect some differences between population groups only for a few multidimensional scaling dimensions. Therefore, different lines of evidence suggest that dichotomizing human populations into open and isolated groups fails to capture the actual relations among their genomic features.

  20. Journalistic Schizophrenia: The Law/Ethics Dichotomy. Research Bulletin Number 4, Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundt, Whitney R.; Broussard, E. Joseph

    Two hundred fourteen journalism students responded to a questionnaire designed to test the extent of the disparity between journalistic attitudes toward law and ethics in the area of invasion of privacy by photography in both print and broadcast media. The survey instrument presented eight cases in which allegations of media invasion of privacy…

  1. Parents Studying Medicine – the dichotomy of studying with a family

    PubMed Central

    Iden, Kirstin; Nürnberger, Frank; Sader, Robert; Dittrich, Winand

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this article the personal study and life situation of parents who are also medical students at the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main is discussed. There is a special focus on the topics “studying with children” and “family-friendly university”, which have been present in discussions about university development and in the daily life of academics, especially during the last decade. The workgroup “Individual Student Services” at the medical faculty at the Goethe University tries to meet the necessities of the individual study courses and to support the study success with a new counselling and student service concept. Methods: The experience of parents studying medicine was recorded in semi-structured interviews (Date: April 2010), which were held as part of the sponsored pilot project on part-time medical studies (“Pilot Project Part-time Medical Studies”). Additionally, study results from the Medical School of the Goethe University Frankfurt am Main were integrated as well as a literature analysis. Results: It was found that the teaching demands and support services, which have been suggested and needed for years now, have been partially implemented and are without sufficient support at the faculty level to date. Thus the current situation of medical students with children is still difficult and seems a big challenge for everyone involved. Solution: As part of the “Individual Student Services” a new pilot project on part-time medical studies was established in November 2009. Only the use of new, unconventional and innovative ideas allows universities to adequately support the changing and heterogeneous student population and support them to successfully completing their medical studies. PMID:22558026

  2. Deconstructing and Transgressing the Theory-Practice Dichotomy in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguchi, Hillevi Lenz

    2007-01-01

    This article theorizes and exemplifies reconceptualized teaching practices, both in early childhood education (ECE) and in a couple of programs within the new Swedish Teacher Education (since 2001). These programs are tightly knit to the last 12 years of reconceptualized early childhood education practices in and around Stockholm, built on…

  3. DOES THE OOSTERHOFF DICHOTOMY EXIST IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY? I. THE CASE OF G11

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras Ramos, Rodrigo; Clementini, Gisella; Federici, Luciana E-mail: gisella.clementini@oabo.inaf.it; and others

    2013-03-01

    We present the first evidence that Oosterhoff type II globular clusters exist in the Andromeda galaxy (M31). On the basis of time-series photometry of the moderately metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}-1.6 dex) M31 globular cluster G11, obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we detected and derived periods for 14 RR Lyrae stars, of which five are found to lie inside the cluster tidal radius. They include three fundamental-mode (RRab) and two first-overtone (RRc) pulsators, with average periods (P{sub ab} ) = 0.70 days, and (P{sub c} ) = 0.40 days, respectively. These mean periods and the position of the cluster variable stars in the period-amplitude and period-metallicity diagrams all suggest that G11 is likely to be an Oosterhoff type II globular cluster. This appears to be in agreement with the general behavior of Milky Way globular clusters with similar metallicity and horizontal branch morphology.

  4. How 'alternative' is CAM? Rethinking conventional dichotomies between biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ning, Ana M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this article is to interrogate the pervasive dichotomization of 'conventional' and 'alternative' therapies in popular, academic and medical literature. Specifically, I rethink the concepts such as holism, vitalism, spirituality, natural healing and individual responsibility for health care as taken-for-granted alternative ideologies. I explore how these ideologies are not necessarily 'alternative', but integral to the practice of clinical medicine as well as socially and culturally dominant values, norms and practices related to health and health care in Canada and elsewhere. These reflections address both theoretical and applied concerns central to the study of integration of different medical practices in western industrialized nations such as Canada. Overall, in examining homologies present in both biomedicine and complementary/alternative medicine (CAM), this article rethinks major social practices against binary oppositions by illustrating through literature review that the biomedical and CAM models may be homologous in their original inceptions and in recent cross-fertilizations towards a rigorous approach in medicine. By highlighting biomedicine and CAM as homologous symbolic systems, this article also sheds light on the potential for enhancing dialogue between diverse perspectives to facilitate an integrative health care system that meets multiple consumer needs.

  5. Why dichotomies can be misleading while dualities fit the analysis of complex phenomena.

    PubMed

    Branco, Angela Uchoa

    2009-12-01

    Humans' tendency to classify and categorize is definitely overspread, but it can be misleading at all fields, including epistemology, ontology, theory, and analysis of scientific knowledge construction itself. Sanchez and Loredo (IPBS: Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science 43:4, 2009-DOI 10.1007/s12124-009-9091-1) in their article on classification of contemporary constructivists fall exactly into such pitfall- even as their effort to make sense of many outstanding theorists is impressive and inriguing. A further analysis, however, points at the theoretical trap posed by such endeavor, for models arisen from different epistemological standpoints cannot be compared along the lines of a simplistic polarity between "objectivism" and "subjectivism". There is much more to be taken into account when a intrinsically complex subject like constructivism and constructionism epistemological approach and their welcome different versions--perspectives--are submitted to analysis and critical evaluation.

  6. The Clinical-Forensic Dichotomy in Sexual Abuse Evaluations: Moving toward an Integrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tishelman, Amy C.; Meyer, Susanne K.; Haney, Penny; McLeod, Sara K.

    2010-01-01

    We propose the use of an approach to evaluation that can be undertaken in a clinical setting when concerns regarding child sexual abuse are unclear or ambiguous and other systems are not involved, thus providing an option for the nondisclosing child often discussed in the "delayed disclosure" literature. This approach can also be appropriate for a…

  7. The syn/anti-Dichotomy in the Palladium-Catalyzed Addition of Nucleophiles to Alkenes

    PubMed Central

    Kočovský, Pavel; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2015-01-01

    In this review the stereochemistry of palladium-catalyzed addition of nucleophiles to alkenes is discussed, and examples of these reactions in organic synthesis are given. Most of the reactions discussed involve oxygen and nitrogen nucleophiles; the Wacker oxidation of ethylene has been reviewed in detail. An anti-hydroxypalladation in the Wacker oxidation has strong support from both experimental and computational studies. From the reviewed material it is clear that anti-addition of oxygen and nitrogen nucleophiles is strongly favored in intermolecular addition to olefin–palladium complexes even if the nucleophile is coordinated to the metal. On the other hand, syn-addition is common in the case of intramolecular oxy- and amidopalladation as a result of the initial coordination of the internal nucleophile to the metal. PMID:25378278

  8. Sex determination in marsupials: evidence for a marsupial-eutherian dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Renfree, M B; Short, R V

