Science.gov

Sample records for medium energy x-rays

  1. Relative response of the alanine dosimeter to medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Anton, M; Büermann, L

    2015-08-07

    The response of the alanine dosimeter to kilovoltage x-rays with respect to the dose to water was measured, relative to the response to Co-60 radiation.Two series of x-ray qualities were investigated, one ranging from 30 kV to 100 kV tube voltage (TW series), the other one ranging from 70 kV to 280 kV (TH series). Due to the use of the water calorimeter as a primary standard, the uncertainty of the delivered dose is significantly lower than for other published data. The alanine response was measured as described in a previous publication (Anton et al 2013 Phys. Med. Biol. 58 3259-82). The uncertainty component due to the alanine measurement and analysis is ⩽0.4%, the major part of the combined uncertainty of the relative response originates from the uncertainty of the delivered dose. The relative uncertainties of the relative response vary from ⩽2% for the TW series to ⩽1.1% for the TH series.Different from the behaviour of the alanine dosimeter for megavoltage x-rays or electrons, the relative response drops significantly from unity for Co-60 radiation to less than 64% for the TW quality with a tube voltage of 30 kV. In order to reproduce this behaviour through Monte Carlo simulations, not only the ratio of the absorbed dose to alanine to the absorbed dose to water has to be known, but also the intrinsic efficiency, i.e. the dependence of the number of free radicals generated per unit of absorbed dose on the photon energy. This quantity is not yet accessible for the TW series.For a possible use of the alanine dosimeter for kilovoltage x-rays, for example in electronic brachytherapy, users should rely on the measured data for the relative response which have become available with this publication.

  2. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  3. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  4. Development of observational and instrumental techniques in hard X-ray and medium energy gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M.

    1985-01-01

    The technical activities, scientific results, related space hardware projects and personnel of the high energy astrophysics program are reported. The development of observational and instrumental techniques in hard X-ray (0.001 to 100 keV) and medium energy gamma-ray (0.1 to 10 MeV) astronomy are examined. Many of these techniques were developed explicitly for use on high altitude balloons where most of the scientific results were obtained. The extensive observational activity using balloons are tabulated. Virtually every research activity will eventually result in a major space hardware development effort.

  5. Comparison of photocurrent enhancement and upset enhancement in CMOS devices in a medium-energy x-ray environment

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.; Beezhold, W.; Browning, J.S.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Counts, N.E. ); Knott, D.P. ); Freshman, C.L.; Conners, M.P. )

    1990-08-01

    Radiation-induced upset levels in SA3001 static random access memories (SRAM's) and SA 3246 clock integrated circuits (IC's) have been measured in a medium-energy flash X-ray environment (average photon energy {approximately}100 keV) where dose-enhancing effects are very important. By comparing device responses using a non-dose-enhancing ceramic package lid and a dose-enhancing Kovar/gold lid, dose-enhancement factors for photocurrent and upset were generated. The observed upset enhancement factors of 3.0 {plus minus} 0.5 (SRAM) and 2.2 {plus minus} 0.2 (clock IC) are in excellent agreement with measurements of photocurrent enhancement factors (2.5 {plus minus} 0.5) in diodes processed with the same diffusions as the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) IC's irradiated in a steady-state X-ray environment. These results indicate that upset is dominated by the radiation-induced transient supply current in these IC's, and that steady-state diode photocurrent measurements are a good predictor of both photocurrent and upset enhancement for IC's made with this technology.

  6. Correction factors for the NMi free-air ionization chamber for medium-energy x-rays calculated with the Monte Carlo method.

    PubMed

    Grimbergen, T W; van Dijk, E; de Vries, W

    1998-11-01

    A new method is described for the determination of x-ray quality dependent correction factors for free-air ionization chambers. The method is based on weighting correction factors for mono-energetic photons, which are calculated using the Monte Carlo method, with measured air kerma spectra. With this method, correction factors for electron loss, scatter inside the chamber and transmission through the diaphragm and front wall have been calculated for the NMi free-air chamber for medium-energy x-rays for a wide range of x-ray qualities in use at NMi. The newly obtained correction factors were compared with the values in use at present, which are based on interpolation of experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities. For x-ray qualities which are similar to this specific set, the agreement between the correction factors determined with the new method and those based on the experimental data is better than 0.1%, except for heavily filtered x-rays generated at 250 kV. For x-ray qualities dissimilar to the specific set, differences up to 0.4% exist, which can be explained by uncertainties in the interpolation procedure of the experimental data. Since the new method does not depend on experimental data for a specific set of x-ray qualities, the new method allows for a more flexible use of the free-air chamber as a primary standard for air kerma for any x-ray quality in the medium-energy x-ray range.

  7. Comparison of the NIST and BIPM Standards for Air Kerma in Medium-Energy X-Rays.

    PubMed

    Burns, D T; O'Brien, M

    2006-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the air-kerma standards for medium-energy x-rays of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM). The comparison involved a series of measurements at the BIPM and the NIST using the air-kerma standards and three NIST reference-class transfer ionization chamber standards. Reference beam qualities in the range from 100 kV to 250 kV were used. The results show the standards to be in reasonable agreement within the combined standard uncertainty of the comparison of 0.37 %, although a significant trend with radiation quality is observed and the possible sources discussed.

  8. Determination of the energy dependence of the BC-408 plastic scintillation detector in medium energy x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, H.; Çubukçu, Ş.; Uyar, E.; Engin, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The energy dependence of the response of BC-408 plastic scintillator (PS), an approximately water-equivalent material, has been investigated by employing standardized x-ray beams. IEC RQA and ISO N series x-ray beam qualities, in the range of 40-100 kVp, were calibrated using a PTW-type ionization chamber. The energy response of a thick BC-408 PS detector was measured using the multichannel pulse height analysis method. The response of BC-408 PS increased gradually with increasing energy in the energy range of 40-80 kVp and then showed a flat behavior at about 80 to 120 kVp. This might be due to the self-attenuation of scintillation light by the scintillator itself and may also be partly due to the ionization quenching, leading to a reduction in the intensity of the light output from the scintillator. The results indicated that the sensitivity drop in BC-408 PS material at lower photon energies may be overcome by adding some high-Z elements to its polyvinyltoluene (PVT) base. The material modification may compensate for the drop in the response at lower photon energies. Thus plastic scintillation dosimetry is potentially suitable for applications in diagnostic radiology.

  9. Variations in semiconductor device response in a medium-energy x-ray dose-enhancing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Beezhold, W.; Knott, D.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Draper, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed to investigate the response of semiconductor devices to medium-energy x-ray irradiation under conditions in which dose-enhancement effects are very important. The response of MOS capacitors to ''dose-enhanced'' radiation can depend on incident radiation spectra, temperature of the device, and oxide electric field. Indeed, the amount of enhanced response can vary by as much as a factor of 10 as these conditions are changed. In such cases, it appears that changes in electron-hole recombination and hole trapping as a function of radiation energy are very important to the interpretation of the results. Therefore, coupled electron/photon transport codes such as the Monte Carlo integrated TIGER series (ITS), which consider only changes in the dose deposited in the device active region, are inadequate, at least in some cases, for predictions of dose-enhancement effects in semiconductor devices. In addition, the response of semiconductor diodes to dose-enhanced radiation appears to be qualitatively different from that of capacitors, and differs markedly in value from code predictions. Hence, an understanding of the modification of incident radiation by its interactions with dose-enhancing materials alone is insufficient to predict the response of semiconductor devices. The dependence of the device response on radiation spectra, electron-hole recombination, and hole transport and trapping, must also be included to assure good simulation fidelity of tests for devices to be used in dose-enhancing environments.

  10. Variations in semiconductor device response in a medium-energy x-ray dose-enhancing environment

    SciTech Connect

    Beutler, D.E.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Beezhold, W.; Knott, D.; Lorence, L.J. Jr.; Draper, B.L.

    1987-12-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments to investigate the response of semiconductor devices to medium-energy x-ray irradiation under conditions in which dose-enhancement effects are very important. They find that the response of MOS capacitors to the same ''dose-enhanced'' radiation depends not only on the increased dose, but also on the incident radiation spectra, device temperature and processing, and/or oxide thickness and electric field. In many cases, these dependencies cannot be explained simply in terms of existing knowledge of basic mechanisms of radiation effects on MOS devices (for example, electron-hole recombination and hole transport and trapping), or by present Monte Carlo electron/photon transport codes such as the Integrated Tiger Series (ITS). In addition, the response of semiconductor diodes to the ''dose-enhanced'' radiation appears to be qualitatively different from that of MOS capacitors, and differs markedly in value from the ITS code predictions. These results demonstrate that an improved understanding of semiconductor device response to ''enhanced'' radiation is needed to assure simulation fidelity of tests of devices to be used in dose-enhancing environments.

  11. The soft and medium-energy X-ray variability of NGC 5548: a reanalysis of EXOSAT observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; Bao, G.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Treves, A.

    1996-02-01

    The authors carried out cross-correlation function (CCF) and power spectrum re-analysis of the X-ray light curves of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 obtained with EXOSAT. The CCF peaks are in all cases consistent with the absence of delays between X-ray variations at different energies. This is unlike the results found by several authors based on the same data. A detailed search for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs), using a new technique for the detection of QPOs even in the presence of source noise variability, did not find significant peaks above the 95% confidence detection threshold. The authors discuss and compare their results with those of Papadakis and Lawrence (1993).

  12. ART-XC: A Medium-energy X-ray Telescope System for the Spectrum-R-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arefiev, V.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.; Thachenko, A.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Semena, N.; Buntov,M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Gubarev, M.; ODell, S.; Ramsey, B.; Romaine, S.; Swartz. D/; Weisskopf, M.; Hasinger, G.; Predehl, P.; Grigorovich, S.; Litvin, D.; Meidinger, N.; Strueder, L. W.

    2008-01-01

    The ART-XC instrument is an X-ray grazing-incidence telescope system in an ABRIXAS-type optical configuration optimized for the survey observational mode of the Spectrum-RG astrophysical mission which is scheduled to be launched in 2011. ART-XC has two units, each equipped with four identical X-ray multi-shell mirror modules. The optical axes of the individual mirror modules are not parallel but are separated by several degrees to permit the four modules to share a single CCD focal plane detector, 1/4 of the area each. The 450-micron-thick pnCCD (similar to the adjacent eROSITA telescope detector) will allow detection of X-ray photons up to 15 keV. The field of view of the individual mirror module is about 18 x 18 arcminutes(exp 2) and the sensitivity of the ART-XC system for 4 years of survey will be better than 10(exp -12) erg s(exp -1) cm(exp -2) over the 4-12 keV energy band. This will allow the ART-XC instrument to discover several thousand new AGNs.

  13. ART-XC: a medium-energy x-ray telescope system for the Spectrum-R-Gamma mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, V.; Pavlinsky, M.; Lapshov, I.; Tkachenko, A.; Sazonov, S.; Revnivtsev, M.; Semena, N.; Buntov, M.; Vikhlinin, A.; Gubarev, M.; O'Dell, S.; Ramsey, B.; Romaine, S.; Swartz, D.; Weisskopf, M.; Hasinger, G.; Predehl, P.; Grigorovich, S.; Litvin, D.; Meidinger, N.; Strüder, L. W.

    2008-07-01

    The ART-XC instrument is an X-ray grazing-incidence telescope system in an ABRIXAS-type optical configuration optimized for the survey observational mode of the Spectrum-RG astrophysical mission which is scheduled to be launched in 2011. ART-XC has two units, each equipped with four identical X-ray multi-shell mirror modules. The optical axes of the individual mirror modules are not parallel but are separated by several degrees to permit the four modules to share a single CCD focal plane detector, 1/4 of the area each. The 450-micron-thick pnCCD (similar to the adjacent eROSITA telescope detector) will allow the detection of X-ray photons up to 15 keV. The field of view of the individual mirror module is about 18×18 arcminutes2 and the sensitivity of the ART-XC system for 4 years of survey will be better than 10-12 erg s-1 cm-2 over the 4-12 keV energy band. This will allow the ART-XC instrument to discover several thousands new AGNs.

  14. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  15. Observing soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium with X-ray calorimeter on a sounding rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, J.; Edwards, B.; Juda, M.; Mccammon, D.; Skinner, M.; Kelley, R.; Moseley, H.; Schoelkopf, R.; Szymkowiak, A.

    1990-01-01

    For an X-ray calorimeter working at 0.1 K, the energy resolution ideally can be as good as one eV for a practical detector. A detector with a resolution of 17 eV FWHM at 6 keV has been constructed. It is expected that this can be improved by a factor of two or more. With X-ray calorimeters flown on a sounding rocket, it should be possible to observe soft X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium over the energy range 0.07 to 1 keV. Here, a preliminary design for an X-ray calorimeter rocket experiment and the spectrum which might be observed from an equilibrium plasma are presented. For later X-ray calorimeter sounding rocket experiments, it is planned to add an aluminum foil mirror with collecting area of about 400 sq cm to observe line features from bright supernova remnants.

  16. The Soft and Medium-Energy X-Ray Variability of NGC 5548: A Reanalysis of EXOSAT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliaferri, G.; Bao, G.; Israel, G. L.; Stella, L.; Treves, A.

    1996-07-01

    We present a detailed cross-correlation (CCF) and power spectrum reanalysis of the X-ray light curves of the bright Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 obtained with EXOSAT. The 0.05-2 keV and 1-4 keV light curves are cross-correlated with the 1-9 keV and 4-9 keV light curves, respectively. We discuss how spurious time lags can be introduced by systematic effects related to detector swapping as well as the switching on and off of the instruments. We also find strong evidence that one of the ME detectors was not working normally during the second part of the 1986 March observation. When these effects are taken into account, the CCF peaks are in all cases consistent with the absence of delays between X-ray variations at different energies. This is unlike the results found by several authors based on the same data. The power spectra of the 1-9 keV light curves are calculated, and a detailed search for quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) is carried out on these spectra by using a new technique for the detection of periodic (or quasi-periodic) signals even in the presence of source noise variability. No significant peaks are found above the 95% confidence detection threshold, except during the second part of the 1986 March observation, most probably as a consequence of the ME detector malfunctioning. We discuss and compare our results with those published by Papadakis & Lawrence in 1993.

  17. The LNE-LNHB water calorimeter for primary measurement of absorbed dose at low depth in water: application to medium-energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Rapp, B; Perichon, N; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Water calorimeters are used to establish absorbed dose standards in several national metrology laboratories involved in ionizing radiation dosimetry. These calorimeters have been first used in high-energy photons of (60)Co or accelerator beams, where the depth of measurement in water is large (5 or 10 cm). The LNE-LNHB laboratory has developed a specific calorimeter which makes measurements at low depth in water (down to 0.5 cm) easier, in order to fulfil the reference conditions required by the international dosimetry protocols for medium-energy x-rays. This new calorimeter was first used to measure the absorbed dose rate in water at a depth of 2 cm for six medium-energy x-ray reference beams with a tube potential from 80 to 300 kV. The relative combined standard uncertainty obtained on the absorbed dose rate to water is lower than 0.8%. An overview of the design of the calorimeter is given, followed by a detailed description of the calculation of the correction factors and the calorimetric measurements.

  18. A graphite calorimeter for absolute measurements of absorbed dose to water: application in medium-energy x-ray filtered beams.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M; Pimpinella, M; Quini, M; D'Arienzo, M; Astefanoaei, I; Loreti, S; Guerra, A S

    2016-02-21

    The Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI) has designed and built a graphite calorimeter that, in a water phantom, has allowed the determination of the absorbed dose to water in medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 180 to 250 kV. The new standard is a miniaturized three-bodies calorimeter, with a disc-shaped core of 21 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness weighing 1.134 g, sealed in a PMMA waterproof envelope with air-evacuated gaps. The measured absorbed dose to graphite is converted into absorbed dose to water by means of an energy-dependent conversion factor obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Heat-transfer correction factors were determined by FEM calculations. At a source-to-detector distance of 100 cm, a depth in water of 2 g cm(-2), and at a dose rate of about 0.15 Gy min(-1), results of calorimetric measurements of absorbed dose to water, D(w), were compared to experimental determinations, D wK, obtained via an ionization chamber calibrated in terms of air kerma, according to established dosimetry protocols. The combined standard uncertainty of D(w) and D(wK) were estimated as 1.9% and 1.7%, respectively. The two absorbed dose to water determinations were in agreement within 1%, well below the stated measurement uncertainties. Advancements are in progress to extend the measurement capability of the new in-water-phantom graphite calorimeter to other filtered medium-energy x-ray qualities and to reduce the D(w) uncertainty to around 1%. The new calorimeter represents the first implementation of in-water-phantom graphite calorimetry in the kilovoltage range and, allowing independent determinations of D(w), it will contribute to establish a robust system of absorbed dose to water primary standards for medium-energy x-ray beams.

  19. Calorimetric determination of the absorbed dose to water for medium-energy x-rays with generating voltages from 70 to 280 kV.

    PubMed

    Krauss, A; Büermann, L; Kramer, H-M; Selbach, H-J

    2012-10-07

    For medium energy x-rays produced with tube voltages from 70 to 280 kV, the absorbed dose to water, D(w), has been determined by means of water calorimetry with relative standard uncertainties ranging from 0.45% to 0.98% at 280 and 70 kV. The results were confirmed by Monte Carlo calculations, in which the ratios of D(w) at 5 cm depth in a reference water phantom to the air kerma free in air, K(a), at the same point in space were compared to the corresponding ratios determined experimentally. The general agreement between measurement and calculation was better than 1%. These results confirm earlier investigations in which the absorbed dose to graphite was determined by means of a graphite extrapolation chamber. For the Monte Carlo calculations, an attempt was made to present a complete uncertainty budget, taking into account type B contributions also.

  20. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  1. Low Energy X-Ray Diagnostics - 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAl RJRAL AU M ’IAN[I)ARDS I ,* A Focusing, Filtering, and Scattering of V. Rehn Soft X-Rays by Mirrors 162 Synthetic... Mirrors Synthetic Multilayers as Bragg Diffractors for J.H. Underwood and T.W. Barbee, Jr. 170 X-Rays and Extreme Ultraviolet: Calculations of...Stradling, T.W. Barbee, Interference Mirrors to Investigate Energy Jr., B.L. Henke, E.M. Campbell Transport in Laser Plasma Applications and W.C. Mead

  2. Energy Scales in X-Ray Microcalorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tillotson, W. A.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Cottam, J.; Figueroa, E.; Kelley, R. L.; Porter, F. S.; Stahle, C. K.

    2003-01-01

    Microcalorimeter pulse shape characteristics, such as pulse height, decay time and rise time, are dependent on the detector temperature and bias as well as the photon energy and flux. We examine the nature of the temperature dependency by illuminating the ASTRO-E2 X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) microcalorimeter array with X-rays generated by electron impact on a range of foil targets. The resulting pulses are collected for a range of detector temperatures. We observe and model the temperature dependence of the pulse shape characteristics by fitting the data with non-linear pulse models. Our aim is to determine a robust method for correcting the energy scale obtained in ground calibration for slight differences in the operating conditions while in orbit.

  3. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  4. Simultaneous profile measurements of medium- and high-Z impurity concentrations (nZ/ne) , Te , ΔZeff and n e2Zeff in MCF plasmas from multi-energy x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, Jacob; Delgado-Aparicio, Luis; Pablant, Novimir; Rutman, Max; Hill, Ken; Bitter, Manfred; Reinke, Matthew; Rice, John

    2016-10-01

    Novel energy resolved measurements of x-ray emissions were used to characterize impurity concentrations, electron temperature, and ΔZeff in a variety of Alcator C-Mod plasmas. A PILATUS2 detector programmed in a multi-energy configuration and used in a pinhole camera geometry provides the capability to function similar to a pulse height analyzer (PHA) but with full plasma profile views and sufficient spatial ( 1 cm), energy ( .5 keV), and temporal ( 10 ms) resolution. Each of the PILATUS2's 100k (487x195) pixels can be set to an energy threshold, which sorts x-ray emissions into energy bins by counting only photons with energy above the threshold energy. By setting every 13th pixel row to the same energy bin and the 12 interjacent pixel rows to different energy bins on the PILATUS2 detector gives 38 poloidal sightlines (487 rows/13 energy bins). The number of photons detected in each energy bin depends on (nZ/ne) , Te, and ne2Zeff, so that these plasma parameters can be extracted by fitting the data to an emission model, which includes free-free, free-bound, and bound-bound emissions from a De/H background plasma with perturbing medium and high-Z impurities, like intrinsic Mo, Fe, and Cu or injected W. Also, radial electron temperature profiles were measured during LHRF and ICRF and compared to Thomson scattering and ECE.

  5. ISMabs: A COMPREHENSIVE X-RAY ABSORPTION MODEL FOR THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Gatuzz, E.; Mendoza, C.; García, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Gorczyca, T. W. E-mail: claudio@ivic.gob.ve E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov

    2015-02-10

    We present an X-ray absorption model for the interstellar medium, to be referred to as ISMabs, that takes into account both neutral and ionized species of cosmically abundant elements, and includes the most accurate atomic data available. Using high-resolution spectra from eight X-ray binaries obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer, we proceed to benchmark the atomic data in the model particularly in the neon K-edge region. Compared with previous photoabsorption models, which solely rely on neutral species, the inclusion of ions leads to improved spectral fits. Fit parameters comprise the column densities of abundant contributors that allow direct estimates of the ionization states. ISMabs is provided in the appropriate format to be implemented in widely used X-ray spectral fitting packages such as XSPEC, ISIS, and SHERPA.

  6. ISMabs: A Comprehensive X-Ray Absorption Model for the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, E.; García, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Mendoza, C.; Gorczyca, T. W.

    2015-02-01

    We present an X-ray absorption model for the interstellar medium, to be referred to as ISMabs, that takes into account both neutral and ionized species of cosmically abundant elements, and includes the most accurate atomic data available. Using high-resolution spectra from eight X-ray binaries obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer, we proceed to benchmark the atomic data in the model particularly in the neon K-edge region. Compared with previous photoabsorption models, which solely rely on neutral species, the inclusion of ions leads to improved spectral fits. Fit parameters comprise the column densities of abundant contributors that allow direct estimates of the ionization states. ISMabs is provided in the appropriate format to be implemented in widely used X-ray spectral fitting packages such as XSPEC, ISIS, and SHERPA.

  7. Oxygen, Neon, and Iron X-Ray Absorption in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatuzz, Efrain; Garcia, Javier; Kallman, Timothy R.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    We present a detailed study of X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium by analyzing the X-ray spectra of 24 galactic sources obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods. By modeling the continuum with a simple broken power-law and by implementing the new ISMabs X-ray absorption model, we have estimated the total H, O, Ne, and Fe column densities towards the observed sources. Results. We have determined the absorbing material distribution as a function of source distance and galactic latitude longitude. Conclusions. Direct estimates of the fractions of neutrally, singly, and doubly ionized species of O, Ne, and Fe reveal the dominance of the cold component, thus indicating an overall low degree of ionization. Our results are expected to be sensitive to the model used to describe the continuum in all sources.

  8. Oxygen, neon, and iron X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, Efraín; García, Javier A.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a detailed study of X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium by analyzing the X-ray spectra of 24 galactic sources obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods: By modeling the continuum with a simple broken power-law and by implementing the new ISMabs X-ray absorption model, we have estimated the total H, O, Ne, and Fe column densities towards the observed sources. Results: We have determined the absorbing material distribution as a function of source distance and galactic latitude-longitude. Conclusions: Direct estimates of the fractions of neutrally, singly, and doubly ionized species of O, Ne, and Fe reveal the dominance of the cold component, thus indicating an overall low degree of ionization. Our results are expected to be sensitive to the model used to describe the continuum in all sources.

  9. Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Pierce, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Polarimeter for Low Energy X-ray Astrophysical Sources (PLEXAS) is an astrophysics mission concept for measuring the polarization of X-ray sources at low energies below the C-K band (less than 277 eV). PLEXAS uses the concept of variations in the reflectivity of a multilayered X-ray telescope as a function of the orientation of an X-rays polarization vector with respect to the reflecting surface of the optic. By selecting an appropriate multilayer, and rotating the X-ray telescope while pointing to a source, there will be a modulation in the source intensity, as measured at the focus of the telescope, which is proportional to the degree of polarization in the source.

  10. Dual Energy X-Ray Densitometry Apparatus and Method Using Single X-Ray Pulse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-13

    absorptiometry ( DEXA ) projection scanning units have been developed by Hologic Inc. (Waltham, MA) and Lunar Corp. (Madison, Wl). Using dual-energy...of the techniques that have been used, quantitative computed tomography (QCT) x-ray scanning techniques produce three- PATENT NC 79,057...determined by most DEXA instruments, and this quantity is usually referred to as the bone mineral density (BMD). The primary goal for a DEXA instrument

  11. Distinctive features of photoionized plasma from short x-ray-pulse interaction with gaseous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bychenkov, V.Yu.; Romanov, D.V.; Rozmus, W.; Capjack, C.E.; Fedosejevs, R.

    2006-01-15

    The study of a photoionized plasma created through the interaction of a short linearly polarized x-ray pulse with a gaseous medium is presented in the context of the future design of experiments involving femtosecond free-electron laser pulses. The dispersion properties and instabilities of such x-ray-produced plasma are studied. It is shown that a two-stream type of instability can be obtained with a growth rate comparable to the plasma frequency. This is expected to have a dramatic effect on the evolution of an x-ray laser-produced plasma. A model for describing electromagnetic-field generation and emission resulting from the interaction of a short x-ray laser pulse with a gas jet is proposed. Issues addressed include the effect of the thermal electromotive force at the edge of a plasma driven by the anisotropic electron energy distribution that arises from the photoionization of a gas. Terahertz pulse emission from these photoionized plasma is also predicted.

  12. The High Energy X-ray Probe (HEX-P)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona; HEX-P Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The High-Energy X-ray Probe (HEX-P) is a probe-class ( 500M) next-generation high-energy X-ray observatory with broadband (2-200 keV) response and 40 times the sensitivity of any previous mis-sion in the 10-80 keV band, and >500 times the sensitivity of any previous mission in the 80-200 keV band. Intended to launch contemporaneously with Athena, HEX-P will provide fundamental new discoveries that range from resolving 90% of the X-ray background at its peak, to measuring the cosmic evolution of black hole spin, to studying faint X-ray populations in nearby galaxies. Based on NuSTAR heritage, HEX-P requires only modest technology development, and could easily be executed within the next decade.

  13. Treatment of foods with high-energy X rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, M. R.; Meissner, J.; Herer, A. S.; Beers, E. W.

    2001-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing energy in the form of gamma rays, accelerated electrons, and X rays can produce beneficial effects, such as inhibiting the sprouting in potatoes, onions, and garlic, controlling insects in fruits, vegetables, and grains, inhibiting the growth of fungi, pasteurizing fresh meat, poultry, and seafood, and sterilizing spices and food additives. After many years of research, these processes have been approved by regulatory authorities in many countries and commercial applications have been increasing. High-energy X rays are especially useful for treating large packages of food. The most attractive features are product penetration, absorbed dose uniformity, high utilization efficiency and short processing time. The ability to energize the X-ray source only when needed enhances the safety and convenience of this technique. The availability of high-energy, high-power electron accelerators, which can be used as X-ray generators, makes it feasible to process large quantities of food economically. Several industrial accelerator facilities already have X-ray conversion equipment and several more will soon be built with product conveying systems designed to take advantage of the unique characteristics of high-energy X rays. These concepts will be reviewed briefly in this paper.

  14. High resolution, large area, high energy x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.E.; Dolan, K.W.; Haddad, W.S.; Haskins, J.J.; Lerche, R.A.; Logan, C.M.; Perkins, D.E.; Schneberk, D.J.; Rikard, R.D.

    1997-08-01

    An x-ray tomography system is being developed for high resolution inspection of large objects. The goal is to achieve 25 micron resolution over object sizes that are tens of centimeters in extent. Typical objects will be metal in composition and therefore high energy, few MeV x-rays will be required. A proof-of-principle system with a limited field of view has been developed. Preliminary results are presented.

  15. The Einstein Observatory Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey. I - X-ray data and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Schild, R. E.; Wolter, A.; Stocke, J. T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of the X-ray data and the optical identification for the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium-Sensitivity Survey (EMSS). The survey consists of 835 serendipitous sources detected at or above 4 times the rms level in 1435 imaging proportional counter fields with centers located away from the Galactic plane. Their limiting sensitivities are about (5-300) x 10 to the -14th ergs/sq cm sec in the 0.3-3.5-keV energy band. A total area of 778 square deg of the high-Galactic-latitude sky has been covered. The data have been analyzed using the REV1 processing system, which takes into account the nonuniformities of the detector. The resulting EMSS catalog of X-ray sources is a flux-limited and homogeneous sample of astronomical objects that can be used for statistical studies.

  16. Comprehensive x-ray spectral code for high energy astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D A; Fournier, K B; Mauche, C W

    2000-08-18

    The aim of this project has been to develop a spectral analysis tool with a level of quality and completeness commensurate to that expected in data from the current generation of X-ray observatories. The code is called LXSS (Livermore X-Ray Spectral Synthesizer). X-ray-emitting astrophysical plasmas are rarely, if ever, in LTE, so they have adopted the detailed level accounting approach, in which rates for processes that populate or depopulate atomic energy levels are treated explicitly. This entails the generation of a large quantity of atomic data, most of which is calculated using ''in-house'' computer codes. Calculations are benchmarked against laboratory data, and spectral models have been used to provide first-time interpretations of astrophysical X-ray spectra. The design of a versatile graphical user interface that allows access to and manipulation of the atomic database comprises the second major part of the project.

  17. Dosimetric properties of high energy current (HEC) detector in keV x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Shrestha, Suman; Elshahat, Bassem; Karellas, Andrew; Sajo, Erno

    2015-04-01

    We introduce a new x-ray radiation detector. The detector employs high-energy current (HEC) formed by secondary electrons consisting predominantly of photoelectrons and Auger electrons, to directly convert x-ray energy to detector signal without externally applied power and without amplification. The HEC detector is a multilayer structure composed of thin conducting layers separated by dielectric layers with an overall thickness of less than a millimeter. It can be cut to any size and shape, formed into curvilinear surfaces, and thus can be designed for a variety of QA applications. We present basic dosimetric properties of the detector as function of x-ray energy, depth in the medium, area and aspect ratio of the detector, as well as other parameters. The prototype detectors show similar dosimetric properties to those of a thimble ionization chamber, which operates at high voltage. The initial results obtained for kilovoltage x-rays merit further research and development towards specific medical applications.

  18. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  19. Radiation processing with high-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleland, Marshall R.; Stichelbaut, Frédéric

    2013-03-01

    The radiation processing of materials and commercial products with high-energy X-rays, which are also identified by the German term bremsstrahlung, can produce beneficial changes that are similar to those obtained by irradiation with nuclear gamma rays emitted by cobalt-60 sources. Both X-rays and gamma rays are electromagnetic radiations with short wavelengths and high photon energies that can stimulate chemical reactions by creating ions and free radicals in irradiated materials. Nevertheless, there are some physical differences in these energy sources that can influence the choice for practical applications. The English translation of bremsstrahlung is braking radiatiorn or deceleration radiation. It is produced when energetic electrons are deflected by the strong electric field near an atomic nucleus. The efficiency for producing this kind of electromagnetic energy increases with the kinetic energy of the electrons and the atomic number of the target material. The energy spectrum of the emitted X-ray photons is very broad and extends up to the maximum energy of the incident electrons. In contrast, a cobalt-60 nucleus emits two gamma rays simultaneously, which have well-defined energies. Another significant difference is the angular distribution of the radiation. Nuclear gamma rays are emitted in all directions, but high-energy bremsstrahlung photons are concentrated in the direction of the incident electrons when they strike the target material. This property enables an X-ray processing facility to be more compact than a gamma-ray processing facility with similar throughput capacity, and it increases the penetration and the efficiency for absorbing the emitted X-ray energy in the irradiated material. Recent increases in the electron energy and the electron beam power from modern industrial accelerators have increased the throughput rates in X-ray processing facilities, so that this irradiation method is now economically competitive with large cobalt-60

  20. Energy weighted x-ray dark-field imaging.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Georg; Zang, Andrea; Anton, Gisela; Bayer, Florian; Horn, Florian; Kraus, Manuel; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, Andre; Wandner, Johannes; Weber, Thomas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Wong, Winnie S; Campbell, Michael; Meiser, Jan; Meyer, Pascal; Mohr, Jürgen; Michel, Thilo

    2014-10-06

    The dark-field image obtained in grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide information about the objects' microstructures on a scale smaller than the pixel size even with low geometric magnification. In this publication we demonstrate that the dark-field image quality can be enhanced with an energy-resolving pixel detector. Energy-resolved x-ray dark-field images were acquired with a 16-energy-channel photon-counting pixel detector with a 1 mm thick CdTe sensor in a Talbot-Lau x-ray interferometer. A method for contrast-noise-ratio (CNR) enhancement is proposed and validated experimentally. In measurements, a CNR improvement by a factor of 1.14 was obtained. This is equivalent to a possible radiation dose reduction of 23%.

  1. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  2. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  3. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  4. Heating the intergalactic medium by X-rays from population III binaries in high-redshift galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; O'Shea, Brian W. E-mail: mlnorman@ucsd.edu E-mail: jwise@gatech.edu

    2014-08-20

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc){sup 3}. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 10{sup 4} K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  5. Heating the Intergalactic Medium by X-Rays from Population III Binaries in High-redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Ahn, Kyungjin; Wise, John H.; Norman, Michael L.; O'Shea, Brian W.

    2014-08-01

    Due to their long mean free path, X-rays are expected to have an important impact on cosmic reionization by heating and ionizing the intergalactic medium (IGM) on large scales, especially after simulations have suggested that Population III (Pop III) stars may form in pairs at redshifts as high as 20-30. We use the Pop III distribution and evolution from a self-consistent cosmological radiation hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of the first galaxies and a simple Pop III X-ray binary model to estimate their X-ray output in a high-density region larger than 100 comoving (Mpc)3. We then combine three different methods—ray tracing, a one-zone model, and X-ray background modeling—to investigate the X-ray propagation, intensity distribution, and long-term effects on the IGM thermal and ionization state. The efficiency and morphology of photoheating and photoionization are dependent on the photon energies. The sub-kiloelectronvolt X-rays only impact the IGM near the sources, while the kiloelectronvolt photons contribute significantly to the X-ray background and heat and ionize the IGM smoothly. The X-rays just below 1 keV are most efficient in heating and ionizing the IGM. We find that the IGM might be heated to over 100 K by z = 10 and the high-density source region might reach 104 K, limited by atomic hydrogen cooling. This may be important for predicting the 21 cm neutral hydrogen signals. On the other hand, the free electrons from X-ray ionizations are not enough to contribute significantly to the optical depth of the cosmic microwave background to the Thomson scattering.

  6. High resolution, low energy avalanche photodiode X-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, R.; Vanderpuye, K.; Entine, G.; Squillante, M. R.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes have been fabricated, and their performance as X-ray detectors has been measured. Photon sensitivity and energy resolution were measured as a function of size and operating parameters. Noise thresholds as low as 212 eV were obtained at room temperature, and backscatter X-ray fluorescence data were obtained for aluminum and other light elements. It is concluded that the results with the X-ray detector are extremely encouraging, and the performance is challenging the best available proportional counters. While not at the performance level of either cryogenic silicon or HgI2, these device operate at room temperature and can be reproduced in large numbers and with much larger areas than typically achieved with HgI2. In addition, they are rugged and appear to be indefinitely stable.

  7. Energy-selective filtration of dental x-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gelskey, D.E.; Baker, C.G.

    1981-11-01

    Samarium is known for its ability to filter simultaneously low- and high-energy x-ray photons from an x-ray beam that are not useful in producing a diagnostic radiograph. This study was undertaken to determine the optimum thickness of samarium required to minimize patient exposure and exposure time. The results indicate that use of a filter thickness of 0.16 mm. minimized patient radiation exposure and permitted the use of an exposure time sufficiently short to minimize motion unsharpness. The incorporation of a 0.16 mm. samarium filter in the x-ray beam reduced exposure by about 40 percent as compared to a 2.5 mm. aluminum filter; the exposure time must be increased approximately twice to obtain optical densities equivalent to those produced with aluminum filtration.

  8. X-ray emission of SNRs in nonuniform medium: properties of thermal and nonthermal spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.

    2006-05-01

    In this report we consider two effects in the thermal and nonthermal spectra of supernova remnants (SNRs) which could be caused by the nonuniform ISM: i) the mimicry of the thermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs under the nonthermal one and ii) artificial broadening of the high-energy end of the nonthermal X-ray spectrum of SNRs. 1.There is possibility that the nonthermal features in the X-ray spectrum of some supernova remnants may be in fact of the thermal origin. Observed spectrum from SNRs is a superposition of ``individual'' spectra from different small volumes along the line of sight. The plasma is under different conditions in different places in SNR. The thermal X-ray spectrum of emission from a volume with high enough gradients of density and temperature may mimic under nonthermal one. This effect is studied with special attention to the case of supernova remnant evolution in the nonuniform interstellar medium like near molecular cloud. The mimicry-effect may be responsible for the nonthermal properties of X-ray spectra in those SNRs where nonthermal flux in photons with energy < 2 keV is expected to be less than thermal one in et least 2 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the effect cannot be a reason of the nonthermal features in X-ray spectra of SN 1006 and other SNRs where nonthermal flux is estimated to be of order or higher than the thermal one. 2.The observed spectrum of SNR is a superposition of many ``local'' spectra emitted by regions of SNR which are under different physical conditions. Does broadening of the high-energy end of the observed nonthermal spectrum of SNRs, like in G347.3-0.5 and SN 1006, may be an artifact of observations or is it a consequence of the microphysics involved in the acceleration process? In this note we study the influence of parameter variations in the volume and over the surface of SNR on the shape of the high-energy end of the synchrotron spectrum. It is shown that gradients of density and magnetic field strength downstream of

  9. An analytical approach to estimating the first order x-ray scatter in heterogeneous medium.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Leszczynski, Konrad W

    2009-07-01

    X-ray scatter estimation in heterogeneous medium is a challenge in improving the quality of diagnostic projection images and volumetric image reconstruction. For Compton scatter, the statistical behavior of the first order scatter can be accurately described by using the Klein-Nishina expression for Compton scattering cross section provided that the exact information of the medium including the geometry and the attenuation, which in fact is unknown, is known. The authors present an approach to approximately separate the unknowns from the Klein-Nishina formula and express the unknown part by the primary x-ray intensity at the detector. The approximation is fitted to the exact solution of the Klein-Nishina formulas by introducing one parameter, whose value is shown to be not sensitive to the linear attenuation coefficient and thickness of the scatterer. The performance of the approach is evaluated by comparing the result with those from the Klein-Nishina formula and Monte Carlo simulations. The approximation is close to the exact solution and the Monte Carlo simulation result for parallel and cone beam imaging systems with various field sizes, air gaps, and mono- and polyenergy of primary photons and for nonhomogeneous scatterer with various geometries of slabs and cylinders. For a wide range of x-ray energy including those often used in kilo- and megavoltage cone beam computed tomographies, the first order scatter fluence at the detector is mainly from Compton scatter. Thus, the approximate relation between the first order scatter and primary fluences at the detector is useful for scatter estimation in physical phantom projections.

  10. Systematic survey of the dose enhancement in tissue-equivalent materials facing medium- and high-Z backscatterers exposed to X-rays with energies from 5 to 250 keV.

    PubMed

    Seidenbusch, M; Harder, D; Regulla, D

    2014-05-01

    The present study has been inspired by the results of earlier dose measurements in tissue-equivalent materials adjacent to thin foils of aluminum, copper, tin, gold, and lead. Large dose enhancements have been observed in low-Z materials near the interface when this ensemble was irradiated with X-rays of qualities known from diagnostic radiology. The excess doses have been attributed to photo-, Compton, and Auger electrons released from the metal surfaces. Correspondingly, high enhancements of biological effects have been observed in single cell layers arranged close to gold surfaces. The objective of the present work is to systematically survey, by calculation, the values of the dose enhancement in low-Z media facing backscattering materials with a variety of atomic numbers and over a large range of photon energies. Further parameters to be varied are the distance of the point of interest from the interface and the kind of the low-Z material. The voluminous calculations have been performed using the PHOTCOEF algorithm, a proven set of interpolation functions fitted to long-established Monte Carlo results, for primary photon energies between 5 and 250 keV and for atomic numbers varying over the periodic system up to Z = 100. The calculated results correlate well with our previous experimental results. It is shown that the values of the dose enhancement (a) vary strongly in dependence upon Z and photon energy; (b) have maxima in the energy region from 40 to 60 keV, determined by the K and L edges of the backscattering materials; and (c) are valued up to about 130 for "International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) soft tissue" (soft tissue composition recommended by the ICRP) as the adjacent low-Z material. Maximum dose enhancement associated with the L edge occurs for materials with atomic numbers between 50 and 60, e.g., barium (Z = 56) and iodine (Z = 53). Such materials typically serve as contrast media in medical X-ray diagnostics. The gradual

  11. The Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey distant cluster sample - X-ray cosmological evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Gioia, I.M.; Henry, J.P.; Maccacaro, T.; Morris, S.L.; Stocke, J.T. CNR, Istituto di Radioastronomia, Bologna Hawaii Univ., Honolulu Osservatorio Astronomico, Bologna Mount Wilson and Las Campanas Observatories, Pasadena, CA Colorado Univ., Boulder )

    1990-06-01

    The X-ray luminosity function of clusters of galaxies is determined at different cosmic epochs using data from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. The sample consists of 67 X-ray-selected clusters that have been grouped in three redshift shells. Evolution is detected in the X-ray properties of clusters. The present volume density of high-luminosity clusters is found to be greater than it was in the past. Given the still limited data set, this result should be regarded as preliminary. It can be interpreted as the consequence of either luminosity evolution or modest density evolution. 22 refs.

  12. High-energy X-ray spectra of five sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Mcclintock, J. E.; Gerassimenko, M.; Lewin , W. H. G.

    1973-01-01

    On October 15-16, 1970, we carried out balloon X-ray observations from Australia at energies above 15 keV. We present the high-energy X-ray spectra of three sources discovered by us, GX 301-2, GX 304-1, and GX 1 + 4. The data suggest that these high-energy sources correspond to the sources 2U 1223-62, 2U 1258-61, and 2U 1728-24 respectively. We also present the spectra for two additional sources, GX 5-1 (2U 1757-25) and GX 3 + 1 (2U 1744-26). The average intensity of the highly variable source GX 301-2 was observed to be as great as Tau X-1 in the energy range 15-50 keV.

  13. Flywheel energy storage for x-ray machines.

    PubMed

    Siedband, M P; Showers, D K

    1984-01-01

    X-ray image quality for stop-motion exposures is greatly affected by the system power capability. High power levels are required for adequate resolution, which often precludes the use of mobile x-ray systems for stop-motion exposures. Currently available mobile systems use (1) 90-V nickel-cadmium batteries capable of 120 A, (2) a power line of 220 V ac, 60 Hz capable of about 100 A, or (3) a capacitor discharge unit using 1.0-microF capacitors and limited to 17-mAs equivalent output (compared to three-phase systems at 100 kVp). In each case, instantaneous power is usually limited to 10 kW. An alternative means which now appears to be a practical power source for mobile x-ray systems is the flywheel energy storage system. A 5-kg flywheel has been constructed which runs at 10 000 rpm and stores 25 000 J while drawing only a few hundred watts to bring the system up to speed. When coupled to an aircraft alternator, pulsed power levels of 25 kW have been achieved. The aircraft alternator also has the advantage of high-frequency output which has permitted the use of smaller high-voltage transformers. This system permits the generation of powerful x rays using low-power sources, such as single automobile batteries, common 115-V outlets, or electrical sources of poor regulation such as found in Third World countries.

  14. Phase contrast imaging with coherent high energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Snigireva, I.

    1997-02-01

    X-ray imaging concern high energy domain (>6 keV) like a contact radiography, projection microscopy and tomography is used for many years to discern the features of the internal structure non destructively in material science, medicine and biology. In so doing the main contrast formation is absorption that makes some limitations for imaging of the light density materials and what is more the resolution of these techniques is not better than 10-100 {mu}m. It was turned out that there is now way in which to overcome 1{mu}m or even sub-{mu}m resolution limit except phase contrast imaging. It is well known in optics that the phase contrast is realised when interference between reference wave front and transmitted through the sample take place. Examples of this imaging are: phase contrast microscopy suggested by Zernike and Gabor (in-line) holography. Both of this techniques: phase contrast x-ray microscopy and holography are successfully progressing now in soft x-ray region. For imaging in the hard X-rays to enhance the contrast and to be able to resolve phase variations across the beam the high degree of the time and more importantly spatial coherence is needed. Because of this it was reasonable that the perfect crystal optics was involved like Bonse-Hart interferometry, double-crystal and even triple-crystal set-up using Laue and Bragg geometry with asymmetrically cut crystals.

  15. Spectacular X-ray Jet Points Toward Cosmic Energy Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-06-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has revealed a spectacular luminous spike of X rays that emanates from the vicinity of a giant black hole in the center of the radio galaxy Pictor A. The spike, or jet, is due to a beam of particles that streaks across hundreds of thousands of light years of intergalactic space toward a brilliant X-ray hot spot that marks its end point. Pictor A Image Press Image and Caption The hot spot is at least 800 thousand light years (8 times the diameter of our Milky Way galaxy) away from where the jet originates. It is thought to represent the advancing head of the jet, which brightens conspicuously where it plows into the tenuous gas of intergalactic space. The jet, powered by the giant black hole, originates from a region of space no bigger than the solar system. "Both the brightness and the spectrum of the X rays are very different from what theory predicts," Professor Andrew Wilson reported today at the 196th national meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Rochester, New York. Wilson, of the University of Maryland, College Park, along with Dr. Patrick Shopbell and Dr. Andrew Young, also of the University of Maryland, are submitting an article on this research to the Astrophysical Journal. "The Chandra observations are telling us that something out there is producing many more high-energy particles than we expected," said Wilson. One possible explanation for the X rays is that shock waves along the side and head of the X-ray jet are accelerating electrons and possibly protons to speeds close to that of light. In the process the electrons are boosted to energies as high as 100 million times their own rest mass energy. These electrons lose their energy rapidly as they produce X rays, so this could be the first direct evidence of this process so far outside a galaxy. The hot spot has been seen with optical and radio telescopes. Radio telescopes have also observed a faint jet. Jets are thought to be produced by the extreme

  16. Elemental quantification using multiple-energy x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozul, N.; Davis, G. R.; Anderson, P.; Elliott, J. C.

    1999-03-01

    A novel implementation of multiple-energy x-ray absorptiometry (MEXA) for elemental quantification has been developed. Species are resolved on the basis of their differential attenuation spectra across a wide energy range, ideally including absorption edges. By measuring the incident and exiting x-ray spectra and using known values of mass attenuation coefficients over selected energy bands, the density line integral of the species along the x-ray path can be calculated from all the selected energy channels simultaneously by non-linear least squares methods. Effects of `escape' peak phenomena are modelled and corrections for them are included in the MEXA software. The applications of MEXA are illustrated by single measurements on aluminium and zirconium foils, quantitation of aqueous KI diffusing into a porous solid, simultaneous measurement of acidic diffusant 0957-0233/10/3/023/img1 and porous solid with which it reacts and which it dissolves and microtomographic reconstructions of liquid and solid specimens containing caesium and/or iodine.

  17. High energy X-ray observations of extragalactic objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.; Knight, F. K.; Nolan, P. L.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Hofman, J. A.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for scanning observations of the active galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A) and the Type 1 Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 with the low-energy detectors of the HEAO-1 A-4 hard X-ray instrument. The X-ray spectra in the energy range from 15 to 100 keV are shown to be consistent with previous observations of these galaxies. It is noted that NGC 5128 rose in intensity from 1972 to 1975, that spectral softening occurred after early 1973, and that the source has since decreased in intensity while maintaining an E to the -1.7 photon power law. The results for NGC 4151 indicate variable absorption below 10 keV and a power-law slope of about E to the -1.4 in the range from 10 keV to 10 MeV.

  18. Energy Feedback from X-ray Binaries in the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fragos, T.; Lehmer, B..; Naoz, S.; Zezas, A.; Basu-Zych, A.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray photons, because of their long mean-free paths, can easily escape the galactic environments where they are produced, and interact at long distances with the intergalactic medium, potentially having a significant contribution to the heating and reionization of the early universe. The two most important sources of X-ray photons in the universe are active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and X-ray binaries (XRBs). In this Letter we use results from detailed, large scale population synthesis simulations to study the energy feedback of XRBs, from the first galaxies (z (redshift) approximately equal to 20) until today.We estimate that X-ray emission from XRBs dominates over AGN at z (redshift) greater than or approximately equal to 6-8. The shape of the spectral energy distribution of the emission from XRBs shows little change with redshift, in contrast to its normalization which evolves by approximately 4 orders of magnitude, primarily due to the evolution of the cosmic star-formation rate. However, the metallicity and the mean stellar age of a given XRB population affect significantly its X-ray output. Specifically, the X-ray luminosity from high-mass XRBs per unit of star-formation rate varies an order of magnitude going from solar metallicity to less than 10% solar, and the X-ray luminosity from low-mass XRBs per unit of stellar mass peaks at an age of approximately 300 Myr (million years) and then decreases gradually at later times, showing little variation for mean stellar ages 3 Gyr (Giga years, or billion years). Finally, we provide analytical and tabulated prescriptions for the energy output of XRBs, that can be directly incorporated in cosmological simulations.

  19. High-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer (HEXIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, James L.; Gruber, Duane E.; Heindl, William A.; Pelling, Michael R.; Peterson, Laurence E.; Rothschild, Richard E.; Skelton, Robert E.; Hink, Paul L.; Slavis, Kimberly R.; Binns, W. Robert

    1998-11-01

    HEXIS is a MIDEX-class mission concept for x-ray astronomy. Its objectives are to improve our knowledge of the high energy x-ray sky by increasing the number of sources above 20 keV to > 2,000, discovering transient sources such as x-ray novae and gamma-ray bursts, and making spectral and temporal studies of the sources. With mission life > 3 years, a 1-year all-sky survey sensitivity of approximately 0.3 mCrab, and continuous monitoring of the entire visible sky, HEXIS will provide unprecedented capabilities. Source positions will be determined to accuracies of a few arcmin or better. Spectra will be determined with an energy resolution of a few keV and source variability will be studied on time scales from < 1 sec to years. In addition, 10 times more sensitive studies of limited fields will be performed at the same time. Gamma-ray bursts will be detected about 4 times/week at about the same sensitivity as BATSE and the sensitivity to nova-like x-ray transients will be approximately 6 mCrab in one day. HEXIS contains a set of coded mask imagers that use position-sensitive CZT detectors operating from approximately 5 keV to 200 keV. Detector planes are built with 41 cm(superscript 2) CZT detector modules which employ crossed-strip readout to obtain a pixel size of 0.5 mm. Nine modules are grouped in a 369 cm(superscript 2) array for each imager. In the past 2 years significant progress has been made on techniques requires for HEXIS: position-sensitive CZT detectors and ASIC readout, coded mask imaging, and background properties at balloon altitudes. Scientific and technical details of HEXIS are presented together with result form tests of detectors and a coded mask imager.

  20. Studies of dark energy with X-ray observatories.

    PubMed

    Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2010-04-20

    I review the contribution of Chandra X-ray Observatory to studies of dark energy. There are two broad classes of observable effects of dark energy: evolution of the expansion rate of the Universe, and slow down in the rate of growth of cosmic structures. Chandra has detected and measured both of these effects through observations of galaxy clusters. A combination of the Chandra results with other cosmological datasets leads to 5% constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, and limits possible deviations of gravity on large scales from general relativity.

  1. Refractive optical elements and optical system for high energy x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.; Altapova, V.; Baumbach, T.; Kluge, M.; Last, A.; Marschall, F.; Mohr, J.; Nazmov, V.; Vogt, H.

    2012-05-17

    In material science, X-ray radiation with photon energies above 25 keV is used because of its penetration into high density materials. Research of the inner structure of novel materials, such as electrodes in high power batteries for engines, require X-ray microscopes operating in the hard X-ray energy range. A flexible X-ray microscope for hard X-rays with photon energies higher than 25 keV will be realized at the synchrotron source ANKA in Karlsruhe, Germany. The device will use refractive X-ray lenses as condenser as well as objective lenses.

  2. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, Victor; Goodman, Claude A.

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels.

  3. High resolution, multiple-energy linear sweep detector for x-ray imaging

    DOEpatents

    Perez-Mendez, V.; Goodman, C.A.

    1996-08-20

    Apparatus is disclosed for generating plural electrical signals in a single scan in response to incident X-rays received from an object. Each electrical signal represents an image of the object at a different range of energies of the incident X-rays. The apparatus comprises a first X-ray detector, a second X-ray detector stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector, and an X-ray absorber stacked upstream of the first X-ray detector. The X-ray absorber provides an energy-dependent absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the first X-ray detector, but provides no absorption of the incident X-rays before they are incident at the second X-ray detector. The first X-ray detector includes a linear array of first pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a first range of energies. The first X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a first electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the first pixels. The second X-ray detector includes a linear array of second pixels, each of which produces an electrical output in response to the incident X-rays in a second range of energies, broader than the first range of energies. The second X-ray detector also includes a circuit that generates a second electrical signal in response to the electrical output of each of the second pixels. 12 figs.

  4. X-ray scatter correction for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: compensation of patient's lean/fat composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinten, Jean-Marc; Darboux, Michel; Bordy, Thomas; Robert-Coutant, Christine; Gonon, Georges

    2004-05-01

    At CEA-LETI, a DEXA approach for systems using a digital 2D radiographic detector has been developed. It relies on an original X-rays scatter management method, based on a combined use of an analytical model and of scatter calibration data acquired through different thicknesses of Lucite slabs. Since Lucite X-rays interaction properties are equivalent to fat, the approach leads to a scatter flux map representative of a 100% fat region. However, patients" soft tissues are composed of lean and fat. Therefore, the obtained scatter map has to be refined in order to take into account the various fat ratios that can present patients. This refinement consists in establishing a formula relating the fat ratio to the thicknesses of Low and High Energy Lucite slabs leading to same signal level. This proportion is then used to compute, on the basis of X-rays/matter interaction equations, correction factors to apply to Lucite equivalent X-rays scatter map. Influence of fat ratio correction has been evaluated, on a digital 2D bone densitometer, with phantoms composed of a PVC step (simulating bone) and different Lucite/water thicknesses as well as on patients. The results show that our X-rays scatter determination approach can take into account variations of body composition.

  5. Radiosensitization of high-Z compounds by medium-energy 160 kV vs. high-energy 6 MV X-rays for radiation therapy: Theoretical, in vitro and in vivo studies of platinum compounds activating glioma F98 cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S.; Pradhan, A.; Nahar, S.; Montenegro, M.; Barth, R.; Nakkula, R.; Turro, C.

    2013-03-01

    Energy dependence of X-ray irradiation of high-Z compounds for enhanced radiosensitization is explored thoeretically and via in vitro and in vivo experiments. The cell killing ability of medium-energy X-rays from 160 kV source are found to be more effective than 6 MV X-rays in activating high-Z contrast agents. Results are presented for a newly synthesized Pt compound, Pyridine Terpyridine Pt(II) Nitrate ([Pt(typ)(py)]) and carboplatin in treating F98 rat glioma. In-vitro results show considerable reduction in cell viability for radiosensitized cells irradiated with a 160 kV irradiator. Cells treated with 6 MV LINAC radiation find little variation with radiation dose. Maximum dose enhancement factors (DEFs) and minimum cancer cell survival fractions correspond to 50-200 keV range, and fall rapidly at higher energies. Theoretical calculations of photoelectric absorption vis-a-vis total scattering demonstrates this energy dependence. However, in vivo studies of rats treated with [Pt(tpy)(py)] had a severe negative neurotoxic response, confirmed by histopathological analysis. But subsequent in vivo studies using carboplatin showed very positive results in the treatment of F98 glioma bearing rats and potential clinical radiation therapy.

  6. RADIO GALAXY FEEDBACK IN X-RAY-SELECTED GROUPS FROM COSMOS: THE EFFECT ON THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Giodini, S.; Finoguenov, A.; Boehringer, H.; Pierini, D.; Smolcic, V.; Massey, R.; BIrzan, L.; Zamorani, G.; Oklopcic, A.; Pratt, G. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Salvato, M.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J. S.; Thompson, D.

    2010-05-01

    We quantify the importance of the mechanical energy released by radio galaxies inside galaxy groups. We use scaling relations to estimate the mechanical energy released by 16 radio-active galactic nuclei located inside X-ray-detected galaxy groups in the COSMOS field. By comparing this energy output to the host groups' gravitational binding energy, we find that radio galaxies produce sufficient energy to unbind a significant fraction of the intragroup medium. This unbinding effect is negligible in massive galaxy clusters with deeper potential wells. Our results correctly reproduce the breaking of self-similarity observed in the scaling relation between entropy and temperature for galaxy groups.

  7. X-ray Reflectivity Measurements of Nanoscale Structures: Limits of the Effective Medium Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-Jeong; Soles, Christopher L.; Kang, Shuhui; Wook Ro, Hyun; Lin, Eric K.; Wu, Wen-li

    2007-09-26

    Specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR) can be used, in the limit of the effective medium approximation (EMA), as a high-resolution shape metrology for periodic patterns on a smooth substrate. The EMA means that the density of the solid patterns and the spaces separating the periodic patterns are averaged together. In this limit the density profile as a function of pattern height obtained by SXR can be used to extract quantitative pattern profile information. Here we explore the limitations of SXR as a pattern shape metrology by studying a series of linear grating structures with periodicities ranging from 300 nm to 16 {mu}m and determining at which length scales the EMA breaks down. We also study the angular dependence of the grating orientation with respect to the incident X-ray beam. The gratings systematically are rotated through a series of azimuthal angles with the incident X-ray beams ranging from 0 deg. to 90 deg. . The applicability of the EMA is related to the coherence length of the X-ray source. When the coherence length of beam is larger than the physical dimension of grating periodicities, EMA can be applied for characterizing nanostructures. For our slit-collimated X-ray source, the coherence length in the direction parallel to the long axis of the slit is on the order of 900 nm while the coherence length along the main axis of the beam appears to be in the range of (22 to 26) {mu}m.

  8. X-Ray Constraints on the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. I.; Mushotzky, R. F.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Three observational constraints can be placed on a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) using ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) pointed and survey data, the emission strength, the energy spectrum, and the fluctuation spectrum. The upper limit to the emission strength of the WHIM is 7.5 +/- 1.0 keV/(s*sq cm*sr*keV) in the 3/4 keV band, an unknown portion of which value may be due to our own Galactic halo. The spectral stape of the WHIM emission can be described as thermal emission with logT = 6.42, although the true spectrum is more likely to come from a range of temperatures. The values of emission strength and spectral shape are in reasonable agreement with hydrodynamical cosmological models. The autocorrelation function in the 0.44 keV < E < 1.21 keV band range, w(theta), for the extragalactic soft X-ray background (SXRB) which includes both the WHIM and contributions due to point sources, is approx. < 0.002 for 10 min < 0 < 20 min in the 3/4 keV band. This value is lower than the Croft et al. (2000) cosmological model by a factor of approx. 5, but is still not inconsistent with cosmological models. It is also found that the normalization of the extragalactic power law component of the soft X-ray background spectrum must be 9.5 +/- 0.9 keV/(s*sq cm*sr*keV) to be consistent with the ROSAT All-Sky Survey.

  9. Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering with cone collimation using X-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-09-01

    Energy-dispersive small-angle X-ray scattering (ED-SAXS) with an innovative design of cone collimation based on an ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL) had been explored. Using this new cone collimation system, scattering angle 2θ has a theoretical minimum angle related to the mean half-opening angle of the hollow cone beam of 1.42 mrad, and with the usable X-ray energy ranging from 4 to 30 keV, the resulting observable scattering vector q is down to a minimum value of about 0.003 Å-1 (or a Bragg spacing of about 2100 Å). However, the absorption of lower energies by X-ray capillary optics, sample transmission, and detector response function limits the application range to lower energy. Cone collimation ED-SAXS experiments carried out on pure water, Lupolen, and in situ temperature-dependent measurement of diacetylenic acid/melamine micelle solid were presented at three different scattering angles 2θ of 0.18°, 0.70° and 1.18° to illustrate the new opportunities offered by this technique as well as its limitations. Also, a comparison has been made by replacing the PPXRL with a pinhole, and the result shows that cone collimation ED-SAXS based on ESBC with PPXRL was helpful in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (i.e., reducing the parasitic background scattering) than ESBC with a pinhole. The cone collimation instrument based on X-ray capillary optics could be considered as a promising tool to perform SAXS experiments, especially cone collimation ED-SAXS has potential application for the in situ temperature-dependent studying on the kinetics of phase transitions.

  10. Fluctuation x-ray microscopy for measuring medium-range order.

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; McNulty, I.; Paterson, D.; Treacy, M. M. J.; Gibson, J. M.; Arizona State Univ.

    2005-01-01

    Many x-ray techniques exist to probe long- and short-range order in matter, in real space by imaging and in reciprocal space by diffraction and scattering. However, measuring medium-range order (MRO) in disordered materials is a long-standing problem. Based on fluctuation electron microscopy, which was applied successfully to the understanding of MRO in amorphous materials, we have developed fluctuation x-ray microscopy (FXM). This novel approach offers quantitative insight into medium-range correlations in materials at nanometer and larger length scales. It examines spatially resolved fluctuations in the intensity of a series of x-ray speckle patterns. The speckle variance depends on higher order correlations that are more sensitive to MRO. Systematically measuring the speckle variance as function of the momentum transfer and x-ray illumination size produces a fluctuation map that contains information about the degree of MRO and the correlation length. This approach can be used for the exploration of MRO and subtle spatial structural changes in a wide range of disordered materials from soft condensed matter to nanowire arrays, semiconductor quantum dot arrays and magnetic materials. It will also help us to understand the mechanisms of order-disorder transitions and may lead to control of ordering, which is important in developing ordered structures tailored for particular applications. A theory for FXM and preliminary experimental results from polystyrene latex spheres are discussed in this paper.

  11. 30-Lens interferometer for high-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Lyubomirskiy, Mikhail; Snigireva, Irina; Kohn, Victor; Kuznetsov, Sergey; Yunkin, Vyacheslav; Vaughan, Gavin; Snigirev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    A novel high-energy multi-lens interferometer consisting of 30 arrays of planar compound refractive lenses is reported. Under coherent illumination each lens array creates a diffraction-limited secondary source. Overlapping such coherent beams produces an interference pattern demonstrating strong longitudinal functional dependence. The proposed multi-lens interferometer was tested experimentally at the 100 m-long ID11 ESRF beamline in the X-ray energy range from 30 to 65 keV. The interference pattern generated by the interferometer was recorded at fundamental and fractional Talbot distances. An effective source size (FWHM) of the order of 15 µm was determined from the first Talbot image, proving the concept that the multi-lens interferometer can be used as a high-resolution tool for beam diagnostics.

  12. Reanalysis of X-ray emission from M87. 2: The multiphase medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, John C.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed that a single-phase model for the gas around M87 simultaneously explained most available X-ray data. Total enclosed masses derived from the model, however, fell well below the determinations from optical measurements. In this paper, we consider possible solutions to the inconsistency, including two multiphase medium models for the gas and the consequences of systematic errors of the Einstein Focal Point Crystal Spectrometer (FPCS). First, we find that when constraints from optical mass determinations are not considered, the best-fit model to the X-ray data is always the single-phase model. Multiphase models or consideration of FPCS systematic errors are required only when optical mass constraints are included. We find that the cooling time model of White & Sarazin adequately explains the available X-ray data and predicts total masses which agree with optical measurements. An ad hoc power-law multiphase does not. This shows both that the existence of mass dropping out of the ambient phase is consistent with the data and that the cooling-time model gives a reasonable parameterization of the dropout rate. Our derived mass accretion rate is similar to previous determinations. The implications of this result for cluster mass determinations in general are discussed. We then consider 'self absorbing' models where we assume that material dropping out of the ambient medium goes completely into X-ray absorbing gas. The resulting internal absorption is small compared to Galactic absorption at most radii. The models are therefore indistinguishable from models with only Galactic absorption. We finally show that it is alternatively possible to simultaneously fit optical mass measurements and X-ray data with a single-phase model if some of the observed FPCS line fluxes are too high by the maximum systematic error. This possiblity can be checked with new data from satellites such as ASCA.

  13. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-28

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  14. Focusing high-energy x rays by compound refractive lenses.

    PubMed

    Snigirev, A; Kohn, V; Snigireva, I; Souvorov, A; Lengeler, B

    1998-02-01

    Compound lenses made from low-Z materials (e.g., Be, B, C, and Al) set up as a linear array of refractive lenses are proposed for submicrometer focusing of high-energy x rays (>5 keV) in one or two dimensions. A theory of focusing based on Maxwell's equation and the Fresnel-Kirchhoff approach is presented. Compound refractive lenses were manufactured by drilling into an Al block a linear array of 200 closely spaced holes 0.5 mm in diameter for linear focusing and two crossed arrays of 100 holes each for point focusing. Focal spots of 3.7 mum and 8 mum x 18 mum were obtained at 30 keV for linear and two-dimensional lenses, respectively. Different technologies of manufacturing and possible applications of the proposed lenses are discussed.

  15. High-Energy X-Ray Diffraction Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-29

    The functionality of heRXD includes the following: distance and angular calibration and viewing flat-panel detector images used for X-ray diffraction; image (polar) rebinning or "caking"; line position fitting in powder diffraction images; image segmentation or "blob finding"; crystal orentation indesing; and lattice vector refinement. These functionalities encompass a critical set analyzing teh data for high-energy diffraction measurements that are currently performed at synchrotron sources such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The software design modular and open source under LGPL. The intent is to provide a common framework and graphical user interface that has the ability to utillize internal as well as external subroutines to provide various optins for performing the fuctionalities listed above. The software will initially be deployed at several national user facilities--including APS, ALS, and CHESS--and then made available for download using a hosting service such as sourceforge.

  16. Spatial resolution of synchrotron x-ray microtomography in high energy range: Effect of x-ray energy and sample-to-detector distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, D.; Tomizato, F.; Toda, H.; Uesugi, K.; Takeuchi, A.; Suzuki, Y.; Kobayashi, M.

    2012-12-01

    Spatial resolution of three-dimensional images obtained by synchrotron X-ray microtomography technique is evaluated using cyclic bar patterns machined on a steel wire. Influences of X-ray energy and the sample-to-detector distance on spatial resolution were investigated. High X-ray energies of 33-78 keV are applied due to the high X-ray absorption of transition metals. Best spatial resolution of about 1.2 μm pitch was observed at the sample-to-detector distance range of 20-110 mm and at the energy range of 68-78 keV. Several factors such as X-ray scattering and diffraction phenomena affecting the degradation of spatial resolution are also discussed.

  17. High Resolution Spectroscopy of X-ray Quasars: Searching for the X-ray Absorption from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Taotao; Canizares, Claude R.; Marshall, Herman L.

    2004-01-01

    We present a survey of six low to moderate redshift quasars with Chandra and XMM-Newton. The primary goal is to search for the narrow X-ray absorption lines produced by highly ionized metals in the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium. All the X-ray spectra can be well fitted by a power law with neutral hydrogen absorption. Only one feature is detected at above 3-sigma level in all the spectra, which is consistent with statistic fluctuation. We discuss the implications in our understanding of the baryon content of the universe. We also discuss the implication of the non-detection of the local (z approx. 0) X-ray absorption.

  18. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, David R.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays From the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detect or such that each one of the of semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction.

  19. High resolution energy-sensitive digital X-ray

    DOEpatents

    Nygren, D.R.

    1995-07-18

    An apparatus and method for detecting an x-ray and for determining the depth of penetration of an x-ray into a semiconductor strip detector. In one embodiment, a semiconductor strip detector formed of semiconductor material is disposed in an edge-on orientation towards an x-ray source such that x-rays from the x-ray source are incident upon and substantially perpendicular to the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector. The semiconductor strip detector is formed of a plurality of segments. The segments are coupled together in a collinear arrangement such that the semiconductor strip detector has a length great enough such that substantially all of the x-rays incident on the front edge of the semiconductor strip detector interact with the semiconductor material which forms the semiconductor strip detector. A plurality of electrodes are connected to the semiconductor strip detector such that each one of the semiconductor strip detector segments has at least one of the of electrodes coupled thereto. A signal processor is also coupled to each one of the electrodes. The present detector detects an interaction within the semiconductor strip detector, between an x-ray and the semiconductor material, and also indicates the depth of penetration of the x-ray into the semiconductor strip detector at the time of the interaction. 5 figs.

  20. Dual energy iodine contrast CT with monochromatic x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Wu, X.Y.; Kress, J.

    1995-12-31

    Computed tomography (CT) with monochromatic x-ray beams was used to image phantoms and a live rabbit using the preclinical Multiple Energy Computed Tomography (MECT) system at the National Synchrotron Light Source. MECT has a horizontal fan beam with a subject apparatus rotating about a vertical axis. Images were obtained at 43 keV for single-energy studies, and at energies immediately below and above the 33.17 keV iodine K-edge for dual-energy subtraction CT. Two CdWO{sub 4}-photodiode array detectors were used. The high-resolution detector (0.5 mm pitch, uncollimated) provided 14 line pair/cm in-plane spatial resolution, with lower image noise than conventional CT. Images with the low-resolution detector (1.844-mm pitch, collimated to 0.922 mm detector elements) had a sensitivity for iodine of {approx} 60 {micro}g/cc in 11-mm channels inside a 135 mm-diameter acrylic cylindrical phantom for a slice height of 2.5 mm and a surface does of {approx} 4 cGy. The image noise was {approx} 1 Hounsfield Unit (HU); it was {approx} 3 HU for the same phantom imaged with conventional CT at approximately the same dose, slice height, and spatial resolution ({approx} 7 lp/cm). These results show the potential advantage of MECT, despite present technical limitations.

  1. Development of Compton X-ray spectrometer for high energy resolution single-shot high-flux hard X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Sadaoki; Ikenouchi, Takahito; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Sakata, Shohei; Zhang, Zhe; Abe, Yuki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takemoto, Akinori; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Hard X-ray spectroscopy is an essential diagnostics used to understand physical processes that take place in high energy density plasmas produced by intense laser-plasma interactions. A bundle of hard X-ray detectors, of which the responses have different energy thresholds, is used as a conventional single-shot spectrometer for high-flux (>10(13) photons/shot) hard X-rays. However, high energy resolution (Δhv/hv < 0.1) is not achievable with a differential energy threshold (DET) X-ray spectrometer because its energy resolution is limited by energy differences between the response thresholds. Experimental demonstration of a Compton X-ray spectrometer has already been performed for obtaining higher energy resolution than that of DET spectrometers. In this paper, we describe design details of the Compton X-ray spectrometer, especially dependence of energy resolution and absolute response on photon-electron converter design and its background reduction scheme, and also its application to the laser-plasma interaction experiment. The developed spectrometer was used for spectroscopy of bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by intense laser-plasma interactions using a 200 μm thickness SiO2 converter. The X-ray spectrum obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer is consistent with that obtained with a DET X-ray spectrometer, furthermore higher certainly of a spectral intensity is obtained with the Compton X-ray spectrometer than that with the DET X-ray spectrometer in the photon energy range above 5 MeV.

  2. Improved energy coupling into the gain region of the Ni-like Pd transient collisional x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R; Dunn, J; Filevich, J; Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Rocca, J; Hunter, J; Shepherd, R; Booth, R; Marconi, M

    2004-10-05

    We present within this paper a series of experiments, which yield new observations to further our understanding of the transient collisional x-ray laser medium. We use the recently developed technique of picosecond x-ray laser interferometry to probe the plasma conditions in which the x-ray laser is generated and propagates. This yields two dimensional electron density maps of the plasma taken at different times relative to the peak of the 600ps plasma-forming beam. In another experimental campaign, the output of the x-ray laser plasma column is imaged with a spherical multilayer mirror onto a CCD camera to give a two-dimensional intensity map of the x-ray laser output. Near-field imaging gives insights into refraction, output intensity and spatial mode structure. Combining these images with the density maps gives an indication of the electron density at which the x-ray laser is being emitted at (yielding insights into the effect of density gradients on beam propagation). Experimental observations coupled with simulations predict that most effective coupling of laser pump energy occurs when the duration of the main heating pulse is comparable to the gain lifetime ({approx}10ps for Ni-like schemes). This can increase the output intensity by more than an order of magnitude relative to the case were the same pumping energy is delivered within a shorter heating pulse duration (< 3ps). We have also conducted an experiment in which the output of the x-ray laser was imaged onto the entrance slit of a high temporal resolution streak camera. This effectively takes a one-dimensional slice of the x-ray laser spatial profile and sweeps it in time. Under some conditions we observe rapid movement of the x-ray laser ({approx} 3 {micro}m/ps) towards the target surface.

  3. Formation and evolution of X-ray clusters - A hydrodynamic simulation of the intracluster medium

    SciTech Connect

    Evrard, A.E. )

    1990-11-01

    The thermodynamic history of the hot intracluster medium in a cluster of Coma richness was examined using a numerical simulation incorporating three-dimensional hydrodynamics of a collisional baryonic component within a self-consistently evolving dark matter mass distribution. The model evolves to states at low redshifts whose X-ray and optical properties are strikingly similar to Coma and A2256. The elliptical X-ray isophotes seen at z = 0 are remnants of a merger event which occurred at z = 0.2; thus, Coma and A2256 probably suffered moderate merger events in the recent past. The model also indicates that clusters of Coma richness should display a Suniaev-Zel'dovich central decrement of about 0.5 mK. 70 refs.

  4. Superiority of Low Energy 160 KV X-Rays Compared to High Energy 6 MV X-Rays in Heavy Element Radiosensitization for Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara N.; Pradhan, Anil K.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Barth, Rolf F.; Yang, Weilian; Nakkula, Robin J.; Palmer, Alycia; Turro, Claudia

    2013-06-01

    High energy X-rays in the MeV range are generally employed in conventional radiation therapy from linear accelerators (LINAC) to ensure sufficient penetration depths. However, lower energy X-rays in the keV range may be more effective when coupled with heavy element (high-Z or HZ) radiosensitizers. Numerical simulations of X-ray energy deposition for tumor phantoms sensitized with HZ radiosensitizers were performed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The results showed enhancement in energy deposition to radiosensitized phantoms relative to unsensitized phantoms for low energy X-rays in the keV range. In contrast, minimal enhancement was seen using high energy X-rays in the MeV range. Dose enhancement factors (DEFs) were computed and showed radiosensitization only in the low energy range < 200 keV, far lower than the energy of the majority of photons in the LINAC energy range. In vitro studies were carried to demonstrate the tumoricidal effects of HZ sensitized F98 rat glioma cells following irradiation with both low energy 160 kV and high energy 6 MV X-ray sources. The platinum compound, pyridine terpyridine Pt(II) nitrate, was initially used because it was 7x less toxic that an equivalent amount of carboplatin in vitro studies. This would allow us to separate the radiotoxic and the chemotoxic effects of HZ sensitizers. Results from this study showed a 10-fold dose dependent reduction in surviving fractions (SF) of radiosensitized cells treated with low energy 160 kV X-rays compared to those treated with 6 MV X-rays. This is in agreement with our simulations that show an increase in dose deposition in radiosensitized tumors for low energy X-rays. Due to unforeen in vivo toxicity, however, another in vitro study was performed using the commonly used, Pt-based chemotherapeutic drug carboplatin which confirmed earlier results. This lays the ground work for a planned in vivo study using F98 glioma bearing rats. This study demonstrates that while high energy X-rays are

  5. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-01

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology.

  6. An edge-on charge-transfer design for energy-resolved x-ray detection.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zaifeng; Yang, Haoyu; Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2016-06-07

    As an x-ray beam goes through the human body, it will collect important information via interaction with tissues. Since this interaction is energy-sensitive, the state-of-the-art spectral CT technologies provide higher quality images of biological tissues with x-ray energy information (or spectral information). With existing energy-integrating technologies, a large fraction of energy information is ignored in the x-ray detection process. Although the recently proposed photon-counting technology promises to achieve higher image quality at a lower radiation dose, it suffers from limitations in counting rate, performance uniformity, and fabrication cost. In this paper, we focus on an alternative approach to resolve the energy distribution of transmitted x-ray photons. First, we analyze the x-ray attenuation in a silicon substrate and describe a linear approximation model for x-ray detection. Then, we design an edge-on architecture based on the proposed energy-resolving model. In our design, the x-ray-photon-induced charges are transferred sequentially resembling the working process of a CCD camera. Finally, we numerically evaluate the linear approximation of x-ray attenuation and derive the energy distribution of x-ray photons. Our simulation results show that the proposed energy-sensing approach is feasible and has the potential to complement the photon-counting technology.

  7. Technical principles of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; Fogelman, I

    1997-07-01

    Since its introduction nearly ten years ago, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has become the single most widely used technique for performing bone densitometry studies. One reason for its popularity is the ability of DXA systems to measure bone mineral density (BMD) in the spine and proximal femur, the two most common sites for osteoporotic fractures. Other advantages of DXA include the exceptionally low radiation dose to patients, short scan times, high resolution images, good precision and inherent stability of calibration. For these reasons DXA scans are widely used to diagnose osteoporosis, assist making decisions in treatment, and as a follow-up response to therapy. Another important application has been the use of DXA in many clinical trials of new treatments for osteoporosis. Since the first generation pencil beam DXA systems became available, the most significant technical innovation has been the introduction of fan beam systems with shorter scan times, increased patient throughput, and improved image quality. New clinical applications include the measurement of lateral spine and total body BMD, body composition, and vertebral morphometry. Despite these advances, posteroanterior (PA) spine and proximal femur scans remain the most widely used application because of their utility in treatment decisions and monitoring response to therapy.

  8. Internal conversion in energy dispersive X-ray analysis of actinide-containing materials.

    PubMed

    Wiss, Thierry; Thiele, Hartmut; Cremer, Bert; Ray, Ian

    2007-06-01

    The use of X-ray elemental analysis tools like energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) is described in the context of the investigation of nuclear materials. These materials contain radioactive elements, particularly alpha-decaying actinides that affect the quantitative EDS measurement by producing interferences in the X-ray spectra. These interferences originating from X-ray emission are the result of internal conversion by the daughter atoms from the alpha-decaying actinides. The strong interferences affect primarily the L X-ray lines from the actinides (in the typical energy range used for EDS analysis) and would require the use of the M lines. However, it is typically at the energy of the actinide's M lines that the interferences are dominant. The artifacts produced in the X-ray analysis are described and illustrated by some typical examples of analysis of actinide-bearing material.

  9. X-ray and gamma-ray line production by nonthermal ions. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.; Ramaty, R.; Omidvar, K.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray production at about 6.8 keV by the 2p to 1s transition in fast hydrogen- and helium-like iron ions is calculated, following both electron capture to excited levels and collisional excitation. A refinement of the Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers (1930) approximation is used to obtain an improved charge-exchange cross-section. This, and the corresponding ionization cross section, were used to determine equilibrium charge fractions for iron ions as functions of their energy. The effective X-ray line production cross section was found to be sharply peaked in energy at about 8 to 12 MeV per amu. Since fast ions of similar energies can also excite nuclear levels, the ratio of selected strong gamma-rays line emissivities to the X-ray line emissivity is calculated. These calculations are employed to set limits on the intensity of gamma-rays line emission from the galactic center and the radio galaxy Cen A, and it is found that these limits are generally lower than those reported in the literature.

  10. A medium sensitivity X-ray survey using the Einstein Observatory - The log N-log S relation for extragalactic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, T.; Gioia, I. M.; Zamorani, G.; Feigelson, E. D.; Fener, M.; Giacconi, R.; Griffiths, R. E.; Murray, S. S.; Stocke, J.; Liebert, J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents results of an X-ray survey of about 50 sq deg of the high galactic latitude sky at sensitivities in the range of 7 x 10 to the -14 to 5 x 10 to the -12 ergs/sq cm/s. The number-flux relation is derived for the extragalactic population to yield a best-fit power-law slope of 1.53 + or - 0.16, and the content of the sample is analyzed in terms of types of sources, appearing to be significantly different from the content of similar samples selected at higher fluxes. The medium sensitivity sample of extragalactic sources is dominated by active galactic nuclei, while samples selected at higher fluxes and higher energies are dominated by clusters of galaxies. Thus, the number-flux relation for extragalactic sources may be interpreted to a first approximation as the sum of the two different distributions with flatter and steeper slopes describing clusters and AGNs, respectively.

  11. Carbon and oxygen X-ray line emission from the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnopper, H. W.; Delvaille, J. P.; Rocchia, R.; Blondel, C.; Cheron, C.; Christy, J. C.; Ducros, R.; Koch, L.; Rothenflug, R.

    1982-01-01

    A soft X-ray, 0.3-1.0 keV spectrum from a 1 sr region which includes a portion of the North Polar Spur, obtained by three rocketborne lithium-drifted silicon detectors, shows the C V, C VI, O VII and O VIII emission lines. The spectrum is well fitted by a two-component, modified Kato (1976) model, where the coronal emission is in collisional equilibrium, with interstellar medium and North Polar Spur temperatures of 1.1 and 3.8 million K, respectively.

  12. Methods for calculating X-ray diffuse scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punegov, V. I.; Sivkov, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two independent approaches to calculate the angular distribution of X-ray diffusion scattering from a crystalline medium with spheroidal quantum dots (QDs) have been proposed. The first method is based on the analytical solution involving the multipole expansion of elastic strain fields beyond QDs. The second approach is based on calculations of atomic displacements near QDs by the Green's function method. An analysis of the diffuse scattering intensity distribution in the reciprocal space within these two approaches shows that both methods yield similar results for the chosen models of QD spatial distribution.

  13. Automatic detection of bone fragments in poultry using multi-energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, Shaun S; Paulus, Michael J; Mullens, James A

    2002-04-09

    At least two linear arrays of x-ray detectors are placed below a conveyor belt in a poultry processing plant. Multiple-energy x-ray sources illuminate the poultry and are detected by the detectors. Laser profilometry is used to measure the poultry thickness as the x-ray data is acquired. The detector readout is processed in real time to detect the presence of small highly attenuating fragments in the poultry, i.e., bone, metal, and cartilage.

  14. X-ray selected galaxy clusters in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, H.; Edge, A. C.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Price, P. A.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-06-01

    We present the results of a pilot study for the extended Massive Cluster Survey (eMACS), a comprehensive search for distant, X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z > 0.5. Our pilot study applies the eMACS concept to the 71 deg2 area extended by the 10 fields of the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Medium Deep Survey (MDS). Candidate clusters are identified by visual inspection of PS1 images in the g, r, i and z bands in a 5 × 5 arcmin2 region around X-ray sources detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS). To test and optimize the eMACS X-ray selection criteria, our pilot study uses the largest possible RASS data base, i.e. all RASS sources listed in the Bright and Faint Source Catalogues (BSC and FSC) that fall within the MDS footprint. We apply no additional constraints regarding X-ray flux, spectral hardness ratio or photon statistics and lower the redshift threshold to z > 0.3 to extend the probed luminosity range to poorer systems. Scrutiny of PS1/MDS images for 41 BSC and 200 FSC sources combined with dedicated spectroscopic follow-up observations results in a sample of 11 clusters with estimated or spectroscopic redshifts of z > 0.3. In order to assess and quantify the degree of point source contamination of the observed RASS fluxes, we examine archival Chandra data obtained in targeted and serendipitous observations of six of the 11 clusters found. As expected, the diffuse emission from all six systems is contaminated by point sources to some degree, and for half of them active galactic nucleus emission dominates. X-ray follow-up observations will thus be crucial in order to establish robust cluster luminosities for eMACS clusters. Although the small number of distant X-ray luminous clusters in the MDS does not allow us to make firm predictions for the over 20 000 deg2 of extragalactic sky covered by eMACS, the identification of two extremely promising eMACS cluster candidates at z ≳ 0.6 (both yet to be observed with Chandra) in such a small solid angle is encouraging

  15. A Review of X-ray Diagnostic Calibrations in the 2 to 100 keV Region Using the High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX)

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Zaheer; Pond, T; Buckles, R A; Maddox, B R; Chen, C D; DeWald, E L; Izumi, N; Stewart, R

    2010-05-19

    The precise and accurate measurement of X-rays in the 2 keV to 100 keV region is crucial to the understanding of HED plasmas and warm dense matter in general. With the emergence of inertially confined plasma facilities as the premier platforms for ICF, laboratory astrophysics, and national security related plasma experiments, the need to calibrate diagnostics in the high energy X-ray regime has grown. At National Security Technologies High Energy X-ray Calibration Facility (HEX) in Livermore, California, X-ray imagers, filter-fluorescer spectrometers, crystal spectrometers, image plates, and nuclear diagnostics are calibrated. The HEX can provide measurements of atomic line radiation, X-ray flux (accuracy within 10%), and X-ray energy (accuracy within 1%). The HEX source is comprised of a commercial 160 kV X-ray tube, a fluorescer wheel, a filter wheel, and a lead encasement. The X-ray tube produces a Tungsten bremsstrahlung spectrum which causes a foil to fluoresce line radiation. To minimize bremsstrahlung in the radiation for calibration we also provide various foils as filters. For experimental purposes, a vacuum box capable of 10{sup -7} Torr, as well as HPGe and CdTe radiation detectors, are provided on an optical table. Most geometries and arrangements can be changed to meet experimental needs.

  16. Studying X-Ray Binaries with High Energy Frequency Quasi-Periodic Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaaret, P.; West, Donald K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to further our understanding of the dynamics of secreting neutron stars and black holes in the hope of using these systems as probes of the physics of strong gravitational fetus. The main focus of this work has been a multi-year program of simultaneous millisecond X-ray timing and spectral observations carried out with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) to perform the X-ray timing and one of the satellites Asca, BeppoSAX, or Chandra to perform X-ray spectral measurements. With the advent of Chandra, we have extended our work to incLude extragalactic X-ray binaries. We conducted a comprehensive study of the X-ray and radio behavior of the Black Hole Candidate (BHC) X-ray transient XTE J1550-564 using RXTE, Chandra, and the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). We showed that strong radio emission is associated with major X-ray outbursts involving an X-ray state transition, while a compact radio jet is seen in the low/hard X-ray state found in the outburst decay. Interesting, the total energy required to produce the compact jet may be a substantial fraction of the total accretion energy of the system in that state. We also performed a detailed study of the spectral and timing properties of the decay. In joint RXTE/BeppoSAX observations of the neutron-star X-ray binary Cyg X-2, we discovered a correlation between the timing properties (the frequency of the horizontal branch oscillations) and the properties of a soft, thermal component of the X-ray spectrum. d e showed that more detX- ray from accreting neutron stars. We have completed analysis of RXTE observations of the X-ray transient SAX J1750.8-2900 made after detection of X-ray bursts from the source with the BeppoSAX Wide-Field Camera. We discovered millisecond oscillations in both the persistent emission and in the X-ray bursts.

  17. The high energy X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula observed from OSO 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, L. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Orwig, L. E.; Maurer, G. S.; Frost, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    The X-ray spectrum of the Crab Nebula was measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite. The total emission of the X-ray source shows no long term variability. The spectrum itself can be described by a single power law out to energies of at least 500 keV.

  18. Phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with a laboratory setup.

    PubMed

    Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A; Diemoz, Paul C; Lorenzo, Rodolfo; Speller, Robert D; Wagner, Ulrich H; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K; Olivo, Alessandro

    2014-06-01

    We report on the design and realization of an x-ray imaging system for quantitative phase-contrast microscopy at high x-ray energy with laboratory-scale instrumentation. Phase and amplitude were separated quantitatively at x-ray energies up to 80 keV with micrometric spatial resolution. The accuracy of the results was tested against numerical simulations, and the spatial resolution was experimentally quantified by measuring a Siemens star phase object. This simple setup should find broad application in those areas of x-ray imaging where high energy and spatial resolution are simultaneously required and in those difficult cases where the sample contains materials with similar x-ray absorption.

  19. Relative calibration of energy thresholds on multi-bin spectral x-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjölin, M.; Danielsson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate and reliable energy calibration of spectral x-ray detectors used in medical imaging is essential for avoiding ring artifacts in the reconstructed images (computed tomography) and for performing accurate material basis decomposition. A simple and accurate method for relative calibration of the energy thresholds on a multi-bin spectral x-ray detector is presented. The method obtains the linear relations between all energy thresholds in a channel by scanning the thresholds with respect to each other during x-ray illumination. The method does not rely on a model of the detector's response function and does not require any identifiable features in the x-ray spectrum. Applying the same method, the offset between the thresholds can be determined also without external stimuli by utilizing the electronic noise as a source. The simplicity and accuracy of the method makes it suitable for implementation in clinical multi-bin spectral x-ray imaging systems.

  20. Soft X-ray bremsstrahlung and fluorescent line production in the atmosphere by low energy electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraushaar, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of low energy quasi-trapped or precipitating electrons which impact on the counter windows of soft X-ray detectors are discussed. The errors caused by X-rays produced in the residual atmosphere above a rocket-borne detector because of the resemblance to X-rays of cosmic origin are examined. The design and development of counter windows which make it possible to identify the atmospherically produced X-rays are described. Curves are presented to show the following: (1) preliminary low energy electron data from Atmospheric Explorer C, (2) X-ray flux in electron-excited nitrogen and oxygen, (3) typical proportional counter response to low energy cosmic rays, and (4) proportional counter response to X-radiation produced by electrons incident upon a gas of oxygen to nitrogen number of 0.4.

  1. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Hawreliak, James A.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Suggit, Matthew J.; Tang, Henry; Wark, Justin S.

    2014-03-01

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  2. Energy dependence measurement of small-type optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter by means of characteristic X-rays induced with general diagnostic X-ray equipment.

    PubMed

    Takegami, Kazuki; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Okino, Hiroki; Kimoto, Natsumi; Maehata, Itsumi; Kanazawa, Yuki; Okazaki, Tohru; Hashizume, Takuya; Kobayashi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For X-ray inspections by way of general X-ray equipment, it is important to measure an entrance-skin dose. Recently, a small optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeter was made commercially available by Landauer, Inc. The dosimeter does not interfere with the medical images; therefore, it is expected to be a convenient detector for measuring personal exposure doses. In an actual clinical situation, it is assumed that X-rays of different energies will be detected by a dosimeter. For evaluation of the exposure dose measured by a dosimeter, it is necessary to know the energy dependence of the dosimeter. Our aim in this study was to measure the energy dependence of the OSL dosimeter experimentally in the diagnostic X-ray region. Metal samples weighing several grams were irradiated and, in this way, characteristic X-rays having energies ranging from 8 to 85 keV were generated. Using these mono-energetic X-rays, the dosimeter was irradiated. Simultaneously, the fluence of the X-rays was determined with a CdTe detector. The energy-dependent efficiency of the dosimeter was derived from the measured value of the dosimeter and the fluence. Moreover, the energy-dependent efficiency was calculated by Monte-Carlo simulation. The efficiency obtained in the experiment was in good agreement with that of the simulation. In conclusion, our proposed method, in which characteristic X-rays are used, is valuable for measurement of the energy dependence of a small OSL dosimeter in the diagnostic X-ray region.

  3. Compact pnCCD-based X-ray camera with high spatial and energy resolution: a color X-ray camera.

    PubMed

    Scharf, O; Ihle, S; Ordavo, I; Arkadiev, V; Bjeoumikhov, A; Bjeoumikhova, S; Buzanich, G; Gubzhokov, R; Günther, A; Hartmann, R; Kühbacher, M; Lang, M; Langhoff, N; Liebel, A; Radtke, M; Reinholz, U; Riesemeier, H; Soltau, H; Strüder, L; Thünemann, A F; Wedell, R

    2011-04-01

    For many applications there is a requirement for nondestructive analytical investigation of the elemental distribution in a sample. With the improvement of X-ray optics and spectroscopic X-ray imagers, full field X-ray fluorescence (FF-XRF) methods are feasible. A new device for high-resolution X-ray imaging, an energy and spatial resolving X-ray camera, is presented. The basic idea behind this so-called "color X-ray camera" (CXC) is to combine an energy dispersive array detector for X-rays, in this case a pnCCD, with polycapillary optics. Imaging is achieved using multiframe recording of the energy and the point of impact of single photons. The camera was tested using a laboratory 30 μm microfocus X-ray tube and synchrotron radiation from BESSY II at the BAMline facility. These experiments demonstrate the suitability of the camera for X-ray fluorescence analytics. The camera simultaneously records 69,696 spectra with an energy resolution of 152 eV for manganese K(α) with a spatial resolution of 50 μm over an imaging area of 12.7 × 12.7 mm(2). It is sensitive to photons in the energy region between 3 and 40 keV, limited by a 50 μm beryllium window, and the sensitive thickness of 450 μm of the chip. Online preview of the sample is possible as the software updates the sums of the counts for certain energy channel ranges during the measurement and displays 2-D false-color maps as well as spectra of selected regions. The complete data cube of 264 × 264 spectra is saved for further qualitative and quantitative processing.

  4. Shielded radiography with a laser-driven MeV-energy X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouyuan; Golovin, Grigory; Miller, Cameron; Haden, Daniel; Banerjee, Sudeep; Zhang, Ping; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Jun; Zhao, Baozhen; Clarke, Shaun; Pozzi, Sara; Umstadter, Donald

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of experimental and numerical-simulation studies of shielded radiography using narrowband MeV-energy X-rays from a compact all-laser-driven inverse-Compton-scattering X-ray light source. This recently developed X-ray light source is based on a laser-wakefield accelerator with ultra-high-field gradient (GeV/cm). We demonstrate experimentally high-quality radiographic imaging (image contrast of 0.4 and signal-to-noise ratio of 2:1) of a target composed of 8-mm thick depleted uranium shielded by 80-mm thick steel, using a 6-MeV X-ray beam with a spread of 45% (FWHM) and 107 photons in a single shot. The corresponding dose of the X-ray pulse measured in front of the target is ∼100 nGy/pulse. Simulations performed using the Monte-Carlo code MCNPX accurately reproduce the experimental results. These simulations also demonstrate that the narrow bandwidth of the Compton X-ray source operating at 6 and 9 MeV leads to a reduction of deposited dose as compared to broadband bremsstrahlung sources with the same end-point energy. The X-ray beam's inherently low-divergence angle (∼mrad) is advantageous and effective for interrogation at standoff distance. These results demonstrate significant benefits of all-laser driven Compton X-rays for shielded radiography.

  5. Soft X-Ray Transmission Spectroscopy of a Warm/Hot Intergalactic Medium with XEUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Hajime; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Sasaki, Shin; Suto, Yasushi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Ohashi, Takaya; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the detectability of a Warm/Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) via absorption lines toward bright point sources with a future X-ray satellite mission, XEUS. While we consider bright QSOs as specific examples, the methodology can be applied to bright gamma-ray burst afterglows. We created mock absorption spectra for bright QSOs (more than 20 QSOs over all sky) using the light-cone output of a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation. We assumed that the WHIM is under collisional and photo-ionization equilibrium. If WHIM has a constant metallicity of Z = 0.1Zodot, approximately 2 O VII absorption line systems with > 3σ will be detected on average along a random line-of-sight toward bright QSOs up to z = 0.3 for a 30ks exposure.

  6. Scintillator Evaluation for High-Energy X-Ray Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; S. A. Baker

    2001-09-01

    This report presents results derived from a digital radiography study performed using x-rays from a 2.3 MeV, rod-pinch diode. Detailed is a parameter study of cerium-doped lutetium ortho-silicate (LSO) scintillator thickness, as it relates to system resolution and detection quantum efficiency (DQE). Additionally, the detection statistics of LSO were compared with that of CsI(Tl). As a result of this study we found the LSO scintillator with a thickness of 3 mm to yield the highest system DQE over the range of spatial frequencies from 0.75 to 2.5 mm{sup -1}.

  7. Soft X-ray Charged Piezoelectret for Kinetic Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Cho, HJ; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Piezoelectret polymer attracts much attention for its high piezoelectric coefficient. Multilayered piezoelectret structures are often charged with corona discharge, but it is difficult to get high surface charge density. To address this issue, a multilayered piezoelectret structure with embedded electrode is proposed, which can be efficiently poled with soft X-ray charging. With the aid of embedded electrodes, the bias voltage is directly applied to each unit cell, rather than divided and distributed to multiple layers. With an early PTFE-based prototype, output power of 0.5 μJ has been obtained for 0.3 mm displacement in 0.2 s.

  8. Theoretical consideration of the energy resolution in planar HPGe detectors for low energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, theoretical consideration of the processes in planar High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors for low energy X-rays using the random stochastic processes formalism was carried out. Using the random stochastic processes formalism, the generating function of the processes of X-rays registration in a planar HPGe detector was derived. The power serial expansions of the detector amplitude and the variance in terms of the inverse bias voltage were derived. The coefficients of these expansions allow determining the Fano factor, electron mobility lifetime product, nonuniformity of the trap density, and other characteristics of the semiconductor material. (authors)

  9. High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 in the X-Ray Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    This photograph is of the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO)-2 telescope being evaluated by engineers in the clean room of the X-Ray Calibration Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The MSFC was heavily engaged in the technical and scientific aspects, testing and calibration, of the HEAO-2 telescope The HEAO-2 was the first imaging and largest x-ray telescope built to date. The X-Ray Calibration Facility was built in 1976 for testing MSFC's HEAO-2. The facility is the world's largest, most advanced laboratory for simulating x-ray emissions from distant celestial objects. It produced a space-like environment in which components related to x-ray telescope imaging are tested and the quality of their performance in space is predicted. The original facility contained a 1,000-foot long by 3-foot diameter vacuum tube (for the x-ray path) cornecting an x-ray generator and an instrument test chamber. Recently, the facility was upgraded to evaluate the optical elements of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, Chandra X-Ray Observatory and Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory.

  10. X-ray fluorescence and energy dispersive x-ray diffraction for the quantification of elemental concentrations in breast tissue.

    PubMed

    Geraki, K; Farquharson, M J; Bradley, D A

    2004-01-07

    This paper presents improvements on a previously reported method for the measurement of elements in breast tissue specimens (Geraki et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2327-39). A synchrotron-based system was used for the detection of the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) emitted from iron, copper, zinc and potassium in breast tissue specimens, healthy and cancerous. Calibration models resulting from the irradiation of standard aqueous solutions were used for the quantification of the elements. The present developments concentrate on increasing the convergence between the tissue samples and the calibration models, therefore improving accuracy. For this purpose the composition of the samples in terms of adipose and fibrous tissue was evaluated, using an energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system. The relationships between the attenuation and scatter properties of the two tissue components and water were determined through Monte Carlo simulations. The results from the simulations and the EDXRD measurements allowed the XRF data from each specimen to be corrected according to its composition. The statistical analysis of the elemental concentrations of the different groups of specimens reveals that all four elements are found in elevated levels in the tumour specimens. The increase is less pronounced for iron and copper and most for potassium and zinc. Other observed features include the substantial degree of inhomogeneity of elemental distributions within the volume of the specimens, varying between 4% and 36% of the mean, depending on the element and the type of the sample. The accuracy of the technique, based on the measurement of a standard reference material, proved to be between 3% and 22% depending on the element, which presents only a marginal improvement (1%-3%) compared to the accuracy of the previously reported results. The measurement precision was between 1% and 9% while the calculated uncertainties on the final elemental concentrations ranged between 10% and 16%.

  11. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  12. High-energy x-ray imaging diagnostics of nanosecond pulse accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Hohlfelder, Robert J.; Tribe, Alun J.; Beutler, David E.; Gallegos, Roque R.; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Thompson, Jon A.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray imaging has been undertaken on Sandia National Laboratories' radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<20ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad (Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.5 to 1.8MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and an evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented.

  13. Two Distinct-absorption X-Ray Components from Type IIn Supernovae: Evidence for Asphericity in the Circumstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Maeda, Keiichi; Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Kawabata, Koji; Ohno, Masanori; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Tsuboi, Yohko; Immler, Stefan

    2016-12-01

    We present multi-epoch X-ray spectral observations of three Type IIn supernovae (SNe), SN 2005kd, SN 2006jd, and SN 2010jl, acquired with Chandra, XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Swift. Previous extensive X-ray studies of SN 2010jl have revealed that X-ray spectra are dominated by thermal emission, which likely arises from a hot plasma heated by a forward shock propagating into a massive circumstellar medium (CSM). Interestingly, an additional soft X-ray component was required to reproduce the spectra at a period of ˜1-2 years after the SN explosion. Although this component is likely associated with the SN, its origin remained an open question. We find a similar, additional soft X-ray component from the other two SNe IIn as well. Given this finding, we present a new interpretation for the origin of this component; it is thermal emission from a forward shock essentially identical to the hard X-ray component, but directly reaches us from a void of the dense CSM. Namely, the hard and soft components are responsible for the heavily and moderately absorbed components, respectively. The co-existence of the two components with distinct absorptions as well as the delayed emergence of the moderately absorbed X-ray component could be evidence for asphericity of the CSM. We show that the X-ray spectral evolution can be qualitatively explained by considering a torus-like geometry for the dense CSM. Based on our X-ray spectral analyses, we estimate the radius of the torus-like CSM to be on the order of ˜5 × 1016 cm.

  14. Empirical studies of solar flares: Comparison of X-ray and H alpha filtergrams and analysis of the energy balance of the X-ray plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The physics of solar flares was investigated through a combined analysis of X-ray filtergrams of the high temperature coronal component of flares and H alpha filtergrams of the low temperature chromospheric component. The data were used to study the magnetic field configuration and its changes in solar flares, and to examine the chromospheric location and structure of X-ray bright points (XPB) and XPB flares. Each topic and the germane data are discussed. The energy balance of the thermal X-ray plasma in flares, while not studied, is addressed.

  15. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the Role of Relaxation Energy in Understanding Chemical Shifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Frank O.; White, Michael G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the measurement of electrons ejected from a system which is being irradiated with X-rays or ultraviolet photons, and a theoretical model for calculating core-electron ionization energies. (MLH)

  16. Multi-energy image sequence fusion based on variable energy X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Han, Yan; Pan, Jinxiao; Chen, Ping

    2014-01-01

    For complicated structural components characterized by wide X-ray attenuation ranges, the conventional fixed-energy imaging mode cannot obtain all structural information using a single tube voltage. This limitation results in information shortage, because the effective thickness of components along the orientation of the X-ray penetration exceeds the limit of the dynamic range of the X-ray imaging system. To solve this problem, multi-energy image sequence fusion technology has been advanced. In this new method, the tube voltage is adjusted several times by matching the voltage and the effective thickness to obtain all the effective local information on an object. Then, the subset sequences in the multi-energy image sequence are extracted based on the recursive template, and that are fused to reconstruct the full projection information based on linear weighting. An accompanying experiment demonstrates that the new technology can extend the dynamic range of X-ray imaging and provide a complete representation of the internal structure of complicated structural components.

  17. Investigation of TLD-700 energy response to low energy x-ray encountered in diagnostic radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrati, Ammar; Bourouina, Mourad; Khalal-Kouache, Karima

    2016-01-01

    The aim of thiswork is to study the energy dependence of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-700) for low energy X-ray beams encountered in conventional diagnostic radiology. In the first step, we studied some characteristics (reproducibility and linearity) of TLD-700 chips using a 137Cs source, and selected TLD chips with reproducibility better than 2.5%. Then we determined TLD-700 energy response for diagnostic radiology X-ray qualities, and investigated its influence on air kerma estimate. A maximum deviation of 60% can be obtained if TLDs are calibrated for 137Cs radiation source and used in diagnostic radiology fields. However, this deviation became less than 20% if TLDs chips are calibrated for the reference x-ray radiation quality RQR5 (recommended by the IEC 61267 standard). Consequently, we recommend calibrating this kind of TLDdetector with RQR5 diagnostic radiology X-ray quality. This method permits to obtain a good accuracy when assessing the entrance dose in diagnostic radiology procedures.

  18. Instantaneous x-ray radiation energy from laser produced polystyrene plasmas for shock ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Wanli; Wei, Huiyue; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Zhu, Tuo; Song, Tianmin; Huang, Chengwu; Yang, Jiamin

    2013-10-15

    Laser target energy coupling mechanism is crucial in the shock ignition (SI) scheme, and x-ray radiation energy is a non-negligible portion of the laser produced plasma energy. To evaluate the x-ray radiation energy amount at conditions relevant to SI scheme, instantaneous x-ray radiation energy is investigated experimentally with continuum phase plates smoothed lasers irradiating layer polystyrene targets. Comparative laser pulses without and with shock spike are employed. With the measured x-ray angular distribution, full space x-ray radiation energy and conversion efficiency are observed. Instantaneous scaling law of x-ray conversion efficiency is obtained as a function of laser intensity and time. It should be pointed out that the scaling law is available for any laser pulse shape and intensity, with which irradiates polystyrene planar target with intensity from 2 × 10{sup 14} to 1.8 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Numerical analysis of the laser energy transformation is performed, and the simulation results agree with the experimental data.

  19. Energy-dependent Orbital Modulation of X-rays and Constraints on Emission of the Jet in Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Maitra, Chandreyee; Frankowski, Adam; Skinner, Gerald K.; Misra, Ranjeev

    2012-01-01

    We study orbital modulation of X-rays from Cyg X-3, using data from Swift, INTEGRAL and RXTE. Using the wealth of the presently available data and an improved averaging method, we obtain energy-dependent folded and averaged light curves with unprecedented accuracy. We find that above 5 keV, the modulation depth decreases with the increasing energy, which is consistent with the modulation being caused by both bound-free absorption and Compton scattering in the stellar wind of the donor, with minima corresponding to the highest optical depth, which occurs around the superior conjunction. We find a decrease of the depth below 3 keV, which appears to be due to re-emission of the absorbed continuum by the wind in soft X-ray lines. Based on the shape of the folded light curves, any X-ray contribution from the jet in Cyg X-3, which emits ?-rays detected at energies > 0.1 GeV in soft spectral states, is found to be minor up to 100 keV. This implies the presence of a rather sharp low-energy break in the jet MeV-range spectrum.We also calculate phase-resolved RXTE X-ray spectra, and show the difference between the spectra corresponding to phases around the superior and inferior conjunctions can indeed be accounted for by a combined effect of bound-free absorption in an ionized medium and Compton scattering.

  20. Bone mineral measurement using dual energy x ray densitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven W.

    1989-01-01

    Bone mineral measurements before and after space missions have shown that weightlessness greatly accelerates bone demineralization. Bone mineral losses as high as 1 to 3 percent per month were reported. Highly precise instrumentation is required to monitor this loss and thereby test the efficacy of treatment. During the last year, a significant improvement was made in Dual-Photon Absorptiometry by replacing the radioactive source with an x ray tube. Advantages of this system include: better precision, lower patient dose, better spacial resolution, and shorter scan times. The high precision and low radiation dose of this technique will allow detection of bone mineral changes of less than 1 percent with measurements conducted directly at the sites of interest. This will allow the required bone mineral studies to be completed in a shorter time with greater confidence.

  1. Low-energy x-ray irradiation for electrophysiological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Zeman, G.H.; Pellmar, T.C.

    1989-01-01

    High-dose-rate acute whole-body exposures have been the main focus of radiobiology research conducted at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) for many years. Extensive quantitative studies have been conducted analyzing behavioral effects, radiation-induced syndromes, and combined injury phenomena. Tolliver and Pellmar initiated a study to evaluate radiation damage to brain neurophysiology. A 50-kVp molybdenum target/filter x-ray tube was installed inside a lead-shielded Faraday cage. High-dose rates of up to 1.54 Gy/min (17.4-keV weighted average photons) were used to conduct local in vitro irradiations of the hippocampal region of guinea pig brains. Electrophysiological recordings of subtle changes in neuronal activity indicate this system is suitable for this application.

  2. Shadowing of the Soft X-ray Background and the Distribution of Hot Gas in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labov, Simon E.; Craig, William W.; Kahn, Steven M.