    1988-12-01

    In this paper, we review briefly the current state of knowledge about sexual differentiation in eutherian mammals, and then describe the situation in detail in two marsupial species: the North American opossum and the tammar wallaby. The conventional explanation for the genesis of all male somatic sexual dimorphisms in mammals is that they are a consequence of the systemic action of testicular hormones. In the absence of testes, the embryo will develop a female phenotype. We present evidence for the tammar wallaby that calls into question the universal applicability of this hormonal theory of mammalian sexual differentiation. We have shown that extensive somatic sexual dimorphisms precede by many days the first morphological evidence of testicular formation, which does not occur until around the third day of pouch life. Male foetuses, and pouch young on the day of birth, already have a well-developed gubernaculum and processus vaginalis, paired scrotal anlagen, and a complete absence of mammary anlagen, whereas female foetuses and newborn pouch young have a poorly developed gubernaculum and processus vaginalis, no scrotal anlagen, and well-developed mammary anlagen. Because it seems unlikely that the male gonad could begin hormone secretion until after the Sertoli and Leydig cells are developed, our results strongly suggest that some sexually dimorphic somatic characteristics develop autonomously, depending on their genotype rather than the hormonal environment to which they are exposed. We have been able to confirm the hormonal independence of the scrotum, pouch and mammary gland by administering testosterone propionate daily by mouth to female pouch young from the day of birth; although the Wolffian duct was hyperstimulated, there was no sign of scrotal development, or pouch or mammary inhibition. When male pouch young were treated with oestradiol benzoate in a similar fashion, there was hyperstimulation of the Müllerian duct and inhibition of testicular migration and development, but no sign of scrotal inhibition or pouch or mammary development. Our results in the tammar wallaby are consistent with the earlier studies on the opossum, whose significance was not appreciated at the time. Further evidence in support of this hormonal independence comes from earlier studies of spontaneously occurring intersexes in several species of marsupial, including the opossum and the tammar wallaby. An XXY individual had intra-abdominal testes and complete masculinization of the male reproductive tract internally, but externally there was a pouch and mammary glands and no scrotum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  9. Efficacy of contemporary chemotherapy in stage IIIC endometrial cancer: A histologic dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Mariani, Andrea; Dowdy, Sean C.; Weaver, Amy L.; McGree, Michaela E.; Martin, Janice R.; Keeney, Gary L.; Jatoi, Aminah; Gostout, Bobbie S.; Podratz, Karl C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment failures in stage IIIC endometrial carcinoma (EC) are predominantly due to occult extrapelvic metastases (EPM). The impact of chemotherapy on occult EPM was investigated according to grade (G), G1/2EC vs G3EC. Methods All surgical-stage IIIC EC cases from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2008, from Mayo Clinic were included. Patient-, disease-, and treatment-specific risk factors were assessed for association with overall survival, cause-specific survival, and extrapelvic disease-free survival (DFS) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results 109 cases met criteria, with 92 (84%) having systematic lymphadenectomy (>10 pelvic and >5 paraaortic lymph nodes resected). In patients with documented recurrence sites, occult EPM accounted for 88%. Among G1/2EC cases (n = 48), the sole independent predictor of extrapelvic DFS was grade 2 histology (hazard ratio [HR], 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08–0.91; P = .03) while receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy approached significance (HR 0.13; 95% CI, 0.02, 1.01; P = .0511). The 5-year extrapelvic DFS with and without adjuvant chemotherapy was 93% and 54%, respectively (log-rank, P = .02). Among G3EC (n = 61), the sole independent predictor of extrapelvic DFS was lymphovascular space involvement (HR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.16–5.97; P = .02). Adjuvant chemotherapy did not affect occult EPM in G3EC; the 5-year extrapelvic DFS for G3EC with and without adjuvant chemotherapy was 43% and 42%, respectively (log-rank, P = .91). Conclusions Chemotherapy improves extrapelvic DFS for stage IIIC G1/2EC but not stage IIIC G3EC. Future efforts should focus on prospectively assessing the impact of chemotherapy on DFS in G3EC and developing innovative phase I and II trials of novel systemic therapies for advanced G3EC. PMID:24434057

  10. ABA and PBS: The Dangers in Creating Artificial Dichotomies in Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Mary Jane; DelPizzo-Cheng, Eliza; LaRue, Robert H.; Sloman, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of controversy regarding the definition and independence of Positive Behavioral Supports (PBS) within the context of behavioral intervention. Specifically, behavior analysts have argued over whether PBS is subsumed within Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) or whether it can be considered a separate…

  11. Does a String-Particle Dualism Indicate the Uncertainty Principle's Philosophical Dichotomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Leod, David; Mc Leod, Roger

    2007-04-01

    String theory may allow resonances of neutrino-wave-strings to account for all experimentally detected phenomena. Particle theory logically, and physically, provides an alternate, contradictory dualism. Is it contradictory to symbolically and simultaneously state that λp = h, but, the product of position and momentum must be greater than, or equal to, the same (scaled) Plank's constant? Our previous electron and positron models require `membrane' vibrations of string-linked neutrinos, in closed loops, to behave like traveling waves, Tws, intermittently metamorphosing into alternately ascending and descending standing waves, Sws, between the nodes, which advance sequentially through 360 degrees. Accumulated time passages as Tws detail required ``loop currents'' supplying magnetic moments. Remaining time partitions into the Sws' alternately ascending and descending phases: the physical basis of the experimentally established 3D modes of these ``particles.'' Waves seem to indicate that point mass cannot be required to exist instantaneously at one point; Mott's and Sneddon's Wave Mechanics says that a constant, [mass], is present. String-like resonances may also account for homeopathy's efficacy, dark matter, and constellations' ``stick-figure projections,'' as indicated by some traditional cultures, all possibly involving neutrino strings. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.5

  12. Brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2010-09-14

    The evolution of mammalian brain size is directly linked with the evolution of the brain's unique structure and performance. Both maternal life history investment traits and basal metabolic rate (BMR) correlate with relative brain size, but current hypotheses regarding the details of these relationships are based largely on placental mammals. Using encephalization quotients, partial correlation analyses, and bivariate regressions relating brain size to maternal investment times and BMR, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of brain size evolution in marsupials and placentals, whose reproduction and metabolism differ extensively. Our results show that the misconception that marsupials are systematically smaller-brained than placentals is driven by the inclusion of one large-brained placental clade, Primates. Marsupial and placental brain size partial correlations differ in that marsupials lack a partial correlation of BMR with brain size. This contradicts hypotheses stating that the maintenance of relatively larger brains requires higher BMRs. We suggest that a positive BMR-brain size correlation is a placental trait related to the intimate physiological contact between mother and offspring during gestation. Marsupials instead achieve brain sizes comparable to placentals through extended lactation. Comparison with avian brain evolution suggests that placental brain size should be constrained due to placentals' relative precociality, as has been hypothesized for precocial bird hatchlings. We propose that placentals circumvent this constraint because of their focus on gestation, as opposed to the marsupial emphasis on lactation. Marsupials represent a less constrained condition, demonstrating that hypotheses regarding placental brain size evolution cannot be generalized to all mammals.

  13. Ossification heterochrony in the therian postcranial skeleton and the marsupial-placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali; Wroe, Stephen; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2008-08-01

    Postcranial ossification sequences in 24 therian mammals and three outgroup taxa were obtained using clear staining and computed tomography to test the hypothesis that the marsupial forelimb is developmentally accelerated, and to assess patterns of therian postcranial ossification. Sequence rank variation of individual bones, phylogenetic analysis, and algorithm-based heterochrony optimization using event pairs were employed. Phylogenetic analysis only recovers Marsupialia, Australidelphia, and Eulipotyphla. Little heterochrony is found within marsupials and placentals. However, heterochrony was observed between marsupials and placentals, relating to late ossification in hind limb long bones and early ossification of the anterior axial skeleton. Also, ossification rank position of marsupial forelimb and shoulder girdle elements is more conservative than that of placentals; in placentals the hind limb area is more conservative. The differing ossification patterns in marsupials can be explained with a combination of muscular strain and energy allocation constraints, both resulting from the requirement of active movement of the altricial marsupial neonates toward the teat. Peramelemorphs, which are comparatively passive at birth and include species with relatively derived forelimbs, differ little from other marsupials in ossification sequence. This suggests that ossification heterochrony in marsupials is not directly related to diversity constraints on the marsupial forelimb and shoulder girdle.

  14. Reassessing the relationship between brain size, life history, and metabolism at the marsupial/placental dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Weisbecker, Vera; Goswami, Anjali

    2014-09-01

    A vigorous discussion surrounds the question as to what enables some mammals--including primates and cetaceans--to evolve large brains. We recently published a study suggesting that the radiation of marsupial mammals is highly relevant to this question because of the unique reproductive and metabolic traits within this clade. In particular, we controversially suggested that marsupial brain sizes are not systematically smaller than those of placentals, and that elevated basal metabolic rates (BMR) are not linked to larger marsupial brains. As our dataset was found to contain some erroneous body size data, derived from a published source, we here use an updated and corrected dataset and employ standard as well as phylogenetically corrected analyses to re-assess and elaborate on our original conclusions. Our proposal that marsupials are not systematically smaller-brained than placentals remains supported, particularly when the unusually large-brained placental clade, Primates, is excluded. Use of the new dataset not only confirms that high metabolic rates are not associated with larger brain size in marsupials, but we additionally find some support for a striking negative correlation between BMR and brain size. The best supported correlates of large brain size remain the reproductive traits of weaning age and litter size. These results support our suggestion that mammalian brain sizes (including, by inference, those of monotremes) are predominantly constrained by the ability of females to fuel the growth of their offspring's large brains, rather than by the maintenance requirements of the adult brain.

  15. Predicting the 'where' and resolving the 'what' of a moving target: a dichotomy of abilities.

    PubMed

    Long, G M; Vogel, C A

    1998-01-01

    Anticipation timing (AT) and dynamic visual acuity (DVA) were assessed in a group of college students (n = 60) under a range of velocity and duration conditions. Subjects participated in two identical sessions 1 week apart. Consistently with previous work, DVA performance worsened as velocity increased and as target duration decreased; and there was a significant improvement from the first to the second session. In contrast, AT performance improved as velocity increased, whereas no improvement from the first to the second session was indicated; but increasing duration again benefited performance. Correlational analyses comparing DVA and AT did not reveal any systematic relationship between the two visual tasks. A follow-up study with different instructions on the AT task revealed the same pattern of AT performance, suggesting the generalizability of the obtained stimulus relationships for the AT task. The importance of the often-overlooked role of stimulus variables on the AT task is discussed.

  16. The Hirst-Carr Debate Revisited: Beyond the Theory-Practice Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misawa, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the benefits and burdens of the debate between Paul Hirst and Wilfred Carr over a set of issues to do with philosophy and education specifically and theory and practice more generally. Hirst and Carr, in different ways, emphasise the importance of Aristotelian practical philosophy as an antidote to the theory-oriented…

  17. 'Naturalistic vs reductionistic approaches to health-related practice: opposing dichotomy or symbiotic partnership?'.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, D

    2000-08-01

    Complementary therapies, within Health Service arenas, have traditionally been associated with 'naturalistic' approaches to health care provision rather than with 'reductionist' practices. Evidence does exist, however, that certain approaches to complementary therapies can exist comfortably within both camps. Subsequent debates within nursing literature, surrounding the place and validity of reductionist approaches to health care provision and their relationship with the 'counter-part' naturalistic (i.e. empowerment) approaches to health care, have existed for some time now. Naturalistic (inductive and interpretive) and reductionistic (deductive and fixed) classifications of health care provision have continued to be viewed, by many health care professionals, as apposite, divided and allopathic. This appears to be even more so recently where elements of reductionist health care have been portrayed in terms that serve to undervalue and undermine its contribution. This is whilst naturalistic approaches, in far more favourable terms, have gone on to be 'championed' by many health professions. This account sets out to investigate how this situation impacts upon the discipline of complementary therapies. It seeks to do so by defining the nature and purpose of these differing approaches - particularly within the boundaries of health promotion activities. It goes on to suggest that our current practices/viewpoints, related to these particular approaches, could be considered in themselves to be flawed, limiting and reductionist with a potential to unwittingly create a counterproductive practice ethic. As an alternative to this situation, it is suggested that by identifying the strengths and weaknesses of both stances it is possible to find common ground which marries together the more favourable aspects of these approaches. This can subsequently provide a clearer and more productive consensus for complementary therapies and other naturalistic-based practices to move forward.

  18. Reconstructing Multicultural Education through Personal Story: Transcending the Essentialist/Relativist Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Like so many other concepts in education, multiculturalism is a term that has lost its potency because of miseducative examples that serve to maintain Whiteness as the cultural norm. At first it offered great promise, but now as a "social science" quite often one is just exchanging one type of essentialism for another. The "packet" approach that…

  19. Causal reasoning versus associative learning: A useful dichotomy or a strawman battle in comparative psychology?

    PubMed

    Hanus, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The debate about whether or not one could/should ascribe reasoning abilities to animals has deep historical roots and seems very up-to-date in the light of the immense body of new empirical data originating from various species and research paradigms. Associative learning (AL) seems to be a ubiquitous low-level contender for any cognitive interpretation of animal behavior, mostly because of the assumed mechanistic simplicity and phylogenetic prevalence. However, the implicit assumption that AL is simple and therefore the most parsimonious mechanism to describe seemingly complex behavior can and must be questioned on various grounds. Using recent empirical findings with chimpanzees as an example, I argue that at times inferential reasoning might be the most likely candidate to account for performance differences between experimental and control conditions. Finally, a general conclusion drawn from the current debate(s) in the field of comparative psychology could be that a dichotomist battle of 2 conceptual camps-each of which is lacking a clear and homogeneous theoretical framework-is a scientific deadlock. (PsycINFO Database Record

  20. Formation of Iapetus' extreme albedo dichotomy by exogenically triggered thermal ice migration.

    PubMed

    Spencer, John R; Denk, Tilmann

    2010-01-22

    The extreme albedo asymmetry of Saturn's moon Iapetus, which is about 10 times as bright on its trailing hemisphere as on its leading hemisphere, has been an enigma for three centuries. Deposition of exogenic dark material on the leading side has been proposed as a cause, but this alone cannot explain the global shape, sharpness, and complexity of the transition between Iapetus' bright and dark terrain. We demonstrate that all these characteristics, and the asymmetry's large amplitude, can be plausibly explained by runaway global thermal migration of water ice, triggered by the deposition of dark material on the leading hemisphere. This mechanism is unique to Iapetus among the saturnian satellites because its slow rotation produces unusually high daytime temperatures and water ice sublimation rates for a given albedo.