    1993-12-01

    The underlying mechanism responsible for variations in the observed 1/4 keV X-ray background is not well understood. Measurements of soft X-ray shadows cast by clumps of neutral material provide a direct method of determining the spatial distribution of the hot gas responsible for the soft X-ray background. The observed contrast of an X-ray shadow depends on the density and size of the cool absorbing cloud, and on the amount of foreground and background soft X-ray emitting gas. We present here a dramatic example of this shadowing effect as observed by the ROSAT X-ray telescope and position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC). The shadow discussed here is particularly dark with high contrast indicating that the vast majority of the X-ray emitting gas in this direction extends beyond the cloud. This work was supported by the NASA ROSAT Guest Observer Program under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.

  3. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  4. Inferring the Energy Distribution of Accelerated Electrons in Solar Flares from X-ray Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.; Sui, Linhui; Su, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of the energy distribution of electrons accelerated in solar flares is important for constraining possible acceleration mechanisms and for understanding the relationships between flare X-ray sources, radio sources, and particles observed in space. Solar flare hard X-rays are primarily emitted from dense, thick-target regions in the lower atmosphere, but the electrons are understood to be accelerated higher in the corona. Various processes can distort the X-ray spectrum or the energy distribution of electrons before they reach the thick-target region. After briefly reviewing the processes that affect the X-ray spectrum and the electron distribution, I will describe recent results from a study of flare spectra from RHESSI to determine the importance of these processes in inferring the energy distribution of accelerated electrons.

  5. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z.

    2015-03-14

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. In addition, an efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  6. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; ...

    2015-03-14

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. In addition, an efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent inmore » the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.« less

  7. Fat to muscle ratio measurements with dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Luo, J.; Wang, A.; Broadbent, C.; Zhong, J.; Dilmanian, F. A.; Zafonte, F.; Zhong, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Accurate measurement of the fat-to-muscle ratio in animal model is important for obesity research. An efficient way to measure the fat to muscle ratio in animal model using dual-energy absorptiometry is presented in this paper. A radioactive source exciting x-ray fluorescence from a target material is used to provide the two x-ray energies needed. The x-rays, after transmitting through the sample, are measured with an energy-sensitive Ge detector. Phantoms and specimens were measured. The results showed that the method was sensitive to the fat to muscle ratios with good linearity. A standard deviation of a few percent in the fat to muscle ratio could be observed with the x-ray dose of 0.001 mGy.

  8. ENERGY DEPENDENCE OF SYNCHROTRON X-RAY RIMS IN TYCHO’S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-10-20

    Several young supernova remnants (SNRs) exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's SNR in five energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths ∼1%–5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths ∼50–400 μG assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are ∼1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields ≳20 μG, affirming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  9. Energy dispersive X-Ray fluorescence determination of thorium in phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirashi, N. N.; Dhara, Sangita; Kumar, S. Sanjay; Chaudhury, Satyajeet; Misra, N. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    2010-07-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence studies on determination of thorium (in the range of 7 to 137 mg/mL) in phosphoric acid solutions obtained by dissolution of thoria in autoclave were made. Fixed amounts of Y internal standard solutions, after dilution with equal amount of phosphoric acid, were added to the calibration as well as sample solutions. Solution aliquots of approximately 2-5 µL were deposited on thick absorbent sheets to absorb the solutions and the sheets were presented for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements. A calibration plot was made between intensity ratios (Th Lα/Y Kα) against respective amounts of thorium in the calibration solutions. Thorium amounts in phosphoric acid samples were determined using their energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra and the above calibration plot. The energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence results, thus obtained, were compared with the corresponding gamma ray spectrometry results and were found to be within average deviation of 2.6% from the respective gamma ray spectrometry values. The average precision obtained in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determinations was found to be 4% (1 σ). The energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method has an advantage over gamma ray spectrometry for thorium determination as the amount of sample required and measurement time is far less compared to that required in gamma ray spectrometry.

  10. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths approximately 1-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths approximately 50-400 micron G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are approximately 1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields approximately greater than 20 micron G, arming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  11. The role of x-ray Swank factor in energy-resolving photon-counting imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian. A.

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Energy-resolved x-ray imaging has the potential to improve contrast-to-noise ratio by measuring the energy of each interacting photon and applying optimal weighting factors. The success of energy-resolving photon-counting (EPC) detectors relies on the ability of an x-ray detector to accurately measure the energy of each interacting photon. However, the escape of characteristic emissions and Compton scatter degrades spectral information. This article makes the theoretical connection between accuracy and imprecision in energy measurements with the x-ray Swank factor for a-Se, Si, CdZnTe, and HgI{sub 2}-based detectors. Methods: For a detector that implements adaptive binning to sum all elements in which x-ray energy is deposited for a single interaction, energy imprecision is shown to depend on the Swank factor for a large element with x rays incident at the center. The response function for each converter material is determined using Monte Carlo methods and used to determine energy accuracy, Swank factor, and relative energy imprecision in photon-energy measurements. Results: For each material, at energies below the respective K edges, accuracy is close to unity and imprecision is only a few percent. Above the K-edge energies, characteristic emission results in a drop in accuracy and precision that depends on escape probability. In Si, and to some extent a-Se, Compton-scatter escape also degrades energy precision with increasing energy. The influence of converter thickness on energy accuracy and imprecision is modest for low-Z materials but becomes important when using high-Z materials at energies greater than the K-edge energies. Conclusions: Accuracy and precision in energy measurements by EPC detectors are determined largely by the energy-dependent x-ray Swank factor. Modest decreases in the Swank factor (5%-15%) result in large increases in relative imprecision (30%-40%).

  12. MeV-energy x rays from inverse compton scattering with laser-wakefield accelerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Powers, N D; Ghebregziabher, I; Maharjan, C M; Liu, C; Golovin, G; Banerjee, S; Zhang, J; Cunningham, N; Moorti, A; Clarke, S; Pozzi, S; Umstadter, D P

    2013-04-12

    We report the generation of MeV x rays using an undulator and accelerator that are both driven by the same 100-terawatt laser system. The laser pulse driving the accelerator and the scattering laser pulse are independently optimized to generate a high energy electron beam (>200  MeV) and maximize the output x-ray brightness. The total x-ray photon number was measured to be ∼1×10(7), the source size was 5  μm, and the beam divergence angle was ∼10  mrad. The x-ray photon energy, peaked at 1 MeV (reaching up to 4 MeV), exceeds the thresholds of fundamental nuclear processes (e.g., pair production and photodisintegration).

  13. Novel x-ray imaging diagnostics of high-energy nanosecond pulse accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graham W.; Beutler, David E.; Bell, John D.; Seymour, Calvin L. G.; Hohlfelder, Robert J.; Gallegos, Roque R.; Dudley, John

    2005-03-01

    Pioneering x-ray imaging has been undertaken on a number of AWE"s and Sandia National Laboratories" radiation effects x-ray simulators. These simulators typically yield a single very short (<50ns) pulse of high-energy (MeV endpoint energy bremsstrahlung) x-ray radiation with doses in the kilorad (krad(Si)) region. X-ray source targets vary in size from 2 to 25cm diameter, dependent upon the particular simulator. Electronic imaging of the source x-ray emission under dynamic conditions yields valuable information upon how the simulator is performing. The resultant images are of interest to the simulator designer who may configure new x-ray source converter targets and diode designs. The images can provide quantitative information about machine performance during radiation effects testing of components under active conditions. The effects testing program is a valuable interface for validation of high performance computer codes and models for the radiation effects community. A novel high-energy x-ray imaging spectrometer is described whereby the spectral energy (0.1 to 2.5MeV) profile may be discerned from the digitally recorded and viewable images via a pinhole/scintillator/CCD imaging system and knowledge of the filtration parameters. Unique images, analysis and a preliminary evaluation of the capability of the spectrometer are presented. Further, a novel time resolved imaging system is described that captures a sequence of high spatial resolution temporal images, with zero interframe time, in the nanosecond timeframe, of our source x-rays.

  14. Quantitative Electron Probe Microanalysis Using a Scanning Electron Microscope and an X-Ray Energy Spectrometer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    necessary to solve the ZAF cor- rections in an iterative manner similar to that used by J . Colby 13in the Magic IV programme . In that programme the...Combined with an Energy Dispersive X-ray Analyzer for Quantitative Analysis", X-ray Spectrometry, 2, 1973. 10. Green, L.: Journ. of Phys. E. Scient ... Instrum ., 2, (3), 1973. 11. Wodke, Norbert F. and Schamber, Frederick, MS 885 Super ML Operation and Programme Description Version 1, Unpublished, Tracor

  15. Thermal expansion in UO2 determined by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Guthrie, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, L. B.; ...

    2016-06-24

    In this study, we present crystallographic analyses of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on polycrystalline UO2 up to the melting temperature. The Rietveld refinements of our X-ray data are in agreement with previous measurements, but are systematically located around the upper bound of their uncertainty, indicating a slightly steeper trend of thermal expansion compared to established values. This observation is consistent with recent first principles calculations.

  16. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens.

  17. Interferometric phase-contrast X-ray CT imaging of VX2 rabbit cancer at 35keV X-ray energy

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Tohoru; Wu Jin; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Lwin, Thet-Thet; Itai, Yuji; Yoneyama, Akio; Hyodo, Kazuyuki

    2004-05-12

    Imaging of large objects at 17.7-keV low x-ray energy causes huge x-ray exposure to the objects even using interferometric phase-contrast x-ray CT (PCCT). Thus, we tried to obtain PCCT images at high x-ray energy of 35keV and examined the image quality using a formalin-fixed VX2 rabbit cancer specimen with 15-mm in diameter. The PCCT system consisted of an asymmetrically cut silicon (220) crystal, a monolithic x-ray interferometer, a phase-shifter, an object cell and an x-ray CCD camera. The PCCT at 35 keV clearly visualized various inner structures of VX2 rabbit cancer such as necrosis, cancer, the surrounding tumor vessels, and normal liver tissue. Besides, image-contrast was not degraded significantly. These results suggest that the PCCT at 35 KeV is sufficient to clearly depict the histopathological morphology of VX2 rabbit cancer specimen.

  18. The energy spectrum of anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trümper, J. E.; Zezas, A.; Ertan, Ü.; Kylafis, N. D.

    2010-07-01

    Context. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) exhibit characteristic X-ray luminosities (both soft and hard) of around 1035 erg s-1 and characteristic power-law, hard X-ray spectra extending to about 200 keV. Two AXPs also exhibit pulsed radio emission. Aims: Assuming that AXPs and SGRs accrete matter from a fallback disk, we attempt to explain both the soft and the hard X-ray emission as the result of the accretion process. We also attempt to explain their radio emission or the lack of it. Methods: We test the hypothesis that the power-law, hard X-ray spectra are produced in the accretion flow mainly by bulk-motion Comptonization of soft photons emitted at the neutron star surface. Fallback disk models invoke surface dipole magnetic fields of 1012 - 1013 G, which is what we assume here. Results: Unlike normal X-ray pulsars, for which the accretion rate is highly super-Eddington, the accretion rate is approximately Eddington in AXPs and SGRs and thus the bulk-motion Comptonization operates efficiently. As an illustrative example we reproduce both the hard and the soft X-ray spectra of AXP 4U 0142+61 well using the XSPEC package compTB. Conclusions: Our model seems to explain both the hard and the soft X-ray spectra of AXPs and SGRs, as well as their radio emission or the lack of it, in a natural way. It might also explain the short bursts observed in these sources. On the other hand, it cannot explain the giant X-ray outbursts observed in SGRs, which may result from the conversion of magnetic energy in local multipole fields.

  19. Material depth reconstruction method of multi-energy X-ray images using neural network.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo-Jin; Kim, Dae-Seung; Kang, Sung-Won; Yi, Won-Jin

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of technology, multi-energy X-ray imaging is promising technique that can reduce the patient's dose and provide functional imaging. Two-dimensional photon-counting detector to provide multi-energy imaging is under development. In this work, we present a material decomposition method using multi-energy images. To acquire multi-energy images, Monte Carlo simulation was performed. The X-ray spectrum was modeled and ripple effect was considered. Using the dissimilar characteristics in energy-dependent X-ray attenuation of each material, multiple energy X-ray images were decomposed into material depth images. Feedforward neural network was used to fit multi-energy images to material depth images. In order to use the neural network, step wedge phantom images were used for training neuron. Finally, neural network decomposed multi-energy X-ray images into material depth image. To demonstrate the concept of this method, we applied it to simulated images of a 3D head phantom. The results show that neural network method performed effectively material depth reconstruction.

  20. Calculating the X-Ray Fluorescence from the Planet Mercury Due to High-Energy Electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbine, T. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Bergstrom, P. M., Jr.; Christon, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    The least-studied terrestrial planet is Mercury due to its proximity to the Sun, which makes telescopic observations and spacecraft encounters difficult. Our lack of knowledge about Mercury should change in the near future due to the recent launching of MESSENGER, a Mercury orbiter. Another mission (BepiColombo) is currently being planned. The x-ray spectrometer on MESSENGER (and planned for BepiColombo) can characterize the elemental composition of a planetary surface by measuring emitted fluorescent x-rays. If electrons are ejected from an atom s inner shell by interaction with energetic particles such as photons, electrons, or ions, electrons from an outer shell can transfer to the inner shell. Characteristic x-rays are then emitted with energies that are the difference between the binding energy of the ion in its excited state and that of the ion in its ground state. Because each element has a unique set of energy levels, each element emits x-rays at a unique set of energies. Electrons and ions usually do not have the needed flux at high energies to cause significant x-ray fluorescence on most planetary bodies. This is not the case for Mercury where high-energy particles were detected during the Mariner 10 flybys. Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field that deflects the solar wind, resulting in a bow shock in the solar wind and a magnetospheric cavity. Electrons and ions accelerated in the magnetosphere tend to follow its magnetic field lines and can impact the surface on Mercury s dark side Modeling has been done to determine if x-ray fluorescence resulting from the impact of high-energy electrons accelerated in Mercury's magnetosphere can be detected by MESSENGER. Our goal is to understand how much bulk chemical information can be obtained from x-ray fluorescence measurements on the dark side of Mercury.

  1. Edge-enhanced imaging obtained with very broad energy band x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Taibi, A.; Cardarelli, P.; Di Domenico, G.; Marziani, M.; Gambaccini, M.; Hanashima, T.; Yamada, H.

    2010-04-05

    We demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that edge-enhancement effects are produced when objects, in contact with the x-ray detector, are imaged by using very broad x-ray spectra. Radiographs of thin Al objects have been obtained with a table-top synchrotron source which generates x-rays in the energy range from a few kilo-electron-volts up to 6 MeV. Edge-enhancement effects arise from the combination of x-ray absorption (kilo-electron-volt part of the spectrum) and secondary particle emission (mega-electron-volt part of the spectrum) within the sample. The exact contribution of absorption and emission profiles in the edge-enhanced images has been calculated via Monte Carlo simulation.

  2. Proposal for an x-ray free electron laser oscillator with intermediate energy electron beam.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jinhua; Deng, Haixiao; Dai, Zhimin

    2012-01-20

    Harmonic lasing of low-gain free electron laser oscillators has been experimentally demonstrated in the terahertz and infrared regions. Recently, the low-gain oscillator has been reconsidered as a promising candidate for hard x-ray free electron lasers, through the use of high reflectivity, high-resolution x-ray crystals. In this Letter, it is proposed to utilize a crystal-based cavity resonant at a higher harmonic of the undulator radiation, together with phase shifting, to enable harmonic lasing of the x-ray free electron laser oscillator, and hence allow the generation of hard x-ray radiation at a reduced electron beam energy. Results show that fully coherent free electron laser radiation with megawatt peak power, in the spectral region of 10-25 keV, can be generated with a 3.5 GeV electron beam.

  3. Evaluation of Exposure From a Low Energy X-Ray Device Using Thermoluminescent Dosimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Harris, William S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The exposure from an electron beam welding device was evaluated using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The device generated low energy X-rays which the current dose equivalent conversion algorithm was not designed to evaluate making it necessary to obtain additional information relating to TLD operation at the photon energies encountered with the device. This was accomplished by performing irradiations at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using low energy X-ray techniques. The resulting data was used to determine TLD badge response for low energy X-rays and to establish the relationship between TLD element response and the dose equivalent at specific depths in tissue for these photon energies. The new energy/dose equivalent calibration data was used to calculate the shallow and eye dose equivalent of badges exposed to the device.

  4. HEAO 1 observations of high-energy X-rays from 3C273. [quasar emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primini, F. A.; Cooke, B. A.; Dobson, C. A.; Howe, S. K.; Scheepmaker, A.; Wheaton, W. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Baity, W. A.; Gruber, D. E.; Matteson, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The first detection of high energy (13 to 120 keV) X rays from the quasar 3C273, made by the HEAO 1 satellite, is reported. Observations were made with the 13 to 180 keV slat collimated detectors of the high energy X-ray and low energy gamma-ray (A4) experiment during December 1977-January 1978 and June-July 1978. Results are consistent with the previously observed X-ray flux variability on a scale of months. Photon count rates are presented for each of five energy bands and count rate and photon spectra for the June through July 1978 observations are derived. A comparison of the data obtained with that at lower X-ray energies and higher gamma-ray energies indicates that there is an overall spectral steepening from low to high energies and a possible break near 20 keV, which may be due to the gamma rays originating from a different region than that of the X rays.

  5. Runaway electron energy measurement using hard x-ray spectroscopy in "Damavand" tokamak.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, C; Iraji, D; Farahbod, A H; Akhtari, K; Rasouli, H; Modarresi, H; Lamehi, M

    2009-01-01

    Set of experiments has been developed to study existing runaway electrons in "Damavand" tokamak plasma upon characteristics of hard x-ray emissions produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles and limiters. As a first step, spatial distribution of hard x-ray emissions on the equatorial plane of the torus was considered. Obtained spectra of hard x-ray emissions for different alignments of shielded detector indicate isotropic emissivity in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with wide angle cone of bremsstrahlung radiations, deduced from the mean value of energy of the runaway electrons. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons. In the second stage in order to investigate time evolution of energy of the runaway electrons, similar technique were applied to obtain hard x-ray energy in every 3 ms intervals, from the beginning to the end of plasma. The mean energy of the runaway electrons increases during the ramp up phase and reaches its maximum between 3 and 9 ms after plasma formation. Also considering the time dependence of the counted photons in each energy range shows that energetic photons are emitted during the ramp up phase of the plasma current in Damavand tokamak.

  6. Runaway electron energy measurement using hard x-ray spectroscopy in 'Damavand' tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Rasouli, C.; Farahbod, A. H.; Rasouli, H.; Lamehi, M.; Iraji, D.; Akhtari, K.; Modarresi, H.

    2009-01-15

    Set of experiments has been developed to study existing runaway electrons in ''Damavand'' tokamak plasma upon characteristics of hard x-ray emissions produced by collision of the runaway electrons with the plasma particles and limiters. As a first step, spatial distribution of hard x-ray emissions on the equatorial plane of the torus was considered. Obtained spectra of hard x-ray emissions for different alignments of shielded detector indicate isotropic emissivity in the equatorial plane. This is in agreement with wide angle cone of bremsstrahlung radiations, deduced from the mean value of energy of the runaway electrons. The mean energy was calculated from the slope of the energy spectrum of hard x-ray photons. In the second stage in order to investigate time evolution of energy of the runaway electrons, similar technique were applied to obtain hard x-ray energy in every 3 ms intervals, from the beginning to the end of plasma. The mean energy of the runaway electrons increases during the ramp up phase and reaches its maximum between 3 and 9 ms after plasma formation. Also considering the time dependence of the counted photons in each energy range shows that energetic photons are emitted during the ramp up phase of the plasma current in Damavand tokamak.

  7. ''Hybrid'' calibrations of a Dual Energy X-ray Scanner for material testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröger, C.; Bartle, C. M.; West, J. G.

    2006-05-01

    Conventional x-ray tubes produce a fan-shaped x-ray beam covering a large spectrum of energies, which is why the fundamental law of x-ray attenuation is not readily applicable. As the mathematical formulation of the problem would be too cumbersome, calibrations using well-defined objects are carried out, which in turn allow the use of multienergy x-rays for measurements. Occasionally, such calibrations may not lead to the desired results. This could be for instance due to an insensitivity of x-rays towards low atomic number elements. Here we present such a case on hand the example of raw natural fibre. The DEXA parameters correlated with the fibre parameter wool base, but show distinct correlation for geographical regions of the origin of the wool. A calibration that is valid independently of geographical origin can be achieved by including independently measured parameters of the calibration body. We demonstrate a successful calibration that uses dual energy x-ray scanning technology as well as a size parameter of the fibre in the regression equation.

  8. The Einstein Observatory Medium Sensitivity Survey - Optical identifications for a complete sample of X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J. T.; Liebert, J.; Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Danziger, I. J.; Kunth, D.; Lub, J.

    1983-01-01

    It is suggested that virtually all the X-ray sources in the Einstein Observatory's Medium Sensitivity Survey flux range can be identified with objects visible on the POSS, on the basis of the complete identification of all sources north of -25 deg declination. There is no evidence for a significant population of 'blank field' X-ray sources at this flux level, and therefore no evidence for any new X-ray source class with very high L(x)/L(v). Most of the quasars detected in the present survey are spectroscopically similar to optical or radio-selected quasars. About 25 percent of the quasar sample, however, had reddish colors, and permitted lines dominated by a narrow-line component. These objects form a second sequence of active galactic nuclei, distinct in their optical properties from the broad line objects.

  9. Plasma Diagnostic Calibration and Characterizations with High Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zaheer Ali

    2009-06-05

    National Security Technologies’ High Energy X-ray (HEX) Facility is unique in the U.S. Department of Energy complex. The HEX provides fluorescent X-rays of 5 keV to 100 keV with fluence of 10^5–10^6 photons/cm^2/second at the desired line energy. Low energy lines can be filtered, and both filters and fluorescers can be changed rapidly. We present results of calibrating image plates (sensitivity and modulation transfer function), a Bremsstrahlung spectrometer (stacked filters and image plates), and the National Ignition Facility’s Filter- Fluorescer Experiment (FFLEX) high energy X-ray spectrometer. We also show results of a scintillator light yield and alignment study for a neutron imaging system.

  10. Energy calibration of the pixels of spectral X-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Panta, Raj Kumar; Walsh, Michael F; Bell, Stephen T; Anderson, Nigel G; Butler, Anthony P; Butler, Philip H

    2015-03-01

    The energy information acquired using spectral X-ray detectors allows noninvasive identification and characterization of chemical components of a material. To achieve this, it is important that the energy response of the detector is calibrated. The established techniques for energy calibration are not practical for routine use in pre-clinical or clinical research environment. This is due to the requirements of using monochromatic radiation sources such as synchrotron, radio-isotopes, and prohibitively long time needed to set up the equipment and make measurements. To address these limitations, we have developed an automated technique for calibrating the energy response of the pixels in a spectral X-ray detector that runs with minimal user intervention. This technique uses the X-ray tube voltage (kVp) as a reference energy, which is stepped through an energy range of interest. This technique locates the energy threshold where a pixel transitions from not-counting (off) to counting (on). Similarly, we have developed a technique for calibrating the energy response of individual pixels using X-ray fluorescence generated by metallic targets directly irradiated with polychromatic X-rays, and additionally γ-rays from (241)Am. This technique was used to measure the energy response of individual pixels in CdTe-Medipix3RX by characterizing noise performance, threshold dispersion, gain variation and spectral resolution. The comparison of these two techniques shows the energy difference of 1 keV at 59.5 keV which is less than the spectral resolution of the detector (full-width at half-maximum of 8 keV at 59.5 keV). Both techniques can be used as quality control tools in a pre-clinical multi-energy CT scanner using spectral X-ray detectors.

  11. Pulse energy measurement at the hard x-ray laser in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tanaka, T.; Saito, N.; Kurosawa, T.; Richter, M.; Sorokin, A. A.; Tiedtke, K.; Kudo, T.; Yabashi, M.; Tono, K.; Ishikawa, T.

    2012-07-09

    The pulse energies of a free electron laser have accurately been measured in the hard x-ray spectral range. In the photon energy regime from 4.4 keV to 16.8 keV, pulse energies up to 100 {mu}J were obtained at the hard x-ray laser facility SACLA (SPring-8 Angstrom Compact free-electron LAser). Two independent methods, using a cryogenic radiometer and a gas monitor detector, were applied and agreement within 3.3% was achieved. Based on our validated pulse energy measurement, a SACLA online monitor detector could be calibrated for all future experiments.

  12. 20-element HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI[sub 2] energy dispersive x-ray arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20-element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K[sub alpha]) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken form diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  13. 20 element HgI sub 2 energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  14. 20 element HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  15. Comparison between absorbed dose to water standards established by water calorimetry at the LNE-LNHB and by application of international air-kerma based protocols for kilovoltage medium energy x-rays.

    PubMed

    Perichon, N; Rapp, B; Denoziere, M; Daures, J; Ostrowsky, A; Bordy, J-M

    2013-05-07

    Nowadays, the absorbed dose to water for kilovoltage x-ray beams is determined from standards in terms of air-kerma by application of international dosimetry protocols. New standards in terms of absorbed dose to water has just been established for these beams at the LNE-LNHB, using water calorimetry, at a depth of 2 cm in water in accordance with protocols. The aim of this study is to compare these new standards in terms of absorbed dose to water, to the dose values calculated from the application of four international protocols based on air-kerma standards (IAEA TRS-277, AAPM TG-61, IPEMB and NCS-10). The acceleration potentials of the six beams studied are between 80 and 300 kV with half-value layers between 3.01 mm of aluminum and 3.40 mm of copper. A difference between the two methods smaller than 2.1% was reported. The standard uncertainty of water calorimetry being below 0.8%, and the one associated with the values from protocols being around 2.5%, the results are in good agreement. The calibration coefficients of some ionization chambers in terms of absorbed dose to water, established by application of calorimetry and air-kerma based dosimetry protocols, were also compared. The best agreement with the calibration coefficients established by water calorimetry was found for those established with the AAPM TG-61 protocol.

  16. Analytic model of energy-absorption response functions in compound X-ray detector materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    The absorbed energy distribution (AED) in X-ray imaging detectors is an important factor that affects both energy resolution and image quality through the Swank factor and detective quantum efficiency. In the diagnostic energy range (20-140 keV), escape of characteristic photons following photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter photons are primary sources of absorbed-energy dispersion in X-ray detectors. In this paper, we describe the development of an analytic model of the AED in compound X-ray detector materials, based on the cascaded-systems approach, that includes the effects of escape and reabsorption of characteristic and Compton-scatter photons. We derive analytic expressions for both semi-infinite slab and pixel geometries and validate our approach by Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic model provides the energy-dependent X-ray response function of arbitrary compound materials without time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. We believe this model will be useful for correcting spectral distortion artifacts commonly observed in photon-counting applications and optimal design and development of novel X-ray detectors.

  17. Measurement of the energy dependence of X-ray-induced decomposition of potassium chlorate.

    PubMed

    Pravica, Michael; Bai, Ligang; Sneed, Daniel; Park, Changyong

    2013-03-21

    We report the first measurements of the X-ray induced decomposition of KClO3 as a function of energy in two experiments. KClO3 was pressurized to 3.5 GPa and irradiated with monochromatic synchrotron X-rays ranging in energy from 15 to 35 keV in 5 keV increments. A systematic increase in the decomposition rate as the energy was decreased was observed, which agrees with the 1/E(3) trend for the photoelectric process, except at the lowest energy studied. A second experiment was performed to access lower energies (10 and 12 keV) using a beryllium gasket; suggesting an apparent resonance near 15 keV or 0.83 Ǻ maximizing the chemical decomposition rate. A third experiment was performed using KIO3 to ascertain the anionic dependence of the decomposition rate, which was observed to be far slower than in KClO3, suggesting that the O-O distance is the critical factor in chemical reactions. These results will be important for more efficiently initiating chemical decomposition in materials using selected X-ray wavelengths that maximize decomposition to aid useful hard X-ray-induced chemistry and contribute understanding of the mechanism of X-ray-induced decomposition of the chlorates.

  18. X-ray grating interferometry at photon energies over 180 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Yaniz, M.; Koch, F.; Meyer, P.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Zanette, I.; Rack, A.; Hipp, A.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2015-04-13

    We report on the implementation and characterization of grating interferometry operating at an x-ray energy of 183 keV. With the possibility to use this technique at high x-ray energies, bigger specimens could be studied in a quantitative way. Also, imaging strongly absorbing specimens will benefit from the advantages of the phase and dark-field signals provided by grating interferometry. However, especially at these high photon energies the performance of the absorption grating becomes a key point on the quality of the system, because the grating lines need to keep their small width of a couple of micrometers and exhibit a greater height of hundreds of micrometers. The performance of high aspect ratio absorption gratings fabricated with different techniques is discussed. Further, a dark-field image of an alkaline multicell battery highlights the potential of high energy x-ray grating based imaging.

  19. Strain Measurements using High Energy White X-rays at SPring-8

    SciTech Connect

    Shobu, T.; Kaneko, H.; Mizuki, J.; Konishi, H.; Shibano, J.; Hirata, T.; Suzuki, K.

    2007-01-19

    The strain in the bulk of a material was evaluated using high energy white X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8. The specimen, which was a 5 mm thick austenitic stainless steel sample (JIS-SUS304L), was subjected to bending. The internal strain was measured using white X-rays, which ranged in energy from 60 keV to 125 keV. Highly accurate internal strain measurements were accomplished by simultaneously using strain data from several lattice planes of {alpha} -Fe. Furthermore, utilizing diffracted beams with a high energy, a high peak count, and a profile similar to a Gaussian distribution decreased the error of the strain measurement The results indicated that high energy white X-rays can effectively measure the internal strain at a millimeter depth.

  20. Design and Implementation of an Acoustic X-ray Detector to Measure the LCLS Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, Jennifer L.; /San Jose State U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    On April 11, 2009, first light was seen from LCLS. The present apparatus being used to measure the x-ray beam energy is the Total Energy Sensor which uses a suite of thermal sensors. Another device is needed to cross-check the energy measurements. This new diagnostic tool utilizes radiation acoustic phenomena to determine the x-ray beam energy. A target is hit by the x-rays from the beam, and a voltage is generated in two piezoelectric sensors attached to the target in response to the consequent deformation. Once the voltage is known, the power can be obtained. Thermal sensors will also be attached to the target for calibration purposes. Material selection and design were based on: durability, ultra-high vacuum compatibility, safety and thermal properties. The target material was also chosen for its acoustic properties which were determined from tests using a frequency generator and laser. Initial tests suggest the device will function as anticipated.

  1. Room-temperature mercuric iodide spectrometry for low-energy X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kusmiss, J. H.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the limits of energy resolution in different energy ranges is given. The energy resolution of a spectrometer is analyzed in terms of the parameters characterizing the crystal, the detector, and the amplification electronics. A high-resolution room-temperature HgI2 spectrometry system was used to measure low-energy X-ray fluorescence spectra. For the MgK-alpha X-ray line the measured resolution was 245 eV (fwhm); the electronic noise linewidth of the system was 225 eV. Alpha-particles were used to excite X-ray fluorescence from low-Z elements separately or in combination. The shape of the photopeaks in the spectra is discussed.

  2. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Thomas J. A.; Lewis, Edward A.; Haigh, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  3. Low-energy X-ray detection with an in-vacuum PILATUS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Julien; Luethi, Benjamin; Ursachi, Catalin; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy; Wagner, Armin

    2011-11-01

    The feasibility of using PILATUS single-X-ray-photon counting detectors for long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography was investigated by carrying out a series of experiments at Diamond Light Source. A water-cooled PILATUS 100k detector was tested in vacuum with monochromatic 3 keV X-rays on the Diamond test beamline B16. Effects of detector cooling on noise performance, energy calibration and threshold trimming were investigated. When detecting 3 keV X-rays, the electronic noise of the analogue output of pixel preamplifiers forces the threshold to be set at a higher level than the 50% energy level recommended to minimize charge-sharing effects. The influence of threshold settings at low X-ray energy was studied by characterizing the detector response to a collimated beam of 3 keV X-rays scanned across several pixels. The relationship between maximum count rate and minimum energy threshold was investigated separately for various detector gain settings.

  4. Aggravation of Pre-Existing Atrioventricular Block, Wenckebach Type, Provoked by Application of X-Ray Contrast Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Brodmann, Marianne Seinost, Gerald; Stark, Gerhard; Pilger, Ernst

    2006-12-15

    Background. Significant bradycardia followed by cardiac arrest related to single bolus administration of X-ray contrast medium into a peripheral artery has not, to our knowledge, been described in the literature. Methods and Results. While performing a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of the left superficial femoral artery in a 68-year old patient with a pre-existing atrioventricular (AV) block, Wenckebach type, he developed an AV block III after a single bolus injection of intra-arterial X-ray contrast medium. Conclusion. We believe that application of contrast medium causes a transitory ischemia in the obstructed vessel and therefore elevation of endogenous adenosine. In the case of a previously damaged AV node this elevation of endogenous adenosine may be responsible for the development of a short period of third-degree AV block.

  5. Phase-contrast and magnification radiography at diagnostic X-ray energies using a pseudo-microfocus X-ray source

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the use of conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes for applications in which specialist microfocus sources are normally required. Methods: A conventional diagnostic X-ray tube was used in conjunction with a range of apertures to investigate improvements in spatial resolution using a line-pairs test object. Phase-contrast effects were investigated by varying source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances using a 2-French catheter as a clinically realistic test object. Results: For magnification radiography using a computed radiography receptor and conventional X-ray tube with a 1-mm nominal focus size, the limiting spatial resolution was improved from 3.55 line-pairs per millimetre, for a conventional contact image, to 5.6 line-pairs per millimetre, for a ×2 magnified view with a 250-µm aperture. For inline phase-contrast radiography, phase contrast enhancement of a 2-French catheter was demonstrated, and the expected trends with variations in source-to-object and object-to-receptor distances were found. Images of a neonatal phantom demonstrated a subtle improvement in visibility of a superimposed 1-French catheter simulating a percutaneously inserted central catheter for no increase in patient radiation dose. Conclusion: Spatial resolution improvement and visible phase contrast can be produced in clinically relevant objects using a pseudo-microfocus geometry at X-ray energies in the normal diagnostic range, using conventional diagnostic X-ray tubes and image receptors. The disadvantages of the proposal are the large distances required to produce phase contrast and limitations imposed by the resulting tube loading. Advances in knowledge: It is possible to use conventional diagnostic X-ray equipment in applications that normally require microfocus X-ray sources. This presents some possibilities for clinical applications. PMID:24779409

  6. The application of a microstrip gas counter to energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Conde, C.A.N.; Morgado, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Performance characteristics of a microstrip gas counter operated as a x-ray fluorescence spectrometer are reported. Gas amplification as a function of microstrip anode-cathode voltage was measured, and the breakdown threshold voltage was determined in pure xenon. The detector temporal stability and the effect of gas purity were assessed. Energy resolution and linearity, detection efficiency, and uniformity of spatial response in the 2- to 60-keV x-ray energy range were determined from the pulse-height distributions of the fluorescence x-ray spectra induced in a variety of single- and multi-element sample materials. Energy resolution similar to conventional proportional counters was achieved at 6 keV.

  7. Dual-energy x-ray image decomposition by independent component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Jiang, Dazong; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Dengfu; Lin, Gang

    2001-09-01

    The spatial distributions of bone and soft tissue in human body are separated by independent component analysis (ICA) of dual-energy x-ray images. It is because of the dual energy imaging modelí-s conformity to the ICA model that we can apply this method: (1) the absorption in body is mainly caused by photoelectric absorption and Compton scattering; (2) they take place simultaneously but are mutually independent; and (3) for monochromatic x-ray sources the total attenuation is achieved by linear combination of these two absorption. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed one needs no priori information about the accurate x-ray energy magnitude for imaging, while the results of the separation agree well with the conventional one.

  8. Application of dual-energy x-ray techniques for automated food container inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashishekhar, N.; Veselitza, D.

    2016-02-01

    Manufacturing for plastic food containers often results in small metal particles getting into the containers during the production process. Metal detectors are usually not sensitive enough to detect these metal particles (0.5 mm or lesser), especially when the containers are stacked in large sealed shipping packages; X-ray inspection of these packages provides a viable alternative. This paper presents the results of an investigation into dual-energy X-ray techniques for automated detection of small metal particles in plastic food container packages. The sample packages consist of sealed cardboard boxes containing stacks of food containers: plastic cups for food, and Styrofoam cups for noodles. The primary goal of the investigation was to automatically identify small metal particles down to 0.5 mm diameter in size or less, randomly located within the containers. The multiple container stacks in each box make it virtually impossible to reliably detect the particles with single-energy X-ray techniques either visually or with image processing. The stacks get overlaid in the X-ray image and create many indications almost identical in contrast and size to real metal particles. Dual-energy X-ray techniques were investigated and found to result in a clear separation of the metal particles from the food container stack-ups. Automated image analysis of the resulting images provides reliable detection of the small metal particles.

  9. A new approach to account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage x-rays.

    PubMed

    Pawlowski, Jason M; Ding, George X

    2011-07-07

    This study presents a new approach to accurately account for the medium-dependent effect in model-based dose calculations for kilovoltage (kV) x-rays. This approach is based on the hypothesis that the correction factors needed to convert dose from model-based dose calculations to absorbed dose-to-medium depend on both the attenuation characteristics of the absorbing media and the changes to the energy spectrum of the incident x-rays as they traverse media with an effective atomic number different than that of water. Using Monte Carlo simulation techniques, we obtained empirical medium-dependent correction factors that take both effects into account. We found that the correction factors can be expressed as a function of a single quantity, called the effective bone depth, which is a measure of the amount of bone that an x-ray beam must penetrate to reach a voxel. Since the effective bone depth can be calculated from volumetric patient CT images, the medium-dependent correction factors can be obtained for model-based dose calculations based on patient CT images. We tested the accuracy of this new approach on 14 patients for the case of calculating imaging dose from kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography used for patient setup in radiotherapy, and compared it with the Monte Carlo method, which is regarded as the 'gold standard'. For all patients studied, the new approach resulted in mean dose errors of less than 3%. This is in contrast to current available inhomogeneity corrected methods, which have been shown to result in mean errors of up to -103% for bone and 8% for soft tissue. Since there is a huge gain in the calculation speed relative to the Monte Carlo method (∼two orders of magnitude) with an acceptable loss of accuracy, this approach provides an alternative accurate dose calculation method for kV x-rays.

  10. Validation of a New Skinfold Prediction Equation Based on Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cowan, Celsi; Thyfault, John; LaFontaine, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Skinfold prediction equations recommended by the American College of Sports Medicine underestimate body fat percentage. The purpose of this research was to validate an alternative equation for men created from dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Two hundred ninety-seven males, aged 18-65, completed a skinfold assessment and dual energy x-ray…

  11. The chemical sensitivity of X-ray spectroscopy: high energy resolution XANES versus X-ray emission spectroscopy of substituted ferrocenes.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Andrew J; Bauer, Matthias; Jacob, Christoph R

    2013-06-07

    X-ray spectroscopy at the metal K-edge is an important tool for understanding catalytic processes and provides insight into the geometric and electronic structures of transition metal complexes. In particular, X-ray emission-based methods such as high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD), X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C-XES) hold the promise of providing increased chemical sensitivity compared to conventional X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Here, we explore the ability of HERFD-XANES and V2C-XES spectroscopy to distinguish substitutions beyond the directly coordinated atoms for the example of ferrocene and selected ferrocene derivatives. The experimental spectra are assigned and interpreted through the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We find that while the pre-edge peaks in the HERFD-XANES spectra are affected by substituents at the cyclopentadienyl ring containing π-bonds [A. J. Atkins, Ch. R. Jacob and M. Bauer, Chem.-Eur. J., 2012, 18, 7021], the V2C-XES spectra are virtually unchanged. The pre-edge in HERFD-XANES probes the weak transition to unoccupied metal d-orbitals, while the V2C-XES spectra are determined by dipole-allowed transitions from occupied ligand orbitals to the 1s core hole. The latter turn out to be less sensitive to changes beyond the first coordination shell.

  12. Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xinguo; Chen, Zhiqiang; Duffy, Thomas S

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we report a method of precise and fast absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using an iterative x-ray diffraction based method. Although accurate x-ray energy calibration is indispensable for x-ray energy-sensitive scattering and diffraction experiments, there is still a lack of effective methods to precisely calibrate energy over a wide range, especially when normal transmission monitoring is not an option and complicated micro-focusing optics are fixed in place. It is found that by using an iterative algorithm the x-ray energy is only tied to the relative offset of sample-to-detector distance, which can be readily varied with high precision of the order of 10(-5) -10(-6) spatial resolution using gauge blocks. Even starting with arbitrary initial values of 0.1 Å, 0.3 Å, and 0.4 Å, the iteration process converges to a value within 3.5 eV for 31.122 keV x-rays after three iterations. Different common diffraction standards CeO(2), Au, and Si show an energy deviation of 14 eV. As an application, the proposed method has been applied to determine the energy-sensitive first sharp diffraction peak of network forming GeO(2) glass at high pressure, exhibiting a distinct behavior in the pressure range of 2-4 GPa. Another application presented is pair distribution function measurement using calibrated high-energy x-rays at 82.273 keV. Unlike the traditional x-ray absorption-based calibration method, the proposed approach does not rely on any edges of specific elements, and is applicable to the hard x-ray region where no appropriate absorption edge is available.

  13. Material specific X-ray imaging using an energy-dispersive pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, Christopher K.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Cernik, Robert J.

    2014-04-01

    By imaging the X-ray spectral properties or ‘colours’ we have shown how material specific imaging can be performed. Using a pixelated energy-dispersive X-ray detector we record the absorbed and emitted hard X-radiation and measure the energy (colour) and intensity of the photons. Using this technology, we are not only able to obtain attenuation contrast but also to image chemical (elemental) variations inside objects, potentially opening up a very wide range of applications from materials science to medical diagnostics.

  14. Low Energy X-Ray and Electron Physics and Technology for High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-01

    fij ( 1 «MM «« Ml T1 w>M :ikj :s -- lau .-!- ■ I s « ~ ä C. Photographic Fllns D«scrlb«d in Fig. 18 is our aochod for OMcsuring ch...gratefully acknowledge the important assistance of other members of this Low Energy X-Ray Physics and Technology Project: Robert Ehrlich, Debra Nanod.and Lau ...sensitive but higher-resolution single-emulsion Ko- dak SB-392 film for microdensitometric applications in the high-energy x-ray region. These

  15. Place of HgI/sub 2/ energy-dispersive x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Kusmiss, J.H.; Barton, J.S.; Szymczyk, J.M.; Schnepple, W.F.; Lynn, R.

    1982-01-01

    After a review of solid-state conduction counters, in general, and of the history of mercuric iodide, in particular, the theory of operation of solid-state energy-dispersive HgI/sub 2/ detectors is dicusssed. The main factors which limit energy resolution in solid-state compound detectors are considered, including statistical fluctuations in charge generation, the window effect, trapping, inhomogeneities in the detector material, and electronic noise. Potential applications of room-temperature HgI/sub 2/ x-ray detectors are listed, and general considerations are discussed for x-ray fluorescence analysis with HgI/sub 2/. Directions of current investigations are given. (LEW)

  16. High energy X-ray observations of the 38-second pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, P. F.; Levine, A. M.; Bautz, M.; Howe, S. K.; Lang, F. L.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Gruber, D. E.; Knight, F. K.; Nolan, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of observations of the 38-second pulsar obtained at high X-ray energies (13-180 keV) with the UCSD/MIT instrument aboard HEAO 1 are reported. The results include a measurement of the source location, measurement of the pulse profile, and determination of the average intensity and spectrum during each of three time intervals spanning a baseline of 1 year. The total intensity of the pulsar is seen to vary on a 6-month time scale. The spectrum is hard but, like other X-ray pulsars, steepens at energies above 20 keV.

  17. Transmission diffraction-tomography system using a high-energy X-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Garrity, D J; Jenneson, P M; Crook, R; Vincent, S M

    2010-01-01

    A high-energy bench-top energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system for 3-dimensional mapping of the crystalline structure and phase transformations in steel is described, for which preliminary data and system development are presented here. The use of precision tungsten slit screens with up to 225 keV X-rays allows for diffraction through samples of 304 L austenitic stainless steel of thickness 3-10 mm, while sample positioning is carried out with a precision goniometer and translation stage system.

  18. Catalytic Adventures in Space and Time Using High Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, Mark A.; Di Michiel, Marco; Ferri, Davide; Fernàndez-Garcia, Marcos; Beale, Andrew M.; Jacques, Simon D. M.; Chupas, Peter J.; Chapman, Karena W.

    2014-09-16

    Very high energy X-rays have long offered great promise in providing great insight into the inner workings of catalysts; insights that may complement the array of techniques available to researchers in catalysis either in the laboratory or at more conventional X-ray wavelengths. This contribution aims to critically assess the diverse possibilities now available in the high energy domain as a result of the maturation of third generation synchrotron facilities and to look forward to the potential that forthcoming developments in synchrotron source technology may offer the world of catalysis in the near future.

  19. Design of a medium size x-ray mirror module based on thin glass foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Stefano; Civitani, Marta; Pareschi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The hot slumping glass technology for X-ray mirror is under development and in the last years the results have been improved. Nustar is the first X-ray telescope based on slumped glass foils and it benefit is the low cost compared to the direct polishing of glass. With the slumping technique it is possible to maintain the glass mass to low values with respect to the direct polishing, but in general the angular resolution is worst. A further technique based on glass is the cold shaping of foils. The improved capabilities of manufacturing thin glass foils, pushed by the industrial application for screens, open new possibilities for X-ray mirror. The increase in strength of thin tempered glasses, the reduction of thickness errors and the good roughness of flat foils are potentially great advantages. In this paper a design of a mediumsize X-ray mirror module is analysed. It is based on integration of glass foils, stacked directly on a supporting structure that is part of the X-ray telescope using stiffening ribs as spacer between foils. The alignment of each stack is performed directly into the integration machine avoiding the necessity of the alignment of different stacked modules. A typical module (glass optic and metallic structure) provides an effective area of 10 cm2/kg at 1 keV (with a mass of about 50- 100 kg and a focal length of 10 m).

  20. Carbon nanotubes and fullerites in high-energy and X-ray physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artru, X.; Fomin, S. P.; Shul'ga, N. F.; Ispirian, K. A.; Zhevago, N. K.

    2005-06-01

    It is demonstrated that the unique structures of carbon nanotubes and single-crystals of C60 fullerenes may have applications to X-ray, neutron and high-energy particle physics, based on channeling, Bragg diffraction and coherent radiation. These are reviewed, pointing out the peculiarities and advantages of nanocrystals compared to ordinary crystals. New applications are explored: X-rays and neutron channeling, undulator radiation in periodically bent nanotubes, “channeled” transition radiation. Quantum and classical channeling, channeling in bent nanocrystals, Bragg scattering of X-rays and neutrons, channeling radiation, coherent bremsstrahlung, parametric X-ray and nanotube undulator radiation are particularly studied using both analytical and Monte-Carlo methods. Continuous potentials, electron densities, transverse energy levels, and spectra of various types of coherent radiation are calculated. Large dechanneling lengths of positive particles, bending efficiencies, reflecting coefficients of soft X-rays and PXR yields are predicted. Principles of particle detectors using photo- and secondary electron emissions are discussed.

  1. Ice core stratigraphy using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroger, Chris; Thomson, Julian; Bertler, Nancy; Morgenstern, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    We are presenting a technique using x-rays to detect strata caused by density variation in 94 mm diameter ice cores. Moreover, high resolution density is determined. A 54 m long ice core retrieved from the Tasman Glacier of the Southern Alps in New Zealand has been x-ray scanned and the images were analysed. As a dual energy capable x-ray (DEXA) scanner was used, DEXA analysis techniques were used where appropriate, such as for the enhancement of strata visibility in the images. Density calculations though were based on a single energy model, using the fundamental law of x-ray attenuation. As the model does not precisely reflect realistic conditions, calibrations were made for the material properties and pixel scaling. Results of detected strata were compared to traditional visual light methods, where up to a depth of ~35 m better detail was achieved using x-rays. Density data was checked against the average volumetric density. Results compare well with the volumetric density, however a small bias exists, which at present requires further investigation.

  2. [Differential dose albedo for high-energy X-rays on concrete slab].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki

    2006-08-20

    We computed the differential dose albedo (alpha(D)) for high-energy X-rays on a concrete slab when the incident angle, reflection angle, and azimuth angle were changed, by means of Monte Carlo simulation. We found that alpha(D) changed with incident, reflection, and azimuth angles to the concrete slab. On the whole, the larger the incident angle, the larger alpha(D) tended to become. If the incident angle and reflection angle were the same, the larger the azimuth angle, the smaller alpha(D) tended to become. When the incident, reflection, and azimuth angles were the same, the smaller the X-ray energy was, the larger alpha(D) became, in the order of 10 MV, 6 MV, and 4 MV X-rays.

  3. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  4. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil, high-pressure apparatus - Comparison of synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, I. L.; Black, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The use of both conventional fixed-anode X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation to carry out energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell, is discussed. The photon flux at the sample and at the detector for the two cases are compared and the results are presented in graphs. It is shown that synchrotron radiation experiments can be performed with nearly two orders of magnitude increase in data rate if superior detectors and detector electronics are available.

  5. The application of thermoluminescence dosimetry in X-ray energy discrimination.

    PubMed

    Nelson, V K; Holloway, L; McLean, I D

    2015-12-01

    Clinical dosimetry requires an understanding of radiation energy to accurately determine the delivered dose. For many situations this is known, however there are also many situations where the radiation energy is not well known, thus limiting dosimetric accuracy. This is the case in personnel dosimetry where thermo luminescent (TL) dosimetry is the method of choice. Traditionally beam energy characteristics in personnel dosimetry are determined through discrimination with the use of various filters fitted within a radiation monitor. The presence of scattered and characteristic radiation produced by these metallic filters, however, can compromise the results. In this study the TL response of five materials TLD100, TLD100H, TLD200, TLD400 and TLD500, was measured at various X-ray energies. The TL sensitivity ratio for various combinations of materials as a function of X-ray energy was calculated. The results indicate that in personal dosimetry a combination of three or more TL detector system has a better accuracy of estimation of effective radiation energy of an X-ray beam than some of the current method of employed for energy estimation and has the potential to improve the accuracy in dose determination in a variety of practical situations. The development of this method also has application in other fields including quality assurance of the orthovoltage therapy machines, dosimetry intercomparisons of kilovoltage X-ray beams, and measurement of the dose to critical organs outside a treatment field of a megavoltage therapy beam.

  6. The detection of X-rays from the hot interstellar medium of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Q.; Hamilton, T.; Helfand, D. J.; Wu, X.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive reanalysis is presented of the Einstein IPC data base on the LMC, and a number of new algorithms are used to improve the reliability of the point source detection in this crowded region and to produce the first large-scale map of diffuse emission free from the effects of solar scattered X-rays and cosmic-ray particles. Algorithms described in detail include a technique to decontaminate fields containing solar scattered flux, a mechanism for obtaining a spectrum-weighted vignetting function, and a source excision and smoothing algorithm which results in a diffuse map of uniform statistical quality. A catalog of discrete X-rays sources in the direction of the LMC is presented which contains 33 new sources and eliminates a number of spurious and/or marginal directions from previous lists. A possible detection of the long-sought shadowing effect on the cosmic X-ray background produced by cold LMC gas is reported.

  7. Energy calibration of superconducting transition edge sensors for x-ray detection using pulse analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hollerith, C.; Simmnacher, B.; Weiland, R.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Isaila, C.; Jochum, J.; Potzel, W.; Hoehne, J.; Phelan, K.; Wernicke, D.; May, T.

    2006-05-15

    Transition edge sensors (TESs) have been developed to be used as high-resolution x-ray detectors. They show excellent energy resolution and can be used in many applications. TESs are a special kind of calorimeters that can determine small temperature changes after x-ray absorption. Such a temperature change causes a strong resistance change (superconducting to normal-conducting phase transition) that can be measured. The energy calibration of a TES based spectrometer is problematic due to the nonlinear behavior of the detector response. In this article, a method is introduced to calibrate the energy scale of TES spectra. This is accomplished by calculating the energy dependence of the response of the detector operated in electrothermal feedback mode. Using this method a calibration accuracy of a few eV for an x-ray energy of 6 keV can be achieved. Examples of energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements demonstrate the high quality of this method for everyday use of TES EDS detectors in material analysis. However, because the method relies only on a few very general assumptions, it should also be useful for other kinds of TES detectors.

  8. A dynamic material discrimination algorithm for dual MV energy X-ray digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Zhang, Siyuan; Zhao, Tiao; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Dual-energy X-ray radiography has become a well-established technique in medical, industrial, and security applications, because of its material or tissue discrimination capability. The main difficulty of this technique is dealing with the materials overlapping problem. When there are two or more materials along the X-ray beam path, its material discrimination performance will be affected. In order to solve this problem, a new dynamic material discrimination algorithm is proposed for dual-energy X-ray digital radiography, which can also be extended to multi-energy X-ray situations. The algorithm has three steps: α-curve-based pre-classification, decomposition of overlapped materials, and the final material recognition. The key of the algorithm is to establish a dual-energy radiograph database of both pure basis materials and pair combinations of them. After the pre-classification results, original dual-energy projections of overlapped materials can be dynamically decomposed into two sets of dual-energy radiographs of each pure material by the algorithm. Thus, more accurate discrimination results can be provided even with the existence of the overlapping problem. Both numerical and experimental results that prove the validity and effectiveness of the algorithm are presented.

  9. COnstrain Dark Energy with X-ray (CODEX) clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finoguenov, Alexis; SDSS Team; Cfht Team; Carma Team

    2012-09-01

    We describe the construction and follow-up observations of the most massive clusters in the Universe, selected in the SDSS-III survey using RASS data down to an unprecedented flux limit of -13 dex. In application to the cosmology studies, we demonstrate that we will achieve a 3% constraint on the dark energy equation of state, and in a combination with BOSS BAO measurement reach a FoM of 160.