  1. Characteristics of Child Molesters: Implications for the Fixated-Regressed Dichotomy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Leonore M. J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Attempted empirical validation of the fixated-regressed typology used in child sexual abuse literature. Analysis of 136 consecutive cases of convicted child molesters over a 2-year period revealed that the victim's and offender's family relatedness and the offender's prior non-sex-criminal record significantly predicted an offender's degree of…

  2. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) exhibits striking sexual dichotomy impacting on autistic and Alzheimer's pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Malishkevich, A; Amram, N; Hacohen-Kleiman, G; Magen, I; Giladi, E; Gozes, I

    2015-01-01

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is a most frequent autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-associated gene and the only protein significantly decreasing in the serum of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Is ADNP associated with ASD being more prevalent in boys and AD more prevalent in women? Our results revealed sex-related learning/memory differences in mice, reflecting hippocampal expression changes in ADNP and ADNP-controlled AD/ASD risk genes. Hippocampal ADNP transcript content was doubled in male vs female mice, with females showing equal expression to ADNP haploinsufficient (ADNP+/−) males and no significant genotype-associated reduction. Increased male ADNP expression was replicated in human postmortem hippocampal samples. The hippocampal transcript for apolipoprotein E (the major risk gene for AD) was doubled in female mice compared with males, and further doubled in the ADNP+/− females, contrasting a decrease in ADNP+/− males. Previously, overexpression of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) led to ASD-like phenotype in mice. Here, we identified binding sites on ADNP for eIF4E and co-immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, hippocampal eIF4E expression was specifically increased in young ADNP+/− male mice. Behaviorally, ADNP+/− male mice exhibited deficiencies in object recognition and social memory compared with ADNP+/+ mice, while ADNP+/− females were partially spared. Contrasting males, which preferred novel over familiar mice, ADNP+/+ females showed no preference to novel mice and ADNP+/− females did not prefer mice over object. ADNP expression, positioned as a master regulator of key ASD and AD risk genes, introduces a novel concept of hippocampal gene-regulated sexual dimorphism and an ADNP+/− animal model for translational psychiatry. PMID:25646590

  3. The Displaced vs. the Disadvantaged: A Necessary Dichotomy? Occasional Paper 1994-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Mangum, Stephen L.

    The current displaced worker initiative towers over the 30-year effort to bring the economically disadvantaged into the mainstream of the labor market. The Congressional Budget Office defines displacement as all workers 18 years of age and older who lose full-time employment due to slack work, job abolition, or plant closure. Major displaced…

  4. Relativistic beaming effects in BL Lacertae objects: Evidence for RBL/XBL dichotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odo, F. C.; Chukwude, A. E.; Ubachukwu, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we review the predictions of the popular relativistic beaming model for the unification of radio- and X-ray selected BL Lac (RBL and XBL) populations. Using results of recent analyses, we compare the detailed predictions against observational data and find that RBL-XBL orientation sequence is somewhat questionable. However, FSRQs and BL Lac populations can be unified via luminosity evolution with XBLs and RBLs representing different, but not continuous, stages in the evolution of FSRQs. RBLs, XBLs and FSRQs independently show significant anti-correlation (r ≥ 0.6) between core-to-lobe luminosity ratio and extended radio luminosity, suggestive that they are different representatives of a spectral sequence formed by similar underlying physical phenomenon. These results suggest that there are some fundamental differences between the two BL Lac populations, although orientation effect can also be playing a significant role.

  5. Ten years of hospitalisation for oral health-related conditions in Western Australia: an unjust dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was: (1) to examine the demographics of in-patient oral health care by Aboriginal status; (2) to identify the mix of oral conditions by Aboriginal status; and (3) to describe trends over a 10-year period, comparing Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal groups. Hospitalisation data were obtained from the Western Australian Morbidity Data System (HMDS). The principal diagnosis, as classified by the International Classification of Disease (ICD-10AM), was obtained for every episode for adult patients who were discharged from all hospitals in Western Australia (WA) for the financial years 1999-2000 to 2008-09. Results indicated that more than 130000 persons were admitted to hospitals in WA over 10 years, for oral health-related conditions, at a direct cost of more than $400million. Most of those admitted were younger than 30 years, and 2.8% of all those admitted were Aboriginal people. Aboriginal people were admitted at significantly higher rates, for a very different mix of conditions, they were mostly from younger age groups, were mostly from very remote and the most disadvantaged areas and were almost all uninsured, compared with non-Aboriginal people. Hospital admissions for oral health-related conditions, as well as the mix of conditions that drive these hospitalisations, are strongly divided across social, racial and geographic variables, and remain a burden to the health-care system.

  6. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  7. The dichotomy of memantine treatment for ischemic stroke: dose-dependent protective and detrimental effects

    PubMed Central

    Trotman, Melissa; Vermehren, Philipp; Gibson, Claire L; Fern, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Excitotoxicity is a major contributor to cell death during the acute phase of ischemic stroke but aggressive pharmacological targeting of excitotoxicity has failed clinically. Here we investigated whether pretreatment with low doses of memantine, within the range currently used and well tolerated for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, produce a protective effect in stroke. A coculture preparation exposed to modeled ischemia showed cell death associated with rapid glutamate rises and cytotoxic Ca2+ influx. Cell death was significantly enhanced in the presence of high memantine concentrations. However, low memantine concentrations significantly protected neurons and glia via excitotoxic cascade interruption. Mice were systemically administered a range of memantine doses (0.02, 0.2, 2, 10, and 20 mg/kg/day) starting 24 hours before 60 minutes reversible focal cerebral ischemia and continuing for a 48-hour recovery period. Low dose (0.2 mg/kg/day) memantine treatment significantly reduced lesion volume (by 30% to 50%) and improved behavioral outcomes in stroke lesions that had been separated into either small/striatal or large/striatocortical infarcts. However, higher doses of memantine (20 mg/kg/day) significantly increased injury. These results show that clinically established low doses of memantine should be considered for patients ‘at risk' of stroke, while higher doses are contraindicated. PMID:25407270

  8. Dining dichotomy: aquatic and terrestrial prey capture behavior in the Himalayan newt Tylototriton verrucosus

    PubMed Central

    De Vylder, Marie

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transitions between aquatic and terrestrial prey capture are challenging. Trophic shifts demand a high degree of behavioral flexibility to account for different physical circumstances between water and air to keep performance in both environments. The Himalayan newt, Tylototriton verrucosus, is mostly terrestrial but becomes aquatic during its short breeding period. Nonetheless, it was assumed that it lacks the capability of trophic behavioral flexibility, only captures prey on land by its tongue (lingual prehension) and does not feed in water. This theory was challenged from stomach content analyses in wild populations that found a variety of aquatic invertebrates in the newts' stomachs during their breeding season. Accordingly, we hypothesized that T. verrucosus actively changes its terrestrial prey capture mechanism to hunt for aquatic prey at least during its aquatic stage. In fact, the kinematic analyses showed that T. verrucosus uses lingual prehension to capture prey on land but changes to suction feeding for aquatic strikes. The statistical analyses revealed that terrestrial and aquatic strikes differ significantly in most kinematic parameters while behavioral variability does not differ between both behaviors. In turn, the movement patterns in suction feeding showed a higher degree of coordination between jaw and hyoid movements compared to the putative primary feeding mode, namely lingual prehension. We conclude that T. verrucosus, though relatively slow compared to trophic specialists, benefits from a high degree of behavioral flexibility that allows exploiting food sources efficiently from two very different habitats. PMID:27612510

  9. Mars Human Science Exploration and Resource Utilization: The Dichotomy Boundary Deuteronilus Mensae Exploration Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Dickson, J.; Milliken, R.; Scott, D.; Johnson, B.; Marchant, D.; Levy, J.; Kinch, K.; Hvidberg, C.; Forget, F.; Boucher, D.; Mikucki, J.; Fastook, J.; Klaus, K.

    2015-10-01

    Deuteronilus Mensae EZ combines: 1) Fundamental MEPAG scientific objectives; 2) Samples from the Noachian, Hesperian and Amazonian); 3) ISRU access to abundant water ice mapped by SHARAD; 4) Civil Engineering to reduce reliance on Earth supplies.

  10. Mars Crustal Dichotomy: Large Lowland Impact Basins may have Formed in Pre-Thinned Crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, H. V.

    2008-01-01

    Crater retention ages of large impact basins on Mars suggest most formed in a relatively short time, perhaps in less than 200 million years. Large basins in the lowlands have thinner central regions than similar size basins in the highlands. Large lowland impact basins, which we previously suggested might explain the low topography and thin crust of the northern part of Mars, may have formed in crust already thinned by yet earlier processes.

  11. The nature of words in human protolanguages: it's not a holophrastic-atomic meanings dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Dowman, Mike

    2008-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate as to whether the words in early presyntactic forms of human language had simple atomic meanings like modern words, or whether they were holophrastic. Simulations were conducted using an iterated learning model in which the agents were able to associate words with meanings, but in which they were not able to use syntactic rules to combine words into phrases or sentences. In some of these simulations words emerged that had neither holophrastic nor atomic meanings, demonstrating the possibility of protolanguages intermediate between these two extremes. Further simulations show how increases in cognitive or articulatory capacity would have produced changes in the type of words that was dominant in protolanguages. It is likely that at some point in time humans spoke a protolanguage in which most words had neither holophrastic nor atomic meanings.

  12. Stimulus-parity synaesthesia versus stimulus-dichotomy synaesthesia: Odd, even or something else?

    PubMed

    White, Rebekah C; Plassart, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In stimulus-parity synaesthesia, a range of stimuli-for example, letters, numbers, weekdays, months, and colours (the inducers)-elicit an automatic feeling of oddness or evenness (the concurrent). This phenomenon was first described by Théodore Flournoy in 1893, and has only recently been "rediscovered." Here, we describe an individual who experiences a comparable phenomenon, but uses the labels negative and positive rather than odd and even. Stimulus-parity synaesthesia may be broader than first supposed, and it is important that assessments are sensitive to this breadth.

  13. Moving beyond the Dichotomy: Meeting the Needs of Urban Students through Contextually-Relevant Education Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Gregory; Dell'Angelo, Tabitha; Spencer, Margaret Beale; Youngblood, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this article is to move beyond the more traditional question, "Does business have a role in public education?" A historical overview of education suggests that the involvement of the private sector is not a new phenomenon and is not likely to end in the near future. Here, the authors argue that a much more fruitful line of…

  14. Functional Age and Retirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaie, K. Warner

    Mandatory retirement because of chronological age is coming under increasing attack and, at least in the United States, it is likely that there may soon be legislative prohibitions against forcing individuals to retire because of age. As a consequence there is renewed interest in redefining retirement criteria in terms of a functional age concept…

  15. Choreographing Patterns and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Finch, Heather; Katz, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin with a description of an algebraic dance--the translation of composite linear growing patterns into choreographed movement--which was the last component of a research-based instructional unit that focused on fostering an understanding of linear functional rules through geometric growing patterns and…

  16. Split Brain Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.

    1978-01-01

    Summarizing recent research, this article defines the functions performed by the left and right sides of the human brain. Attention is given to the right side, or the nondominant side, of the brain and its potential in terms of perception of the environment, music, art, geometry, and the aesthetics. (JC)

  17. Empirical microeconomics action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.; Du, Xin; Tanputraman, Winson

    2015-06-01

    A statistical generalization of microeconomics has been made in Baaquie (2013), where the market price of every traded commodity, at each instant of time, is considered to be an independent random variable. The dynamics of commodity market prices is modeled by an action functional-and the focus of this paper is to empirically determine the action functionals for different commodities. The correlation functions of the model are defined using a Feynman path integral. The model is calibrated using the unequal time correlation of the market commodity prices as well as their cubic and quartic moments using a perturbation expansion. The consistency of the perturbation expansion is verified by a numerical evaluation of the path integral. Nine commodities drawn from the energy, metal and grain sectors are studied and their market behavior is described by the model to an accuracy of over 90% using only six parameters. The paper empirically establishes the existence of the action functional for commodity prices that was postulated to exist in Baaquie (2013).

  18. Iridescence: a functional perspective

    PubMed Central

    Doucet, Stéphanie M.; Meadows, Melissa G.

    2009-01-01

    In animals, iridescence is generated by the interaction of light with biological tissues that are nanostructured to produce thin films or diffraction gratings. Uniquely among animal visual signals, the study of iridescent coloration contributes to biological and physical sciences by enhancing our understanding of the evolution of communication strategies, and by providing insights into physical optics and inspiring biomimetic technologies useful to humans. Iridescent colours are found in a broad diversity of animal taxa ranging from diminutive marine copepods to terrestrial insects and birds. Iridescent coloration has received a surge of research interest of late, and studies have focused on both characterizing the nanostructures responsible for producing iridescence and identifying the behavioural functions of iridescent colours. In this paper, we begin with a brief description of colour production mechanisms in animals and provide a general overview of the taxonomic distribution of iridescent colours. We then highlight unique properties of iridescent signals and review the proposed functions of iridescent coloration, focusing, in particular, on the ways in which iridescent colours allow animals to communicate with conspecifics and avoid predators. We conclude with a brief overview of non-communicative functions of iridescence in animals. Despite the vast amount of recent work on animal iridescence, our review reveals that many proposed functions of iridescent coloration remain virtually unexplored, and this area is clearly ripe for future research. PMID:19336344

  19. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana, R.A.

    1988-05-24

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: R[sub 1]H wherein H represents a hydrogen atom; and R[sub 1] represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRh[P(R[sub 2])[sub 3

  20. Conjugate flow action functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-01

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  1. Functional Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durand, V. Mark; Moskowitz, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the first experimental demonstration was published showing that educators could improve significant challenging behavior in children with disabilities by replacing these behaviors with forms of communication that served the same purpose, a procedure called functional communication training (FCT). Since the publication of that…

  2. Functional Group Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter T., Jr.; Patterson, John M.

    1984-01-01

    Literature on analytical methods related to the functional groups of 17 chemical compounds is reviewed. These compounds include acids, acid azides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amino acids, aromatic hydrocarbons, carbodiimides, carbohydrates, ethers, nitro compounds, nitrosamines, organometallic compounds, peroxides, phenols, silicon compounds,…

  3. Conjugate flow action functionals

    SciTech Connect

    Venturi, Daniele

    2013-11-15

    We present a new general framework to construct an action functional for a non-potential field theory. The key idea relies on representing the governing equations relative to a diffeomorphic flow of curvilinear coordinates which is assumed to be functionally dependent on the solution field. Such flow, which will be called the conjugate flow, evolves in space and time similarly to a physical fluid flow of classical mechanics and it can be selected in order to symmetrize the Gâteaux derivative of the field equations with respect to suitable local bilinear forms. This is equivalent to requiring that the governing equations of the field theory can be derived from a principle of stationary action on a Lie group manifold. By using a general operator framework, we obtain the determining equations of such manifold and the corresponding conjugate flow action functional. In particular, we study scalar and vector field theories governed by second-order nonlinear partial differential equations. The identification of transformation groups leaving the conjugate flow action functional invariant could lead to the discovery of new conservation laws in fluid dynamics and other disciplines.