  10. Mass and Energy of Erupting Solar Plasma Observed with the X-Ray Telescope on Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Yi; Raymond, John C.; Reeves, Katharine K.; Moon, Yong-Jae; Kim, Kap-Sung

    2015-01-01

    We investigate seven eruptive plasma observations by Hinode/XRT. Their corresponding EUV and/or white light coronal mass ejection features are visible in some events. Five events are observed in several passbands in X-rays, which allows for the determination of the eruptive plasma temperature using a filter ratio method. We find that the isothermal temperatures vary from 1.6 to 10 MK. These temperatures are an average weighted toward higher temperature plasma. We determine the mass constraints of eruptive plasmas by assuming simplified geometrical structures of the plasma with isothermal plasma temperatures. This method provides an upper limit to the masses of the observed eruptive plasmas in X-ray passbands since any clumping causes the overestimation of the mass. For the other two events, we assume the temperatures are at the maximum temperature of the X-ray Telescope (XRT) temperature response function, which gives a lower limit of the masses. We find that the masses in XRT, ~3 × 1013-5 × 1014 g, are smaller in their upper limit than the total masses obtained by LASCO, ~1 × 1015 g. In addition, we estimate the radiative loss, thermal conduction, thermal, and kinetic energies of the eruptive plasma in X-rays. For four events, we find that the thermal conduction timescales are much shorter than the duration of eruption. This result implies that additional heating during the eruption may be required to explain the plasma observations in X-rays for the four events.

  11. Bismuth sulfide nanoflowers for detection of X-rays in the mammographic energy range.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K; Yeow, John T W

    2015-03-24

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale "flower-like" structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials - 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber.

  12. Bismuth Sulfide Nanoflowers for Detection of X-rays in the Mammographic Energy Range

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Shruti; Osei, Ernest K.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of diagnostic x-rays, especially in the field of medical radiology, has necessitated a significant demand for high resolution, real-time radiation detectors. In this regard, the photoresponse of bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3), an n-type semiconducting metal chalcogenide, to low energy x-rays has been investigated in this study. In recent years, several types of nanomaterials of Bi2S3 have been widely studied for optoelectronic and thermoelectric applications. However, photoresponse of Bi2S3 nanomaterials for dosimetric applications has not yet been reported. The photosensitivity of Bi2S3 with nanoscale “flower-like” structures was characterized under x-ray tube-potentials typically used in mammographic procedures. Both dark current and photocurrent were measured under varying x-ray doses, field sizes, and bias voltages for each of the tube potentials – 20, 23, 26 and 30 kV. Results show that the Bi2S3 nanoflowers instantaneously responded to even minor changes in the dose delivered. The photoresponse was found to be relatively high (few nA) at bias voltage as low as +1 V, and fairly repeatable for both short and long exposures to mammographic x-rays with minimal or no loss in sensitivity. The overall dose-sensitivity of the Bi2S3 nanoflowers was found to be similar to that of a micro-ionization chamber. PMID:25801531

  13. Study on Dual-Energy X-ray Computed Tomography using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoo, T.; Torikoshi, M.; Endo, M.; Natsuhori, M.; Kakizaki, T.; Yamada, N.; Itoh, N.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2004-05-01

    The electron density is one of the most important elements for the treatment planning in the radiotherapy, because this information is used for the range estimation of the heavy-ion beam. In order to measure more precise electron density, we have developed the dual-energy x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation. The x-ray detector consists of 256 × 96 scintillator-array. It can take more than a hundred projection images per second. The response of the detector to x-rays was proved to be linear up to at least 1013 photon/pixel. The experiments were carried out using two monochromatic x-rays of 40 keV and 70 keV at the beam-line BL20B2 of SPring-8. As the results from samples of water, ethanol and solutions of dipotassium hydrogenphosphate with five concentrations, the electron densities measured in the dual-energy x-ray CT method were in agreement with the theoretical values by about ± 1%. This is almost the same level as that achieved by the one-dimensional CT system we developed previously. In addition, a sample of kidney of a pig fixed by formalin neutral buffer solution was used to distinguish the tissues in the CT images based on the electron density and the effective atomic number that was additionally obtained in the dual-energy x-ray CT. It suggested that renal pelvis was enriched with adipose tissue, and it was difficult to distinguish renal cortex and renal medulla.

  14. Study on Dual-Energy X-ray Computed Tomography using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunoo, T.; Torikoshi, M.; Endo, M.; Natsuhori, M.; Kakizaki, T.; Yamada, N.; Itoh, N.; Uesugi, K.; Yagi, N.

    2004-05-12

    The electron density is one of the most important elements for the treatment planning in the radiotherapy, because this information is used for the range estimation of the heavy-ion beam. In order to measure more precise electron density, we have developed the dual-energy x-ray CT system using synchrotron radiation. The x-ray detector consists of 256 x 96 scintillator-array. It can take more than a hundred projection images per second. The response of the detector to x-rays was proved to be linear up to at least 1013 photon/pixel. The experiments were carried out using two monochromatic x-rays of 40 keV and 70 keV at the beam-line BL20B2 of SPring-8. As the results from samples of water, ethanol and solutions of dipotassium hydrogenphosphate with five concentrations, the electron densities measured in the dual-energy x-ray CT method were in agreement with the theoretical values by about {+-} 1%. This is almost the same level as that achieved by the one-dimensional CT system we developed previously. In addition, a sample of kidney of a pig fixed by formalin neutral buffer solution was used to distinguish the tissues in the CT images based on the electron density and the effective atomic number that was additionally obtained in the dual-energy x-ray CT. It suggested that renal pelvis was enriched with adipose tissue, and it was difficult to distinguish renal cortex and renal medulla.

  15. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  16. CZT detector for dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wear, James; Buchholz, Michael; Payne, Randall K.; Gorsuch, Darrell; Bisek, Joseph; Ergun, David L.; Grosholz, Joe; Falk, Ron

    2000-12-01

    A cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detector has been developed for a bone densitometer that uses dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) to determine bone mineral density in vivo. A linear array of 16 discrete CZT detectors is used with a narrow fan-shaped x-ray beam to scan the patient. Each detector is 3 mm thick and 7 mm by 3 mm in area and has simple planar contacts. The x-ray beam has two broad energy lobes with effective energies of approximately 38 keV and approximately 65 keV. The energy sensitivity of the CZT detectors allows discrimination between low and high energy x-rays. Using DEXA, the relative difference in these two count rates permits a quantitative measurement of the real densities of bone mineral and soft tissue. The detectors demonstrate good performance characteristics and stable operation in a clinical environment. This paper discusses the suitability of CZT for use in DEXA applications and describes its successful implementation and performance in this bone densitometer.

  17. Preliminary research on dual-energy X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hua-Jie; Wang, Sheng-Hao; Gao, Kun; Wang, Zhi-Li; Zhang, Can; Yang, Meng; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) has been widely applied to measure the bone mineral density (BMD) and soft-tissue composition of the human body. However, the use of DEXA is greatly limited for low-Z materials such as soft tissues due to their weak absorption, while X-ray phase-contrast imaging (XPCI) shows significantly improved contrast in comparison with the conventional standard absorption-based X-ray imaging for soft tissues. In this paper, we propose a novel X-ray phase-contrast method to measure the area density of low-Z materials, including a single-energy method and a dual-energy method. The single-energy method is for the area density calculation of one low-Z material, while the dual-energy method aims to calculate the area densities of two low-Z materials simultaneously. Comparing the experimental and simulation results with the theoretical ones, the new method proves to have the potential to replace DEXA in area density measurement. The new method sets the prerequisites for a future precise and low-dose area density calculation method for low-Z materials. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program (2012CB825800), Science Fund for Creative Research Groups (11321503) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179004, 10979055, 11205189, 11205157)

  18. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Inubushi, Yuichi; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2010-10-01

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 μm and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  19. Monochromatic x-ray radiography for areal-density measurement of inertial fusion energy fuel in fast ignition experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Fujiwara, Takashi; Tanabe, Minoru; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Ohira, Shinji; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Inubushi, Yuichi

    2010-10-15

    Ultrafast, two-dimensional x-ray imaging is an important diagnostics for the inertial fusion energy research, especially in investigating implosion dynamics at the final stage of the fuel compression. Although x-ray radiography was applied to observing the implosion dynamics, intense x-rays emitted from the high temperature and dense fuel core itself are often superimposed on the radiograph. This problem can be solved by coupling the x-ray radiography with monochromatic x-ray imaging technique. In the experiment, 2.8 or 5.2 keV backlight x-rays emitted from laser-irradiated polyvinyl chloride or vanadium foils were selectively imaged by spherically bent quartz crystals with discriminating the out-of-band emission from the fuel core. This x-ray radiography system achieved 24 {mu}m and 100 ps of spatial and temporal resolutions, respectively.

  20. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  1. Breast tissue contrast-simulating materials using energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Shyma M; Abdelkader, Mohamed H; Bradley, David A; Pani, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    Breast lesions and normal tissues have different molecular arrangements that affect their diffraction patterns. Different mouldable and non-mouldable materials were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction system based on a conventional X-ray source (operated at 70 kVp) and a CdTe detector (Amptek XT-100), including a conventional spectroscopic chain. Combinations of materials were identified to have a contrast comparable to that achieved in diffraction imaging for different breast tissues at the momentum transfer values carrying the greatest amount of information (1.1 nm(-1) and 1.6 nm(-1)).

  2. Improvements in the Low Energy Collection Efficiency of Si(Li) X-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cox,C.; Fischer, D.; Schwartz, W.; Song, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Soft X-ray beam-line applications are of fundamental importance to material research, and commonly employ high-resolution Si(Li) detectors for energy dispersive spectroscopy. However, the measurement of X-rays below 1 keV is compromised by absorption in the material layers in front of the active crystal and a dead layer at the crystal surface. Various Schottky barrier type contacts were investigated resulting in a 40% reduction of the dead-layer thickness and a factor of two increased sensitivity at carbon K{sub {alpha}} compared to the standard Si(Li) detector. Si(Li) detectors were tested on the U7A soft X-ray beam-line at the National Synchrotron Light Source and on a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  3. High Energy X-Ray Source Generation by Short Pulse High Intensity Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H-S; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Phillips, T W; Goldsack, T; Clark, E; Eagleton, R; Edwards, R

    2003-09-02

    We are studying the feasibility of utilizing K{alpha} x-ray sources in the range of 20 to 100 keV as a backlighters for imaging various stages of implosions and high areal density planar samples driven by the NIF laser facility. The hard x-ray K{alpha} sources are created by relativistic electron plasma interactions in the target material after a radiation by short pulse high intensity lasers. In order to understand K{alpha} source characteristics such as production efficiency and brightness as a function of laser parameters, we have performed experiments using the 10 J, 100 fs JanUSP laser. We utilized single-photon counting spectroscopy and x-ray imaging diagnostics to characterize the K{alpha} source. We find that the K{alpha} conversion efficiency from the laser energy at 22 keV is {approx} 3 x 10{sup -4}.

  4. Femtosecond laser-generated high-energy-density states studied by x-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsutsumi, M.; Appel, K.; Baehtz, C.; Chen, B.; Cowan, T. E.; Göde, S.; Konopkova, Z.; Pelka, A.; Priebe, G.; Schmidt, A.; Sukharnikov, K.; Thorpe, I.; Tschentscher, Th; Zastrau, U.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of powerful optical lasers and an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) provides unique capabilities to study the transient behaviour of matter in extreme conditions. The high energy density science instrument (HED instrument) at the European XFEL will provide the experimental platform on which an unique x-ray source can be combined with various types of high-power optical lasers. In this paper, we highlight selected scientific examples together with the associated x-ray techniques, with particular emphasis on femtosecond (fs)-timescale pump-probe experiments. Subsequently, we present the current design status of the HED instrument, outlining how the experiments could be performed. First user experiments will start at the beginning of 2018, after which various optical lasers will be commissioned and made available to the international scientific community.

  5. Low energy x-ray response of Ge detectors with amorphous Ge entrance contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Luke, P.N.; Rossington, C.S.; Wesela, M.F.

    1993-10-01

    The low energy x-ray response of GI detectors with amorphous GI entrance contacts has been evaluated. The spectral background due to near contact incomplete charge collection was found to consist of two components: a low level component which is insensitive to applied voltage and a high level step-like component which is voltage dependent. At high operating voltages, the high level component can be completely suppressed, resulting in background levels which are much lower than those previously observed using GI detectors with Pd surface barrier or B ion implanted contacts, and which also compare favorably to those obtained with Si(Li) x-ray detectors. The response of these detectors to {sup 55}Fe and 1.77 keV x-rays is shown. A qualitative explanation of the origins of the observed background components is presented.

  6. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, M. J. Gamboa, E. J.; Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P.; Montgomery, D. S.; Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B.; Streit, J.

    2014-11-15

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-α x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  7. Analysis of titanium and zirconium in red mud with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kobya, M.; Ertugrul, M.; Dogan, O.; Simsek, O.

    1996-11-01

    An energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique was used for the determination of Titanium (Ti) and Zirconium (Zr) in red mud by using a standard addition method. An annular {sup 241}Am source is employed for excitation of K shells of elements. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  9. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  10. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  11. Comparison of Anthropometry to Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry: A New Prediction Equation for Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Swan, Pamela D.; DeSimone, Rosemarie

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of three recommended anthropometric equations for women and then develop an updated prediction equation using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The percentage of body fat (%BF) by anthropometry was significantly correlated (r = .896-. 929; p [is less than] .01) with DXA, but each equation…

  12. Development of mm2-size high energy resolution X-ray detectors using W-SPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Kraus, H.; Pröbst, F.; Seidel, W.

    2002-02-01

    The low transition temperature of tungsten should allow fabrication of X-ray detectors combining high-energy resolution and enlarged absorber area (~1 mm2). We present first results obtained for lead and gold absorbers read out by tungsten superconducting phase transition thermometers (W-SPT) using a variety of detector geometries. .

  13. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-15

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%.

  14. Diagnosing x-ray power and energy of tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun-lun; Ren, Xiao-dong; Huang, Xian-bin; Zhang, Si-qun; Zhou, Shao-tong; Dan, Jia-kun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Ouyang, Kai; Cai, Hong-chun; Wei, Bing; Ji, Ce; Feng, Shu-ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-ping; Deng, Jian-jun

    2015-11-01

    Fast z-pinch is a very efficient way of converting electromagnetic energy to radiation. With an 8-10 MA current on primary test stand facility, about 1 MJ electromagnetic energy is delivered to vacuum chamber, which heats z-pinch plasma to radiate soft x-ray. To develop a pulsed high power x-ray source, we studied the applicability of diagnosing x-ray power from tungsten wire array z-pinch with a flat spectral response x-ray diode (FSR-XRD). The detector was originally developed to diagnose radiation of a hohlraum in SG-III prototype laser facility. It utilized a gold cathode XRD and a specially configured compound gold filter to yield a nearly flat spectral response in photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV. In practice, it was critical to avoid surface contamination of gold cathode. It is illustrated that an exposure of an XRD to multiple shots caused a significant change of response. Thus, in diagnosing x-ray power and energy, we used each XRD in only one shot after calibration. In a shot serial, output of FSR-XRD was compared with output of a nickel bolometer. In these shots, the outputs agreed with each other within their uncertainties which were about 12% for FSR-XRD and about 15% for bolometer. Moreover, the ratios between the FSR-XRD and the bolometer among different shots were explored. In 8 shots, the standard deviation of the ratio was 6%. It is comparable to XRD response change of 7%.

  15. Hard X-ray measurement from a plasma focus of low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Patricio; Farías, Cristián; L'Huissier, Patricio; Pinto, Victor; Zambra, Marcelo; Soto, Leopoldo

    2008-11-01

    Hard X-ray emission in the plasma focus device PF-400J [1-3] is studied using a stepped filters array of different materials and thickness leaned to a radiographic commercial cassette, Agfa Curix [4, 5]. This diagnostic is located in the axial symmetrical axis at 45 cm away from pinch zone. Different targets are used (Cu, Mo, Ag, Pb) at the bottom of the central hole of the anode. The device was run using Hydrogen like filling gas at a charging voltage between 28 kV to 30 kV. Accumulating X radiation over a X-ray film by means of a sequence of electrical discharges, effective energies are obtained whose values are between 30 keV to close 100 keV. The obtained energy is discussed and interpreted like an effective energy, when it is compared with the results that would be obtained by means of X-ray generators based on a conventional accelerator. X-ray photographies of organic bodies are obtained showing possible applications.

  16. Energy-windowed, pixellated X-ray diffraction using the Pixirad CdTe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Minuti, M.; Brez, A.; Pinchera, M.; Spandre, G.; Moss, R.; Speller, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a powerful tool for material identification. In order to interpret XRD data, knowledge is required of the scattering angles and energies of X-rays which interact with the sample. By using a pixellated, energy-resolving detector, this knowledge can be gained when using a spectrum of unfiltered X-rays, and without the need to collimate the scattered radiation. Here we present results of XRD measurements taken with the Pixirad detector and a laboratory-based X-ray source. The cadmium telluride sensor allows energy windows to be selected, and the 62 μm pixel pitch enables accurate spatial information to be preserved for XRD measurements, in addition to the ability to take high resolution radiographic images. Diffraction data are presented for a variety of samples to demonstrate the capability of the technique for materials discrimination in laboratory, security and pharmaceutical environments. Distinct diffraction patterns were obtained, from which details on the molecular structures of the items under study were determined.

  17. Energy-tunable x-ray diffraction: A tool for depth profiling in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotoyabko, E.; Quintana, J. P.

    2002-03-01

    We have developed a new variant of depth-sensitive x-ray diffraction technique to study structural parameters in inhomogeneous polycrystalline materials. In this method, diffraction patterns are measured at different x-ray energies which are varied by small steps, and then the depth-resolved structural characteristics are retrieved from the energy-dependent x-ray diffraction data. In the current articles, this approach is applied to extract preferred orientation with depth resolution. In the case of uniaxial preferred orientation, the analytical algorithm has been developed based on March functions. Application of this technique to seashells allowed us to characterize the microstructure evolution in the nacre layer. Near the inner surface, adjacent to the mollusk mantle, the nacre consists of well-defined lamellas which reveal a high degree of the (001)-preferred orientation. This preferred orientation deteriorates in depth due to the accumulation of cracks and other imperfections. The texture distribution is characterized quantitatively by depth-dependent March parameters, which allows us to compare samples taken from different shells. In a similar way, energy-variable x-ray diffraction can be used for nondestructive characterization of a very broad spectrum of laminated structures and composite materials and systems.

  18. A new approach to synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Olivier; Egan, Christopher K; Jacques, Simon D M; Sochi, Taha; Di Michiel, Marco; Cernik, Robert J; Barnes, Paul

    2012-07-01

    A new data collection strategy for performing synchrotron energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction computed tomography has been devised. This method is analogous to angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction whose diffraction signal originates from a line formed by intersection of the incident X-ray beam and the sample. Energy resolution is preserved by using a collimator which defines a small sampling voxel. This voxel is translated in a series of parallel straight lines covering the whole sample and the operation is repeated at different rotation angles, thus generating one diffraction pattern per translation and rotation step. The method has been tested by imaging a specially designed phantom object, devised to be a demanding validator for X-ray diffraction imaging. The relative strengths and weaknesses of the method have been analysed with respect to the classic angle-dispersive technique. The reconstruction accuracy of the method is good, although an absorption correction is required for lower energy diffraction because of the large path lengths involved. The spatial resolution is only limited to the width of the scanning beam owing to the novel collection strategy. The current temporal resolution is poor, with a scan taking several hours. The method is best suited to studying large objects (e.g. for engineering and materials science applications) because it does not suffer from diffraction peak broadening effects irrespective of the sample size, in contrast to the angle-dispersive case.

  19. Hiresmon: A Fast High Resolution Beam Position Monitor for Medium Hard and Hard X-Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Giuressi, Dario; Arfelli, Fulvia; Rigon, Luigi

    2007-01-19

    The high-resolution x-ray beam position monitor (XBPM) is based on the principle of a segmented longitudinal ionization chamber with integrated readout and USB2 link. In contrast to traditional transversal ionization chambers here the incident x-rays are parallel to the collecting field which allows absolute intensity measurements with a precision better than 0.3 %. Simultaneously the beam position in vertical and horizontal direction can be measured with a frame rate of one kHz. The precision of position encoding depends only on the SNR of the synchrotron radiation and is in the order of micro meters at one kHz frame rate and 108 photon /sec at 9 KeV.

  20. What is the nature of the high energy X-ray sources in the galaxy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuturilo, Sophie; Tomsick, John; Clavel, Maica; Lansbury, George B.

    2017-01-01

    Finding sources of high energy “hard” X-rays allow us to probe the most extreme conditions in the Universe. Such sources include accreting black holes and neutron stars, where we find the strongest gravitational and magnetic fields, as well as pulsars and supernova remnants, where particles are accelerated to produce the hard X-rays. Over the past decade, the INTEGRAL satellite ahs been discovering new high energy sources, and this has allowed us to understand the population of bright hard X-ray sources. Over the past few years, the NuSTAR satellite, with much better sensitivity than INTEGRAL, has been allowing us to find even more hard X-ray sources, and we will present results from studies of sources discovered in the NuSTAR serendipitous source survey. We analyzed seven different potential sources looking for counterparts using NuSTAR, Chandra and ground based optical/NIR observations. Of the seven, two have confirmed counterparts and five need either an optical/NIR detection or further spectroscopy.

  1. Response of large area avalanche photodiodes to low energy x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, T. R.; Bales, M.; Arp, U.; Dong, B.; Farrell, R.

    2012-05-15

    For an experiment to study neutron radiative beta-decay, we operated large area avalanche photodiodes (APDs) near liquid nitrogen temperature to detect x rays with energies between 0.2 keV and 20 keV. Whereas there are numerous reports of x ray spectrometry using APDs at energies above 1 keV, operation near liquid nitrogen temperature allowed us to reach a nominal threshold of 0.1 keV. However, due to the short penetration depth of x rays below 1 keV, the pulse height spectrum of the APD become complex. We studied the response using monochromatic x ray beams and employed phenomenological fits of the pulse height spectrum to model the measurement of a continuum spectrum from a synchrotron. In addition, the measured pulse height spectrum was modelled using a profile for the variation in efficiency of collection of photoelectrons with depth into the APD. The best results are obtained with the collection efficiency model.

  2. CT dual-energy decomposition into x-ray signatures ρe and Ze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martz, Harry E.; Seetho, Issac M.; Champley, Kyle E.; Smith, Jerel A.; Azevedo, Stephen G.

    2016-05-01

    In a recent journal article [IEEE Trans. Nuc. Sci., 63(1), 341-350, 2016], we introduced a novel method that decomposes dual-energy X-ray CT (DECT) data into electron density (ρe) and a new effective-atomic-number called Ze in pursuit of system-independent characterization of materials. The Ze of a material, unlike the traditional Zeff, is defined relative to the actual X-ray absorption properties of the constituent atoms in the material, which are based on published X-ray cross sections. Our DECT method, called SIRZ (System-Independent ρe, Ze), uses a set of well-known reference materials and an understanding of the system spectral response to produce accurate and precise estimates of the X-ray-relevant basis variables (ρe, Ze) regardless of scanner or spectra in diagnostic energy ranges (30 to 200 keV). Potentially, SIRZ can account for and correct spectral changes in a scanner over time and, because the system spectral response is included in the technique, additional beam-hardening correction is not needed. Results show accuracy (<3%) and precision (<2%) values that are much better than prior methods on a wide range of spectra. In this paper, we will describe how to convert DECT system output into (ρe, Ze) features and we present our latest SIRZ results compared with ground truth for a set of materials.

  3. Development of optics for x-ray phase-contrast imaging of high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Moldovan, N.

    2010-10-15

    Phase-contrast or refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography can be useful for the diagnostic of low-Z high energy density plasmas, such as imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pellets, due to its sensitivity to density gradients. To separate and quantify the absorption and refraction contributions to x-ray images, methods based on microperiodic optics, such as shearing interferometry, can be used. To enable applying such methods with the energetic x rays needed for ICF radiography, we investigate a new type of optics consisting of grazing incidence microperiodic mirrors. Using such mirrors, efficient phase-contrast imaging systems could be built for energies up to {approx}100 keV. In addition, a simple lithographic method is proposed for the production of the microperiodic x-ray mirrors based on the difference in the total reflection between a low-Z substrate and a high-Z film. Prototype mirrors fabricated with this method show promising characteristics in laboratory tests.

  4. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Tiedtke, K; Sorokin, A A; Jastrow, U; Juranić, P; Kreis, S; Gerken, N; Richter, M; Arp, U; Feng, Y; Nordlund, D; Soufli, R; Fernández-Perea, M; Juha, L; Heimann, P; Nagler, B; Lee, H J; Mack, S; Cammarata, M; Krupin, O; Messerschmidt, M; Holmes, M; Rowen, M; Schlotter, W; Moeller, S; Turner, J J

    2014-09-08

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray optical elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.

  5. An evaluation of high energy bremsstrahlung background in point-projection x-ray radiography experiments.

    PubMed

    Krauland, C M; Jarrott, L C; Drake, R P; Keiter, P A; Kuranz, C C; Westover, B; Sawada, H; Kaczala, D N; Bonofiglo, P

    2012-10-01

    Backlit pinhole x-ray radiography has provided high-resolution images in many recent high-energy-density laser experiments. Its aim is to image the object of interest with a roughly monochromatic Kα source. However, despite the high intrinsic brightness achieved by the technique, data on x-ray film have shown a signal to background ratio near one, with data on image plates producing a higher background. This has been attributed, without direct evidence, to the interaction of suprathermal electrons with the (high Z) pinhole substrate. We present here the first direct measurement of the hard x-rays produced by such a backlighter target and a test of an approach to reducing the background. Specifically, a thick, low-Z layer was added on the side of the substrate toward the detector, intended to stop the energetic electrons and produce smaller emissions. Results from the Omega-60 laser experiment showed that the oft-seen background signal is in the range of 60-80 keV, a plausible energy range for energetic electrons produced in the laser-irradiated plasma. It also showed a comparable level of background signal in both types of targets. The work presented here includes target design and motivating theory, as well as the unexpected findings about x-ray background production.

  6. High-Energy Density science with an ultra-bright x-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    This talk will review recent progress in high-energy density physics using the world's brightest x-ray source, the Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC's free electron x-ray laser. These experiments investigate laser-driven matter in extreme conditions where powerful x-ray scattering and imaging techniques have been applied to resolve ionic interactions at atomic (Ångstrom) scale lengths and to visualize the formation of dense plasma states. Major research areas include dynamic compression experiments of solid targets to determine structural properties and to discover and characterize phase transitions at mega-bar pressures. A second area studies extreme fields produced by high-intensity radiation where fundamental questions of laboratory plasmas can be related to cosmological phenomena. Each of these areas takes advantage of the unique properties of the LCLS x-ray beam. They include small foci for achieving high intensity or high spatial resolution, high photon flux for dynamic structure factor measurements in single shots, and high spectral bandwidth to resolve plasmon (Langmuir) waves or ion acoustic waves in dense plasmas. We will further describe new developments of ultrafast pump-probe technique at high repetition rates. These include studies on dense cryogenic hydrogen that have begun providing fundamental insights into the physical properties of matter in extreme conditions that are important for astrophysics, fusion experiments and generation of radiation sources. This work was supported by DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science under FWP 100182.

  7. The energy spectrum of X-rays from rocket-triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Lucia, R. J.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Uman, M. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Although the production of X-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning leaders have been studied in detail over the last 10 years, the energy spectrum of the X-rays has never been well measured because the X-rays are emitted in very short but intense bursts that result in pulse pileup in the detectors. The energy spectrum is important because it provides information about the source mechanism for producing the energetic runaway electrons and about the electric fields that they traverse. We have recently developed and operated the first spectrometer for the energetic radiation from lightning. The instrument is part of the Atmospheric Radiation Imagery and Spectroscopy (ARIS) project and will be referred to as ARIS-S (ARIS Spectrometer). It consists of seven 3'' NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube scintillation detectors with different thicknesses of attenuators, ranging from no attenuator to more than 1'' of lead placed over the detector (all the detectors are in a 1/8'' thick aluminum box). Using X-ray pulses preceding 48 return strokes in 8 rocket-triggered lightnings, we found that the spectrum of X-rays from leaders is too soft to be consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche. It has a power law dependence on the energies of the photons, and the power index, λ, is between 2.5 and 3.5. We present the details of the design of the instrument and the results of the analysis of the lightning data acquired during the summer of 2012.

  8. High-energy neutrino fluxes from AGN populations inferred from X-ray surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Idunn B.; Wu, Kinwah; On, Alvina Y. L.; Saxton, Curtis J.

    2015-08-01

    High-energy neutrinos and photons are complementary messengers, probing violent astrophysical processes and structural evolution of the Universe. X-ray and neutrino observations jointly constrain conditions in active galactic nuclei (AGN) jets: their baryonic and leptonic contents, and particle production efficiency. Testing two standard neutrino production models for local source Cen A (Koers & Tinyakov and Becker & Biermann), we calculate the high-energy neutrino spectra of single AGN sources and derive the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected for the current epoch. Assuming that accretion determines both X-rays and particle creation, our parametric scaling relations predict neutrino yield in various AGN classes. We derive redshift-dependent number densities of each class, from Chandra and Swift/BAT X-ray luminosity functions (Silverman et al. and Ajello et al.). We integrate the neutrino spectrum expected from the cumulative history of AGN (correcting for cosmological and source effects, e.g. jet orientation and beaming). Both emission scenarios yield neutrino fluxes well above limits set by IceCube (by ˜4-106 × at 1 PeV, depending on the assumed jet models for neutrino production). This implies that: (i) Cen A might not be a typical neutrino source as commonly assumed; (ii) both neutrino production models overestimate the efficiency; (iii) neutrino luminosity scales with accretion power differently among AGN classes and hence does not follow X-ray luminosity universally; (iv) some AGN are neutrino-quiet (e.g. below a power threshold for neutrino production); (v) neutrino and X-ray emission have different duty cycles (e.g. jets alternate between baryonic and leptonic flows); or (vi) some combination of the above.

  9. Robust x-ray based material identification using multi-energy sinogram decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yaoshen; Tracey, Brian; Miller, Eric

    2016-05-01

    There is growing interest in developing X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging systems with improved ability to discriminate material types, going beyond the attenuation imaging provided by most current systems. Dual- energy CT (DECT) systems can partially address this problem by estimating Compton and photoelectric (PE) coefficients of the materials being imaged, but DECT is greatly degraded by the presence of metal or other materials with high attenuation. Here we explore the advantages of multi-energy CT (MECT) systems based on photon-counting detectors. The utility of MECT has been demonstrated in medical applications where photon- counting detectors allow for the resolution of absorption K-edges. Our primary concern is aviation security applications where K-edges are rare. We simulate phantoms with differing amounts of metal (high, medium and low attenuation), both for switched-source DECT and for MECT systems, and include a realistic model of detector energy 0 resolution. We extend the DECT sinogram decomposition method of Ying et al. to MECT, allowing estimation of separate Compton and photoelectric sinograms. We furthermore introduce a weighting based on a quadratic approximation to the Poisson likelihood function that deemphasizes energy bins with low signal. Simulation results show that the proposed approach succeeds in estimating material properties even in high-attenuation scenarios where the DECT method fails, improving the signal to noise ratio of reconstructions by over 20 dB for the high-attenuation phantom. Our work demonstrates the potential of using photon counting detectors for stably recovering material properties even when high attenuation is present, thus enabling the development of improved scanning systems.

  10. Feasibility of using intermediate x-ray energies for highly conformal extracranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Peng; Yu, Victoria; Nguyen, Dan; Demarco, John; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke; Woods, Kaley; Boucher, Salime

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using intermediate energy 2 MV x-rays for extracranial robotic intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: Two megavolts flattening filter free x-rays were simulated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP (v4c). A convolution/superposition dose calculation program was tuned to match the Monte Carlo calculation. The modeled 2 MV x-rays and actual 6 MV flattened x-rays from existing Varian Linacs were used in integrated beam orientation and fluence optimization for a head and neck, a liver, a lung, and a partial breast treatment. A column generation algorithm was used for the intensity modulation and beam orientation optimization. Identical optimization parameters were applied in three different planning modes for each site: 2, 6 MV, and dual energy 2/6 MV. Results: Excellent agreement was observed between the convolution/superposition and the Monte Carlo calculated percent depth dose profiles. For the patient plans, overall, the 2/6 MV x-ray plans had the best dosimetry followed by 2 MV only and 6 MV only plans. Between the two single energy plans, the PTV coverage was equivalent but 2 MV x-rays improved organs-at-risk sparing. For the head and neck case, the 2MV plan reduced lips, mandible, tongue, oral cavity, brain, larynx, left and right parotid gland mean doses by 14%, 8%, 4%, 14%, 24%, 6%, 30% and 16%, respectively. For the liver case, the 2 MV plan reduced the liver and body mean doses by 17% and 18%, respectively. For the lung case, lung V20, V10, and V5 were reduced by 13%, 25%, and 30%, respectively. V10 of heart with 2 MV plan was reduced by 59%. For the partial breast treatment, the 2 MV plan reduced the mean dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs by 27% and 47%, respectively. The mean body dose was reduced by 16%. Conclusions: The authors showed the feasibility of using flattening filter free 2 MV x-rays for extracranial treatments as evidenced by equivalent or superior dosimetry compared to 6 MV plans

  11. Optimum energy window setting on Hg-201 x-rays photopeak for effective Tl-201 imaging.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Akihiro; Takaki, Akihiro; Noguchi, Teruya; Matsumoto, Masanori; Katsuda, Noboru; Tomiguchi, Seiji; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2005-10-01

    For more effective Tl-201 imaging, the location and width of the energy window set on the Hg-201 x-rays photopeak was investigated using Monte Carlo simulation and phantom experiments. We calculated energy spectra and investigated the amount of primary and scattered photons within various energy windows set on the x-rays photopeak. The energy resolution (ER) at 71 keV (the peak of the x-rays photopeak) was changed to 10%, 12%, 14% and 16%. The relationships between the energy window and the primary counts rate or the scatter fraction (= scattered counts/primary counts, SF) were obtained. By compromise between the primary counts rate and the SF for ER = 12%, the optimum energy window was determined as a wider off-peak window, 77 keV +/- 14.3% (66-88 keV). This off-peak window increased the primary counts rate by 12.5% and decreased the SF by -17% as compared with the conventional on-peak energy window (71 keV +/- 10%, 64-78 keV). When this off-peak widow acquisition was compared with the conventional on-peak window one on a gamma camera, planar and SPECT images using the off-peak widow clearly showed superior results qualitatively and quantitatively.

  12. In Situ Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Characterization of Interfacial Phenomena in Energy Materials and Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinghua; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Glans, Per-Anders; Bora, Debajeet; Braun, Artur; Velasco Vélez, Juan Jesús; Salmeron, Miquel; ALS/LBNL Team; EMPA, MSD/LBNL Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Advanced energy technology arises from the understanding in basic science, thus rest in large on in-situ/operando characterization tools for observing the physical and chemical interfacial processes, which has been largely limited in a framework of thermodynamic and kinetic concepts or atomic and nanoscale. In many important energy systems such as energy conversion, energy storage and catalysis, advanced materials and functionality in devices are based on the complexity of material architecture, chemistry and interactions among constituents within. To understand and thus ultimately control the energy conversion and energy storage applications calls for in-situ/operando characterization tools. Soft X-ray spectroscopy offers a number of very unique features. We will present our development of the in-situ/operando soft X-ray spectroscopic tools of catalytic and electrochemical reactions in recent years, and reveal how to overcome the challenge that soft X-rays cannot easily peek into the high-pressure catalytic cells or liquid electrochemical cells. In this presentation a number of examples are given, including the nanocatalysts and the recent experiment performed for studying the hole generation in a specifically designed photoelectrochemical cell under operando conditions. The ALS is supported by the the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Tilted angle CZT detector for photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Shikhaliev, Polad M

    2006-09-07

    X-ray imaging with a photon counting/energy weighting detector can provide the highest signal to noise ratio (SNR). Scanning slit/multi-slit x-ray image acquisition can provide a dose-efficient scatter rejection, which increases SNR. Use of a photon counting/energy weighting detector in a scanning slit/multi-slit acquisition geometry could provide highest possible dose efficiency in x-ray and CT imaging. Currently, the most advanced photon counting detector is the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector, which, however, is suboptimal for energy resolved x-ray imaging. A tilted angle CZT detector is proposed in this work for applications in photon counting/energy weighting x-ray and CT imaging. In tilted angle configuration, the x-ray beam hits the surface of the linear array of CZT crystals at a small angle. This allows the use of CZT crystals of a small thickness while maintaining the high photon absorption. Small thickness CZT detectors allow for a significant decrease in the polarization effect in the CZT volume and an increase in count rate. The tilted angle CZT with a small thickness also provides higher spatial and energy resolution, and shorter charge collection time, which potentially enables fast energy resolving x-ray image acquisition. In this work, the major performance parameters of the tilted angle CZT detector, including its count rate, spatial resolution and energy resolution, were evaluated. It was shown that for a CZT detector with a 0.7 mm thickness and 13 degrees tilting angle, the maximum count rate can be increased by 10.7 times, while photon absorption remains >90% at photon energies up to 120 keV. Photon counting/energy weighting x-ray imaging using a tilted angle CZT detector was simulated. SNR improvement due to optimal photon energy weighting was 23% and 14% when adipose contrast element, inserted in soft tissue with 10 cm and 20 cm thickness, respectively, was imaged using 5 energy bins and weighting factors optimized for the adipose. SNR

  14. X-ray lasers and methods utilizing two component driving illumination provided by optical laser means of relatively low energy and small physical size

    DOEpatents

    Rosen, Mordecai D.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10), and related methodology, are disclosed wherein an X-ray laser target (12) is illuminated with a first pulse of optical laser radiation (14) of relatively long duration having scarcely enough energy to produce a narrow and linear cool plasma of uniform composition (38). A second, relatively short pulse of optical laser radiation (18) is uniformly swept across the length, from end to end, of the plasma (38), at about the speed of light, to consecutively illuminate continuously succeeding portions of the plasma (38) with optical laser radiation having scarcely enough energy to heat, ionize, and invert them into the continuously succeeding portions of an X-ray gain medium. This inventive double pulse technique results in a saving of more than two orders of magnitude in driving optical laser energy, when compared to the conventional single pulse approach.

  15. Targeted Silver Nanoparticles for Dual-Energy Breast X-Ray Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    FOR TEMPORAL SUBTRACTION AND DUAL-ENERGY X-RAY IMAGING, Roshan Karunamuni, Ajlan Al Zaki, Anatoliy V. Popov, E. James Delikatny, Sara Gavenonis, Andrew...imaging Roshan Karunamuni1, Ajlan Al Zaki2, Anatoliy V. Popov1, E. James Delikatny1, Sara Gavenonis1, Andrew Tsourkas2, Andrew D. A. Maidment1...Carton AK, Ullberg C, Lindman K, Acciavati R, Francke T, Maidmenet ADA. Optimization of a dual- energy contrast-enhanced technique for a photon

  16. The nuclear spectroscopic telescope array (NuSTAR) high-energy X-ray mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; An, Hongjun; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Cook, Rick; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Kitaguchi, Takao; Markwardt, Craig; Mao, Peter; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram R.; Stern, Daniel K.; Zhang, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Walton, Dominic; Westergaard, Niels J.

    2014-07-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission was launched on 2012 June 13 and is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit operating above ~10 keV. NuSTAR flies two co-aligned Wolter-I conical approximation X-ray optics, coated with Pt/C and W/Si multilayers, and combined with a focal length of 10.14 meters this enables operation from 3-79 keV. The optics focus onto two focal plane arrays, each consisting of 4 CdZnTe pixel detectors, for a field of view of 12.5 arcminutes. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity, and with an effective point spread function FWHM of 18 arcseconds (HPD ~1), NuSTAR provides a leap of improvement in resolution over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. We present in-orbit performance details of the observatory and highlight important science results from the first two years of the mission.

  17. Sample preparation of energy materials for X-ray nanotomography with micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Chen-Wiegart, Yu-chen Karen; Camino, Fernando E; Wang, Jun

    2014-06-06

    X-ray nanotomography presents an unprecedented opportunity to study energy storage/conversion materials at nanometer scales in three dimensions, with both elemental and chemical sensitivity. A critical step in obtaining high-quality X-ray nanotomography data is reliable sample preparation to ensure that the entire sample fits within the field of view of the X-ray microscope. Although focused-ion-beam lift-out has previously been used for large sample (few to tens of microns) preparation, a difficult undercut and lift-out procedure results in a time-consuming sample preparation process. Herein, we propose a much simpler and direct sample preparation method to resolve the issues that block the view of the sample base after milling and during the lift-out process. This method is applied on a solid-oxide fuel cell and a lithium-ion battery electrode, before numerous critical 3D morphological parameters are extracted, which are highly relevant to their electrochemical performance. A broad application of this method for microstructure study with X-ray nanotomography is discussed and presented.

  18. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  19. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) High-Energy X-ray Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Craig, Willliam W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Giommi, Paolo; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Kim, Yunjin; Kitaguchi, Takao; Koglin, Jason E.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Mori, Kaya; Perri, Matteo; Markwardt, Craig B.; Wik, Daniel R.; Hornschemeier, Anne E.; Ptak, Andrew; Rigby, Jane R.

    2013-01-01

    High-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the 10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to thepeak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element 44Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an expected orbit lifetime of 10 yr, we anticipate proposing a guest investigator program, to begin in late 2014.

  20. THE NUCLEAR SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE ARRAY (NuSTAR) HIGH-ENERGY X-RAY MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, W. Rick; Forster, Karl; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Mao, Peter H.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Craig, William W.; Pivovaroff, Michael J.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Koglin, Jason E.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, William W.; Boggs, Steven E.; Stern, Daniel; Kim, Yunjin; Giommi, Paolo; Perri, Matteo; and others

    2013-06-20

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, launched on 2012 June 13, is the first focusing high-energy X-ray telescope in orbit. NuSTAR operates in the band from 3 to 79 keV, extending the sensitivity of focusing far beyond the {approx}10 keV high-energy cutoff achieved by all previous X-ray satellites. The inherently low background associated with concentrating the X-ray light enables NuSTAR to probe the hard X-ray sky with a more than 100-fold improvement in sensitivity over the collimated or coded mask instruments that have operated in this bandpass. Using its unprecedented combination of sensitivity and spatial and spectral resolution, NuSTAR will pursue five primary scientific objectives: (1) probe obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity out to the peak epoch of galaxy assembly in the universe (at z {approx}< 2) by surveying selected regions of the sky; (2) study the population of hard X-ray-emitting compact objects in the Galaxy by mapping the central regions of the Milky Way; (3) study the non-thermal radiation in young supernova remnants, both the hard X-ray continuum and the emission from the radioactive element {sup 44}Ti; (4) observe blazars contemporaneously with ground-based radio, optical, and TeV telescopes, as well as with Fermi and Swift, to constrain the structure of AGN jets; and (5) observe line and continuum emission from core-collapse supernovae in the Local Group, and from nearby Type Ia events, to constrain explosion models. During its baseline two-year mission, NuSTAR will also undertake a broad program of targeted observations. The observatory consists of two co-aligned grazing-incidence X-ray telescopes pointed at celestial targets by a three-axis stabilized spacecraft. Deployed into a 600 km, near-circular, 6 Degree-Sign inclination orbit, the observatory has now completed commissioning, and is performing consistent with pre-launch expectations. NuSTAR is now executing its primary science mission, and with an

  1. A new detector system for low energy X-ray fluorescence coupled with soft X-ray microscopy: First tests and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bufon, Jernej; Ahangarianabhari, Mahdi; Altissimo, Matteo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Bertuccio, Giuseppe; Borghes, Roberto; Carrato, Sergio; Cautero, Giuseppe; Fabiani, Sergio; Giacomini, Gabriele; Giuressi, Dario; Kourousias, George; Menk, Ralf Hendrik; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Rachevski, Alexandre; Rashevskaya, Irina; Stolfa, Andrea; Vacchi, Andrea; Zampa, Gianluigi; Zampa, Nicola; Zorzi, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The last decades have witnessed substantial efforts in the development of several detector technologies for X-ray fluorescence (XRF) applications. In spite of the increasing trend towards performing, cost-effective and reliable XRF systems, detectors for soft X-ray spectroscopy still remain a challenge, requiring further study, engineering and customization in order to yield effective and efficient systems. In this paper we report on the development, first characterization and tests of a novel multielement detector system based on low leakage current silicon drift detectors (SDD) coupled to ultra low noise custom CMOS preamplifiers for synchrotron-based low energy XRF. This new system exhibits the potential for improving the count rate by at least an order of magnitude resulting in ten-fold shorter dwell time at an energy resolution similar to that of single element silicon drift detectors.

  2. Novel energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Ellis, R.; Hill, K. W.; Brandstetter, S.; Eikenberry, E.; Hofer, P.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-10-15

    A new energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera has been recently installed on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic is capable of 1D or 2D imaging with a spatial resolution of Almost-Equal-To 1 cm, an energy resolution of Almost-Equal-To 1 keV in the range of 3.5-15 keV and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms. A novel use of a Pilatus 2 hybrid-pixel x-ray detector [P. Kraft et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 368 (2009)] is employed in which the lower energy threshold of individual pixels is adjusted, allowing regions of a single detector to be sensitive to different x-ray energy ranges. Development of this new detector calibration technique was done as a collaboration between PPPL and Dectris Ltd. The calibration procedure is described, and the energy resolution of the detector is characterized. Initial data from this installation on Alcator C-Mod is presented. This diagnostic provides line-integrated measurements of impurity emission which can be used to determine impurity concentrations as well as the electron energy distribution.

  3. Novel energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, N. A.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Bitter, M.; Brandstetter, S.; Eikenberry, E.; Ellis, R.; Hill, K. W.; Hofer, P.; Schneebeli, M.

    2012-10-01

    A new energy resolving x-ray pinhole camera has been recently installed on Alcator C-Mod. This diagnostic is capable of 1D or 2D imaging with a spatial resolution of ≈1 cm, an energy resolution of ≈1 keV in the range of 3.5-15 keV and a maximum time resolution of 5 ms. A novel use of a Pilatus 2 hybrid-pixel x-ray detector [P. Kraft et al., J. Synchrotron Rad. 16, 368 (2009), 10.1107/S0909049509009911] is employed in which the lower energy threshold of individual pixels is adjusted, allowing regions of a single detector to be sensitive to different x-ray energy ranges. Development of this new detector calibration technique was done as a collaboration between PPPL and Dectris Ltd. The calibration procedure is described, and the energy resolution of the detector is characterized. Initial data from this installation on Alcator C-Mod is presented. This diagnostic provides line-integrated measurements of impurity emission which can be used to determine impurity concentrations as well as the electron energy distribution.

  4. Low energy electrons and ultra-soft X-rays irradiation of plasmid DNA. Technical innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fromm, Michel; Boulanouar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we present in a first part the latest results of our group which are in relation with the study of DNA damages inflicted by low energy electrons (0-20 eV) in ultra-high vacuum as well as in air under atmospheric conditions. A short description of the drop-casting technique we developed to produce thin and nanometre-scaled DNA layers onto graphite sheets is given. We provide the absolute cross-section for loss of supercoiled topology of plasmid DNA complexed with 1,3-diaminopropane (Dap) in the vacuum under 10 eV electron impact and suggest a specific pathway for the dissociation of the transient negative ion formed by resonant capture of such a low energy electron (LEE) by the DNA's phosphate group when complexed to Dap. Well-gauged DNA-Dap layers with various nanometre-scaled thicknesses are used to evaluate the effective attenuation length of secondary photo-LEEs in the energy range (0-20 eV). The values of 11-16 nm for DNA kept under atmospheric conditions are in good agreement with the rare literature data available and which are stemming from computer simulations. In a second part, we describe the method we have developed in order to expose liquid samples of plasmid DNA to ultra-soft X-rays (Al Kα line at 1.5 keV) under hydroxyl radical scavenging conditions. We provide an experimentally determined percentage of indirect effects in aqueous medium kept under standard conditions of 94.7±2.1% indirect effects; in satisfactory agreement with the data published by others (i.e. 97.7%) relative to gamma irradiation of frozen solutions (Tomita et al., 1995).

  5. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randall, Jill M.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2009-12-01

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al. [4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with Γ1~0.4 and four observations with Γ1~3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index Γ2~2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  6. High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Jun-Sang; Zhang, Xuan; Sharma, Hemant; ...

    2015-03-20

    High performance materials that can withstand radiation, heat, multiaxial stresses, and corrosive environment are necessary for the deployment of advanced nuclear energy systems. Nondestructive in situ experimental techniques utilizing high energy x-rays from synchrotron sources can be an attractive set of tools for engineers and scientists to investigate the structure–processing–property relationship systematically at smaller length scales and help build better material models. In this paper, two unique and interconnected experimental techniques, namely, simultaneous small-angle/wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) are presented. Finally, the changes in material state as Fe-based alloys are heated to high temperatures ormore » subject to irradiation are examined using these techniques.« less

  7. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Crannell, C. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Forrest, D. J.; Lin, R. P.; Starr, R.

    1988-01-01

    Basic principles of operation and characteristics of scintillation and semi-conductor detectors used for solar hard X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers are presented. Scintillation materials such as NaI offer high stopping power for incident gamma rays, modest energy resolution, and relatively simple operation. They are, to date, the most often used detector in solar gamma-ray spectroscopy. The scintillator BGO has higher stopping power than NaI, but poorer energy resolution. The primary advantage of semi-conductor materials such as Ge is their high-energy resolution. Monte-Carlo simulations of the response of NaI and Ge detectors to model solar flare inputs show the benefit of high resoluton for studying spectral lines. No semi-conductor material besides Ge is currently available with adequate combined size and purity to make general-use hard X-ray and gamma-ray detectors for solar studies.

  9. High-energy synchrotron x-ray techniques for studying irradiated materials

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jun-Sang; Zhang, Xuan; Sharma, Hemant; Kenesei, Peter; Hoelzer, David; Li, Meimei; Almer, Jonathan

    2015-03-20

    High performance materials that can withstand radiation, heat, multiaxial stresses, and corrosive environment are necessary for the deployment of advanced nuclear energy systems. Nondestructive in situ experimental techniques utilizing high energy x-rays from synchrotron sources can be an attractive set of tools for engineers and scientists to investigate the structure–processing–property relationship systematically at smaller length scales and help build better material models. In this paper, two unique and interconnected experimental techniques, namely, simultaneous small-angle/wide-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy (FF-HEDM) are presented. Finally, the changes in material state as Fe-based alloys are heated to high temperatures or subject to irradiation are examined using these techniques.

  10. Model-based x-ray energy spectrum estimation algorithm from CT scanning data with spectrum filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of technology, the traditional X-ray CT can't meet the modern medical and industry needs for component distinguish and identification. This is due to the inconsistency of X-ray imaging system and reconstruction algorithm. In the current CT systems, X-ray spectrum produced by X-ray source is continuous in energy range determined by tube voltage and energy filter, and the attenuation coefficient of object is varied with the X-ray energy. So the distribution of X-ray energy spectrum plays an important role for beam-hardening correction, dual energy CT image reconstruction or dose calculation. However, due to high ill-condition and ill-posed feature of system equations of transmission measurement data, statistical fluctuations of X ray quantum and noise pollution, it is very hard to get stable and accurate spectrum estimation using existing methods. In this paper, a model-based X-ray energy spectrum estimation method from CT scanning data with energy spectrum filter is proposed. First, transmission measurement data were accurately acquired by CT scan and measurement using phantoms with different energy spectrum filter. Second, a physical meaningful X-ray tube spectrum model was established with weighted gaussian functions and priori information such as continuity of bremsstrahlung and specificity of characteristic emission and estimation information of average attenuation coefficient. The parameter in model was optimized to get the best estimation result for filtered spectrum. Finally, the original energy spectrum was reconstructed from filtered spectrum estimation with filter priori information. Experimental results demonstrate that the stability and accuracy of X ray energy spectrum estimation using the proposed method are improved significantly.

  11. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90° from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and −66.33 mV, respectively. The detector’s energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 20–45 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the

  12. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  13. The soft X-ray diffuse background observed with the HEAO 1 low-energy detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmire, G. P.; Nousek, J. A.; Apparao, K. M. V.; Burrows, D. N.; Fink, R. L.; Kraft, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study of the diffuse soft-X-ray background as observed by the low-energy detectors of the A-2 experiment aboard the HEAO 1 satellite are reported. The observed sky intensities are presented as maps of the diffuse X-ray background sky in several energy bands covering the energy range 0.15-2.8 keV. It is found that the soft X-ray diffuse background (SXDB) between 1.5 and 2.8 keV, assuming a power law form with photon number index 1.4, has a normalization constant of 10.5 +/- 1.0 photons/sq cm s sr keV. Below 1.5 keV the spectrum of the SXDB exceeds the extrapolation of this power law. The low-energy excess for the NEP can be fitted with emission from a two-temperature equilibrium plasma model with the temperatures given by log I1 = 6.16 and log T2 = 6.33. It is found that this model is able to account for the spectrum below 1 keV, but fails to yield the observed Galactic latitude variation.

  14. Techniques for deriving tissue structure from multiple projection dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jr., Harry K. (Inventor); Beck, Thomas J. (Inventor); Feldmesser, Howard S. (Inventor); Magee, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Techniques for deriving bone properties from images generated by a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry apparatus include receiving first image data having pixels indicating bone mineral density projected at a first angle of a plurality of projection angles. Second image data and third image data are also received. The second image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a different second angle. The third image data indicates bone mineral density projected at a third angle. The third angle is different from the first angle and the second angle. Principal moments of inertia for a bone in the subject are computed based on the first image data, the second image data and the third image data. The techniques allow high-precision, high-resolution dual-energy x-ray attenuation images to be used for computing principal moments of inertia and strength moduli of individual bones, plus risk of injury and changes in risk of injury to a patient.

  15. Elemental contrast imaging with a polychromatic laboratory x-ray source using energy-discriminating detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokhana, Viona S. K.; Arhatari, Bendicta D.; Gureyev, Timur E.; Abbey, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Determining the specific spatial distributions of elements within compound samples is of critical importance to a range of applied research fields. The usual approaches to obtaining elemental contrast involve measurement of the characteristic peaks associated with x-ray fluorescence or measuring the x-ray transmission as a function of energy. In the laboratory these measurements are challenging due to the polychromaticity and lack of tunability of the source. Here we demonstrate how newly developed, high-resolution, energy-discriminating area detector technology can be exploited to enhance elemental contrast. The detector we employ here is the Pixirad area detector which can simultaneously have up to four separate colour channels. We also discuss the potential of this new technology in the context of tomographic imaging of soft tissue.

  16. A high resolution gas scintillation proportional counter for studying low energy cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, T. T.; Hailey, C. J.; Ku, W. H.-M.; Novick, R.

    1980-01-01

    In recent years much effort has been devoted to the development of large area gas scintillation proportional counters (GSPCs) suitable for use in X-ray astronomy. The paper deals with a low-energy GSPC for use in detecting sub-keV X-rays from cosmic sources. This instrument has a measured energy resolution of 85 eV (FWHM) at 149 eV over a sensitive area of 5 sq cm. The development of imaging capability for this instrument is discussed. Tests are performed on the feasibility of using an arrangement of several phototubes placed adjacent to one another to determine event locations in a large flat counter. A simple prototype has been constructed and successfully operated.

  17. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C.; Hartsough, Neal E.; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm2/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a 57Co source. An output rate of 6×106 counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and energy

  18. Photon Counting Energy Dispersive Detector Arrays for X-ray Imaging.

    PubMed

    Iwanczyk, Jan S; Nygård, Einar; Meirav, Oded; Arenson, Jerry; Barber, William C; Hartsough, Neal E; Malakhov, Nail; Wessel, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    The development of an innovative detector technology for photon-counting in X-ray imaging is reported. This new generation of detectors, based on pixellated cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays electrically connected to application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) for readout, will produce fast and highly efficient photon-counting and energy-dispersive X-ray imaging. There are a number of applications that can greatly benefit from these novel imagers including mammography, planar radiography, and computed tomography (CT). Systems based on this new detector technology can provide compositional analysis of tissue through spectroscopic X-ray imaging, significantly improve overall image quality, and may significantly reduce X-ray dose to the patient. A very high X-ray flux is utilized in many of these applications. For example, CT scanners can produce ~100 Mphotons/mm(2)/s in the unattenuated beam. High flux is required in order to collect sufficient photon statistics in the measurement of the transmitted flux (attenuated beam) during the very short time frame of a CT scan. This high count rate combined with a need for high detection efficiency requires the development of detector structures that can provide a response signal much faster than the transit time of carriers over the whole detector thickness. We have developed CdTe and CZT detector array structures which are 3 mm thick with 16×16 pixels and a 1 mm pixel pitch. These structures, in the two different implementations presented here, utilize either a small pixel effect or a drift phenomenon. An energy resolution of 4.75% at 122 keV has been obtained with a 30 ns peaking time using discrete electronics and a (57)Co source. An output rate of 6×10(6) counts per second per individual pixel has been obtained with our ASIC readout electronics and a clinical CT X-ray tube. Additionally, the first clinical CT images, taken with several of our prototype photon-counting and

  19. Analysis of some Nigerian solid mineral ores by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obiajunwa, E. I.

    2001-11-01

    Determination of major, minor and trace elements in some Nigerian solid mineral ores by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy is described. Concentration values of major, minor and trace elements for Z>18 are reported. The mineral ores studied include (i) tantalite-coloumbite minerals, (ii) bismuth minerals and (iii) lead minerals. The accuracy and precision of the technique for chemical analysis was assured by analysing the geological standards mica-Fe (biotite) and NBS 278 (obsidian).

  20. The High-Energy RXTE X-Ray Spectrum of RX J0852.0-4622

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. E.; Markwardt, C. B.; Petre, R.

    1999-04-01

    A new shell-type supernova remnant, RX J0852.0-4622, was recently discovered in the direction of the Vela remnant. While the Vela remnant dominates the low-energy (ROSAT) X-ray image of this region, the ring of RX J0852.0-4622 is clearly observable at energies > 1.3 keV. This new remnant and the Cas A remnant are the only two sources that have been detected to emit 1.156 MeV gamma rays from the decay of (44) Ti. The presence of (44) Ti, which has a half-life of ~ 90 yr, and the strength of the (44) Ti-line flux indicate that RX J0852.0-4622 is both young ( ~ 600--1100 yr) and close to Earth ( ~ 100--300 pc). Except for the Local Bubble, this remnant may be the closest of the known supernova remnants. A series of scans with the instruments on the RXTE satellite indicate that both the RX J0852.0-4622 and Vela remnants are sources of high-energy X-ray emission. We present the count-rate scan profile and a 3--12 keV RXTE spectrum, which includes emission from both remnants. Although it is difficult to distinguish the RXTE X-ray spectrum of one remnant from the other, spectral models suggest that RX J0852.0-4622 exhibits no evidence of Fe-K--line emission. We discuss whether the high-energy X-ray continuum of this remnant is thermal or non-thermal and review the implications of the results.

  1. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  2. Use of MCNP code in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojek, T.; Čechák, T.

    2007-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations enable us to improve the applicability of analytical techniques based on emission of characteristic radiation. In particular, the MCNP4C2 code was tested for interpretation of measured data obtained with the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. This paper describes MCNP outputs and compares them with the results of analytical calculations or experiments. Then the application of Monte Carlo simulations to the prediction of measurement results is shown, and the MCNP results are verified.

  3. Measurement of electron density in dual-energy x-ray CT with monochromatic x rays and evaluation of its accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tsunoo, Takanori; Torikoshi, Masami; Ohno, Yumiko; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2008-11-01

    Information on electron density is important for radiotherapy treatment planning in order to optimize the dose distribution in the target volume of a patient. At present, the electron density is derived from a computed tomography (CT) number measured in x-ray CT scanning; however, there are uncertainties due to the beam hardening effect and the method by which the electron density is converted from the CT number. In order to measure the electron density with an accuracy of +/-1%, the authors have developed dual-energy x ray CT using monochromatic x rays. They experimentally proved that the measured linear attenuation coefficients were only a few percent lower than the theoretical ones, which led to an accuracy within 2% for the electron density. There were three factors causing inaccuracy in the linear attenuation coefficient and the electron density: the influence of scattered radiation, the nonlinearity in the detector response function, and a theoretical process to derive the electron density from the linear attenuation coefficients. The linear attenuation coefficients of water were experimentally proved to differ by 1%-2% from the theoretical one even when the scattering effect was negligible. The nonlinearity of the response function played an important role in correcting the difference in the linear attenuation coefficient. Furthermore, the theoretical process used for deriving the electron density from the linear attenuation coefficients introduces about 0.6% deviation from the theoretical value into the resultant electron density. This deviation occurs systematically so that it can be corrected. The authors measured the electron densities for seven samples equivalent to soft tissue in dual-energy x-ray CT, and finally obtained them with an accuracy of around +/-1%.

  4. The Application of Monochromatic Energies to Investigate Multiphase Porous Media Systems using Synchrotron X-ray Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, Kyungmin; Willson, Clinton S.

    2006-01-31

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is becoming a useful tool for nondestructive imaging of many geoenvironmental and geotechnical systems. Conventional X-ray CT systems typically utilize a polychromatic X-ray beam. While providing a high throughput of photons, the use of polychromatic energy can make quantifying material concentrations, densities or composition very difficult or impossible without appropriate standards. Synchrotron X-rays have an extremely small angular divergence, thus permitting spatial resolution that is only limited by the optical components of the system. In addition, the ability to tune to a monochromatic X-ray energy allows better phase contrast by reducing beam hardening and allowing for elemental discrimination. In this work we will show how monochromatic energy can be used to provide high-quality images allowing for phase separation several different porous media systems thus improving our ability to quantify a range of processes and phenomena.

  5. The Missing Baryon Explorer: A Proposed SMEX Mission to Map the X-ray Emission from the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Missing Baryon Explorer Team

    2003-12-01

    The Missing Baryon Explorer was proposed to NASA in the most recent round of SMEX proposals. It is dedicated to high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy, with medium-resolution x-ray imaging, of the diffuse plasmas in the hot intergalactic medium, the hot Galactic halo, the hot interstellar medium, and from highly-ionized species within the solar system. The highest priority science goal is tracing the structure of the emission from the missing baryonic matter in the local universe, with a secondary science goal of understanding the role of hot material in the in the life cycles of galaxies and stars. To achieve these goals, we propose an imaging x-ray spectrometer, an array of microcalorimeters, to provide 4-eV spectral resolution over the 40 - 2000 eV energy range. A conical-foil optic with a 1.4-meter focal length provides large collecting area and 5-arcminute image quality that matches the spatial resolution of the detectors. Observations are carried out either in pointed mode (first 4 months and after the all-sky survey) or in all-sky survey mode (months 5-10). The final 7 months of the mission combine additional science team pointed observations and guest observer pointings. The Missing Baryon Explorer team includes major hardware contributions from the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Lockheed-Martin, and Spectrum Astro in addition to the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The science team in addition includes members from Yale Univ., SRON, SAO, Princeton Univ., Univ. of Michigan, Univ. of Miami, Johns Hopkins Univ., Carnegie Mellon Univ., California Inst. of Tech., Univ. of California-Berkeley, and Univ. of Alabama-Huntsville.

  6. Study of induced thermoluminescence in CVD diamond film by low-energy X-rays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi-Chang; Lin, Jao-Perng; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2003-07-01

    For diamond film the one-hit model that is used to interpret low-energy X-ray thermoluminescence (TL) will require some modifications. After the films were irradiated with a superficial X-ray machine with different peak voltages, a two-compartment model with three parameters, the target size, the microscopic saturation factor and the high-LET saturation factor, was used to more precisely describe the TL response to X-ray with energies down to 10 kV. The microdosimetric distribution was calculated using single-event Monte Carlo code developed by authors together with EEDL cross-section data library. Some mechanistic insight into the physical aspect of radiation interaction with solid detectors can be obtained. The sensitive size in diamond was found to be about 15 nm. The saturation of one group of sublevels combined with the activation of another group of sublevels caused the relative efficiency to have a local minimum near 20 keV. The relative efficiency becomes higher below 10 keV, which is similar to the increasing relative biological effectiveness when the linear energy transfer passing through a biological system increases. The similarity made this material to be a molecular-scale dosimeter in the future.

  7. The energy calibration of x-ray absorption spectra using multiple-beam diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, M.; Cunis, S. ); Frahm, R. ); Rabe, P. )

    1992-01-01

    A new method for calibrating the energy scale of x-ray absorption spectra from an energy dispersive spectrometer has been developed. Distinct features in the diffracted intensity of the curved silicon crystal monochromator have been assigned to multiple-beam diffraction. The photon energies of these structures can be calculated if the precise spacing of the diffracting planes and the orientation of the crystal relative to the incident synchrotron radiation are known. The evaluation of Miller indices of operative reflections and the calculation of the corresponding photon energy is presented. The assignment of operative reflexes is simplified if the monochromator crystal can be rotated around the main diffracting vector {bold H}.

  8. Nonthermal X-ray Spectral Flattening toward Low Energies in Early Impulsive Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    2007-01-01

    The determination of the low-energy cutoff to nonthermal electron distributions is critical to the calculation of the nonthermal energy in solar flares. The most direct evidence for low-energy cutoffs is flattening of the power-law, nontherma1 X-ray spectra at low energies. However, because of the plasma preheating often seen in flares, the thermal emissions at low energies may hide such spectral flattening of the nonthermal component. We select a category of flares, which we call "early impulsive flares", in which the > 25 keV hard X-ray (HXR) flux increase is delayed by less than 30 s after the flux increase at lower energies. Thus, the plasma preheating in these flares is minimal, so the nonthermal spectrum can be determined to lower energies than in flares with significant preheating. Out of a sample of 33 early impulsive flares observed by the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopy Imager (RHESSI), 9 showed spectral flattening toward low energies. In these events, the break energy of the double power-law fit to the HXR spectra lies in the range of 10-50 keV, significantly lower than the value we have seen for other flares that do not show such early impulsive emissions. In particular, it correlates with the HXR flux. After correcting the spatially-integrated spectra for albedo from isotropically emitted X-rays and using RHESSI imaging spectroscopy to exclude the extended albedo halo, we find that albedo associated with isotropic or nearly isotropic electrons can only account for the spectral flattening in 3 flares near Sun center. The spectral flattening in the remaining 6 flares is found to be consistent with the existence of a low-energy cutoff in the electron spectrum, falling in the range of 15-50 keV, which also correlates with the HXR flux.

  9. Modular soft x-ray spectrometer for applications in energy sciences and quantum materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-De; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Cruz, Alejandro; Hanzel, Kelly; Brown, Adam; Frano, Alex; Qiao, Ruimin; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Huang, Shih-Wen; Wray, L. Andrew; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P.; Chiou, Jaw-Wern; Pong, Way-Faung; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Gullikson, Eric; Reininger, Ruben; Yang, Wanli; Guo, Jinghua; Duarte, Robert; Hussain, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the advances in grating-based soft X-ray spectrometers have revolutionized the soft X-ray spectroscopies in materials research. However, these novel spectrometers are mostly dedicated designs, which cannot be easily adopted for applications with diverging demands. Here we present a versatile spectrometer design concept based on the Hettrick-Underwood optical scheme that uses modular mechanical components. The spectrometer's optics chamber can be used with gratings operated in either inside or outside orders, and the detector assembly can be reconfigured accordingly. The spectrometer can be designed to have high spectral resolution, exceeding 10 000 resolving power when using small source (˜1 μ m) and detector pixels (˜5 μ m) with high line density gratings (˜3000 lines/mm), or high throughput at moderate resolution. We report two such spectrometers with slightly different design goals and optical parameters in this paper. We show that the spectrometer with high throughput and large energy window is particularly useful for studying the sustainable energy materials. We demonstrate that the extensive resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) map of battery cathode material LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 can be produced in few hours using such a spectrometer. Unlike analyzing only a handful of RIXS spectra taken at selected excitation photon energies across the elemental absorption edges to determine various spectral features like the localized dd excitations and non-resonant fluorescence emissions, these features can be easily identified in the RIXS maps. Studying such RIXS maps could reveal novel transition metal redox in battery compounds that are sometimes hard to be unambiguously identified in X-ray absorption and emission spectra. We propose that this modular spectrometer design can serve as the platform for further customization to meet specific scientific demands.

  10. Modular soft x-ray spectrometer for applications in energy sciences and quantum materials.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-De; Shao, Yu-Cheng; Cruz, Alejandro; Hanzel, Kelly; Brown, Adam; Frano, Alex; Qiao, Ruimin; Smith, Brian; Domning, Edward; Huang, Shih-Wen; Wray, L Andrew; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Devereaux, Thomas P; Chiou, Jaw-Wern; Pong, Way-Faung; Yashchuk, Valeriy V; Gullikson, Eric; Reininger, Ruben; Yang, Wanli; Guo, Jinghua; Duarte, Robert; Hussain, Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the advances in grating-based soft X-ray spectrometers have revolutionized the soft X-ray spectroscopies in materials research. However, these novel spectrometers are mostly dedicated designs, which cannot be easily adopted for applications with diverging demands. Here we present a versatile spectrometer design concept based on the Hettrick-Underwood optical scheme that uses modular mechanical components. The spectrometer's optics chamber can be used with gratings operated in either inside or outside orders, and the detector assembly can be reconfigured accordingly. The spectrometer can be designed to have high spectral resolution, exceeding 10 000 resolving power when using small source (∼1μm) and detector pixels (∼5μm) with high line density gratings (∼3000 lines/mm), or high throughput at moderate resolution. We report two such spectrometers with slightly different design goals and optical parameters in this paper. We show that the spectrometer with high throughput and large energy window is particularly useful for studying the sustainable energy materials. We demonstrate that the extensive resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) map of battery cathode material LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 can be produced in few hours using such a spectrometer. Unlike analyzing only a handful of RIXS spectra taken at selected excitation photon energies across the elemental absorption edges to determine various spectral features like the localized dd excitations and non-resonant fluorescence emissions, these features can be easily identified in the RIXS maps. Studying such RIXS maps could reveal novel transition metal redox in battery compounds that are sometimes hard to be unambiguously identified in X-ray absorption and emission spectra. We propose that this modular spectrometer design can serve as the platform for further customization to meet specific scientific demands.

  11. X-Ray

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gray. For some types of X-ray tests, a contrast medium — such as iodine or barium — is introduced into your body to provide greater detail on the images. X-ray technology is used to examine many parts of the ...

  12. Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters for High-Energy X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeffery

    2003-01-01

    A focal plane array of high-pressure gas scintillation proportional counters (GSPC) for a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope is under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center. These detectors have an active area of approx. 20 sq cm, and are filled with a high pressure (10(exp 6) Pa) xenon-helium mixture. Imaging is via crossed-grid position-sensitive phototubes sensitive in the UV region. The performance of the GSPC is well matched to that of the telescopes x-ray optics which have response to 75 keV and a focal spot size of approx. 500 microns. The detector s energy resolution, 4% FWHM at 60 keV, is adequate for resolving the broad spectral lines of astrophysical importance and for accurate continuum measurements. Full details of the instrument and its performance will be provided.

  13. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-09-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  14. Fast scattering simulation tool for multi-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossin, A.; Tabary, J.; Rebuffel, V.; Létang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Verger, L.

    2015-12-01

    A combination of Monte Carlo (MC) and deterministic approaches was employed as a means of creating a simulation tool capable of providing energy resolved x-ray primary and scatter images within a reasonable time interval. Libraries of Sindbad, a previously developed x-ray simulation software, were used in the development. The scatter simulation capabilities of the tool were validated through simulation with the aid of GATE and through experimentation by using a spectrometric CdTe detector. A simple cylindrical phantom with cavities and an aluminum insert was used. Cross-validation with GATE showed good agreement with a global spatial error of 1.5% and a maximum scatter spectrum error of around 6%. Experimental validation also supported the accuracy of the simulations obtained from the developed software with a global spatial error of 1.8% and a maximum error of around 8.5% in the scatter spectra.

  15. Crystallographic Characterization of Extraterrestrial Materials by Energy-Scanning X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagiya, Kenji; Mikouchi, Takashi; Ohsumi, Kazumasa; Terada, Yasuko; Yagi, Naoto; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Yamaguchi, Shoki; Hirata, Arashi; Kurokawa, Ayaka; Zolensky, Michael E. (Principal Investigator)

    2016-01-01

    We have continued our long-term project using X-ray diffraction to characterize a wide range of extraterrestrial samples. The stationary sample method with polychromatic X-rays is advantageous because the irradiated area of the sample is always same and fixed, meaning that all diffraction spots occur from the same area of the sample, however, unit cell parameters cannot be directly obtained by this method though they are very important for identification of mineral and for determination of crystal structures. In order to obtain the cell parameters even in the case of the sample stationary method, we apply energy scanning of a micro-beam of monochromatic SR at SPring-8.

  16. 'Optical' soft x-ray arrays for fluctuation diagnostics in magnetic fusion energy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Aparicio, L.F.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Finkenthal, M.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, L.; Johnson, D.; Majeski, R.

    2004-10-01

    We are developing large pixel count, fast ({>=}100 kHz) and continuously sampling soft x-ray (SXR) array for the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and turbulent fluctuations in magnetic fusion energy plasmas. The arrays are based on efficient scintillators, high thoughput multiclad fiber optics, and multichannel light amplification and integration. Compared to conventional x-ray diode arrays, such systems can provide vastly increased spatial coverage, and access to difficult locations with small neutron noise and damage. An eight-channel array has been built using columnar CsI:Tl as an SXR converter and a multianode photomultiplier tube as photoamplifier. The overall system efficiency is measured using laboratory SXR sources, while the time response and signal-to-noise performance have been evaluated by recording MHD activity from the spherical tori (ST) Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade and National Spherical Torus Experiment, both at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory.

  17. High-efficiency high-energy-resolution spectrometer for inelastic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Q.; Tyson, T. A.; Caliebe, W. A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2005-12-01

    A nine-element analyzer system for inelastic X-ray scattering has been designed and constructed. Each individual analyzer crystal is carefully aligned with an inverse joystick goniometer. For the analyzers silicon wafers with 100 mm diameter are spherically bent to 1 or 0.85 m radius, respectively. Additionally, an analyzer with an extra small radius of 0.182 m and diameter of 100 mm was constructed for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. All analyzer crystals with large radius have highly uniform focusing property. The total energy resolution is approximately 0.5 eV at backscattering for the 1 m radius Si(440) analyzer array and approximately 4 eV for the 0.182 m radius Si(440) analyzer at 6493 eV.

  18. Star Factory Near Galactic Center Bathed In High-Energy X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Near the crowded core of the Milky Way galaxy, where stars shine so brightly and plentifully that planets there would never experience nighttime, astronomers have found a new phenomenon: a cauldron of 60-million-degree gas enveloping a cluster of young stars. Professor Farhad Zadeh of Northwestern University and his collaborators used NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to trace the gas around the Arches cluster, a well-studied region of star formation that is home to some of our Galaxy's largest and youngest stars. "This is the first time we have seen a young cluster of stars surrounded by such a halo of high-energy X-rays," said Zadeh in a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in Pasadena, CA. "This supports theoretical predictions that stellar winds from massive stars can collide with each other and generate very hot gas." Massive stars, newborn stars, and stellar winds have long been known to emit X-rays. The Chandra results are significant because they identify this new type of mechanism of colliding winds to generate X-rays as energetic as those seen in distant starburst galaxies, which are known for their furious pace of star production. The Arches cluster is about 26,000 light years from Earth and only about 1 to 2 million years old. It is also less than 100 light years from what is thought to be a supermassive black hole in the center of our Galaxy. The cluster contains 150 hot, young stars, known as "O" stars, concentrated within a diameter of one light year, making it the most compact cluster known in the Milky Way galaxy. The density of stars makes the region in and around the Arches cluster a microcosm of what is likely occurring in starburst galaxies. "The Arches cluster is one of the best 'local' analogues of starburst galaxies-- the most prodigious stellar nurseries known," said Casey Law of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. "Yet the Arches cluster is in our backyard, not millions of light years away." The Arches Cluster

  19. Experimental validation of a multi-energy x-ray adapted scatter separation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossin, A.; Rebuffel, V.; Tabary, J.; Létang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Verger, L.

    2016-12-01

    Both in radiography and computed tomography (CT), recently emerged energy-resolved x-ray photon counting detectors enable the identification and quantification of individual materials comprising the inspected object. However, the approaches used for these operations require highly accurate x-ray images. The accuracy of the images is severely compromised by the presence of scattered radiation, which leads to a loss of spatial contrast and, more importantly, a bias in radiographic material imaging and artefacts in CT. The aim of the present study was to experimentally evaluate a recently introduced partial attenuation spectral scatter separation approach (PASSSA) adapted for multi-energy imaging. For this purpose, a prototype x-ray system was used. Several radiographic acquisitions of an anthropomorphic thorax phantom were performed. Reference primary images were obtained via the beam-stop (BS) approach. The attenuation images acquired from PASSSA-corrected data showed a substantial increase in local contrast and internal structure contour visibility when compared to uncorrected images. A substantial reduction of scatter induced bias was also achieved. Quantitatively, the developed method proved to be in relatively good agreement with the BS data. The application of the proposed scatter correction technique lowered the initial normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) of 45% between the uncorrected total and the reference primary spectral images by a factor of 9, thus reducing it to around 5%.

  20. A novel portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer with triaxial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, S.; Alves, M.; Sampaio, J. M.; Santos, J. P.; Carvalho, M. L.; Guerra, M.

    2017-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence technique is a powerful analytical tool with a broad range of applications such as quality control, environmental contamination by heavy metals, cultural heritage, among others. For the first time, a portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was assembled, with orthogonal triaxial geometry between the X-ray tube, the secondary target, the sample and the detector. This geometry reduces the background of the measured spectra by reducing significantly the Bremsstrahlung produced in the tube through polarization in the secondary target and in the sample. Consequently, a practically monochromatic excitation energy is obtained. In this way, a better peak-background ratio is obtained compared to similar devices, improving the detection limits and leading to superior sensitivity. The performance of this setup is compared with the one of a benchtop setup with triaxial geometry and a portable setup with planar geometry. Two case studies are presented concerning the analysis of a 18th century paper document, and the bone remains of an individual buried in the early 19th century.

  1. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  2. Determination of high-energy x-ray spectra by photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Schulz, R J

    1976-01-01

    The determination of high-energy x-ray spectra has required scintillation spectrometers with massive shielding, neutron time-of-flight spectrometers, or the tedious counting of electron tracks in nuclear emulsions. A new approach has been developed which takes advantage of the energy dependence of photoactivation cross sections. Radioactivity is produced in a small packet of C, Cu, Co, Y, Zr, and Au foils by approximately 5000 rad (tissue). Since the amount of radioactivity produced in each foil is given by the integral of the product of photonuclear cross section and differential photon fluence, a numerical method for unfolding the spectrum is required, and the orthonormal expansion has been employed for this purpose. The photoactivation method has been used to determine the x-ray spectra produced by 30-MeV electrons incident upon thin and thick tungsten targets, and filtered by equivalent amounts of lead and aluminum. These spectra have been compared to calculated thin-target spectra as well as to those determined by a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer. The central-axis and off-axis x-ray spectra produced by a 33-MeV betatron have also been determined.

  3. Energy dependent variability and outburst evolution in black hole X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiele, H.; Kong, A. K. H.

    2016-12-01

    Almost all low mass black hole X-ray binaries are transient sources. Most of these sources show a certain pattern during outburst: the evolution from low hard state through intermediate state(s) into high soft state and the returning to the hard state at lower luminosity. However, there are outbursts that remain in the hard state (so called "failed" outbursts). Using the technique of covariance spectra we can investigate the variability of individual spectral components on different time scales. Comprehensive studies of covariance spectra for a sample of black hole X-ray binaries observed in the rising low hard state of "normal" outbursts revealed an increase of the covariance ratios towards lower energies that has been interpreted as the sign of additional disc variability on long time scales. There are now two sources (h1743 and gs) that do not show an increase towards lower energies in their covariance ratio. Both sources have been observed during "failed" outbursts and showed photon indices much harder than what is usually observed in black hole X-ray binaries.

  4. High-energy x-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography of human anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Florian; Hauke, Christian; Lachner, Sebastian; Ludwig, Veronika; Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Schuster, Max; Seifert, Maria; Wandner, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Michel, Thilo; Anton, Gisela

    2016-03-01

    X-ray grating-based phase-contrast Talbot-Lau interferometry is a promising imaging technology that has the potential to raise soft tissue contrast in comparison to conventional attenuation-based imaging. Additionally, it is sensitive to attenuation, refraction and scattering of the radiation and thus provides complementary and otherwise inaccessible information due to the dark-field image, which shows the sub-pixel size granularity of the measured object. Until recent progress the method has been mainly limited to photon energies below 40 keV. Scaling the method to photon energies that are sufficient to pass large and spacious objects represents a challenging task. This is caused by increasing demands regarding the fabrication process of the gratings and the broad spectra that come along with the use of polychromatic X-ray sources operated at high acceleration voltages. We designed a setup that is capable to reach high visibilities in the range from 50 to 120 kV. Therefore, spacious and dense parts of the human body with high attenuation can be measured, such as a human knee. The authors will show investigations on the resulting attenuation, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. The images experimentally show that X-ray grating-based phase-contrast radiography is feasible with highly absorbing parts of the human body containing massive bones.

  5. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  6. SOLEX: a tunable monochromatic X-ray source in the 1-20 keV energy range for metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelle, C.; Jonnard, P.; André, J.-M.; Avila, A.; Laporte, D.; Ringuenet, H.; Lépy, M. C.; Plagnard, J.; Ferreux, L.; Protas, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    A tunable monochromatic X-ray source covering the 1-20 keV energy range is described. The initial X-ray beam is obtained from a dedicated windowless X-ray tube. The energy selection is performed through a cylindrically bent crystal, used either in the reflection (Johann geometry) or in the transmission (Cauchois geometry) mode, by rotating the crystal holder by a 90° angle. Contrary to conventional geometries where the X-ray tube is fixed, here the direction of the exit beam impinging the X-ray detector is fixed. This setup is shown to be useful for various studies: high-resolution spectrometry, characterization of the response function and the efficiency of detectors and optical components, determination of transmission characteristics of different materials. Observations of the Lα line and Kα doublet from a copper anode are presented, that demonstrate the performance of this new setup.

  7. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  8. The Effects of Low- and High-Energy Cutoffs on Solar Flare Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holman, G. D.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Microwave and hard x-ray spectra provide crucial information about energetic electrons and their environment in solar flares. These spectra are becoming better determined with the Owens Valley Solar Array (OVSA) and the recent launch of the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The proposed Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) promises even greater advances in radio observations of solar flares. Both microwave and hard x-ray spectra are sensitive to cutoffs in the electron distribution function. The determination of the high-energy cutoff from these spectra establishes the highest electron energies produced by the acceleration mechanism, while determination of the low-energy cutoff is crucial to establishing the total energy in accelerated electrons. This paper will show computations of the effects of both high- and low-energy cutoffs on microwave and hard x-ray spectra. The optically thick portion of a microwave spectrum is enhanced and smoothed by a low-energy cutoff, while a hard x-ray spectrum is flattened below the cutoff energy. A high-energy cutoff steepens the microwave spectrum and increases the wavelength at which the spectrum peaks, while the hard x-ray spectrum begins to steepen at photon energies roughly an order of magnitude below the electron cutoff energy. This work discusses how flare microwave and hard x-ray spectra can be analyzed together to determine these electron cutoff energies. This work is supported in part by the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program.

  9. X-ray spectroscopy studies of nonradiative energy transfer processes in luminescent lanthanide materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacold, Joseph I.

    Luminescent materials play important roles in energy sciences, through solid state lighting and possible applications in solar energy utilization, and in biomedical research and applications, such as in immunoassays and fluorescence microscopy. The initial excitation of a luminescent material leads to a sequence of transitions between excited states, ideally ending with the emission of one or more optical-wavelength photons. It is essential to understand the microscopic physics of this excited state cascade in order to rationally design materials with high quantum efficiencies or with other fine-tuning of materials response. While optical-wavelength spectroscopies have unraveled many details of the energy transfer pathways in luminescent materials, significant questions remain open for many lanthanide-based luminescent materials. For organometallic dyes in particular, quantum yields remain limited in comparison with inorganic phosphors. This dissertation reports on a research program of synchrotron x-ray studies of the excited state electronic structure and energy-relaxation cascade in trivalent lanthanide phosphors and dyes. To this end, one of the primary results presented here is the first time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy studies of the transient 4f excited states in lanthanide-activated luminescent dyes and phosphors. This is a new application of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy that makes it possible to directly observe and, to some extent, quantify intramolecular nonradiative energy transfer processes. We find a transient increase in 4f spectral weight associated with an excited state confined to the 4f shell of trivalent Eu. This result implies that it is necessary to revise the current theoretical understanding of 4f excitation in trivalent lanthanide activators: either transient 4f-5d mixing effects are much stronger than previously considered, or else the lanthanide 4f excited state has an unexpectedly large contribution

  10. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  11. [Application of in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis in mineralogy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Xiong, Sheng-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Thirteen rock samples were collected for studying the variation of element content in the mineral during the alteration process from Xinjiang, China. The IED-6000 in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence developed by CDUT was applied to get chemical and physical data from minerals. The non-destructive spectrometer is based on a low-power Mo-anode X-ray tube and a Si-PIN peltier cooled X-ray detector. The unique design of the tube's probe allows very close coupling of polycapillary and makes the use of micro-area measurement feasible and efficient. The spectrometer can be integrated into any microscope for analysis. The long axis diameter of beam spot is about 110 microm. According to micro-EDXRF measurement, the tetrahedrite was corrected to pyrite, improving the efficiency and accuracy of the mineral identification. The feldspar of mineralized rock sample is rich in Cu and Zn which can be used as prospecting indicator elements. Element content of Cr, Mn and Co shows negative correlation with the degree of mineralization.

  12. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  13. Simulation of X-ray Irradiation on Optics and Chamber Wall Materials for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Stein, W

    2003-09-10

    We have used the ABLATOR code to analyze the effect of the x-ray emission from direct drive targets on the optics and the first wall of a conceptual laser Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant. For this purpose, the ABLATOR code has been modified to incorporate the predicted x-ray spectrum from a generic direct drive target. We have also introduced elongation calculations in ABLATOR to predict the thermal stresses in the optic and first wall materials. These results have been validated with thermal diffusion calculations, using the LLNL heat transfer and dynamic structural finite element codes Topaz3d and Dyna3d. One of the most relevant upgrades performed in the ABLATOR code consists of the possibility to accommodate multi-material simulations. This new feature allows for a more realistic modeling of typical IFE optics and first wall materials, which may have a number of different layers. Finally, we have used the XAPPER facility, at LLNL, to develop our predictive capability and validate the results. The ABLATOR code will be further modified, as necessary, to predict the effects of x-ray irradiation in both the IFE real case and our experiments on the XAPPER facility.

  14. X-ray spectroscopy for chemical and energy sciences: the case of heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Anatoly I; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A

    2014-09-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is the enabling technology for much of the current and future processes relevant for energy conversion and chemicals synthesis. The development of new materials and processes is greatly helped by the understanding of the catalytic process at the molecular level on the macro/micro-kinetic time scale and on that of the actual bond breaking and bond making. The performance of heterogeneous catalysts is inherently the average over the ensemble of active sites. Much development aims at unravelling the structure of the active site; however, in general, these methods yield the ensemble-average structure. A benefit of X-ray-based methods is the large penetration depth of the X-rays, enabling in situ and operando measurements. The potential of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods (XANES, EXAFS, HERFD, RIXS and HEROS) to directly measure the structure of the catalytically active site at the single nanoparticle level using nanometer beams at diffraction-limited storage ring sources is highlighted. The use of pump-probe schemes coupled with single-shot experiments will extend the time range from the micro/macro-kinetic time domain to the time scale of bond breaking and making.

  15. X-ray Spectroscopy for Chemical and Energy Sciences. the Case of Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frenkel, A. I.; van Bokhoven, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is the enabling technology for much of the current and future processes relevant for energy conversion and chemicals synthesis. The development of new materials and processes is greatly helped by the understanding of the catalytic process at the molecular level on the macro/micro-kinetic time scale and on that of the actual bond breaking and bond making. The performance of heterogeneous catalysts is inherently the average over the ensemble of active sites. Much development aims at unravelling the structure of the active site; however, in general, these methods yield the ensemble-average structure. A benefit of X-ray-based methods is the large penetration depth of the X-rays, enabling in situ and operando measurements. Furthermore, the potential of X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy methods (XANES, EXAFS, HERFD, RIXS and HEROS) to directly measure the structure of the catalytically active site at the single nanoparticle level using nanometer beams at diffraction-limited storage ring sources is highlighted. Use of pump-probe schemes coupled with single-shot experiments will extend the time range from the micro/macro-kinetic time domain to the time scale of bond breaking and making.

  16. High energy X-ray spectra of cygnus XR-1 observed from OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray spectra of Cygnus XR-1 were measured with the scintillation spectrometer on board the OSO-8 satellite during a period of one and one-half to three weeks in each of the years from 1975 to 1977. Observations were made when the source was both in a high state and in a low state. Typical spectra of the source between 15 and 250 keV are presented. The observed pivoting effect is consistent with two temperature accretion disk models of the X-ray emitting region. No significant break in the spectrum occurred at energies up to 150 keV. The high state as defined in the 3 to 6 keV bandwidth was found to be the higher luminosity state of the X-ray source. One transition from a low to a high state occurred during observations. The time of occurrence of this and other transitions is consistent with the hypothesis that all intensity transitions occur near periastron of the binary system, and that such transitions are caused by changes in the mass transfer rate between the primary and the accretion disk around the secondary.

  17. Internal strain gradients quantified in bone under load using high-energy X-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, S.R.; Yuan, F.; Brinson, L.C.; Almer, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray scattering (>60 keV) allows noninvasive quantification of internal strains within bone. In this proof-of-principle study, wide angle X-ray scattering maps internal strain vs position in cortical bone (murine tibia, bovine femur) under compression, specifically using the response of the mineral phase of carbonated hydroxyapatite. The technique relies on the response of the carbonated hydroxyapatite unit cells and their Debye cones (from nanocrystals correctly oriented for diffraction) to applied stress. Unstressed, the Debye cones produce circular rings on the two-dimensional X-ray detector while applied stress deforms the rings to ellipses centered on the transmitted beam. Ring ellipticity is then converted to strain via standard methods. Strain is measured repeatedly, at each specimen location for each applied stress. Experimental strains from wide angle X-ray scattering and an attached strain gage show bending of the rat tibia and agree qualitatively with results of a simplified finite element model. At their greatest, the apatite-derived strains approach 2500 {micro}{var_epsilon} on one side of the tibia and are near zero on the other. Strains maps around a hole in the femoral bone block demonstrate the effect of the stress concentrator as loading increased and agree qualitatively with the finite element model. Experimentally, residual strains of approximately 2000 {micro}{var_epsilon} are present initially, and strain rises to approximately 4500 {micro}{var_epsilon} at 95 MPa applied stress (about 1000 {micro}{var_epsilon} above the strain in the surrounding material). The experimental data suggest uneven loading which is reproduced qualitatively with finite element modeling.

  18. Internal strain gradients quantified in bone under load using high-energy X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Stock, S R; Yuan, Fang; Brinson, L C; Almer, J D

    2011-01-11

    High-energy synchrotron X-ray scattering (>60 keV) allows noninvasive quantification of internal strains within bone. In this proof-of-principle study, wide angle X-ray scattering maps internal strain vs position in cortical bone (murine tibia, bovine femur) under compression, specifically using the response of the mineral phase of carbonated hydroxyapatite. The technique relies on the response of the carbonated hydroxyapatite unit cells and their Debye cones (from nanocrystals correctly oriented for diffraction) to applied stress. Unstressed, the Debye cones produce circular rings on the two-dimensional X-ray detector while applied stress deforms the rings to ellipses centered on the transmitted beam. Ring ellipticity is then converted to strain via standard methods. Strain is measured repeatedly, at each specimen location for each applied stress. Experimental strains from wide angle X-ray scattering and an attached strain gage show bending of the rat tibia and agree qualitatively with results of a simplified finite element model. At their greatest, the apatite-derived strains approach 2500 με on one side of the tibia and are near zero on the other. Strains maps around a hole in the femoral bone block demonstrate the effect of the stress concentrator as loading increased and agree qualitatively with the finite element model. Experimentally, residual strains of approximately 2000 με are present initially, and strain rises to approximately 4500 με at 95 MPa applied stress (about 1000 με above the strain in the surrounding material). The experimental data suggest uneven loading which is reproduced qualitatively with finite element modeling.

  19. A computation method of dual-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Xuanqin; Tang, Shaojie; Hong, Wei

    2006-03-01

    Dual-energy X-ray imaging is an important method of medical imaging, capable of not only obtaining spatial information of imaging object but also disclosing its chemical components, and has many applications in clinic. The current computation methods of dual-energy imaging are still based on the model of mono-energy spectrum imaging with some linear calibration, while they are incapable to reflect correctly the physical characteristics of dual-energy imaging and obstruct deeper research in this field. The article presents a new medical X-ray imaging model in accordance with physics of imaging and its corresponding computational method. The computation process includes two steps: first, to compute two attenuation parameters that have clear physical meaning: equivalent electron density and attenuation parameter of photoemission; then to compute the components of high- and low-density mass through a group of simple equation with two variables. Experiments showed that such method has quite a satisfactory precision in theory, that is, the solutions of parameters under different exposure voltages and thickness of tissue for several main tissues of human body are much low in deviations, whose quotient of standard deviation divided by mean are mostly under 0.1%, and at most 0.32%. The method provides not only a new computational way for dual-energy X-ray imaging, but also a feasible analysis for its nature. In addition, the method can be used to linearly rectify data of dual-energy CT and analyze the chemical component of reconstructed object by means of parameters clear in physics.

  20. Effects of contrast medium on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. [X-ray; /sup 60/Co

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, S.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, H.; Kuwabara, Y.; Okano, T.

    1982-07-01

    The effects of contrast material (meglumine iothalamate) on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations were investigated in studies on the lymphocytes of patients who had undergone diagnostic radiography and in vitro experiments with diagnostic x rays and /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays. Chromosome and chromatic aberrations were found to increase significantly with increasing concentrations of contrast material that were added at irradiation. However, the aberrations were not associated with elevation of the ratio of dicentric and ring chromosomes to the number of cells with unstable chromosome aberrations at the first mitosis. Lymphocytes irradiated in the absence of contrast material did not show an increase in chromosome-type aberrations when the agent was given in increasing concentrations during subsequent incubation, but there were greater numbers of chromatid gaps and breaks. When lymphocytes were exposed to 400 R (103.2 mC/kg) of /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. rays, the presence of contrast agent did not increase the yield of dicentric and ring chromosomes, but induced a marked delay in cell proliferation, especially in lymphocytes with more heavily damaged chromosomes. In additional examination, the contrast agent itself induced sister chromatid exchanges in lymphocytes.

  1. Superconducting tunneling-junction detectors of X-ray radiation. Issues concerning the energy resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianov, V. A. Gor'kov, V. P. Koshelets, V. P. Filippenko, L. V.

    2007-02-15

    The effect of the recombination-and edge-related losses of nonequilibrium quasiparticles on the energy resolution of superconducting tunneling detectors is studied. The dependence of the signal on the energy of X-ray photons is measured and the shape of instrument-related lines is studied for the Ti/Nb/Al/AlO{sub x}/Al/Nb/NbN detectors with the Ti/Nb passive electrode. Experimental data are analyzed using the diffusion-based model of tunneling detectors.

  2. Monte Carlo analysis of energy dependent anisotropy of bremsstrahlung x-ray spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kakonyi, Robert; Erdelyi, Miklos; Szabo, Gabor

    2009-09-15

    The energy resolved emission angle dependence of x-ray spectra was analyzed by MCNPX (Monte Carlo N particle Monte Carlo) simulator. It was shown that the spectral photon flux had a maximum at a well-defined emission angle due to the anisotropy of the bremsstrahlung process. The higher the relative photon energy, the smaller the emission angle belonging to the maximum was. The trends predicted by the Monte Carlo simulations were experimentally verified. The Monte Carlo results were compared to both the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine spectra table and the SPEKCALCV1.0 code.

  3. Flare onsets in hard and soft X-rays. [magnetic energy conversion in sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Orwig, Larry E.; Antonucci, Ester

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the onset of solar flares, within about 2 min or less before the impulsive peaks, is characterized by an increase in high-energy emission at E less than 100 keV, and strong broadening of soft X-ray lines characteristic of the 10-million-K plasma already present at this stage. The observations are interpreted in terms of the early signature of energy release, during a phase preceding the instability that leads to strong particle acceleration.

  4. K-alpha x-ray source using high energy and high repetition rate laser system for phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbanescu, Cristina; Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Kincaid, Russell; Krol, Andrzej

    2009-08-01

    K-alpha x-ray sources from laser produced plasmas provide completely new possibilities for x-ray phase-contrast imaging applications. By tightly focusing intense femtosecond laser pulses onto a solid target, K-alpha x-ray pulses are generated through the interaction of energetic electrons created in the plasma with the bulk target. In this paper, we present a continuous and efficient Mo K-alpha x-ray source produced by a femtosecond laser system operating at 100 Hz repetition rate with maximum pulse energy of 110 mJ before compression. The source has x-ray conversion efficiency greater than 10-5 into K-alpha line emission. In preparation for phase contrast imaging applications, the size of the resultant K-alpha x-ray emission spot has been also characterized. The source exhibits sufficient spatial coherence to observe phase contrast. We observe a relatively small broadening of the K-alpha source size compared to the size of the laser beam itself. Detailed characterization of the source including the x-ray spectrum and the x-ray average yield along with phase contrast images of test objects will be presented.

  5. X-ray Sources by Energy Recovered Linacs and Their Needed R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen; Douglas, David; Dowell, David; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Kayran, D; Krafft, Geoffrey; Legg, Robert; Moog, E; Obina, T; Rimmer, Robert; Yakimenko, V

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we review the current state of research on energy recovered linacs as drivers for future X-ray sources. For many types of user experiments, such sources may have substantial advantages compared to the workhorse sources of the present: high energy storage rings. Energy recovered linacs need to be improved beyond present experience in both energy and average current to support this application. To build an energy recovered linac based X-ray user facility presents many interesting challenges. We present summaries on the Research and Development (R&D) topics needed for full development of such a source, including the discussion at the Future Light Sources Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on September 15- 17, 2009. A rst iteration of an R&D plan is presented that is founded on the notion of building a set of succeedingly larger test accelerators exploring cathode physics, high average current injector physics, and beam recirculation and beam energy recovery at high average current. Our basic conclusion is that a reviewable design of such a source can be developed after an R&D period of ve to ten years.

  6. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  7. Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis at Low Beam Energy: Almost Always an Adventure!

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-08-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectrometry has been applied to the analysis of various materials at low-incident beam energies, E 0≤5 keV, using peak fitting and following the measured standards/matrix corrections protocol embedded in the National Institute of Standards and Technology Desktop Spectrum Analyzer-II analytical software engine. Low beam energy analysis provides improved spatial resolution laterally and in-depth. The lower beam energy restricts the atomic shells that can be ionized, reducing the number of X-ray peak families available to the analyst. At E 0=5 keV, all elements of the periodic table except H and He can be measured. As the beam energy is reduced below 5 keV, elements become inaccessible due to lack of excitation of useful characteristic X-ray peaks. The shallow sampling depth of low beam energy microanalysis makes the technique more sensitive to surface compositional modification due to formation of oxides and other reaction layers. Accurate and precise analysis is possible with the use of appropriate standards and by accumulating high count spectra of unknowns and standards (>1 million counts integrated from 0.1 keV to E 0).

  8. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  9. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  10. Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.; ...

    2016-09-07

    Here, soft x-ray detection with the new "multi-energy" PILATUS3 detector systems holds promise as a magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasma diagnostic for ITER and beyond. The measured x-ray brightness can be used to determine impurity concentrations, electron temperatures, n2eZeff products, and to probe the electron energy distribution. However, in order to be effective, these detectors which are really large arrays of detectors with photon energy gating capabilities must be precisely calibrated for each pixel. The energy-dependence of the detector response of the multi-energy PILATUS3 system with 100 K pixels has been measured at Dectris Laboratory. X-rays emitted from a tubemore » under high voltage bombard various elements such that they emit x-ray lines from Zr-Lα to Ag-Kα between 1.8 and 22.16 keV. Each pixel on the PILATUS3 can be set to a minimum energy threshold in the range from 1.6 to 25 keV. This feature allows a single detector to be sensitive to a variety of x-ray energies, so that it is possible to sample the energy distribution of the x-ray continuum and line-emission. PILATUS3 can be configured for 1D or 2D imaging of MCF plasmas with typical spatial energy and temporal resolution of 1 cm, 0.6 keV, and 5 ms, respectively.« less

  11. Multi-energy x-ray detector calibration for Te and impurity density (nZ) measurements of MCF plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, J.; Pablant, N.; Efthimion, P.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rissi, M.; Donath, T.; Luethi, B.; Stratton, B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft x-ray detection with the new "multi-energy" PILATUS3 detector systems holds promise as a magnetically confined fusion (MCF) plasma diagnostic for ITER and beyond. The measured x-ray brightness can be used to determine impurity concentrations, electron temperatures, ne 2 Z eff products, and to probe the electron energy distribution. However, in order to be effective, these detectors which are really large arrays of detectors with photon energy gating capabilities must be precisely calibrated for each pixel. The energy-dependence of the detector response of the multi-energy PILATUS3 system with 100 K pixels has been measured at Dectris Laboratory. X-rays emitted from a tube under high voltage bombard various elements such that they emit x-ray lines from Zr-Lα to Ag-Kα between 1.8 and 22.16 keV. Each pixel on the PILATUS3 can be set to a minimum energy threshold in the range from 1.6 to 25 keV. This feature allows a single detector to be sensitive to a variety of x-ray energies, so that it is possible to sample the energy distribution of the x-ray continuum and line-emission. PILATUS3 can be configured for 1D or 2D imaging of MCF plasmas with typical spatial energy and temporal resolution of 1 cm, 0.6 keV, and 5 ms, respectively.

  12. Characterization of energy dispersive semiconductor detectors for x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopman, Theodore Lambert

    Since the development of the electron microprobe in the 1950s by Castaing, characteristic x-ray emission lines have been used to determine chemical compositions of samples. Energy-dispersive detectors allow simultaneous multi-element analysis; continued improvements in detector technology have lowered limits of detection and allowed the effects of physical processes in the detector to become apparent. A well-characterized detector, in terms of its geometry and its response to x-rays, is essential for accurate and precise chemical analysis. In this work, scans with a collimated 55Fe radionuclide source allowed the geometry of Si(Li) detectors to be determined. Across the surface of the detector the response function was uniform, indicating it is due primarily to detector physics and/or processing electronics. Monochromatized x-rays over an energy range of 1--10 keV were used to generate simple spectra in Si(Li) and silicon drift detectors with analog and digital pulse processing systems. Monte Carlo simulations of detector response allowed approximate contributions from physical processes to be seen individually. Transport of energetic electrons, electron diffusion at metal-semiconductor junctions, and differences in detector structure together determine variation with energy of spectral features. The Si K photoelectron escape step at ˜1.8 keV, previously attributed to electron transport only, is found to be affected by diffusion. The diffusion tail to the low-energy side of the primary peak is found to have a component due to escape of Si L Auger electrons. Escape peak intensities in SDD and Si(Li) detectors agree only when contact photoelectron contributions are taken into account.

  13. Systematic bias in basis material decomposition applied to quantitative dual-energy x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Gingold, E L; Hasegawa, B H

    1992-01-01

    Basis material decomposition represents dual-energy x-ray attenuation measurements in terms of the attenuation coefficients or thickness of two standard materials which, when combined, produce attenuation equivalent to the object being measured. In tomographic imaging, the reconstructed attenuation coefficient is calculated in terms of the attenuation coefficients of the basis materials, while in projection imaging, the thicknesses of two materials can be specified in terms of the basis materials. This analysis shows that basis material decomposition is exact in a dual-monoenergetic system, but for broad spectra, x-ray beam hardening introduces a bias into quantitative measurements. The error is small enough that it can be ignored when dual-energy imaging is used primarily to enhance the contrast of one material over another. The magnitude of the error in quantitative measurements depends on the details of the specific application including the energy of the x-ray beam, and the composition and thickness of the materials included in the object. The magnitude of the error for dual-energy bone densitometry has been analyzed using a first-order propagation of error analysis and the calculations verified by computer simulation. This analysis shows that the magnitude of the systematic error can be as high as 3% for 1 g/cm2 of bone mineral when aluminum and acrylic basis materials are used for the calibration. This systematic error is eliminated when the basis materials are the same as the materials that are being quantified (i.e., bone mineral and water).

  14. Energies of GRB blast waves and prompt efficiencies as implied by modelling of X-ray and GeV afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beniamini, Paz; Nava, Lara; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol; Piran, Tsvi

    2015-11-01

    We consider a sample of 10 gamma-ray bursts with long-lasting ( ≳ 102 s) emission detected by Fermi/Large Area Telescope and for which X-ray data around 1 d are also available. We assume that both the X-rays and the GeV emission are produced by electrons accelerated at the external forward shock, and show that the X-ray and the GeV fluxes lead to very different estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the blast wave. The energy estimated from GeV is on average ˜50 times larger than the one estimated from X-rays. We model the data (accounting also for optical detections around 1 d, if available) to unveil the reason for this discrepancy and find that good modelling within the forward shock model is always possible and leads to two possibilities: (i) either the X-ray emitting electrons (unlike the GeV emitting electrons) are in the slow-cooling regime or (ii) the X-ray synchrotron flux is strongly suppressed by Compton cooling, whereas, due to the Klein-Nishina suppression, this effect is much smaller at GeV energies. In both cases the X-ray flux is no longer a robust proxy for the blast wave kinetic energy. On average, both cases require weak magnetic fields (10-6 ≲ ɛB ≲ 10-3) and relatively large isotropic kinetic blast wave energies 10^{53} erg<{E}_{0,kin}<10^{55} erg corresponding to large lower limits on the collimated energies, in the range 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<5× 10^{52} erg for an ISM (interstellar medium) environment with n ˜ 1 cm-3 and 10^{52} erg<{E}_{θ ,kin}<10^{53} erg for a wind environment with A* ˜ 1. These energies are larger than those estimated from the X-ray flux alone, and imply smaller inferred values of the prompt efficiency mechanism, reducing the efficiency requirements on the still uncertain mechanism responsible for prompt emission.

  15. Formation, disruption and energy output of Population III X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Taeho; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Perna, Rosalba

    2016-02-01

    The first astrophysical objects shaped the cosmic environment by reionizing and heating the intergalactic medium (IGM). Particularly, X-rays are very efficient at heating the IGM before reionization is complete. High-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) in early stellar populations are prime candidates for driving the thermal evolution of the IGM at redshifts z ≳ 20; however, their formation efficiency is not well understood. Using N-body simulations, we estimate the HMXB formation rate via mutual gravitational interactions of nascent, small groups of the Population III stars. We run two sets of calculations: (i) stars formed in small groups of five in nearly Keplerian initial orbits and (ii) collision of two such groups (an expected outcome of mergers of host protogalaxies). We find that HMXBs form at a rate of one per ≳ 104 M⊙ in newly born stars, and that they emit with a power of ˜1041 erg s-1 in the 2-10 keV band per star formation rate. This value is a factor of ˜102 larger than what is observed in star-forming galaxies at lower redshifts; the X-ray production from early HMXBs would have been even more copious, if they also formed in situ or via migration in protostellar discs. Combining our results with earlier studies suggests that early HMXBs were highly effective at heating the IGM and leaving a strong 21-cm signature. We discuss broader implications of our results, such as the rate of long gamma-ray bursts from Population III stars and the direct collapse channel for massive black hole formation.