  4. Balance functions reexamined

    SciTech Connect

    Bialas, A.

    2011-02-15

    The idea of glue clusters, i.e., short-range correlations in the quark-gluon plasma close to freeze-out, is used to estimate the width of balance functions in momentum space. A good agreement is found with the recent measurements of the STAR Collaboration for central Au-Au collisions.

  5. Functionalized Silk Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-10

    A genetic combination of spider dragline silk sequence (Nephila clavipes) and the silaffin derived R5 peptide of the diatom (Cylindrotheca... sequences identified by phage display into silk, new materials which incorporate mineral binding functional of the peptide while retaining the useful...strong morphological and spatial control are attractive in electronics, biosensors, microfluidic devices, and DNA microarray technology. The novelty

  6. Functions of Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Southern Coll., Statesboro.

    Intended for teachers of industrial arts in teaching the functions of industry, this course of study was compiled as a result of the EPDA Institute in Industrial and Career Development at Georgia Southern College. Contents are: (1) Introduction, (2) Organization, (3) Research and Development, (4) Production, (5) Marketing, (6) Finance and Control,…

  7. Function Transformation without Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonneau, Francois; Arreola, Fara; Martinez, Alma Gabriela

    2006-01-01

    In studies of function transformation, participants initially are taught to match stimuli in the presence of a contextual cue, X; the stimuli to be matched bear some formal relation to each other, for example, a relation of opposition or difference. In a second phase, the participants are taught to match arbitrary stimuli (say, A and B) in the…

  8. HRD Function in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the human resource development (HRD) function in organizations. In "Comparing Quality Profiles of Training Organizations--A Multi-Level Approach" (Martin Mulder), analysis of over 1,300 training projects indicates that variation in quality is almost entirely explained by the…

  9. Functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P; Aziz, Q

    2005-01-01

    Functional abdominal pain or functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) is an uncommon functional gut disorder characterised by chronic or recurrent abdominal pain attributed to the gut but poorly related to gut function. It is associated with abnormal illness behaviour and patients show psychological morbidity that is often minimised or denied in an attempt to discover an organic cause for symptoms. Thus the conventional biomedical approach to the management of such patients is unhelpful and a person's symptom experience is more usefully investigated using a biopsychosocial evaluation, which necessarily entails a multidisciplinary system of healthcare provision. Currently the pathophysiology of the disorder is poorly understood but is most likely to involve a dysfunction of central pain mechanisms either in terms of attentional bias, for example, hypervigilance or a failure of central pain modulation/inhibition. Although modern neurophysiological investigation of patients is promising and may provide important insights into the pathophysiology of FAPS, current clinical management relies on an effective physician-patient relationship in which limits on clinical investigation are set and achievable treatment goals tailored to the patient's needs are pursued. PMID:15998821

  10. Enzyme design: Functional Frankensteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhlynets, Olga V.; Korendovych, Ivan V.

    2016-09-01

    An artificial esterase with no known natural structural analogues has been formed via the homo-heptameric self-assembly of a designed peptide. This esterase represents the first report of a functional catalytic triad rationally engineered into a de novo protein framework.

  11. Functional Extended Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Suk, Hye Won; Lee, Jang-Han; Moskowitz, D. S.; Lim, Jooseop

    2012-01-01

    We propose a functional version of extended redundancy analysis that examines directional relationships among several sets of multivariate variables. As in extended redundancy analysis, the proposed method posits that a weighed composite of each set of exogenous variables influences a set of endogenous variables. It further considers endogenous…

  12. THE PROTOSTELLAR MASS FUNCTION

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Christopher F.; Offner, Stella S. R. E-mail: soffner@cfa.harvard.ed

    2010-06-10

    The protostellar mass function (PMF) is the present-day mass function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined by the initial mass function weighted by the accretion time. The PMF thus depends on the accretion history of protostars and in principle provides a powerful tool for observationally distinguishing different protostellar accretion models. We consider three basic models here: the isothermal sphere model, the turbulent core model, and an approximate representation of the competitive accretion model. We also consider modified versions of these accretion models, in which the accretion rate tapers off linearly in time. Finally, we allow for an overall acceleration in the rate of star formation. At present, it is not possible to directly determine the PMF since protostellar masses are not currently measurable. We carry out an approximate comparison of predicted PMFs with observation by using the theory to infer the conditions in the ambient medium in several star-forming regions. Tapered and accelerating models generally agree better with observed star formation times than models without tapering or acceleration, but uncertainties in the accretion models and in the observations do not allow one to rule out any of the proposed models at present. The PMF is essential for the calculation of the protostellar luminosity function, however, and this enables stronger conclusions to be drawn.

  13. Pharmacological effects on sexual function.

    PubMed

    Carey, J Chris

    2006-12-01

    Many drugs may have effects on sexual function. Sexual function is complex and psychological and relationship issues are likely to have greater impacts on sexual function in women than drugs. Although it is important to understand the effects of drugs on sexual function, physicians should use caution in "medicalization" of sexual function in women [106].

  14. Graphical functions in parametric space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golz, Marcel; Panzer, Erik; Schnetz, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Graphical functions are positive functions on the punctured complex plane Csetminus {0,1} which arise in quantum field theory. We generalize a parametric integral representation for graphical functions due to Lam, Lebrun and Nakanishi, which implies the real analyticity of graphical functions. Moreover, we prove a formula that relates graphical functions of planar dual graphs.

  15. Comparisons of power transfer functions and flow transfer functions

    SciTech Connect

    Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

    1987-11-15

    Transfer functions may be used to calculate component feedbacks or temperature increments by convolution of the transfer function with the appropriate fractional change in system-quantity. Power-change transfer functions have been reported. The corresponding flow transfer functions for this case, and comparison with the power transfer functions, are reported here. Results of feedback simulation of ramped flow transients using flow transfer functions are also described.

  16. Pulmonary function in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  17. Engineering Living Functional Materials

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered ‘living functional materials’ and ‘living materials synthesis platforms’ that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater.13, 515–523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis–materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner. PMID

  18. Functional correlates of the lateral and medial entorhinal cortex: objects, path integration and local-global reference frames.

    PubMed

    Knierim, James J; Neunuebel, Joshua P; Deshmukh, Sachin S

    2014-02-05

    The hippocampus receives its major cortical input from the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC). It is commonly believed that the MEC provides spatial input to the hippocampus, whereas the LEC provides non-spatial input. We review new data which suggest that this simple dichotomy between 'where' versus 'what' needs revision. We propose a refinement of this model, which is more complex than the simple spatial-non-spatial dichotomy. MEC is proposed to be involved in path integration computations based on a global frame of reference, primarily using internally generated, self-motion cues and external input about environmental boundaries and scenes; it provides the hippocampus with a coordinate system that underlies the spatial context of an experience. LEC is proposed to process information about individual items and locations based on a local frame of reference, primarily using external sensory input; it provides the hippocampus with information about the content of an experience.