  16. SU-C-18C-03: Dual-Energy X-Ray Fluoroscopy Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Virshup, G; Richmond, M; Mostafavi, H; Ganguly, A; Fu, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work studies the clinical utility of dual energy (DE) subtraction fluoroscopy for fiducial-free tumor tracking in lung radiation therapy (RT). Improvement in tumor visualization and quantification of tumor shift within a breathing cycle were analyzed. Methods: Twenty subjects who were undergoing RT for lung cancer were recruited following institutional review board approval. The subjects had a range of tumor sizes, locations in the lungs, and body sizes. An x-ray imaging system was setup with the following components: (a) x-ray tube (Varian G-242, Varian Medical Systems (VMS), CA) (b) flat panel detector (4030CB, VMS, CA) and (c) x-ray generator (EPS 50RF, EMD, Canada). Firmware and software modifications were made to the generator to allow 10 x-ray pulse pairs with alternating low/high kV, 100 ms apart for ∼4s (one breathing cycle). Images were obtained at 4 angles: 0°, 45°, 90° and 135°. Weighted subtraction of a kV-pair image set was used to create a “bone-free” image of the lungs. The 2D tumor-shift in each subtracted image and the 3D shift during a breathing cycle was calculated using all views. Results: The subjects enrolled had the following statistics: average age 62.3±7.1 years, 5 female/15 male, 11 had tumors on the right and 9 on the left and the average tumor size was ∼31.4±10.8 mm. X-ray imaging conditions for the pulse pairs were: 70/120 kVp, 280/221 mA and 65/8 ms. For views where these parameters were insufficient 80/130 kVp, 280/221 mA and 60/12 ms was used. Tumor visibility improved for 0°, 45°, 90° and 135° in 100%, 55%, 75% and 80% of the cases respectively. Tumor shift during a breathing cycle was: 2.4±1.0 mm AP, 2.7±1.4 mm LR and 7.6±4.8 mm IS. Conclusion: DE subtraction fluoroscopy allowed improved visualization and quantification of movement of tumors in the lungs during a breathing cycle. This study was entirely funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  17. The observed characteristics of flare energy release. II - High-speed soft X-ray fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Xiao, Y. C.; Wu, S. T.; Prokakis, TH.; Dialetis, D.

    1988-01-01

    Flare-associated large-scale brightenings of magnetic loop structures have recently been shown to be related to the propagation of soft X-ray fronts, moving at speeds of the order of 1000 km/s. These are also linked with the brightening of remote H-alpha patches and, in many cases, with type II or U radio emission. A detailed study of the best example found in the Solar Maximum Mission's Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data was performed and with the help of numerical simulations and additional information provided by H-alpha records, it is shown that all together the three energy transport processes proposed by previous authors, namely high-energy particles, conduction fronts, and shocks, play significant roles in the redistribution of flare energy within the loops. The observable evidence of thermal flux limitation and the implication of these and previous results on the efficiency ratio between thermal and nonthermal processes in flares are discussed. Finally, these results are placed under the perspective of the interacting loop model of flares discussed in previous papers, to show that only about 10 percent of the total energy conversion occurs at the interface between loops. The bulk of the flare energy seems to be released internally within one of the bipolar loop structures.

  18. Feasibility study for a novel method of dual energy x-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midgley, S. M.

    2011-09-01

    Dual energy x-ray analysis (DEXA) is investigated using a nonlinear model for the x-ray linear attenuation coefficient μ that is expressed as a function of electron density Ne and the fourth compositional ratio R4. Nonlinear simultaneous equations are solved using a least-squares algorithm based upon the method of Levenberg and Marquardt. Measurements of μ for low atomic number materials (containing elements hydrogen to calcium) at energies 32-66 keV are used to study DEXA accuracy as a function of sample composition, photon energy and their separation ΔE. Results are presented for ΔE = 5-30 keV, for 2% measurement precision, and the doses involved are quantified. The model is subject to propagation of error analysis and results are presented for the relationship between measurement uncertainties and those for Ne and R4. The analysis shows how DEXA accuracy is controlled by the fractional compositional cross-product, which represents the contribution of composition to μ, and how this can be optimized by careful selection of beam energies according to the compositional range of interest. Accurate DEXA is achieved over restricted energy and compositional ranges: soft tissues only at approximately 15-25 keV, all tissues at approximately 30-80 keV and, for situations where a higher dose can be tolerated, all tissues at approximately 4-8 MeV.

  19. Radio and Hard X-Ray Images of High-Energy Electrons in an X-Class Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, S. M.; Krucker, S.; Shibasaki, K.; Yokoyama, T.; Shimojo, M.; Kundu, Mukul R.

    2003-01-01

    We present the first comparison between radio images of high-energy electrons accelerated by a solar flare and images of hard X-rays produced by the same electrons at photon energies above 100 keV. The images indicate that the high-energy X-rays originate at the footpoints of the loops dominating the radio emission. The radio and hard X-ray light curves match each other well and are quantitatively consistent with an origin in a single population of nonthermal electrons with a power-law index of around 4.5-5. The high-frequency radio spectral index suggests a flatter energy spectrum, but this is ruled out by the X-ray spectrum up to 8 MeV.

  20. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from Sagittarius A{sup *} flares

    SciTech Connect

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Zoglauer, Andreas; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Christensen, Finn E.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Zhang, Shuo; Stern, Daniel; Zhang, William W.

    2014-05-01

    Sagittarius A{sup *} harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A{sup *} spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A{sup *} X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cutoff. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (<100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within ∼10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  1. NuSTAR Detection of High-Energy X-Ray Emission and Rapid Variability from Sagittarius A(star) Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barriere, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Dexter, Jason; Grefenstette, Brian; Hailey, Charles J.; Zhang, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A(star) harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A(star) spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum of Sagittarius A(star) X-ray flares extends to high energy, with no evidence for a cut off. Although the photon index of the absorbed power-law fits are in agreement with past observations, we find a difference between the photon index of two of the flares (significant at the 95% confidence level). The spectra of the two brightest flares (approx. 55 times quiescence in the 2- 10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters obtained with synchrotron models are, for the X-ray emission, physically more reasonable than those obtained with inverse-Compton models. One flare exhibits large and rapid (less than 100 s) variability, which, considering the total energy radiated, constrains the location of the flaring region to be within approx. 10 Schwarzschild radii of the black hole.

  2. Dual-Source Multi-Energy CT with Triple or Quadruple X-ray Beams.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H

    2016-02-01

    Energy-resolved photon-counting CT (PCCT) is promising for material decomposition with multi-contrast agents. However, corrections for non-idealities of PCCT detectors are required, which are still active research areas. In addition, PCCT is associated with very high cost due to lack of mass production. In this work, we proposed an alternative approach to performing multi-energy CT, which was achieved by acquiring triple or quadruple x-ray beam measurements on a dual-source CT scanner. This strategy was based on a "Twin Beam" design on a single-source scanner for dual-energy CT. Examples of beam filters and spectra for triple and quadruple x-ray beam were provided. Computer simulation studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of material decomposition for multi-contrast mixtures using a tri-beam configuration. The proposed strategy can be readily implemented on a dual-source scanner, which may allow material decomposition of multi-contrast agents to be performed on clinical CT scanners with energy-integrating detector.

  3. Analysis of Fast Electron Energy Distribution by Measuring Hard X-ray Bremsstrahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daykin, Tyler; Sawada, Hiroshi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bass, Anthony; Griffin, Brandon; Pandit, Rishi; Beg, Farhat; Chen, Hui; McLean, Harry; Link, Anthony; Patel, Prav; Ping, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of intense, short-pulse laser-produced fast electrons is important for fundamental understanding and applications. We carried out an experiment to characterize the fast electron energy distribution by measuring angular-dependent high-energy bremsstrahlung x-rays. A 100 μm thick metal foil (Al, Cu, and Ag) mounted on a plastic backing was irradiated by the 0.35 ps, 15 J Leopard Laser at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. The bremsstrahlung x-rays and the escaping electrons from the target were recorded using differential filter stack spectrometers at 22° and 45° off laser axis and a magnet-based electron spectrometer along the laser axis. The electron spectrum inferred from two different diagnostics had single slope temperature of ~ 1.5 MeV for the Cu foil. The results were compared to an analytic calculation and a 2-D Particle-in-cell code, PICLS. The analysis of the electron energy distribution and angular distribution will be presented. This work was supported by the UNR Office of the Provost and by DOE/OFES under Contract No. DE-SC0008827. This collaborative work was partially supported under the auspices of the US Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Con.

  4. Dual-Source Multi-Energy CT with Triple or Quadruple X-ray Beams

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lifeng; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.

    2016-01-01

    Energy-resolved photon-counting CT (PCCT) is promising for material decomposition with multi-contrast agents. However, corrections for non-idealities of PCCT detectors are required, which are still active research areas. In addition, PCCT is associated with very high cost due to lack of mass production. In this work, we proposed an alternative approach to performing multi-energy CT, which was achieved by acquiring triple or quadruple x-ray beam measurements on a dual-source CT scanner. This strategy was based on a “Twin Beam” design on a single-source scanner for dual-energy CT. Examples of beam filters and spectra for triple and quadruple x-ray beam were provided. Computer simulation studies were performed to evaluate the accuracy of material decomposition for multi-contrast mixtures using a tri-beam configuration. The proposed strategy can be readily implemented on a dual-source scanner, which may allow material decomposition of multi-contrast agents to be performed on clinical CT scanners with energy-integrating detector. PMID:27330237

  5. [Application of the racial algorithm in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Yao-Yao; Ge, Liang-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-02-01

    In the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, scintillation detector such as NaI (Tl) detector usually has a low energy resolution at around 8%. The low energy resolution causes problems in spectral data analysis especially in the high background and low counts condition, it is very limited to strip the overlapped spectrum, and the more overlapping the peaks are, the more difficult to peel the peaks, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis can't be carried out because we can't recognize the peak address and peak area. Based on genetic algorithm and immune algorithm, we build a new racial algorithm which uses the Euclidean distance as the judgment of evolution, the maximum relative error as the iterative criterion to be put into overlapped spectrum analysis, then we use the Gaussian function to simulate different overlapping degrees of the spectrum, and the racial algorithm is used in overlapped peak separation and full spectrum simulation, the peak address deviation is in +/- 3 channels, the peak area deviation is no more than 5%, and it is proven that this method has a good effect in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis.

  6. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities.

  7. Method and apparatus for multiple-projection, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, Jr., Harry K. (Inventor); Beck, Thomas J. (Inventor); Feldmesser, Howard S. (Inventor); Magee, Thomas C. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for advanced, multiple-projection, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning systems include combinations of a conical collimator; a high-resolution two-dimensional detector; a portable, power-capped, variable-exposure-time power supply; an exposure-time control element; calibration monitoring; a three-dimensional anti-scatter-grid; and a gantry-gantry base assembly that permits up to seven projection angles for overlapping beams. Such systems are capable of high precision bone structure measurements that can support three dimensional bone modeling and derivations of bone strength, risk of injury, and efficacy of countermeasures among other properties.

  8. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  9. Application of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDX) in a case of methomyl ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naoko; Jamal, Mostofa; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Okuzono, Ryota; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2013-04-10

    We applied energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDX) in a case of poisoning by methomyl, a carbamate pesticide. Quantitative GC/MS analysis showed that the concentration of methomyl-oxime in the femoral blood was 4.0 μg/ml. The elemental analysis by EDX identified the high peak of silicon and sulfur in the stomach contents. We concluded that the cause of his death was methomyl poisoning. This indicates that screening of stomach contents by EDX provides useful information for the forensic diagnosis.

  10. UCSD High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment magnetic shield design and test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Richard E.; Pelling, Michael R.; Hink, Paul L.

    1991-01-01

    Results are reported from an effort to define a passive magnetic field concept for the High Energy X-ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE), in the interest of reducing the detector-gain variations due to 0.5-1.0-sec timescale magnetic field variations. This will allow a sensitivity of the order of 1 percent of the HEXTE background. While aperture modulation and automatic gain control will minimize effects on timescales of tens of seconds and longer, passive magnetic shielding of the photomultiplier tubes will address 1-sec timescale variations due to aperture motions.

  11. Silica granuloma: scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Chun, S I; Cho, S W

    1991-02-01

    A 46-year-old woman had 1-month-old erythematous papules on the left elbow and both knees where acupuncture with gold needles had been performed twenty years earlier. She also had a 2-month-old pruritic scar lesion on the nape. Histopathologic findings showed sarcoidal granulomas. The presence of silica components in the granulomas was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the lesion on the nape and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) of the lesions on the nape and the left elbow. We suggest that acupuncture with gold needles may be one cause of silica granuloma.

  12. Bone geometry, structure and mineral distribution using Dual energy X ray Absorptiometry (DXA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Cleek, Tammy

    1993-01-01

    Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is currently the most widely used method of analyzing regional and whole body changes in bone mineral content (BMC) and areal (g/sq cm) bone mineral density (BMD). However, BMC and BMD do not provide direct measures of long bone geometry, structure, or strength nor do regional measurements detect localized changes in other regions of the same bone. The capabilities of DXA can be enhanced significantly by special processing of pixel BMC data which yields cross-sectional geometric and structural information. We have extended this method of analysis in order to develop non-uniform structural beam models of long bones.

  13. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  14. A method for high-energy, low-dose mammography using edge illumination x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diemoz, Paul C.; Bravin, Alberto; Sztrókay-Gaul, Anikó; Ruat, Marie; Grandl, Susanne; Mayr, Doris; Auweter, Sigrid; Mittone, Alberto; Brun, Emmanuel; Ponchut, Cyril; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Coan, Paola; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    Since the breast is one of the most radiosensitive organs, mammography is arguably the area where lowering radiation dose is of the uttermost importance. Phase-based x-ray imaging methods can provide opportunities in this sense, since they do not require x-rays to be stopped in tissue for image contrast to be generated. Therefore, x-ray energy can be considerably increased compared to those usually exploited by conventional mammography. In this article we show how a novel, optimized approach can lead to considerable dose reductions. This was achieved by matching the edge-illumination phase method, which reaches very high angular sensitivity also at high x-ray energies, to an appropriate image processing algorithm and to a virtually noise-free detection technology capable of reaching almost 100% efficiency at the same energies. Importantly, while proof-of-concept was obtained at a synchrotron, the method has potential for a translation to conventional sources.

  15. The Energy Spectrum of X-Rays from Rocket-triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabshahi, S.; Cramer, E. S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Grove, J.; Gwon, C.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Lucia, R. J.; Rassoul, H. K.; Uman, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Although the production of x-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning leaders has been studied in detail over the last ten years, the energy spectrum of the x-rays has never been well measured because the x-rays are emitted in very short but intense bursts that result in pulse pile-up in the detectors. The energy spectrum is important because it provides information about the source mechanism for producing the energetic runaway electrons and about the electric fields that they traversed. We have recently developed and operated the first spectrometer for the energetic radiation from lightning during the spring of 2012. The instrument is part of the Atmospheric Radiation Imagery and Spectroscopy (ARIS) project and will be referred to as "ARIS-S" (ARIS Spectrometer). The instrument consisted of seven 3" NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube (PMT) scintillation detectors with different layers of shielding, ranging from 1/8" of Al to more than 1" thickness of lead. Great care was taken to reduce spurious signals from the electrically noisy environment near lightning. The spectrometer was located about 27 meters horizontally from the rocket launcher at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT). We will present the details of the design of the instrument and the results of analyzing the lightning data acquired during the summer 2012. This work was supported in part by DARPA grant HR0011-1-10-1-0061. Portions of this work were performed at NRL under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research.

  16. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of Electrochemical Processes in Renewable Energy Storage and Conversion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Farmand, Maryam

    2013-05-19

    The development of better energy conversion and storage devices, such as fuel cells and batteries, is crucial for reduction of our global carbon footprint and improving the quality of the air we breathe. However, both of these technologies face important challenges. The development of lower cost and better electrode materials, which are more durable and allow more control over the electrochemical reactions occurring at the electrode/electrolyte interface, is perhaps most important for meeting these challenges. Hence, full characterization of the electrochemical processes that occur at the electrodes is vital for intelligent design of more energy efficient electrodes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a short-range order, element specific technique that can be utilized to probe the processes occurring at operating electrode surfaces, as well for studying the amorphous materials and nano-particles making up the electrodes. It has been increasingly used in recent years to study fuel cell catalysts through application of the and #916; and mgr; XANES technique, in combination with the more traditional X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) techniques. The and #916; and mgr; XANES data analysis technique, previously developed and applied to heterogeneous catalysts and fuel cell electrocatalysts by the GWU group, was extended in this work to provide for the first time space resolved adsorbate coverages on both electrodes of a direct methanol fuel cell. Even more importantly, the and #916; and mgr; technique was applied for the first time to battery relevant materials, where bulk properties such as the oxidation state and local geometry of a cathode are followed.

  17. Risk and benefit of diffraction in Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikonow, Wilhelm; Rammlmair, Dieter

    2016-11-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence mapping (μ-EDXRF) is a fast and non-destructive method for chemical quantification and therefore used in many scientific fields. The combination of spatial and chemical information is highly valuable for understanding geological processes. Problems occur with crystalline samples due to diffraction, which appears according to Bragg's law, depending on the energy of the X-ray beam, the incident angle and the crystal parameters. In the spectra these peaks can overlap with element peaks suggesting higher element concentrations. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of diffraction, the possibility of diffraction removal and potential geoscientific applications for X-ray mapping. In this work the μ-EDXRF M4 Tornado from Bruker was operated with a Rh-tube and polychromatic beam with two SDD detectors mounted each at ± 90° to the tube. Due to the polychromatic beam the Bragg condition fits for several mineral lattice planes. Since diffraction depends on the angle, it is shown that a novel correction approach can be applied by measuring from two different angles and calculating the minimum spectrum of both detectors gaining a better limit of quantification for this method. Furthermore, it is possible to use the diffraction information for separation of differently oriented crystallites within a monomineralic aggregate and obtain parameters like particle size distribution for the sample, as it is done by thin section image analysis in cross-polarized light. Only with μ-EDXRF this can be made on larger samples without preparation of thin sections.

  18. REVEALING THE STRUCTURE OF AN ACCRETION DISK THROUGH ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Chartas, G.; Moore, D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Mosquera, A. M.; Blackburne, J. A.; Dai, X.

    2012-10-01

    We present results from monitoring observations of the gravitationally lensed quasar RX J1131-1231 performed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The X-ray observations were planned with relatively long exposures that allowed a search for energy-dependent microlensing in the soft (0.2-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) light curves of the images of RX J1131-1231. We detect significant microlensing in the X-ray light curves of images A and D, and energy-dependent microlensing of image D. The magnification of the soft band appears to be larger than that in the hard band by a factor of {approx}1.3 when image D becomes more magnified. This can be explained by the difference between a compact, softer-spectrum corona that is producing a more extended, harder spectrum reflection component off the disk. This is supported by the evolution of the fluorescent iron line in image D over three consecutive time-averaged phases of the light curve. In the first period, an Fe line at E = 6.35{sup +0.14}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). In the second period, two Fe lines are detected, one at E = 5.50{sup +0.03}{sub -0.08} keV (detected at >99% confidence) and another at E = 6.04{sup +0.10}{sub -0.07} keV (marginally detected at >90% confidence), and in the third period, a broadened Fe line at 6.42{sup +0.16}{sub -0.14} keV is detected (at >99% confidence). This evolution of the Fe line profile during the microlensing event is consistent with the line distortion expected when a caustic passes over the inner disk where the shape of the fluorescent Fe line is distorted by general relativistic and Doppler effects.

  19. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  20. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  1. Effect of X-ray energies on induced photo-neutron doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, N. E.; Ghanim, E. H.; Shinashin, Kh.; El-Sersy, A. R.

    2014-03-01

    Photoneutrons induced by two high energies range from the Elekta medical linear accelerator (10 and 18 MV) were measured by nuclear track detectors (NTDs). CR-39 NTD in contact with converter screen slide films, natural boron of thickness 40 μm coated on the polyester film (BN1). Detectors were exposed at 100 cm SSD with field size 20×20 on the patient table, with chest phantom and with build-up Perspex used for high-energy exposure. CR-39 registers the thermal neutron by the (n-α) reaction with the thin layer of boron and the fast neutron was measured through the (n-p) elastic scattering with the H2 molecules in the CR-39 constituents.It was found that the total neutron dose (thermal and fast) from the 18 MV X-ray is higher than that of 10 MV. The measured thermal neutron dose is relatively smaller than the fast neutron dose in the case of direct exposure at the two X-ray energies. On the other hand, in the case of measurements on phantom and upon the use of build-up Perspex sheets, the ratio of fast to that of thermal is less than that of direct exposure.

  2. Characterizing the behavior of scattered radiation in multi-energy x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sossin, Artur; Rebuffel, V.; Tabary, J.; Létang, J. M.; Freud, N.; Verger, L.

    2017-04-01

    Scattered radiation results in various undesirable effects in medical diagnostics, non-destructive testing (NDT) and security x-ray imaging. Despite numerous studies characterizing this phenomenon and its effects, the knowledge of its behavior in the energy domain remains limited. The present study aims at summarizing some key insights on scattered radiation originating from the inspected object. In addition, various simulations and experiments with limited collimation on both simplified and realistic phantoms were conducted in order to study scatter behavior in multi-energy x-ray imaging. Results showed that the spectrum shape of the scatter component can be considered preserved in the first approximation across the image plane for various acquisition geometries and phantoms. The variations exhibited by the scatter spectrum were below 10% for most examined cases. Furthermore, the corresponding spectrum shape proved to be also relatively invariant for different experimental angular projections of one of the examined phantoms. The observed property of scattered radiation can potentially lead to the decoupling of spatial and energy scatter components, which can in turn enable speed ups in scatter simulations and reduce the complexity of scatter correction.

  3. MCP characterization at the Cu and Mo K{sub {alpha}} x-ray energies

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, P.J.; Evans, S.; Schappert, G.T.; Kyrala, G.A.

    1998-03-01

    The authors are investigating the usefulness of microchannel plate (MCP) intensifiers for imaging x-rays at high photon energies, specifically by using filtered X-rays from an electron bombardment source to generate the K{sub {alpha}} lines of Cu at 8.04 KeV and Mo at 17.5 KeV. These high energy lines are used to measure the resolution of an MCP based intensifier produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory. They have investigated the spot size of a fielded MCP intensifier by observing, on film, the result of single photon excitation of microchannels. Measurement of the spot size was done with visible light microscopy. They report initial results of the spot size distribution in the stripline direction. They have also begun a measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy in the spatial resolution, accentuated at these energies by the inclination of the axis of the MCP channels. They concentrate on an actual ``fielded instrument`` resolution, rather than ideal, for the purpose of analyzing image data captured at the NOVA Laser Facility.

  4. Time-resolved soft-x-ray studies of energy transport in layered and planar laser-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Stradling, G.L.

    1982-04-19

    New low-energy x-ray diagnostic techniques are used to explore energy-transport processes in laser heated plasmas. Streak cameras are used to provide 15-psec time-resolution measurements of subkeV x-ray emission. A very thin (50 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/) carbon substrate provides a low-energy x-ray transparent window to the transmission photocathode of this soft x-ray streak camera. Active differential vacuum pumping of the instrument is required. The use of high-sensitivity, low secondary-electron energy-spread CsI photocathodes in x-ray streak cameras is also described. Significant increases in sensitivity with only a small and intermittant decrease in dynamic range were observed. These coherent, complementary advances in subkeV, time-resolved x-ray diagnostic capability are applied to energy-transport investigations of 1.06-..mu..m laser plasmas. Both solid disk targets of a variety of Z's as well as Be-on-Al layered-disk targets were irradiated with 700-psec laser pulses of selected intensity between 3 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/.

  5. Material separation in x-ray CT with energy resolved photon-counting detectors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolan; Meier, Dirk; Taguchi, Katsuyuki; Wagenaar, Douglas J.; Patt, Bradley E.; Frey, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to demonstrate that, in x-ray computed tomography (CT), more than two types of materials can be effectively separated with the use of an energy resolved photon-counting detector and classification methodology. Specifically, this applies to the case when contrast agents that contain K-absorption edges in the energy range of interest are present in the object. This separation is enabled via the use of recently developed energy resolved photon-counting detectors with multiple thresholds, which allow simultaneous measurements of the x-ray attenuation at multiple energies. Methods: To demonstrate this capability, we performed simulations and physical experiments using a six-threshold energy resolved photon-counting detector. We imaged mouse-sized cylindrical phantoms filled with several soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials and with iodine-based and gadolinium-based contrast agents. The linear attenuation coefficients were reconstructed for each material in each energy window and were visualized as scatter plots between pairs of energy windows. For comparison, a dual-kVp CT was also simulated using the same phantom materials. In this case, the linear attenuation coefficients at the lower kVp were plotted against those at the higher kVp. Results: In both the simulations and the physical experiments, the contrast agents were easily separable from other soft-tissue-like and bone-like materials, thanks to the availability of the attenuation coefficient measurements at more than two energies provided by the energy resolved photon-counting detector. In the simulations, the amount of separation was observed to be proportional to the concentration of the contrast agents; however, this was not observed in the physical experiments due to limitations of the real detector system. We used the angle between pairs of attenuation coefficient vectors in either the 5-D space (for non-contrast-agent materials using energy resolved photon

  6. ROSI and GEANT4 - A comparison in the context of high energy X-ray physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiunke, Markus; Stritt, Carina; Schielein, Richard; Sukowski, Frank; Hölzing, Astrid; Zabler, Simon; Hofmann, Jürgen; Flisch, Alexander; Kasperl, Stefan; Sennhauser, Urs; Hanke, Randolf

    2016-06-01

    This work compares two popular MC simulation frameworks ROSI (Roentgen Simulation) and GEANT4 (Geometry and Tracking in its fourth version) in the context of X-ray physics. The comparison will be performed with the help of a parameter study considering energy, material and length variations. While the total deposited energy as well as the contribution of Compton scattering show a good accordance between all simulated configurations, all other physical effects exhibit large deviations in a comparison of data-sets. These discrepancies between simulations are shown to originate from the different cross sectional databases used in the frameworks, whereas the overall simulation mechanics seem to not have an influence on the agreement of the simulations. A scan over energy, length and material shows that the two parameters energy and material have a significant influence on the agreement of the simulation results, while the length parameter shows no noticeable influence on the deviations between the data-sets.

  7. Infrared to x-ray spectral energy distributions of high redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Jill; Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Kuhn, Olga; Cutri, Roc M.; Mcdowell, Jonathan C.; Rieke, Marcia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    We have observed 14 quasars with z greater than 2.8 with the ROSAT-PSPC, and detected 12 of them, including the z=4.11 quasar 0000-263. We present the first x-ray spectrum of a radio quiet quasar with z greater than 3, 1946+768. Its x-ray spectrum is consistent with a power law with spectral index alpha(sub E)=1.8(sup +2.1, sub -1.4) and no evidence for absorption in excess of the galactic column (alpha(sub E)=1.00(sup +0.28, sub -0.32) assuming N(sub H)=N(sub H)(Gal)). A Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) hardness ratio is used to constrain the x-ray spectral properties of the quasars for which there were less than 100 photons detected. For the radio quiet quasars, (alpha(sub E)) approximately equals 1.2, if one assumes that there is no absorption in excess of the galactic column. We combine the x-ray data with new ground based optical and near-IR spectrophotometry obtained at the Steward 2.3 m and Multiple Mirror Telescope, and data from the literature. The spectral energy distributions are compared to those of low redshift objects. For the radio quiet quasars with z greater than 2.5, the mean (alpha(sub ox)) is approximately 1.8. This is larger than the mean for quasars with z less than 2.5, but consistent with the expected value for quasars with the high optical luminosities of the objects in this sample. For the radio-loud quasars, (alpha(sub ox)) is approximately 1.4, independent of redshift. This is smaller than the expected value for the optically luminous, high redshift objects in this sample, if they are mostly GHz peaked radio sources and hence comparable to steep-spectrum, compact radio sources at lower redshift. Finally, we compare the spectral energy distributions of two representative objects to the predicted spectrum of a thin accretion disk in the Kerr geometry, and discuss the uncertainties in deriving black hole masses and mass accretion rates.

  8. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  9. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-rays are a form of high energy electromagnetic radiation. The x-rays penetrate the body to form ... for detecting cavities, unless the decay is very advanced and deep. Many ... The amount of radiation given off during the procedure is less than ...

  10. High energy X-ray observations of COS-B gamma-ray sources from OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, J. F.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Caraveo, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    During the three years between satellite launch in June 1975 and turn-off in October 1978, the high energy X-ray spectrometer on board OSO-8 observed nearly all of the COS-B gamma-ray source positions given in the 2CG catalog (Swanenburg et al., 1981). An X-ray source was detected at energies above 20 keV at the 6-sigma level of significance in the gamma-ray error box containing 2CG342 - 02 and at the 3-sigma level of significance in the error boxes containing 2CG065 + 00, 2CG195 + 04, and 2CG311 - 01. No definite association between the X-ray and gamma-ray sources can be made from these data alone. Upper limits are given for the 2CG sources from which no X-ray flux was detected above 20 keV.

  11. Minimum detectable limits of measuring bone mineral density using an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, A. W.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2001-06-01

    In the clinical environment, the most common method of assessing bone mineral density (BMD) loss is dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), which relies on the transmission of X-ray photons through the volume of interest. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD), which utilises coherent X-ray scattering, potentially is a more accurate method. As part of the development of a precision EDXRD system, an experiment was performed using a range of bone and fat mix phantoms, which were also used for DEXA evaluation. The results are presented here and suggest initial minimum detectable limits of the order of 5% BMD loss for the EDXRD experiment and 10-15% for the DEXA assessment.

  12. Structural studies coupling X-ray diffraction and high-energy X-ray scattering in the UO2(2+)-HBr(aq) system.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard E; Skanthakumar, S; Cahill, C L; Soderholm, L

    2011-11-07

    The structural chemistry of uranium(VI) in concentrated aqueous hydrobromic acid solutions was investigated using both single crystal X-ray diffraction and synchrotron-based high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) to reveal the structure of the uranium(VI) complexes in solution prior to crystallization. The crystal structures of a series of uranyl tetrabromide salts are reported, including Cs(2)UO(2)Br(4), Rb(2)UO(2)Br(4)·2H(2)O, K(2)UO(2)Br(4)·2H(2)O, and (NH(4))(2)UO(2)Br(4)·2H(2)O, as well as a molecular dimer of uranium(VI), (UO(2))(2)(OH)(2)Br(2)(H(2)O)(4). Limited correspondence exists between the structures observed in the solid state and those in solution. Quantitative analysis of the HEXS data show an average U-Br coordination number of 1.9(2) in solution, in contrast to the U-Br coordination number of 4 in the solid salts.

  13. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of runoff water and vegetation from abandoned mining of Pb Zn ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Bordalo, M.

    2003-12-01

    The present work reports on the heavy metal content: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in running waters and vegetation around abandoned mining areas. Two species of mosses ( Dicranum sp. and Pleurocarpus sp.) and three different species of wild grass ( Bromus sp., Rumex sp. and Pseudoavena sp.) growing on the surrounding areas of old lead-zinc mines (Aran Valley, Pyrenees, NE Spain) have been analyzed. Both water and vegetation were collected in two different sampling places: (a) near the mine gallery water outlets and (b) on the landfill close to the abandoned mineral concentration factories. For the heavy metal content determination, two different techniques were used: total reflection X-ray fluorescence for water analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence for vegetation study. Surface waters around mine outlets exhibit anomalous content of Co, Ni, Zn, Cd. Stream waters running on mining landfills exhibit higher Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than those of the waters at the mine gallery outlets. The results allow us to assess the extent of the environmental impact of the mining activities on the water quality. The intake of these elements by vegetation was related with the sampling place, reflecting the metal water content and the substrate chemistry. Accumulation of metals in mosses is higher than those exhibited in wild grasses. Furthermore, different levels of accumulation were found in different wild grass. Rumex sp. presented the lowest metal concentrations, while Pseudoavena sp. reported the highest metal content.

  14. Large field-of-view asymmetric masks for high-energy x-ray phase imaging with standard x-ray tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endrizzi, M.; Astolfo, A.; Price, B.; Haig, I.; Olivo, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a new approach to large field-of-view laboratory-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging. The method is based upon the asymmetric mask design that enables the retrieval of the absorption, refraction and ultra-small- angle scattering properties of the sample without the need to move any component of the imaging system. The sample is scanned through the imaging system, which also removes possible aliasing problems that might arise from partial sample illumination when using the edge illumination technique. This concept can be extended to any desired number of apertures providing, at the same time, intensity projections at complementary illumination conditions. Experimental data simultaneously acquired at seven different illumination fractions are presented along with the results obtained from a numerical model that incorporates the actual detector performance. The ultimate shape of the illumination function is shown to be significantly dependent on these detector-specific characteristics. Based on this concept, a large field-of-view system was designed, which is also capable to cope with relatively high (100 kVp) X-ray energies. The imaging system obtained in this way, where the asymmetric mask design enables the data to be collected without moving any element of the instrumentation, adapts particularly well to those situations in medical, industrial and security imaging where the sample has to be scanned through the system.

  15. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry: the effects of beam hardening on bone density measurements.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; McKeeney, D B; Chhaya, S C; Ryan, P J; Fogelman, I

    1992-01-01

    X-ray tubes have superseded radionuclide sources for dual photon absorptiometry of the spine and hip. However, the use of a polyenergetic spectrum is a potential source of error for x-ray absorptiometers since beam hardening may result in a nonlinear measurement scale for bone mineral density (BMD). A quantitative study of the effects of beam hardening on measurements made with a commercial dual energy x-ray scanner has been performed. Bone was represented by layers of aluminum of linearly increasing thickness which were scanned under water thicknesses ranging from 0 to 25 cm to represent different body thicknesses of soft tissue. Beam hardening had two effects on measured BMD: (i) at a constant true BMD, measured BMD varied with water thickness; (ii) at a constant water thickness, the BMD scale was not precisely linear. For conditions appropriate to spine and hip studies (BMD) values in the range 0.7 to 1.4 g/cm2 and body thickness between 15 and 25 cm) the maximum deviation of measured BMD from a linear scale was 0.023 g/cm2, while the root-mean-square deviation (0.01 g/cm2) was comparable to the measurement precision for a spine or femoral neck scan (about 1%). The largest departures from linearity were found to occur at the thinnest water thicknesses for BMD values in the range 0.2 to 0.6 g/cm2. The effect of scale nonlinearity on the results of longitudinal studies was examined: for a spine scan at 20-cm body thickness, measured changes in BMD slightly overestimated the true change and implied an error of 0.15%/year for a measurement of a true rate of loss of 3% year in a postmenopausal woman.

  16. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  17. The medium sensitivity survey - A new sample of X-ray sources with optical identifications and the revised extragalactic log N-log S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, I. M.; Maccacaro, T.; Schild, R. E.; Stocke, J. T.; Liebert, J. W.; Danziger, I. J.; Kunth, D.; Lub, J.

    1984-01-01

    Maccacaro et al. (1982) surveyed approximately 50 sq deg in different regions of the sky at medium sensitivity flux levels intermediate between the Uhuru/Ariel V limit and the Einstein deep survey limit. This 'first' medium sensitivity survey (MSS 1) was primarily aimed at the analysis of the source-count relation for extragalactic X-ray sources. The present investigation is concerned with an extension of the MSS 1 on the basis of an analysis of new fields obtained with the aid of the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) on board the Einstein Observatory. A parallel optical program to identify all the new sources was also undertaken. X-ray and optical data are presented for this 'second' complete sample of medium sensitivity survey X-ray sources (MSS 2). The log N-log S relation is derived and discussed.

  18. Performance of Gas Scintillation Proportional Counter Array for High-Energy X-Ray Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeffery

    2004-01-01

    A focal plane array of high-pressure gas scintillation proportional counters (GSPC) for a High Energy X-Ray Observatory (HERO) is developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The array is consisted from eight GSPCs and is a part of balloon born payload scheduled to flight in May 2004. These detectors have an active area of approximately 20 square centimeters, and are filled with a high pressure (10(exp 6) Pa) xenon-helium mixture. Imaging is via crossed-grid position-sensitive phototubes sensitive in the UV region. The performance of the GSPC is well matched to that of the telescopes x-ray optics which have response to 75 keV and a focal spot size of approximately 500 microns. The detector's energy resolution, 4% FWHM at 60 keV, is adequate for resolving the broad spectral lines of astrophysical importance and for accurate continuum measurements. Results of the on-earth detector calibration will be presented and in-flight detector performance will be provided, as available.

  19. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. W.; Landheer, K. A.; Johns, P. C.

    2011-07-01

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = λ-1sin (θ/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm-1. The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum.

  20. Low-energy x-ray emission from magnetic-fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.; Eames, D.; von Goeler, S.; Goldman, M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Silver, E.

    1982-04-01

    Complex, transient, spatially inhomogeneous tokamak plasmas require careful diagnosis. As the reactor regime is approached, soft x rays become more important as a versatile diagnostic tool and an energy-loss mechanism. Continuum emission provides a measure of electron temperature and light impurity content. Impurity lines serve as a probe for ion and electron temperature, impurity behavior, and radiative cooling. The entire spectrum yields vital information on instabilities and disruptions. The importance of impurities is illustrated by the extensive efforts toward understanding impurity production, effects, and control. Minute heavy impurity concentrations can prevent reactor ignition. Si(Li) - detector arrays give a broad overview of continuum and line x-ray emission (.3 to 50 keV) with moderate energy (200 eV) and time (50 ms) resolution. Bragg crystal and grating spectrometers provide detailed information on impurity lines with moderate to excellent (E/..delta..E = 100 to 23,000) resolving power and 1 to 50 ms time resolution. Imaging detector arrays measure rapid (approx. 10 ..mu..s) fluctuations due to MHD instabilities and probe impurity behavior and radiative cooling. Future tokamaks require more diagnostic channels to avoid spatial scanning, higher throughput for fast, single-shot diagnosis, increased spectral information per sample period via fast scanning or use of multi-element detectors with dispersive elements, and radiation shielding and hardening of detectors.

  1. Development of a dual MCP framing camera for high energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N. Hall, G. N.; Carpenter, A. C.; Allen, F. V.; Cruz, J. G.; Felker, B.; Hargrove, D.; Holder, J.; Lumbard, A.; Montesanti, R.; Palmer, N. E.; Piston, K.; Stone, G.; Thao, M.; Vern, R.; Zacharias, R.; Landen, O. L.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P. M.; and others

    2014-11-15

    Recently developed diagnostic techniques at LLNL require recording backlit images of extremely dense imploded plasmas using hard x-rays, and demand the detector to be sensitive to photons with energies higher than 50 keV [R. Tommasini et al., Phys. Phys. Plasmas 18, 056309 (2011); G. N. Hall et al., “AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using ARC on the NIF,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)]. To increase the sensitivity in the high energy region, we propose to use a combination of two MCPs. The first MCP is operated in a low gain regime and works as a thick photocathode, and the second MCP works as a high gain electron multiplier. We tested the concept of this dual MCP configuration and succeeded in obtaining a detective quantum efficiency of 4.5% for 59 keV x-rays, 3 times larger than with a single plate of the thickness typically used in NIF framing cameras.

  2. Analysis of physical parameters associated with the measurement of high-energy x-ray penumbra.

    PubMed

    Dawson, D J; Harper, J M; Akinradewo, A C

    1984-01-01

    The effect of dosemeter type and configuration on the measured penumbral distribution for Co-60, 6-MV, and 31-MV x rays has been determined in air using equilibrium buildup caps for three commercial detection systems including a silicon diode and two ionization chambers. The diode is shown to be measuring a different parameter in the penumbral region than the ionization chambers. This fact in combination with the lateral spread of the secondary electrons and the difference in the inside diameters of the ionization chambers results in significant differences between the measured beam penumbra. The latter effect is studied in more detail with a series of specially designed ionization chambers of varying inside diameter from 0.3 to 1.4 cm. A theoretical model is described which resolves these differences, indicates a method to determine the true penumbral primary-dose distribution and introduces the concept of an effective diameter for the ionometric measurement of high-energy x-ray penumbra. Recommendations are made concerning the dosemeters of choice for penumbral measurements over this range of photon energies.

  3. [Analysis of pine pollen by using FTIR, SEM and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-min; Wang, Hong-jie; Zhang, Zhuo-yong

    2005-11-01

    Infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to analyze nutrients in four pine pollen powder samples. The IR fingerprints showed that each of the samples, pinus massoniana, pinus yunnanensis, pinus tabulaeformis, and pinus densiflora, respectively had its own characteristic infrared spectrum. Based on the difference of the relative intensity of those characteristic absorption peaks, the IR fingerprints can be used for the identification of the four kinds of pine pollen samples. The broken pollen of pinus was more easily to release nutritional components for the distinct difference IR fingerprints of natural and broken masson pine pollen samples. As a result of SEM, four kinds of pollen grains were oblong or subspheroidal in distal face and proximal face. The exine sculpture of the four kinds of samples were granulous and almost the same, but there was some difference of the size of pollen grains. The main morphologic change of the broken pollen was that the air bags were separated from pollen particles, and part of the main body of pollen particles was broken. The energy-dispersive X-ray analysis results showed that eleven elements, including Mg, Se, Si, Sr, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, and Fe, existed and the highest content in pollen of pinus was K element. The contents of trace elements were different in different kinds of pollen of pinus. The element intensity in broken masson pine pollen was distinctlyhigher than that innatural masson pine pollen.

  4. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  5. Modernizing the OSO-8 High-Energy Celestial X-ray Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, E.; Dolan, J.

    1993-12-01

    This project is designed to modernize the data from the High Energy Celestial X-ray Detector on OSO-8, which observed sources around the entire sky from 1975 to 1978. The observations from this instrument provide an archive of information on celestial X-ray sources during a time when no other satellite data were obtained in the 20-500 keV range. The energy range of this experiment overlaps that of the the OSSE instrument on CGRO and so the data may allow synoptic observations of recently discovered sources which were not previously investigated using the OSO-8 data set. The goal is to make the data set more readily usable. The results will include a near-line FITS data set and online documentation, both of which will be available from the National Space Science Date Center (NSSDC). The philosophy is to do nothing irreversible to the data. We do not intend to produce high level products (e.g. spectra, light curves) directly, but to make their production possible by the archival investigator. This paper describes the state of the archive, summarizes our approach to its restoration, gives examples of the possible science to be done, and provides a few lessons learned.

  6. The LCLS variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Rich, David; Zhu, Diling; Turner, James; Zhang, Dehong; Hill, Bruce; Feng, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    The engineering design, implementation, operation and performance of the new variable-energy hard X-ray single-shot spectrometer (HXSSS) for the LCLS free-electron laser (FEL) are reported. The HXSSS system is based on a cylindrically bent Si thin crystal for dispersing the incident polychromatic FEL beam. A spatially resolved detector system consisting of a Ce:YAG X-ray scintillator screen, an optical imaging system and a low-noise pixelated optical camera is used to record the spectrograph. The HXSSS provides single-shot spectrum measurements for users whose experiments depend critically on the knowledge of the self-amplified spontaneous emission FEL spectrum. It also helps accelerator physicists for the continuing studies and optimization of self-seeding, various improved mechanisms for lasing mechanisms, and FEL performance improvements. The designed operating energy range of the HXSSS is from 4 to 20 keV, with the spectral range of order larger than 2% and a spectral resolution of 2 × 10(-5) or better. Those performance goals have all been achieved during the commissioning of the HXSSS.

  7. Enhancement of X-ray Energy Deposition via Heavy Element Sensitization in Biological Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sara; Pradhan, Anil; Nahar, Sultana; Barth, Rolf

    2015-05-01

    Energy (dose) deposition by low vs. high energy x-rays (LEX & HEX), approximately E ~ 100 keV and E > 1 MeV respectively, was studied in biological matter sensitized with heavy elements (high-Z or HZ) to improve radiation therapy of cancer. Computations and simulations show that LEX interact favorably with HZ sensitizers by depositing more dose than HEX. LEX photons effectively photoionize deep inner electronic shells and release cell-killing Auger electrons near malignant cells embedded with HZ atoms. HEX photons predominantly Compton scatter with little interaction, even with HZ elements. Monte Carlo simulations show that in comparison to unsensitized tissue, LEX irradiation of HZ-sensitized models resulted in up to a factor of 2 increase in dose deposition relative to HEX. To validate the studies, in vitro experiments were performed using 2 distinct cancer cell types treated with Pt-based sensitizers, then irradiated with a LEX 160 KV x-ray source and a HEX 6 MV LINAC employed in radiation therapy. The experiments support numerical simulations, and demonstrate several factors lower survival of HZ-sensitized cells irradiated with LEX compared with HEX.

  8. High energy white beam x-ray diffraction studies of residual strains in engineering components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. Y.; Vorster, W.; Jun, T. S.; Song, X.; Golshan, M.; Laundy, D.; Walsh, M. J.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2008-09-01

    In order to predict the durability of engineering components and improve performance, it is mandatory to understand residual stresses. The last decade has witnessed a significant increase of residual stress evaluation using diffraction of penetrating radiation, such as neutrons or high energy X-rays. They provide a powerful non-destructive method for determining the level of residual stresses in engineering components through precise characterisation of interplanar crystal lattice spacing. The unique non-destructive nature of these measurement techniques is particularly beneficial in the context of engineering design, since it allows the evaluation of a variety of structural and deformational parameters inside real components without material removal, or at worst with minimal interference. However, while most real engineering components have complex shape and are often large in size, leading to measurement and interpretation difficulties, since experimental facilities usually have limited space for mounting the sample, limited sample travel range, limited loading capacity of the sample positioning system, etc. Consequently, samples often have to be sectioned, requiring appropriate corrections on measured data; or facilities must be improved. Our research group has contributed to the development of engineering applications of high-energy X-ray diffraction methods for residual stress evaluation, both at synchrotron sources and in the lab setting, including multiple detector setup, large engineering component manipulation and measurement at the UK Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS Daresbury), and in our lab at Oxford. A nickel base superalloy combustion casing and a large MIG welded Al alloy plate were successfully studied.

  9. Thermal expansion in UO2 determined by high-energy X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Guthrie, M.; Benmore, C. J.; Skinner, L. B.; Alderman, O. L. G.; Weber, J. K. R.; Parise, J. B.; Williamson, M.

    2016-06-24

    In this study, we present crystallographic analyses of high-energy X-ray diffraction data on polycrystalline UO2 up to the melting temperature. The Rietveld refinements of our X-ray data are in agreement with previous measurements, but are systematically located around the upper bound of their uncertainty, indicating a slightly steeper trend of thermal expansion compared to established values. This observation is consistent with recent first principles calculations.

  10. High energy x-ray phase contrast CT using glancing-angle grating interferometers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarapata, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Finkenthal, M.; Stutman, D.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The authors present initial progress toward a clinically compatible x-ray phase contrast CT system, using glancing-angle x-ray grating interferometry to provide high contrast soft tissue images at estimated by computer simulation dose levels comparable to conventional absorption based CT. Methods: DPC-CT scans of a joint phantom and of soft tissues were performed in order to answer several important questions from a clinical setup point of view. A comparison between high and low fringe visibility systems is presented. The standard phase stepping method was compared with sliding window interlaced scanning. Using estimated dose values obtained with a Monte-Carlo code the authors studied the dependence of the phase image contrast on exposure time and dose. Results: Using a glancing angle interferometer at high x-ray energy (∼45 keV mean value) in combination with a conventional x-ray tube the authors achieved fringe visibility values of nearly 50%, never reported before. High fringe visibility is shown to be an indispensable parameter for a potential clinical scanner. Sliding window interlaced scanning proved to have higher SNRs and CNRs in a region of interest and to also be a crucial part of a low dose CT system. DPC-CT images of a soft tissue phantom at exposures in the range typical for absorption based CT of musculoskeletal extremities were obtained. Assuming a human knee as the CT target, good soft tissue phase contrast could be obtained at an estimated absorbed dose level around 8 mGy, similar to conventional CT. Conclusions: DPC-CT with glancing-angle interferometers provides improved soft tissue contrast over absorption CT even at clinically compatible dose levels (estimated by a Monte-Carlo computer simulation). Further steps in image processing, data reconstruction, and spectral matching could make the technique fully clinically compatible. Nevertheless, due to its increased scan time and complexity the technique should be thought of not as

  11. High-energy gamma-ray and hard X-ray observations of Cyg X-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hermsen, W.; Bloemen, J. B. G. M.; Jansen, F. A.; Bennett, K.; Buccheri, R.; Mastichiadis, A.; Mayer-Hasselwander, H. A.; Strong, A. W.; Oezel, M. E.; Pollock, A. M. T.

    1987-01-01

    COS-B viewed the Cyg X-3 region seven times between November, 1975, and February, 1982; a search for steady gamma-ray emission pulsed at the characteristic 4.8-hour period did not reveal its source. Leiden-MIT balloon experiment observations of Cyg X-3 in May, 1979 show the 4.8-hour modulation with sinusoidal light curve and modulation depth of 0.30, for energies of up to about 140 keV. The strong variability of Cyg X-3 over more than one order of magnitude at energies below 20 keV does not emerge in the data collected at hard X-ray energies.

  12. Characterization of a 2D soft x-ray tomography camera with discrimination in energy bands

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, A.; Pacella, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Tilia, B.; Piergotti, V.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2010-10-15

    A gas detector with a 2D pixel readout is proposed for a future soft x-ray (SXR) tomography with discrimination in energy bands separately per pixel. The detector has three gas electron multiplier foils for the electron amplification and it offers the advantage, compared with the single stage, to be less sensitive to neutrons and gammas. The energy resolution and the detection efficiency of the detector have been accurately studied in the laboratory with continuous SXR spectra produced by an electronic tube and line emissions produced by fluorescence (K, Fe, and Mo) in the range of 3-17 keV. The front-end electronics, working in photon counting mode with a selectable threshold for pulse discrimination, is optimized for high rates. The distribution of the pulse amplitude has been indirectly derived by means of scans of the threshold. Scans in detector gain have also been performed to assess the capability of selecting different energy ranges.

  13. Emerging operando and x-ray pair distribution function methods for energy materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Karena W.

    2016-03-01

    Our energy needs drive widespread materials research. Advances in materials characterization are critical to this research effort. Using new characterization tools that allow us to probe the atomic structure of energy materials in situ as they operate, we can identify how their structure is linked to their functional properties and performance. These fundamental insights serve as a roadmap to enhance performance in the next generation of advanced materials. In the last decade, developments in synchrotron instrumentation have made the pair distribution function (PDF) method and operando x-ray studies more readily accessible tools capable of providing valuable insights into complex materials systems. Here, the emergence of the PDF method as a versatile structure characterization tool and the further enhancement of this method through developments in operando capabilities and multivariate data analytics are described. These advances in materials characterization are demonstrated by several highlighted studies focused on energy storage in batteries.

  14. On reachable energy resolution of SiPM based scintillation counters for X-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, K. E.; Oleynikov, V. P.; Porosev, V. V.; Savinov, G. A.; Drozdowski, W.

    2017-01-01

    Presently, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are very attractive devices to replace photomultipliers for light detection in many different fields. For example, they could be used in detectors of photons with energies of 20-150 keV for medical and nondestructive testing applications. The small size and high electron gain of SiPMs make them very attractive candidates for pixelated X-ray detectors operating in a photon counting mode. In this research we evaluated the detector performance that can be reached with up-to-date Lu-based scintillators. Application of LYSO:Ce and LFS-3 scintillators provides high count rate capability because of a short scintillator decay time of ~ 40 ns but enables reaching just a moderate energy resolution. Meanwhile, with a LuYAG:Pr scintillator of quite low non-proportionality one can attain much better energy resolution at a reduced rate.

  15. Temperatures following x-ray free-electron-laser heating of thin low- and medium-Z solid targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, D. S.; Wagenaars, E.; Tallents, G. J.

    2011-01-01

    The absorption of ultrashort (100 fs or shorter) bursts of x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) radiation by thin (less than an attenuation length) solid carbon and iron target is modeled. Photon energies of several hundred eV to several keV and intensities of 1016 to 1018 W cm-2 are considered. We calculate carbon and iron temperatures at sufficient times after XFEL irradiation that local thermodynamic equilibrium has been established and electron-ion thermalization has occurred, assuming classical heat capacities. It is shown that there is an optimum photon energy for maximizing temperatures. Constant irradiation at 1018 W cm-2 for 100 fs with photons of 2 and 3 keV, for example, is predicted to result in a temperature of over 500 eV in solid density carbon and over 1 keV in solid density iron, respectively.

  16. Low-energy d-d excitations in MnO studied by resonant x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Butorin, S.M.; Guo, J.; Magnuson, M.

    1997-04-01

    Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy has been demonstrated to possess interesting abilities for studies of electronic structure in various systems, such as symmetry probing, alignment and polarization dependence, sensitivity to channel interference, etc. In the present abstract the authors focus on the feasibility of resonant soft X-ray emission to probe low energy excitations by means of resonant electronic X-ray Raman scattering. Resonant X-ray emission can be regarded as an inelastic scattering process where a system in the ground state is transferred to a low excited state via a virtual core excitation. The energy closeness to a core excitation of the exciting radiation enhances the (generally) low probability for inelastic scattering at these wavelengths. Therefore soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (in resonant electronic Raman mode) can be used to study low energy d-d excitations in transition metal systems. The involvement of the intermediate core state allows one to use the selection rules of X-ray emission, and the appearance of the elastically scattered line in the spectra provides the reference to the ground state.

  17. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  18. Efficacy of fixed filtration for rapid kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yuan; Wang, Adam S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Dose efficiency of dual kVp imaging can be improved if the two beams are filtered to remove photons in the common part of their spectra, thereby increasing spectral separation. While there are a number of advantages to rapid kVp-switching for dual energy, it may not be feasible to have two different filters for the two spectra. Therefore, the authors are interested in whether a fixed added filter can improve the dose efficiency of kVp-switching dual energy x-ray systems. Methods: The authors hypothesized that a K-edge filter would provide the energy selectivity needed to remove overlap of the spectra and hence increase the precision of material separation at constant dose. Preliminary simulations were done using calcium and water basis materials and 80 and 140 kVp x-ray spectra. Precision of the decomposition was evaluated based on the propagation of the Poisson noise through the decomposition function. Considering availability and cost, the authors chose a commercial Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S screen as the filter for their experimental validation. Experiments were conducted on a table-top system using a phantom with various thicknesses of acrylic and copper and 70 and 125 kVp x-ray spectra. The authors kept the phantom exposure roughly constant with and without filtration by adjusting the tube current. The filtered and unfiltered raw data of both low and high energy were decomposed into basis material and the variance of the decomposition for each thickness pair was calculated. To evaluate the filtration performance, the authors measured the ratio of material decomposition variance with and without filtration. Results: Simulation results show that the ideal filter material depends on the object composition and thickness, and ranges across the lanthanide series, with higher atomic number filters being preferred for more attenuating objects. Variance reduction increases with filter thickness, and substantial reductions (40%) can be achieved with a 2× loss in

  19. Tandem-Phase Zone-Plate Optics for High-Energy X-ray Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagoshima, Yasushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Koyama, Takahisa; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Saikubo, Akihiko

    2011-02-01

    An optical system consisting of two phase zone plates closely arranged in tandem was constructed for focusing high-energy X-rays. The phase zone plates were made from tantalum and their combined thickness was 4.8 µm. An ideal diffraction efficiency of 30% is expected at 30 keV, which is about 3 times higher than that of a single zone plate. The focusing properties at 30 keV were studied both numerically and experimentally. The coaxial tandem arrangement was precisely achieved by observing Young's interference patterns in the far-field produced by the two point foci. A focus size of ˜4 µm was obtained. The photon flux density was 2.2 ×1013 photons/s/mm2, which is 2.4 and 85 times higher than that obtained with a single zone plate and without focusing, respectively. The focused beam was used for scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy and the residual tin distribution on a float glass surface was imaged.

  20. Calibration of the NuSTAR High-energy Focusing X-ray Telescope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Markwardt, Craig B.; An, Hongjun; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Bachetti, Matteo; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Kitaguchi, Takao; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steve; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Forster, Karl; Fuerst, Felix; Hailey, Charles J.; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Rana, Vikram; Stern, Daniel; Walton, Dominic J.; Jørgen Westergaard, Niels; Zhang, William W.

    2015-09-01

    We present the calibration of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray satellite. We used the Crab as the primary effective area calibrator and constructed a piece-wise linear spline function to modify the vignetting response. The achieved residuals for all off-axis angles and energies, compared to the assumed spectrum, are typically better than ±2% up to 40 keV and 5%-10% above due to limited counting statistics. An empirical adjustment to the theoretical two-dimensional point-spread function (PSF) was found using several strong point sources, and no increase of the PSF half-power diameter has been observed since the beginning of the mission. We report on the detector gain calibration, good to 60 eV for all grades, and discuss the timing capabilities of the observatory, which has an absolute timing of ±3 ms. Finally, we present cross-calibration results from two campaigns between all the major concurrent X-ray observatories (Chandra, Swift, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton), conducted in 2012 and 2013 on the sources 3C 273 and PKS 2155-304, and show that the differences in measured flux is within ˜10% for all instruments with respect to NuSTAR.

  1. Finite temperature effects on the X-ray absorption spectra of energy related materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David

    2014-03-01

    We elucidate the role of room-temperature-induced instantaneous structural distortions in the Li K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of crystalline LiF, Li2SO4, Li2O, Li3N and Li2CO3 using high resolution X-ray Raman spectroscopy (XRS) measurements and first-principles density functional theory calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole (XCH) approach. Based on thermodynamic sampling via ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we find calculated XAS in much better agreement with experiment than those computed using the rigid crystal structure alone. We show that local instantaneous distortion of the atomic lattice perturbs the symmetry of the Li 1 s core-excited-state electronic structure, broadening spectral line-shapes and, in some cases, producing additional spectral features. This work was conducted within the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  2. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, Elżbieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafał

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment.

  3. Can we detect Li K X-ray in lithium compounds using energy dispersive spectroscopy?

    PubMed

    Hovington, Pierre; Timoshevskii, Vladimir; Burgess, Simon; Demers, Hendrix; Statham, Peter; Gauvin, Raynald; Zaghib, Karim

    2016-11-01

    Lithium is the key element for the development of battery and new technology and the development of an analytical technique to spatially and quantitatively resolve this element is of key importance. Detection of Li K in pure metallic lithium is now possible in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with newly designed Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). However, this work is clearly showing, for the first time using EDS, the detection of Li K in several binary lithium compounds (LiH, Li3 N, Li2 S, LiF and LiCl). Experimental Li K X-rays intensity is compared with a specially modified Monte Carlo simulation program showing discrepancies between theoretical and experimental Li K measurements. The effect of chemical bounding on the X-rays emission using density functional theory with the all-electron linearized augmented plane wave is showing that the emission of Li K from the binary compounds studied should be, at least, 12 times lower than in metallic Li. SCANNING 38:571-578, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. CALIBRATION OF THE NuSTAR HIGH-ENERGY FOCUSING X-RAY TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, Kristin K.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Forster, Karl; Fuerst, Felix; Rana, Vikram; Walton, Dominic J.; Markwardt, Craig B.; An, Hongjun; Bachetti, Matteo; Kitaguchi, Takao; Bhalerao, Varun; Boggs, Steve; Craig, William W.; Christensen, Finn E.; Hailey, Charles J.; Perri, Matteo; Puccetti, Simonetta; Stern, Daniel; and others

    2015-09-15

    We present the calibration of the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) X-ray satellite. We used the Crab as the primary effective area calibrator and constructed a piece-wise linear spline function to modify the vignetting response. The achieved residuals for all off-axis angles and energies, compared to the assumed spectrum, are typically better than ±2% up to 40 keV and 5%–10% above due to limited counting statistics. An empirical adjustment to the theoretical two-dimensional point-spread function (PSF) was found using several strong point sources, and no increase of the PSF half-power diameter has been observed since the beginning of the mission. We report on the detector gain calibration, good to 60 eV for all grades, and discuss the timing capabilities of the observatory, which has an absolute timing of ±3 ms. Finally, we present cross-calibration results from two campaigns between all the major concurrent X-ray observatories (Chandra, Swift, Suzaku, and XMM-Newton), conducted in 2012 and 2013 on the sources 3C 273 and PKS 2155-304, and show that the differences in measured flux is within ∼10% for all instruments with respect to NuSTAR.

  5. First TDCR measurements at low energies using a miniature x-ray tube.

    PubMed

    Halter, E; Thiam, C; Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Chambellan, D; Chauvenet, B; Hamel, M; Rocha, L; Trocmé, M; Woo, R

    2014-11-01

    Developed for radionuclide standardization using liquid scintillation, the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method is applied using coincidence counting obtained with a specific three-photomultiplier system. For activity determination, a statistical model of light emission is classically used to establish a relation between the detection efficiency and the experimental TDCR value. At LNE-LNHB, a stochastic approach of the TDCR modeling was developed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The interest of this TDCR-Geant4 model is the possibility to simulate the propagation of optical photons from their creation in the scintillation vial to the production of photoelectrons in photomultipliers. As an alternative to the use of radionuclide sources, first TDCR measurements are presented using a miniature x-ray tube closely coupled to the scintillation vial. The objective of this new set-up was to enable low-energy depositions (lower than 20 keV) in liquid scintillator in order to study the influence of both time and geometrical dependence between PMTs already observed with radioactive sources. As for the statistical TDCR model, the non-linearity of light emission is implemented in the TDCR-Geant4 model using the Birks formula which depends on the kB factor and the scintillation yield. Measurements performed with the x-ray tube are extended to the assessment of these parameters and they are tested afterwards in the TDCR-Geant4 model for activity measurements of (3)H.

  6. The high-energy celestial X-ray instrument on board OSO-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Lencho, R. J.; Orwig, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    The 20 keV-3 MeV celestial X-ray detector on the OSO-8 is described. The primary objectives of this instrument are to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic X-ray sources above 20 keV and to search for time variations, both periodic and irregular, in the intensity of the sources detected. The detector consists of two optically isolated central crystals shielded by a large, active collimator. The sensitive area is 27.5 sq cm and the field-of-view is 5 deg FWHM. The instrument is mounted in the wheel section of OSO-8 with the axis of its field of view offset by 5 deg from the negative spin axis of the wheel. The minimum detectable intensity of a point source which is brought to within 5 deg of the negative spin axis for greater than one day is about 10 to the minus fifth power photons/sq cm-sec at 100 keV.

  7. Material Discrimination for Treaty Verification with Multi-energy, X-ray Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Robinson, Sean M.; White, Timothy A.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Deinert, Mark

    2013-06-10

    As nuclear warhead stockpiles are reduced under current and future arms treaties, accuracy in accountancy of material stockpiles becomes increasingly important. Image-based active interrogation offers advantages to spectroscopic detection in its ability to measure the location and extent of a material, or materials, of interest from a declaration. However, the detail that imaging provides is often viewed as too intrusive due to its potential to disseminate sensitive information. In this work, we present a method for reducing multi-energy, x-ray radiography data to a few important attributes, based on declarations from behind an information barrier, which can then be used to confirm or deny a declaration. We build on previous work by improving the physics modeling; considering currently attainable, multiple-endpoint x-ray systems; and posing the problem as a nonlinear, inverse problem. Regularization is added to the problem, which smooths the solution and stabilizes an otherwise unstable solution. Here we show the ability to discriminate high-atomic–number materials from others with simulated single-view multiple-endpoint radiography data and present results from initial bench-top measurements.

  8. THE NEXT GENERATION ATLAS OF QUASAR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM RADIO TO X-RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Zhaohui; Li Jun; Xie Yanxia; Brotherton, Michael S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Kelly, Benjamin J.; Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D.; Green, Richard F.; Nemmen, Rodrigo S.; Ganguly, Rajib; Hines, Dean C.; Kriss, Gerard A.; Tang, Baitian

    2011-09-01

    We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

  9. Development of a prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, D. J.; De Rosa, A. J.; Bradley, D. A.; Jarman, S. E.; Jenneson, P. M.; Vincent, S. M.

    2010-07-01

    A prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) has been produced, for which system development and preliminary results are presented here. This apparatus has been developed from experience with 2D and 3D bench-top EDXRD systems and comprises a conventional industrial X-ray tube coupled to a bespoke design of tungsten collimators and compact CdTe detector. It is designed as a robust system, rather than delicate lab-based system, to investigate sections of stainless steel pipework for structural changes induced through quenching the steel in liquid nitrogen, and damaging effects such as chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Given the properties of tungsten, namely its brittle nature, a complex programme of electro-discharge machining (EDM) has been devised to precisely manufacture the collimators from a series of sintered tungsten blocks. Preliminary measurements have focused on calibrating the system using the extreme ferrite and austenite phases, meeting a pre-requisite benchmark for attempting more challenging measurements such as the austenite to martensite transformation and investigations of SCC in these sections of pipework.

  10. X-ray generator

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, John M.

    1976-01-01

    Apparatus and method for producing coherent secondary x-rays that are controlled as to direction by illuminating a mixture of high z and low z gases with an intense burst of primary x-rays. The primary x-rays are produced with a laser activated plasma, and these x-rays strip off the electrons of the high z atoms in the lasing medium, while the low z atoms retain their electrons. The neutral atoms transfer electrons to highly excited states of the highly striped high z ions giving an inverted population which produces the desired coherent x-rays. In one embodiment, a laser, light beam provides a laser spark that produces the intense burst of coherent x-rays that illuminates the mixture of high z and low z gases, whereby the high z atoms are stripped while the low z ones are not, giving the desired mixture of highly ionized and neutral atoms. To this end, the laser spark is produced by injecting a laser light beam, or a plurality of beams, into a first gas in a cylindrical container having an adjacent second gas layer co-axial therewith, the laser producing a plasma and the intense primary x-rays in the first gas, and the second gas containing the high and low atomic number elements for receiving the primary x-rays, whereupon the secondary x-rays are produced therein by stripping desired ions in a neutral gas and transfer of electrons to highly excited states of the stripped ions from the unionized atoms. Means for magnetically confining and stabilizing the plasma are disclosed for controlling the direction of the x-rays.

  11. Pixellated Cd(Zn)Te high-energy X-ray instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seller, P.; Bell, S.; Cernik, R. J.; Christodoulou, C.; Egan, C. K.; Gaskin, J. A.; Jacques, S.; Pani, S.; Ramsey, B. D.; Reid, C.; Sellin, P. J.; Scuffham, J. W.; Speller, R. D.; Wilson, M. D.; Veale, M. C.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a pixellated high energy X-ray detector instrument to be used in a variety of imaging applications. The instrument consists of either a Cadmium Zinc Telluride or Cadmium Telluride (Cd(Zn)Te) detector bump-bonded to a large area ASIC and packaged with a high performance data acquisition system. The 80 by 80 pixels each of 250 μm by 250 μm give better than 1 keV FWHM energy resolution at 59.5 keV and 1.5 keV FWHM at 141 keV, at the same time providing a high speed imaging performance. This system uses a relatively simple wire-bonded interconnection scheme but this is being upgraded to allow multiple modules to be used with very small dead space. The readout system and the novel interconnect technology is described and how the system is performing in several target applications.

  12. Pixellated Cd(Zn)Te high-energy X-ray instrument

    PubMed Central

    Seller, P.; Bell, S.; Cernik, R.J.; Christodoulou, C.; Egan, C.K.; Gaskin, J.A.; Jacques, S.; Pani, S.; Ramsey, B.D.; Reid, C.; Sellin, P.J.; Scuffham, J.W.; Speller, R.D.; Wilson, M.D.; Veale, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pixellated high energy X-ray detector instrument to be used in a variety of imaging applications. The instrument consists of either a Cadmium Zinc Telluride or Cadmium Telluride (Cd(Zn)Te) detector bump-bonded to a large area ASIC and packaged with a high performance data acquisition system. The 80 by 80 pixels each of 250 μm by 250 μm give better than 1 keV FWHM energy resolution at 59.5 keV and 1.5 keV FWHM at 141 keV, at the same time providing a high speed imaging performance. This system uses a relatively simple wire-bonded interconnection scheme but this is being upgraded to allow multiple modules to be used with very small dead space. The readout system and the novel interconnect technology is described and how the system is performing in several target applications. PMID:22737179

  13. Transformation of the X-ray contrast medium iopromide in soil and biological wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Manoj; Löffler, Dirk; Wagner, Manfred; Ternes, Thomas A

    2008-10-01

    In water/soil systems, the iodinated contrast medium iopromide was quantitatively biotransformed into several transformation products (TPs). Twelve TPs were identified via HPLC-UV and LC tandem MS. The chemical structures of the TPs were elucidated via fragmentation in MS2 and MS3 of LC tandem MS with a linear ion trap and 1H and 13C NMR analyses. All TPs exhibited transformations at the side chains containing either carboxylic moieties and/or primary and secondary amide moieties, while the triiodoisophthalic acid structure remained unaltered. A transformation pathway was proposed based on the sequence of TP formation in aerobic batch experiments. Additionally, the occurrence of iopromide TPs was investigated in native water samples. All TPs identified were found in municipal WWTP effluents because of their formation during biological wastewater treatment with maximum concentrations of up to 3.7 +/- 0.9 microg/L (TP 819). Predominantly, those TPs were present at higher concentrations in WWTP effluents which were formed at the beginning of the transformation pathway. Furthermore, four TPs formed at the end of the transformation pathway (TP 759, 701A/B, and 643) were also found in bank filtrate up to 0.050 microg/L and in groundwater of an wastewater irrigation area up to 4.6 microg/L.

  14. Sub-second variations of high energy ( 300 keV) hard X-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Taeil

    1986-01-01

    Subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission from solar flares were first observed with a balloon-borne detector. With the launch of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), it is now well known that subsecond variations of hard X-ray emission occur quite frequently. Such rapid variations give constraints on the modeling of electron energization. Such rapid variations reported until now, however, were observed at relatively low energies. Fast mode data obtained by the Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer (HXRBS) has time resolution of approximately 1 ms but has no energy resolution. Therefore, rapid fluctuations observed in the fast-mode HXRBS data are dominated by the low energy hard X-rays. It is of interest to know whether rapid fluctuations are observed in high-energy X-rays. The highest energy band at which subsecond variations were observed is 223 to 1057 keV. Subsecond variations observed with HXRBS at energies greater than 300 keV are reported, and the implications discussed.

  15. Soft X-Ray Irradiation of Methanol Ice: Formation of Products as a Function of Photon Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Ciaravella, A.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH2OH, H2CO, CH4, HCOOH, HCOCH2OH, CH3COOH, CH3OCH3, HCOOCH3, and (CH2OH)2, as well as HCO, CO, and CO2. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH3OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  16. Coded Mask Imaging of High Energy X-rays with CZT Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matteson, J. L.; Dowkontt, P. F.; Duttweiler, F.; Heindl, W. A.; Hink, P. L.; Huszar, G. L.; Kalemci, E.; Leblanc, P. C.; Rothschild, R. E.; Skelton, R. T.; Slavis, K. R.; Stephan, E. A.

    1998-12-01

    Coded mask imagers are appropriate for important objectives of high energy X-ray astronomy, e.g., gamma- ray burst localization, all-sky monitors and surveys, and deep surveys of limited regions. We report results from a coded mask imager developed to establish the proof-of-concept for this technique with CZT detectors. The detector is 2 mm thick with orthogonal crossed strip readout and an advanced electrode design to improve the energy resolution. Each detector face has 22 strip electrodes, and the strip pitch and pixel size are 500 microns. ASIC readout is used and the energy resolution varies from 3 to 6 keV FWHM over the 14 to 184 keV keV range. A coded mask with 2 x 2 cycles of a 23 x 23 MURA pattern (860 micron unit cell) was built from 600 micron thick tantalum to provide good X-ray modulation up to 200 keV. The detector, mask, and a tiny Gd-153 source of 41 keV X-rays were positioned with a spacing that caused the mask cells in the shadowgram to have a projected size of 1300 microns at the detector. Multiple detector positions were used to measure the shadowgram of a full mask cycle and this was recorded with 100 percent modulation transfer by the detector, due to its factor of 2.6 oversampling of the mask unit cell, and very high strip-to-strip selectivity and spatial accuracy. Deconvolution of the shadowgram produced a correlation image in which the source was detected as a 76-sigma peak with the correct FWHM and base diameter. Off-source image pixels had gaussian fluctuations that agree closely with the measurement statistics. Off-source image defects such as might be produced by systematic effects were too small to be seen and limited to <0.5 percent of the source peak. These results were obtained with the "raw" shadowgram and image; no "flat fielding" corrections were used.

  17. High energy neutrino absorption and its effects on stars in close X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    The physics and astrophysics of high energy neutrino production and interactions in close X-ray binary systems are studied. These studies were stimulated by recent observations of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays and possibly other ultrahigh energy particles coming from the directions of Cygnus X-3 and other binary systems and possessing the periodicity characteristics of these systems. Systems in which a compact object, such as a neutron star, is a strong source of high energy particles which, in turn, produce photons, neutronos and other secondary particles by interactions in the atmosphere of the companion star were considered. The highest energy neutrinos are absorbed deep in the companion and the associated energy deposition may be large enough to effect its structure or lead to its ultimate disruption. This neutrino heating was evaluated, starting with a detailed numerical calculation of the hadronic cascade induced in the atmosphere of the companion star. For some theoretical models, the resulting energy deposition from neutrino absorption may be so great as to disrupt the companion star over an astronomically small timescale of the order of 10,000 years. Even if the energy deposition is smaller, it may still be high enough to alter the system substantially, perhaps leading to quenching of high energy signals from the source. Given the cosmic ray luminosities required to produce the observed gamma rays from cygnus X-3 and LMX X-4, such a situation may occur in these sources.

  18. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  19. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R [Williamsburg, VA

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  20. Time-resolved X-ray measurements of energy relaxation in ultrafast laser excited semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo Heyong

    In semiconductors, the properties and dynamics of photoexcited carriers and subsequent energy relaxation through lattice vibrations are quite complex and occur on a variety of time scales. Typically the transient dynamics involving transitions of electrons from lower energy states to higher ones upon photoexcitation take place almost instantaneously. The electrons eventually recombine with holes while losing most of their kinetic energy to the lattice through various routes at different time scales. The lattice relaxation processes, especially at high photoexcitation levels, have been subjected to numerous experimental and theoretical investigations during past decades. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) method provides a novel tool for studying these dynamics because X-rays have short wavelength, long material penetration depth and relatively strong interaction with core electrons. In my work, femtosecond laser pulses excite electrons in opaque materials, and subsequent carrier relaxation process and coherent/incoherent lattice dynamics are investigated using TRXD. My thesis covers quantitative detail of the generation and propagation of ultrafast laser induces acoustic strain waves in bulk semiconductor materials as well as at the heterostructure interface. In particular propagation of strain waves, which are comprised of broadband low wave vector phonons, is studied in an AlGaAs/GaAs multilayer structure. The spatial and temporal profiles of the acoustic waves at varying photoexcitation density are characterized. We are able to distinguish thermal from carrier-induced strain and measure the free-carrier absorption cross-section. The approximation that impulsively generated acoustic waves are uniaxial is found to break down. The research also demonstrates a novel approach to explore laser induced acoustic phonon dynamics at high wavevector, near the Brillouin zone-boundary, the details of which are inaccessible to optical pump-probe methods. Throughout this

  1. HEAO 1 high-energy X-ray observations of three bright transient X-ray sources H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi), H1743-322, and H1833-077 (Scutum X-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, B. A.; Levine, A. M.; Lang, F. L.; Primini, F. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1984-01-01

    The bright X-ray transients H1705-250 (Nova Ophiuchi) and H1743-322 in the energy range 12-180 keV were observed, and the presence of high-energy spectral components was revealed. On the basis of X-ray spectra in the 1-10 keV range, transients are classified as 'soft' (kT = 4 keV) or 'hard' (kT = 17 keV); and both H1705-250 and H1743-322 should be in the 'soft' category. Data have been reexamined for the archetypal 'soft' transient A0600-00 taken by the SAS 3 satellite, but no evidence is found there for a high-energy spectral component. Thus consideration of a wider X-ray energy range makes the 'hard'/'soft' distinction between X-ray transients much less clear.

  2. Differential Effects of X-Rays and High-Energy {sup 56}Fe Ions on Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kurpinski, Kyle; Jang, Deok-Jin; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Rydberg, Bjorn; Chu, Julia; So, Joanna; Wyrobek, Andy; Li Song; Wang Daojing

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Stem cells hold great potential for regenerative medicine, but they have also been implicated in cancer and aging. How different kinds of ionizing radiation affect stem cell biology remains unexplored. This study was designed to compare the biological effects of X-rays and of high-linear energy transfer (LET) {sup 56}Fe ions on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Methods and Materials: A multi-functional comparison was carried out to investigate the differential effects of X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions on hMSC. The end points included modulation of key markers such as p53, cell cycle progression, osteogenic differentiation, and pathway and networks through transcriptomic profiling and bioinformatics analysis. Results: X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions differentially inhibited the cell cycle progression of hMSC in a p53-dependent manner without impairing their in vitro osteogenic differentiation process. Pathway and network analyses revealed that cytoskeleton and receptor signaling were uniquely enriched for low-dose (0.1 Gy) X-rays. In contrast, DNA/RNA metabolism and cell cycle regulation were enriched for high-dose (1 Gy) X-rays and {sup 56}Fe ions, with more significant effects from {sup 56}Fe ions. Specifically, DNA replication, DNA strand elongation, and DNA binding/transferase activity were perturbed more severely by 1 Gy {sup 56}Fe ions than by 1 Gy X-rays, consistent with the significant G2/M arrest for the former while not for the latter. Conclusions: {sup 56}Fe ions exert more significant effects on hMSC than X-rays. Since hMSC are the progenitors of osteoblasts in vivo, this study provides new mechanistic understandings of the relative health risks associated with low- and high-dose X-rays and high-LET space radiation.

  3. The Prospects for Constraining Dark Energy withFuture X-ray Cluster Gas Mass Fraction Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rapetti, David; Allen, Steven W.

    2007-10-15

    We examine the ability of a future X-ray observatory, with capabilities similar to those planned for the Constellation-X mission, to constrain dark energy via measurements of the cluster X-ray gas mass fraction, fgas. We find that fgas measurements for a sample of {approx}500 hot (kT{approx}> 5keV), X-ray bright, dynamically relaxed clusters, to a precision of {approx}5 percent, can be used to constrain dark energy with a Dark Energy Task Force (DETF; Albrecht et al. 2006) figure of merit of 20-50. Such constraints are comparable to those predicted by the DETF for other leading, planned 'Stage IV' dark energy experiments. A future fgas experiment will be preceded by a large X-ray or SZ survey that will find hot, X-ray luminous clusters out to high redshifts. Short 'snapshot' observations with the new X-ray observatory should then be able to identify a sample of {approx}500 suitably relaxed systems. The redshift, temperature and X-ray luminosity range of interest has already been partially probed by existing X-ray cluster surveys which allow reasonable estimates of the fraction of clusters that will be suitably relaxed for fgas work to be made; these surveys also show that X-ray flux contamination from point sources is likely to be small for the majority of the targets of interest. Our analysis uses a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method which fully captures the relevant degeneracies between parameters and facilities the incorporation of priors and systematic uncertainties in the analysis. We explore the effects of such uncertainties, for scenarios ranging from optimistic to pessimistic. We conclude that the fgas experiment offers a competitive and complementary approach to the best other large, planned dark energy experiments. In particular, the fgas experiment will provide tight constraints on the mean matter and dark energy densities, with a peak sensitivity for dark energy work at redshifts midway between those of supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillation

  4. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rénata; Peyrin, Frédéric; Vénien, Annie; Hénot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining.

  5. Energy-resolved visibility analysis of grating interferometers operated at polychromatic X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Hipp, A; Willner, M; Herzen, J; Auweter, S; Chabior, M; Meiser, J; Achterhold, K; Mohr, J; Pfeiffer, F

    2014-12-15

    Grating interferometry has been successfully adapted at standard X-ray tubes and is a promising candidate for a broad use of phase-contrast imaging in medical diagnostics or industrial testing. The achievable image quality using this technique is mainly dependent on the interferometer performance with the interferometric visibility as crucial parameter. The presented study deals with experimental investigations of the spectral dependence of the visibility in order to understand the interaction between the single contributing energies. Especially for the choice which type of setup has to be preferred using a polychromatic source, this knowledge is highly relevant. Our results affirm previous findings from theoretical investigations but also show that measurements of the spectral contributions to the visibility are necessary to fully characterize and optimize a grating interferometer and cannot be replaced by only relying on simulated data up to now.

  6. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of charge density waves via chemical filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yejun; Somayazulu, M. S.; Jaramillo, R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Isaacs, E.D.; Hu Jingzhu; Mao Hokwang

    2005-06-15

    Pressure tuning of phase transitions is a powerful tool in condensed matter physics, permitting high-resolution studies while preserving fundamental symmetries. At the highest pressures, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) has been a critical method for geometrically confined diamond anvil cell experiments. We develop a chemical filter technique complementary to EDXD that permits the study of satellite peaks as weak as 10{sup -4} of the crystal Bragg diffraction. In particular, we map out the temperature dependence of the incommensurate charge density wave diffraction from single-crystal, elemental chromium. This technique provides the potential for future GPa pressure studies of many-body effects in a broad range of solid state systems.

  7. Investigation of gas generation in regenerative fuel cells by low-energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selamet, Omer Faruk; Deevanhxay, Phengxay; Tsushima, Shohji; Hirai, Shuichiro

    2015-11-01

    Gas generation and discharge behaviors in an operating regenerative fuel cell (RFC) are investigated using low-energy X-ray radiography. In situ visualization at high spatial and temporal resolution reveal dynamic and inhomogeneous behaviors of the gas generation in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) in the RFC. Temporal and spatial variation of the gas thickness in the MEA is quantitatively discussed and shows an intermittent and periodic discharge processes of the gas generated by electrolysis, suggesting that the reaction sites in the catalyst layer and the discharging path of gas bubbles are well established in the MEA for the electrolysis. Larger gas accumulation and discharge in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) under the ribs are identified in comparison with those under the channels, which is attributed to the relatively longer path for accumulated gas under the ribs to be discharged into the flow channels.

  8. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research

    DOE PAGES

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E.; ...

    2015-05-29

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, the analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. We discovered that this enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to findmore » the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.« less

  9. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  10. Welders' pneumoconiosis: tissue elemental microanalysis by energy dispersive x ray analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, A; Schlueter, D P; Pintar, K; Bemis, E L; Siegesmund, K A

    1988-01-01

    Histological examination on lung tissue obtained from 10 symptomatic welders was performed by two certified pathologists without the knowledge of the patients' clinical condition. In all cases, there was some degree of interstitial fibrosis; in five the degree of fibrosis was considered to be moderate to pronounced. The tissue was also analysed by energy dispersive x ray analysis and elemental contents were compared with age matched controls. There was a large amount of iron in the lungs of welders but the silicon content did not differ from the control subjects. No specific foreign element was detected. It is concluded that (1) interstitial pulmonary fibrosis is seen in some welders and (2) the cause of fibrosis does not appear to be coexisting silicosis. Images PMID:3342182

  11. Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry: Beyond Bone Mineral Density Determination

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Significant improvements in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) concerning quality, image resolution and image acquisition time have allowed the development of various functions. DXA can evaluate bone quality by indirect analysis of micro- and macro-architecture of the bone, which and improve the prediction of fracture risk. DXA can also detect existing fractures, such as vertebral fractures or atypical femur fractures, without additional radiologic imaging and radiation exposure. Moreover, it can assess the metabolic status by the measurement of body composition parameters like muscle mass and visceral fat. Although more studies are required to validate and clinically use these parameters, it is clear that DXA is not just for bone mineral densitometry. PMID:26996419

  12. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of birds: an examination of excised skeletal specimens.

    PubMed

    Dirrigl, F J; Dalsky, G P; Warner, S E

    2004-08-01

    The ability of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to measure bone mineral content and density of bird bones has received little attention. This paper represents the first comprehensive study of the methods, precision, and reproducibility of DXA (GE-Lunar DPX-L) for the uniquely shaped, thin and pneumatic bones of birds. Skeletal elements and portions represented by 26 regions of interest (ROIs) are presented and evaluated for the gallinaceous bird species, wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus) and bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus). Using Lunar small animal software and the methods described in this paper, photodensitometry of bird bones is possible and opens new opportunities for using birds in clinical models in veterinarian science, osteoporosis studies, space biology, and even archaeological and paleontological research.

  13. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research.

    PubMed

    Schollmeier, Marius S; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E; Smith, Ian C; Porter, John L

    2015-06-01

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. The analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. This enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to find the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.

  14. [Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in Ilizarov lower extremity lengthening: preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Wroński, S; Wojciechowski, P; Wójcik, K; Kusz, D

    1999-01-01

    Ilizarov method for lower extremity lengthening has been employed in 107 patients. Some 25% of numerous complications are bony union disturbances. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) for assessment of new bone formation was introduced to reduce these problems. Detailed densitometry methodology developed on the ground of 93 measurements in 11 patients is presented. Pre-operative measurement was followed by subsequent evaluations done every 3 weeks after the onset of distraction. DEXA was capable of showing the callus 3-4 weeks earlier than conventional radiography. DEXA allows for adjusting the pace of lengthening to the extent of new bone mineralization, evaluation of lengthening achieved, determining the timing for safe removal of the apparatus. The need for temporary rearranging of the apparatus and troublesome image analysis are among the drawbacks of the method.

  15. Performance of bent-crystal x-ray microscopes for high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Schollmeier, Marius S.; Geissel, Matthias; Shores, Jonathon E.; Smith, Ian C.; Porter, John L.

    2015-05-29

    We present calculations for the field of view (FOV), image fluence, image monochromaticity, spectral acceptance, and image aberrations for spherical crystal microscopes, which are used as self-emission imaging or backlighter systems at large-scale high energy density physics facilities. Our analytic results are benchmarked with ray-tracing calculations as well as with experimental measurements from the 6.151 keV backlighter system at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, the analytic expressions can be used for x-ray source positions anywhere between the Rowland circle and object plane. We discovered that this enables quick optimization of the performance of proposed but untested, bent-crystal microscope systems to find the best compromise between FOV, image fluence, and spatial resolution for a particular application.

  16. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  17. Capabilities of dual-energy x-ray imaging in medicine and security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhikov, Volodymyr D.; Grinyov, Borys V.; Opolonin, Oleksandr D.; Galkin, Serhiy M.; Lysetska, Olena K.; Voronkin, Yevheniy F.; Kostioukevitch, Serhiy A.

    2012-10-01

    The dual-energy computer tomography compared with its traditional single-energy variant ensures substantially higher contrast sensitivity. The evaluation of the signal ratio from high-energy and low-energy detectors has been carried out using a simplified model of the dual-energy detector array and accounting for the X-ray tube spectrum. We proposed to use of a dual-energy receiving-detecting circuit with a detector pair ZnSe/CsI or ZnSe/CdWO that allows efficient distinction between muscular and bone tissues, which supports our earlier theoretical assumptions that this method could be successfully used for separate detection of materials differing in their effective atomic number Zeff and local density (e.g., calcium contents in bone densitometry), so as can be turn to account for new generation instruments. A possibility of dual energy tomography use for osteoporosis diagnostics was considered. Direct image reconstruction of biological objects has been carried out, demonstrating details of bones with different density. The density of the bone depends on the calcium content, which is not more than 20 % for the narrow part and about 18,5 % in the broad part. This results obtained were in good agreement with the results of the independent chemical analysis.

  18. An ARXPS and ERXPS study of quaternary ammonium and phosphonium ionic liquids: utilising a high energy Ag Lα' X-ray source.

    PubMed

    Blundell, Rebecca K; Delorme, Astrid E; Smith, Emily F; Licence, Peter

    2016-02-17

    A series of ammonium- and phosphonium-based ionic liquids have been probed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) with a high energy Ag Lα' X-ray source. The capability of the Ag Lα' X-ray source for ionic liquid analysis is confirmed alongside the characterisation of previously undetected high energy core photoelectron emissions. Additionally, the utilisation of the Ag Lα' X-ray source as a depth profiling technique (ERXPS) to investigate the structure of the ionic liquid/vacuum interface has been demonstrated, with comparison made to angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ARXPS).

  19. Dual energy x-ray laser measurement of calcaneal bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, M. A.; Saarakkala, S.; Töyräs, J.; Kröger, H.; Jurvelin, J. S.

    2003-06-01

    In dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) the photon attenuation is assumed to be similar in soft tissue overlying, adjacent to and inside the measured bone. In the calcaneal dual energy x-ray laser (DXL) technique, this assumption is not needed as attenuation by soft tissues at the local bone site is determined by combining DXA and heel thickness measurements. In the present study, 38 subjects were measured with DXL Calscan, Lunar PIXI and Lunar DPX-IQ DXA instruments and Hologic Sahara ultrasound instrument, and the performance and agreement of the instruments were analysed. Furthermore, numerical simulations on the effect of non-uniform fat-to-lean tissue ratio within soft tissue in heel were conducted. In vivo short-term precision (CV%, sCV%) of DXL Calscan (1.24%, 1.48%) was similar to that of Lunar PIXI (1.28%, 1.60%). Calcaneal areal bone mineral densities (BMD, g cm-2) measured using DXL Calscan and Lunar PIXI predicted equally well variations in BMD of femoral neck (r2 = 0.63 and 0.52, respectively) or lumbar spine (r2 = 0.61 and 0.64, respectively), determined with Lunar DPX-IQ. BMD values measured with DXL Calscan were, on average, 19% lower (p < 0.01) than those determined with Lunar PIXI. Interestingly, the difference in BMD values between instruments increased as a function of body mass index (BMI) (r2 = 0.17, p < 0.02) or heel thickness (r2 = 0.37, p < 0.01). Numerical simulations suggested that the spatial variation of soft tissue composition in heel can induce incontrollable inaccuracy in BMD when measured with the DXA technique. Theoretically, in contrast to DXA instruments, elimination of the effect of non-uniform soft tissue is possible with DXL Calscan.

  20. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  1. Measurements of M and L X-ray energies and relative intensities emanating from (241)Am source.

    PubMed

    Verma, H R

    2017-04-01

    Energies and relative Intensities of 13 X-ray transitions in the M X-ray spectrum (per 100 disintegrations of (241)Am) viz. M4N1, Mξ1,2, M3N1, Mα, Mβ, Mγ, M2N1, M3O4,5+M3P1, M3Q1, M1N3, M2N4+M1N3, M2O1 and M1O2,3 lines along with L1-L3 have been measured in addition to the 21L X-ray lines viz. Lℓ, Lt, Ls, Lα2, Lα1, Lη, Lβ6, Lβ2,15, Lβ4, Lβ5,7, Lβ1, Lβ3, Lβ9,10, Lγ5, Lγ1, Lγ2,8, Lγ3,6, Lγ4,4, Lγ13 including two new lines at 19.63 and 23.17keV, have been measured. Since the M and L X-ray lines of 93Np in the decay of (241)Am source are frequently used for energy and efficiency calibration of the Si(Li)/HpGe detectors, the present measurements have been undertaken with an objective to update the data since there are either no concrete data available (even in the Table of Radioactive Isotopes and Table of Radionuclides) or there exist inconsistencies/disparities in the data available in the earlier publications. We confirm the existence of L1-L3 X-ray transition (falling in the region of M X-ray energy range) and Lt, Ls and Lβ9,10 (forbidden transitions as per selection rules). However, the origin of the two new L X-ray lines at 19.63 and 23.17keV, both with intensities of 0.05±0.01%, could not be ascertained.

  2. Localizing INTEGRAL Sources with Chandra: X-Ray and Multi-wavelength Identifications and Energy Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Rahoui, Farid; Halpern, Jules; Kalemci, Emrah; Özbey Arabaci, Mehtap

    2012-08-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and subarcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5° of the plane, four of the IGR sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGNs (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGNs selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGNs are in the range of typical values. There is evidence in favor of four of the sources being Galactic (IGR J12489-6243, IGR J15293-5609, IGR J16173-5023, and IGR J16206-5253), but only IGR J15293-5609 is confirmed as a Galactic source as it has a unique Chandra counterpart and a parallax measurement from previous optical observations that puts its distance at 1.56 ± 0.12 kpc. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity for this source is (1.4+1.0 - 0.4) × 1032 erg s-1, and its optical/IR spectral energy distribution is well described by a blackbody with a temperature of 4200-7000 K and a radius of 12.0-16.4 R ⊙. These values suggest that IGR J15293-5609 is a symbiotic binary with an early K-type giant and a white dwarf accretor. We also obtained likely Chandra identifications for IGR J13402-6428 and IGR J15368-5102, but follow-up observations are required to constrain their source types.

  3. Remarkable events from X ray emulsion chambers and multiple production at LHC energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevielle, J. N.; Talai, M. C.; Attallah, R.

    The CORSIKA programme and specific Monte Carlo collision generators are employed in the interpretation of X-ray emulsion chambers data on super gamma ray families at mountain altitude (Chacaltaya, Kanbala, Pamir...) and in the stratosphere (Concorde, balloons). The consequences of measurement conditions(energy thresholds levels...) are detailed to extract common features for the neutral and charged secondaries. The vertex is approached by invariant mass method, geometry, pseudo rapidity distributions , and factors. Sorting the gamma's coupled in the maximum of invariant histograms, we evaluate the multiplicity , , inelasticity behavior up to LHC energy. Attention is given to the penetration power of EAS which levels off one energy decade around the knee and observations related with the fragmentation region (high energy hadron and gamma spectra in EAS, intensity of families with halo's). Hints of new physics are considered around the intriguing alignments registrated in the energy band between colliders and LHC. Several events (stratosphere and mountain) exhibit coplanar emission at similar visible energy, suggesting the valence diquark breaking. Such violent breaking suppressing the leading cluster recombination might come from the rupture of the string under very high tension between the two partners of the diquark.

  4. Co-analysis of Solar Microwave and Hard X-Ray Spectral Evolutions. I. In Two Frequency or Energy Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qiwu; Huang, Guangli; Nakajima, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Solar microwave and hard X-ray spectral evolutions are co-analyzed in the 2000 June 10 and 2002 April 10 flares, and are simultaneously observed by the Owens-Valley Solar Array in the microwave band and by Yohkoh/Hard X-ray Telescope or RHESSI in the hard X-ray band, with multiple subpeaks in their light curves. The microwave and hard X-ray spectra are fitted by a power law in two frequency ranges of the optical thin part and two photon energy ranges, respectively. Similar to an earlier event in Shao & Huang, the well-known soft-hard-soft pattern of the lower energy range changed to the hard-soft-hard (HSH) pattern of the higher energy range during the spectral evolution of each subpeak in both hard X-ray flares. This energy dependence is actually supported by a positive correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower energy range, while it becomes an anti-correlation in the higher energy range. Regarding microwave data, the HSH pattern appears in the spectral evolution of each subpeak in the lower frequency range, which is somewhat similar to Huang & Nakajima. However, it returns back to the well-known pattern of soft-hard-harder for the overall spectral evolution in the higher frequency range of both events. This frequency dependence is confirmed by an anti-correlation between the overall light curves and spectral evolution in the lower frequency range, but it becomes a positive correlation in the higher frequency range. The possible mechanisms are discussed, respectively, for reasons why hard X-ray and microwave spectral evolutions have different patterns in different energy and frequency intervals.

  5. Investigations into the environmental fate and effects of iopromide (ultravist), a widely used iodinated X-ray contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Länge, Reinhard; Schweinfurth, Hermann; Tschampel, Matthias; Rehmann, Irmgard

    2002-01-01

    lodinated X-ray contrast media are pharmaceuticals which are biologically inert and metabolically stable during their passage through the body and are excreted almost completely within a day into waste water. They are not readily biodegradable. However, in a test system simulating sewage treatment, we were able to show that the model compound iopromide (N,N'-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2,4,6-triiodo-5-methoxyacetylamino-N-methyliso-phthalamide) was amenable to primary degradation. The resulting degradation product (5-amino-N'N'-bis(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-2,4,6-triiodo-N-methyliso-phthalamide) showed a faster photolysis than the parent compound. Additionally this product was further degraded in a test system simulating surface water conditions. Short-term toxicity of the primary degradation product was low, i.e. no effects on any of various aquatic species could be found even at concentrations of 1 gl(-1). Additionally no chronic toxicity of the degradation product was observed in an early-life stage test with zebrafish at the highest tested concentration of 100mgl(-1). Based on the results from model systems a degradation pathway for iopromide is postulated. Though further work showing the transferability of the laboratory results to environmental conditions is necessary the presently available information on the environmental fate and effects of iopromide and its degradation products do not provide evidence of a risk for aquatic life caused by the introduction of this contrast medium into waste water.

  6. MEASUREMENT OF THE HIGH ENERGY COMPONENT OF THE X-RAY SPECTRA INTHE VENUS ECR ION SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Daniela; Benitez, Janilee Y.; Lyneis, Claude M.; Todd,Damon S.; Ropponen,Tommi; Ropponen,Janne; Koivisto, Hannu; Gammino, Santo

    2007-11-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for Nuclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental set-up to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different than for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper we will discuss the experimental set-up for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the correction for detector efficiency, the shielding of the detector and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates in dependence of various ion source parameters such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power and heating frequency.

  7. Measurement of the high energy component of the x-ray spectra in the VENUS electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, D.; Benitez, J. Y.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Ropponen, T.; Ropponen, J.; Koivisto, H.; Gammino, S.

    2008-03-15

    High performance electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources, such as VENUS (Versatile ECR for NUclear Science), produce large amounts of x-rays. By studying their energy spectra, conclusions can be drawn about the electron heating process and the electron confinement. In addition, the bremsstrahlung from the plasma chamber is partly absorbed by the cold mass of the superconducting magnet, adding an extra heat load to the cryostat. Germanium or NaI detectors are generally used for x-ray measurements. Due to the high x-ray flux from the source, the experimental setup to measure bremsstrahlung spectra from ECR ion sources is somewhat different from that for the traditional nuclear physics measurements these detectors are generally used for. In particular, the collimation and background shielding can be problematic. In this paper, we will discuss the experimental setup for such a measurement, the energy calibration and background reduction, the shielding of the detector, and collimation of the x-ray flux. We will present x-ray energy spectra and cryostat heating rates depending on various ion source parameters, such as confinement fields, minimum B-field, rf power, and heating frequency.

  8. Metrology for the Development of High Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Engelhaupt, Darell; Dpeegle, Chet

    2005-01-01

    We are developing grazing incidence x-ray optics for a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope (HERO). The instrument will have 200 sq cm effective collecting area at 40 keV and an angular resolution goal of 15 arcsec. The HERO mirror shells are fabricated using electroform-nickel replication off super-polished cylindrical mandrels. The angular resolution goal puts stringent requirements on the quality of x-ray mirrors and, hence, on mandrel quality. We used metrology in an iterative approach to monitor and refine the x- ray mirror fabrication process. Comparison of surface figure and microroughness measurements of the mandrel and the shells will be presented together with results from x-ray tests.

  9. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system.

  10. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  11. Energy calibration and gain correction of pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors using correlation optimised warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, C. K.; Scuffham, J. W.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Cernik, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a reliable, robust and flexible gain correction and energy calibration algorithm for pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors. This algorithm uses a data processing method known as correlation optimised warping which aligns shifted datasets by means of a segmental linear stretching and compression of the spectral data in order to best correlate with a reference spectrum. We found the algorithm to be very robust against low-count spectroscopy, and was reliable in a range of different spectroscopic applications. Analysis of the integrated spectrum over all pixels for a Cerium K-alpha x-ray emission (at 34.72 keV) yielded a peak width of 2.45 keV before alignment and 1.11 keV after alignment. This compares favourably with the best in class pixel peak width of 0.76 keV and the mean peak width for all pixels of 1.00 keV. We also found the algorithm to be more user friendly than other peak-search algorithms because there is less external input. A key advantage of this algorithm is that it requires no prior knowledge of the input spectral characteristics, shape or quality of the data. This therefore lends itself to being useful for in-line processing and potentially removes the need for a separate calibration standard (e.g. a radioactive source). This algorithm can be used for any system that simultaneously collects large numbers of spectral data—including multi-element detectors.

  12. Comparing performances of a CdTe X-ray spectroscopic detector and an X-ray dual-energy sandwich detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorecki, A.; Brambilla, A.; Moulin, V.; Gaborieau, E.; Radisson, P.; Verger, L.

    2013-11-01

    Multi-energy (ME) detectors are becoming a serious alternative to classical dual-energy sandwich (DE-S) detectors for X-ray applications such as medical imaging or explosive detection. They can use the full X-ray spectrum of irradiated materials, rather than disposing only of low and high energy measurements, which may be mixed. In this article, we intend to compare both simulated and real industrial detection systems, operating at a high count rate, independently of the dimensions of the measurements and independently of any signal processing methods. Simulations or prototypes of similar detectors have already been compared (see [1] for instance), but never independently of estimation methods and never with real detectors. We have simulated both an ME detector made of CdTe - based on the characteristics of the MultiX ME100 and - a DE-S detector - based on the characteristics of the Detection Technology's X-Card 1.5-64DE model. These detectors were compared to a perfect spectroscopic detector and an optimal DE-S detector. For comparison purposes, two approaches were investigated. The first approach addresses how to distinguise signals, while the second relates to identifying materials. Performance criteria were defined and comparisons were made over a range of material thicknesses and with different photon statistics. Experimental measurements in a specific configuration were acquired to checks simulations. Results showed good agreement between the ME simulation and the ME100 detector. Both criteria seem to be equivalent, and the ME detector performs 3.5 times better than the DE-S detector with same photon statistics based on simulations and experimental measurements. Regardless of the photon statistics ME detectors appeared more efficient than DE-S detectors for all material thicknesses between 1 and 9 cm when measuring plastics with an attenuation signature close that of explosive materials. This translates into an improved false detection rate (FDR): DE

  13. Compton scattering for spectroscopic detection of ultra-fast, high flux, broad energy range X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiccia, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Brunetti, E.; Vieux, G.; Yang, X.; Welsh, G. H.; Anania, M.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Maneuski, D.; Montgomery, R.; Smith, G.; Hoek, M.; Hamilton, D. J.; Shea, V. O.; Issac, R. C.; Lemos, N. R. C.; Dias, J. M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Compton side-scattering has been used to simultaneously downshift the energy of keV to MeV energy range photons while attenuating their flux to enable single-shot, spectrally resolved, measurements of high flux X-ray sources to be undertaken. To demonstrate the technique a 1 mm thick pixelated cadmium telluride detector has been used to measure spectra of Compton side-scattered radiation from a Cobalt-60 laboratory source and a high flux, high peak brilliance X-ray source of betatron radiation from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. Development of mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray array detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Warburton, W.K.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1988-02-01

    There are various areas of synchrotron radiation research particularly Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) on dilute solutions and anomalous scattering, which would strongly benefit from the availability of energy dispersive detector arrays with high energy resolution and good spatial resolution. The goal of this development project is to produce high energy resolution mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) detector sub-modules, consisting of several elements. These sub-modules can later be grouped into larger arrays of 100-400 elements. A prototype 5 element HgI/sub 2/ array detector was constructed and tested. Dimensions of each element were 7.3 mm x 0.7 mm. An energy resolution of 335 eV (FWHM) for Mn0K..cap alpha.. at 5.9 keV has been measured. The novel fiber-optic pulsed light feedback has been introduced into the charge preamplifiers in order to minimize electronic crosstalk between channels.

  15. Inelastic scattering measurements of low energy x-ray photons by organics, soil, water, wood, and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paki Amouzou, P.; Gertsenshteyn, M.; Jannson, T.; Shnitser, P.; Savant, G.

    2006-08-01

    The angular distribution of the inelastic scattering of photons at low energies (<=80 KeV) has been measured in organic material, soil, rocks, wood, steel sheet, and water. The measurements have been performed under air inside an X-ray shield cabinet using X-rays tube as a photon source and a thermoelectrically cooled CdTe detector. Measurements have been taken for both single and combined materials. The contributions of inelastic scattering of photons for the lower Z material in a given configuration have been extracted. The measured signal is primarily Compton scattering. The measured inelastic scattering contributions were compared with the calculated inelastic scattering cross sections according to the Klein-Nishina theory, updated to include a practical energy distribution of an X-ray tube beam. Relatively good agreement was found for all targets under investigation. The slight discrepancy is attributed to photoelectric effect and sample configuration. Present results may act as a guide for optimization of X-ray imaging sensors and in particular of those based on lobster eye X-ray optics suitable for cargo inspection, improvised explosives detection, non-destructive evaluation, and medical imaging.

  16. Development of a CdTe pixel detector with a window comparator ASIC for high energy X-ray applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirono, T.; Toyokawa, H.; Furukawa, Y.; Honma, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kawase, M.; Koganezawa, T.; Ohata, T.; Sato, M.; Sato, G.; Takagaki, M.; Takahashi, T.; Watanabe, S.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a photon-counting-type CdTe pixel detector (SP8-01). SP8-01 was designed as a prototype of a high-energy X-ray imaging detector for experiments using synchrotron radiation. SP8-01 has a CdTe sensor of 500 μm thickness, which has an absorption efficiency of almost 100% up to 50 keV and 45% even at 100 keV. A full-custom application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) was designed as a readout circuit of SP8-01, which is equipped with a window-type discriminator. The upper discriminator realizes a low-background measurement, because X-ray beams from the monochromator contain higher-order components beside the fundamental X-rays in general. ASIC chips were fabricated with a TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, and CdTe sensors were bump-bonded to the ASIC chips by a gold-stud bonding technique. Beam tests were performed at SPring-8. SP8-01 detected X-rays up to 120 keV. The capability of SP8-01 as an imaging detector for high-energy X-ray synchrotron radiation was evaluated with its performance characteristics.

  17. Phase development in the hardening process of two calcium phosphate bone cements: an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Generosi, A.; Smirnov, V.V.; Rau, J.V.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Ferro, D.; Barinov, S.M.

    2008-03-04

    This work was aimed at the application of an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique to study the kinetics of phase development during the setting and hardening reactions in two calcium phosphate bone cements. The cements under study are based on either tricalcium phosphate or tetracalcium phosphate initial solid phase, and a magnesium carbonate-phosphoric acid liquid phase as the hardening liquid. The application of the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method allowed to collect the diffraction patterns from the cement pastes in situ starting from 1 min of the setting and hardening process. The only crystallized phase in both cements was apatite-like phase, the primary crystallization process proceeds during a few seconds of the setting reaction. Both the compressive strength and the pH value changes during the hardening period can be attributed to the transformations occurring in the intergranular X-ray amorphous phase.

  18. A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high energy x-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shade, Paul A. Schuren, Jay C.; Turner, Todd J.; Blank, Basil; Kenesei, Peter; Goetze, Kurt; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jonathan; Suter, Robert M.; Bernier, Joel V.; Li, Shiu Fai; Lind, Jonathan

    2015-09-15

    High energy x-ray characterization methods hold great potential for gaining insight into the behavior of materials and providing comparison datasets for the validation and development of mesoscale modeling tools. A suite of techniques have been developed by the x-ray community for characterizing the 3D structure and micromechanical state of polycrystalline materials; however, combining these techniques with in situ mechanical testing under well characterized and controlled boundary conditions has been challenging due to experimental design requirements, which demand new high-precision hardware as well as access to high-energy x-ray beamlines. We describe the design and performance of a load frame insert with a rotational and axial motion system that has been developed to meet these requirements. An example dataset from a deforming titanium alloy demonstrates the new capability.

  19. Charging of ionic liquid surfaces under X-ray irradiation: the measurement of absolute binding energies by XPS.

    PubMed

    Villar-Garcia, Ignacio J; Smith, Emily F; Taylor, Alasdair W; Qiu, Fulian; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Jones, Robert G; Licence, Peter

    2011-02-21

    Ionic liquid surfaces can become electrically charged during X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments, due to the flux of photoelectrons leaving the surface. This causes a shift in the measured binding energies of X-ray photoelectron peaks that depends on the magnitude of the surface charging. Consequently, a charge correction method is required for ionic liquids. Here we demonstrate the nature and extent of surface charging in ionic liquids and model it using chronopotentiometry. We report the X-ray photoelectron spectra for a range of imidazolium based ionic liquids and investigate the use of long alkyl chains (C(n)H(2n+1), n ≥ 8) and the imidazolium nitrogen, both of which are part of the ionic liquid chemical structure, as internal references for charge correction. Accurate and reproducible binding energies are obtained which allow comparisons to be made across ionic liquid-based systems.