  19. Functional Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Hayes, Judith C.; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Moore, Alan D.

    1999-01-01

    The Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was established to address specific issues associated with optimizing the ability of crews to complete mission tasks deemed essential to entry, landing, and egress for spaceflights lasting up to 16 days. The main objectives of this functional performance evaluation were to investigate the physiological effects of long-duration spaceflight on skeletal muscle strength and endurance, as well as aerobic capacity and orthostatic function. Long-duration exposure to a microgravity environment may produce physiological alterations that affect crew ability to complete critical tasks such as extravehicular activity (EVA), intravehicular activity (IVA), and nominal or emergency egress. Ultimately, this information will be used to develop and verify countermeasures. The answers to three specific functional performance questions were sought: (1) What are the performance decrements resulting from missions of varying durations? (2) What are the physical requirements for successful entry, landing, and emergency egress from the Shuttle? and (3) What combination of preflight fitness training and in-flight countermeasures will minimize in-flight muscle performance decrements? To answer these questions, the Exercise Countermeasures Project looked at physiological changes associated with muscle degradation as well as orthostatic intolerance. A means of ensuring motor coordination was necessary to maintain proficiency in piloting skills, EVA, and IVA tasks. In addition, it was necessary to maintain musculoskeletal strength and function to meet the rigors associated with moderate altitude bailout and with nominal or emergency egress from the landed Orbiter. Eight investigations, referred to as Detailed Supplementary Objectives (DSOs) 475, 476, 477, 606, 608, 617, 618, and 624, were conducted to study muscle degradation and the effects of exercise on exercise capacity and orthostatic function (Table 3-1). This chapter is divided into

  20. Inverse Functions and their Derivatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapper, Ernst

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a method of interchanging the x-axis and y-axis for viewing the graph of the inverse function. Discussed are the inverse function and the usual proofs that are used for the function. (KR)

  1. Functional CAR models for large spatially correlated functional datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Zhu, Hongxiao; Baggerly, Keith A; Majewski, Tadeusz; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Morris, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    We develop a functional conditional autoregressive (CAR) model for spatially correlated data for which functions are collected on areal units of a lattice. Our model performs functional response regression while accounting for spatial correlations with potentially nonseparable and nonstationary covariance structure, in both the space and functional domains. We show theoretically that our construction leads to a CAR model at each functional location, with spatial covariance parameters varying and borrowing strength across the functional domain. Using basis transformation strategies, the nonseparable spatial-functional model is computationally scalable to enormous functional datasets, generalizable to different basis functions, and can be used on functions defined on higher dimensional domains such as images. Through simulation studies, we demonstrate that accounting for the spatial correlation in our modeling leads to improved functional regression performance. Applied to a high-throughput spatially correlated copy number dataset, the model identifies genetic markers not identified by comparable methods that ignore spatial correlations.

  2. [The functional mandibular prognathism].

    PubMed

    Le Gall, M; Philip, C; Bandon, D

    2009-01-01

    The functional mandibular prognathism belong to the class III malocclusion according to the terminology of Angle. Its origins are multiple, from the abnormality of eruption of deciduous or definitive incisors to lingual dysfunction (low position of the tongue). In spite of its weak prevalence, it must be prematurely detected and treated (mixed or temporary teeth) to prevent a functional anomaly to become a skeletal anomaly. It is important at this stage to proceed to the unique gesture which allows making the differential diagnosis: it is the De Névrezé procedure; it allows obtaining a more retrusive position of the mandible to minimize the dental relations. In case of true mandibular prognathism, the maneuver does not succeed; there is no modification of the dental reports. An interceptive therapeutic phase allows finding quickly a previous correct guide and to rehabilitate the growth of jaws.

  3. Functions of Intact Carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, George

    The traditional view that carotenoids are a class of plant pigments does not do justice to their versatility. This versatility will become clear from the overview of the biological roles of carotenoids, in animals and microorganisms as well as in plants, that is given in this Chapter. It has become customary and convenient to differentiate biological effects of carotenoids into functions, actions and associations [1]. `Functions' have been defined as effects or properties that are essential for the normal well-being of the organism. Biological responses that follow the administration of carotenoids in the diet or as supplements are considered as `actions'. When an effect is seen but a causal relationship to the carotenoid has not been demonstrated, this is described as an `association'. The line between these is often not clear, however.

  4. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  5. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, R.G.; Janowicz, A.H.; Periana-Pillai, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprises: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons with a metal complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/H/sub 2/ in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form a hydridoalkyl complex CpRhPMe/sub 3/RH; (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform CHX/sub 3/ at -60/sup 0/ to -17/sup 0/C to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) CpRhPMe/sub 3/RX; and (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex with halogen -60 to 25/sup 0/C to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  6. Functional magnetic microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Landel, Robert F. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Functional magnetic particles are formed by dissolving a mucopolysaccharide such as chitosan in acidified aqueous solution containing a mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. As the pH of the solution is raised magnetite is formed in situ in the solution by raising the pH. The dissolved chitosan is a polyelectrolyte and forms micelles surrounding the granules at pH of 8-9. The chitosan precipitates on the granules to form microspheres containing the magnetic granules. On addition of the microspheres to waste aqueous streams containing dissolved ions, the hydroxyl and amine functionality of the chitosan forms chelates binding heavy metal cations such as lead, copper, and mercury and the chelates in turn bind anions such as nitrate, fluoride, phosphate and borate.

  7. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    SciTech Connect

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-11-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each.

  8. Nuclear functions of prefoldin

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Zambrano, Gonzalo; Chávez, Sebastián

    2014-01-01

    Prefoldin is a cochaperone, present in all eukaryotes, that cooperates with the chaperonin CCT. It is known mainly for its functional relevance in the cytoplasmic folding of actin and tubulin monomers during cytoskeleton assembly. However, both canonical and prefoldin-like subunits of this heterohexameric complex have also been found in the nucleus, and are functionally connected with nuclear processes in yeast and metazoa. Plant prefoldin has also been detected in the nucleus and physically associated with a gene regulator. In this review, we summarize the information available on the involvement of prefoldin in nuclear phenomena, place special emphasis on gene transcription, and discuss the possibility of a global coordination between gene regulation and cytoplasmic dynamics mediated by prefoldin. PMID:25008233

  9. Executive functions in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rouw, Romke; van Driel, Joram; Knip, Koen; Richard Ridderinkhof, K

    2013-03-01

    In grapheme-color synesthesia, a number or letter can evoke two different and possibly conflicting (real and synesthetic) color sensations at the same time. In this study, we investigate the relationship between synesthesia and executive control functions. First, no general skill differences were obtained between synesthetes and non-synesthetes in classic executive control paradigms. Furthermore, classic executive control effects did not interact with synesthetic behavioral effects. Third, we found support for our hypothesis that inhibition of a synesthetic color takes effort and time. Finally, individual differences analyses showed no relationship between the two skills; performance on a 'normal' Stroop task does not predict performance on a synesthetic Stroop task. Across four studies, the current results consistently show no clear relationship between executive control functions and synesthetic behavioral effects. This raises the question of which mechanisms are at play in synesthetic 'management' during the presence of two conflicting (real and synesthetic) sensations.

  10. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; ...