  20. Athermal Energy Loss from X-rays Deposited in Thin Superconducting Films on Solid Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozorezov, Alexander G.; Lambert, Colin J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Balvin, Manuel A.; Busch, Sarah E.; Sagler, Peter N.; Porst, Jan-Patrick; Smith, Stephen J.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Sadleir, John E.

    2013-01-01

    When energy is deposited in a thin-film cryogenic detector, such as from the absorption of an X-ray, an important feature that determines the energy resolution is the amount of athermal energy that can be lost to the heat bath prior to the elementary excitation systems coming into thermal equilibrium. This form of energy loss will be position-dependent and therefore can limit the detector energy resolution. An understanding of the physical processes that occur when elementary excitations are generated in metal films on dielectric substrates is important for the design and optimization of a number of different types of low temperature detector. We have measured the total energy loss in one relatively simple geometry that allows us to study these processes and compare measurements with calculation based upon a model for the various di.erent processes. We have modeled the athermal phonon energy loss in this device by finding an evolving phonon distribution function that solves the system of kinetic equations for the interacting system of electrons and phonons. Using measurements of device parameters such as the Debye energy and the thermal di.usivity we have calculated the expected energy loss from this detector geometry, and also the position-dependent variation of this loss. We have also calculated the predicted impact on measured spectral line-shapes, and shown that they agree well with measurements. In addition, we have tested this model by using it to predict the performance of a number of other types of detector with di.erent geometries, where good agreement is also found.

  1. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  2. Characterization of the C-MOS Cd-Te Imager PIXIRAD for energy discriminated X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, A.; Pacella, D.; Claps, G.; Causa, F.; Gabellieri, L.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present work is to assess the operational characteristics of the PIXIRAD Imaging Counter for use in high-definition energy resolved X-ray imaging for different applications. The PIXIRAD imager was developed by an INFN-Pisa Spin-off. It works in photon counting mode in a wide energy range, soft and hard X-rays (2-100 keV), with pulse discrimination defined by two thresholds. The 650 μ m thick CdTe X-ray sensor is interfaced with a CMOS VLSI chip organized on a 512× 476 matrix of 55 μ m exagonal pixels (total active area of 30.7× 24.8 mm2). The experimental characterization was carried out in the range 3.7-80 keV, to assess the energy discrimination capability and detection efficiency of the PIXIRAD. Energy discrimination in bands was investigated using calibrated monochromatic X-ray sources (fluorescence of Ca, Fe, Cu, Br, Mo, Ag, I, Ta) and a BaCs radioactive source. In addition, two absolutely calibrated X-ray sources (Moxtek 50 kV Bullet and Oxford Instruments SB-80-1M) were utilized. The experimental data show that the PIXIRAD energy response is linear up to about 15 keV, beyond which the cluster size becomes larger than the pixel dimension. It produces multiple counts resulting in a tail at lower energy. Energy resolution was estimated to be about 30%. The effects in term of energy discrimination and a ``smooth energy discrimination'' in bands has been investigated by studying the separation between different energy lines, acquiring combined images with different energy ranges and setting properly the PIXIRAD threshold.

  3. High Energy Observations of X-Ray Binaries and Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The report discusses the CGRO observation of X-ray binary systems and studies of gamma-ray blasars. Numerous authors have suggested mechanisms for particle acceleration within X-Ray Binary (XRB) systems. Among the acceleration mechanisms that have been applied are pulsar acceleration, shock acceleration at an accretion shock front, shock acceleration at a pulsar wind termination shock, plasma turbulence excited by the accretion flow, and a number of electrodynamic mechanisms. There are therefore many mechanisms which are capable of generating very energetic particles in the XRB environment. If the reports of TeV/PeV gamma-ray generation in XRBs are correct, then one can show that the accelerated particles must be hadrons and that the most likely gamma-ray production mechanism is the decay of collisionally-produced (or photoproduced) neutral pions. At these ultra-high energies, the emission is so strongly beamed that the target conditions are constrained by the requirement that the column depth be large enough to efficiently generate gamma-rays, but not so large that the gamma-rays are absorbed. These constraints naturally lead to models that explain the periodic, narrow duty-cycle pulses observed at TeV/PeV energies as arising from interactions with, either, the atmosphere of the binary companion, an accretion column, or an accretion disk. The production of these TeV/PeV gamma-rays by the decay of pions from "leading isobars" must also be accompanied by a more isotropic emission component in the EGRET energy band from the decay of slower pions (i.e. the "pionization" component). Since the attenuation of 35 MeV-1 GeV photons by photon-photon pair production is not likely to be significant in most XRBs, the TeV/PeV reports therefore strongly suggest sporadic emission in the EGRET energy band. One of the key unresolved issues for understanding AGN is the relationship between XBLs and RBLs.To test the "reunification" hypothesis, authors conducted a multiwavelength

  4. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  5. High energy x-ray and neutron studies of disordered energy-related materials at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Parise, John

    2016-05-16

    The fundamental scientific accomplishments are: (1) advances in a general description of the liquid state by employing structural models constrained by measurements to interpret experimental results and extend them to liquids in general, with special emphasis on (2) The structure of the high-temperature crystal and molten UO2 and 3) water. Specifically, samples of UO2 and water were probed using high-energy x-rays at the Advanced Photon Source. The high Z of UO2, and the 2-3mm diameter droplet shape of the molten sample, means that >100keV X-rays are required to minimize absorption and multiple scattering, which can distort the measured structure factor. A high flux of x-rays is also required to obtain sufficient statistical accuracy in short (a few seconds) measurement times. The scattered x-ray data were analyzed and pair distribution functions, extracted that characterize the local and long-range atomic structure of the material. The measurements of the hot UO2 solid show a substantial increase in oxygen disorder and, upon melting, the average U-O coordination was found to decrease from 8 to 6.7±0.5. The research incorporated development of diffraction techniques, sample environment optimization and state-of-the-art simulation techniques. The symbiotic nature of the advances in simulation and experiment allowed for a more focused and informed development of future experiments, effective use of expensive beam time and generated new research agendas for the growing number of research groups, within the US and internationally, that focus on the structure of liquids. Molecular dynamics (MD) provided detailed information when combined with high-quality XN data including addressing key issues in liquids; the relationship between cooling path, structure and fictive temperature, and the trade-offs between network over connectedness in liquids containing low-coordination cations.

  6. The inverse triax x ray diode: An alternate reduced-endpoint-energy bremsstrahlung source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. J.; Poukey, J. W.; Stygar, W. A.; Fowler, W. E.; Peyton, B.

    1990-02-01

    The inverse triax diode is a high power, low impedance electron diode which offers significant advantages over conventional electron diodes on short-pulse (less than 30 ns FWHM) high power x ray simulators. Parametric calculations show that the radiation efficiency of the inverse triax is competitive with standard diodes for mean photon energies below about 120 keV, and sometimes up to 150 keV. Particle-in-cell code simulations show the impedance behavior and flow pattern in the inverse triax with and without the presence of an anode plasma. The simulation results are used to suggest design rules for inverse triax diodes. Experimental results show good agreement with calculations of the impedance behavior and electron beam dynamics. Using inverse triax diodes, we have produced peak doses of 1.4 x 10(exp 11) rad(TLD)/s over 840 sq cm with a mean photon energy of 120 keV on SPEED and 3.1 x 10(exp 11) rad(TLD)/s over 3700 sq cm with a mean photon energy of 140 keV on Saturn.

  7. Line Integral Alternating Minimization Algorithm for Dual-Energy X-Ray CT Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaqi; O'Sullivan, Joseph A; Politte, David G; Evans, Joshua D; Han, Dong; Whiting, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new algorithm, called line integral alternating minimization (LIAM), for dual-energy X-ray CT image reconstruction. Instead of obtaining component images by minimizing the discrepancy between the data and the mean estimates, LIAM allows for a tunable discrepancy between the basis material projections and the basis sinograms. A parameter is introduced that controls the size of this discrepancy, and with this parameter the new algorithm can continuously go from a two-step approach to the joint estimation approach. LIAM alternates between iteratively updating the line integrals of the component images and reconstruction of the component images using an image iterative deblurring algorithm. An edge-preserving penalty function can be incorporated in the iterative deblurring step to decrease the roughness in component images. Images from both simulated and experimentally acquired sinograms from a clinical scanner were reconstructed by LIAM while varying the regularization parameters to identify good choices. The results from the dual-energy alternating minimization algorithm applied to the same data were used for comparison. Using a small fraction of the computation time of dual-energy alternating minimization, LIAM achieves better accuracy of the component images in the presence of Poisson noise for simulated data reconstruction and achieves the same level of accuracy for real data reconstruction.

  8. Ab initio calculation of optical constants from visible to x-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prange, M. P.; Rivas, G.; Ankudinov, A. L.; Rehr, J. J.

    2004-03-01

    We present a semi-automated approach for ab initio calculations of optical constants of materials from the visible to the hard x-ray energies. The approach is based on a generalization of the real space Green's formalism implemented in the FEFF8 spectroscopy code to include optical spectra. The method includes self-consistent potentials, core-hole and self-energy effects, inelastic losses and a full- or high order multiple-scattering. The procedure is based on calculations of the imaginary part of the dielectric function ɛ2 summed over all edges, from which other optical constants are derived using Kramers-Kronig transforms and analytical relations. These constants include the complex index of refraction, the real part of the dielectric function, and energy loss spectra. In contrast to standard atomic tables, the calculations include solid-state corrections, such as fine structure, Debye-Waller factors, lifetime broadening, etc. Typical results for several materials are presented and compared with experiment.

  9. ERICA: an energy resolving photon counting readout ASIC for X-ray in-line cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macias-Montero, J.-G.; Sarraj, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Moore, T.; Casanova, R.; Martinez, R.; Puigdengoles, C.; Prats, X.; Kolstein, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present ERICA (Energy Resolving Inline X-ray Camera) a photon-counting readout ASIC, with 6 energy bins. The ASIC is composed of a matrix of 8 × 20 pixels controlled by a global digital controller and biased with 7 independent digital to analog converters (DACs) and a band-gap current reference. The pixel analog front-end includes a charge sensitive amplifier with 16 mV/ke- gain and dynamic range of 45 ke-. ERICA has programmable pulse width, an adjustable constant current feedback resistor, a linear test pulse generator, and six discriminators with 6-bit local threshold adjustment. The pixel digital back-end includes the digital controller, 8 counters of 8-bit depth, half-full buffer flag for any of the 8 counters, a 74-bit shadow/shift register, a 74-bit configuration latch, and charge sharing compensation processing to perform the energy classification and counting operations of every detected photon in 1 μ s. The pixel size is 330 μm × 330 μm and its average consumption is 150 μW. Implemented in TSMC 0.25 μm CMOS process, the ASIC pixel's equivalent noise charge (ENC) is 90 e- RMS connected to a 1 mm thickness matching CdTe detector biased at -300 V with a total leakage current of 20 nA.

  10. X-ray resonant photoexcitation: linewidths and energies of Kα transitions in highly charged Fe ions.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, J K; Bernitt, S; Epp, S W; Steinbrügge, R; Beilmann, C; Brown, G V; Eberle, S; Graf, A; Harman, Z; Hell, N; Leutenegger, M; Müller, A; Schlage, K; Wille, H-C; Yavaş, H; Ullrich, J; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R

    2013-09-06

    Photoabsorption by and fluorescence of the Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions are essential mechanisms for x-ray radiation transfer in astrophysical environments. We study photoabsorption due to the main Kα transitions in highly charged iron ions from heliumlike to fluorinelike (Fe24+ to Fe17+) using monochromatic x rays around 6.6 keV at the PETRA III synchrotron photon source. Natural linewidths were determined with hitherto unattained accuracy. The observed transitions are of particular interest for the understanding of photoexcited plasmas found in x-ray binary stars and active galactic nuclei.

  11. Structural analysis of polymer thin films using GISAXS in the tender X-ray region: Concept and design of GISAXS experiments using the tender X-ray energy at BL-15A2 at the Photon Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, H.; Igarashi, N.; Mori, T.; Saijo, S.; Nagatani, Y.; Ohta, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Shimizu, N.

    2016-10-01

    If small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) utilizing the soft X-ray region is available, advanced and unique experiments, which differ from traditional SAXS methods, can be realized. For example, grazing-incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) using hard X-ray is a powerful tool for understanding the nanostructure in both vertical and lateral directions of thin films, while GISAXS utilizing the tender X-ray region (SX-GISAXS) enables depth-resolved analysis as well as a standard GISAXS analysis in thin films. Thus, at BL-15A2 at the Photon Factory, a dedicated diffractometer for SX-GISAXS (above 2.1 keV) was constructed. This diffractometer is composed of four vacuum chambers and can be converted into the vacuum state from the sample chamber in front of the detector surface. Diffractions are clearly observed until 12th peak when measuring collagen by SAXS with an X-ray energy of 2.40 keV and a camera length of 825 mm. Additionally, we conducted the model experiment using SX-GISAXS with an X-ray energy of 2.40 keV to confirm that a poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(n-butyl acrylate) block copolymer thin film has a microphase-separated structure in the thin film, which is composed of lamellae aligned both parallel and perpendicular to the substrate surface. Similarly, in a polystyrene-poly(methyl methacrylate) block copolymer thin film, SX-GISAXS with 3.60 keV and 5.73 keV revealed that hexagonally packed cylinders are aligned parallel to the substrate surface. The incident angle dependence of the first order peak position of the qz direction obtained from experiments at various incident X-ray energies agrees very well with the theoretical one calculated from the distorted wave Born approximation.

  12. Fast GPU-based absolute intensity determination for energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghabi, F.; Send, S.; Schipper, U.; Abboud, A.; Pietsch, U.; Kolb, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for fast determination of absolute intensities in the sites of Laue spots generated by a tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystal after exposure to white synchrotron radiation during an energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction experiment. The Laue spots are taken by means of an energy-dispersive X-ray 2D pnCCD detector. Current pnCCD detectors have a spatial resolution of 384 × 384 pixels of size 75 × 75 μm2 each and operate at a maximum of 400 Hz. Future devices are going to have higher spatial resolution and frame rates. The proposed method runs on a computer equipped with multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) which provide fast and parallel processing capabilities. Accordingly, our GPU-based algorithm exploits these capabilities to further analyse the Laue spots of the sample. The main contribution of the paper is therefore an alternative algorithm for determining absolute intensities of Laue spots which are themselves computed from a sequence of pnCCD frames. Moreover, a new method for integrating spectral peak intensities and improved background correction, a different way of calculating mean count rate of the background signal and also a new method for n-dimensional Poisson fitting are presented.We present a comparison of the quality of results from the GPU-based algorithm with the quality of results from a prior (base) algorithm running on CPU. This comparison shows that our algorithm is able to produce results with at least the same quality as the base algorithm. Furthermore, the GPU-based algorithm is able to speed up one of the most time-consuming parts of the base algorithm, which is n-dimensional Poisson fitting, by a factor of more than 3. Also, the entire procedure of extracting Laue spots' positions, energies and absolute intensities from a raw dataset of pnCCD frames is accelerated by a factor of more than 3.

  13. Comparison between X-rays spectra and their effective energies in small animal CT tomographic imaging and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Mahdjoub; Mimi, Malika; Bentourkia, M'hamed

    2017-03-01

    Small animal CT imaging and dosimetry usually rely on X-ray radiation produced by X-ray tubes. These X-rays typically cover a large energy range. In this study, we compared poly-energetic X-ray spectra against estimated equivalent (effective) mono-energetic beams with the same number of simulated photons for small animal CT imaging and dosimetry applications. Two poly-energetic X-ray spectra were generated from a tungsten anode at 50 and 120 kVp. The corresponding effective mono-energetic beams were established as 36 keV for the 50 kVp spectrum and 49.5 keV for the 120 kVp spectrum. To assess imaging applications, we investigated the spatial resolution by a tungsten wire, and the contrast-to-noise ratio in a reference phantom and in a realistic mouse phantom. For dosimetry investigation, we calculated the absorbed dose in a segmented digital mouse atlas in the skin, fat, heart and bone tissues. Differences of 2.1 and 2.6% in spatial resolution were respectively obtained between the 50 and 120 kVp poly-energetic spectra and their respective 36 and 49.5 keV mono-energetic beams. The differences in contrast-to-noise ratio between the poly-energetic 50 kVp spectrum and its corresponding mono-energetic 36 keV beam for air, fat, brain and bone were respectively -2.9, -0.2, 11.2 and -4.8%, and similarly between the 120 kVp and its effective energy 49.5 keV: -11.3, -20.2, -4.2 and -13.5%. Concerning the absorbed dose, for the lower X-ray beam energies, 50 kVp against 36 keV, the poly-energetic radiation doses were higher than the mono-energetic doses. Instead, for the higher X-ray beam energies, 120 kVp and 49.5 keV, the absorbed dose to the bones and lungs were higher for the mono-energetic 49.5 keV. The intensity and energy of the X-ray beam spectrum have an impact on both imaging and dosimetry in small animal studies. Simulations with mono-energetic beams should take into account these differences in order to study biological effects or to be compared to

  14. ELECTRON ENERGY PARTITION IN THE ABOVE-THE-LOOPTOP SOLAR HARD X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuo; Krucker, Säm; Hudson, Hugh S.; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal

    2015-02-01

    Solar flares produce non-thermal electrons with energies up to tens of MeVs. To understand the origin of energetic electrons, coronal hard X-ray (HXR) sources, in particular above-the-looptop sources, have been studied extensively. However, it still remains unclear how energies are partitioned between thermal and non-thermal electrons within the above-the-looptop source. Here we show that the kappa distribution, when compared to conventional spectral models, can better characterize the above-the-looptop HXRs (≳15 keV) observed in four different cases. The widely used conventional model (i.e., the combined thermal plus power-law distribution) can also fit the data, but it returns unreasonable parameter values due to a non-physical sharp lower-energy cutoff E{sub c}. In two cases, extreme-ultraviolet data were available from SDO/AIA and the kappa distribution was still consistent with the analysis of differential emission measure. Based on the kappa distribution model, we found that the 2012 July 19 flare showed the largest non-thermal fraction of electron energies about 50%, suggesting equipartition of energies. Considering the results of particle-in-cell simulations, as well as density estimates of the four cases studied, we propose a scenario in which electron acceleration is achieved primarily by collisionless magnetic reconnection, but the electron energy partition in the above-the-looptop source depends on the source density. In low-density above-the-looptop regions (few times 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}), the enhanced non-thermal tail can remain and a prominent HXR source is created, whereas in higher-densities (>10{sup 10} cm{sup –3}), the non-thermal tail is suppressed or thermalized by Coulomb collisions.

  15. Deterministic Computer-Controlled Polishing Process for High-Energy X-Ray Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Gufran S.; Gubarev, Mikhail; Speegle, Chet; Ramsey, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A deterministic computer-controlled polishing process for large X-ray mirror mandrels is presented. Using tool s influence function and material removal rate extracted from polishing experiments, design considerations of polishing laps and optimized operating parameters are discussed

  16. Automatic energy dispersive x-ray analyzer for defining the small quantities of chemical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Landman, K.; Antipov, A.; Veits, B.

    1993-12-31

    The results of analyzer development, which represents an analysing complex for high sensitive x-ray fluorescence analysis is presented. Results of research of detection limits of a wide range of elements is described.

  17. Characterization of spatially resolved high resolution x-ray spectrometers for high energy density physics and light source experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K. W. Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparacio, L.; Efthimion, P.; Pablant, N. A.; Lu, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Magee, E.

    2014-11-15

    A high resolution 1D imaging x-ray spectrometer concept comprising a spherically bent crystal and a 2D pixelated detector is being optimized for diagnostics of small sources such as high energy density physics (HEDP) and synchrotron radiation or x-ray free electron laser experiments. This instrument is used on tokamak experiments for Doppler measurements of ion temperature and plasma flow velocity profiles. Laboratory measurements demonstrate a resolving power, E/ΔE of order 10 000 and spatial resolution better than 10 μm. Initial tests of the high resolution instrument on HEDP plasmas are being performed.

  18. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meimei; Almer, Jonathan D.; Yang, Yong; Tan, Lizhen

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  19. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-01

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI3 and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  20. Minority additive distributions in a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp using high-energy x-ray induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Adler, H. G.; Shastri, S. D.; Lawler, J. E.

    2001-09-24

    X-ray induced fluorescence is used to measure the elemental densities of minority additives in a metal-halide arc contained inside a translucent ceramic envelope. A monochromatic x-ray beam from the Sector 1 Insertion Device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is used to excite K-shell x-ray fluorescence in the constituents of a ceramic metal-halide arc lamp dosed with DyI{sub 3} and CsI. Fluorescence and scattered photons are collected by a cryogenic energy-resolving Ge detector. The high signal-to-noise spectra show strong fluorescence from Dy, Cs, and I, as well as elastic scattering from Hg. Radial distributions of the absolute elemental densities of Dy, Cs, and I are obtained.

  1. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    DOE PAGES

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; ...

    2016-09-27

    Here, we applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM)max of 50×10–5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount (~1 cm/s)more » to avert collision ~a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM = 5 × 10–4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5 × 1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.« less

  2. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Furnish, M. D.

    2016-09-27

    Here, we applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM)max of 50×10–5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount (~1 cm/s) to avert collision ~a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM = 5 × 10–4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5 × 1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.

  3. Geopolymerisation Kinetics. 1. In situ Energy-Dispersive X-ray Diffractometry

    SciTech Connect

    Provis,J.; van Deventer, J.

    2007-01-01

    In situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffractometry, using a polychromatic synchrotron beam and a 'laboratory-sized' sample, is used to provide a direct measurement of the kinetics of geopolymerisation. The effects of sample SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, Na/(Na+K) ratio and reaction temperature are investigated. The results obtained support recent propositions that the initial gel phase formed during geopolymerisation is later transformed to a second, probably more-ordered gel phase, and provide detailed information regarding the rate of formation of the first gel phase during the first 3 h of reaction. Increasing the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio generally decreases the initial rate of reaction, with the highest SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio samples showing what appears to be a pause in the reaction corresponding roughly to the solidification of the geopolymeric binder. Mixed (Na,K)-aluminosilicate geopolymers with moderate SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios behave similarly to pure Na- or K-aluminosilicate compositions of higher SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio. Fitting a simplified first-order rate expression to the overall reaction process at different temperatures allows the calculation of an effective overall activation energy, which may be useful in comparing geopolymerisation of slurries with different compositions.

  4. High energy density soft X-ray momentum coupling to comet analogs for NEO mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remo, J. L.; Lawrence, R. J.; Jacobsen, S. B.; Furnish, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    We applied MBBAY high fluence pulsed radiation intensity driven momentum transfer analysis to calculate X-ray momentum coupling coefficients CM=(Pa s)/(J/m2) for two simplified comet analog materials: i) water ice, and ii) 70% water ice and 30% distributed olivine grains. The momentum coupling coefficients (CM) max of 50×10-5 s/m, are about an order of magnitude greater than experimentally determined and computed MBBAY values for meteoritic materials that are analogs for asteroids. From the values for comet analog materials we infer applied energies (via momentum transfer) required to deflect an Earth crossing comet from impacting Earth by a sufficient amount ( 1 cm/s) to avert collision a year in advance. Comet model calculations indicate for CM=5×10-4 s/m the deflection of a 2 km comet with a density 600 kg/m3 by 1 cm/s requires an applied energy on the target surface of 5×1013 J, the equivalent of 12 kT of TNT. Depending on the geometrical configuration of the interaction the explosive yield required could be an order of magnitude higher.

  5. Mercuric iodide detector systems for identifying substances by x-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E.; Wang, Y.J.; Croft, M.; Kalman, Z.; Mayo, W.

    1995-08-01

    The use of mercuric iodide arrays for energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) spectroscopy is now being investigated by the authors for inspection of specific crystalline powders in substances ranging from explosives to illicit drugs. Mercuric iodide has been identified as the leading candidate for replacing the Ge detectors previously employed in the development of this technique because HgI{sub 2} detectors: operate at or near room temperature; without the bulky apparatus associated with cryogenic cooling; and offer excellent spectroscopy performance with extremely high efficiency. Furthermore, they provide the practicality of constructing optimal array geometries necessary for these measurements. Proof of principle experiments have been performed using a single-HgI{sub 2} detector spectrometer. An energy resolution of 655 eV (FWHM) has been obtained for 60 keV gamma line from an {sup 241}Am source. The EDXRD signatures of various crystalline powdered compounds have been measured and the spectra obtained show the excellent potential of mercuric iodide for this application.

  6. Correlation of Thermally Induced Pores with Microstructural Features Using High Energy X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menasche, David B.; Shade, Paul A.; Lind, Jonathan; Li, Shiu Fai; Bernier, Joel V.; Kenesei, Peter; Schuren, Jay C.; Suter, Robert M.

    2016-11-01

    Combined application of a near-field High Energy Diffraction Microscopy measurement of crystal lattice orientation fields and a tomographic measurement of pore distributions in a sintered nickel-based superalloy sample allows pore locations to be correlated with microstructural features. Measurements were carried out at the Advanced Photon Source beamline 1-ID using an X-ray energy of 65 keV for each of the measurement modes. The nickel superalloy sample was prepared in such a way as to generate significant thermally induced porosity. A three-dimensionally resolved orientation map is directly overlaid with the tomographically determined pore map through a careful registration procedure. The data are shown to reliably reproduce the expected correlations between specific microstructural features (triple lines and quadruple nodes) and pore positions. With the statistics afforded by the 3D data set, we conclude that within statistical limits, pore formation does not depend on the relative orientations of the grains. The experimental procedures and analysis tools illustrated are being applied to a variety of materials problems in which local heterogeneities can affect materials properties.

  7. Predicting Football Players' Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry Body Composition Using Standard Anthropometric Measures

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Jonathan M.; Lambert, Brad S.; Martin, Steven E.; Green, John S.; Crouse, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The recent increase in athlete size, particularly in football athletes of all levels, coupled with the increased health risk associated with obesity warrants continued monitoring of body composition from a health perspective in this population. Equations developed to predict percentage of body fat (%Fat) have been shown to be population specific and might not be accurate for football athletes. Objective: To develop multiple regression equations using standard anthropometric measurements to estimate dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry %Fat (DEXA%Fat) in collegiate football players. Design: Controlled laboratory study. Patients and Other Participants: One hundred fifty-seven National Collegiate Athletic Association Division IA football athletes (age  =  20 ± 1 years, height  =  185.6 ± 6.5 cm, mass  =  103.1 ± 20.4 kg, DEXA%Fat  =  19.5 ± 9.1%) participated. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants had the following measures: (1) body composition testing with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; (2) skinfold measurements in millimeters, including chest, triceps, subscapular, midaxillary, suprailiac, abdominal (SFAB), and thigh; and (3) standard circumference measurements in centimeters, including ankle, calf, thigh, hip (AHIP), waist, umbilical (AUMB), chest, wrist, forearm, arm, and neck. Regression analysis and fit statistics were used to determine the relationship between DEXA%Fat and each skinfold thickness, sum of all skinfold measures (SFSUM), and individual circumference measures. Results: Statistical analysis resulted in the development of 3 equations to predict DEXA%Fat: model 1, (0.178 • AHIP) + (0.097 • AUMB) + (0.089 • SFSUM) − 19.641; model 2, (0.193 • AHIP) + (0.133 • AUMB) + (0.371 • SFAB) − 23.0523; and model 3, (0.132 • SFSUM) + 3.530. The R2 values were 0.94 for model 1, 0.93 for model 2, and 0.91 for model 3 (for all, P < .001). Conclusions: The equations developed provide an accurate way to assess DEXA

  8. Learning to Apply Metrology Principles to the Measurement of X-ray Intensities in the 500 eV to 110 keV Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J.; Pond, T.; Silbernagel, C.; Torres, P.; Marlett, K.; Goldin, F.; Cyr, S.

    2011-02-08

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Livermore Operations, has two optical radiation calibration laboratories accredited by “the National Voluntary Laboratories Accreditation Program (NVLAP) which is the accrediting body of” the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and is now working towards accreditation for its X-ray laboratories. NSTec operates several laboratories with X-ray sources that generate X-rays in the energy range from 50 eV to 115 keV. These X-ray sources are used to characterize and calibrate diagnostics and diagnostic components used by the various national laboratories, particularly for plasma analysis on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). Because X-ray photon flux measurement methods that can be accredited, i.e., traceable to NIST, have not been developed for sources operating in these energy ranges, NSTec, NIST, and the National Voluntary Accreditation Program (NVLAP) together have defined a path toward the development and validation of accredited metrology methods for X-ray energies. The methodology developed for the high energy X-ray (HEX) Laboratory was NSTec’s starting point for X-ray metrology accreditation and will be the basis for the accredited processes in the other X-ray laboratories. This paper will serve as a teaching tool, by way of this example using the NSTec X-ray sources, for the process and methods used in developing an accredited traceable metrology.

  9. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    DOE PAGES

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; ...

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as wellmore » as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.« less

  10. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu -Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glockner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-11-05

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. Furthermore, the technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II.

  11. The Difference in Backscatter Factors of Diagnostic X-rays by the Difference in the Scattering Medium and in the Objective Dose.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideki; Sakai, Keita; Uchiyama, Mizuki; Suzuki, Kentaro

    The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) of the general X-ray radiography are defined by the absorbed dose of air at the entrance surface with backscattered radiation from a scattering medium. Generally, the entrance surface dose of the general X-ray radiography is calculated from measured air kerma of primary X-ray multiplied by a backscatter factor (BSF). However, the BSF data employed at present used water for scattering medium, and was calculated based on the water-absorbed dose by incident primary photons and backscattered photons from the scattering medium. In the calculation of air dose at the entrance surface defined in DRLs, there are no theoretical consistencies for using BSF based on water dose, and this may be a cause of calculation error. In this paper, we verified the difference in BSF by the difference in the scattering medium and by the difference in the objective dose by means of the Monte Carlo simulation. In this calculation, the scattering medium was set as water and the soft-tissue, and the objective dose was set as air dose, water dose, soft-tissue dose, and skin dose. The difference in BSF calculated by the respective combination was at most about 1.3% and was less than 1% in most cases. In conclusion, even if the entrance surface dose defined by DRLs of general X-ray radiography is calculated using BSF, which set both the scattering medium and the object substance of the absorbed dose as water, a so big error doesn't show.

  12. Mammalian cell killing by ultrasoft X rays and high-energy radiation: an extension of the MK model.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Roland B

    2006-08-01

    An alternate formulation of the microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is presented that applies to irradiation of mammalian cells with ultrasoft X rays as well as high-energy radiations of variable linear energy transfer (LET). Survival and DNA double-strand break measurements for V79 cells from the literature are examined to illustrate application of the model. It is demonstrated that the linear component of the linear-quadratic survival relationship (alpha) is enhanced because repairable potentially lethal lesions formed from a single ultrasoft X-ray energy deposition event, when closer on average than for a single high-energy radiation event, are more likely to combine to form a lethal lesion. The quadratic component (beta) of the linear-quadratic survival relationship is increased because the potentially lethal lesions formed by ultrasoft X rays are created with greater efficiency than those of high-energy radiation. In addition, potentially lethal lesions from very low-energy carbon K-shell X rays may be enriched in structural forms that favor combination to form lethal lesions instead of repair. These features account for the increased effectiveness of killing of V79 cells by ultrasoft X rays compared to cobalt-60 gamma radiation. The importance of pairwise combination of potentially lethal lesions to form exchange chromosome aberrations that become lethal lesions is discussed. The extended MK model explains and reconciles differences between the MK model and the theory of dual radiation action on the one hand, and on the other, the view that variation in the RBE with radiation quality is explained by differences in energy deposition in nanometer- rather than micrometer-size volumes.

  13. DISCOVERY OF ENERGY-DEPENDENT X-RAY MICROLENSING IN Q2237+0305

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Bin; Dai Xinyu; Kochanek, C. S.; Blackburne, Jeffrey A.; Chartas, George; Kozlowski, Szymon

    2011-10-20

    We present our long-term Chandra X-ray monitoring data for the gravitationally lensed quasar Q2237+0305 with 20 epochs spanning 10 years. We easily detect microlensing variability between the images in the full (0.2-8 keV), soft (0.2-2 keV), and hard (2-8 keV) bands at very high confidence. We also detect, for the first time, chromatic microlensing differences between the soft and hard X-ray bands. The hard X-ray band is more strongly microlensed than the soft band, suggesting that the corona above the accretion disk thought to generate the X-rays has a non-uniform electron distribution, in which the hotter and more energetic electrons occupy more compact regions surrounding the black holes. Both the hard and soft X-ray bands are more strongly microlensed than the optical (rest-frame UV) emission, indicating that the X-ray emission is more compact than the optical, confirming the microlensing results from other lenses.

  14. Body Composition Comparison: Bioelectric Impedance Analysis with Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry in Adult Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Company, Joe; Ball, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the DF50 (ImpediMed Ltd, Eight Mile Plains, Queensland, Australia) bioelectrical impedance analysis device using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry as the criterion in two groups: endurance athletes and power athletes. The secondary purpose was to develop accurate body fat…

  15. A hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of X-ray photon counting detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dufan; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhang, Li; Wang, Sen

    2016-09-01

    In photon counting computed tomography (CT), it is vital to know the energy response functions of the detector for noise estimation and system optimization. Empirical methods lack flexibility and Monte Carlo simulations require too much knowledge of the detector. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid Monte Carlo model for the energy response functions of photon counting detectors in X-ray medical applications. GEANT4 was used to model the energy deposition of X-rays in the detector. Then numerical models were used to describe the process of charge sharing, anti-charge sharing and spectral broadening, which were too complicated to be included in the Monte Carlo model. Several free parameters were introduced in the numerical models, and they could be calibrated from experimental measurements such as X-ray fluorescence from metal elements. The method was used to model the energy response function of an XCounter Flite X1 photon counting detector. The parameters of the model were calibrated with fluorescence measurements. The model was further tested against measured spectrums of a VJ X-ray source to validate its feasibility and accuracy.

  16. Assessing Body Composition of Children and Adolescents Using Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry, Skinfolds, and Electrical Impedance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Angela; Kelsey, Laurel; Fellingham, Gilbert W.; George, James D.; Hager, Ron L.; Myrer, J. William; Vehrs, Pat R.

    2011-01-01

    To determine the validity and reliability of percent body fat estimates in 177 boys and 154 girls between 12-17 years of age, percent body fat was assessed once using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and twice using the sum of two skinfolds and three bioelectrical impedance analysis devices. The assessments were repeated on 79 participants on a…

  17. A Review of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as an Analytical Tool in Numismatic Studies.

    PubMed

    Navas, María José; Asuero, Agustín García; Jiménez, Ana María

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as an analytical technique in studies of ancient coins is summarized and reviewed. Specific EDXRF applications in historical studies, in studies of the corrosion of coins, and in studies of the optimal working conditions of some laser-based treatment for the cleaning of coins are described.

  18. Measurements of electron temperature profiles on Alcator C-Mod using a novel energy-resolving x-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddox, J.; Delgado, L.; Pablant, N.; Hill, K. W.; Bitter, M.; Efthimion, P.; Rice, J.

    2015-11-01

    The most common electron temperature diagnostics, Thomson Scattering (TS) and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE), both require large diagnostic footprints and expensive optics. Another electron temperature diagnostic is the Pulse-Height-Analysis (PHA) system, which derives the electron temperature from the x-ray bremsstrahlung continuum. However, the main disadvantage of the PHA method is poor temporal resolution of the Si(Li) diode detectors. This paper presents a novel x-ray pinhole camera, which uses a pixilated Pilatus detector that allows single photon counting at a rate 2MHz per pixel and the setting of energy thresholds. The detector configuration is optimized by Shannon-sampling theory, such that spatial profiles of the x-ray continuum intensity can be obtained simultaneously for different energies, in the range from 4 to 16 keV. The exponential-like dependence of the x-ray intensity with photon energies is compared with a model describing the Be filter, attenuation in air, and detector efficiency, as well as different sets of energy thresholds. Electron temperature measurements are compared with TS and ECE measurements. This work was supported by the US DOE Contract No.DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the DoE Summer Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program.

  19. Levels of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in ground beef patties irradiated by low-energy X-ray and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Hijaz, Faraj M; Smith, J Scott

    2010-01-01

    Food irradiation improves food safety and maintains food quality by controlling microorganisms and extending shelf life. However, acceptance and commercial adoption of food irradiation is still low. Consumer groups such as Public Citizen and the Food and Water Watch have opposed irradiation because of the formation of 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) in irradiated, lipid-containing foods. The objectives of this study were to measure and to compare the level of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in ground beef irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays. Beef patties were irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays (Cs-137) at 3 targeted absorbed doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 kGy. The samples were extracted with n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus, and the 2-DCB concentration was determined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The 2-DCB concentration increased linearly (P < 0.05) with irradiation dose for gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties. There was no significant difference in 2-DCB concentration between gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties (P > 0.05) at all targeted doses.

  20. A Giant Lyα Nebula in the Core of an X-Ray Cluster at Z = 1.99: Implications for Early Energy Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentino, Francesco; Daddi, Emanuele; Finoguenov, Alexis; Strazzullo, Veronica; Le Brun, Amandine; Vignali, Cristian; Bournaud, Frédéric; Dickinson, Mark; Renzini, Alvio; Béthermin, Matthieu; Zanella, Anita; Gobat, Raphaël; Cimatti, Andrea; Elbaz, David; Onodera, Masato; Pannella, Maurilio; Sargent, Mark; Arimoto, Nobuo; Carollo, Marcella; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2016-09-01

    We present the discovery of a giant ≳100 kpc Lyα nebula detected in the core of the X-ray emitting cluster CL J1449+0856 at z = 1.99 through Keck/LRIS narrow-band imaging. This detection extends the known relation between Lyα nebulae and overdense regions of the universe to the dense core of a 5-7 × 1013 M ⊙ cluster. The most plausible candidates to power the nebula are two Chandra-detected AGN host cluster members, while cooling from the X-ray phase and cosmological cold flows are disfavored primarily because of the high Lyα to X-ray luminosity ratio ({L}{Lyα }/{L}{{X}}≈ 0.3, ≳10-1000 times higher than in local cool-core clusters) and by current modeling. Given the physical conditions of the Lyα-emitting gas and the possible interplay with the X-ray phase, we argue that the Lyα nebula would be short-lived (≲10 Myr) if not continuously replenished with cold gas at a rate of ≳1000 M ⊙ yr-1. We investigate the possibility that cluster galaxies supply the required gas through outflows and we show that their total mass outflow rate matches the replenishment necessary to sustain the nebula. This scenario directly implies the extraction of energy from galaxies and its deposition in the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM), as required to explain the thermodynamic properties of local clusters. We estimate an energy injection of the order of ≈ 2 {{keV}} per particle in the ICM over a 2 Gyr interval. In our baseline calculation, AGNs provide up to 85% of the injected energy and two-thirds of the mass, while the rest is supplied by supernovae-driven winds.

  1. Soft X-ray irradiation of methanol ice: Formation of products as a function of photon energy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.-J.; Juang, K.-J.; Yih, T.-S.; Ciaravella, A.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Jiménez-Escobar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Pure methanol ices have been irradiated with monochromatic soft X-rays of 300 and 550 eV close to the 1s resonance edges of C and O, respectively, and with a broadband spectrum (250-1200 eV). The infrared (IR) spectra of the irradiated ices show several new products of astrophysical interest such as CH{sub 2}OH, H{sub 2}CO, CH{sub 4}, HCOOH, HCOCH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}COOH, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, HCOOCH{sub 3}, and (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, as well as HCO, CO, and CO{sub 2}. The effect of X-rays is the result of the combined interactions of photons and electrons with the ice. A significant contribution to the formation and growth of new species in the CH{sub 3}OH ice irradiated with X-rays is given by secondary electrons, whose energy distribution depends on the energy of X-ray photons. Within a single experiment, the abundances of the new products increase with the absorbed energy. Monochromatic experiments show that product abundances also increase with the photon energy. However, the abundances per unit energy of newly formed species show a marked decrease in the broadband experiment as compared to irradiations with monochromatic photons, suggesting a possible regulatory role of the energy deposition rate. The number of new molecules produced per absorbed eV in the X-ray experiments has been compared to those obtained with electron and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation experiments.

  2. Probing the micro-mechanical behavior of bone via high-energy x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Almer, J.; Stock, S. R.; X-Ray Science Division; Northwestern Univ.

    2006-01-01

    the sample. While under load, high-energy x-rays (80.7 keV) of transverse size 0.05(x) x 0.05(y) mm{sup 2} were used to sample through the entire thickness (z) of the sample. Wide-angle scattering patterns at multiple x-positions (y=0) were collected using a large area detector, with each 2D pattern containing data in a plane approximately parallel to the sample x-y plane. Internal strains along the longitudinal/loading direction ({var_epsilon}{sub yy}) are shown for the apatite (002) reflection in Fig. 1. Values for five different lateral positions are shown, with x = -1 mm near the convex side of the sample and x = +1 near the concave side. Also shown are value from the strain gage located on the concave side of the specimen. All internal strains are non-zero before unloading and {var_epsilon}{sub yy} {approx} -700 {mu}{var_epsilon}. When stress is applied, strain response varies substantially across the sample, with {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = 1) showing the highest compression while {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = -1) slightly more tensile values. The macroscopic strain increases similar to, but at a higher degree than, {var_epsilon}{sub yy} (x = -1). At the maximum applied stress of {approx}33 MPa the sample experienced multiple cracks, as verified via post-mortem analysis. Upon unloading the macroscopic strain was primarily elastic, as values (nearly) returned to those seen upon loading.

  3. A new interpretation of the binding energies in X-ray photoelectron studies of oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Tery L.; Seal, Sudipta; Chen, Li Mei; Kao, Chi Chang

    1994-12-01

    Films and coatings applied to different substrates are often various types of oxides. The latter are employed for a number of reasons with particular emphasis on their lack of chemical and electrical porosity. It is generally important therefore to have some measure of the physical and chemical integrity of the resulting oxide films and their interfaces with the substrate. The latter is often realized by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. In order to accomplish this, it is common practice to utilize the (now generally well accepted) binding energy data from the literature to verify and expand upon one's results. Unfortunately, close scrutiny reveals a number of major discrepancies in these literature results for certain key oxides. Thus, for example, a significant portion of the literature reports the Al 2p level of Al2O3at approximately 75.7+/-0.3 eV, whereas many others specify approximately 74.0+/-0.2 eV. Perhaps the greatest difficulty with this observation is that it can be shown that, based upon their respective methods of analysis, both results are equally valid. In the present investigation, we examine the extent and nature of this problem. We have discovered that there are particular types of oxides that exhibit this dichotomy in binding energies, whereas others do not. The role played by bonding and morphology in these differences is explored, as is the effect of the different methods of binding energy determination. Finally, we shall describe how the mechanism of the growth of oxides is the principal 'culprit' and a lack of understanding of the latter and its electronic implications may lead many to an incorrect interpretation of 'true' binding energies.

  4. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2015-12-15

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  5. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Garcia, G.

    2007-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  6. Total and regional body volumes derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry output.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Joseph P; Fan, Bo; Shepherd, John A

    2013-01-01

    Total body volume is an important health metric used to measure body density, shape, and multicompartmental body composition but is currently only available through underwater weighing or air displacement plethysmography (ADP). The objective of this investigation was to derive an accurate body volume from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-reported measures for advanced body composition models. Volunteers received a whole body DXA scan and an ADP measure at baseline (N = 25) and 6 mo (N = 22). Baseline measures were used to calibrate body volume from the reported DXA masses of fat, lean, and bone mineral content. A second population (N = 385) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to estimate the test-retest precision of regional (arms, legs, head, and trunk) and total body volumes. Overall, we found that DXA-volume was highly correlated to ADP-volume (R² = 0.99). The 6-mo change in total DXA-volume was highly correlated to change in ADP-volume (R² = 0.98). The root mean square percent coefficient of variation precision of DXA-volume measures ranged from 1.1% (total) to 3.2% (head). We conclude that the DXA-volume method can measure body volume accurately and precisely, can be used in body composition models, could be an independent health indicator, and is useful as a prospective or retrospective biomarker of body composition.

  7. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯ṡO hydrogen bonds.

  8. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  9. Determination of actinide speciation in solution using high-energy X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Soderholm, L; Skanthakumar, S; Neuefeind, J

    2005-09-01

    High-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS) has been used to understand the coordination environment of the uranyl ion in a perchlorate solution. Assuming the two coordinating oxo ligands bound to U(VI) are represented in a peak in the pair distribution function (PDF) at 1.766(1) A, integration of the peak intensity is used to quantify the charge located on the oxygens. The dioxo ligands are essentially neutral, as predicted by numerous published calculations, with a charge of -16.4(8) electrons. The peak in the PDF at 2.420(1) A is consistent with equatorial ligating waters. The intensity of this peak is inconsistent with an integral coordination number and is used to propose a solution equilibrium of five and four waters coordinating to the uranyl(VI) ion favoring the five-coordinate species. This equilibrium is then used to experimentally determine that five-coordinate uranyl is 1.19+/-0.42 kcal/mol more stable than its four-coordinate counterpart under the conditions of the experiment. Further peaks in the Fourier transform of the scattering data at 4.50, 7, and 8.7 A are attributed to uranium-solvent correlations.

  10. Measurement of body composition in cats using computed tomography and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Buelund, Lene E; Nielsen, Dorte H; McEvoy, Fintan J; Svalastoga, Eiliv L; Bjornvad, Charlotte R

    2011-01-01

    Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is a reference method for assessing body composition but is seldom `accessible in veterinary settings. Computed tomography (CT) can provide similar body composition estimates and we propose that it can be used in body composition studies in animals. We compared CT and DEXA data from 73 healthy adult neutered domestic cats. Three approaches for measuring adipose tissue percentage from full-body CT scans were explored. By examining the frequency distribution of voxels by Hounsfield unit (HU) value, it is possible to calculate a fat index (Fat%) that is in close agreement with the fat percentages obtained from DEXA scans. Fat% values obtained by the best of the methods had a mean difference of 0.96% (95% confidence interval 0.33-1.59%) from the DEXA results. Fat% obtained by the other two methods were characterized by good correlation but poor agreement and in one of the methods, the difference between the values from the two modalities was proportional to their mean. By using CT, it is possible to obtain body composition estimates that are in close agreement with those available using DEXA. While the significance of individual Fat% measurements obtained from CT can be difficult to interpret and to compare between centers, CT can contribute to research studies concerned either with nutrition or with obesity-related disorders.

  11. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.

    2015-12-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  12. Wool Base determination using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).

    PubMed

    Kröger, Chris; Murray Bartle, C; West, John G; van Rensburg, Brendon

    2006-12-01

    An industry grade dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanner was calibrated for Wool Base determination. The calibration used 201 Crossbred and Merino wool samples, and a further 72 samples to validate the calibration. The prediction correlation had the smallest residual standard deviation (RSD) when the independently measured mean fibre diameter (MFD) was included in the multiple regression analysis. Best results were achieved when separate calibrations were used for individual wool breeds. The RSD for the Merino calibration set of 44 samples was 1.88, when the MFD was included in the regression, and 2.1 without. The RSD for 144 Crossbred samples was 1.73 including the MFD, and 2.59 without. The validation trial with 46 Crossbred and 24 Merino wool samples resulted in RSD of 2.35 and 2.23, respectively. An excellent DEXA repeatability was achieved at a standard deviation of approximately 0.2%. Improvement of the calibration is expected from concurrent laboratory testing and scanning. The research shows the promising potential for DEXA as a tool to determine Wool Base.

  13. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; Xu, G S; Tritz, K; Zhu, Y B; Wan, B N; Lan, H; Liu, Y L; Wei, J; Zhang, W; Hu, G H; Wang, H Q; Duan, Y M; Zhao, J L; Wang, L; Liu, S C; Ye, Y; Li, J; Lin, X; Li, X L

    2015-12-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  14. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Brian M.; Beachey, David J.; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-15

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator (2) to characterize the energy of this beam (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3x0.3 to 4.0x4.0 cm{sup 2}, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  15. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brian M; Beachey, David J; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator, (2) to characterize the energy of this beam, (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3 x 0.3 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm2, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  16. A novel numerical method to eliminate thickness effect in dual energy X-ray imaging used in baggage inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazoochi, Alireza; Rahmani, Faezeh; Abbasi Davani, Freydoun; Ghaderi, Ruhollah

    2014-11-01

    One of the methods for material inspection is the dual-energy X-ray technique. Although this method can be more useful in material distinguishing, but signal's intensities are still dependent on the thicknesses of materials in front of the detector, so the material identification results may be affected. In this paper, the new technique using Composite Simpson numerical method has been introduced for eliminating this conflicting effect which stems from material's thickness in the image. This method has been evaluated for some materials such as aluminum and plastic. Calculations have been performed using MCNP4C code to obtain the received X-ray intensity to the detectors. MATLAB software has been also used for the calculations of removing the effect of thickness and optimizing the system performance. Results have shown good performance in identifying materials independent of their thicknesses. The standard deviation of the R parameter, a common parameter for identification, has been improved from 0.613 to 0.0557 for aluminum and from 0.3043 to 0.0288 for plastic, respectively. This method provides an approximation for the X-ray attenuation at two X-ray energies instead of two energy spectra which greatly improves the material identification.

  17. A semianalytic model to extract differential linear scattering coefficients of breast tissue from energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Boileau, Michel M.; Wang Yinkun

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this work is to develop a technique to measure the x-ray diffraction signals of breast biopsy specimens. A biomedical x-ray diffraction technology capable of measuring such signals may prove to be of diagnostic use to the medical field. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements coupled with a semianalytical model were used to extract the differential linear scattering coefficients [{mu}{sub s}(x)] of breast tissues on absolute scales. The coefficients describe the probabilities of scatter events occurring per unit length of tissue per unit solid angle of detection. They are a function of the momentum transfer argument, x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}, where {theta}=scatter angle and {lambda}=incident wavelength. The technique was validated by using a 3 mm diameter 50 kV polychromatic x-ray beam incident on a 5 mm diameter 5 mm thick sample of water. Water was used because good x-ray diffraction data are available in the literature. The scatter profiles from 6 deg. to 15 deg. in increments of 1 deg. were measured with a 3 mmx3 mmx2 mm thick cadmium zinc telluride detector. A 2 mm diameter Pb aperture was placed on top of the detector. The target to detector distance was 29 cm and the duration of each measurement was 10 min. Ensemble averages of the results compare well with the gold standard data of A. H. Narten [''X-ray diffraction data on liquid water in the temperature range 4 deg. C-200 deg. C, ORNL Report No. 4578 (1970)]. An average 7.68% difference for which most of the discrepancies can be attributed to the background noise at low angles was obtained. The preliminary measurements of breast tissue are also encouraging.

  18. Prediction and Measurement of X-Ray Spectral and Intensity Distributions from Low Energy Electron Impact Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.

    1999-01-01

    In-vacuum electron beam welding is a technology that NASA considered as a joining technique for manufacture of space structures. The interaction of energetic electrons with metal produces x-rays. The radiation exposure to astronauts performing the in-vacuum electron beam welding must be characterized and minimized to insure safe operating conditions. This investigation characterized the x-ray environment due to operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. NASA, in a joint venture with the Russian Space Agency, was scheduled to perform a series of welding in space experiments on board the United States Space Shuttle. This series of experiments was named the International Space Welding Experiment (ISWE). The hardware associated with the ISWE was leased to NASA, by the Paton Welding Institute (PWI) in Ukraine, for ground based welding experiments in preparation for flight. Two tests were scheduled, using the ISWE electron beam welding tool, to characterize the radiation exposure to an astronaut during the operation of the ISWE. These radiation exposure tests consisted of Thermoluminescence Dosimeters (TLD's) shielded with material currently used by astronauts during Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) and exposed to x-ray radiation generated by operation of an in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. This investigation was the first known application of TLD's to measure absorbed dose from x-rays of energy less than 10 KeV. The ISWE hardware was returned to Ukraine before the issue of adequate shielding for the astronauts was verified. Therefore, alternate experimental and analytical methods were developed to measure and predict the x-ray spectral and intensity distribution generated by electron impact with metal. These x-ray spectra were used to calculate the absorbed radiation dose to astronauts. These absorbed dose values were compared to TLD measurements obtained during actual operation of the in-vacuum electron beam welding tool. The calculated absorbed dose

  19. The Chandra Multi-wavelength Project: Optical Spectroscopy and the Broadband Spectral Energy Distributions of X-Ray-selected AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Silverman, John D.; Aldcroft, Tom; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kim, Dong-Woo; Marshall, Herman L.; Mossman, Amy; Pérez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; Smith, Paul S.; Torres, Guillermo; Wik, Daniel R.; Wilkes, Belinda J.; Wolfgang, Angie

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z ~ 5.5 and galaxies out to z ~ 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While ~58% of X-ray Seyferts (1042 erg s-1 < L 2 - 10 keV <1044 erg s-1) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L 2 - 10 keV >1044 erg s-1) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a

  20. YIELDS OF IONS AND EXCITED STATES IN NONPOLAR LIQUIDS EXPOSED TO X-RAYS OF 1 TO 30 KEV ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    HOLROYD,R.A.

    1999-08-18

    When x-rays from a synchrotron source are absorbed in a liquid, the x-ray energy (E{sub x}) is converted by the photoelectric effect into the kinetic energy of the electrons released. For hydrocarbons, absorption by the K-electrons of carbon dominates. Thus the energy of the photoelectron (E{sub pe}) is E{sub x}-E{sub b}, where E{sub b} is the K-shell binding energy of carbon. Additional electrons with energy equal to E{sub b} is released in the Auger process that fills the hole in the K-shell. These energetic electrons will produce many ionizations, excitations and products. The consequences of the high density of ionizations and excitations along the track of the photoelectron and special effects near the K-edge are examined here.