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biologicalmore » multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.« less

  11. Mitochondrial Function in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Deutschman, Clifford S.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Schumacker, Paul T.; Gomez, Hernando; Gomez, Alonso; Murray, Patrick; Kellum, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are an essential part of the cellular infrastructure, being the primary site for high energy adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production through oxidative phosphorylation. Clearly, in severe systemic inflammatory states, like sepsis, cellular metabolism is usually altered and end organ dysfunction not only common but predictive of long term morbidity and mortality. Clearly, interest is mitochondrial function both as a target for intracellular injury and response to extrinsic stress have been a major focus of basic science and clinical research into the pathophysiology of acute illness. However, mitochondria have multiple metabolic and signaling functions that may be central in both the expression of sepsis and its ultimate outcome. In this review, the authors address five primary questions centered on the role of mitochondria in sepsis. This review should be used as both a summary source in placing mitochondrial physiology within the context of acute illness and as a focal point for addressing new research into diagnostic and treatment opportunities these insights provide. PMID:26871665

  12. Superconducting combined function magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H.; Fernow, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting accelerators and storage rings, presently under construction or in the design phase, are based on separate dipole and quadrupole magnets. It is here suggested that a hybrid lattice configuration consisting of dipoles and combined function gradient magnets would: (1) reduce the number of magnet units and their total cost; and (2) increase the filling factor and thus the energy at a given field. Coil cross sections are presented for the example of the Brookhaven Colliding Beam Accelerator. An asymmetric two-layer cable gradient magnet would have transfer functions of 10.42 G/A and 0.628 G cm/sup -1//A versus 15.77 G/A and 2.03 G cm/sup -1//A of the present separate dipoles and quadrupoles.

  13. Bioinspired Functional Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yongmei; Wang, Jingxia; Hou, Yongping; Bai, Hao; Hu, Michael Z.

    2014-11-25

    This special issue is focused on the nanoscale or micro-/nanoscale structures similar to the biological features in multilevels or hierarchy and so on. Research by mimicking biological systems has shown more impact on many applications due to the well-designed micro-/nanostructures inspired from the biological surfaces or interfaces; therefore, the materials may achieve the fascinating functionality. In conclusion, the bioinspired functional materials may be fabricated by developing novel technology or methods such as synthesis, self-assembly, and soft lithography at micro- or nanolevel or multilevels and, in addition, the multidisciplinary procedures of physical or chemical methods and nanotechnology to mimic the biological multiscale micro-/nanostructures onto one-/two-dimensional surface materials.

  14. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Schienbein, I.; Yu, J.-Y.; Keppel, Cynthia; Morfin, Jorge; Olness, F.; Owens, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2 analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x_Bj-dependent and Q^2-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x_Bj, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  15. Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein, J.Y. Yu, C. Keppel, J.G. Morfin, F. Olness, J.F. Owens

    2009-06-01

    We study nuclear effects of charged current deep inelastic neutrino-iron scattering in the framework of a {chi}{sup 2} analysis of parton distribution functions (PDFs). We extract a set of iron PDFs which are used to compute x{sub Bj}-dependent and Q{sup 2}-dependent nuclear correction factors for iron structure functions which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs. We compare our results with nuclear correction factors from neutrino-nucleus scattering models and correction factors for charged-lepton--iron scattering. We find that, except for very high x{sub Bj}, our correction factors differ in both shape and magnitude from the correction factors of the models and charged-lepton scattering.

  16. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed.

  17. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  18. Functional group analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.T. Jr.; Patterson, J.M.

    1986-04-01

    Analytical methods for functional group analysis are reviewed. Literature reviewed is from the period of December 1983 through November 1985 and presents methods for determining the following compounds: acids, acid halides, active hydrogen, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, amines, amino acids, anhydrides, aromatic hydrocarbons, azo compounds, carbohydrates, chloramines, esters, ethers, halogen compounds, hydrazines, isothiocyanates, nitro compounds, nitroso compounds, organometallic compounds, oxiranes, peroxides, phenols, phosphorus compounds, quinones, silicon compounds, sulfates, sulfonyl chlorides, thioamides, thiols, and thiosemicarbazones. 150 references.

  19. Functional consequences of hemispherectomy.

    PubMed

    van Empelen, R; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; Buskens, E; Helders, P J M; van Nieuwenhuizen, O

    2004-09-01

    Using the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) (WHO, 2001), impairments, activities and social participation are reported in 12 children (mean age at surgery 5.9 years) who were investigated before and three times over a 2-year period after hemispherectomy. Impairments were assessed (i) in terms of seizure frequency (Engel classification) and seizure severity (HASS) and (ii) with respect to muscle strength (MRC), range of motion (JAM score) and muscle tone (modified Ashworth scale). Activities were assessed in terms of gross motor functioning (GMFM) and self-care, mobility and social function (PEDI). Participation was assessed in terms of epilepsy-related restrictions and quantified by means of the Hague Restrictions in Childhood Epilepsy Scale (HARCES). Nine out of 12 children could be classified as free of seizures (Engel class I), and in the remaining three seizure frequency was Engel class III. HASS scores showed maximum improvement in 10 out of 12 children and near-maximum improvement in the two remaining children. Muscle strength and muscle tone on the side of the body contralateral to the hemispherectomy, which were already decreased preoperatively, decreased even further in the first 6 months after surgery, but returned to the presurgical baseline thereafter, except for the distal part of the arm. Range of motion was abnormal prior to operation and remained so after operation. Mean GMFM increase was 20% after 2 years (95% confidence interval 10-33); all five dimensions improved statistically significantly (P < 0.05). Mean PEDI increase was more than 20 scale points (95% confidence interval 10-35); again, all domains improved significantly (P < 0.05). In nearly all children, HARCES scores had normalized 2 years after surgery. In conclusion, decrease of seizure frequency and severity widens the scope of motor and social functioning, which overrides the effects of remaining motor impairments.

  20. Executive Functioning in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Orellana, Gricel; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The executive function (EF) is a set of abilities, which allows us to invoke voluntary control of our behavioral responses. These functions enable human beings to develop and carry out plans, make up analogies, obey social rules, solve problems, adapt to unexpected circumstances, do many tasks simultaneously, and locate episodes in time and place. EF includes divided attention and sustained attention, working memory (WM), set-shifting, flexibility, planning, and the regulation of goal directed behavior and can be defined as a brain function underlying the human faculty to act or think not only in reaction to external events but also in relation with internal goals and states. EF is mostly associated with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Besides EF, PFC is involved in self-regulation of behavior, i.e., the ability to regulate behavior according to internal goals and constraints, particularly in less structured situations. Self-regulation of behavior is subtended by ventral medial/orbital PFC. Impairment of EF is one of the most commonly observed deficits in schizophrenia through the various disease stages. Impairment in tasks measuring conceptualization, planning, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency, ability to solve complex problems, and WM occur in schizophrenia. Disorders detected by executive tests are consistent with evidence from functional neuroimaging, which have shown PFC dysfunction in patients while performing these kinds of tasks. Schizophrenics also exhibit deficit in odor identifying, decision-making, and self-regulation of behavior suggesting dysfunction of the orbital PFC. However, impairment in executive tests is explained by dysfunction of prefronto-striato-thalamic, prefronto-parietal, and prefronto-temporal neural networks mainly. Disorders in EFs may be considered central facts with respect to schizophrenia and it has been suggested that negative symptoms may be explained by that executive dysfunction. PMID:23805107